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Sample records for rhodium additions

  1. Oxidative addition of methane and benzene C--H bonds to rhodium center: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Zhu, Shufen

    2006-11-01

    A density functional theory study on mechanisms of the oxidative addition of methane and benzene C-H bonds to the rhodium center containing Cp and PMe 3 ligands has been performed. Our calculated results confirm that the C-H bond cleavage from a sigma complex to a hydride alkyl complex is the rate-determining step. Compared with the case of methane C-H bond, the oxidative addition of benzene C-H bond is more favorable kinetically and thermodynamically. Stronger backdonation from metal center to the σ ∗ antibonding orbital of benzene C-H bond is responsible for the observations.

  2. Development of an improved rhodium catalyst for z-selective anti-markovnikov addition of carboxylic acids to terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Siping; Pedroni, Julia; Meißner, Antje; Lumbroso, Alexandre; Drexler, Hans-Joachim; Heller, Detlef; Breit, Bernhard

    2013-09-02

    To develop more active catalysts for the rhodium-catalyzed addition of carboxylic acids to terminal alkynes furnishing anti-Markovnikov Z enol esters, a thorough study of the rhodium complexes involved was performed. A number of rhodium complexes were characterized by NMR, ESI-MS, and X-ray analysis and applied as catalysts for the title reaction. The systematic investigations revealed that the presence of chloride ions decreased the catalyst activity. Conversely, generating and applying a mixture of two rhodium species, namely, [Rh(DPPMP)2][H(benzoate)2] (DPPMP=diphenylphosphinomethylpyridine) and [{Rh(COD)(μ2-benzoate)}2], provided a significantly more active catalyst. Furthermore, the addition of a catalytic amount of base (Cs2CO3) had an additional accelerating effect. This higher catalyst activity allowed the reaction time to be reduced from 16 to 1-4 h while maintaining high selectivity. Studies on the substrate scope revealed that the new catalysts have greater functional-group compatibility.

  3. Carbinol derivatives via rhodium-catalyzed addition of potassium trifluoro(organo)borates to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Pucheault, Mathieu; Darses, Sylvain; Genet, Jean-Pierre

    2005-10-07

    Reaction of potassium aryltrifluoroborates with aldehydes, in the presence of a rhodium catalyst, afforded carbinol derivatives in high yields under mild aqueous conditions; this efficient reaction proved to be general, allowing the production of highly hindered diarylmethanols and aliphatic aldehydes were also reactive under these conditions.

  4. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric addition of arylboronic acids to β-nitroolefins: formal synthesis of (S)-SKF 38393.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kung-Chih; Gopula, Balraj; Kuo, Ting-Shen; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Wu, Ping-Yu; Henschke, Julian P; Wu, Hsyueh-Liang

    2013-11-15

    An efficient enantioselective addition of an array of arylboronic acids to various β-nitrostyrenes catalyzed by a novel and reactive rhodium-diene catalyst (S/C up to 1000) was developed, providing β,β-diarylnitroethanes in good to high yields (62-99%) with excellent enantioselectivities (85-97% ee). The method was extended to 2-heteroarylnitroolefins and 2-alkylnitroolefins similarly providing the desired products with high enantioselectivities and yields. The usefulness of this method was demonstrated in the formal synthesis of the enantiomer of the dopamine receptor agonist and antagonist, SKF 38393.

  5. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  6. Access to enantioenriched alpha-amino esters via rhodium-catalyzed 1,4-addition/enantioselective protonation.

    PubMed

    Navarre, Laure; Martinez, Rémi; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Darses, Sylvain

    2008-05-14

    Conjugate addition of potassium trifluoro(organo)borates 2 to dehydroalanine derivatives 1, mediated by a chiral rhodium catalyst and in situ enantioselective protonation, afforded straightforward access to a variety of protected alpha-amino esters 3 with high yields and enantiomeric excesses up to 95%. Among the tested chiral ligands and proton sources, Binap, in combination with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), an inexpensive and nontoxic phenol, afforded the highest asymmetric inductions. Organostannanes have also shown to participate in this reaction. By a fine-tuning of the ester moiety, and using Difluorophos as chiral ligand, increased levels of enantioselectivity, generally close to 95%, were achieved. Deuterium labeling experiments revealed, and DFT calculation supported, an unusual mechanism involving a hydride transfer from the amido substituent to the alpha carbon explaining the high levels of enantioselectivity attained in controlling this alpha chiral center.

  7. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric addition of arylboronic acids to cyclic N-sulfonyl ketimines towards the synthesis of α,α-diaryl-α-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Takahiro

    2015-05-07

    Rhodium/chiral diene complex-catalyzed asymmetric addition of arylboronic acids to cyclic ketimines having an ester group proceeded to give the corresponding α-amino acid derivatives in high yields with high enantioselectivity. The cyclic amino acid derivative was transformed into a linear α,α-diaryl-substituted α-N-methylamino acid ester.

  8. Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Vinylogous Addition of Enol Ethers to Vinyldiazoacetates

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Austin G.; Davies, Huw M. L.

    2012-01-01

    A highly asymmetric vinylogous addition of acyclic silyl enol ethers to siloxyvinyldiazoacetate is described. The reaction features a diastereoselective 1,4-siloxy group migration event. Products are obtained in up to 97% ee. When more sterically crowded silyl enol ethers are employed, an enantioselective formal [3 + 2] cycloaddition becomes the dominant reaction pathway. Control experiments reveal the (Z)-olefin geometry to be critical for high levels of enantiocontrol. PMID:23098215

  9. Rhodium/chiral diene-catalyzed asymmetric 1,4-addition of arylboronic acids to chromones: a highly enantioselective pathway for accessing chiral flavanones.

    PubMed

    He, Qijie; So, Chau Ming; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Hayashi, Tamio; Wang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Chromone has been noted to be one of the most challenging substrates in the asymmetric 1,4-addition of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. By employing the rhodium complex associated with a chiral diene ligand, (R,R)-Ph-bod*, the 1,4-addition of a variety of arylboronic acids was realized to give high yields of the corresponding flavanones with excellent enantioselectivities (≥97% ee, 99% ee for most substrates). Ring-opening side products, which would lead to erosion of product enantioselectivity, were not observed under the stated reaction conditions.

  10. Synergistic Rhodium/Phosphoric Acid Catalysis for the Enantioselective Addition of Oxonium Ylides to ortho-Quinone Methides.

    PubMed

    Alamsetti, Santosh Kumar; Spanka, Matthias; Schneider, Christoph

    2016-02-12

    We report herein a powerful and highly stereoselective protocol for the domino-type reaction of diazoesters with ortho-quinone methides generated in situ to furnish densely functionalized chromans with three contiguous stereogenic centers. A transition-metal and a Brønsted acid catalyst were shown to act synergistically to produce a transient oxonium ylide and ortho-quinone methide, respectively, in two distinct cycles. These intermediates underwent subsequent coupling in a conjugate-addition-hemiacetalization event in generally good yield with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity.

  11. Novel asymmetric michael addition of alpha-cyanopropionates to acrolein by the use of a bis(oxazolinyl)phenylstannane-derived rhodium(III) complex as a chiral Lewis acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Yukihiro; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Kouji; Aoki, Katsuyuki; Nishiyama, Hisao

    2002-07-02

    The rhodium complex prepared in situ by simply mixing [[RhCl(c-octene)2]2] and [(Phebox)SnMe3] (1) (Phebox = 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)phenyl) was found to serve as an efficient catalyst for the asymmetric Michael addition of alpha-cyanopropionates (4) to acrolein under mild and neutral conditions. In the present catalytic system, both the temperature of catalyst preparation and the order of the addition of the substrates were very important for the catalytic efficiency and enantioselectivity. Detailed mechanistic studies of this catalytic system revealed that the [(Phebox)RhIII(SnMe3)Cl] complex (9), generated by oxidative addition of [[RhCl(c-octene)2]2] to 1, is an active catalyst and the turnover number (TON) of the present actual catalyst existing in a reaction mixture is greater than 10,000. The obtained (R) stereochemistry of the Michael adducts 5 can be explained by N-bonded enol intermediates C', which are formed by enolization of 4 bound to the Lewis acidic rhodium complex 9. We also found that the active catalyst 9 gradually decomposed in the presence of the remaining [[RhCl(c-octene)2]2] in the reaction mixture to form the catalytically nonactive [(Phebox)RhCl2] fragment A, whose structure was characterized by an X-ray crystallographic study after converting to the tBuNC complex 10.

  12. The adsorption of acetylene on rhodium-modified colloidal silver, a surface-enhanced Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilchenfeld, Hannah; Luckier, Miguel; Efron, Leah; Willner, Bilha

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules adsorbed on rhodium-modified colloidal silver particles is reported for the first time. Deposition of thin layers of metallic rhodium on the silver surface led to fast aggregation of the sol and to modifications of its SERS spectrum. An intense new band, assigned to the RhO stretching vibration of citrate ions bound to rhodium sites, appeared at 530 cm -1 in the Raman spectrum after rhodium addition to the suspension. The spectra of acetylene adsorbed on both unmodified silver particles and silver modified by an overlayer of rhodium indicated that acetylene displaced the citrate ions from their adsorption sites. All acetylene spectra were characterized by weak bands at 1990, 2050 and 2150 cm -1 assigned to σ π-complexes between acetylene and silver, by a silver acetylide peak at 1800 cm -1 and by an intense band at 1550 cm -1 due to C=C containing species formed on the surface. However, on the rhodium-modified colloid an additional band, attributed to acetylene σ π-bound to rhodium sites, was observed at 1910-1920 cm -1. The intensity of the new band was a direct function of the amount of rhodium deposited on the silver. It increased immediately after acetylene adsorption, and later slowly diminished, while simultaneously the 1550 cm -1 peak became more important. This time evolution was ascribed to a reaction taking place on the surface.

  13. Antitumor effect and toxicity of free rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles in mice bearing breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic fluids containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles represent an attractive platform as nanocarriers in chemotherapy. Recently, we developed a formulation of maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate, which resulted in in vitro cytotoxicity enhanced up to 4.6 times when compared to free rhodium (II) citrate formulation on breast carcinoma cells. In this work, we evaluate the antitumor activity and toxicity induced by these formulations in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast carcinoma. Methods Mice were evaluated with regard to the treatments’ toxicity through analyses of hemogram, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, iron, and creatinine; DNA fragmentation and cell cycle of bone marrow cells; and liver, kidney and lung histology. In addition, the antitumor activity of rhodium (II) citrate and maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate was verified by tumor volume reduction, histology and immunohistochemistry. Results Regarding the treatments’ toxicity, no experimental groups had alterations in levels of serum ALT or creatinine, and this suggestion was corroborated by the histopathologic examination of liver and kidney of mice. Moreover, DNA fragmentation frequency of bone marrow cells was lower than 15% in all experimental groups. On the other hand, the complexes rhodium (II) citrate-functionalized maghemite and free rhodium (II) citrate led to a marked growth inhibition of tumor and decrease in CD31 and Ki-67 staining. Conclusions In summary, we demonstrated that both rhodium (II) citrate and maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate formulations exhibited antitumor effects against 4T1 metastatic breast cancer cell line following intratumoral administration. This antitumor effect was followed by inhibition of both cell proliferation and microvascularization and by tumor tissue injury characterized as necrosis and fibrosis. Remarkably, this is the first published report

  14. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed N-nitroso-directed C-H addition to ethyl 2-oxoacetate for cycloaddition/fragmentation synthesis of indazoles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsen; Chen, Pei; Song, Chao; Zhu, Jin

    2014-10-27

    Rh(III) -catalyzed N-nitroso-directed CH addition to ethyl 2-oxoacetate allows subsequent construction of indazoles, a privileged heterocycle scaffold in synthetic chemistry, through the exploitation of reactivity between the directing group and installed group. The formal [2+2] cycloaddition/fragmentation reaction pathway identified herein, a unique reactivity pattern hitherto elusive for the N-nitroso group, emphasizes the importance of forward reactivity analysis in the development of useful CH functionalization-based synthetic tools. The synthetic utility of the protocol is demonstrated with the synthesis of a tricyclic-fused ring system. The diversity of covalent linkages available for the nitroso group should enable the extension of the genre of reactivity reported herein to the synthesis of other types of heterocycles.

  15. Degradation of nonmodified and rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Wierzbińska, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Kamil; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-base superalloy CMSX 4 used in the turbine blades of aircraft engines was coated with rhodium layer (0.5-μm thick). Next coated CMSX 4 superalloy was aluminized by the CVD method. The rhodium modified aluminide coating and nonmodified aluminide coating were oxidized at 1100°C at the air atmosphere. The rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. The spallation equal 62% of the total area was observed on the surface of the nonmodified coating whereas only 36% spallation area was observed on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating after the oxidation test. The oxide layer formed on the surface of the nonmodified coating was composed of nonprotective (Ni,Cr)Al2 O4 and (Ni,Cr)O phases. Aluminium in the coating reacts with oxygen, forming a protective α-Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating. When the oxide cracks and spalls due to oxidation, additional aluminium from the coating diffuses to the surface to form the oxide. The presence of protective Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating slows coating degradation. Therefore, rhodium modified aluminide coating has better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one.

  16. Formation of supported rhodium clusters from mononuclear rhodium complexes controlled by the support and ligands on rhodium.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Yardimci, Dicle; Kistler, Joseph D; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-01-21

    Extremely small supported rhodium clusters were prepared from rhodium complexes on the surfaces of solids with contrasting electron-donor properties. The samples were characterized by infrared and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies to determine the changes occurring in the rhodium species resulting from treatments in hydrogen. Rhodium cluster formation occurred in the presence of H2, and the first steps are controlled by the electron-donor properties of the support--which acts as a ligand--and the other ligands bonded to the rhodium. The cluster formation begins at a lower temperature when the support is zeolite HY than when it is the better electron-donor MgO, provided that the other ligands on rhodium are ethene. In contrast, when these other ligands are CO, the pattern is reversed. The choice of ligands including the support also allows regulation of the stoichiometry of the surface transformations in H2 and the stability of the structures formed in the presence of other reactants. The combination of MgO as the support and ethene as a ligand allows restriction of the rhodium cluster size to the smallest possible-and these were formed in high yields. The data presented here are among the first characterizing the first steps of metal cluster formation.

  17. Asymmetric synthesis of gem-diaryl substituted cyclic sulfamidates and sulfamides by rhodium-catalyzed arylation of cyclic ketimines.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ebe, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Hiroto; Hayashi, Tamio

    2013-06-18

    Asymmetric addition of arylboronates to aryl-substituted cyclic ketimines proceeded in the presence of a rhodium catalyst coordinated with a chiral diene ligand to give high yields of sulfamidates and sulfamides with high enantioselectivity (up to 99% ee).

  18. Rhodium nanoparticles for ultraviolet plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne M; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Marcos Sanz, Juan; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O

    2015-02-11

    The nonoxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photodamage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 min. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  19. Enantioselective rhodium-catalyzed arylation of cyclic N-sulfamidate alkylketimines: a new access to chiral β-alkyl-β-aryl amino alcohols.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Jing; Chen, Ya-Heng; Feng, Chen-Guo; Lin, Guo-Qiang

    2014-06-20

    The enantioselective rhodium-catalyzed 1,2-addition of arylboronates to cyclic N-sulfamidate alkylketimines was developed. With a rhodium/diene complex as catalyst, high enantioselectivity and broad functional group tolerance were observed. The resulting sulfamidates can easily be converted into chiral β-alkyl-β-aryl amino alcohols.

  20. Electronic structure of ternary rhodium hydrides with lithium and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonas Nils; Bauer, Jessica; Giehr, Andreas; Chu, Pui Ieng; Kunkel, Nathalie; Springborg, Michael; Kohlmann, Holger

    2014-01-21

    Chemical bonding in and electronic structure of lithium and magnesium rhodium hydrides are studied theoretically using DFT methods. For Li3RhH4 with planar complex RhH4 structural units, Crystal Orbital Hamilton Populations reveal significant Rh−Rh interactions within infinite one-dimensional ∞ 1 [RhH4] stacks in addition to strong rhodium−hydrogen bonding. These metal−metal interactions are considerably weaker in the hypothetical, heavier homologue Na3RhH4. Both compounds are small-band gap semiconductors. The electronic structures of Li3RhH6 and Na3RhH6 with rhodium surrounded octahedrally by hydrogen, on the other hand, are compatible with a classical complex hydride model according to the limiting ionic formula (M+)3[RhH6]3− without any metal−metal interaction between the 18-electron hydridorhodate complexes. In MgRhH, building blocks of the composition (RhH2)4 are formed with strong rhodium−hydrogen and significant rhodium−rhodium bonding (bond lengths of 298 pm within Rh4 squares). These units are linked together to infinite two-dimensional layers ∞ 2 [(RhH2/2)4] via common hydrogen atoms. Li3RhH4 and MgRhH are accordingly examples for border cases of chemical bonding where the classical picture of hydridometalate complexes in complex hydrides is not sufficient to properly describe the chemical bonding situation.

  1. Structure and transport behavior of In-filled cobalt rhodium antimonide skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Eilertsen, James; Berthelot, Romain; Sleight, Arthur W.; Subramanian, M.A.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of indium icosahedral void-site filling on the transport properties of cobalt and rhodium antimonide solid solutions is investigated. Co{sub 4-x}Rh{sub x}Sb{sub 12} and indium-filled In{sub 0.1}Co{sub 4-x}Rh{sub x}Sb{sub 12} solid solutions were synthesized. Partial rhodium substitution produces a distinct clustering-induced lattice strain that is partly relieved upon indium substitution into the skutterudite icosahedral void-sites. Indium lowers the thermal conductivity of all samples near room temperature. A distinct increase in thermal conductivity is observed in all indium-filled rhodium substituted samples at elevated temperatures and is attributed to bipolar thermal conductivity. In addition, the indium-filled samples were subjected to a 6-day heat treatment at 673 K. Void-site filled indium was found to be metastable at this temperature, and was found to partially precipitate during the 6-day heat treatment; thereby presenting concerns over the long-term stability of thermoelectric devices based on indium-filled skutterudites. - Graphical Abstract: Strain in the cobalt rhodium skutterudite solid solutions decreases upon indium filling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unfilled and indium-filled cobalt and rhodium skutterudite solid solutions were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indium filling stabilizes the cobalt and rhodium skutterudite solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermoelectric properties of all compositions are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal conductivity of rhodium-rich compositions is strongly affected by indium filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Void-site filled indium was found to be metastable.

  2. Microstructure and oxidation behaviour investigation of rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Morgiel, Jerzy; Romanowska, Jolanta; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The CMSX 4 superalloy was coated with rhodium 0.5-μm thick layer and next aluminized by the CVD method. The coating consisted of two layers: the additive and the interdiffusion one. The outward diffusion of nickel from the substrate turned out to be a coating growth dominating factor. The additive layer consists of the β-NiAl phase, whereas the interdiffusion layer consists of the β-NiAl phase with precipitates of σ and μ phases. Rhodium has dissolved in the coating up to the same level in the matrix and in the precipitates. The oxidation test proved that the rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of rhodium-ligand interaction in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shuang; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Licence, Peter

    2016-02-01

    We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the interaction between the rhodium atom and phosphine ligands in six 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C8C1Im][X]). The formation of a mono-phosphine rhodium complex based upon addition of triphenylphosphine (PPh3) is confirmed by XPS in all ionic liquids studied herein. Due to the electron donation effect of the ligand, the rhodium atom becomes more negatively charged and thus exhibits a lower measured binding energy. The influence of the anion basicity on the formation of different types of rhodium complexes is also investigated. By introducing a biphosphine ligand, a chelated diphosphine rhodium complex is formed in ionic liquids with more basic anions and verified by both XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). The measured Rh 3d binding energies are correlated to the reaction selectivity of a hydroformylation reaction which inspires a method to design a metal catalyst to control the chemical reaction towards desired products in the future.

  4. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  5. Effet de la concentration du cuivre ou de l'argent sur les propriétés des agrégats de rhodium déposés sur silice amorphe dans l'hydrogénation du 1,3 butadiène

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksibi, Z.; Ghorbel1, A.; Bellamy, B.

    1999-02-01

    Some samples with rhodium, rhodium-copper and rhodium-silver deposited on amorphous silica by vapor deposition of the metallic phase under high-vacuum (P < 5.10-7 Pa) have been prepared. The effect of rhodium cluster size and copper or silver addition on catalytic properties of rhodium in the 1,3 butadiène hydrogenation was studied. Results show that the reaction is sensitive to the size of rhodium aggregates and that there is an important difference between the effect of copper and silver on the rhodium properties. Indeed copper forms an alloy with rhodium and provokes a poison effect on the activity of the noble metal, whereas silver exhibits a mask effect on the rhodium particles without forming alloy with it. Des échantillons mono-métalliques au rhodium et bimétalliques rhodium-cuivre et rhodium-argent déposés sur une silice amorphe par vapodéposition d'une phase métallique dans des conditions ultra-vide (P < 5.10-7 Pa) ont été préparés. L'effet de la taille des agrégats de rhodium ainsi que celui de l'addition du cuivre ou de l'argent sur les propriétés catalytiques du rhodium dans l'hydrogénation du 1,3 butadiène ont été étudiés. Les résultats montrent que la réaction étudiée est sensible à la taille des agrégats de rhodium et nous notons une différence importante entre l'effet du cuivre et de l'argent sur les propriétés du rhodium. En effet le cuivre forme un alliage avec le rhodium et provoque un effet poison d?où une modification de l'activité du métal noble, alors que l'argent exerce un effet de masque sur les particules de rhodium sans toutefois former d'alliage avec ce dernier.

  6. Determination of phenolic compounds using spectral and color transitions of rhodium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gatselou, Vasiliki; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Giokas, Dimosthenis L

    2016-08-17

    This work reports a new approach for the determination of phenolic compounds based on their interaction with citrate-capped rhodium nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds (i.e., catechins, gallates, cinnamates, and dihydroxybenzoic acids) were found to cause changes in the size and localized surface plasmon resonance of rhodium nanoparticles, and therefore, give rise to analyte-specific spectral and color transitions in the rhodium nanoparticle suspensions. Upon reaction with phenolic compounds (mainly dithydroxybenzoate derivatives, and trihydroxybenzoate derivatives), new absorbance peaks at 350 nm and 450 nm were observed. Upon reaction with trihydroxybenzoate derivatives, however, an additional absorbance peak at 580 nm was observed facilitating the speciation of phenolic compounds in the sample. Both absorbance peaks at 450 nm and 580 nm increased with increasing concentration of phenolic compounds over a linear range of 0-500 μM. Detection limits at the mid-micromolar levels were achieved, depending on the phenolic compound involved, and with satisfactory reproducibility (<7.3%). On the basis of these findings, two rhodium nanoparticles-based assays for the determination of the total phenolic content and total catechin content were developed and applied in tea samples. The obtained results correlated favorably with commonly used methods (i.e., Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum complexation assay). Not the least, the finding that rhodium nanoparticles can react with analytes and exhibit unique localized surface plasmon resonance bands in the visible region, can open new opportunities for developing new optical and sensing analytical applications.

  7. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  8. Rhodium oxides in unusual oxidation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Barbara Alice

    Mixed valence RhIII/RhIV oxides have been proposed as a promising class of candidate compounds for superconductivity. Unfortunately, it is difficult to stabilize rhodates with a formal oxidation state approaching RhIV, as other techniques used for the synthesis of rhodium. oxides favor the most commonly observed formal oxidation state, RhIII. One technique which has been used to stabilize metal oxides in high formal oxidation states is crystallization from molten hydroxides. This thesis explores the use of molten hydroxides to enhance the reactivity of rhodium oxides in order to synthesize rhodates with high formal oxidation states. K0.5RhO2, Rb0.2RhO2, and CsxRhO2 were synthesized from pure alkali metal hydroxides. All crystallized with a previously unobserved polytype in the alkali metal rhodate system. Due to the low activity of dissolved oxygen species in LiOH and NaOH, LiRhO2 and NaRhO2 cannot be crystallized. The formal oxidation state of rhodium in AxRhO2 (A = K, Rb, Cs) is a function of the alkali metal hydroxide used to synthesize these oxides. These materials exhibit remarkable stability for layered metal oxides containing the heavier alkali metals, but all phases are susceptible to intercalation by water. The synthesis, structural characterization, magnetic susceptibility, and reactivity of these oxides are reported. Sr2RhO4 and a new rhodate were crystallized from a KOH-Sr(OH)2 flux. The synthesis and characterization of these materials is reported. Efforts to substitute platinum for rhodium in Sr 2RhO4 are also discussed. Mixed alkali metal-alkaline earth metal hydroxide fluxes were used to crystallize LiSr3RhO6, and NaSr3RhO 6. The synthesis of LiSr3RhO6 and NaSr3RhO 6 represents the first example of the stabilization of a rhodium oxide with a formal oxidation state approaching RhV. X-ray diffraction, electron beam microprobe analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, potentiometric titrations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility

  9. Overgrowth of Rhodium on Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the deposition and growth mode of rhodium (Rh) on gold (Au) seed nanorods (NRs). Using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, we show that Rh deposition results in an uneven overlayer morphology on the Au NR seeds, with a tendency for Rh deposition to occur preferentially on the Au NR ends. The results suggest that complex and kinetically driven metal–metal interactions take place in this system. PMID:22582111

  10. Chemical Posttranslational Modification with Designed Rhodium(II) Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, S C; Minus, M B; Ball, Z T

    2016-01-01

    Natural enzymes use molecular recognition to perform exquisitely selective transformations on nucleic acids, proteins, and natural products. Rhodium(II) catalysts mimic this selectivity, using molecular recognition to allow selective modification of proteins with a variety of functionalized diazo reagents. The rhodium catalysts and the diazo reactivity have been successfully applied to a variety of protein folds, the chemistry succeeds in complex environments such as cell lysate, and a simple protein blot method accurately assesses modification efficiency. The studies with rhodium catalysts provide a new tool to study and probe protein-binding events, as well as a new synthetic approach to protein conjugates for medical, biochemical, or materials applications.

  11. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  12. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  13. Oxidation-promoted activation of a ferrocene C-H bond by a rhodium complex.

    PubMed

    Labande, Agnès; Debono, Nathalie; Sournia-Saquet, Alix; Daran, Jean-Claude; Poli, Rinaldo

    2013-05-14

    The oxidation of a rhodium(I) complex containing a ferrocene-based heterodifunctional phosphine N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand produces a stable, planar chiral rhodium(III) complex with an unexpected C-H activation on ferrocene. The oxidation of rhodium(I) to rhodium(III) may be accomplished by initial oxidation of ferrocene to ferrocenium and subsequent electron transfer from rhodium to ferrocenium. Preliminary catalytic tests showed that the rhodium(III) complex is active for the Grignard-type arylation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde via C-H activation of 2-phenylpyridine.

  14. Polyethylene-bound rhodium(I) hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergbreiter, D.E.; Chandran, R.

    1987-01-07

    Homogeneous, recoverable hydrogenation catalysts were prepared with use of functionalized ethylene oligomers as ligands. Phosphine groups were introduced onto ethylene oligomers following anionic oligomerization of ethylene. The product polyethylenediphenylphosphine ligands were then exchanged with triphenylphosphine or ethylene ligands to prepare ethylene oligomer ligated rhodium(I) complexes. These Rh(I) complexes had the solubility of polyethylene and dissolved at 90-110/sup 0/C in hydrocarbon solvents but quantitatively precipitated at 25/sup 0/C. Less than 0.1% of the charged rhodium was lost in each dissolution precipitation cycle. The rhodium(I) complexes so prepared were shown to have about 80% of the activity of tris(triphenylphosphine)rhodium chloride in hydrogenation of various alkenes including 1-octene, ..delta../sup 2/-cholestene, cyclooctene, cyclododecene, styrene, and ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene. /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy and reactivity studies were used to characterize these catalysts.

  15. Enantioselective rhodium(I)-catalyzed hydrogenation of trifluoromethyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Y; Sakamaki, Y; Iseki, K

    2001-02-08

    [figure: see text] The asymmetric hydrogenation of trifluoromethyl ketones to yield chiral alpha-trifluoromethyl alcohols with enantiomeric excesses up to 98% was achieved in the presence of chiral rhodium-(amidephosphine-phosphinite) complexes.

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Borylation of Cyclic Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Azusa; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    A rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes is described. This reaction provides direct access to cyclic 1-alkenylboronic acid pinacol esters, useful intermediates in organic synthesis. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling applications are also presented. PMID:20107646

  17. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed indazole synthesis by C-H bond functionalization and cyclative capture.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yajing; Bergman, Robert G; Lavis, Luke D; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2013-05-15

    An efficient, one-step, and highly functional group-compatible synthesis of substituted N-aryl-2H-indazoles is reported via the rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H bond addition of azobenzenes to aldehydes. The regioselective coupling of unsymmetrical azobenzenes was further demonstrated and led to the development of a new removable aryl group that allows for the preparation of indazoles without N-substitution. The 2-aryl-2H-indazole products also represent a new class of readily prepared fluorophores for which initial spectroscopic characterization has been performed.

  18. High pressure synthesis of marcasite-type rhodium pernitride.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Ken; Dzivenko, Dmytro; Suzuki, Kentaro; Riedel, Ralf; Troyan, Ivan; Eremets, Mikhail; Hasegawa, Masashi

    2014-01-21

    Marcasite-type rhodium nitride was successfully synthesized in a direct chemical reaction between a rhodium metal and molecular nitrogen at 43.2 GPa using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. This material shows a low zero-pressure bulk modulus of K0 = 235(13) GPa, which is much lower than those of other platinum group nitrides. This finding is due to the weaker bonding interaction between metal atoms and quasi-molecular dinitrogen units in the marcasite-type structure, as proposed by theoretical studies.

  19. Dicarba-closo-dodecarborane-containing half-sandwich complexes of ruthenium, osmium, rhodium and iridium: biological relevance and synthetic strategies.

    PubMed

    Barry, Nicolas P E; Sadler, Peter J

    2012-04-21

    This review describes how the incorporation of dicarba-closo-dodecarboranes into half-sandwich complexes of ruthenium, osmium, rhodium and iridium might lead to the development of a new class of compounds with applications in medicine. Such a combination not only has unexplored potential in traditional areas such as Boron Neutron Capture Therapy agents, but also as pharmacophores for the targeting of biologically important proteins and the development of targeted drugs. The synthetic pathways used for the syntheses of dicarba-closo-dodecarboranes-containing half-sandwich complexes of ruthenium, osmium, rhodium and iridium are also reviewed. Complexes with a wide variety of geometries and characteristics can be prepared. Examples of addition reactions on the metal centre, B-H activation, transmetalation reactions and/or direct formation of metal-metal bonds are discussed (103 references).

  20. Recent advances in rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis of heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Wen; Xu, Ming-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Heterocycles are crucial structural motifs that are ubiquitously present in biologically active natural products and pharmaceutically important compounds. Over the past few decades, great attention has been paid to develop efficient methodologies for the construction of diverse enantioenriched heterocyclic frameworks. This review focuses on the recent impressive progress and advances in the asymmetric synthesis of heterocycles under rhodium catalysis.

  1. Rhodium complexes bearing tetradentate diamine-bis(phenolate) ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang Y; Lokare, Kapil S; Ganesh, Somesh K; Gonzales, Jason M; Oxgaard, Jonas; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2011-01-01

    Using tetradentate, dianionic ligands, several new rhodium complexes have been prepared. Some of these diamine-bis(phenolate) compounds, are active for C–H activation of benzene. These complexes are air and thermally stable. All four complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction.

  2. In vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through Caucasian skin.

    PubMed

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; Du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Jordaan, A; Du Plessis, J L

    2014-12-01

    During platinum group metals (PGMs) refining the possibility exists for dermal exposure to PGM salts. The dermal route has been questioned as an alternative route of exposure that could contribute to employee sensitisation, even though literature has been focused on respiratory exposure. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through intact Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3mg/ml of metal, K2PtCl4 and RhCl3 respectively, was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24h experiment, and analysed with high resolution ICP-MS. Skin was digested and analysed by ICP-OES. Results indicated cumulative permeation with prolonged exposure, with a significantly higher mass of platinum permeating after 24h when compared to rhodium. The mass of platinum retained inside the skin and the flux of platinum across the skin was significantly higher than that of rhodium. Permeated and skin retained platinum and rhodium may therefore contribute to sensitisation and indicates a health risk associated with dermal exposure in the workplace.

  3. Discovery of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, and rhodium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, A.M.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Currently, 31 rubidium, 35 strontium, 35 molybdenum, and 38 rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of small rhodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of rhodium-atomic clusters. The lowest energy structures at the semi-empirical level of rhodium clusters are first obtained from a novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as PTMBHGA, where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. The structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation. For the purpose of calculating the magnetic moment of a given cluster, we calculate the optimized structure as a function of the spin multiplicity within the DFT framework. The resultant magnetic moments with the lowest energies so obtained allow us to work out the magnetic moment as a function of cluster size. Rhodium atomic clusters are found to display a unique variation in the magnetic moment as the cluster size varies. However, Rh{sub 4} and Rh{sub 6} are found to be nonmagnetic. Electronic structures of the magnetic ground-state structures are also investigated within the DFT framework. The results are compared against those based on different theoretical approaches available in the literature.

  5. The synthesis of rhodium/carbon dots nanoparticles and its hydrogenation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yao; Tan, Jing; Sang, Haitao; Zhang, Liqun; Yue, Dongmei

    2017-02-01

    Rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles have been widely used as potent hydrogenation catalysts. Herein, a new convenient method has been developed to synthesize rhodium nanoparticles, in which carbon dots (CDs) were used both as stabilizing and reducing agents. The fluorescent CDs were prepared by microwave-assisted heating method using chitosan as raw material and the presences of hydroxyl and carbonyl on the surface of CDs were supported by FTIR spectra. Subsequently, CDs could directly reduce Rh3+ to Rh0 without additional reducing and stabilizing agents by heating Rh3+ with CDs for 1 h at 120 °C. The resulting Rh nanoparticles have an average size of about 2.8 nm and the Rh/CDs nanoparticles also retain the fluorescent property of CDs. The hydrogenation activities of Rh/CDs nanoparticles were investigated. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles had highly catalytic activity in the hydrogenation reaction of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and hydroxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (HTBN). Also, the presence of CDs could improve the fluorescent properties of rubbers after hydrogenation.

  6. Rhodium-catalyzed formation of stereocontrolled trisubstituted alkenes from Baylis-Hillman adducts.

    PubMed

    Gendrineau, Thomas; Demoulin, Nicolas; Navarre, Laure; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Darses, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Efficient and general conditions for the formation of stereodefined trisubstituted alkenes by using the rhodium-catalyzed reaction of unactivated Baylis-Hillman adducts with either organoboronic acids or potassium trifluoro(organo)borates are reported (see scheme).We report here efficient and general conditions for the formation of stereodefined trisubstituted alkenes using the rhodium-catalyzed reaction of unactivated Baylis-Hillman adducts with either organoboronic acids and potassium trifluoro(organo)borates. The use of the [{Rh(cod)OH}(2)] precursor gave very fast coupling reactions under low catalyst loading, very mild reaction conditions (from room temperature up to 50 degrees C) and without the need of additional phosphane ligands. Based on the new reaction conditions, the reaction, originally limited to Baylis-Hillman adducts derived from esters, could be extended to a large variety of Baylis-Hillman adducts, bearing either keto, cyano or amido functionalities. Moreover, the reaction of Baylis-Hillman adducts bearing esters functionality was improved and could be conducted at lower temperature using lower catalyst loading.

  7. Plasmonics in the UV range with Rhodium nanocubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Gutiérrez, Y.; Li, P.; Barreda, Á. I.; Watson, A. M.; Alcaraz de la Osa, R.; Finkelstein, G.; González, F.; Ortiz, D.; Saiz, J. M.; Sanz, J. M.; Everitt, H. O.; Liu, J.; Moreno, F.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonics in the UV-range constitutes a new challenge due to the increasing demand to detect, identify and destroy biological toxins, enhance biological imaging, and characterize semiconductor devices at the nanometer scale. Silver and aluminum have an efficient plasmonic performance in the near UV region, but oxidation reduces its performance in this range. Recent studies point out rhodium as one of the most promising metals for this purpose: it has a good plasmonic response in the UV and, as gold in the visible, it presents a low tendency to oxidation. Moreover, its easy fabrication through chemical means and its potential for photocatalytic applications, makes this material very attractive for building plasmonic tools in the UV. In this work, we will show an overview of our recent collaborative research with rhodium nanocubes (NC) for Plasmonics in the UV.

  8. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

    2011-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

  9. Arylation of Rhodium(II) Azavinyl Carbenes with Boronic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Nicklas; Worrell, Brady T.; Chuprakov, Stepan; Velaparthi, Subash; Fokin, Valery V.

    2013-01-01

    A highly efficient and stereoselective arylation of in situ generated azavinyl carbenes affording 2,2-diaryl enamines at ambient temperatures has been developed. These transition metal carbenes are directly produced from readily available and stable 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles in the presence of a rhodium carboxylate catalyst. In several cases, the enamines generated in this reaction can be cyclized into substituted indoles employing copper catalysts. PMID:22913576

  10. Asymmetric Arylation of Imines Catalyzed by Heterogeneous Chiral Rhodium Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomohiro; Kuremoto, Tatsuya; Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Shu̅

    2016-06-03

    Asymmetric arylation of aldimines catalyzed by heterogeneous chiral rhodium nanoparticles has been developed. The reaction proceeded in aqueous media without significant decomposition of the imines by hydrolysis to afford chiral (diarylmethyl)amines in high yields with outstanding enantioselectivities. This catalyst system exhibited the highest turnover number (700) in heterogeneous catalysts reported to date for these reactions. The reusability of the catalyst was also demonstrated.

  11. Recovery of rhodium(III) from solutions and industrial wastewaters by a sulfate-reducing bacteria consortium.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Nonhlanhla; Whiteley, Chris G

    2006-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the rate of removal of rhodium(III) by a resting sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium under different initial rhodium and biomass concentrations, pH, temperature, and electron donor was studied. Rhodium speciation was found to be the main factor controlling the rate of its removal from solution. SRB cells were found to have a higher affinity for anionic rhodium species, as compared to both cationic and neutral species, which become abundant when speciation equilibrium was reached. Consequently, a pH-dependent rate of rhodium removal from solution was observed. The maximum SRB uptake capacity for rhodium was found to be 66 mg of rhodium per gram of resting SRB biomass. Electron microscopy studies revealed a time-dependent localization and distribution of rhodium precipitates, initially intracellularly and then extracellularly, suggesting the involvement of an enzymatic reductive precipitation process. When a purified hydrogenase enzyme was incubated with rhodium chloride solution under hydrogen, 88% of the rhodium was removed within 1 h, whereas with a soluble extract from SRB 77% was removed within 10 min. Due to the low pH of the industrial effluent (1.31), the enzymatic reduction of rhodium by the purified hydrogenase was greatly limited, and it was apparent that an industrial effluent pretreatment was necessary before the application of an enzymatic treatment. In the present study, however, it was established that SRB are good candidates for the enzymatic recovery of rhodium from both aqueous solution and industrial effluent.

  12. Synthesis of Carbazoles and Carbazole-Containing Heterocycles via Rhodium-Catalyzed Tandem Carbonylative Benzannulations.

    PubMed

    Song, Wangze; Li, Xiaoxun; Yang, Ka; Zhao, Xian-liang; Glazier, Daniel A; Xi, Bao-min; Tang, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds are important constituents of pharmaceuticals and other materials. We have developed a series of Rh-catalyzed tandem carbonylative benzannulations for the synthesis of tri-, tetra-, and pentacyclic heterocycles from different types of aryl propargylic alcohols. These tandem reactions provide efficient access to highly substituted carbazoles, furocarbazoles, pyrrolocarbazoles, thiophenocarbazoles, and indolocarbazoles. While tricyclic heterocycles could be derived from vinyl aryl propargylic alcohols, tetra- and pentacyclic heterocycles were synthesized from diaryl propargylic alcohols. The tandem carbonylative benzannulation is initiated by a π-acidic rhodium(I) catalyst-mediated nucleophilic addition to alkyne to generate a key metal-carbene intermediate, which is then trapped by carbon monoxide to form a ketene species for 6π electrocyclization. Overall, three bonds and two rings are formed in all of these tandem carbonylative benzannulation reactions.

  13. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2009 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.; White, J. F.; Rummel, Becky L.

    2010-12-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been conducting research for the United States Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy, Biomass Program to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). This research has involved the screening of potential catalysts, and optimization of the more promising ones, using laboratory scale reactors. During 2009, the main goal of the testing program focused on optimizing selected supported catalysts containing rhodium (Rh) and manganese (Mn). Optimization involved examining different total concentrations and atomic ratios of Rh and Mn as well as that of the more promising promoters (Ir and Li) identified in the earlier screening studies. Evaluation of catalyst performance focused on attaining improvements with respect to the space-time-yield and converted carbon selectivity to C2+ oxygenates, with additional consideration given to the fraction of the oxygenates that were C2+ alcohols.

  14. Rhodium-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in cycloadditions, inspiration from the recent "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Shu, Xing-Zhong; Shu, Dongxu; Schienebeck, Casi M; Tang, Weiping

    2012-12-07

    Transition metal-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters offers versatile entries to allene and vinyl carbene intermediates for various fascinating subsequent transformations. Most π-acidic metals (e.g. gold and platinum) are capable of facilitating these acyloxy migration events. However, very few of these processes involve redox chemistry, which are well-known for most other transition metals such as rhodium. The coupling of acyloxy migration of propargylic esters with oxidative addition, migratory insertion, and reductive elimination may lead to ample new opportunities for the design of new reactions. This tutorial review summarizes recent developments in Rh-catalyzed 1,3- and 1,2-acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in a number of cycloaddition reactions. Related Au- and Pt-catalyzed cycloadditions involving acyloxy migration are also discussed.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cernota, Paul Davis

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with (√7x√7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  16. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

  17. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-07

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls.

  18. Atomic-absorption determination of rhodium in chromite concentrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Rhodium is determined in chromite concentrates by atomic absorption after concentration either by co-precipitation with tellurium formed by the reduction of tellurite with tin(II) chloride or by fire assay into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed by buffering the solutions with lanthanum sulphate (lanthanum concentration 1%). Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated. A lower limit of approximately 0.07 ppm Rh can be determined in a 3-g sample. ?? 1969.

  19. The solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Oates, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature variation of the solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and nickel in equilibrium with H2 gas at 1 atm pressure has been measured by a technique involving saturating the solvent metal with hydrogen, quenching, and analyzing in resultant solid solutions. The solubilities determined are small (atom fraction of H is in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00001, and the results are consistent with the simple quasi-regular model for dilute interstitial solid solutions. The relative partial enthalpy and excess entropy of the dissolved hydrogen atoms have been calculated from the solubility data and compared with well-known correlations between these quantities.

  20. Rhodium-catalyzed enantioselective cyclopropanation of electron deficient alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hengbin; Guptill, David M.; Alvarez, Adrian Varela

    2013-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed reaction of electron-deficient alkenes with substituted aryldiazoacetates and vinyldiazoacetates results in highly stereoselective cyclopropanations. With adamantylglycine derived catalyst Rh2(S-TCPTAD)4, high asymmetric induction (up to 98% ee) can be obtained with a range of substrates. Computational studies suggest that the reaction is facilitated by weak interaction between the carbenoid and the substrate carbonyl but subsequently proceeds via different pathways depending on the nature of the carbonyl.. Acrylates and acrylamides result in the formation of cyclopropanation products while the use of unsaturated aldehydes and ketones results in the formation of epoxides. PMID:24049630

  1. Structure of adsorbed organometallic rhodium: model single atom catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R A; McCavish, N D; Basham, M; Dhanak, V R; Newton, M A

    2007-02-02

    We have determined the structure of a complex rhodium carbonyl chloride [Rh(CO)2Cl] molecule adsorbed on the TiO2(110) surface by the normal incidence x-ray standing wave technique. The data show that the technique is applicable to reducible oxide systems and that the dominant adsorbed species is undissociated with Rh binding atop bridging oxygen and to the Cl found close to the fivefold coordinated Ti ions in the surface. A minority geminal dicarbonyl species, where Rh-Cl bond scission has occurred, is found bridging the bridging oxygen ions forming a high-symmetry site.

  2. Complexation of heteroaromatic N-oxides with rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates in solution: DFT and NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2014-03-01

    Complexation of rhodium(II) tetraacetate and rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate with a set of heteroaromatic N-oxides containing additional functional groups was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and 1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in CDCl3 solutions. Chemical shifts for five N-oxides and their 1:1 adducts with rhodium tetraacetate were computed at the B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart ECP)//B3LYP/[6-31G(2d), LANL2DZ] theory level applying IEF PCM (CHCl3) solvation model and taking into account various complexation modes and conformational variety. Calculated values were used for the estimation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δadduct - δligand). The largest negative complexation shift were estimated for heteroatoms bonded to Rh, from -37 to -70 ppm (N), from -100 to -160 ppm (O in NO group), from -13 to -23 ppm (O in OCH3 group), and from -12 to -22 ppm (Cl). For the remaining heteroatoms in adducts, the corresponding Δδ values ranged from -22 to +8.2 ppm (N), from +3 to +58 ppm (O) and from +6 to +51 ppm (Cl). The Δδ(1H) usually did not exceed 1 ppm, whereas Δδ(13C) varied from ca. -1 to +7 ppm. Some trends useful for the determination of the complexation site were extracted from calculated data sets. Theoretical findings were applied to analyse experimental NMR data.

  3. Recyclable rhodium nanoparticles: green hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and highly catalytic performance in reduction of nitroarenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yohan; Jang, Seongwan; Cho, Chang-Woo; Bae, Jong-Seong; Park, Sungkyun; Park, Kang Hyun

    2013-11-01

    In this work, rhodium nanoparticles were synthesized using hydrothermal method that is simple and easy to manipulate reaction and use nontoxic supercritical water. The rhodium nanoparticles were formed in uniform size and shape. These Rh NPs also acted as a efficient heterogenous catalyst in reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. Moreover, the rhodium nanoparticles can be recycled without any loss in catalytic activity, and showed highly catalytic activity for various nitroarenes. Therefore, this method will contribute greatly to the development of environmental field and be suitable for use in the industry.

  4. Structural Evolution of a Recoverable Rhodium Hydrogenation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.; Chen, Yongsheng; Fulton, John L.; Linehan, John C.; Gutowska, Anna; Bitterwolf, Thomas E.

    2008-06-01

    N-isopropylacrylamide was utilized as a ligand to affect recoverability into a rhodium hydrogenation catalyst. The catalyst ligand structure was characterized in situ using NMR, XAFS and IR. Model compounds including glycine, cysteamine and methionine methyl ester were also investigated to aid in the interpretation. The investigation revealed a ligand switch from RNH2 to RSR’ when the catalyst is placed in water as opposed to organic solvents. The catalyst continued to transform with time, creating Rh clusters of up to 4 rhodium atoms, with no Rh metal detected. Over the time and solvents investigated, the catalyst ligands evolve from 1-Cl, 1-NH2, and 2-CO’s to 3-Rh, 1-RSR’ and 1-CO. Upon introduction of the alkene for hydrogenation catalysis, the Rh cluster is lost, favoring instead the interaction with the reactant. The kinetics of the hydrogenation reaction were measured using a novel high pressure flow through NMR system and the catalyst was found to have a TOF of 3000/hr at 25 ºC. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Rhodium, iridium and nickel complexes with a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene tris-MIC ligand. Study of the electronic properties and catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Mejuto, Carmen; Royo, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Summary The coordination versatility of a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-mesoionic carbene ligand is illustrated by the preparation of complexes with three different metals: rhodium, iridium and nickel. The rhodium and iridium complexes contained the [MCl(COD)] fragments, while the nickel compound contained [NiCpCl]. The preparation of the tris-MIC (MIC = mesoionic carbene) complex with three [IrCl(CO)2] fragments, allowed the estimation of the Tolman electronic parameter (TEP) for the ligand, which was compared with the TEP value for a related 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-NHC ligand. The electronic properties of the tris-MIC ligand were studied by cyclic voltammetry measurements. In all cases, the tris-MIC ligand showed a stronger electron-donating character than the corresponding NHC-based ligands. The catalytic activity of the tri-rhodium complex was tested in the addition reaction of arylboronic acids to α,β-unsaturated ketones. PMID:26734104

  6. The interaction of hydrazine with an Rh(1 1 1) surface as a model for adsorption to rhodium nanoparticles: A dispersion-corrected DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan Bin; Jia, Jian Feng; Wu, Hai Shun

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, metal nanoparticles were found to be excellent catalysts for hydrogen generation from hydrazine for chemical hydrogen storage. In order to gain a better understanding of these catalytic systems, we have simulated the adsorption of hydrazine on rhodium nanoparticles surfaces by density functional theory (DFT) calculations with dispersion correction, DFT-D3 in the method of Grimme. The rhodium nanoparticles were modeled by the Rh(1 1 1) surface, in addition, the adsorptions at corners and edges sites of nanoparticles were considered by using rhodium adatoms on the surfaces. The calculations showed that hydrazine binds most strongly to the edge of nanoparticle with adsorption energy of -2.48 eV, where the hydrazine bridges adatoms of edge with the molecule twisted to avoid a cis structure; similar adsorption energy was found at the corner of nanoparticle, where the hydrazine bridges corner atom and surface atom with gauche configuration. However, we found that inclusion of the dispersion correction results in significant enhancement of molecule-substrate binding, thereby increasing the adsorption energy, especially the adsorption to the Rh(1 1 1) surface. The results demonstrate that the surface structure is a key factor to determine the thermodynamics of adsorption, with low coordinated atoms which providing sites of strong adsorption from the surface.

  7. Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2013-09-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

  8. Combination of supported bimetallic rhodium-molybdenum catalyst and cerium oxide for hydrogenation of amide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tamura, Riku; Tamura, Masazumi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogenation of cyclohexanecarboxamide to aminomethylcyclohexane was conducted with silica-supported bimetallic catalysts composed of noble metal and group 6-7 elements. The combination of rhodium and molybdenum with molar ratio of 1:1 showed the highest activity. The effect of addition of various metal oxides was investigated on the catalysis of Rh-MoOx/SiO2, and the addition of CeO2 much increased the activity and selectivity. Higher hydrogen pressure and higher reaction temperature in the tested range of 2-8 MPa and 393-433 K, respectively, were favorable in view of both activity and selectivity. The highest yield of aminomethylcyclohexane obtained over Rh-MoOx/SiO2 + CeO2 was 63%. The effect of CeO2 addition was highest when CeO2 was not calcined, and CeO2 calcined at >773 K showed a smaller effect. The use of CeO2 as a support rather decreased the activity in comparison with Rh-MoOx/SiO2. The weakly-basic nature of CeO2 additive can affect the surface structure of Rh-MoOx/SiO2, i.e. reducing the ratio of Mo-OH/Mo-O- sites.

  9. Rhodium-Catalyzed Ketone Methylation Using Methanol Under Mild Conditions: Formation of α-Branched Products**

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Louis K M; Poole, Darren L; Shen, Di; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed methylation of ketones has been accomplished using methanol as the methylating agent and the hydrogen-borrowing method. The sequence is notable for the relatively low temperatures that are required and for the ability of the reaction system to form α-branched products with ease. Doubly alkylated ketones can be prepared from methyl ketones and two different alcohols by using a sequential one-pot iridium- and rhodium-catalyzed process. PMID:24288297

  10. Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0023 (NII) - Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts MATTHEW KANAN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV...Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts Principal Investigator: Matthew W. Kanan Project Publications: 1. “An Electric Field–Induced Change...design—i.e. controlling selectivity by changing the molecular structure of the reactants, catalysts or other reaction components. The overall goal of

  11. Rhodium Complex and Enzyme Couple Mediated Electrochemical Detection of Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Han, Dawoon; Kim, Hyeong-Mook; Chand, Rohit; Kim, Gyumin; Shin, Ik-Soo; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine is one of the nucleoside which plays an important role in signal transduction and neuromodulation. This work proposes a simple electrochemical assay, comprising two enzymes and rhodium complex based electron transfer mediator, for the detection of adenosine. Sequential reaction of adenosine deaminase and L-glutamic dehydrogenase and the supporting cycle between β-NADH and mediator enable quantitative analysis of adenosine. Role of electron transfer mediator is the conveyance of proton from electrode to β-NAD(+) for regeneration of β-NADH. The electrochemical characteristics of electron transfer mediator were also studied. Real-time adenosine detection was carried out using this multiple enzyme based chronoamperometric assay. The analysis results show a low limit of detection (140 μM) and good correspondence between current signal and the adenosine concentration (R (2) = 0.997).

  12. Thermal effects on Rhodium nanoparticles supported on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, G.; Grisenti, R.; Lamberti, C.; Piovano, A.; Fornasini, P.

    2013-04-01

    EXAFS measurements have been made in the temperature range 5 - 300 K on rhodium nano-clusters of average diameters 15.9 and 11.5 Å (rms dispersion 7.2 and 4.7 Å, respectively) supported on carbon, as well as on a Rh reference foil. The preliminary results of the first shell analysis are presented. The Debye temperature is slightly smaller in n-Rh with respect to bulk and decreases when the cluster size decreases. The results of amplitude analysis (coordination number and static DW) are sensitive to the inclusion of the 4th cumulant. In going from bulk Rh to n-Rh and decreasing the nanocluster size the average coordination number decreases and the static disorder increases. A contraction of the average nearest-neighbour distance is observed at 5 K, -0.004 Å and -0.009 Å for the larger and smaller clusters, respectively, accompanied by a very slight thermal expansion.

  13. Strong Metal-Support Interactions (smsi) in Model Titania-Supported Rhodium Catalysts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Hassan Roger

    Model catalysts consisting of rhodium particles supported on well characterized, single crystal rutile substrates were used to study the nature of strong metal -support interactions (SMSI) in supported catalyst systems. The use of single crystal supports eliminates many of the complications inherent with powder supported catalysts and greatly simplifies the interpretation of experimental data. A variety of surface sensitive electron spectroscopic techniques, including ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission (UPS and XPS), electron energy loss (ELS) and Auger spectroscopies, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), combined with chemisorption measurements were applied to rhodium on titania model catalysts in order to separate the various phenomena that contribute to SMSI. The properties of the clean titania supports have been determined, including the dynamics of oxidation of reduced surfaces. Model catalysts were then prepared by thermal evaporation of rhodium onto these supports. The high temperature reduction procedures that produce the SMSI state on powder supported catalysts have been used on the model catalysts, and Auger sputter profiles indicate that during high temperature reduction (HTR) a suboxide of titanium migrates onto the rhodium particles, thus blocking carbon monoxide chemisorption. Removal of the suboxide layer by ion bombardment restores the normal chemisorption properties of the catalyst. Model rhodium on titania catalysts fabricated on both fully oxidized and on partially reduced single crystal supports have also been used. In this way it is possible to observe support-to-metal charge transfer in the absence of the encapsulation that accompanies HTR. The experimental results show that reduced titania species and rhodium interact with each other through a partially ionic bond, with electronic charge transferred from the reduced titanium cations to the rhodium. This bonding interaction is part of the driving force that leads to encapsulation of the

  14. Alcohols synthesis from carbon oxides and hydrogen on palladium and rhodium catalysts. Study of active species

    SciTech Connect

    Kiememann, A.; Hindermann, J.P.; Breault, R.; Idries, H.

    1986-03-01

    The synthesis of primary chemical products and/or gasoline additives of high octane number from synthesis gas obtained by coal gasification has received much attention these past years. Actually, even if methanol has been the most important oxygenated product, intensive research is being carried out for the direct synthesis of higher alcohols: ethanol for organic synthesis, or an alcohol mixture, from C/sub 1/ to C/sub 5/, as an additive to gasoline. For the methanol synthesis, copper-based catalysts, have long been considered as the only effective catalysts. Meanwhile Poutsma et al., showed the possible obtaining of methanol with palladium; this last metal has always been considered inactive for directing production of methane from CO-H/sub 2/. It is also true that the selectivity and activity vary greatly with the support. Even if other factors like the particle size was evoked to explain the change in the selectivity, the support effect seems to be primordial. It can play different roles on: the acidity and basicity, the structure of the active sites, the stabilization of intermediates and the formation of an intimate contact between metallic particles and sodium or lithium ions, a strong metal support interaction (SMSI); in particular with rhodium catalysts.

  15. Synthesis and structures of a pincer-type rhodium(iii) complex: reactivity toward biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Milutinović, Milan M; Bogojeski, Jovana V; Klisurić, Olivera; Scheurer, Andreas; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Bugarčić, Živadin D

    2016-10-04

    A novel rhodium(iii) complex [Rh(III)(H2L(tBu))Cl3] (1) (H2L(tBu) = 2,6-bis(5-tert-butyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine) containing a pincer type, tridentate nitrogen-donor chelate system was synthesized. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis revealed that 1 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn with a = 20.7982(6), b = 10.8952(4), c = 10.9832(4) Å, V = 2488.80(15) Å(3), and eight molecules in the unit cell. The rhodium center in the complex [Rh(III)(H2L(tBu))Cl3] (1) is coordinated in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry by the tridentate N,N,N-donor and three chloro ligands, adopting a mer arrangement with an essentially planar ligand skeleton. Due to the tridentate coordination of the N,N,N-donor, the central nitrogen atom N1 is located closer to the Rh(III) center. The reactivity of the synthesized complex toward small biomolecules (l-methionine (l-Met), guanosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP), l-histidine (l-His) and glutathione (GSH)) and to a series of duplex DNAs and RNA was investigated. The order of reactivity of the studied small biomolecules is: 5'-GMP > GSH > l-Met > l-His. Duplex RNA reacts faster with the [Rh(III)(H2L(tBu))Cl3] complex than duplex DNA, while shorter duplex DNA (15mer GG) reacts faster compared with 22mer GG duplex DNA. In addition, a higher reactivity is achieved with a DNA duplex with a centrally located GG-sequence than with a 22GTG duplex DNA, in which the GG-sequence is separated by a T base. Furthermore, the interaction of this metal complex 1 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was examined by absorption (UV-Vis) and emission spectral studies (EthBr displacement studies). Overall, the studied complex exhibited good DNA and BSA interaction ability.

  16. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hung-An

    2012-01-01

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, ToR, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the ToR-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[ToR] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 and [Rh(μ- Cl)(COE)]2 gives ToMRh(CO)2 (2.2) and ToMRhH(β3-C8H13) (3.1) respectively while Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 affords ToPRh(CO)2 (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brønsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex ToMRh(H)2CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary

  17. Zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and clusters: switching catalytic selectivity by controlling structures of essentially molecular species.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, B C

    2011-04-06

    Precise synthesis and characterization of site-isolated rhodium complexes and extremely small rhodium clusters supported on zeolite HY allow control of the catalyst selectivity in the conversion of ethene to n-butene or ethane, respectively, as a result of tuning the structure of the active sites at a molecular level.

  18. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  19. Synthesis and Conformational Behavior of Rhodium(I) Metallohosts Derived from Diphenylglycoluril.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Hein K. A. C.; van Leeuwen, Piet W. N. M.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.

    1996-07-12

    The design and synthesis of molecules containing both a substrate-binding cavity and a nearby catalytically active metal center is a useful approach to the development of synthetic systems that function according to the principles of enzymes. To this end the receptor molecule 2a, derived from diphenylglycoluril, was functionalized with triaryl phosphite ligands to give the receptor ligand 2d. Exchange reactions of 2d with (diketonate)Rh(CO)(2), (diketone = acetylacetone, dibenzoylmethane, or dipivaloylmethane) led to the formation of the metallohosts 3a-c, respectively. The properties and conformational behavior of these metal complexes were studied by NMR techniques. Reaction of compounds 3 with H(2) in the presence of a small excess of additional triphenyl phosphite yields the rhodium(I) hydride complex 5. The metallohosts are capable of binding dihydroxybenzene guests in their cavities by hydrogen bonding and pi-pi stacking interactions. On binding a substrate the conformational behavior of hosts 3a-c was affected considerably.

  20. Synthesis of phthalocyanine stabilized rhodium nanoparticles and their application in biosensing of cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Lokesh, K S; Shivaraj, Y; Dayananda, B P; Chandra, Sudeshna

    2009-06-01

    A single step synthesis route is described for the preparation of rhodium nanoparticles using a cobalt aminophthalocyanine macrocyclic complex as a stabilizer. The results of nanoparticles characterization using electronic absorption, Raman and X-ray spectroscopes as well as transmission electron microscopy are reported. Rhodium nanoparticle modified electrode behavior as examined by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry is also provided. The nanoparticles were found to be well dispersed and stabilized throughout the macromolecular matrix. TEM studies showed that they have an average diameter of 3 to 5 nm with spherical shape. The colloidal rhodium was then used for electrochemical sensing of cytochrome c using glassy carbon electrode. The results showed that the colloidal rhodium nanoparticles enhanced the electron transfer process between cytochrome c and the electrode. Differential pulse voltammetric measurements of cytochrome c at the colloidal rhodium nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode showed a linear relationship with the oxidation peak currents in the concentration range of 100 nM to 3 microM of cytochrome c.

  1. Interaction between water-soluble rhodium complex RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)2 and surfactants probed by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li-Mei; Guo, Cai-Hong; Fu, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Hua; Li, Rui-Xiang; Li, Xian-Jun

    The interactions of rhodium complex RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)2 [TPPTS = P(m-C6H4SO3Na)3] with cationic, nonionic, and anionic surfactants have been investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence and 1H NMR measurements. The presence of four different species of RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)2 in cationic cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAB) solution has been demonstrated: free rhodium complex, rhodium complex bound to CTAB monomer, rhodium complex bound to CTAB premicelles, rhodium complex bound to CTAB micelles. The spectroscopy data show that RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)2 can adsorb on the interface of cationic CTAB micelles by strong electrostatic attraction, weakly bind to the nonionic polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) micelles by hydrophobic interaction, and does not interact with anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles due to the strong electrostatic repulsion.

  2. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael Edward

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  3. Inhibition of carrageenin paw edema by pyridinalalkylimine rhodium(I) complexes.

    PubMed

    Sava, G; Pacor, S; Ceschia, V; Zassinovich, G; Mestroni, G

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a series of pyridinalalkyl-1,5-cyclooctadiene Rhodium(I) complexes were studied on the carrageenin paw edema model, using Sprague-Dawley rats. The series of compounds used were administered at 35, 70 and 140 mumol/kg i.p. 1hr before carrageenin application, and the effect was measured 4hr after carrageenin. The 1,5-cyclooctadienepyridinalaldoxime Rhodium(I) complex proved to be the most active compound, effective also when administered 1hr after carrageenin induction of paw swelling. However, the effects of this complex are not superior to those reported for the methyl derivative, and the overall antiinflammatory activity is inferior to that of this latter compound, particularly when the number of dosages causing at least 80% inhibition are compared. These data are consistent with those obtained in a previous investigation indicating that Rhodium(I) complexes have potential antiinflammatory properties, susceptible of further investigations extended also to other models of inflammatory disease.

  4. Formation of Hexagonal-Close Packed (HCP) Rhodium as a Size Effect.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing Lu; Li, Zhi; Duan, Hao Hong; Cheng, Zhi Ying; Li, Ya Dong; Zhu, Jing; Yu, Rong

    2017-01-18

    Previous studies on the structural and functional properties of rhodium are based on the face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure in the bulk form. Here we report the first discovery of the hexagonal-close packed (hcp) rhodium in the nanoparticle form. The hcp Rh can be directly synthesized by solvothermal reaction or by electron-beam induced decomposition of Rh monolayers. The hcp Rh nanoparticles are stable under electron beam irradiation. Compared with the fcc structure, the hcp Rh nanoparticles show a large lattice expansion (6% larger atomic volume). The first-principles calculations suggest that the lower surface energy of hcp Rh leads to the size effect in the crystal structure.

  5. Probing the structures of gas-phase rhodium cluster cations by far-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D. J.; Gruene, P.; Haertelt, M.; Meijer, G.; Fielicke, A.; Hamilton, S. M.; Hopkins, W. S.; Mackenzie, S. R.; Neville, S. P.; Walsh, T. R.

    2010-12-07

    The geometric structures of small cationic rhodium clusters Rh{sub n}{sup +} (n = 6-12) are investigated by comparison of experimental far-infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra with spectra calculated using density functional theory. The clusters are found to favor structures based on octahedral and tetrahedral motifs for most of the sizes considered, in contrast to previous theoretical predictions that rhodium clusters should favor cubic motifs. Our findings highlight the need for further development of theoretical and computational methods to treat these high-spin transition metal clusters.

  6. Asymmetric Synthesis of Hydrocarbazoles Catalyzed by an Octahedral Chiral-at-Rhodium Lewis Acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Song, Liangliang; Gong, Lei; Meggers, Eric

    2015-12-01

    A bis-cyclometalated chiral-at-metal rhodium complex catalyzes the Diels-Alder reaction between N-Boc-protected 3-vinylindoles (Boc = tert-butyloxycarbonyl) and β-carboxylic ester-substituted α,β-unsaturated 2-acyl imidazoles with good-to-excellent regioselectivity (up to 99:1) and excellent diastereoselectivity (>50:1 d.r.) as well as enantioselectivity (92-99% ee) under optimized conditions. The rhodium catalyst serves as a chiral Lewis acid to activate the 2-acyl imidazole dienophile by two-point binding and overrules the preferred regioselectivity of the uncatalyzed reaction.

  7. Thermoelectric homogeneity and stability of platinum-rhodium alloyed thermoelements of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Ederer, P.

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses the different oxidation behavior of platinum and rhodium and their alloys usable as thermocouple materials. A specially prepared thermocouple containing thermoelements of different platinum-rhodium alloys (Pt-5%Rh, Pt-6%Rh, Pt-13%Rh, Pt-17%Rh and Pt-20%Rh) and a Pt-67 thermoelement was investigated. It was annealed at different temperatures in air. The thermoelectric homogeneity and stability of the thermocouple was tested by measurements of immersion profiles at 400 °C in a salt bath. The alloys of Pt-17%Rh and Pt-20%Rh were found to be the most suitable compositions with regard to thermoelectric homogeneity and stability.

  8. N-tosyloxycarbamates as a source of metal nitrenes: rhodium-catalyzed C-H insertion and aziridination reactions.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Hélène; Huard, Kim; Lectard, Sylvain

    2005-10-19

    The rhodium-catalyzed decomposition of N-tosyloxycarbamates to generate metal nitrenes which undergo intramolecular C-H insertion or aziridination reaction is described. Aliphatic N-tosyloxycarbamates produce oxazolidinones with high yields and stereospecificity through insertion in benzylic, tertiary, and secondary C-H bonds. Intramolecular aziridination occurs with allylic N-tosyloxycarbamates to produce aziridines as single diastereomers. The reaction proceeds at room temperature using a rhodium catalyst and an excess of potassium carbonate and does not require the use of strong oxidant, such as hypervalent iodine reagents. A rhodium nitrene species is presumably involved, as both reactions are stereospecific.

  9. Rhodium dihydride (RhH2) with high volumetric hydrogen density.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Ding, Yang; Kim, Duck Young; Ahuja, Rajeev; Zou, Guangtian; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2011-11-15

    Materials with very high hydrogen density have attracted considerable interest due to a range of motivations, including the search for chemically precompressed metallic hydrogen and hydrogen storage applications. Using high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique and theoretical calculations, we have discovered a new rhodium dihydride (RhH(2)) with high volumetric hydrogen density (163.7 g/L). Compressing rhodium in fluid hydrogen at ambient temperature, the fcc rhodium metal absorbs hydrogen and expands unit-cell volume by two discrete steps to form NaCl-typed fcc rhodium monohydride at 4 GPa and fluorite-typed fcc RhH(2) at 8 GPa. RhH(2) is the first dihydride discovered in the platinum group metals under high pressure. Our low-temperature experiments show that RhH(2) is recoverable after releasing pressure cryogenically to 1 bar and is capable of retaining hydrogen up to 150 K for minutes and 77 K for an indefinite length of time.

  10. Direct C-H alkylation and indole formation of anilines with diazo compounds under rhodium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Choi, Miji; Jo, Hyeim; Oh, Yongguk; Sharma, Satyasheel; Han, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Taejoo; Han, Sangil; Lee, Seok-Yong; Kim, In Su

    2015-12-18

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct functionalization of aniline C-H bonds with α-diazo compounds is described. These transformations provide a facile construction of ortho-alkylated anilines with diazo malonates or highly substituted indoles with diazo acetoacetates.

  11. Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Asymmetric Sulfur(VI) Reduction of Diazo Sulfonylamidines

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Nicklas; Fokin, Valery V.

    2013-01-01

    Diazo sulfonylamidines readily undergo enantioselective oxygen transfer from sulfur to carbon atom in the presence of chiral rhodium(II) carboxylates resulting in chiral sulfinylamidines. This unusual asymmetric atom transfer “reduction” occurs rapidly under mild conditions, and sulfinylamidines are obtained in excellent yield. PMID:22233190

  12. A Rhodium Nanoparticle-Lewis Acidic Ionic Liquid Catalyst for the Chemoselective Reduction of Heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Karakulina, Alena; Gopakumar, Aswin; Akçok, İsmail; Roulier, Bastien L; LaGrange, Thomas; Katsyuba, Sergey A; Das, Shoubhik; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-01-04

    We describe a catalytic system composed of rhodium nanoparticles immobilized in a Lewis acidic ionic liquid. The combined system catalyzes the hydrogenation of quinolines, pyridines, benzofurans, and furan to access the corresponding heterocycles, important molecules present in fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The catalyst is highly selective, acting only on the heteroaromatic ring, and not interfering with other reducible functional groups.

  13. Rhodium-catalyzed, efficient deutero- and tritiosilylation of carbonyl compounds from hydrosilanes and deuterium or tritium.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel; Campos, Jesús; Carmona, Ernesto

    2011-10-07

    A cationic rhodium compound which is an active catalyst for both the hydrogen isotope exchange in hydrosilanes and the hydrosilylation of carbonyl compounds permits, in a one-flask, two-step procedure, efficient deutero- and tritiosilylations using SiEt(3)H under D(2) (0.5 bar) or T(2), at low catalyst loadings (0.1-0.5 mol %).

  14. Activating Group Recycling in Action: A Rhodium-Catalyzed Carbothiolation Route to Substituted Isoquinolines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A new rhodium(I) catalyst allows practical and efficient alkyne carbothiolation reactions to be achieved on synthetically useful ketone-bearing aryl methyl sulfides. The carbothiolation adducts, featuring a ‘recycled methyl sulfide’ activating group, are convenient precursors to highly substituted isoquinolines. PMID:24083625

  15. The rhodium catalyzed three-component reaction of diazoacetates, titanium(IV) alkoxides and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chong-Dao; Liu, Hui; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Hu, Wen-Hao; Mi, Ai-Qiao

    2005-05-28

    The rhodium(II)-catalyzed three-component reaction of diazoacetates, titanium alkoxides and aldehydes is shown to give alpha-alkoxyl-beta-hydroxyl acid derivatives; the novel C-C bond formation reaction is proposed to occur through oxonium ylides derived from diazo compounds and titanium alkoxides, and followed by intermolecular trapping by aldehydes.

  16. Rhodium dihydride (RhH[subscript 2]) with high volumetric hydrogen density

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bing; Ding, Yang; Kim, Duck Young; Ahuja, Rajeev; Zou, Guangtian; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2012-03-14

    Materials with very high hydrogen density have attracted considerable interest due to a range of motivations, including the search for chemically precompressed metallic hydrogen and hydrogen storage applications. Using high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique and theoretical calculations, we have discovered a new rhodium dihydride (RhH{sub 2}) with high volumetric hydrogen density (163.7 g/L). Compressing rhodium in fluid hydrogen at ambient temperature, the fcc rhodium metal absorbs hydrogen and expands unit-cell volume by two discrete steps to form NaCl-typed fcc rhodium monohydride at 4 GPa and fluorite-typed fcc RhH{sub 2} at 8 GPa. RhH{sub 2} is the first dihydride discovered in the platinum group metals under high pressure. Our low-temperature experiments show that RhH{sub 2} is recoverable after releasing pressure cryogenically to 1 bar and is capable of retaining hydrogen up to 150 K for minutes and 77 K for an indefinite length of time.

  17. Toward the Synthesis of Nuphar Sesquiterpene Thioalkaloids: Stereodivergent Rhodium-Catalyzed Synthesis of the Thiolane Subunit.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Herrmann, Aaron T; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-08-07

    A stereodivergent approach to the central thiolane subunit of Nuphar sesquiterpene thioalkaloids has been developed. This approach features a rhodium-catalyzed Stevens-type rearrangement in conjunction with an enzyme resolution reaction. Further elaboration into a polycyclic ring system via alcohol oxidation and ring-closing metathesis is also described.

  18. Ligand Fluorination to Optimize Preferential Oxidation (PROX) of Carbon Monoxide by Water-Soluble Rhodium Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Biffinger, Justin C.; Uppaluri, ShriHarsha; Sun, Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic, low temperature preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide by aqueous [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (1[Rh(III)]) and [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-sulfonato-2,6-difluorophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (2[Rh(III)]) is reported. The PROX reaction occurs at ambient temperature in buffered (4 ≤ pH ≤ 13) aqueous solutions. Fluorination on the porphyrin periphery is shown to increase the CO PROX reaction rate, shift the metal centered redox potentials, and acidify ligated water molecules. Most importantly, β-fluorination increases the acidity of the rhodium hydride complex (pKa = 2.2 ± 0.2 for 2[Rh-D]); the dramatically increased acidity of the Rh(III) hydride complex precludes proton reduction and hydrogen activation near neutral pH, thereby permitting oxidation of CO to be unaffected by the presence of H2. This new fluorinated water-soluble rhodium porphyrin-based homogenous catalyst system permits preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen gas streams at 308 °K using dioxygen or a sacrificial electron acceptor (indigo carmine) as the terminal oxidant. PMID:21949596

  19. Synthesis of 1H-Indazoles from Imidates and Nitrosobenzenes via Synergistic Rhodium/Copper Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Xingwei

    2016-05-06

    Nitrosobenzenes have been used as a convenient aminating reagent for the efficient synthesis of 1H-indazoles via rhodium and copper catalyzed C-H activation and C-N/N-N coupling. The reaction occurred under redox-neutral conditions with high efficiency and functional group tolerance. Moreover, a rhodacyclic imidate complex has been identified as a key intermediate.

  20. Ligand Fluorination to Optimize Preferential Oxidation (PROX) of Carbon Monoxide by Water-Soluble Rhodium Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin C; Uppaluri, Shriharsha; Sun, Haoran; Dimagno, Stephen G

    2011-05-18

    Catalytic, low temperature preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide by aqueous [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (1[Rh(III)]) and [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-sulfonato-2,6-difluorophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (2[Rh(III)]) is reported. The PROX reaction occurs at ambient temperature in buffered (4 ≤ pH ≤ 13) aqueous solutions. Fluorination on the porphyrin periphery is shown to increase the CO PROX reaction rate, shift the metal centered redox potentials, and acidify ligated water molecules. Most importantly, β-fluorination increases the acidity of the rhodium hydride complex (pK(a) = 2.2 ± 0.2 for 2[Rh-D]); the dramatically increased acidity of the Rh(III) hydride complex precludes proton reduction and hydrogen activation near neutral pH, thereby permitting oxidation of CO to be unaffected by the presence of H(2). This new fluorinated water-soluble rhodium porphyrin-based homogenous catalyst system permits preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen gas streams at 308 °K using dioxygen or a sacrificial electron acceptor (indigo carmine) as the terminal oxidant.

  1. Anisotropic etching of rhodium and gold as the onset of nanoparticle formation by cathodic corrosion.

    PubMed

    Hersbach, Thomas J P; Mints, Vladislav A; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Yanson, Alexei I; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-12-12

    Cathodic corrosion is a phenomenon in which negatively polarized metal electrodes are degraded by cathodic etching and nanoparticle formation. Though these changes are dramatic and sometimes even visible by eye, the exact mechanisms underlying cathodic corrosion are still unclear. This work aims to improve the understanding of cathodic corrosion by studying its onset on rhodium and gold electrodes, which are subjected to various constant cathodic potentials in 10 M NaOH. After this polarization, the electrodes are studied using cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy, allowing a corrosion onset potential of -1.3 V vs. NHE for rhodium and -1.6 V vs. NHE for gold to be defined. The mildness of the potentials on both metals suggests that cathodic corrosion is less extreme and more ubiquitous than expected. Furthermore, we are able to observe well-defined rectangular etch pits on rhodium. Combined with rhodium cyclic voltammetry, this indicates a strong preference for forming (100) sites during corrosion. In contrast, a (111) preference is indicated on gold by voltammetry and the presence of well-oriented quasi-octahedral nanoparticles. This different etching behavior is suggested to be caused by preferential adsorption of sodium ions to surface defects, as is confirmed by density functional theory calculations.

  2. Toxicity of platinum, palladium and rhodium to Daphnia magna in single and binary metal exposure experiments.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Sonja; Wolff, Carolina; Sures, Bernd

    2017-02-17

    Mainly due to automobile traffic, but also due to other sources, the platinum group elements (PGE) platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh) are introduced into aquatic biotopes where they accumulate in sediments of lakes and rivers. However, the toxicity of these noble metals to aquatic organisms is not well understood and especially toxicity studies under standardized condition are lacking. Thus, the toxicity of Pt, Pd and Rh to Daphnia magna was tested in single metal exposure experiments according to OECD guideline 202. Immobility and lethality was recorded after 24 h and 48 h of exposure and EC50 and LC50, respectively, were determined. As the nominal exposure concentration of Pd differed significantly from the quantified concentration, the control of the real exposure concentration by chemical analysis is mandatory, especially for Pd. The toxicity decreased in the order Pd > Pt ≫ Rh with e.g. LC50(48 h) values of 14 μg/L for Pd, 157 μg/L for Pt and 56,800 μg/L for Rh. The exposure period had a clear effect on the toxicity of Pt, Pd and Rh. For Pt and Rh the endpoint immobility was more sensitive than the endpoint lethality whereas Pd toxicity was similar for both endpoints. The Hill slopes, which are a measure for the steepness of the concentration-response curves, showed no significant discrepancies between the different metals. The binary metal exposure to Pt and Pd revealed a more-than-additive, i.e. a synergistic toxicity using the toxic unit approach. The present study is a start to understand the toxicity of interacting PGE. The modes of action behind the synergistic effect are unclear.

  3. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, M.A. |

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  4. Cyto- and genotoxic effects of coordination complexes of platinum, palladium and rhodium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bünger, J; Stork, J; Stalder, K

    1996-01-01

    The growing industrial use of platinum group elements as catalysts, especially in automobile exhaust detoxification (trimetal catalytic converters), is causing increasing occupational and environmental pollution. The cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of industrially used coordination complexes of platinum, palladium and rhodium were investigated using the neutral red cytotoxicity assay on two established cell lines and the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome test system (Ames test). Cytotoxic effects of the platinum complexes, measured as ED50, occurred at test concentrations of 0.2 mM. The analogous palladium salts tested were 3 times less toxic with ED50 being 0.6 mM, while the rhodium salts proved to be 30 times less toxic (ED50 = 6 mM). Levels of toxicity of the different complexes of a particular metal did not differ significantly from each other, which indicates that the metal itself is responsible for the toxic effects. In the Ames test, the spontaneous mutation rates increased by factors of 3 to 20 when the four tester strains were exposed to the platinum complexes. The analogous rhodium compounds proved to be considerably less mutagenic, and palladium demonstrated no mutagenic potential. As all of the four tester strains contain different mutations, the mutagenic potential of platinum and rhodium complexes appears to be based on a variety of mechanisms that damage DNA. From these in vitro experiments, it can be concluded that water-soluble complex salts of rhodium are less toxic and have a smaller mutagenic potential than the analogous platinum complexes. For palladium there is no evidence of any mutagenic property. From this point of view, the development of a catalytic converter containing predominantly palladium may be a possible means of minimizing potential health risks from this exhaust detoxification technique.

  5. Double hydrophosphination of alkynes promoted by rhodium: the key role of an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Andrea; De Luca, Roberto; Castarlenas, Ricardo; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Crucianelli, Marcello; Oro, Luis A

    2016-04-25

    The regioselective double hydrophosphination of alkynes mediated by rhodium catalysts is presented. The distinctive stereoelectronic properties of the NHC ligand prevent the catalyst deactivation by diphosphine coordination thereby allowing for the closing of a productive catalytic cycle.

  6. Stabilized rhodium(0) nanoparticles: a reusable hydrogenation catalyst for arene derivatives in a biphasic water-liquid system.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Roucoux, A; Patin, H

    2000-02-18

    A colloidal system based on an aqueous suspension of rhodium(o) nanoparticles proved to be an efficient catalyst for the hydrogenation of arene derivatives under biphasic conditions. The rhodium nanoparticles (2-2.5 nm) were synthesized by the reduction of RhCl3 x 3H2O with sodium borohydride and were stabilized by highly water-soluble N-alkyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium salts (HEA-Cn). These surfactant molecules were characterized by measurements of the surface tension and the aqueous dispersions with rhodium were observed by transmission electron cryomicroscopy. The catalytic system is efficient under ultramild conditions, namely room temperature and 1 atm H2 pressure. The aqueous phase which contains the protected rhodium(0) colloids can be reused without significant loss of activity. The microheterogeneous behavior of this catalytic system was confirmed on a mercury poisoning experiment.

  7. Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Promoted by a Pincer-Square-Planar Rhodium(I) Monohydride: A Stepwise Hydrogen Transfer from the Substrate to the Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; Nolis, Pau; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique; Vallribera, Adelina; Vélez, Andrea

    2016-07-18

    The pincer d(8)-monohydride complex RhH{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (xant(P(i)Pr2)2 = 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(diisopropylphosphino)xanthene) promotes the release of 1 equiv of hydrogen from H3BNH3 and H3BNHMe2 with TOF50% values of 3150 and 1725 h(-1), to afford [BH2NH2]n and [BH2NMe2]2 and the tandem ammonia borane dehydrogenation-cyclohexene hydrogenation. DFT calculations on the ammonia borane dehydrogenation suggest that the process takes place by means of cis-κ(2)-PP-species, through four stages including: (i) Shimoi-type coordination of ammonia borane, (ii) homolytic addition of the coordinated H-B bond to afford a five-coordinate dihydride-boryl-rhodium(III) intermediate, (iii) reductive intramolecular proton transfer from the NH3 group to one of the hydride ligands, and (iv) release of H2 from the resulting square-planar hydride dihydrogen rhodium(I) intermediate.

  8. Evaluation of the role of the metal-support interfacial centers in the dry reforming of methane on alumina-supported rhodium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.

    2000-03-10

    The reforming of CH{sub 4} with CO{sub 2} (dry reforming) has been studied on a series of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Rh-Cu catalysts. The reaction has been found to proceed on these systems through a bifunctional mechanism, in which the activation on methane takes place on the rhodium phase while carbon dioxide is activated on the support surface via formate intermediates. The addition of a metal, such as copper, inactive for methane activation, has allowed the authors to evaluate the role of the interfacial Rh-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sites in the reaction. The presence of copper reduces the stability of the catalysts, though it does not have any effect on the initial activity per surface exposed site. It indicates that the dry reforming of methane is not a structure-sensitive reaction and that catalytic activity, largely affected by the alumina support, is dependent on the number of surface exposed rhodium centers.

  9. Enantioselective Synthesis of Spiroindenes by Enol-Directed Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalization and Spiroannulation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Chidipudi, Suresh; Burns, David J; Khan, Imtiaz; Lam, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Chiral cyclopentadienyl rhodium complexes promote highly enantioselective enol-directed C(sp2)-H functionalization and oxidative annulation with alkynes to give spiroindenes containing all-carbon quaternary stereocenters. High selectivity between two possible directing groups, as well as control of the direction of rotation in the isomerization of an O-bound rhodium enolate into the C-bound isomer, appear to be critical for high enantiomeric excesses. PMID:26404643

  10. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  11. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of pyrroloindolines via a rhodium(II)-catalyzed annulation of indoles.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Jillian E; Davies, Huw M L

    2013-05-08

    Herein we report the synthesis of pyrroloindolines via a catalytic enantioselective formal [3+2] cycloaddition of C(3)-substituted indoles. This methodology utilizes 4-aryl-1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles as carbenoid precursors and the rhodium(II)-tetracarboxylate catalyst Rh2(S-PTAD)4. A variety of aryl-substituted pyrroloindolines were prepared in good yields and with high levels of enantioinduction.

  12. Particle size, precursor, and support effects in the hydrogenolysis of alkanes over supported rhodium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Coq, B.; Dutartre, R.; Figueras, F.; Tazi, T. )

    1990-04-01

    A series of Rh catalysts of widely varying dispersion has been prepared using {gamma}-alumina as support and Rh acetylacetonate (Rh(acac){sub 3}) as precursor. The hydrogenolyses of n-hexane (nH), methylcyclopentane (MCP), and 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (TeMB) were investigated as model reactions. Clear dependence of turnover frequency on Rh particle size is observed for nH and MCP hydrogenolysis, but only slight changes of selectivities occur with these alkanes. By contrast, large modifications of both specific activity and selectivity appear when TeMB is reacted. TeMB hydrogenolysis is thus a reliable tool for studying modifications of the surface structure of rhodium particles. This probe was used to investigate the effects of precursor and support on rhodium catalysts. The effect of chlorine is appreciable and shifts the selectivity of TeMB hydrogenolysis toward that of large particles. This is attributed to a different morphology of the rhodium particles. When the effect of dispersion of the metal is taken into account, no support effect is observed when SiO{sub 2} or ZrO{sub 2} is used as support. The different properties of rhodium on MgO can also be attributed to a different morphology of the particles. For Rh/TiO{sub 2} prepared from RhCl{sub 3} {center dot} 3H{sub 2}O, the catalytic properties are similar to those of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of moderate dispersion whatever temperature is used for reduction. Rh/TiO{sub 2} prepared from Rh(acac){sub 3} and reduced at 573 and 773 K simulates the catalytic properties of particles smaller than indeed observed. This effect can be interpreted by a partial coverage of the Rh surface by TiO{sub x} species (SMSI). This SMSI effect disappears upon reduction at 873 K.

  13. Cyclic (Alkyl)(Amino)Carbene Complexes of Rhodium and Nickel and Their Steric and Electronic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ursula S D; Sieck, Carolin; Haehnel, Martin; Hammond, Kai; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2016-07-25

    N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbenes (CAACs) are of great interest, as their electronic and steric properties provide a unique class of ligands and organocatalysts. Herein, substitution reactions involving novel carbonyl complexes of rhodium and nickel were studied to provide a deeper understanding of the fundamental electronic factors characterizing CAAC(methyl) , which were compared with the large array of data available for NHC and sterically more demanding CAAC ligands.

  14. Long Range Materials Research. Appendix 1. Synthesis and Characterization of Supported Organometallic Rhodium (I) Catalysts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-30

    support organo - metallic homogeneous catalysts on inert supports. This thesis describes the synthesis of a new chelating ligand for binding...homogeneous catalysts to silica surfaces, a now method using poisons for distinguishing con- ventional heterogeneous catal’,sts from the newer supported organo ...Homogeneous HIydrogenation by Rhodium(l) Complexes Homogeneous catalysts have both served and plagued alchemists and chemists since work began with solutions

  15. Drift as a Function of Temperature in Platinum-Rhodium-Alloyed Thermoelements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.; Edler, F.

    2017-02-01

    Platinum-rhodium-alloyed thermocouples are the most commonly used high-temperature reference thermometer in national measurement institutes, second tier laboratories and industry. Despite the common use of these thermocouples, there is still a great deal that is not known about the drift processes that occur in them. Drift processes in these alloys are known to be made up of three main components: crystallographic changes, rhodium oxidation and migration, and contamination. Through careful use, contamination can be largely avoided; however, the other two processes often cannot. Research on drift in the different platinum-rhodium alloys is important because the largest uncertainty component during calibration of these thermocouple types is due to inhomogeneity, and the same mechanisms responsible for inhomogeneity are responsible for the drift. This study investigates the drift processes as a function of temperature and time for the 5 %, 13 %, 17 %, 20 %, 30 % and 40 % Rh alloys when paired with pure platinum. The use of a linear gradient furnace and high-resolution homogeneity scanner has enabled identification of drift characteristics in the temperature range 100°C to 950°C, where the bulk of reversible drift occurs. The experiments have quantified the drift rates and magnitude for thermoelements given two commonly used annealing procedures: the high-temperature quench anneal and the low-temperature vacancy anneal. Consequently, this study provides users of platinum-rhodium thermoelements with guidance on what levels of drift they should expect and exposure times before re-annealing is required. It also shows that a Pt-Rh alloy of 20 % Rh is by far the most stable and has properties comparable to the Pt-Pd thermocouple.

  16. Production of saturated and unsaturated silahydrocarbon mixtures using rhodium catalyst, and to products produced thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Onopchenki, A.; Sabourin, E.T.

    1986-02-25

    This patent describes a process for the production of a mixture of saturated and unstaurated silahydrocarbons. This process contacts an admixture consisting of (A) at least one alpha-olefin containing from 2 to about 20 carbon atoms per molecule, and (B) at least one alkylsilane selected from the group consisting of (i) a dialkylsilane (ii) a trialkylsilane (iii) mixtures thereof, with a catalyst consisting of a homogeneous monomeric rhodium-containing catalyst having a basicity substantially equal to or less than that provided by a rhodium-containing catalyst having a triphenyl phosphine ligand or a heterogeneous rhodium-containing catalyst in a halogen-free inert solvent. The process conducted at a temperature of from about 30/sup 0/ to about 200/sup 0/C., a weight ratio of olefin to alkylsilane of from about 0.5 to about 20 to one and a catalyst concentration of from about 1 x 10-/sup 5/ to about 1 x 10-/sup 2/ millimoles of catalyst per millimole alkylsilane, to produce a mixture containing saturated silane hydrocarbons and an unsaturated silahydrocarbon. Inclusive with the proviso that the molecular weight of the unsaturated silane hydrocarbon is above 300.

  17. Mild partial deoxygenation of esters catalyzed by an oxazolinylborate-coordinated rhodium silylene

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Songchen; Boschen, Jeffery S.; Biswas, Abhranil; ...

    2015-08-17

    An electrophilic, coordinatively unsaturated rhodium complex supported by borate-linked oxazoline, oxazoline-coordinated silylene, and N-heterocyclic carbene donors [{κ³-N,Si,C-PhB(OxMe²)(OxMe²SiHPh)ImMes}Rh(H)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] (2, OxMe² = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImMes = 1-mesitylimidazole) is synthesized from the neutral rhodium silyl {PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (1) and B(C6F5)3. The unusual oxazoline-coordinated silylene structure in 2 is proposed to form by rearrangement of an unobserved isomeric cationic rhodium silylene species [{PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiHPh)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] generated by H abstraction. Complex 2 catalyzes reductions of organic carbonyl compounds with silanes to give hydrosilylation products or deoxygenation products. The pathway to these reactions is primarily influenced by the degree of substitution of the organosilane. Reactions with primary silanes give deoxygenationmore » of esters to ethers, amides to amines, and ketones and aldehydes to hydrocarbons, whereas tertiary silanes react to give 1,2-hydrosilylation of the carbonyl functionality. In contrast, the strong Lewis acid B(C₆F₅)₃ catalyzes the complete deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to hydrocarbons with PhSiH₃ as the reducing agent.« less

  18. Column preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of rhodium in some food and standard samples.

    PubMed

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Pourmohammad, Fatemeh; Fazelirad, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium after adsorption of its 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol/tetraphenylborate ion associated complex at the surface of alumina. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the pH, type of eluent, sample and eluent flow rates, sorption capacity of alumina and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The relative standard deviation for eight measurements of 0.1 ng/mL of rhodium was ±6.3%. In this method, the detection limit was 0.003 ng/mL in the original solution. The sorption capacity of alumina and the linear range for Rh(III) were evaluated as 0.8 mg/g and 0.015-0.45 ng/mL in the original solution, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of rhodium content in some food and standard samples with high recovery values.

  19. Catalytic activity of rhodium complex immobilized on AN-31 ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Parshikova, G.N.; Korneva, L.I.; Kononov, Yu.S.

    1995-08-10

    Immobilized platinum-metal complexes are of interest as heterogeneous catalysts. Ion-exchange resins may be used as supports for catalytically active complexes. However, immobilized metal complexes are often unstable, are washed out from supports, and are lost with reaction products. Secure immobilization of metal complexes on supports is possible, for example, via coordination of the central metal by electron-donor groups of the support. This is the case when platinum metals are sorbed from solutions by nitrogen-containing ion exchangers. Complexes thus immobilized have high catalytic activity. Previously the authors demonstrated that rhodium(III) is sorbed from solutions containing rhodium aqua-chloro complexes as stable complexes with AN-31. These complexes were not desorbed with 10 M hydrochloric acid. Stable amino complexes of transition metals sorbed on ion exchangers are known to be active in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. In this work, the authors have studied catalytic properties of rhodium complex with the ion exchanger under atmospheric pressure at 25-80{degrees}C.

  20. Versatile bonding and coordination modes of ditriazolylidene ligands in rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kevin; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Albrecht, Martin

    2016-10-12

    Metalation of novel ditriazolium salts containing a trimethylene (-CH2CH2CH2-) or dimethylether linker (-CH2OCH2-) was probed with different rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) precursors. When using [MCp*Cl2]2, a transmetalation protocol via a triazolylidene silver intermediate was effective, while base-assisted metalation with MCl3via sequential deprotonation of the triazolium salt with KOtBu and addition of the metal precursor afforded homoleptic complexes. The N-substituent on the triazole heterocycle directed the metalation process and led to Ctrz,Ctrz,CPh-tridentate chelating ditriazolylidene complexes for N-phenyl substituents. With ethyl substituents, only Ctrz,Ctrz-bidentate complexes were formed, while metalation with mesityl substituents was unsuccessful, presumably due to steric constraints. Through modification of the reaction conditions for the metalation step, an intermediate species was isolated that contains a Ctrz,CPh-bidentate chelate en route to the formation of the tridentate ligand system. Accordingly, Cphenyl-H bond activation occurs prior to formation of the second metal-triazolylidene bond. Stability studies with a Ctrz,Ctrz,CPh-tridentate chelating ditriazolylidene iridium complex towards DCl showed deuterium incorporation at both N-phenyl groups and indicate that Cphenyl-H bond activation is reversible while the Ctrz-Ir bond is robust. The flexible linker between the two triazolylidene donor sites provides access to both facial and meridional coordination modes.

  1. Influence of particle size and support on the catalytic properties of rhodium for hydrogenolysis of hexanes and methylcyclopentane

    SciTech Connect

    Del Angel, G.; Coq, B.; Dutartre, R.; Figueras, F.

    1984-05-01

    The catalytic properties of rhodium for the hydrogenolysis of C/sub 6/ hydrocarbons have been investigated. Rhodium preferentially cleaves bisecondary and primary-secondary carbon-carbon bonds. Primary-tertiary C-C bonds react much more slowly. Methylcyclopentane (MCP) is converted to methyl-2-pentane, methyl-3-pentane, and n-hexane at temperatures lower than 503 K. The selectivity to n-hexane is low (10%) but measurable on well-dispersed Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts and decreases when the dispersion decreases. Rh/SiO/sub 2/ catalysts have a low selectivity for the formation of n-hexane whatever the dispersion. The specific activity for MCP conversion changes as a function of the dispersion of rhodium and of the support: small rhodium particles are more active than large particles when the support is silica, but the reverse is true on alumina. These changes of activity are consistent with the results reported for C/sub 2/H/sub 6/ hydrogenolysis on Rh/SiO/sub 2/ and for C/sub 5/H/sub 10/ conversion on Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The variations of the catalytic properties for hydrogenolysis may be interpreted as due to the modification of the structure of the small rhodium particles observed on silica.

  2. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  3. The structures of the crystalline phase and columnar mesophase of rhodium (II) heptanoate and of its binary mixture with copper (II) heptanoate probed by EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inb-Elhaj, M.; Guillon, D.; Skoulios, A.; Maldivi, P.; Giroud-Godquin, A. M.; Marchon, J.-C.

    1992-12-01

    EXAFS was used to investigate the local structure of the polar spines of rhodium (II) soaps in the columnar liquid crystalline state. It was also used to ascertain the degree of blending of the cores in binary mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps. For the pure rhodium soaps, the columns are shown to result from the stacking of binuclear metal-metal bonded dirhodium tetracarboxylate units bonded to one another by apical ligation of the metal atom of each complex with one of the oxygen atoms of the adjacent molecule. Mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps give a hexagonal columnar mesophase in which pure rhodium and pure copper columns are randomly distributed.

  4. Photocatalytic carbon dioxide reduction with rhodium-based catalysts in solution and heterogenized within metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Matthew B; Wang, Xia; Elgrishi, Noémie; Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Bonnefoy, Jonathan; Canivet, Jérôme; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra; Farrusseng, David; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-02-01

    The first photosensitization of a rhodium-based catalytic system for CO2 reduction is reported, with formate as the sole carbon-containing product. Formate has wide industrial applications and is seen as valuable within fuel cell technologies as well as an interesting H2 -storage compound. Heterogenization of molecular rhodium catalysts is accomplished via the synthesis, post-synthetic linker exchange, and characterization of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) Cp*Rh@UiO-67. While the catalytic activities of the homogeneous and heterogeneous systems are found to be comparable, the MOF-based system is more stable and selective. Furthermore it can be recycled without loss of activity. For formate production, an optimal catalyst loading of ∼10 % molar Rh incorporation is determined. Increased incorporation of rhodium catalyst favors thermal decomposition of formate into H2 . There is no precedent for a MOF catalyzing the latter reaction so far.

  5. A rhodium/silicon co-electrocatalyst design concept to surpass platinum hydrogen evolution activity at high overpotentials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lili; Lin, Haiping; Li, Youyong; Liao, Fan; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Sheng, Minqi; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-01-01

    Currently, platinum-based electrocatalysts show the best performance for hydrogen evolution. All hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts should however obey Sabatier's principle, that is, the adsorption energy of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should be neither too high nor too low to balance between hydrogen adsorption and desorption. To overcome the limitation of this principle, here we choose a composite (rhodium/silicon nanowire) catalyst, in which hydrogen adsorption occurs on rhodium with a large adsorption energy while hydrogen evolution occurs on silicon with a small adsorption energy. We show that the composite is stable with better hydrogen evolution activity than rhodium nanoparticles and even exceeding those of commercial platinum/carbon at high overpotentials. The results reveal that silicon plays a key role in the electrocatalysis. This work may thus open the door for the design and fabrication of electrocatalysts for high-efficiency electric energy to hydrogen energy conversion. PMID:27447292

  6. Mechanochemical Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Bond Functionalization of Acetanilides under Solventless Conditions in a Ball Mill.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gary N; Becker, Peter; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-06-15

    In a proof-of-principle study, a planetary ball mill was applied to rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization. Under solventless conditions and in the presence of a minute amount of Cu(OAc)2, the mechanochemical activation led to the formation of an active rhodium species, thus enabling an oxidative Heck-type cross-coupling reaction with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant. The absence of an organic solvent, the avoidance of a high reaction temperature, the possibility of minimizing the amount of the metallic mediator, and the simplicity of the protocol result in a powerful and environmentally benign alternative to the common solution-based standard protocol.

  7. Permeation of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles through intact and damaged human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, Marcella; Crosera, Matteo; Bianco, Carlotta; Adami, Gianpiero; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo; Jaganjac, Morana; Bovenzi, Massimo; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate percutaneous penetration of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (PtNPs: 5.8 ± 0.9 nm, RhNPs: 5.3 ± 1.9 nm) through human skin. Salts compounds of these metals are sensitizers and some also carcinogenic agents. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged skin. PtNPs and RhNPs, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone, were synthesized by reduction of Na2PtCl6 and RhCl3·3H2O respectively. Suspensions with a concentration of 2.0 g/L of PtNPs and RhNPs were dispersed separately in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and applied as donor phases to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Measurements of the content of the metals in the receiving solution and in the skin were performed subsequently. Rhodium skin permeation was demonstrated through damaged skin, with a permeation flux of 0.04 ± 0.04 μg cm-2 h-1 and a lag time of 7.9 ± 1.1 h, while no traces of platinum were found in receiving solutions. Platinum and rhodium skin-analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metals in damaged skin. Rh and Pt applied as NPs can penetrate the skin barrier and Rh can be found in receiving solutions. These experiments pointed out the need for skin contamination prevention, since even a minor injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase penetration.

  8. Mild partial deoxygenation of esters catalyzed by an oxazolinylborate-coordinated rhodium silylene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Boschen, Jeffery S.; Biswas, Abhranil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-08-17

    An electrophilic, coordinatively unsaturated rhodium complex supported by borate-linked oxazoline, oxazoline-coordinated silylene, and N-heterocyclic carbene donors [{κ³-N,Si,C-PhB(OxMe²)(OxMe²SiHPh)ImMes}Rh(H)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] (2, OxMe² = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImMes = 1-mesitylimidazole) is synthesized from the neutral rhodium silyl {PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (1) and B(C6F5)3. The unusual oxazoline-coordinated silylene structure in 2 is proposed to form by rearrangement of an unobserved isomeric cationic rhodium silylene species [{PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiHPh)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] generated by H abstraction. Complex 2 catalyzes reductions of organic carbonyl compounds with silanes to give hydrosilylation products or deoxygenation products. The pathway to these reactions is primarily influenced by the degree of substitution of the organosilane. Reactions with primary silanes give deoxygenation of esters to ethers, amides to amines, and ketones and aldehydes to hydrocarbons, whereas tertiary silanes react to give 1,2-hydrosilylation of the carbonyl functionality. In contrast, the strong Lewis acid B(C₆F₅)₃ catalyzes the complete deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to hydrocarbons with PhSiH₃ as the reducing agent.

  9. Hydrolysis of Letrozole catalyzed by macrocyclic Rhodium (I) Schiff-base complexes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Muralidhar; Shanker, K; Srinivas, V; Krishna, E Ravi; Rohini, R; Srikanth, G; Hu, Anren; Ravinder, V

    2015-03-15

    Ten mononuclear Rhodium (I) complexes were synthesized by macrocyclic ligands having N4 and N2O2 donor sites. Square planar geometry is assigned based on the analytical and spectral properties for all complexes. Rh(I) complexes were investigated as catalysts in hydrolysis of Nitrile group containing pharmaceutical drug Letrozole. A comparative study showed that all the complexes are efficient in the catalysis. The percent yields of all the catalytic reaction products viz. drug impurities were determined by spectrophotometric procedures and characterized by spectral studies.

  10. Construction of a Chiral Silicon Center by Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Yuki; Namba, Tomoya; Kawagishi, Mayu; Nishiyama, Hisao

    2015-06-22

    Rhodium-catalyzed enantioselective desymmetrizing intramolecular hydrosilylation of symmetrically disubstituted hydrosilanes is described. The original axially chiral phenanthroline ligand (S)-BinThro (Binol-derived phenanthroline) was found to work as an effective chiral catalyst for this transformation. A chiral silicon stereogenic center is one of the chiral motifs gaining much attention in asymmetric syntheses and the present protocol provides cyclic five-membered organosilanes incorporating chiral silicon centers with high enantioselectivities (up to 91 % ee). The putative active Rh(I) catalyst takes the form of an N,N,O-tridentate coordination complex, as determined by several complementary experiments.

  11. The oxidation of carbon monoxide on polycrystalline rhodium under knudsen conditions. II. Reaction with nitrogen monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, Hans-Günther; Weisker, Tilman

    1985-09-01

    The reaction between carbon monoxide and nitrogen monoxide on a polycrystalline rhodium ribbon under stationary conditions is followed by mass spectrometry. In the temperature range 300 to 1100 K the ratio of the partial pressures of the reactants varies between 0.1 < pNO/ pCO < 100 at values of the total pressure in the reactor from 10 -4 to 10 -5 Torr. The results can be interpreted qualitatively by a simple elementary reaction sequence. Simulation using literature values of the kinetic constants leads to semi-quantitative agreement with experimental results. No isothermal oscillations of the reaction rate could be observed under the stated conditions.

  12. AMTEC cell testing, optimization of rhodium/tungsten electrodes, and tests of other components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Underwood, Mark L.; O'Connor, Dennis; Kikkert, Stan

    1991-01-01

    Electrodes, current collectors, ceramic to metal braze seals, and metallic components exposed to the high 'hot side' temperatures and sodium liquid and vapor environment have been tested and evaluated in laboratory cells running for hundreds of hours at 1100-1200 K. Rhodium/tungsten electrodes have been selected as the optimum electrodes based on performance parameters and durability. Current collectors have been evaluated under simulated and actual operating conditions. The microscopic effects of metal migration between electrode and current collector alloys as well as their thermal and electrical properties determined the suitability of current collector and lead materials. Braze seals suitable for long term application to AMTEC devices are being developed.

  13. Associative Covalent Relay: An Oxadiazolone Strategy for Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Primary Pyridinylamines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolong; Chen, Kehao; Wang, Qi; Guo, Shan; Zha, Shanke; Zhu, Jin

    2017-04-05

    A relay formalism is proposed herein for categorizing the interplay among reactants, target product, and catalytic center in transition-metal catalysis, an important factor that can dictate overall catalysis viability and efficiency. In this formalism, transition-metal catalysis can proceed by dissociative relay, associative covalent relay, and associative dative relay modes. An intriguing associative covalent relay process operates in rhodium(III)-catalyzed oxadiazolone-directed alkenyl C-H coupling with alkynes and allows efficient access to primary pyridinylamines. Although the primary pyridinylamine synthesis mechanism is posteriori rationalized, the relay formalism formulated herein can provide an important mechanistic conceptual framework for future catalyst design and reaction development.

  14. A convergent rhodium-catalysed asymmetric synthesis of tetrahydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Li, Ho Yin; Horn, Joachim; Campbell, Amanda; House, David; Nelson, Adam; Marsden, Stephen P

    2014-09-14

    Rh-catalysed conjugate additions of 2-aminophenyl boronic acid derivatives were exploited in diastereoselective and asymmetric syntheses of tetrahydroquinolines. In both cases, combinatorial variation of the substitution of the tetrahydroquinoline ring system was possible.

  15. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-06-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES).

  16. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation with vinyl esters as an acetylene equivalent.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicola J; Marsden, Stephen P; Raw, Steven A

    2014-09-19

    The behavior of electron-rich alkenes in rhodium-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation reactions is investigated. Vinyl acetate emerges as a convenient acetylene equivalent, facilitating the synthesis of sixteen 3,4-unsubstituted isoquinolones, as well as select heteroaryl-fused pyridones. The complementary regiochemical preferences of enol ethers versus enol esters/enamides is discussed.

  17. Asymmetric cyclopropanation of alkenes catalyzed by a rhodium {open_quotes}chiral fortress{close_quotes} porphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    O`Malley, S.; Kodadek, T.

    1992-06-01

    The authors investigated the use of chiral rhodium porphyrin catalysts for the production of predominantly syn isomers in the cyclopropanation of alkenes. The reactions display good diastereoselectivity on some cases, but only modest enantioselectivities are observed. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Ethylaluminum as an ethylene source for the Mizoroki-Heck-type reaction. Rhodium-catalyzed preparation of stilbene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shota; Itami, Kazuki; Sunahara, Kazuhiro; Tatsuta, Go; Mori, Atsunori

    2015-02-04

    Treatment of an organoaluminum reagent bearing aryl and ethyl groups furnishes 1,2-diarylethene derivatives in good to excellent yields by the catalysis of a rhodium complex, in which the ethyl group of the aluminum reagent serves as an ethylene source in the product formation.

  19. Direct access to ketones from aldehydes via rhodium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction with potassium trifluoro(organo)borates.

    PubMed

    Pucheault, Mathieu; Darses, Sylvain; Genet, Jean-Pierre

    2004-12-01

    A direct cross-coupling reaction of aromatic aldehydes with potassium trifluoro(organo)borates afforded ketones in high yields and under mild conditions in the presence of a rhodium catalyst and acetone. This new reaction, involving a formal aldehyde C-H bond activation, is believed to proceed via a Heck-type mechanism followed by hydride transfer to acetone.

  20. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). PMID:27283394

  1. Immobilization of rhodium complexes in chiral organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Adima, A; Moreau, J J; Wong Chi Man, M

    2000-06-01

    Two new alkoxysilylated derivatives of (-)-(1R,2R)-1, 2-diaminocyclohexane: M = N-[(triethoxysilyl)propyl]-(-)-(1R,2R)-1, 2-diaminocyclohexane and B = N, N'-bis[(triethoxysilyl)propyl]-(-)-(1R,2R)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane have been synthesized. Their complexation with [Rh(cod)Cl]2 in the presence of TEOS = Si(OEt)4, followed by sol-gel hydrolysis-condensation, afforded new catalytic chiral hybrid materials. Evidence for the presence of the organic moieties complexed by rhodium in these solids was obtained by UV-visible spectroscopy, FT-IR studies, solid state 13C and 29Si CP-MAS NMR analysis, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques, and elemental analysis. The nitrogen sorption studies and BET analyses ranged these solid gels from nonporous to highly porous materials. The catalytic activities and selectivities of the solid materials have been studied in the asymmetric hydrogen-transfer reduction of prochiral ketones and compared to that of the homogeneous rhodium complexes of the ligands M and B. The hybrid materials appeared interesting supports for enantioselective heterogeneous catalysis leading to chiral alcohols with ee up to 58% in the reduction of acetophenone and up to 98% in the case of the more hindered related ketones. The catalytic properties as a function of the nature of chiral hybrid solid are discussed.

  2. Tracking the shape-dependent sintering of platinum–rhodium model catalysts under operando conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hejral, Uta; Müller, Patrick; Balmes, Olivier; Pontoni, Diego; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle sintering during catalytic reactions is a major cause for catalyst deactivation. Understanding its atomic-scale processes and finding strategies to reduce it is of paramount scientific and economic interest. Here, we report on the composition-dependent three-dimensional restructuring of epitaxial platinum–rhodium alloy nanoparticles on alumina during carbon monoxide oxidation at 550 K and near-atmospheric pressures employing in situ high-energy grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, online mass spectrometry and a combinatorial sample design. For platinum-rich particles our results disclose a dramatic reaction-induced height increase, accompanied by a corresponding reduction of the total particle surface coverage. We find this restructuring to be progressively reduced for particles with increasing rhodium composition. We explain our observations by a carbon monoxide oxidation promoted non-classical Ostwald ripening process during which smaller particles are destabilized by the heat of reaction. Its driving force lies in the initial particle shape which features for platinum-rich particles a kinetically stabilized, low aspect ratio. PMID:26957204

  3. Development of Chinese Standard Type of Rhodium-Iron Resistance Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Li, Xingwei; Gao, Bo; Yu, Lihong; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Fuhong

    2017-02-01

    New rhodium alloy wires with 0.52 % atomic of iron have been drawn, and several batches of RhFe thermometer with strain-free construction and helium-filled platinum capsule have been made using these new alloy wires and old alloy wires which were made in the 1980s in China. In one of the constructions, the coil of wire is inserted into twisted glass tubes, and in the other, it is laid in grooves on a fused-silica crossed frame. The resistance versus temperature relationship and interpolating characteristic of Chinese RhFe thermometer are similar to those of Tinsley 5187U thermometer from 1.5 K to 27 K. The resistance changes of most thermometers are less than that of equivalent to 0.2 mK at 4.5 K after they are exposed to fifty thermal cycles from room temperature to liquid helium temperature. This standard type of rhodium-iron resistance thermometer is now commercially available. Instead of the regular annealing temperature, which is 750°C, two batches of RhFe thermometers are made with the annealing temperature of 850°C and 950°C. The interpolating characteristics of RhFe thermometers will be studied to find new calibration method.

  4. Correlation between the Stereochemistry and Bioactivity in Octahedral Rhodium Prolinato Complexes.

    PubMed

    Rajaratnam, Rajathees; Martin, Elisabeth K; Dörr, Markus; Harms, Klaus; Casini, Angela; Meggers, Eric

    2015-08-17

    Controlling the relative and absolute configuration of octahedral metal complexes constitutes a key challenge that needs to be overcome in order to fully exploit the structural properties of octahedral metal complexes for applications in the fields of catalysis, materials sciences, and life sciences. Herein, we describe the application of a proline-based chiral tridentate ligand to decisively control the coordination mode of an octahedral rhodium(III) complex. We demonstrate the mirror-like relationship of synthesized enantiomers and differences between diastereomers. Further, we demonstrate, using the established pyridocarbazole pharmacophore ligand as part of the organometallic complexes, the importance of the relative and absolute stereochemistry at the metal toward chiral environments like protein kinases. Protein kinase profiling and inhibition data confirm that the proline-based enantiopure rhodium(III) complexes, despite having all of the same constitution, differ strongly in their selectivity properties despite their unmistakably mutual origin. Moreover, two exemplary compounds have been shown to induce different toxic effects in an ex vivo rat liver model.

  5. Reactions of Highly Uniform Zeolite H-Supported Rhodium Complexes: Transient Characterization by Infrared and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, I.; Gates, B

    2010-01-01

    A zeolite H-{beta}-supported mononuclear rhodium diethene complex (Rh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{l_brace}O{sub 2}Al{r_brace}, where the braces indicate a part of the zeolite) was formed by the reaction of Rh(acac)({eta}{sub 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} (acac = acetylacetonate, C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}{sup -}) with the zeolite. Transient characterization of the sample by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and infrared (IR) spectroscopies (combined with mass spectrometry of the effluent gas) while the sample was in contact with flowing CO indicates a simple stoichiometric conversion of the supported metal complex into another species, identified by the spectra as the zeolite-supported rhodium gem-dicarbonyl (Rh(CO){sub 2}{l_brace}O{sub 2}Al{r_brace}). The sharpness of the v{sub CO} bands in the IR spectrum indicates a high degree of uniformity of the supported rhodium gem-dicarbonyl, and isosbestic points in the XANES spectra as the transformation was occurring imply that the rhodium diethene complex was also highly uniform. Spectra similarly show that treatment of the supported rhodium gem-dicarbonyl with flowing C{sub 2}H{sub 4} resulted in another stoichiometrically simple transformation, giving a species suggested to be Rh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4})(CO){sub 2}{l_brace}O{sub 2}Al{r_brace}. The intermediate was ultimately transformed when the sample was purged with helium into another highly uniform supported species, inferred on the basis of IR spectra to be Rh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4})(CO){l_brace}O{sub 2}Al{r_brace}. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra characterizing the supported rhodium diethene complex and the species formed from it show how the Rh-O bond distance at the Rh-support interface varied in response to the changes in the ligands bonded to the rhodium.

  6. Rhodium as permanent modifier for atomization of lead from biological fluids using tungsten filament electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Parsons, Patrick J.; Aldous, Kenneth M.; Brockman, Paul; Slavin, Walter

    2002-04-01

    Rhodium (Rh) was investigated as a permanent modifier for the atomization of Pb from biological fluids in W-filament atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Heating the W-filament with a Rh solution provided a protective coating for subsequent determinations of Pb in blood and urine matrices. The W-filament AAS instrumentation used was based on a prototype design that utilized self-reversal background correction scheme and peak area measurements. We found that Rh not only stabilized Pb during the pyrolysis step, but also facilitated the removal of carbonaceous residues during the cleaning step, requiring much less power than with phosphate modifier. Thus, the filament lifetime was greatly extended to over 300 firings. Periodic reconditioning with Rh was necessary every 30 firings or so. Conditioning the filament with Rh also permitted direct calibration using simple aqueous Pb standards. The method detection limit for blood Pb was approximately 1.5 μg dl -1, similar to that reported previously. Potential interferences from concomitants such as Na, K, Ca and Mg were evaluated. Accuracy was verified using lead reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the New York State Department of Health. Blood lead results below 40 μg dl -1 were within ±1 μg dl -1 of certified values, and within ±10% above 40 μg dl -1; within-run precision was ±10% or better. Additional validation was reported using proficiency test materials and human blood specimens. All blood lead results were within the acceptable limits established by regulatory authorities in the US. When measuring Pb in urine, sensitivity was reduced and matrix-matched calibration became necessary. The method of detection limit was 27 μg l -1 for urine Pb. Urine lead results were also validated using an acceptable range comparable to that established for blood lead by US regulatory agencies.

  7. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  8. Direct Syn Addition of Two Silicon Atoms to a C≡C Triple Bond by Si-Si Bond Activation: Access to Reactive Disilylated Olefins.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maha; Gaumont, Annie-Claude; Durandetti, Muriel; Maddaluno, Jacques

    2017-02-20

    A catalytic intramolecular silapalladation of alkynes affords, in good yields and stereoselectively, syn-disilylated heterocycles of different chemical structure and size. When applied to silylethers, this reaction leads to vinylic silanols that undergo a rhodium-catalyzed addition to activated olefins, providing the oxa-Heck or oxa-Michael products, depending on the reaction conditions.

  9. MERCURY-NITRITE-RHODIUM-RUTHENIUM INTERACTIONS IN NOBLE METAL CATALYZED HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM FORMIC ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136C

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Chemical pre-treatment of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site is performed to prepare the waste for vitrification into a stable waste glass form. During pre-treatment, compounds in the waste become catalytically active. Mercury, rhodium, and palladium become active for nitrite destruction by formic acid, while rhodium and ruthenium become active for catalytic conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Nitrite ion is present during the maximum activity of rhodium, but is consumed prior to the activation of ruthenium. Catalytic hydrogen generation during pre-treatment can exceed radiolytic hydrogen generation by several orders of magnitude. Palladium and mercury impact the maximum catalytic hydrogen generation rates of rhodium and ruthenium by altering the kinetics of nitrite ion decomposition. New data are presented that illustrate the interactions of these various species.

  10. Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, Enrique J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2011-08-01

    Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

  11. Enantioselective and Regiodivergent Addition of Purines to Terminal Allenes: Synthesis of Abacavir.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Niels; Breit, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed atom-economic asymmetric N-selective intermolecular addition of purine derivatives to terminal allenes is reported. Branched allylic purines were obtained in high yields, regioselectivity and outstanding enantioselectivity utilizing a Rh/Josiphos catalyst. Conversely, linear selective allylation of purines could be realized in good to excellent regio- and E/Z-selectivity with a Pd/dppf catalyst system. Furthermore, the new methodology was applied to a straightforward asymmetric synthesis of carbocyclic nucleoside abacavir.

  12. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  13. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  14. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  15. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  16. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  17. Production of Palladium-103 ( 103Pd) from a thin rhodium foil target - Improved cooling concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, I.; Lavie, E.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Vaknin, D.; Veinguer, M.; Nagler, A.

    2007-08-01

    Palladium-103 (103Pd) is one of the commonly used radioisotopes for prostate cancer treatment. The current irradiation technique used to produce this radioisotope suffers from several serious inherent drawbacks, of which one is the low beam current due to cooling limitation and the other is the electroplating process used to prepare the target. A liquid-metal jet impingement target cooling system developed at Soreq NRC demonstrated recently a cooling capacity of 8.4 kW/cm2 while the pressure of the cooling liquid on the target back was less than 1 bar. The latter value implies that the target can be made very thin and that the copper back-plate might be removed. Hence, we propose a new target design based on the use of a thin rhodium foil directly cooled by a liquid-metal such as gallium.

  18. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  19. Dimerisation, rhodium complex formation and rearrangements of N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zong; Namyslo, Jan C; Drafz, Martin H H; Nieger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Deprotonation of indazolium salts at low temperatures gives N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles (indazol-3-ylidenes) which can be trapped as rhodium complexes (X-ray analysis). In the absence of Rh, the indazol-3-ylidenes spontaneously dimerize under ring cleavage of one of the N,N-bonds and ring closure to an indazole–indole spiro compound which possesses an exocyclic imine group. The E/Z isomers of the imines can be separated by column chromatography when methanol is used as eluent. We present results of a single crystal X-ray analysis of one of the E-isomers, which equilibrate in solution as well as in the solid state. Heating of the indazole–indole spiro compounds results in the formation of quinazolines by a ring-cleavage/ring-closure sequence (X-ray analysis). Results of DFT calculations are presented. PMID:24778738

  20. Screen-Printed Carbon Electrodes Modified by Rhodium Dioxide and Glucose Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Polan, Vojtěch; Soukup, Jan; Vytřas, Karel

    2010-01-01

    The described glucose biosensor is based on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modified by rhodium dioxide, which functions as a mediator. The electrode is further modified by the enzyme glucose dehydrogenase, which is immobilized on the electrode's surface through electropolymerization with m-phenylenediamine. The enzyme biosensor was optimized and tested in model glucose samples. The biosensor showed a linear range of 500–5000 mg L−1 of glucose with a detection limit of 210 mg L−1 (established as 3σ) and response time of 39 s. When compared with similar glucose biosensors based on glucose oxidase, the main advantage is that neither ascorbic and uric acids nor paracetamol interfere measurements with this biosensor at selected potentials. PMID:21528113

  1. Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D.; Maier, L.; Deutschmann, O.

    2010-09-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

  2. Determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in geologic materials by fire assay and emission spectrography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapfty, J.; Riley, L.B.

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of palladium down to 4ppb (parts per billion, 109), platinum down to 10 ppb and rhodium down to 5 ppb in 15 g of sample. Fire-assay techniques are used to preconcentrate the platinum metals into a gold bead, then the bead is dissolved in aqua regia and diluted to volume with 1M hydrochloric acid. The solution is analysed by optical emission spectrography of the residue from 200 ??l of it evaporated on a pair of flat-top graphite electrodes. This method requires much less sample handling than most published methods for these elements. Data are presented for G-1, W-1, and six new standard rocks of the U.S. Geological Survey. The values for palladium in W-1 are in reasonable agreement with previously published data. ?? 1968.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial study of cyclometalated rhodium(III) complex containing dithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Ghobad; Heidarizadi, Fateme; Naghipour, Ali; Notash, Behrouz

    2016-10-01

    The novel cyclometalated Rh(III) complex, [Rh(phpy)2(SˆS)], Where phpy is 2-phenylpyridine and (SˆS) is diethyldithiocarbamate, has been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 13C and 1H NMR, electronic absorption and Fluorescence spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of [Rh(phpy)2(SˆS)] shows that the coordination geometry around the Rh(III) is a distorted octahedron, with bite angles of 71.19-81.04° for all three bidentate ligands. Electrochemical analysis by cyclic voltammetry reveals irreversible redox behavior of the rhodium centre. Antibacterial activity of the complex has also been studied by agar disc diffusion method against three Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli) and two Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Corynebacterium renale).

  4. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2010 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; White, J. F.; Rummel, Becky L.; Stevens, Don J.

    2010-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research for the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy, Biomass Program to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas. In recent years this research has primarily involved the further development of a silica-supported catalyst containing rhodium and manganese that was selected from earlier catalyst screening tests. A major effort during 2010 was to examine alternative catalyst supports to determine whether other supports, besides the Davisil 645 silica, would improve performance. Optimization of the Davisil 645 silica-supported catalyst also was continued with respect to candidate promoters iridium, platinum, and gallium, and examination of selected catalyst preparation and activation alternatives for the baseline RhMn/SiO2 catalyst.

  5. Iminophosphanes: Synthesis, Rhodium Complexes, and Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed Hydration of Nitriles

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Highly stable iminophosphanes, obtained from alkylating nitriles and reaction of the resulting nitrilium ions with secondary phosphanes, were explored as tunable P-monodentate and 1,3-P,N bidentate ligands in rhodium complexes. X-ray crystal structures are reported for both κ1 and κ2 complexes with the counterion in one of them being an unusual anionic coordination polymer of silver triflate. The iminophosphane-based ruthenium(II)-catalyzed hydration of benzonitrile in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (180 °C, 3 h) and water (100 °C, 24 h) and under solvent free conditions (180 °C, 3 h) results in all cases in the selective formation of benzamide with yields of up to 96%, thereby outperforming by far the reactions in which the common 2-pyridyldiphenylphosphane is used as the 1,3-P,N ligand. PMID:28316361

  6. Gravimetric preparation and characterization of primary reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Angela; Noordmann, Janine; Görlitz, Volker; Pape, Carola; Richter, Silke; Kipphardt, Heinrich; Kopp, Gernot; Jährling, Reinhard; Rienitz, Olaf; Güttler, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Gravimetrically prepared mono-elemental reference solutions having a well-known mass fraction of approximately 1 g/kg (or a mass concentration of 1 g/L) define the very basis of virtually all measurements in inorganic analysis. Serving as the starting materials of all standard/calibration solutions, they link virtually all measurements of inorganic analytes (regardless of the method applied) to the purity of the solid materials (high-purity metals or salts) they were prepared from. In case these solid materials are characterized comprehensively with respect to their purity, this link also establishes direct metrological traceability to The International System of Units (SI). This, in turn, ensures the comparability of all results on the highest level achievable. Several national metrology institutes (NMIs) and designated institutes (DIs) have been working for nearly two decades in close cooperation with commercial producers on making an increasing number of traceable reference solutions available. Besides the comprehensive characterization of the solid starting materials, dissolving them both loss-free and completely under strict gravimetric control is a challenging problem in the case of several elements like molybdenum and rhodium. Within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), in the Joint Research Project (JRP) called SIB09 Primary standards for challenging elements, reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium were prepared directly from the respective metals with a relative expanded uncertainty associated with the mass fraction of U rel(w) < 0.05 %. To achieve this, a microwave-assisted digestion procedure for Rh and a hotplate digestion procedure for Mo were developed along with highly accurate and precise inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) methods required to assist with the preparation and as dissemination tools.

  7. Chiral Bicyclic Bridgehead Phosphoramidite (Briphos) Ligands for Asymmetric Rhodium-Catalyzed 1,2- and 1,4-Addition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ansoo; Kim, Hyunwoo

    2016-05-06

    A complementary solution for Rh-catalyzed enantioselective 1,2- and 1,4-arylation with two structurally related chiral ligands is reported. A chiral bicyclic bridgehead phosphoramidite (briphos) ligand derived from 1-aminoindane was efficient for the 1,2-arylation of N-sulfonyl imines, while that derived from 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthylamine was efficient for 1,4-arylation of α,β-unsaturated cyclic ketones. For α,β-unsaturated N-tosyl ketimines, the briphos derived from 1-aminoindane was found to selectively provide γ,γ-diaryl N-tosyl enamines with high yields and stereoselectivities.

  8. Rhodium-catalyzed [(3+2)+1] carbocyclization reactions of alkynylidenecyclopropanes with carbon monoxide: regiospecific construction of polysubstituted phenols.

    PubMed

    Evans, P Andrew; Burnie, Andrew J; Negru, Daniela E

    2014-09-05

    The development of the rhodium-catalyzed [(3+2)+1] carbocyclization reaction of alkynylidenecyclopropanes with carbon monoxide to construct polysubstituted phenols is described. This work offers a convenient method for the selective formation of tetra- and pentasubstituted phenols, which provide important intermediates for target directed synthesis. Finally, the ability to regiospecifically functionalize the phenols using conventional methods further illustrates the utility of this process.

  9. Rhodium-catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of α-Dehydroamino Ketones: A General Approach to Chiral α-amino Ketones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenchao; Wang, Qingli; Xie, Yun; Lv, Hui; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-01-01

    Rhodium/DuanPhos-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of aliphatic α-dehydroamino ketones has been achieved and afforded chiral α-amino ketones in high yields and excellent enantioselectives (up to 99 % ee), which could be reduced further to chiral β-amino alcohols by LiAlH(tBuO)3 with good yields. This protocol provides a readily accessible route for the synthesis of chiral α-amino ketones and chiral β-amino alcohols.

  10. Sequential rhodium/palladium catalysis: enantioselective formation of dihydroquinolinones in the presence of achiral and chiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qureshi, Zafar; Sonaglia, Lorenzo; Lautens, Mark

    2014-12-08

    Compatible combinations of achiral and chiral ligands can be used in rhodium/palladium catalysis to achieve highly enantioselective domino reactions. The difference in rates of catalysis and minimal effects of ligand interference confer control in the domino sequence. The "all-in-one" 1,4-conjugate arylation and C-N cross-coupling through sequential Rh/Pd catalysis provides access to enantioenriched dihydroquinolinone building blocks.

  11. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes.

  12. Merging rhodium-catalysed C–H activation and hydroamination in a highly selective [4+2] imine/alkyne annulation

    PubMed Central

    Manan, Rajith S.; Zhao, Pinjing

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic C–H activation and hydroamination represent two important strategies for eco-friendly chemical synthesis with high atom efficiency and reduced waste production. Combining both C–H activation and hydroamination in a cascade process, preferably with a single catalyst, would allow rapid access to valuable nitrogen-containing molecules from readily available building blocks. Here we report a single metal catalyst-based approach for N-heterocycle construction by tandem C–H functionalization and alkene hydroamination. A simple catalyst system of cationic rhodium(I) precursor and phosphine ligand promotes redox-neutral [4+2] annulation between N–H aromatic ketimines and internal alkynes to form multi-substituted 3,4-dihydroisoquinolines (DHIQs) in high chemoselectivity over competing annulation processes, exclusive cis-diastereoselectivity, and distinct regioselectivity for alkyne addition. This study demonstrates the potential of tandem C–H activation and alkene hydrofunctionalization as a general strategy for modular and atom-efficient assembly of six-membered heterocycles with multiple chirality centres. PMID:27321650

  13. The promotion of CO dissociation by molybdenum oxide overlayers on rhodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szenti, Imre; Bugyi, László; Kónya, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    A considerable promotional effect of MoOx species observed at high pressures on the catalytic activity of rhodium initiated the present UHV model study. The MoOx overlayers formed on Rh films (0.15-20.0 ML) supported by TiO2(110) substrate were characterized by AES, TPD, work function (WF) measurements and CO adsorption. On the mixed oxide support produced by depositing 1.2 ML Mo onto TiO2(110), a new recombinative CO desorption state was observed with Tp=700 K, assigned as β-CO and related to the promotional effect of MoOx species diffused onto Rh particles of 1.0 ML coverage. The development of β-CO needs 0.5-0.7 ML threshold Rh coverage, attributable to particle size effect and geometric factors governing the CO adsorption. The β-CO state with Tp=725-742 K could also be detected on Rh films covered by MoOx moiety formed by the oxidation of Mo overlayers in O2. Remarkably, recombinative CO desorption with Tp=700 K could be observed on the Rh nanoparticles covered by MoOzCy produced from pure Mo deposits by CO adsorption, too. In harmony with the promotional effect of MoOx overlayer found at high pressures, it is established that the dissociation of CO is maximal at 0.2-0.3 ML Mo coverage, attributed to the presence of active sites at the oxide-metal interface. The low desorption peak temperature (700 K) of associative CO desorption observed in the presence of MoOx and MoOzCy overlayers indicates a low activation energy for the reactions of Oa and Ca atoms, allowing high reaction rates for these intermediates. The MoOx species exerted both promotion and inhibition effects on CO adsorption at sub-monolayer coverages, but above 1 ML it completely suppressed the reactivity of rhodium layers towards CO, suggesting that its surface concentration is a critical factor.

  14. MgF2 prism/rhodium/graphene: efficient refractive index sensing structure in optical domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Akhilesh Kumar; Mishra, Satyendra Kumar

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical study of a noble surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based sensing probe has been carried out. The sensing probe consists of a magnesium fluoride (MgF2) prism with its base coated with rarely used noble metal rhodium (Rh) and a bio-compatible layer of graphene. The refractive indices (RIs) of the sensing medium vary from 1.33 to 1.36 refractive index unit (RIU). The thickness of Rh and the number of graphene layers have been optimized for maximum sensitivity in a constraint set by the detection accuracy (DA). For the operating wavelength of 632 nm, the optimized sensing probe Rh (12 nm)/graphene (single layer) demonstrates sensitivity of ~259 degree/RIU with corresponding DA of ~0.32 degree‑1 while for 532 nm of excitation, the optimized sensing probe Rh (12 nm)/graphene (three layer) exhibits sensitivity of ~240 degree/RIU and DA of ~0.27 degree‑1.

  15. MgF2 prism/rhodium/graphene: efficient refractive index sensing structure in optical domain.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Akhilesh Kumar; Mishra, Satyendra Kumar

    2017-04-12

    A theoretical study of a noble surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based sensing probe has been carried out. The sensing probe consists of a magnesium fluoride (MgF2) prism with its base coated with rarely used noble metal rhodium (Rh) and a bio-compatible layer of graphene. The refractive indices (RIs) of the sensing medium vary from 1.33 to 1.36 refractive index unit (RIU). The thickness of Rh and the number of graphene layers have been optimized for maximum sensitivity in a constraint set by the detection accuracy (DA). For the operating wavelength of 632 nm, the optimized sensing probe Rh (12 nm)/graphene (single layer) demonstrates sensitivity of ~259 degree/RIU with corresponding DA of ~0.32 degree(-1) while for 532 nm of excitation, the optimized sensing probe Rh (12 nm)/graphene (three layer) exhibits sensitivity of ~240 degree/RIU and DA of ~0.27 degree(-1).

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Silylation of Acetophenone Derivatives: Formation of Silyl Enol Ethers versus Silyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Karin; Lalrempuia, Ralte; Polo, Víctor; Fernández-Alvarez, Francisco J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2016-10-04

    A series of rhodium-NSiN complexes (NSiN=bis (pyridine-2-yloxy)methylsilyl fac-coordinated) is reported, including the solid-state structures of [Rh(H)(Cl)(NSiN)(PCy3 )] (Cy=cyclohexane) and [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] (coe=cis-cyclooctene). The [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)]-catalyzed reaction of acetophenone with silanes performed in an open system was studied. Interestingly, in most of the cases the formation of the corresponding silyl enol ether as major reaction product was observed. However, when the catalytic reactions were performed in closed systems, formation of the corresponding silyl ether was favored. Moreover, theoretical calculations on the reaction of [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] with HSiMe3 and acetophenone showed that formation of the silyl enol ether is kinetically favored, while the silyl ether is the thermodynamic product. The dehydrogenative silylation entails heterolytic cleavage of the Si-H bond by a metal-ligand cooperative mechanism as the rate-determining step. Silyl transfer from a coordinated trimethylsilyltriflate molecule to the acetophenone followed by proton transfer from the activated acetophenone to the hydride ligand results in the formation of H2 and the corresponding silyl enol ether.

  17. Synthesis of colloidal dispersions of rhodium nanoparticles under high temperatures and high pressures.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masafumi; Abe, Daisuke; Kimura, Yoshifumi

    2005-12-01

    Colloidal dispersions of rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of Rh ions (III) in high-temperature and high-pressure water, ethanol, or water-ethanol mixture under the existence of the protective polymer of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone). The possibility of the regulation of the particle size and size distribution has been tested under several solvents at various temperatures and pressures. At 473 K and 25 MPa, particularly, concentrated colloidal dispersions of Rh particles of 2.5+/-0.5 nm were synthesized from the ionic solution of ethanol ([Rh]=15 mM) within a few seconds. Dilute colloidal dispersions of Rh particles were also synthesized from the dilute ionic solution ([Rh]=1.5 mM) with a diameter of 2.0+/-0.4 nm. From the water solution, Rh particles tended to form aggregates, especially for the lower concentration solution. In the case of solutions in water and ethanol mixture, the average diameter of Rh particles tended to be larger than in ethanol solution, and their distribution became broad.

  18. Carbon monoxide rich methanation kinetics on supported rhodium and nickel catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keehan, D.

    1988-08-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide reforming of methane in a solar-based Chemical Energy Transmission System (CETS) relies greatly upon the development of suitable catalysts for both the endothermic and exothermic reactions. Carbon dioxide reforming of methane produces hydrogen and carbon monoxide at a ratio of about one, thus requiring the methanation reaction on the other side of the closed loop CETS to utilize this feed. H/sub 2//CO ratios lower than three favor the formation of carbon with industrial methanation catalysts. Preliminary tests performed on methanation with rhodium and nickel catalysts produced two, 0.5% Rh/A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Ni/A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/, for further study. Kinetic experiments were conducted in an isothermal continuous stirred tank reactor constructed of a copper alloy which prevented carbon formation on reactor parts. These experiments were performed on pelleted 0.5% Rh/A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the 400 to 500 C range and pelleted 70% Ni/A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the 300 to 500 C temperature range. In most experiments steam was added to the reactor feed to inhibit carbon formation.

  19. Vapour phase hydrogenation of phenol over rhodium on SBA-15 and SBA-16.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Liliana; Bastidas-Barranco, Marlon; Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos

    2014-12-10

    In the present work, mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 were synthesised using classical methods, and their physicochemical properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, TEM and N2 adsorption-desorption. Rhodium (Rh, 1 wt %) was loaded on the mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 by an impregnation method. The Rh surface coverage, dispersion and crystallite size were determined by room temperature H2 chemisorption on reduced samples. The catalytic activity of Rh supported on mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 was evaluated for the first time in the hydrogenation of phenol in vapour phase in a temperature range between 130 and 270 °C at atmospheric pressure. The reaction over Rh/SBA-15 at 180 °C produced cyclohexanone as the major product (about 60%) along with lower amounts of cyclohexanol (about 35%) and cyclohexane (about 15%). The influences of temperature, H2/phenol ratio, contact time and the nature of the solvent on the catalytic performance were systematically investigated. The Rh/SBA-16 system offered lower phenol conversion compared to Rh/SBA-15, but both have a very high selectivity for cyclohexanone (above 60%).

  20. Nanofiltration of rhodium tris(triphenylphosphine) catalyst in ethyl acetate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Mustafa, Ahmad K.; Taha, Mohd F.

    2012-09-01

    Solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) using polymer membranes has recently received enhanced attention due to the search for cleaner and more energy-efficient technologies. The large size of the rhodium tris(triphenylphosphine) [HRh(CO)(PPh3)3] catalyst (>400 Da) - relative to other components of the hydroformylation reaction provides the opportunity for a membrane separation based on retention of the catalyst species while permeating the solvent. The compatibility of the solvent-polyimide membrane (DuraMem{trade mark, serif} 200 and DuraMem{trade mark, serif} 500) combinations was assessed in terms of the membrane stability in solvent plus non-zero solvent flux at 2.0 MPa. Good HRh(CO)(PPh3)3 rejection (>0.95) and solvent fluxes of 9.9 L/m2ṡh1 at 2.0 MPa were obtained in the catalyst-ethyl acetate-DuraMem 500 system. The effect of pressure and catalyst concentration on the solvent flux and catalyst rejection was conducted on the catalyst-ethyl acetate-membrane systems. Increasing pressure substantially improved both solvent flux and catalyst rejection, while increasing catalyst concentration was found to be beneficial in terms of substantial increases in catalyst rejection without significantly affecting solvent flux.

  1. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  2. Rh(III)-catalyzed addition of alkenyl C-H bond to isocyanates and intramolecular cyclization: direct synthesis 5-ylidenepyrrol-2(5H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Zhou, Bing; Yang, Yaxi; Feng, Huijin; Li, Yuanchao

    2013-04-19

    The rhodium-catalyzed addition of an alkenyl C-H bond to isocyanates via sp(2) C-H bond activation followed by an intramolecular cyclization is described. This atom-economic and catalytic reaction affords a simple and straightforward access to biologically relevant 5-ylidene pyrrol-2(5H)-ones and can be carried out under mild and neutral conditions in the absence of any additives and environmentally hazardous waste production.

  3. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Heterocycles and Related Substances Based on α-Imino Rhodium Carbene Complexes Derived from N-Sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Sun, Run; Tang, Xiang-Ying; Shi, Min

    2016-12-12

    In recent years, α-imino rhodium carbene complexes derived by ring-opening of N-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles have attracted much attention from organic chemists. Many transformations of these species have been reported that involve, in most cases, nucleophilic attack at the carbene center of the α-imino rhodium carbene, facilitating the synthesis of a wide range of novel and useful compounds, particularly heterocycles. This Minireview mainly focuses on advances in the transformation of N-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles during the past two years.

  4. Rhodium nanocatalysts stabilized by various bipyridine ligands in nonaqueous ionic liquids: influence of the bipyridine coordination modes in arene catalytic hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Léger, Bastien; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Olivier-Bourbigou, Hélène; Roucoux, Alain

    2008-10-06

    Rhodium nanoparticles stabilized by 2,2'-, 3,3'-, 4,4'-bipyridine ligands were prepared in various ionic liquids according to a chemical reduction approach. Zerovalent nanospecies in the size range of 2.0-2.5 nm were characterized. The nature of the bipyridine and its influence on the coordination environment of rhodium nanoparticles were investigated in various nonaqueous ionic liquids according to the cation and anion. The hydrogenation of various aromatic compounds by these colloidal suspensions was carried out at 80 degrees C and under 40 bar of H 2. A first structural explanation based on bipyridine coordination modes is proposed to justify the observed different activities.

  5. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of rhodium and iridium complexes of the chelating bis-sulfoxide tBuSOC2H4SOtBu. Selective O-H activation of 2-hydroxy-isopropyl-pyridine.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Thomas; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Radius, Udo; Milstein, David

    2008-07-21

    The chloro-bridged rhodium and iridium complexes [M2(BTSE)2Cl2] (M = Rh 1, Ir 2) bearing the chelating bis-sulfoxide tBuSOC2H4SOtBu (BTSE) were prepared by the reaction of [M2(COE)4Cl2] (M = Rh, Ir; COE = cyclooctene) with an excess of a racemic mixture of the ligand. The cationic compounds [M(BTSE)2][PF6] (M = Rh 3, Ir 4), bearing one S- and one O-bonded sulfoxide, were also obtained in good yields. The chloro-bridges in 2 can be cleaved with 2-methyl-6-pyridinemethanol and 2-aminomethyl pyridine, resulting in the iridium(I) complexes [Ir(BTSE)(Py)(Cl)] (Py = 2-methyl-6-pyridinemethanol 5, 2-aminomethyl-pyridine 6). In case of the bulky 2-hydroxy- isopropyl-pyridine, selective OH oxidative addition took place, forming the Ir(III)-hydride [Ir(BTSE)(2-isopropoxy-pyridine)(H)(Cl)] 7, with no competition from the six properly oriented C-H bonds. The cationic rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds [M(BTSE)(2-aminomethyl-pyridine)][X] (M = Rh 8, Ir 10), [Rh(BTSE)(2-hydroxy- isopropyl-pyridine)][X] 9(stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding), [Ir(BTSE)(pyridine)2][PF6] 12, [Ir(BTSE)(alpha-picoline)2][PF6] 13, and [Rh(BTSE)(1,10-phenanthroline)][PF6] 14 were prepared either by chloride abstraction from the dimeric precursors or by replacement of the labile oxygen bonded sulfoxide in 3 or 4. Complex 14 exhibits a dimeric structure in the solid state by pi-pi stacking of the phenanthroline ligands.

  6. H 2 production from CH 4 decomposition: Regeneration capability and performance of nickel and rhodium oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, M. E.; Hori, C. E.; Fierro, J. L. G.; Goldwasser, M. R.; Griboval-Constant, A.

    Nickel-lanthanum (LaNiO 3) and nickel-rhodium-lanthanum (LaNi 0.95Rh 0.05O 3) perovskite-type oxide precursors were synthesized by different methodologies (co-precipitation, sol-gel and impregnation). They were reduced in an H 2 atmosphere to produce nickel and rhodium nanoparticles on the La 2O 3 substrate. All samples were tested in the catalytic decomposition of CH 4. Methane decomposed into carbon and H 2 at reaction temperatures as low as 450 °C-no other reaction products were observed. Conversions were in the range of 14-28%, and LaNi 0.95Rh 0.05O 3 synthesized by co-precipitation was the most active catalyst. All catalysts maintained sustained activity even after massive carbon deposition indicating that these deposits are of the nanotube-type, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reaction seems to occur in a way that a nickel or rhodium crystal face is always clean enough to expose sufficient active sites to make the catalytic process continue. The samples were subjected to a reduction-oxidation-reduction cycle and in situ analyses confirmed the stability of the perovskite structure. All diffraction patterns showed a phase change around 400 °C, due to reduction of LaNiO 3 to an intermediate La 2Ni 2O 5 structure. When the reduction temperatures reach 600 °C, this structure collapses through the formation of Ni 0 crystallites deposited on the La 2O 3. Under oxidative conditions, the perovskite system is recomposed with nickel re-entering the LaNiO 3 framework structure accounting for the regenerative capability of these solids.

  7. Rhodium fluorapatite catalyst for the synthesis of trisubstituted olefins via cross coupling of Baylis-Hillman adducts and arylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Kantam, M Lakshmi; Kumar, K B Shiva; Sreedhar, B

    2008-01-04

    Treatment of fluorapatite (prepared by incorporating basic species F(-) in apatite in situ by coprecipitation) with an aqueous solution of RhCl(3) resulted in rhodium-exchanged fluorapatite catalyst (RhFAP), which successfully promoted cross coupling of Baylis-Hillman adducts with arylboronic acids to yield trisubstituted olefins. A variety of arylboronic acids and Baylis-Hillman adducts were converted to the corresponding trisubstituted olefins, demonstrating the versatility of the reaction. The reaction is highly stereoselective. RhFAP was recovered quantitatively by simple filtration and reused with almost consistent activity.

  8. Rhodium(III)-triphenylphosphine complex with NNS donor thioether containing Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, spectra, electrochemistry and catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sujan; Sarkar, Deblina; Kundu, Subhankar; Roy, Puspendu; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    New rhodium(III)-triphenylphosphine complex, [Rh(PPh3)(L)Cl2](PF6) (1) with thioether containing NNS donor ligand (L) (L = 2-(methylthio)-N-((pyridine-2-yl)methylene)benzenamine) has been synthesized and characterized. The pseudo octahedral geometry of the complex has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray analysis. The electronic structure, redox properties, absorption and emission properties of the complexes have been interpreted by DFT and TDDFT calculations. The complex effectively catalyzed the transfer hydrogenation reaction of ketones in 2-propanol and oxidation of alcohols in presence of NMO.

  9. Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Insertion of Carbenoid into Si-H: Efficient Access to Functional Chiral Silanes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Diao; Zhu, Dong-Xing; Xu, Ming-Hua

    2016-02-10

    The first rhodium(I)-catalyzed enantioselective Si-H insertion reaction of α-diazoesters and α-diazophosphonates has been developed. The use of a C1-symmetric chiral diene ligand enabled the asymmetric reaction to proceed under exceptionally mild conditions and give versatile chiral α-silyl esters and phosphonates with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee). The mechanism and stereochemical pathway of this novel Rh(I)-carbene-directed Si-H insertion was investigated by deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and DFT calculations.

  10. Double-Stereodifferentiation in Rhodium-Catalyzed [2 + 2 + 2] Cycloaddition: Chiral Ligand/Chiral Counterion Matched Pair.

    PubMed

    Augé, Mylène; Feraldi-Xypolia, Alexandra; Barbazanges, Marion; Aubert, Corinne; Fensterbank, Louis; Gandon, Vincent; Kolodziej, Emilie; Ollivier, Cyril

    2015-08-07

    The first enantioselective metal-catalyzed [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition involving a double asymmetric induction has been devised. It relies on the use of an in situ generated chiral cationic rhodium(I) catalyst with a matched chiral ligand/chiral counterion pair. Careful optimization of the catalytic system, as well as of the reaction conditions, led to atroposelective [2 + 2 + 2] pyridone cycloadducts with high ee's up to 96%. This strategy outperformed those previously described involving a chiral ligand only or a chiral counterion only.

  11. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Enantiotopic C-H Activation Enables Access to P-Chiral Cyclic Phosphinamides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Cramer, Nicolai

    2017-01-02

    Compounds with stereogenic phosphorus atoms are frequently used as ligands for transition-metal as well as organocatalysts. A direct catalytic enantioselective method for the synthesis of P-chiral compounds from easily accessible diaryl phosphinamides is presented. The use of rhodium(III) complexes equipped with a suitable atropochiral cyclopentadienyl ligand is shown to enable an enantiodetermining C-H activation step. Upon trapping with alkynes, a broad variety of cyclic phosphinamides with a stereogenic phosphorus(V) atom are formed in high yields and enantioselectivities. Moreover, these can be reduced enantiospecifically to P-chiral phosphorus(III) compounds.

  12. Surface Electrochemistry of Chloro(phthalocyaninato)rhodium(III) species, and Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis, Formation of a Dimeric Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-20

    rhodium(III) Species, and Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis , Formation of a Dimeric Species By Y.-H. Tse, P. Seymour, N. Kobayashi, H. Lam, C.C. Leznoff... Electrocatalysis , Formation of a Dimeric Species 12. PERSONAL AuTI𔃾OR(S)* Y.-H. Ise, P. Sey;mour, N. Kobayashi, H. Lam, C.C. Leznoff, and A.B.P. L...Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis . Formation of a Dimeric Species. Yu-Hong Tse, Penny Seymour, Nagao Kobayashi, 1 Herman Lam, Clifford C. Leznoff. and

  13. Thermodynamic properties of rhodium at high temperature and pressure by using mean field potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Priyank; Bhatt, Nisarg K.; Vyas, Pulastya R.; Gohel, Vinod B.

    2016-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of rhodium are studied up to melting temperature by incorporating anharmonic effects due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons. In order to account anharmonic effects due to lattice vibrations, we have employed mean field potential (MFP) approach and for thermally excited electrons Mermin functional. The local form of the pseudopotential with only one effective adjustable parameter rc is used to construct MFP and hence vibrational free energy due to ions - Fion. We have studied equation of state at 300 K and further, to access the applicability of present conjunction scheme, we have also estimated shock-Hugoniot and temperature along principle Hugoniot. We have carried out the study of temperature variation of several thermophysical properties like thermal expansion (βP), enthalpy (EH), specific heats at constant pressure and volume (CP and CV), specific heats due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons ( and , isothermal and adiabatic bulk moduli (BT and Bs) and thermodynamic Gruneisen parameter (γth) in order to examine the inclusion of anharmonic effects in the present study. The computed results are compared with available experimental results measured by using different methods and previously obtained theoretical results using different theoretical philosophy. Our computed results are in good agreement with experimental findings and for some physical quantities better or comparable with other theoretical results. We conclude that local form of the pseudopotential used accounts s-p-d hybridization properly and found to be transferable at extreme environment without changing the values of the parameter. Thus, even the behavior of transition metals having complexity in electronic structure can be well understood with local pseudopotential without any modification in the potential at extreme environment. Looking to the success of present scheme (MFP + pseudopotential) we would like to extend it further for the

  14. Base-catalyzed insertion of dioxygen into rhodium-hydrogen bonds: kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Szajna-Fuller, Ewa; Bakac, Andreja

    2010-02-01

    The reaction between molecular oxygen and rhodium hydrides L(OH)RhH(+) (L = (NH(3))(4), trans-L(1), and cis-L(1), where L(1) = cyclam) in basic aqueous solutions rapidly produces the corresponding hydroperoxo complexes. Over the pH range 8 < pH < 12, the kinetics exhibit a first order dependence on [OH(-)]. The dependence on [O(2)] is less than first order and approaches saturation at the highest concentrations used. These data suggest an attack by OH(-) at the hydride with k = (1.45 +/- 0.25) x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) for trans-L(1)(OH)RhH(+) at 25 degrees C, resulting in heterolytic cleavage of the Rh-H bond and formation of a reactive Rh(I) intermediate. A competition between O(2) and H(2)O for Rh(I) is the source of the observed dependence on O(2). In support of this mechanism, there is a significant kinetic isotope effect for the initial step, L(1)(OH(D))RhH(D)(+) + OH(D)(-) k(1)/k(-1) L(1)(OH(D))Rh(I) + H(D)(2)O, k(1H)/k(1D) = 1.7, and k(-1H)/k(-1D) = 3.0. The activation parameters for k(1) for trans-L(1)(OH)RhH(+) are DeltaH(++) = 64.6 +/- 1.3 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS(++) = 40 +/-4 J mol(-1) K(-1).

  15. Iridium, platinum and rhodium baseline concentration in lichens from Tierra del Fuego (South Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Pino, Anna; Alimonti, Alessandro; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Bocca, Beatrice

    2010-10-06

    Lichen samples of Usnea barbata were used as possible biomonitors of the atmospheric background level of iridium (Ir), platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh) in the remote region of Tierra del Fuego (South Patagonia, Argentina). Lichens were collected in 2006 at 53 sites covering 7 different areas of the region (24 transplanted lichens of the northern region and 29 native lichen samples of the central-southern region). A microwave acidic digestion procedure was used to mineralize the samples and a sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method was developed to quantify the elements. The study of the influence of interferences on analyte signals and a quality control procedure were carried out. The analytical protocol was further applied to evaluate Ir, Pt and Rh bioaccumulation in lichens. The detection limits obtained were 0.010 ng g⁻¹, 0.013 ng g⁻¹ and 0.030 ng g⁻¹ for Ir, Pt and Rh, respectively. Recoveries at different fortification levels were between 96.3% and 106% and precision was 3.3% on average. The metals concentration (as dry weight) spanned the following ranges: Ir, <0.010-1.011 ng g⁻¹; Pt, 0.016-2.734 ng g⁻¹; and Rh, 0.063-1.298 ng g⁻¹. Data on 7 areas were similar suggesting that no specific source, for example traffic or anthropogenic activity, influenced directly the metal concentrations in Tierra del Fuego. Values detected are more likely influenced by the long-range atmospheric transport of these pollutants and, in comparison with densely populated areas in the world, they can represent the baseline for low impacted areas.

  16. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  17. Rhodium-Catalyzed Oxidative Benzannulation of N-Adamantyl-1-naphthylamines with Internal Alkynes via Dual C-H Bond Activation: Synthesis of Substituted Anthracenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Ji, Dingwei; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Arumugam, Natarajan; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Bao, Ming

    2016-09-02

    Rhodium-catalyzed oxidative benzannulation of N-adamantyl-1-naphthylamines with internal alkynes to produce highly substituted anthracenes in satisfactory to good yields was developed. The annulation reaction proceeded smoothly under mild conditions in the presence of [Cp*RhCl2]2 as the precatalyst and Cu(OAc)2 as the oxidant.

  18. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed allylic C-H bond amination. Synthesis of cyclic amines from ω-unsaturated N-sulfonylamines.

    PubMed

    Cochet, Thomas; Bellosta, Véronique; Roche, Didier; Ortholand, Jean-Yves; Greiner, Alfred; Cossy, Janine

    2012-11-11

    For the first time, intramolecular allylic amination was conducted using rhodium(III) according to an "inner-sphere" type mechanism with amines activated by only one electron-withdrawing group. The activation of C(sp(3))-H bonds was chemoselective and allows the access to a variety of substituted cyclic amines such as pyrrolidines and piperidines.

  19. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  20. A visible light responsive rhodium and antimony-codoped SrTiO3 powdered photocatalyst loaded with an IrO2 cocatalyst for solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Asai, Rikako; Nemoto, Hiroaki; Jia, Qingxin; Saito, Kenji; Iwase, Akihide; Kudo, Akihiko

    2014-03-07

    IrO2-loaded SrTiO3 doped with rhodium and antimony synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction splits water under visible light and simulated sunlight irradiation giving 0.1% of the apparent quantum yield at 420 nm. The response wavelength up to 500 nm is the longest among achieved photocatalytic water splitting with one-step photoexcitation.

  1. Elucidation of the resting state of a rhodium NNN-pincer hydrogenation catalyst that features a remarkably upfield hydride (1)H NMR chemical shift.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Mikko M; Zamora, Matthew T; MacNeil, Connor S; Knott, Jackson P; Hayes, Paul G

    2016-01-11

    Rhodium(I) alkene complexes of an NNN-pincer ligand catalyze the hydrogenation of alkenes, including ethylene. The terminal or resting state of the catalyst, which exhibits an unprecedentedly upfield Rh-hydride (1)H NMR chemical shift, has been isolated and a synthetic cycle for regenerating the catalytically active species has been established.

  2. Synthesis of Multifunctionalized 2-Carbonylpyrrole by Rhodium-Catalyzed Transannulation of 1-Sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazole with β-Diketone.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wanli; Tang, Yanhua; Xu, Ze-Feng; Li, Chuan-Ying

    2016-12-02

    A facile rhodium-catalyzed transannulation of 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles with β-diketones was realized, and a series of multisubstituted 2-carbonylpyrroles were synthesized efficiently (up to 94% yield). The protocol features several advantages, such as readily available materials, mild reaction conditions, a concise operating procedure, a broad reaction scope, and excellent regioselectivity when benzoylacetone derivatives were used.

  3. Diastereoselective access to polyoxygenated polycyclic spirolactones through a rhodium-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition reaction: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Rodier, Fabien; Rajzmann, Michel; Parrain, Jean-Luc; Chouraqui, Gaëlle; Commeiras, Laurent

    2013-02-11

    The synthetic utility of γ-alkylidenebutenolides is demonstrated as highly competent dipolarophile partners in both intra- and intermolecular rhodium(II)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions. The strength of this approach lies in the formation of spiro[6,4]lactone moieties with the concomitant construction of quaternary spiro stereocenters. Typically, the construction of spirolactones involves an esterification step, which has often been reported as a "biosynthetic pathway", and often occurs either as or near to the final step of a total synthesis. Furthermore, a convergent and versatile route is reported for the formation of the (5,7) skeleton of molecules that were isolated from the Schisandra genus. Computational studies were performed to provide an overall picture of the mechanism of the intermolecular [3+2] cycloaddition between 2-diazo-1,3-ketoester and protoanemonin and to rationalize the empirical observations. In particular, we have demonstrated for the first time that the rhodium center plays an important role during the cyclization step itself and reacts with the dipolarophile as a complex with the ylide.

  4. Reversed reactivity of anilines with alkynes in the rhodium-catalysed C–H activation/carbonylation tandem

    PubMed Central

    Midya, Siba P.; Sahoo, Manoj K.; Landge, Vinod G.; Rajamohanan, P. R.; Balaraman, Ekambaram

    2015-01-01

    Development of multicatalytic approach consisting of two or more mechanistically distinct catalytic steps using a single-site catalyst for rapid and straightforward access of structurally complex molecules under eco-benign conditions has significance in contemporary science. We have developed herein a rhodium-catalysed C–H activation strategy which uses an unprotected anilines and an electron-deficient alkynes to C–C bonded products as a potential intermediate in contrast to the archetypical C–N bonded products with high levels of regioselectivity. This is followed by carbonylation of C–H bond activated intermediate and subsequent annulation into quinolines has been described. This rhodium-catalysed auto-tandem reaction operates under mild, environmentally benign conditions using water as the solvent and CO surrogates as the carbonyl source with the concomitant generation of hydrogen gas. The strategy may facilitate the development of new synthetic protocols for the efficient and sustainable production of chemicals in an atom-economic way from simple, abundant starting materials. PMID:26486182

  5. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has

  6. Synthesis, structure, DNA/protein binding, and cytotoxic activity of a rhodium(III) complex with 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine.

    PubMed

    Esteghamat-Panah, Roya; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Simpson, Jim; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Abyar, Fatemeh

    2017-02-15

    A new mononuclear rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(bzimpy)Cl3] (bzimpy = 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of the complex was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, emission titration, and viscosity measurement in order to evaluate the possible DNA-binding mode and to calculate the corresponding DNA-binding constant. The results reveal that the Rh(III) complex interacts with DNA through groove binding mode with a binding affinity on the order of 10(4). In addition, the binding of the Rh(III) complex to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by UV-Vis and fluorescence emission spectroscopy at different temperatures. The mechanism of the complex interaction was found to be static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy data show that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds play a major role in the binding of the Rh(III) complex to BSA. For the comparison of the DNA- and BSA-binding affinities of the free bzimpy ligand with its Rh(III) complex, the absorbance titration and fluorescence quenching experiments of the free bzimpy ligand with DNA and BSA were carried out. Competitive experiments using eosin Y and ibuprofen as site markers indicated that the complex was mainly located in the hydrophobic cavity of site I of the protein. These experimental results were confirmed by the results of molecular docking. Finally, the in vitro cytotoxicity properties of the Rh(III) complex against the MCF-7, K562, and HT-29 cell lines were evaluated and compared with those of the free ligand (bzimpy). It was found that the complexation process improved the anticancer activity significantly.

  7. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  8. Reactivity of rhodium(I) complexes bearing nitrogen-containing ligands toward CH3I: synthesis and full characterization of neutral cis-[RhX(CO)2(L)] and acetyl [RhI(μ-I)(COMe)(CO)(L)]2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Romain J; Nguyen, Duc Hanh; Ladeira, Sonia; Le Berre, Carole; Serp, Philippe; Kalck, Philippe

    2012-08-20

    The neutral rhodium(I) square-planar complexes [RhX(CO)(2)(L)] [X = Cl (3), I (4)] bearing a nitrogen-containing ligand L [diethylamine (a), triethylamine (b), imidazole (c), 1-methylimidazole (d), pyrazole (e), 1-methylpyrazole (f), 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (g)] are straightforwardly obtained from L and [Rh(μ-X)(CO)(2)](2) [X = Cl (1), I (2)] precursors. The synthesis is extended to the diethylsulfide ligand h for 3h and 4h. According to the CO stretching frequency of 3 and 4, the ranking of the electronic density on the rhodium center follows the order b > a ≈ d > c > g > f ≈ h > e. The X-ray molecular structures of 3a, 3d-3f, 4a, and 4d-4f were determined. Results from variable-temperature (1)H and (13)C{(1)H} NMR experiments suggest a fluxional associative ligand exchange for 4c-4h and a supplementary hydrogen-exchange process in 4e and 4g. The oxidative addition reaction of CH(3)I to complexes 4c-4g affords the neutral dimeric iodo-bridged acetylrhodium(III) complexes [RhI(μ-I)(COCH(3))(CO)(L)](2) (6c-6g) in very good isolated yields, whereas 4a gives a mixture of neutral 6a and dianionic [RhI(2)(μ-I)(COCH(3))(CO)][NHMeEt(2)](2) and 4h exclusively provides the analogue dianionic complex with [SMeEt(2)](+) as the counterion. X-ray molecular structures for 6d(2) and 6e reveal that the two apical CO ligands are in mutual cis positions, as are the two apical d and e ligands, whereas isomer 6d(1) is centrosymmetric. Further reactions of 6d and 6e with CO or ligand e gave quantitatively the monomeric complexes [RhI(2)(COCH(3))(CO)(2)(d)] (7d) and [RhI(2)(COCH(3))(CO)(e)(2)] (8e), respectively, as confirmed by their X-ray structures. The initial rate of CH(3)I oxidative addition to 4 as determined by IR monitoring is dependent on the nature of the nitrogen-containing ligand. For 4a and 4h, reaction rates similar to those of the well-known rhodium anionic [RhI(2)(CO)(2)](-) species are observed and are consistent with the formation of this intermediate species

  9. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  10. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  11. Carboxylic acids as traceless directing groups for the rhodium(III)-catalyzed decarboxylative C-H arylation of thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Zhao, Huaiqing; Zhang, Min; Su, Weiping

    2015-03-16

    A rhodium(III)-catalyzed carboxylic acid directed decarboxylative C-H/C-H cross-coupling of carboxylic acids with thiophenes has been developed. With a slight adjustment of the reaction conditions based on the nature of the substrates, aryl carboxylic acids with a variety of substituents could serve as suitable coupling partners, and a broad variety of functional groups were tolerated. This method provides straightforward access to biaryl scaffolds with diverse substitution patterns, many of which have conventionally been synthesized through lengthy synthetic sequences. An illustrative example is the one-step gram-scale synthesis of a biologically active 3,5-substituted 2-arylthiophene by way of the current method.

  12. Study of activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2011-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the 103Rh(d,x) 100,101,103Pd, 100g,101m,101g,102m,102gRh and 103gRu reactions were determined up to 40 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions of the contributing reactions were calculated using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. From the measured cross-sections and previous data, activation curves were deduced to support thin layer activation (TLA) on rhodium and Rh containing alloys.

  13. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-05

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  14. Mechanism, reactivity, and regioselectivity in rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening reactions of oxabicyclic alkenes: a DFT Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zheng-Hang; Zhang, Yi; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Xing-Wang; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the enantio- and regioselectivity of ring-opening reaction of oxabicyclic alkenes catalyzed by rhodium/Josiphos has been examined using M06-2X density functional theory(DFT). DFT calculations predict a 98% ee for the enantioselectivity and only the 1,2-trans product as one regio- and diastereomer, in excellent agreement with experimental results. The solvent tetrahydrofuran(THF) plays a key role in assisting nucleophilic attack. Orbital composition analysis of the LUMO and the NPA atomic charge calculations were conducted to probe the origins of the regioselectivity. The orbital composition analysis reveals two potential electrophilic sites of the Rh–π-allyl intermediate M3 and the NPA atomic charges demonstrate that Cα carries more positive charges than Cγ, which suggests that Cα is the electrophilic site. PMID:28074930

  15. Rhodium/Silver Synergistic Catalysis in Highly Enantioselective Cycloisomerization/Cross Coupling of Keto-Vinylidenecyclopropanes with Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song; Rui, Kang-Hua; Tang, Xiang-Ying; Xu, Qin; Shi, Min

    2017-04-07

    A rhodium/silver synergistic catalysis has been established, enabling cycloisomerization/cross coupling of keto-vinylidenecyclopropanes with terminal alkynes toward the regio- and enantioselective formation of diversified tetrahydropyridin-3-ol tethered 1,4-enynes in good yields and high ee values. In this synergistic catalysis, Rh(I) and Ag(I) catalysts selectively activate keto-VDCP substrates and terminal alkynes to generate -allyl Rh(III) complex of oxa-rhodacyclic intermediate and Ag alkynyl intermediate, respectively. The rapid transmetalation of alkynyl groups from Ag to Rh is proposed to play a key role to realize the regioselective cleavage of distal bond of the three-membered ring in this transformation.

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Chiral Spiro-9-silabifluorenes by Dehydrogenative Silylation: Mechanistic Insights into the Construction of Tetraorganosilicon Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masahito; Takeuchi, Yutaro; Yamauchi, Kanae; Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-18

    Mechanistic insight into the construction of quaternary silicon chiral centers by rhodium-catalyzed synthesis of spiro-9-silabifluorenes through dehydrogenative silylation is reported. The C2 -symmetric bisphosphine ligand, BINAP, was effective in controlling enantioselectivity, and axially chiral spiro-9-silabifluorenes were obtained in excellent yields with high enantiomeric excess. Monitoring of the reaction revealed the presence of a monohydrosilane intermediate as a mixture of two constitutional isomers. The reaction proceeded through two consecutive dehydrogenative silylations, and the absolute configuration was determined in the first silylative cyclization. Competitive reactions with electron-rich and electron-deficient dihydrosilanes indicated that the rate of silylative cyclization increased with decreasing electron density on the silicon atom of the starting dihydrosilane. Further investigation disclosed a rare interconversion between the two constitutional isomers of the monohydrosilane intermediate with retention of the absolute configuration.

  17. A Monofunctional Platinum Complex Coordinated to a Rhodium Metalloinsertor Selectively Binds Mismatched DNA in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh—O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA non-classically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors. PMID:26397309

  18. Synthesis and application of Amberlite xad-4 functionalized with alizarin red-s for preconcentration and adsorption of rhodium (III)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A new chelating resin was prepared by coupling Amberlite XAD-4 with alizarin red-s through an azo spacer, characterized by infra-red spectroscopy and thermal analysis and studied for Rh(III) preconcentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for rhodium monitoring in the environment. The optimum pH for sorption of the metal ion was 6.5. The sorption capacity was found 2.1 mg/g of resin for Rh(III). A recovery of 88% was obtained for the metal ion with 1.5 M HCl as eluting agent. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed by adsorption and desorption times of Rh(III) on modified resin. Scat chard analysis revealed that the homogeneous binding sites were formed in the polymers. The linear regression equation was Q/C = –1.3169Q + 27.222 (R2 = 0.9239), for Rh were formed in the SPE sorbent,Kd and Qmax for the affinity binding sites were calculated to be 0.76 μmol/mL and 20.67 μmol/g, respectively. The equilibrium data and parameters of Rh(III) adsorption on modified resin were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Redlich–Peterson models. The experimental adsorption isotherm was in good concordance with Langmuir and Freundlich models (R2 > 0.998) and based on the Langmuir isotherm the maximum amount of adsorption (qmax) was 4.842 mg/g. The method was applied for rhodium ions determination in environmental samples. with high recovery (>80%). PMID:23369526

  19. A DFT based investigation into the electronic structure and properties of hydride rich rhodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Brayshaw, Simon K; Green, Jennifer C; Hazari, Nilay; Weller, Andrew S

    2007-05-14

    Density functional theory has been used to investigate the structures, bonding and properties of a family of hydride rich late transition metal clusters of the type [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](x) (x = 0, +1, +2, +3 or +4), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(16)](x) (x = +1 or +2) and [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](x) (x = 0, +1 or +2). The positions of the hydrogen atoms around the pseudo-octahedral Rh(6) core in the optimized structures of [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](x) (x = 0, +1, +2, +3 or +4) varied depending on the overall charge on the cluster. The number of semi-bridging hydrides increased (semi-bridging hydrides have two different Rh-H bond distances) as the charge on the cluster increased and simultaneously the number of perfectly bridging hydrides (equidistant between two Rh centers) decreased. This distortion maximized the bonding between the hydrides and the metal centers and resulted in the stabilization of orbitals related to the 2T(2g) set in a perfectly octahedral cluster. In contrast, the optimized structures of the 16-hydride clusters [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](x) (x = +1 or +2) were similar and both clusters contained an interstitial hydride, along with one terminal hydride, ten bridging hydrides and two coordinated H(2) molecules which were bound to two rhodium centers in an eta(2):eta(1)-fashion. All the hydrides were on the outside of the Rh(6) core in the lowest energy structures of the 14-hydride clusters [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)] and [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](+), which both contained eleven bridging hydrides, one terminal hydride and one coordinated H(2) molecule. Unfortunately, the precise structure of [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](2+) could not be determined as structures both with and without an interstitial hydride were of similar energy. The reaction energetics for the uptake and release of two molecule of H(2) by a cycle consisting of [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](2+), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(16)](2+), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](+), [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(12)](+) and [Rh(6)(PH(3))(6)H(14)](2+) were modelled

  20. Monodisperse colloidal metal particle from nonaqueous solutions: catalytic behavior in hydrogenation of but-1-ene of platinum, palladium, and rhodium particles supported on pumice

    SciTech Connect

    Boutonnet, M.; Kizling, J.; Mintsa-Eya, V.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Maire, G.; Stenius, P.

    1987-01-01

    Metal catalysts have been prepared by depositing monodisperse particles of platinum (2-3 nm), rhodium (2-3 nm), or palladium (5 nm) prepared in reversed micellar solutions on pumice. The particles are well dispersed on the support whereas particles deposited from aqueous or alcoholic solution give large aggregates. The catalytic properties of these different catalysts in the deuteration, isomerization, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange of but-1-ene have been compared. The activities calculated per metal surface atom are similar. However, platinum prepared from microemulsions show unusually high selectivity in the isomerization reaction, and for such particles dehydrogenated species are active in the exchange reaction. The specificity of rhodium and palladium catalysts is independent of the mode of preparation. The reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  1. Partitioning of rhodium and ruthenium between Pd-Rh-Ru and (Ru,Rh)O2 solid solutions in high-level radioactive waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Toru; Ohira, Toshiaki; Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    The partitioning of rhodium and ruthenium between Pd-Rh-Ru alloy with a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure and (Ru,Rh)O2 solid solution has been investigated between 1273 and 1573 K at atmospheric oxygen fugacity. The rhodium and ruthenium contents in FCC increase, while the RhO2 content in (Ru,Rh)O2 decreases with increasing temperature due to progressive reduction of the system. Based on the experimental results and previously reported thermodynamic data, the thermodynamic mixing properties of FCC phase and (Ru,Rh)O2 have been calibrated in an internally consistent manner. Phase equilibrium of platinum grope metals in an HLW glass was calculated by using the obtained thermodynamic parameters.

  2. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds.

  3. Hydrogen generation from water/methanol under visible light using aerogel prepared strontium titanate (SrTiO3) nanomaterials doped with ruthenium and rhodium metals.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yenting; Klabunde, Kenneth J

    2012-07-27

    Nanostructured strontium titanate visible-light-driven photocatalysts containing rhodium and ruthenium were synthesized by a modified aerogel synthesis using ruthenium chloride and rhodium nitrate as dopant precursors, and titanium isopropoxide and strontium metal as the metal sources. The well-defined crystalline SrTiO(3) structure was confirmed by means of x-ray diffraction. After calcination at 500 °C, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy shows an increase in light absorption at 370 nm due to the presence of Rh(3 + ); however an increase of the calcination temperature to 600 °C led to a decrease in intensity, probably due to a loss of surface area. An increase in the rhodium doping level also led to an increase in absorption at 370 nm; however, the higher amounts of dopant lowered the photocatalytic activity. The modified aerogel synthesis allows greatly enhanced H(2) production performance from an aqueous methanol solution under visible light irradiation compared with lower surface area conventional materials. We believe that this enhanced activity is due to the higher surface areas while high quality nanocrystalline materials are still obtained. Furthermore, the surface properties of these nanocrystalline aerogel materials are different, as exhibited by the higher activities in alkaline solutions, while conventional materials (obtained via high temperature solid-state synthesis methods) only exhibit reasonable hydrogen production in acidic solutions. Moreover, an aerogel synthesis approach gives the possibility of thin-film formation and ease of incorporation into practical solar devices.

  4. Time-Resolved, In Situ DRIFTS/EDE/MS Studies on Alumina-Supported Rhodium Catalysts: Effects of Ceriation and Zirconiation on Rhodium–CO Interactions**

    PubMed Central

    Kroner, Anna B; Newton, Mark A; Tromp, Moniek; Roscioni, Otello M; Russell, Andrea E; Dent, Andrew J; Prestipino, Carmelo; Evans, John

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ceria and zirconia on the structure–function properties of supported rhodium catalysts (1.6 and 4 wt % Rh/γ-Al2O3) during CO exposure are described. Ceria and zirconia are introduced through two preparation methods: 1) ceria is deposited on γ-Al2O3 from [Ce(acac)3] and rhodium metal is subsequently added, and 2) through the controlled surface modification (CSM) technique, which involves the decomposition of [M(acac)x] (M=Ce, x=3; M=Zr, x=4) on Rh/γ-Al2O3. The structure–function correlations of ceria and/or zirconia-doped rhodium catalysts are investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy/energy-dispersive extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy/mass spectrometry (DRIFTS/EDE/MS) under time-resolved, in situ conditions. CeOx and ZrO2 facilitate the protection of Rh particles against extensive oxidation in air and CO. Larger Rh core particles of ceriated and zirconiated Rh catalysts prepared by CSM are observed and compared with Rh/γ-Al2O3 samples, whereas supported Rh particles are easily disrupted by CO forming mononuclear Rh geminal dicarbonyl species. DRIFTS results indicate that, through the interaction of CO with ceriated Rh particles, a significantly larger amount of linear CO species form; this suggests the predominance of a metallic Rh phase. PMID:25044889

  5. Ionic liquid ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for preconcentration of trace amounts of rhodium prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Molaakbari, Elaheh; Mostafavi, Ali; Afzali, Daryoush

    2011-01-30

    In this article, we consider ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of rhodium from aqueous samples and show that this is a fast and reliable sample pre-treatment for the determination of rhodium ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Rh(III) was transferred into its complex with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylamino phenol as a chelating agent, and an ultrasonic bath with the ionic liquid, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide at room temperature was used to extract the analyte. The centrifuged rhodium complex was then enriched in the form of ionic liquid droplets and prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, 300 μL ethanol was added to the ionic liquid-rich phase. Finally, the influence of various parameters on the recovery of Rh(III) was optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 4.0-500.0 ng mL(-1), the detection limit was 0.37 ng mL(-1) (3S(b)/m, n = 7) and the relative standard deviation was ±1.63% (n = 7, C = 200 ng mL(-1)). The results show that ionic liquid based ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, is a rapid, simple, sensitive and efficient analytical method for the separation and determination of trace amounts of Rh(III) ions with minimum organic solvent consumption.

  6. A heterojunction photocatalyst composed of zinc rhodium oxide, single crystal-derived bismuth vanadium oxide, and silver for overall pure-water splitting under visible light up to 740 nm.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryoya; Takashima, Toshihiro; Tanigawa, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Shugo; Ohtani, Bunsho; Irie, Hiroshi

    2016-10-12

    We recently reported the synthesis of a solid-state heterojunction photocatalyst consisting of zinc rhodium oxide (ZnRh2O4) and bismuth vanadium oxide (Bi4V2O11), which functioned as hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) evolution photocatalysts, respectively, connected with silver (Ag). Polycrystalline Bi4V2O11 (p-Bi4V2O11) powders were utilized to form ZnRh2O4/Ag/p-Bi4V2O11, which was able to photocatalyze overall pure-water splitting under red-light irradiation with a wavelength of 700 nm (R. Kobayashi et al., J. Mater. Chem. A, 2016, 4, 3061). In the present study, we replaced p-Bi4V2O11 with a powder obtained by pulverizing single crystals of Bi4V2O11 (s-Bi4V2O11) to form ZnRh2O4/Ag/s-Bi4V2O11, and demonstrated that this heterojunction photocatalyst had enhanced water-splitting activity. In addition, ZnRh2O4/Ag/s-Bi4V2O11 was able to utilize nearly the entire range of visible light up to a wavelength of 740 nm. These properties were attributable to the higher O2 evolution activity of s-Bi4V2O11.

  7. Dinuclear pyridine-4-thiolate-bridged rhodium and iridium complexes as ditopic building blocks in molecular architecture.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Gómez-Bautista, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Albert; Miranda, José R; Orduña-Marco, Guillermo; Oro, Luis A; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Rossell, Oriol; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J

    2014-02-03

    A series of dinuclear pyridine-4-thiolate (4-Spy)-bridged rhodium and iridium compounds [M(μ-4-Spy)(diolef)]2 [diolef = 1,5-cyclooctadiene (cod), M = Rh (1), Ir (2); diolef = 2,5-norbornadiene (nbd), M = Rh (3)] were prepared by the reaction of Li(4-Spy) with the appropriate compound [M(μ-Cl)(diolef)]2 (M = Rh, Ir). The dinuclear compound [Rh(μ-4-Spy)(CO)(PPh3)]2 (4) was obtained by the reaction of [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh3)] (acac = acetylacetonate) with 4-pySH. Compounds 1-4 were assessed as metalloligands in self-assembly reactions with the cis-blocked acceptors [M(cod)(NCCH3)2](BF4) [M = Rh (a), Ir (b)] and [M(H2O)2(dppp)](OTf)2 [M = Pd (c), Pt (d); dppp = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane]. The homometallic hexanuclear metallomacrocycles [{M2(μ-4-Spy)2(cod)2}2{M(cod)}2](BF4)2 (M = Rh [(1a)2], Ir [(2b)2]) and the heterometallic hexanuclear metallomacrocycles [{Rh2(μ-4-Spy)2(cod)2}2{Ir(cod)}2](BF4)2 [(1b)2], [{Rh2(μ-4-Spy)2(cod)2}2{M'(dppp)}2](OTf)4 (M' = Pd [(1c)2], Pt [(1d)2]), and [{Ir2(μ-4-Spy)2(cod)2}2{M'(dppp)}2](OTf)4 (M' = Pd [(2c)2], Pt [(2d)2]) were obtained. NMR spectroscopy in combination with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to elucidate the nature of the metalloligands and their respective supramolecular assemblies. Most of the synthesized species were found to be nonrigid in solution, and their fluxional behavior was studied by variable-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy. An X-ray diffraction study of the assemblies (1a)2 and (1d)2 revealed the formation of rectangular (9.6 Å × 6.6 Å) hexanuclear metallomacrocycles with alternating dinuclear (Rh2) and mononuclear (Rh or Pt) corners. The hexanuclear core is supported by four pyridine-4-thiolate linkers, which are bonded through the thiolate moieties to the dinuclear rhodium units, exhibiting a bent-anti arrangement, and through the peripheral pyridinic nitrogen atoms to the mononuclear corners.

  8. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; ...

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distancesmore » determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction of the catalytic properties of numerous supported metal complexes, as summarized in detail here.« less

  9. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distances determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction

  10. Rhodium-doped barium titanate perovskite as a stable p-type semiconductor photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution under visible light.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-12

    Rhodium-doped barium titanate (BaTiO3:Rh) powder was prepared by the polymerized complex (PC) method, and the photocatalytic activity for H2 evolution from water was examined. BaTiO3 is a wide-gap n-type semiconductor having a band gap of 3.0 eV. Doping Rh species into the lattice of BaTiO3 resulted in the formation of new absorption bands in visible light region. Upon visible light (λ > 420 nm), BaTiO3:Rh modified with nanoparticulate Pt as a water reduction promoter was capable of producing H2 from water containing an electron donor such as methanol and iodide. The best material prepared by the PC method exhibited higher activity than that made by a conventional solid-state reaction method. Visible-light-driven Z-scheme water splitting was also accomplished using Pt/BaTiO3:Rh as a building block for H2 evolution in combination with PtOx-loaded WO3 as an O2 evolution photocatalyst in the presence of an IO3(-)/I(-) shuttle redox mediator. Photoelectrochemical analysis indicated that a porous BaTiO3:Rh electrode exhibited cathodic photoresponse due to water reduction in a neutral aqueous Na2SO4 solution upon visible light.

  11. Domino rhodium/palladium-catalyzed dehydrogenation reactions of alcohols to acids by hydrogen transfer to inactivated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Trincado, Mónica; Grützmacher, Hansjörg; Vizza, Francesco; Bianchini, Claudio

    2010-03-01

    The combination of the d(8) Rh(I) diolefin amide [Rh(trop(2)N)(PPh(3))] (trop(2)N=bis(5-H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5-yl)amide) and a palladium heterogeneous catalyst results in the formation of a superior catalyst system for the dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols. The overall process represents a mild and direct method for the synthesis of aromatic and heteroaromatic carboxylic acids for which inactivated olefins can be used as hydrogen acceptors. Allyl alcohols are also applicable to this coupling reaction and provide the corresponding saturated aliphatic carboxylic acids. This transformation has been found to be very efficient in the presence of silica-supported palladium nanoparticles. The dehydrogenation of benzyl alcohol by the rhodium amide, [Rh]N, follows the well established mechanism of metal-ligand bifunctional catalysis. The resulting amino hydride complex, [RhH]NH, transfers a H(2) molecule to the Pd nanoparticles, which, in turn, deliver hydrogen to the inactivated alkene. Thus a domino catalytic reaction is developed which promotes the reaction R-CH(2)-OH+NaOH+2 alkene-->R-COONa+2 alkane.

  12. Adsorption of Ruthenium, Rhodium and Palladium from Simulated High-Level Liquid Waste by Highly Functional Xerogel - 13286

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Takashi; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    Fission products are generated by fission reactions in nuclear fuel. Platinum group (Pt-G) elements, such as palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh) and ruthenium (Ru), are also produced. Generally, Pt-G elements play important roles in chemical and electrical industries. Highly functional xerogels have been developed for recovery of these useful Pt-G elements from high - level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW). An adsorption experiment from simulated HLLW was done by the column method to study the selective adsorption of Pt-G elements, and it was found that not only Pd, Rh and Ru, but also nickel, zirconium and tellurium were adsorbed. All other elements were not adsorbed. Adsorbed Pd was recovered by washing the xerogel-packed column with thiourea solution and thiourea - nitric acid mixed solution in an elution experiment. Thiourea can be a poison for automotive exhaust emission system catalysts, so it is necessary to consider its removal. Thermal decomposition and an acid digestion treatment were conducted to remove sulfur in the recovered Pd fraction. The relative content of sulfur to Pd was decreased from 858 to 0.02 after the treatment. These results will contribute to design of the Pt-G element separation system. (authors)

  13. Characteristics of rhodium-iron resistance thermometers and interpolation properties from 0.65 K to 24.5561 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusby, R. L.; Tew, W. L.

    2013-09-01

    Resistance thermometers using wires of rhodium with 0.5 mol % of iron (Rh-Fe thermometers or RIRTs) were first made by H Tinsley & Co in 1969 for applications at low temperatures, below the range where standard platinum resistance thermometers can be used, and down to 0.5 K or lower. They were investigated at NPL and found to have good sensitivity and excellent stability. Subsequently RIRTs have been used as the standard thermometers which record and compare the results of experiments in thermometry particularly below 24.5561 K, the triple-point of neon. From 1969 until the early 2000s, when Tinsley ceased to manufacture them, several hundred RIRTs were made and many were calibrated at NPL, NIST and elsewhere. In order to document the resistance-temperature characteristics of the production, and indicate the variability from batch to batch, the present paper analyses representative data for the resistance at the triple-point of water and the low-temperature calibrations of a number of thermometers produced at various times. The opportunity has been taken to include data for three RIRTs which were made independently, two in Russia and one in China.

  14. Organometallic rhodium(III) and iridium(III) cyclopentadienyl complexes with curcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin co-ligands.

    PubMed

    Pettinari, Riccardo; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Condello, Francesca; Petrini, Agnese; Scopelliti, Rosario; Riedel, Tina; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-12-21

    A series of half-sandwich cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) and iridium(III) complexes of the type [Cp*M(curc/bdcurc)Cl] and [Cp*M(curc/bdcurc)(PTA)][SO3CF3], in which Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, curcH = curcumin and bdcurcH = bisdemethoxycurcumin as O^O-chelating ligands, and PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane, is described. The X-ray crystal structures of three of the complexes, i.e. [Cp*Rh(curc)(PTA)][SO3CF3] (5), [Cp*Rh(bdcurc)(PTA)][SO3CF3] (6) and [Cp*Ir(bdcurc)(PTA)][SO3CF3] (8), confirm the expected "piano-stool" geometry. With the exception of 5, the complexes are stable under pseudo-physiological conditions and are moderately cytotoxic to human ovarian carcinoma (A2780 and A2780cisR) cells and also to non-tumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, but lack the cancer cell selectivity observed for related arene ruthenium(II) complexes.

  15. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  16. Octahedral rhodium(III) complexes as kinase inhibitors: Control of the relative stereochemistry with acyclic tridentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Mollin, Stefan; Riedel, Radostan; Harms, Klaus; Meggers, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Octahedral metal complexes are attractive structural templates for the design of enzyme inhibitors as has been demonstrated, for example, with the development of metallo-pyridocarbazoles as protein kinase inhibitors. The octahedral coordination sphere provides untapped structural opportunities but at the same time poses the drawback of dealing with a large number of stereoisomers. In order to address this challenge of controlling the relative metal-centered configuration, the synthesis of rhodium(III) pyridocarbazole complexes with facially coordinating acyclic tridentate ligands was investigated. A strategy for the rapid synthesis of such complexes is reported, the diastereoselectivities of these reactions were investigated, the structure of several complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography, the high kinetic stability of such complexes in thiol-containing solutions was demonstrated in (1)H-NMR experiments, and the protein kinase inhibition ability of this class of complexes was confirmed. It can be concluded that the use of multidentate ligands is currently maybe the most practical strategy to avoid a large number of possible stereoisomers in the course of exploiting octahedral coordination spheres as structural templates for the design of bioactive molecules.

  17. Rhodium Complexes Promoting C-O Bond Formation in Reactions with Oxygen: The Role of Superoxo Species.

    PubMed

    Vilella-Arribas, Laia; García-Melchor, Max; Balcells, David; Lledós, Agustí; López, José A; Sancho, Sofía; Villarroya, B Eva; Del Río, M Pilar; Ciriano, Miguel A; Tejel, Cristina

    2017-01-28

    C-O bond formation in reactions of olefins with oxygen is a long standing challenge in chemistry for which the very complicated-sometimes controversial-mechanistic panorama slows down the design of catalysts for oxygenations. In this regard, the mechanistic details of the oxidation of the complex [Rh(cod)(Ph2 N3 )] (1) (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) with oxygen to the unique 2-rhodaoxetane compound [{Rh(OC8 H12 )(Ph2 N3 )}2 ] (2) has been investigated by DFT calculations. The results of this study provide evidences for a novel bimetallic mechanism in which two rhodium atoms redistribute the four electrons involved in the cleavage of the O=O bond. Furthermore, both oxygen atoms are used to create two new C-O bonds in a controlled fashion with 100 % atom economy. The key intermediates that we have found in this process are a mononuclear open-shell triplet superoxo compound, an open-shell singlet "μ-(peroxo)" derivative, and a closed-shell singlet "bis(μ-oxo)" complex. Some of the findings are used to predict the reactions of Rh(I) complexes with oxygen, exemplified by that of the complex [Rh(cod)(OnapyMe2 )] (3). Starting from 3, [{Rh(OC8 H12 )(OnapyMe2 )}2 ] (4) has been prepared and characterized, which represents the second example of a 2-rhodaoxetane compound coming from an oxygenation reaction with oxygen.

  18. Inhibition of endonuclease cleavage and DNA replication of E. coli plasmid by the antitumor rhodium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Masudur; Yasuda, Hachiro; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2007-08-01

    Binding effect of the antitumor complex rhodium(II) acetate [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4)] (Rh1) to the plasmid pUC19 DNA has been studied under different molar ratio of Rh1 compound to base pair of pUC19 DNA (R(f)) and reaction time. The Rh1 binding inhibited the activity of restriction enzyme. The binding effect was monitored using gel electrophoresis. The results indicate that at least one Rh1 binds with the recognition sequence and the binding has no preference between A-T and G-C pairs. At high value of R(f)=100, ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) measurement confirmed that 46% of Rh1 binds to DNA. PCR amplification of the DNA was also inhibited by the Rh1 binding. The transformation experiment using Escherichia coli suggested that the cell growth was inhibited after binding the Rh1 to the plasmid. These results indicated that DNA synthesis could be inhibited both in vitro and in vivo by the Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4) binding.

  19. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  20. Determination of rhodium by resonance light-scattering technique coupled with solid phase extraction using Rh(III) ion-imprinted polymers as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Zhang, Ting; Tan, Wenxiang; Liu, Peng; Ding, Zhongtao; Cao, Qiue

    2013-02-15

    A resonance light-scattering method (RLS) for the determination of Rh(III) was initially developed, based on the reaction among Rh(III), WO4(2-) and ethylrhodamine B. The method possesses high sensitivity, but lacks selectivity. Therefore, a Rh(III) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP), prepared by precipitation polymerization using 2-(allylthio)nicotinic acid (ANA) as functional monomer, was used as sorbent to construct a ion-imprint based solid-phase extraction (IIP-SPE) method for separation of rhodium from complicated matrices prior to its determination by RLS. The experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and selectivity of IIP-SPE were studied carefully. Under the optimal conditions, the IIP-SPE column with the enrichment factor (EF) of 10 could be used at least 20 times without decreasing its extraction recovery (above 90%) significantly. The calibration graph for the determination of rhodium by RLS coupled with IIP-SPE procedure was linear in the range of 0.06-1.5 ng mL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.024 ng mL(-1). There is no metal ions tested at the concentration below 10 ng mL(-1) interfered in the determination of 0.8 ng mL(-1) Rh(III). The proposed IIP-SPE-RLS method was successfully applied to the extraction and measurement of trace rhodium in catalyst, water and geochemical samples with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (n=4).

  1. Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing (N^N and N^O) bound chloroquine analogue ligands: synthesis, characterization and antimalarial properties.

    PubMed

    Ekengard, Erik; Kumar, Kamlesh; Fogeron, Thibault; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Haukka, Matti; Monari, Magda; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2016-03-07

    The synthesis and characterization of twenty new pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing N^N and N^O-chelating chloroquine analogue ligands are described. The in vitro antimalarial activity of the new ligands as well as the complexes was evaluated against the chloroquine sensitive (CQS) NF54 and the chloroquine resistant (CQR) Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The antimalarial activity was found to be good to moderate; although all complexes are less active than artesunate, some of the ligands and complexes showed better activity than chloroquine (CQ). In particular, rhodium complexes were found to be considerably more active than iridium complexes against the CQS NF54 strain. Salicylaldimine Schiff base ligands having electron-withdrawing groups (F, Cl, Br, I and NO2) in para position of the salicyl moiety and their rhodium complexes showed good antiplasmodial activity against both the CQS-NF54 and the CQR-Dd2 strains. The crystal structures of (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)} chlororhodium(III) chloride and (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(4-chloro-2-(((2-((7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenolate)}chlororhodium(III) chloride are reported. The crystallization of the amino-pyridyl complex (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride in acetone resulted in the formation of the imino-pyridyl derivative (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N1-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N2-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride, the crystal structure of which is also reported.

  2. Rhodium-Catalyzed Atroposelective [2 + 2 + 2] Cycloaddition of Ortho-Substituted Phenyl Diynes with Nitriles: Effect of Ortho Substituents on Regio- and Enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Kenichi; Teraoka, Kota; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Shibata, Yu; Tanaka, Ken

    2016-05-06

    Axially chiral 3-(2-halophenyl)pyridines were successfully synthesized in high yields with excellent enantioselectivity by the cationic rhodium(I)/(S)-H8-BINAP complex-catalyzed atroposelective [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition of (o-halophenyl)diynes with nitriles. Interestingly, regio- and enantioselectivity highly depend on ortho substituents on the phenyl group of diynes. When the ortho substituents were methoxy and methoxycarbonyl groups, axially chiral 3-arylpyridines were obtained as a major product, while enantioselectivity was lowered significantly. On the other hand, when the ortho substituents were alkyl groups, regioselectivity was switched to give achiral 6-arylpyridines in high yields.

  3. Zeolite-supported Metal Complexes of Rhodium and of Ruthenium: a General Synthesis Method Influenced by Molecular Sieving Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, I.; Chen, C; Gates , B

    2010-01-01

    A general method for synthesis of supported metal complexes having a high degree of uniformity is presented, whereby organometallic precursors incorporating acetylacetonate (C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}{sup -}, acac) ligands react with zeolites incorporating OHgroups near Al sites. The method is illustrated by the reactions of Rh(acac)(CO){sub 2} and of cis-Ru(acac){sub 2}({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} with zeolites slurried in n-pentane at room temperature. The zeolites were H-Beta, H-SSZ-42, H-Mordenite, and HZSM-5. Infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of the zeolites incorporating rhodium complexes indicate the formation of Rh(CO){sub 2}{sup +} bonded near Al sites; similar results have been reported for the formation of zeolite-supported Rh({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sup 2+} from Rh(acac)({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}. IR spectra of the supported rhodiumgem-dicarbonyls include sharp, well-resolved {nu}{sub CO} bands, demonstrating that the sites surrounding each metal complex are nearly equivalent. The frequencies of the {nu}{sub CO} bands show how the composition of the zeolite influences the bonding of the supported species, demonstrating subtle differences in the roles of the zeolite as ligands. When the zeolite has pore openings larger than the critical diameter of the precursor organometallic compound, the latter undergoes facile transport into the interior of the zeolite, so that a uniform distribution of the supported species results, but when the precursors barely fit through the zeolite apertures, the mass transport resistance is significant and the supported metal complexes are concentrated near the pore mouths.

  4. Rhodium catalyzed oxidative coupling of salicylaldehydes with diazabicyclic olefins: a one pot strategy involving aldehyde C-H cleavage and π-allyl chemistry towards the synthesis of fused ring chromanones.

    PubMed

    Jijy, E; Prakash, Praveen; Shimi, M; Pihko, Petri M; Joseph, Nayana; Radhakrishnan, K V

    2013-08-25

    An efficient one pot strategy for the synthesis of cyclopentene fused chromanone derivatives through the direct oxidative coupling of salicylaldehydes with bicyclic olefins in the presence of a rhodium-copper catalyst system is described. This is the first report on the ring opening-ring closing of bicyclic hydrazines via metal catalyzed oxidative coupling reaction.

  5. Improved antiparasitic activity by incorporation of organosilane entities into half-sandwich ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Muneebah; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Land, Kirkwood M; Liu, Nicole; Hopper, Melissa; Hsiao, Allyson; Burgoyne, Andrew R; Stringer, Tameryn; Meyer, Mervin; Wiesner, Lubbe; Chibale, Kelly; Smith, Gregory S

    2015-02-07

    A series of ferrocenyl- and aryl-functionalised organosilane thiosemicarbazone compounds was obtained via a nucleophilic substitution reaction with an amine-terminated organosilane. The thiosemicarbazone (TSC) ligands were further reacted with either a ruthenium dimer [(η(6-i)PrC6H4Me)Ru(μ-Cl)Cl]2 or a rhodium dimer [(Cp*)Rh(μ-Cl)Cl]2 to yield a series of cationic mono- and binuclear complexes. The thiosemicarbazone ligands, as well as their metal complexes, were characterised using NMR and IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The molecular structure of the binuclear ruthenium(ii) complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The thiosemicarbazones and their complexes were evaluated for their in vitro antiplasmodial activities against the chloroquine-sensitive (NF54) and chloroquine-resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum strains, displaying activities in the low micromolar range. Selected compounds were screened for potential β-haematin inhibition activity, and it was found that two Rh(iii) complexes exhibited moderate to good inhibition. Furthermore, the compounds were screened for their antitrichomonal activities against the G3 Trichomonas vaginalis strain, revealing a higher percentage of growth inhibition for the ruthenium and rhodium complexes over their corresponding ligand.

  6. Realistic energy surfaces for real-world systems: an IMOMO CCSD(T):DFT scheme for rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation with the 6-DPPon ligand.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Urs; Himmel, Daniel; Meuwly, Markus; Breit, Bernhard

    2013-11-25

    The hydroformylation of terminal alkenes is one of the most important homogeneously catalyzed processes in industry, and the atomistic understanding of this reaction has attracted enormous interest in the past. Herein, the whole catalytic cycle for rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation with the 6-diphenylphosphinopyridine-(2H)-1-one (6-DPPon) ligand 1 was studied. This catalytic transformation is challenging to describe computationally, since two requirements must be met: 1) changes in the hydrogen-bond network must be modeled accurately and 2) bond-formation/bond-breaking processes in the coordination sphere of the rhodium center must be calculated accurately. Depending on the functionals used (BP86, B3LYP), the results were found to differ strongly. Therefore, the complete cycle was calculated by using highly accurate CCSD(T) computations for a PH3 model ligand. By applying an integrated molecular orbital plus molecular orbital (IMOMO) method consisting of CCSD(T) as high level and DFT as low-level method, excellent agreement between the two functionals was achieved. To further test the reliability of the calculations, the energetic-span model was used to compare experimentally derived and computed activation barriers. The accuracy of the new IMOMO method apparently makes it possible to predict the catalytic potential of real-world systems.

  7. A DFT study of the role of water in the rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation of acetone.

    PubMed

    Polo, Victor; Schrock, Richard R; Oro, Luis A

    2016-11-24

    The positive effect of the addition of water to acetone hydrogenation by [RhH2(PR3)2S2](+) catalysts has been studied by DFT calculations. The studied energetic profiles reveal that the more favourable mechanistic path involves a hydride migration to the ketone followed by a reductive elimination that is assisted by two water molecules.

  8. Essentially Molecular Metal Complexes Anchored to Zeolite: Synthesis and Characterization of Rhodium Complexes and Ruthenium Complexes Prepared from Rh(acac)(2-C2H4)2 and cis-Ru(acac)2( -C2H4)2

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, I.; Gates, B

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear complexes of rhodium and of ruthenium, Rh(acac)({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} and cis-Ru(acac)2({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} (acac = C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}{sup -}), were used as precursors to synthesize metal complexes bonded to zeolite {beta}. Infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra show that the species formed from Rh(acac)({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} was Rh({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +}, which was bonded to the zeolite at aluminum sites via two Rh-O bonds. Reaction of this supported rhodium complex with CO gave the supported rhodium gem-dicarbonyl Rh(CO){sub 2}{sup +}, which was characterized by two {nu}{sub CO} bands in the IR spectrum, at 2048 and 2115 cm{sup -1}, that were sharp (fwhm of 2115-cm{sup -1} band = 5 cm{sup -1}), indicating a high degree of uniformity of the supported species. Nearly the same result was observed (Liang, A. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 8460) for the isostructural rhodium complex supported on dealuminated HY zeolite, which was characterized by frequencies of the {nu}{sub CO} bands that were 4 and 2 cm{sup -1}, respectively, greater than those characterizing the zeolite {beta}-supported complex. This comparison indicates that the Rh atoms in Rh({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +} anchored on zeolite {beta} were slightly more electron-rich than those on zeolite Y. This inference is supported by EXAFS results showing shorter Rh-C bonds in the zeolite {beta}-supported rhodium ethene complex than in the zeolite Y-supported rhodium ethene complex. In contrast to these supported rhodium complexes, the zeolite {beta}-supported ruthenium samples were shown by IR and EXAFS spectroscopies to consist of mixtures of mononuclear ruthenium complexes with various numbers of acac ligands; when CO reacted with the supported ruthenium complexes, the resultant ruthenium carbonyls were characterized by {nu}{sub CO} spectra characteristic of both

  9. A chiral rhodium carboxamidate catalyst for enantioselective C-H amination.

    PubMed

    Zalatan, David N; Du Bois, J

    2008-07-23

    Rh2(S-nap)4, a chiral dirhodium tetracarboxamidate complex, has been developed and shown to be an effective catalyst for the asymmetric, intramolecular C-H amination of sulfamate esters. Enantiomeric excesses range from 60-99% for a collection of disparately substituted 3-arylpropylsulfamates. In addition, Rh2(S-nap)4 is found to promote chemoselective allylic C-H oxidation of unsaturated sulfamates, a property not observed with other dirhodium complexes tested to date.

  10. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, C; Silwana, B; Iwuoha, E; Somerset, V

    2012-01-01

    Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent assessments of aquatic samples have shown increased levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in aquatic ecosystems, caused by automobile exhaust emissions and mining activities. The development of an analytical sensor for the detection and characterisation of PGMs were investigated, since there is an ongoing need to find new sensing materials with suitable recognition elements that can respond selectively and reversibly to specific metal ions in environmental samples. The work reported shows the successful application of another mercury-free sensor electrode for the determination of platinum group metals in environmental samples. The work reported in this study entails the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bismuth film for the determination of platinum (Pt(2+)), palladium (Pd(2+)) or rhodium (Rh(2+)) by means of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Optimised experimental conditions included composition of the supporting electrolyte, complexing agent concentration, deposition potential, deposition time and instrumental voltammetry parameters for Pt(2+), Pd(2+) and Rh(2+) determination. Adsorptive differential pulse stripping voltammetric measurements for PGMs were performed in the presence of dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as complexing agent. The glassy carbon bismuth film electrode (GC/BiFE) employed in this study exhibit good and reproducible sensor characteristics. Application of GC/BiFE sensor exhibited well-defined peaks and highly linear behaviour for the stripping analysis of the PGMs in the concentration range between 0 and 3.5 μg/L. The detection limit of Pd, Pt and Rh was found to be 0.12 μg/L, 0.04 μg/L and 0.23 μg/L, respectively for the deposition times of 90 s (Pd) and 150 s (for both Pt and Rh). Good

  11. Chiral Ligands for Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydroformylation: A Personal Account.

    PubMed

    Chen, Caiyou; Dong, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-12-01

    Asymmetric hydroformylation represents one of the most efficient routes for the preparation of chiral aldehydes from alkenes in the presence of syngas in a perfect atom-economic way. During the past few decades, a variety of chiral ligands have been developed for the asymmetric hydroformylation. However, only a few ligands exhibit good performance in terms of the regio- and enantioselectivities. Additionally, for the chiral ligands developed up to now, only limited substrates were tolerated and no examples have led to the application of the asymmetric hydroformylation reaction on a commercial scale due to several technical challenges. This account provides a brief introduction of the current efficient chiral ligands for asymmetric hydroformylation and the ongoing efforts we have made in this field.

  12. Intercalation of rhodium complex hydrogenation catalysts and organo-silanes in layered silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Raythatha, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    (Rh(NBO)(Diphos))/sup +/ where NBD = norbornadiene and Diphos = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane intercalated in hectorite, a swelling layered silicate, catalyze the overall 1,2 and 1,4 addition of hydrogen to 1,3-butadiene, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene and 2,3-dimehtyl-1,3-butadiene at rates which range from < 10/sup -5/ to 0.83 relative to the homogeneous catalyst. The yields of the 1,2 addition products are 1.5 to 2.3 times higher than those obtained under homogeneous conditions. The catalysis of the reduction of 1-hexene in methanol with the intercalated catalysts occurs without isomerization up to 69% conversion of substrate, whereas extensive isomerization of internal olefin was observed with analogous catalyst system in homogeneous solution. The difference in specificity between the intercalated and homogeneous catalyst is accounted for by the effect of catalyst intercalation on the equilibrium between RhH/sub 2//sup 2 +/ and RhH/sup 2 +/ complexes and a hydrogen ion. The behavior of the catalyst was explained on the basis of surface Broensted acidity of the RhH/sub 2//sup 2 +/ complex. The initial rate of reduction of relatively small alkynes (1-hexyne, 2-hexyne), with a catalyst precursor of the type Rh(PPh/sub 3/)/sub x//sup +/ where PPh = triphenylphosphine and x = 1,2, in the interlayers swelled with methanol are comparable to those observed with heterogeneous catalyst. With large alkynes, the spatial requirements, of the substrates in the swelled interlayers are important in determining their reactivity with the intercalated catalyst. A binding model is proposed for the intercalated substrate-catalyst complex.

  13. Effect of support on iron promoted rhodium nanocatalysts for ethanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo Sanchez, Pamela Carolina

    Depleting fossil fuel sources coupled with the deleterious effects of petroleum-based fuel combustion have led to the development of sustainable ways for energy production. One alternative is the production of biofuels like ethanol. Ethanol's biggest advantages are its high energy density, biodegradability and carbon neutrality. A potential scalable process is the conversion of synthetic gas (syngas: CO, CO2, H 2) produced from gasification of biomass with the use of Rh-based catalysts. The work presented in this thesis aimed to study the effect of the introduction of 1, 5, and 10 wt % CeO2 into a TiO2 support on Fe promoted-Rh catalysts for ethanol production from CO hydrogenation. The mixed-oxide CeO2-TiO2 support was synthesized by a sol-gel method where Rh and Fe nanoparticles were deposited by wet incipient impregnation. Reactivity studies were carried under CO hydrogenation conditions with the use of gas chromatography. Characterization of the bare support and the catalyst that showed the best ethanol selectivity were performed by in-situ X-ray diffraction synchrotron experiments. Ethanol selectivity increases with ceria content with a shift on product distribution and CO conversion rates compared to Rh supported on single TiO2 and CeO2. This could be explained by a synergetic effect between CeO2 and TiO2 and to the to the formation of amorphous and mobile species of CeOx that can act as dispersing agents for the Rh particles increasing catalytic sites for CO insertion and for the stabilization of HCOx species. XRD characterization analysis of 10%CeO2-90%TiO2 identified three crystallographic phases: anatase, TiO2(B), and cerianite. The unpromoted 2%Rh/10%CeO2-90%TiO2 in-situ XRD analysis showed an absence of Rh0 under CO hydrogenation conditions. Conversely, the addition of Fe to the different mixed-oxide compositions showed comparable ethanol selectivity at the expense of methane formation. Therefore, the introduction of ceria into the titania support on

  14. Synthesis and crystal structure of the rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with bis(3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.; Shao, K.-J.; Xiao, Y.-C.; Pu, X.-J.; Zhu, B.; Jiang, M.-J.

    2015-12-15

    The rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with the bis(3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand [H{sub 2}B(Im{sup t}Bu){sup 2}]Rh(COD) C{sup 22}H{sup 36}BN{sup 4}Rh, has been prepared, and its crystal structure is determined by X-ray diffraction. Complex exhibits slightly distorted square planar configurations around the metal center, which is coordinated by the bidentate H{sup 2}B(Im{sup t}Bu){sub 2} and one cyclooctadiene group. The Rh–C{sub carbene} bond lengths are 2.043(4) and 2.074(4) Å, and the bond angle C–Rh1–C is 82.59°. The dihedral angle between two imidazol-2-ylidene rings is 67.30°.

  15. The role of fluctuations in bistability and oscillations during the H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} reaction on nanosized rhodium crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grosfils, P.; Gaspard, P.; Visart de Bocarmé, T.

    2015-08-14

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is presented of fluctuations observed by field ion microscopy in the catalytic reaction of water production on a rhodium tip. A stochastic approach is developed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the different phenomena observed in the experiment, including burst noise manifesting itself in a bistability regime, noisy oscillations, and nanopatterns with a cross-like oxidized zone separating the surface into four quadrants centered on the (111) facets. The study is based on a stochastic model numerically simulating the processes of adsorption, desorption, reaction, and transport. The surface diffusion of hydrogen is described as a percolation process dominated by large clusters corresponding to the four quadrants. The model reproduces the observed phenomena in the ranges of temperature, pressures, and electric field of the experiment.

  16. New ammonium surfactant-stabilized rhodium(0) colloidal suspensions: influence of novel counter-anions on physico-chemical and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Bilé, Elodie Guyonnet; Sassine, Rita; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Launay, Franck; Roucoux, Alain

    2011-06-28

    Novel anionic species, such as hydrogen carbonate (HCO(3)(−)), fluoride (F(−)), triflate (CF(3)SO(3)(−)), tetrafluoroborate (BF(4)(−)) and chloride (Cl(−)) were investigated as new partners of water soluble N,N-dimethyl-N-cetyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ammonium salts, used as a protective agent of rhodium colloids. The effect of the surfactant polar head on the micellar behavior, size and morphology of the nanospecies was studied by adapted physico-chemical experiments (surface tension measurements, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric and TEM analyses) and discussed in terms of strong or weak stabilization of the growing nanoparticles surface. Finally, the influence of the nanoenvironment generated by the surfactant with various counter-anions was evaluated via the hydrogenation of aromatics.

  17. Aqua-bis-(4-methyl-benzene-sulfonato-κO)(η(5)-penta-methyl-cyclo-penta-dien-yl)rhodium(III) monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Roy, Christopher P; Boyer, Pauline M; Merola, Joseph S

    2013-05-01

    The title half-sandwich rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(C10H15)(C7H7O3S)2(H2O)]·H2O, consists of a π-bonded penta-methyl-cyclo-penta-dienyl group, two σ-bonded tosyl-ate groups and an aqua ligand. The structure displays both inter- and intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonding results in an extended helical chain along a 21 screw axis parallel to c, due to hydrogen bonding from the coordinating water ligand to the lattice water mol-ecule and then to a sulfonate O atom of a different asymmetric unit.

  18. Colloidal stability, surface characterisation and intracellular accumulation of Rhodium(II) citrate coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in breast tumour: a promising platform for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Nunes, Eloiza; Carneiro, Marcella Lemos Brettas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Guirelli Simões; Báo, Sônia Nair; de Souza, Aparecido Ribeiro

    2013-06-01

    The colloidal stability of a rhodium(II) citrate, Rh2(H2cit)4, coating on the surface of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles was studied and compared in different dispersion media. The adsorption of Rh2(H2cit)4 at the water-maghemite interface was evaluated as a function of pH and complex concentration. A slight pH-dependent adsorption of the complex was observed with a maximum at pH 3. The colloidal stability of the functionalised nanoparticles with different amounts of Rh2(H2cit)4 as a function of pH was evaluated using dynamic light scattering measurements. The particles have a mean magnetic core size of 5.6 nm and the hydrodynamic diameters are approximately 60 nm, which remained unchanged in the pH range in which the samples were a stable sol. The tolerance to different dispersion media, which were deionised water, saline, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), foetal bovine serum (FBS) and NaCl solutions with different concentrations, was investigated. At moderate ionic strength, the colloidal stability of the dispersions was similar in saline and in PBS compared to the stability of dispersions diluted in water. Moreover, the intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles in 4T1 breast tumour was examined by ultrastructural analysis performed by transmission electron microscopy. The rhodium(II) citrate-coated nanoparticles were found mostly in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Thus, we suggest that these SPIO nanoparticles functionalized with Rh2(H2Cit)4 can be potential tools for anticancer therapy.

  19. Rh-catalyzed enantioselective conjugate addition of arylboronic acids with a dynamic library of chiral tropos phosphorus ligands.

    PubMed

    Monti, Chiara; Gennari, Cesare; Piarulli, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    A library of 19 chiral tropos phosphorus ligands, based on a free-to-rotate (tropos) biphenol unit and a chiral P-bonded alcohol (11 phosphites, 1-P(O)(2)O to 11-P(O)(2)O) or secondary amine (8 phosphoramidites, 12-P(O)(2)N to 19-P(O)(2)N), were screened, individually and in combinations of two, in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition of arylboronic acids to enones and enoates. High enantioselectivities (up to 99 % ee) and excellent yields were obtained in the addition to either cyclic or acyclic substrates. The flexible biphenolic P ligands outperformed the analogous rigid binaphtholic P ligands. Variable-temperature (31)P NMR studies revealed that the biphenolic ligands are tropos even at low temperature. Only below 190 K was a coalescence observed; upon further cooling, two atropisomers were detected. The Rh homocomplexes ([Rh(L(a))(2)](+)) were also studied: in general, a single doublet (P-Rh coupling) was observed in the case of the biphenolic phosphite ligands, over the temperature range 380-230 K, demonstrating their tropos nature in the rhodium complexes even at low temperatures. On the other hand, the phosphoramidites showed different behaviors depending on the structure of the ligand and on the nature of the rhodium source. The spectrum at 230 K of the mixture of [Rh(acac)(eth)(2)] (eth=C(2)H(4)) with phosphite 6-P(O)(2)O and phosphoramidite 19-P(O)(2)N (the most enantioselective ligand combination in the conjugate addition reaction) revealed the presence of four homocomplexes (total approximately 40 %: [Rh{6-P(O)(2)O}(2)], [Rh{(aR)-19-P(O)(2)N}(2)], [Rh{(aS)-19-P(O)(2)N}(2)], [Rh{(aR)-19-P(O)(2)N}{(aS)-19-P(O)(2)N}]) and one heterocomplex, [Rh{6-P(O)(2)O}{(aR)-19-P(O)(2)N}] (approximately 60 %) In the heterocomplex, the biphenol-derived phosphite is free to rotate (tropos) while the biphenol-derived phosphoramidite shows a temperature-dependent tropos/atropos behavior (coalescence temperature=310 K).

  20. Rh(III)-Catalyzed Cascade Annulation/C-H Activation of o-Ethynylanilines with Diazo Compounds: One-Pot Synthesis of Benzo[a]carbazoles via 1,4-Rhodium Migration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songjin; Yuan, Kai; Gu, Meng; Lin, Aijun; Yao, Hequan

    2016-10-05

    A Rh(III)-catalyzed cascade annulation/C-H activation of o-ethynylanilines with diazo compounds has been developed. This concise method allows for the rapid formation of a number of benzo[a]carbazoles in high yields, exhibiting good functional group tolerance and scalability. The key to the success of this approach involves one C-N bond and two C-C bond formation, and an aryl-to-aryl 1,4-rhodium migration.

  1. Determination of Ultra-trace Rhodium in Water Samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after Cloud Point Extraction Using 2-(5-Iodo-2-Pyridylazo)-5-Dimethylaminoaniline as a Chelating Agent.

    PubMed

    Han, Quan; Huo, Yanyan; Wu, Jiangyan; He, Yaping; Yang, Xiaohui; Yang, Longhu

    2017-03-24

    A highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) separation/preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium in water samples. A new reagent, 2-(5-iodo-2-pyridylazo)-5-dimethylaminoaniline (5-I-PADMA), was used as the chelating agent and the nonionic surfactant TritonX-114 was chosen as extractant. In a HAc-NaAc buffer solution at pH 5.5, Rh(III) reacts with 5-I-PADMA to form a stable chelate by heating in a boiling water bath for 10 min. Subsequently, the chelate is extracted into the surfactant phase and separated from bulk water. The factors affecting CPE were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.1-6.0 ng/mL, the detection limit was 0.023 ng/mL for rhodium and relative standard deviation was 3.67% (c = 1.0 ng/mL, n = 11).The method has been applied to the determination of trace rhodium in water samples with satisfactory results.

  2. Chlorido(dimethyl 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate-κ2N,N')(η5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) chloride 1-hydroxypyrrolidine-2,5-dione disolvate.

    PubMed

    Sivanesan, Dharmalingam; Kim, Hyung Min; Sungho, Yoon

    2013-06-01

    The title complex, [Rh(C10H15)Cl(C14H12N2O4)]Cl·2C4H5NO3, has been synthesized by a substitution reaction of the precursor [bis(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl) 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate]chlorido(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) chloride with NaOCH3. The Rh(III) cation is located in an RhC5N2Cl eight-coordinated environment. In the crystal, 1-hydroxypyrrolidine-2,5-dione (NHS) solvent molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with the Cl(-) counter-anions in the lattice and weak hydrogen bonds with the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*) ligands. Hydrogen bonding between the Cp* ligands, the NHS solvent molecules and the Cl(-) counter-anions form links in a V-shaped chain of Rh(III) complex cations along the c axis. Weak hydrogen bonds between the dimethyl 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate ligands and the Cl(-) counter-anions connect the components into a supramolecular three-dimensional network. The synthetic route to the dimethyl 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate-containing rhodium complex from the [bis(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl) 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylate]rhodium(III) precursor may be applied to link Rh catalysts to the surface of electrodes.

  3. Selective synthesis and characterization of single-site HY zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and their use as catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khivantsev, Konstantin

    Single-site Rh(CO)2, Rh(C2H4)2 and Rh(NO)2 complexes anchored on various dealuminated HY zeolites can be used as precursors for the selective surface mediated synthesis of well-defined site-isolated Rh(CO)(H)x complexes. DFT calculations and D 2 isotope exchange experiments provide strong evidence for the formation of a family of site isolated mononuclear rhodium carbonyl hydride complexes (including the first examples of RhH complexes with undissociated H2 ligands): Rh(CO)(H2), Rh(CO)(H)2, and Rh(CO)(H). The fraction of each individual complex formed varies significantly with the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite and the nature of the precursor used. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(CO)2 complexes are very active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. There is strong evidence for the cooperation mechanism between mononuclear rhodium complexes and Bronsted acid sites of the zeolite support in C-C bond formation process, as well as ethane formation. Finally, it is shown that the dimerization pathway selectivity can be progressively tuned (and completely switched off) by modifying the number of Bronsted acid sites on the zeolite surface. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(NO)2 complexes can be selectively formed upon exposure of Rh(CO)2/HY to the gas phase NO/He. They are structurally similar to Rh(CO)2/HY with Rh(I) retaining square planar geometry and nitrosyl ligands adopting a linear configuration. Rh(NO)2/HY30 is active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. This is the first unprecedented example of a supported transition-metal nitrosyl complex capable of performing a catalytic reaction. Moreover, this is the first example of a site-isolated Rh complex with ligands other than ethylene or carbonyl, which can catalyze both ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization. Unlike its dicarbonyl counterpart, dinitrosyl rhodium complex has a uniquely different reactivity towards ethylene and hydrogen

  4. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  6. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  7. Interception and characterization of catalyst species in rhodium bis(diazaphospholane)-catalyzed hydroformylation of octene, vinyl acetate, allyl cyanide, and 1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Eleanor R; Brezny, Anna C; Landis, Clark R

    2015-11-11

    In the absence of H2, reaction of [Rh(H) (CO)2(BDP)] [BDP = bis(diazaphospholane)] with hydroformylation substrates vinyl acetate, allyl cyanide, 1-octene, and trans-1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene at low temperatures and pressures with passive mixing enables detailed NMR spectroscopic characterization of rhodium acyl and, in some cases, alkyl complexes of these substrates. For trans-1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene, the stable alkyl complex is an η(3)-allyl complex. Five-coordinate acyl dicarbonyl complexes appear to be thermodynamically preferred over the four-coordinate acyl monocarbonyls at low temperatures and one atmosphere of CO. Under noncatalytic (i.e., no H2 present) reaction conditions, NMR spectroscopy reveals the kinetic and thermodynamic selectivity of linear and branched acyl dicarbonyl formation. Over the range of substrates investigated, the kinetic regioselectivity observed at low temperatures under noncatalytic conditions roughly predicts the regioselectivity observed for catalytic transformations at higher temperatures and pressures. Thus, kinetic distributions of off-cycle acyl dicarbonyls constitute reasonable models for catalytic selectivity. The Wisconsin high-pressure NMR reactor (WiHP-NMRR) enables single-turnover experiments with active mixing; such experiments constitute a powerful strategy for elucidating the inherent selectivity of acyl formation and acyl hydrogenolysis in hydroformylation reactions.

  8. Rhodium nanoparticle-modified screen-printed graphite electrodes for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in tea extracts in the presence of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Gatselou, Vasiliki A; Giokas, Dimothenis L; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Prodromidis, Mamas I

    2015-03-01

    In this work we describe the fabrication of nanostructured electrocatalytic surfaces based on polyethyleneimine (PEI)-supported rhodium nanoparticles (Rh-NP) over graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. Rh-NP, electrostatically stabilized by citrate anions, were immobilized over graphite SPEs, through coulombic attraction on a thin film of positively charged PEI. The functionalized sensors, polarized at 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl/3 M KCl, exhibited a linear response to H2O2 over the concentration range from 5 to 600 μmol L(-1) H2O2 in the presence of oxygen. The 3σ limit of detection was 2 μmol L(-1) H2O2, while the reproducibility of the method at the concentration level of 10 μmol L(-1) H2O2 (n=10) and between different sensors (n=4) was lower than 3 and 5%, respectively. Most importantly, the sensors showed an excellent working and storage stability at ambient conditions and they were successfully applied to the determination of H2O2 produced by autooxidation of polylphenols in tea extracts with ageing. Recovery rates ranged between 97 and 104% suggesting that the as-prepared electrodes can be used for the development of small-scale, low-cost chemical sensors for use in on-site applications.

  9. Hollow-shell-structured nanospheres: a recoverable heterogeneous catalyst for rhodium-catalyzed tandem reduction/lactonization of ethyl 2-acylarylcarboxylates to chiral phthalides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Jin, Ronghua; An, Juzeng; Zhao, Qiankun; Cheng, Tanyu; Liu, Guohua

    2014-05-01

    Chiral organorhodium-functionalized hollow-shell-structured nanospheres were prepared by immobilization of a chiral N-sulfonylated diamine-based organorhodium complex within an ethylene-bridged organosilicate shell. Structural analysis and characterization reveal its well-defined single-site rhodium active center, and transmission electron microscopy images reveal a uniform dispersion of hollow-shell-structured nanospheres. As a heterogenous catalyst, it exhibits excellent catalytic activity and enantioselectivity in synthesis of chiral phthalides by a tandem reduction/lactonization of ethyl 2-acylarylcarboxylates in aqueous medium. The high catalytic performance is attributed to the synergistic effect of the high hydrophobicity and the confined chiral organorhodium catalytic nature. The organorhodium-functionalized nanospheres could be conveniently recovered and reused at least 10 times without loss of catalytic activity. This feature makes it an attractive catalyst in environmentally friendly organic reactions. The results of this study offer a new approach to immobilize chiral organometal functionalities within the hollow-shell-structured nanospheres to prepare materials with high activity in heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis.

  10. Rhodium-coordinated poly(arylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(arylene-vinylene) copolymer acting as photocatalyst for visible-light-powered NAD⁺/NADH reduction.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Kerstin T; Gasiorowski, Jacek; Egbe, Daniel Ayuk Mbi; Kollender, Jan Philipp; Himmelsbach, Markus; Hassel, Achim Walter; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Knör, Günther

    2014-09-10

    A 2,2'-bipyridyl-containing poly(arylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(arylene-vinylene) polymer, acting as a light-harvesting ligand system, was synthesized and coupled to an organometallic rhodium complex designed for photocatalytic NAD(+)/NADH reduction. The material, which absorbs over a wide spectral range, was characterized by using various analytical techniques, confirming its chemical structure and properties. The dielectric function of the material was determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Photocatalytic reduction of nucleotide redox cofactors under visible light irradiation (390-650 nm) was performed and is discussed in detail. The new metal-containing polymer can be used to cover large surface areas (e.g. glass beads) and, due to this immobilization step, can be easily separated from the reaction solution after photolysis. Because of its high stability, the polymer-based catalyst system can be repeatedly used under different reaction conditions for (photo)chemical reduction of NAD(+). With this concept, enzymatic, photo-biocatalytic systems for solar energy conversion can be facilitated, and the precious metal catalyst can be recycled.

  11. A Standardized Interpolation of Temperature Using Rhodium-Iron Resistance Thermometers Over the Interval 4.2 K to 24.5 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tew, W. L.; Rusby, R. L.; Lin, P.; Lipinski, L.; Steur, P. P. M.; Ricketson, B. W. A.

    2015-08-01

    The worldwide history and present state of development of rhodium-iron resistance thermometers (RIRTs) is briefly reviewed. A standardized interpolation method using RIRTs with the nominal composition of 0.5 % Fe (by mole) is presented, with examples using data taken from 60 RIRTs made from a variety of wire batches and sources worldwide over the last 40 years. The parameterization exploits the favorable characteristics of the Cragoe reduced resistance and a suitably reduced temperature . A reference function which approximates the average characteristics of selected wire is derived for use over the interval 0.65 K to 24.5561 K on the ITS-90. The deviations of real RIRT data from this reference function are examined, and simple four-parameter Fourier-series solutions for the resulting deviation curves are presented. Despite the fact that the wire samples may be of different origins or state-of-anneal, it was found that the interpolations are successful for most of the samples studied over the 4.2 K to 24.5561 K interval, at the level of 1 standard uncertainty or less. This method would allow for calibrations of most RIRTs over this interval using only six calibration points, permitting an efficiency not achievable using the common least-squares curve-fitting calibration methods. The potential of this formalism for a standardized interpolation scheme using RIRTs is discussed.

  12. Toward new organometallic architectures: synthesis of carbene-centered rhodium and palladium bisphosphine complexes. stability and reactivity of [PC(BIm)PRh(L)][PF6] pincers.

    PubMed

    Plikhta, Andriy; Pöthig, Alexander; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Rieger, Bernhard

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we report the synthesis of a tridentate carbene-centered bisphosphine ligand precursor and its complexes. The developed four-step synthetic strategy of a new PC(BIm)P pincer ligand represents the derivatization of benzimidazole in the first and third positions by (diphenylphosphoryl)methylene synthone, followed by phosphine deprotection and subsequent insertion of a noncoordinating anion. The obtained ligand precursor undergoes complexation, with PdCl2 and [μ-OCH3Rh(COD)]2 smoothly forming the target organometallics [PC(BIm)PPdCl][PF6] and [PC(BIm)PRh(L)][PF6] under mild hydrogenation conditions. A more detailed study of the rhodium complexes [PC(BIm)PRh(L)][PF6] reveals significant thermal stability of the PC(BIm)PRh moiety in the solid state as well as in solution. The chemical behavior of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphinomethylene)benzimidazol-2-ylrhodium acetonitrile hexafluorophosphate has been screened under decarbonylation, hydrogenation, and hydroboration reaction conditions. Thus, the PC(BIm)PRh(I) complex is a sufficiently stable compound, with the potential to be applied in catalysis.

  13. Separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of rhodium using a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method and its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mirrahimi, Fateme; Taher, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method for the determination of low levels of rhodium (Rh) in environmental samples is needed. In the proposed method, an extracting solvent with a lower toxicity and density than the other solvents typically used in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was used to extract trace amounts of Rh from aqueous samples. Rh ions were complexed with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol in the pH range of 3.2-4.7 and extracted with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The type and volume of the extracting solvent and dispersive solvent, centrifugation time, pH, amount of the chelating agent, and sample ionic strength were carefully studied. Under the optimal conditions, the LOD and RSD were 0.36 ng/mL (3Sb/m, n = 7) and +/-2.0% (n = 7), respectively. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 4.0-800 ng/mL. The method was applied to the determination of Rh in well and tap water, and spiked recoveries were in the range of 96-103.7%.

  14. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  15. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  16. Rhodium-catalyzed [5 + 2 + 1] cycloaddition of ene-vinylcyclopropanes and CO: reaction design, development, application in natural product synthesis, and inspiration for developing new reactions for synthesis of eight-membered carbocycles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-08-18

    Practical syntheses of natural products and their analogues with eight-membered carbocyclic skeletons are important for medicinal and biological investigations. However, methods and strategies to construct the eight-membered carbocycles are limited. Therefore, developing new methods to synthesize the eight-membered carbocycles is highly desired. In this Account, we describe our development of three rhodium-catalyzed cycloadditions for the construction of the eight-membered carbocycles, which have great potential in addressing the challenges in the synthesis of medium-sized ring systems. The first reaction described in this Account is our computationally designed rhodium-catalyzed two-component [5 + 2 + 1] cycloaddition of ene-vinylcyclopropanes (ene-VCPs) and CO for the diastereoselective construction of bi- and tricyclic cyclooctenones. The design of this reaction is based on the hypothesis that the C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination of the eight-membered rhodacycle intermediate generated from the rhodium-catalyzed cyclopropane cleavage and alkene insertion, giving Wender's [5 + 2] cycloadduct, is not easy. Under CO atmosphere, CO insertion may occur rapidly, converting the eight-membered rhodacycle into a nine-membered rhodacycle, which then undergoes an easy C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination process and furnishes the [5 + 2 + 1] product. This hypothesis was supported by our preliminary DFT studies and also served as inspiration for the development of two [7 + 1] cycloadditions: the [7 + 1] cycloaddition of buta-1,3-dienylcyclopropanes (BDCPs) and CO for the construction of cyclooctadienones, and the benzo/[7 + 1] cycloaddition of cyclopropyl-benzocyclobutenes (CP-BCBs) and CO to synthesize the benzocyclooctenones. The efficiency of these rhodium-catalyzed cycloadditions can be revealed by the application in natural product synthesis. Two eight-membered ring-containing natural products, (±)-asterisca-3(15),6-diene and (+)-asteriscanolide, have been

  17. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  18. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  19. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  20. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Rhodium-Catalyzed Coupling of Benzamides with 2,2-Difluorovinyl Tosylate: Diverse Synthesis of Fluorinated Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Qiang; Zhang, Shang-Shi; Gao, Hui; Qi, Zisong; Zhou, Chu-Jun; Ji, Wei-Wei; Liu, Yao; Chen, Yunyun; Li, Qingjiang; Li, Xingwei; Wang, Honggen

    2017-03-08

    Fluorinated heterocycles play an important role in pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries. Herein, we report on the synthesis of four types of fluorinated heterocycles via rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H activation of arenes/alkenes and versatile coupling with 2,2-difluorovinyl tosylate. With N-OMe benzamide being a directing group (DG), the reaction delivered a monofluorinated alkene with the retention of the tosylate functionality. Subsequent one-pot acid treatment allowed the efficient synthesis of 4-fluoroisoquinolin-1(2H)-ones and 5-fluoropyridin-2(1H)-ones. When N-OPiv benzamides were used, however, [4 + 2] cyclization occurred to provide gem-difluorinated dihydroisoquinolin-1(2H)-ones. Synthetic applications have been demonstrated and the ready availability of both the arene and the coupling partner highlighted the synthetic potentials of these protocols. Mechanistically, these two processes share a common process involving N-H deprotonation, C-H activation, and olefin insertion to form a 7-membered rhodacycle. Thereafter, different reaction pathways featuring β-F elimination and C-N bond formation are followed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) studies. These two pathways are DG-dependent and led to the open chain and cyclization products, respectively. The mechanistic rationale was supported by detailed DFT studies. In particular, the origins of the intriguing selectivity in the competing β-F elimination versus C-N bond formation were elucidated. It was found that β-F elimination is a facile event and proceeds via a syn-coplanar transition state with a low energy barrier. The C-N bond formation proceeds via a facile migratory insertion of the Rh-C(alkyl) into the Rh(V) amido species. In both reactions, the migratory insertion of the alkene is turnover-limiting, which stays in good agreement with the experimental studies.

  2. Electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose by rhodium porphyrin-functionalized MWCNT electrodes: application to a fully molecular catalyst-based glucose/O2 fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Elouarzaki, Kamal; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael; Thery, Jessica; Cosnier, Serge

    2012-08-29

    This paper details the electrochemical investigation of a deuteroporphyrin dimethylester (DPDE) rhodium(III) ((DPDE)Rh(III)) complex, immobilized within a MWCNT/Nafion electrode, and its integration into a molecular catalysis-based glucose fuel cell. The domains of present (DPDE)Rh(I), (DPDE)Rh-H, (DPDE)Rh(II), and (DPDE)Rh(III) were characterized by surface electrochemistry performed at a broad pH range. The Pourbaix diagrams (plots of E(1/2) vs pH) support the stability of (DPDE)Rh(II) at intermediate pH and the predominance of the two-electron redox system (DPDE)Rh(I)/(DPDE)Rh(III) at both low and high pH. This two-electron system is especially involved in the electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols and was applied to the glucose oxidation. The catalytic oxidation mechanism exhibits an oxidative deactivation coupled with a reductive reactivation mechanism, which has previously been observed for redox enzymes but not yet for a metal-based molecular catalyst. The MWCNT/(DPDE)Rh(III) electrode was finally integrated in a novel design of an alkaline glucose/O(2) fuel cell with a MWCNT/phthalocyanin cobalt(II) (CoPc) electrode for the oxygen reduction reaction. This nonenzymatic molecular catalysis-based glucose fuel cell exhibits a power density of P(max) = 0.182 mW cm(-2) at 0.22 V and an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 0.64 V.

  3. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  4. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  5. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  6. Fused Lasso Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable using p covariates that are measured on n independent observations, in a setting in which additive, flexible, and interpretable fits are desired. We propose the fused lasso additive model (FLAM), in which each additive function is estimated to be piecewise constant with a small number of adaptively-chosen knots. FLAM is the solution to a convex optimization problem, for which a simple algorithm with guaranteed convergence to a global optimum is provided. FLAM is shown to be consistent in high dimensions, and an unbiased estimator of its degrees of freedom is proposed. We evaluate the performance of FLAM in a simulation study and on two data sets. Supplemental materials are available online, and the R package flam is available on CRAN. PMID:28239246

  7. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  8. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  9. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  10. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  11. More Than Additional Space...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A much needed addition to the Jamestown Elementary School turned out to be more than an expansion of walls for more space. A new educational program, a limited budget, and a short time line were tackled on a team approach basis and were successfully resolved. (Author)

  12. Rhodium-Catalyzed/Copper-Mediated Tandem C(sp(2))-H Alkynylation and Annulation: Synthesis of 11-Acylated Imidazo[1,2-a:3,4-a']dipyridin-5-ium-4-olates from 2H-[1,2'-Bipyridin]-2-ones and Propargyl Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Wang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Kun; Liu, Wenmin; Zhang, Xu; Mao, Wutao; Guo, Yongming; Ge, Xiaolin; Pan, Fei

    2016-03-04

    A rhodium-catalyzed/copper-mediated tandem C(sp(2))-H alkynylation and intramolecular annulation of 2H-[1,2'-bipyridin]-2-ones with propargyl alcohols for the synthesis of 11-acylated imidazo[1,2-a:3,4-a']dipyridin-5-ium-4-olates is described.

  13. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  14. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  15. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  16. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  17. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  18. Additive composition, for gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Vataru, M.

    1989-01-10

    An admixture is described that comprises Diesel fuel and an additive composition added thereto which is between about 0.05 to about 2.0 percent by weight of the fuel, the composition comprising: (a) between about 0.05 and 25% relative weight parts of an organic peroxide, and (b) between about 0.1 and 25% relative weight parts of detergent selected from the component group that consists of: (i) fatty amines; (ii) ethoxylated and propoxylated derivatives of fatty amines; (iii) fatty diamines; (iv) fatty imidazlines; (v) polymeric amines and derivatives thereof; (vi) combination of one or more of the (i) through (v) components with carboxylic acid or acids having from three to forth carbon atoms, (c) from about 99.0 to about 50% by weight of a hydrocarbon solvent.

  19. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  20. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  1. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  2. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  3. Additive lattice kirigami.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  4. Ceramics with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Feng, Lajun; Lei, Ali; Zhao, Kang; Yan, Aijun

    2014-09-01

    Li2CO3, MgCO3, BaCO3, and Bi2O3 dopants were introduced into CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics in order to improve the dielectric properties. The CCTO ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method. The phase structure, microstructure, and dielectric behavior were carefully investigated. The pure structure without any impurity phases can be confirmed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis illuminated that the grains of Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics were greater than that of pure CCTO. It was important for the properties of the CCTO ceramics to study the additives in complex impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics had the higher permittivity (>45000), the lower dielectric loss (<0.025) than those of CCTO at 1 kHz at room temperature and good temperature stability from -30 to 75 °C.

  5. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  6. Aqua­bis­(4-methyl­benzene­sulfonato-κO)(η5-penta­methyl­cyclo­penta­dien­yl)rhodium(III) monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Christopher P.; Boyer, Pauline M.; Merola, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    The title half-sandwich rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(C10H15)(C7H7O3S)2(H2O)]·H2O, consists of a π-bonded penta­methyl­cyclo­penta­dienyl group, two σ-bonded tosyl­ate groups and an aqua ligand. The structure displays both inter- and intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonding. The inter­molecular hydrogen bonding results in an extended helical chain along a 21 screw axis parallel to c, due to hydrogen bonding from the coordinating water ligand to the lattice water mol­ecule and then to a sulfonate O atom of a different asymmetric unit. PMID:23723770

  7. A rapid and practical strategy for the determination of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, iridium and gold in large amounts of ultrabasic rock by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry combined with ultrasound extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gai; Tian, Min

    2015-04-01

    This proposed method regulated the determination of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, iridium and gold in platinum-group ores by nickel sulfide fire assay—inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) combined with ultrasound extraction for the first time. The quantitative limits were 0.013-0.023μg/g. The samples were fused to separate the platinum-group elements from matrix. The nickel sulfide button was then dissolved with hydrochloric acid and the insoluble platinum-group sulfide residue was dissolved with aqua regia by ultrasound bath and finally determined by ICP-OES. The proposed method has been applied into the determination of platinum-group element and gold in large amounts of ultrabasic rocks from the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe.

  8. Stereoselective formation and catalytic activity of hydrido(acylphosphane)(chlorido)(pyrazole)rhodium(III) complexes. Experimental and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    San Nacianceno, Virginia; Azpeitia, Susan; Ibarlucea, Lourdes; Mendicute-Fierro, Claudio; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio; Seco, José M; San Sebastian, Eider; Garralda, María A

    2015-08-07

    The reaction of [{RhCl(COD)}2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) with L = pyrazole (Hpz), 3(5)-methylpyrazole (Hmpz) or 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (Hdmpz) and PPh2(o-C6H4CHO) (Rh : L : P = 1 : 2 : 1) gives hydridoacyl complexes [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(L)2] (). Stereoselective formation of and with pyrazoles trans to hydrido and phosphorus and hydrogen bond formation with O-acyl and chlorido occur. is a mixture of two linkage isomers in a 9 : 1 ratio, with two 5-methylpyrazole ligands or with one 3- and one 5-methylpyrazole ligand, respectively. Fluxional undergoes metallotropic tautomerization and is a mixture of equal amounts of and , with hydrido trans to pyrazole or chlorido, respectively. Complexes readily exchange hydrido by chlorido to afford [RhCl2{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(L)2] (, and ) as single isomers with cis chloridos and two N-HCl hydrogen bonds. The reaction of with PPh3 or PPh2OH affords static [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(PPh3)L] () or [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(PPh2OH)L] () respectively with trans P-atoms and pyrazoles forming N-HCl hydrogen bonds. and contain single species with hydrido cis to chlorido, while is a mixture of equal amounts of and . Complexes , with an additional O-HO hydrogen bond, selectively contain only the cis-H,Cl species with all the three ligands. The reaction of [{RhCl(COD)}2] with L and PPh2(o-C6H4CHO) (Rh : L : P = 1 : 1 : 2) led to complexes with trans P-atoms, [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}{PPh2(o-C6H4CHO)-κP}L] (, and ), at room temperature, and to [RhCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}{PPh2(o-C6H4CHOH)}(Hmpz)] () or [RhCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}2L] () with hydrogen evolution in refluxing benzene. DFT calculations were used to predict the correct isomers, their ratios and the particular intramolecular hydrogen bonds in these complexes. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was performed on , and . Complexes are efficient homogeneous catalysts (0.5 mol% loading) in the hydrolysis of amine- or ammonia-borane (AB) to generate up to 3 equivalents

  9. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  10. How Safe Are Color Additives?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Safe are Color Additives? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed Download PDF (380 K) Color additives give the red tint to your fruit ...

  11. A mechanistic investigation of oxidative addition of methyl iodide to [Tp*Rh(CO)(L)].

    PubMed

    Chauby, Valérie; Daran, Jean-Claude; Serra-Le Berre, Carole; Malbosc, François; Kalck, Philippe; Delgado Gonzalez, Oscar; Haslam, Claire E; Haynes, Anthony

    2002-06-17

    Reaction of methyl iodide with square planar [kappa(2)-Tp*Rh(CO)(PMe(3))] 1a (Tp* = HB(3,5-Me(2)pz)(3)) at room temperature affords [kappa(3)-Tp*Rh(CO)(PMe(3))(Me)]I 2a, which was fully characterized by spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The pseudooctahedral geometry of cationic 2a, which contains a kappa(3)-coordinated Tp* ligand, indicates a reaction mechanism in which nucleophilic attack by Rh on MeI is accompanied by coordination of the pendant pyrazolyl group. In solution 2a transforms slowly into a neutral (acetyl)(iodo) rhodium complex [kappa(3)-Tp*Rh(PMe(3))(COMe)I] 3a, for which an X-ray crystal structure is also reported. Kinetic studies on the reactions of [kappa(2)-Tp*Rh(CO)(L)] (L = PMe(3), PMe(2)Ph, PMePh(2), PPh(3), CO)] with MeI show second-order behavior with large negative activation entropies, consistent with an S(N)2 mechanism. The second-order rate constants correlate well with phosphine basicity. For L = CO, reaction with MeI gives an acetyl complex, [kappa(3)-Tp*Rh(CO)(COMe)I]. The bis(pyrazolyl)borate complexes [kappa(2)-Bp*Rh(CO)(L)] (L = PPh(3), CO) are much less reactive toward MeI than the Tp* analogues, indicating the importance of the third pyrazolyl group and the accessibility of a kappa(3) coordination mode. The results strengthen the evidence in favor of an S(N)2 mechanism for oxidative addition of MeI to square planar d(8) transition metal complexes.

  12. Detergent Additive for Lubricating Oils,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Russian patent pertains to a method of producing additives for lubricating oils . A method is known for producing an antiwear additive for... lubricating oils by processing phenols with phosphorus oxychloride, phosphoric acid esters are obtained. In order to give the additive detergent properties

  13. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  14. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  15. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-09

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  16. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  17. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  18. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  19. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  20. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  1. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... SNIPEND SNIPSTART Find A Radiation Oncologist SNIPEND Additional Treatment Options SNIPSTART A A SNIPEND Chemotherapy Medicines prescribed ... such as antibodies, to fight cancer. Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  2. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  3. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  4. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  5. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  6. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  7. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  8. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  9. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  10. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  11. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  12. The Frontiers of Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, Christopher John

    2016-03-03

    Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, has become a ubiquitous tool in science for its precise control over mechanical design. For additive manufacturing to work, a 3-D structure is split into thin 2D slices, and then different physical properties, such as photo-polymerization or melting, are used to grow the sequential layers. The level of control allows not only for devices to be made with a variety of materials: e.g. plastics, metals, and quantum dots, but to also have finely controlled structures leading to other novel properties. While 3-D printing is widely used by hobbyists for making models, it also has industrial applications in structural engineering, biological tissue scaffolding, customized electric circuitry, fuel cells, security, and more.

  13. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  14. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-02-05

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  15. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  16. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    ScienceCinema

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-07-12

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  17. Nanoengineered Additives for Active Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    commercial ad bial activ component from the coating, leading to eventual depletion of the film. Small TPU samples were evaluated using a Kirby - Bauer ...7 Table 5. Summary of 24-hr ASTM E 2180 tests with 1 weight-percent additive in PUr (solvent dispersible) based on 6-log loading of...Noveon X-1150). The ASTM E 2180 test is run in triplicate (Note that alternative ro 1° amines) was suspended in dry tetrahydrofuran (THF) (150 mL) in

  18. Reversible Oxidative Addition at Carbon.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Antonius F; Fuchs, Sonja; Flock, Marco; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2017-04-07

    The reactivity of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and cyclic alkyl amino carbenes (cAACs) with arylboronate esters is reported. The reaction with NHCs leads to the reversible formation of thermally stable Lewis acid/base adducts Ar-B(OR)2 ⋅NHC (Add1-Add6). Addition of cAAC(Me) to the catecholboronate esters 4-R-C6 H4 -Bcat (R=Me, OMe) also afforded the adducts 4-R-C6 H4 Bcat⋅cAAC(Me) (Add7, R=Me and Add8, R=OMe), which react further at room temperature to give the cAAC(Me) ring-expanded products RER1 and RER2. The boronate esters Ar-B(OR)2 of pinacol, neopentylglycol, and ethyleneglycol react with cAAC at RT via reversible B-C oxidative addition to the carbene carbon atom to afford cAAC(Me) (B{OR}2 )(Ar) (BCA1-BCA6). NMR studies of cAAC(Me) (Bneop)(4-Me-C6 H4 ) (BCA4) demonstrate the reversible nature of this oxidative addition process.

  19. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; ...

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  20. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  1. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  2. Ligand effects on the oxidative addition of halogens to (dpp-nacnac(R))Rh(phdi).

    PubMed

    Shaffer, David W; Ryken, Scott A; Zarkesh, Ryan A; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-11-19

    The treatment of (dpp-nacnac(R))Rh(phdi) {(dpp-nacnac(R))(-) = CH[C(R)(N-(i)Pr2C6H3)]2(-); R = CH3, CF3; phdi = 9,10-phenanthrenediimine} with X2 oxidants afforded octahedral rhodium(III) products in the case of X = Cl and Br. The octahedral complexes exhibit well-behaved cyclic voltammograms in which a two-electron reduction is observed to regenerate the initial rhodium(I) complex. When treated with I2, (dpp-nacnac(CH3))Rh(phdi) produced a square pyramidal η(1)-I2 complex, which was characterized by NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. The more electron poor complex (dpp-nacnac(CF3))Rh(phdi) reacted with I2 to give a mixture of two products that were identified by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a square pyramidal η(1)-I2 complex and an octahedral diiodide complex. Reaction of the square pyramidal (dpp-nacnac(CH3))Rh(I2)(phdi) with HBF4 resulted in protonation of the (dpp-nacnac(CH3))(-) backbone to provide an octahedral rhodium(III) diiodide species. These reactions highlight the impact that changes in the electron-withdrawing nature of the supporting ligands can have on the reactivity at the metal center.

  3. The Mozart Effect: Additional Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R.

    2002-04-01

    After the review of the Mozart effect was published in this journal (Hughes JR. Epilepsy Behav 2001;2:369-417), additional data from the music of Haydn and Liszt have been analyzed that may account for the decrease in seizure activity originally reported during Mozart music. Even with these added data Mozart music continued to score significantly higher than the selections from the other six composers in one of the important characteristics of this music, namely, the repetition of the melody. However Haydn's values were second highest among Mozart, J. S. Bach, Wagner, Beethoven, Chopin, and Liszt.

  4. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  5. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  6. Theatre fleet's vital additional capacity.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Vanguard Healthcare's fleet of mobile surgical facilities has been deployed to healthcare sites throughout Europe and beyond for over a decade, providing vital additional clinical capacity when existing buildings are refurbished or upgraded, in the event of flood or fire, or simply to help hospitals cater for rising demand. It is a combination of careful planning, teamwork, and the specialist expertise of Vanguard's personnel--many with a clinical background--that ensures not only each unit's successful installation, but equally its subsequent running, servicing, and maintenance, the company explains.

  7. Shale JP-4 Additive Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    8217. •% . , ’ ,,,r ,% . -- - ,.-. ’ ’ 4,w% %’. " - ,’ . . . * ’, .* . TABLE OF CONTENTS .4q ,4 . * SECTION PAGE I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. TEST PARAMETERS 2 1...42 PRECEDING PAGE BLANK TABLE OF CONTENTS (CON’T) SECT ION PAGE V. CONCLUSIONS 44 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A Drum to Test Sample Relationship 47 APPENDIX...B.O.C.L.E. Results 40 vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 Antioxidants 3 2 Raw Shale/Petroleum Fuel Properties 10 3 Drum Sample Additive Content 13 4

  8. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  9. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  10. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this gap by conducting a county-level cross-sectional analysis of interactions between Environmental Quality Index (EQI) domain indices on preterm birth in the Unites States from 2000-2005.METHODS: The EQI, a county-level index constructed for the 2000-2005 time period, was constructed from five domain-specific indices (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic) using principal component analyses. County-level preterm birth rates (n=3141) were estimated using live births from the National Center for Health Statistics. Linear regression was used to estimate prevalence differences (PD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing worse environmental quality to the better quality for each model for a) each individual domain main effect b) the interaction contrast and c) the two main effects plus interaction effect (i.e. the “net effect”) to show departure from additive interaction for the all U.S counties. Analyses were also performed for subgroupings by four urban/rural strata. RESULTS: We found the suggestion of antagonistic interactions but no synergism, along with several purely additive (i.e., no interaction) associations. In the non-stratified model, we observed antagonistic interac

  11. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  12. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  13. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  14. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  15. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system.

  16. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder.

  17. Selective introduction of organic groups to C60 and C70 using organoboron compounds and rhodium catalyst: a new synthetic approach to organo(hydro)fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Nambo, Masakazu; Segawa, Yasutomo; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Itami, Kenichiro

    2011-02-01

    A Rh-catalyzed reaction of C(60) and C(70) with organoboron compounds is described. This new catalytic method enables introduction of various organic groups onto C(60) and C(70). [Rh(cod)(MeCN)(2)]BF(4) proved to be the most effective catalyst in terms of productivity and selectivity. The reaction generally proceeds with a high regioselectivity and in a mono-addition selective manner. It was found that water is an essential additive to promote the reaction. By X-ray crystal structure analysis, we have confirmed the reaction site of organometallic-based hydroarylation of C(70) for the first time. Various functional fullerenes, such as fullerene-tagged amino acids and fullerene-capped π systems, can be synthesized. The X-ray crystal structure of biphenyl-attached C(60) revealed an interesting opportunity for the well-organized alignment of bucky balls by taking advantage of CH-π interactions.

  18. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting.

  19. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  20. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  1. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts.

  2. Dynamics of ultrasonic additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state technology for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils near room temperature by scrubbing them together with ultrasonic vibrations under pressure. Structural dynamics of the welding assembly and work piece influence how energy is transferred during the process and ultimately, part quality. To understand the effect of structural dynamics during UAM, a linear time-invariant model is proposed to relate the inputs of shear force and electric current to resultant welder velocity and voltage. Measured frequency response and operating performance of the welder under no load is used to identify model parameters. Using this model and in-situ measurements, shear force and welder efficiency are estimated to be near 2000N and 80% when welding Al 6061-H18 weld foil, respectively. Shear force and welder efficiency have never been estimated before in UAM. The influence of processing conditions, i.e., welder amplitude, normal force, and weld speed, on shear force and welder efficiency are investigated. Welder velocity was found to strongly influence the shear force magnitude and efficiency while normal force and weld speed showed little to no influence. The proposed model is used to describe high frequency harmonic content in the velocity response of the welder during welding operations and coupling of the UAM build with the welder.

  3. Dimensionless numbers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, T.; Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of many process variables and alloy properties on the structure and properties of additively manufactured parts are examined using four dimensionless numbers. The structure and properties of components made from 316 Stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and Inconel 718 powders for various dimensionless heat inputs, Peclet numbers, Marangoni numbers, and Fourier numbers are studied. Temperature fields, cooling rates, solidification parameters, lack of fusion defects, and thermal strains are examined using a well-tested three-dimensional transient heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results show that lack of fusion defects in the fabricated parts can be minimized by strengthening interlayer bonding using high values of dimensionless heat input. The formation of harmful intermetallics such as laves phases in Inconel 718 can be suppressed using low heat input that results in a small molten pool, a steep temperature gradient, and a fast cooling rate. Improved interlayer bonding can be achieved at high Marangoni numbers, which results in vigorous circulation of liquid metal, larger pool dimensions, and greater depth of penetration. A high Fourier number ensures rapid cooling, low thermal distortion, and a high ratio of temperature gradient to the solidification growth rate with a greater tendency of plane front solidification.

  4. Children's understanding of additive concepts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine M; Dubé, Adam K; Beatch, Jacqueline-Ann

    2017-04-01

    Most research on children's arithmetic concepts is based on one concept at a time, limiting the conclusions that can be made about how children's conceptual knowledge of arithmetic develops. This study examined six arithmetic concepts (identity, negation, commutativity, equivalence, inversion, and addition and subtraction associativity) in Grades 3, 4, and 5. Identity (a-0=a) and negation (a-a=0) were well understood, followed by moderate understanding of commutativity (a+b=b+a) and inversion (a+b-b=a), with weak understanding of equivalence (a+b+c=a+[b+c]) and associativity (a+b-c=[b-c]+a). Understanding increased across grade only for commutativity and equivalence. Four clusters were found: The Weak Concept cluster understood only identity and negation; the Two-Term Concept cluster also understood commutativity; the Inversion Concept cluster understood identity, negation, and inversion; and the Strong Concept cluster had the strongest understanding of all of the concepts. Grade 3 students tended to be in the Weak and Inversion Concept clusters, Grade 4 students were equally likely to be in any of the clusters, and Grade 5 students were most likely to be in the Two-Term and Strong Concept clusters. The findings of this study highlight that conclusions about the development of arithmetic concepts are highly dependent on which concepts are being assessed and underscore the need for multiple concepts to be investigated at the same time.

  5. Additives In Meat and Poultry Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is a food additive? What is a "direct" food additive? What is an 'indirect" food additive? ... convenience foods. [ Top of Page ] What is a “direct” food additive? According to the FDA, “Direct food ...

  6. Photoinduced electron and energy transfer and pH-induced modulation of the photophysical properties in homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) based on a heteroditopic phenanthroline-terpyridine bridge.

    PubMed

    Maity, Dinesh; Bhaumik, Chanchal; Karmakar, Srikanta; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2013-07-15

    Homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of compositions [(bpy)2Ru(II)(phen-Hbzim-tpy)Ru(II)(tpy/tpy-PhCH3/H2pbbzim)](4+) and [(bpy)2Ru(II)(phen-Hbzim-tpy)Rh(III)(tpy-PhCH3/H2pbbzim)](5+), where phen-Hbzim-tpy = 2-[4-(2,6-dipyridin-2-ylpyridin-4-yl)phenyl]-1H-imidazole[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, tpy = 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine, tpy-PhCH3 = 4'-(4-methylphenyl)-2,2':6',2"-terpyridine, and H2pbbzim = 2,6-bis(benzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The absorption spectra, redox behavior, and luminescence properties of these bimetallic complexes have been thoroughly investigated and compared with those of monometallic [(bpy)2Ru(II)(phen-Hbzim-tpy)](2+) and [(tpy-PhCH3)Rh(III)(tpy-Hbzim-phen)](3+) model compounds. The electrochemistry of the complexes shows a reversible Ru(II/III) oxidation in the anodic region and an irreversible Rh(III/I) reduction and several ligand-based reductions in the cathodic region. Steady-state and time-resolved luminescence data at room temperature show that an efficient intramolecular electronic energy transfer from the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state of the [(bpy)2Ru(II)(phen-Hbzim-tpy)] chromophore to the MLCT state of the tpy-containing chromophore [(phen-Hbzim-tpy)Ru(II)(tpy/tpy-PhCH3/H2pbbzim)] occurs in all three unsymmetrical homobimetallic complexes. On the other hand, for both heterometallic dyads, an efficient intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer from the excited ruthenium moiety to the rhodium-based unit takes place. The rate constants for the energy- and electron-transfer processes have been determined by time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The influence of the pH on the absorption, steady-state, and time-resolved emission properties of complexes has been thoroughly investigated. The absorption titration data were used to determine the ground-state pK values

  7. Carbon nanotubes decorated with gold, platinum and rhodium clusters by injection of colloidal solutions into the post-discharge of an RF atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Claessens, N; Demoisson, F; Dufour, T; Mansour, Ali; Felten, A; Guillot, J; Pireaux, J-J; Reniers, F

    2010-09-24

    In this paper, we present a new, simple, robust and efficient technique to decorate multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with metal nanoparticles. As case studies, Au, Pt and Rh nanoparticles are grafted onto MWCNTs by spraying a colloidal solution into the post-discharge of an atmospheric argon or argon/oxygen RF plasma. The method that we introduce here is different from those usually described in the literature, since the treatment is operated at atmospheric pressure, allowing the realization in only one step of the surface activation and the deposition processes. We demonstrate experimentally that the addition of oxygen gas in the plasma increases significantly the amount of grafted metal nanoparticles. Moreover, TEM pictures clearly show that the grafted nanoparticles are well controlled in size.

  8. Carbon nanotubes decorated with gold, platinum and rhodium clusters by injection of colloidal solutions into the post-discharge of an RF atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessens, N.; Demoisson, F.; Dufour, T.; Mansour, Ali; Felten, A.; Guillot, J.; Pireaux, J.-J.; Reniers, F.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new, simple, robust and efficient technique to decorate multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with metal nanoparticles. As case studies, Au, Pt and Rh nanoparticles are grafted onto MWCNTs by spraying a colloidal solution into the post-discharge of an atmospheric argon or argon/oxygen RF plasma. The method that we introduce here is different from those usually described in the literature, since the treatment is operated at atmospheric pressure, allowing the realization in only one step of the surface activation and the deposition processes. We demonstrate experimentally that the addition of oxygen gas in the plasma increases significantly the amount of grafted metal nanoparticles. Moreover, TEM pictures clearly show that the grafted nanoparticles are well controlled in size.

  9. The Simplest Amino‐borane H2B=NH2 Trapped on a Rhodium Dimer: Pre‐Catalysts for Amine–Borane Dehydropolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Beattie, Nicholas A.; Pike, Sebastian D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The μ‐amino–borane complexes [Rh2(LR)2(μ‐H)(μ‐H2B=NHR′)][BArF 4] (LR=R2P(CH2)3PR2; R=Ph, iPr; R′=H, Me) form by addition of H3B⋅NMeR′H2 to [Rh(LR)(η6‐C6H5F)][BArF 4]. DFT calculations demonstrate that the amino–borane interacts with the Rh centers through strong Rh‐H and Rh‐B interactions. Mechanistic investigations show that these dimers can form by a boronium‐mediated route, and are pre‐catalysts for amine‐borane dehydropolymerization, suggesting a possible role for bimetallic motifs in catalysis. PMID:27100775

  10. Evidence from bond lengths and bond angles for enneacovalence of cobalt, rhodium, iridium, iron, ruthenium, and osmium is compounds with elements of medium electronegativity

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L.

    1984-03-01

    Enneacovalence of neutral atoms can be achieved for Co, Rh, and Ir by promoting some electrons from the nd orbital to the (n + 1)s and (n + 1)p orbitals and for Fe, Ru, and Os by a similar promotion together with the addition of an electron, which may be provided by an electron pair from a singly bonded carbonyl group or other group. The bond lengths and bond angles are predicted by the theory of enneacovalence to be significantly different for the different transition metals. Recently reported experimental values are shown to be in good agreement with the predicted values, providing support for the theory of enneacovalence and the theory of hybrid spTdV bond orbitals. 48 references, 4 tables.

  11. Flash kinetics in liquefied noble gases: Studies of alkane activation and ligand dynamics at rhodium carbonyl centers, and a search for xenon-carbene adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Yeston, Jake Simon

    2001-01-01

    A general introduction is given to place the subsequent chapters in context for the nonspecialist. Results are presented from a low temperature infrared (IR) flash kinetic study of C-H bond activation via photoinduced reaction of Cp*Rh(CO)2 (1) with linear and cyclic alkanes in liquid krypton and liquid xenon solution. No reaction was observed with methane; for all other hydrocarbons studied, the rate law supports fragmentation of the overall reaction into an alkane binding step followed by an oxidative addition step. For the binding step, larger alkanes within each series (linear and cyclic) interact more strongly than smaller alkanes with the Rh center. The second step, oxidative addition of the C-H bond across Rh, exhibits very little variance in the series of linear alkanes, while in the cyclic series the rate decreases with increasing alkane size. Results are presented from an IR flash kinetic study of the photoinduced chemistry of Tp*Rh(CO)2 (5; Tp* = hydridotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borato) in liquid xenon solution at –50 °C. IR spectra of the solution taken 2 μs after 308 nm photolysis exhibit two transient bands at 1972-1980 cm-1 and 1992-2000 cm-1, respectively. These bands were assigned to (η3-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe and (η2-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe solvates on the basis of companion studies using Bp*Rh(CO)2 (9; Bp* = dihydridobis(3,5-dimethyl pyrazolyl)borato). Preliminary kinetic data for reaction of 5 with cyclohexane in xenon solution indicate that both transient bands still appear and that their rates of decay correlate with formation of the product Tp*Rh(CO)(C6H11)(H). The preparation and reactivity of the new complex Bp*Rh(CO)(pyridine) (11) are described. The complex reacts with CH3I to yield the novel Rh carbene hydride complex HB(Me2pz)2Rh(H)(I)(C5H5N)(C(O)Me) (12), resulting from formal addition of CH

  12. The Mechanism of N-O Bond Cleavage in Rhodium-Catalyzed C-H Bond Functionalization of Quinoline N-oxides with Alkynes: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzi; Liu, Song; Qi, Zisong; Qi, Xiaotian; Li, Xingwei; Lan, Yu

    2015-07-06

    Metal-catalyzed C-H activation not only offers important strategies to construct new bonds, it also allows the merge of important research areas. When quinoline N-oxide is used as an arene source in C-H activation studies, the N-O bond can act as a directing group as well as an O-atom donor. The newly reported density functional theory method, M11L, has been used to elucidate the mechanistic details of the coupling between quinoline N-O bond and alkynes, which results in C-H activation and O-atom transfer. The computational results indicated that the most favorable pathway involves an electrophilic deprotonation, an insertion of an acetylene group into a Rh-C bond, a reductive elimination to form an oxazinoquinolinium-coordinated Rh(I) intermediate, an oxidative addition to break the N-O bond, and a protonation reaction to regenerate the active catalyst. The regioselectivity of the reaction has also been studied by using prop-1-yn-1-ylbenzene as a model unsymmetrical substrate. Theoretical calculations suggested that 1-phenyl-2-quinolinylpropanone would be the major product because of better conjugation between the phenyl group and enolate moiety in the corresponding transition state of the regioselectivity-determining step. These calculated data are consistent with the experimental observations.

  13. Catalytic reduction of NO by CO over rhodium catalysts. 2. Effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondarides, D.I.; Chafik, T.; Verykios, X.E.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed during reduction of NO by CO over Rh/TiO{sub 2} catalysts has been examined employing FTIR and transient MS techniques. It has been found that the activity of Rh is hindered by accumulation of surface oxygen originating from NO decomposition and gas-phase oxygen in the feed. Adsorbed CO and reduced TiO{sub 2{minus}x} species in the vicinity of Rh particles act as oxygen atom scavengers and, under fuel-rich conditions, remove atomic oxygen from the surface and restore the catalytic properties. Results of the present study provide additional evidence that production of N{sub 2} is related to dissociation of adsorbed Rh-NO{sup {minus}} while production of N{sub 2}O is related to the presence of Rh(NO){sub 2}. The presence of reduced RH{sup 0} sites is necessary for the formation of both reduction products. In the absence of oxygen in the feed, surface isocyanate species are also observed under reaction conditions. Their formation requires the presence of adjacent Rh{sup 0}-CO and reduced Rh{sup 0} sites. Although these species are favored under conditions in which NO conversion to reduction products is observed, there is no evidence that they are catalytically active species.

  14. Overview of Food Ingredients, Additives and Colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pesticides where other legal premarket approval requirements apply. Direct food additives are those that are added to ... and other foods to add texture -- is a direct additive. Most direct additives are identified on the ...

  15. Uniform Additivity in Classical and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew; Li, Ke; Smith, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Information theory quantifies the optimal rates of resource interconversions, usually in terms of entropies. However, nonadditivity often makes evaluating entropic formulas intractable. In a few auspicious cases, additivity allows a full characterization of optimal rates. We study uniform additivity of formulas, which is easily evaluated and captures all known additive quantum formulas. Our complete characterization of uniform additivity exposes an intriguing new additive quantity and identifies a remarkable coincidence—the classical and quantum uniformly additive functions with one auxiliary variable are identical.

  16. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  17. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  18. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  19. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  20. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  1. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  2. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  3. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  4. Effects of irradiation and annealing on deep levels in rhodium-doped p-GaAs grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Naz, Nazir A.; Qurashi, Umar S.; Iqbal, M. Zafar

    2011-06-01

    This paper reports a detailed study of the effects of irradiation and thermal annealing on deep levels in Rh-doped p-type GaAs grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition, using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. It is found upon irradiation with alpha particles that, in addition to the radiation-induced defect peaks, all the Rh-related peaks observed in majority, as well as minority-carrier emission DLTS scans show an increase in their respective concentrations. The usually observed {alpha}-induced defects H{alpha}1, H{alpha}2, and H{alpha}3 are found to have lower introduction rates in Rh-doped samples, as compared to reference samples (not doped with Rh). Alpha-irradiation has been found to decompose the two minority carrier emitting bands (one at low temperature {approx}150 K and the other at {approx}380 K) observed prior to irradiation into distinct peaks corresponding to deep levels Rh1 and Rh2 and EL2 and Rh3, respectively. A similar effect is also observed for the majority-carrier emitting band composed of hole emission from deep levels RhA and RhB, which separate out well upon irradiation. Further, from the double-correlation DLTS measurements, the emission rates of carriers from the radiation-enhanced peaks corresponding to deep levels Rh1, Rh2, Rh3, and RhC were found to be dependent on junction electric field. For RhC, the field dependence data have been analyzed in terms of the Poole-Frenkel model employing a 3-dimensional Coulomb potential with q = 2e (electronic charge). Temperature dependence of the hole capture cross-sections of the levels RhA and RhC was also studied quantitatively. The observed dependence of the hole capture cross-section of RhC on temperature can be interpreted in terms of multiphonon capture model, yielding a capture barrier of 0.2 eV and {sigma}({infinity}) = 2.3 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The results of irradiation and isochronal thermal annealing study, in combination with the theoretical

  5. Effects of irradiation and annealing on deep levels in rhodium-doped p-GaAs grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, Nazir A.; Qurashi, Umar S.; Iqbal, M. Zafar

    2011-06-01

    This paper reports a detailed study of the effects of irradiation and thermal annealing on deep levels in Rh-doped p-type GaAs grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition, using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. It is found upon irradiation with alpha particles that, in addition to the radiation-induced defect peaks, all the Rh-related peaks observed in majority, as well as minority-carrier emission DLTS scans show an increase in their respective concentrations. The usually observed α-induced defects Hα1, Hα2, and Hα3 are found to have lower introduction rates in Rh-doped samples, as compared to reference samples (not doped with Rh). Alpha-irradiation has been found to decompose the two minority carrier emitting bands (one at low temperature ˜150 K and the other at ˜380 K) observed prior to irradiation into distinct peaks corresponding to deep levels Rh1 and Rh2 and EL2 and Rh3, respectively. A similar effect is also observed for the majority-carrier emitting band composed of hole emission from deep levels RhA and RhB, which separate out well upon irradiation. Further, from the double-correlation DLTS measurements, the emission rates of carriers from the radiation-enhanced peaks corresponding to deep levels Rh1, Rh2, Rh3, and RhC were found to be dependent on junction electric field. For RhC, the field dependence data have been analyzed in terms of the Poole-Frenkel model employing a 3-dimensional Coulomb potential with q = 2e (electronic charge). Temperature dependence of the hole capture cross-sections of the levels RhA and RhC was also studied quantitatively. The observed dependence of the hole capture cross-section of RhC on temperature can be interpreted in terms of multiphonon capture model, yielding a capture barrier of 0.2 eV and σ(∞) = 2.3 × 10-14 cm2. The results of irradiation and isochronal thermal annealing study, in combination with the theoretical analysis of the field dependence of hole emission data

  6. 14 CFR 1274.917 - Additional funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional funds. 1274.917 Section 1274.917... FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.917 Additional funds. Additional Funds July 2002... under the terms of this cooperative agreement. NASA is under no obligation to provide additional...

  7. A quantum chemical study of the mechanisms of olefin addition to group 9 transition metal dioxo compounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Issahaku; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic aspects of ethylene addition to MO2(CH2)(CH3) (M=Co, Rh, Ir) have been investigated with a Hartree-Fock/DFT hybrid functional at the MO6/LACVP* and B3LYP/LACVP* levels of theory to elucidate the reaction pathways on the singlet, doublet and triplet potential energy surfaces (PES). In the reaction of the IrO2CH2CH3 complex with ethylene, [3 + 2]C,O addition is the most plausible pathway on the singlet PES, the [3 + 2]O,O addition is the most favoured pathway on the doublet surface whiles the stepwise [1 + 1] addition involving the oxygen atom of the complex in the first step and the carbon atom of the complex in the second step is the most plausible pathway on the triplet PES. For the reaction of the RhO2(CH2)(CH3) complex, the [2 + 2]Rh,O addition pathway is the most favoured on the singlet surface, the [2 + 2]Rh,C is the most plausible pathway on the triplet PES and [3 + 2]C,O is the most plausible on the doublet surface. For the reactions of the CoO2(CH2)(CH3) complex, the [1 + 2]O addition is the most plausible on the singlet PES, [3 + 2]C=Co=O cycloaddition to form the five-membered intermediate is the most preferred pathway on the doublet PES, whiles on the triplet PES the preferred pathway is the [3 + 2] addition across the O=Co=O bond of the metal complex. The reactions of olefins with the Co dioxo complex have lower activation barriers for the preferred [3 + 2] and [2 + 2] addition pathways as well as fewer side reactions than those of the rhodium and iridium systems. This could imply that the cobalt dioxo complexes can efficiently and selectively catalyze specific reactions in oxidation of olefins than Rh and Ir oxo complexes will do and therefore Co oxo complexes may be better catalysts for specific oxidation reactions of olefins than Rh and Ir complexes are. The activation barriers for the formation of the four-or five-membered metallacycle intermediates through [2 + 2] or [3 + 2] cyclo-addition are lower on the

  8. The ternary system cerium-rhodium-silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Gribanov, Alexander; Grytsiv, Andriy; Safronov, Sergey; Rogl, Peter; Rousnyak, Julia; Seropegin, Yurii; Giester, Gerald

    2010-04-01

    Phase relations have been established in the ternary system Ce-Rh-Si for the isothermal section at 800 °C based on X-ray powder diffraction and EPMA on about 80 alloys, which were prepared by arc melting under argon or by powder reaction sintering. From the 25 ternary compounds observed at 800 °C 13 phases have been reported earlier. Based on XPD Rietveld refinements the crystal structures for 9 new ternary phases were assigned to known structure types. Structural chemistry of these compounds follows the characteristics already outlined for their prototype structures: τ7—Ce 3RhSi 3, (Ba 3Al 2Ge 2-type), τ8—Ce 2Rh 3-xSi 3+x (Ce 2Rh 1.35Ge 4.65-type), τ10—Ce 3Rh 4-xSi 4+x (U 3Ni 4Si 4-type), τ11—CeRh 6Si 4 (LiCo 6P 4-type), τ13—Ce 6Rh 30Si 19.3 (U 6Co 30Si 19-type), τ18—Ce 4Rh 4Si 3 (Sm 4Pd 4Si 3-type), τ21—CeRh 2Si (CeIr 2Si-type), τ22—Ce 2Rh 3+xSi 1-x (Y 2Rh 3Ge-type) and τ24—Ce 8(Rh 1-xSi x) 24Si (Ce 8Pd 24Sb-type). For τ25—Ce 4(Rh 1-xSi x) 12Si a novel bcc structure was proposed from Rietveld analysis. Detailed crystal structure data were derived for τ3—CeRhSi 2 (CeNiSi 2-type) and τ6—Ce 2Rh 3Si 5 (U 2Co 3Si 5-type) by X-ray single crystal experiments, confirming the structure types. The crystal structures of τ4—Ce 22Rh 22Si 56, τ5—Ce 20Rh 27Si 53 and τ23—Ce 33.3Rh 58.2-55.2Si 8.5-11.5 are unknown. High temperature compounds with compositions Ce 10Rh 51Si 33 (U 10Co 51Si 33-type) and CeRhSi (LaIrSi-type) have been observed in as-cast alloys but these phases do not participate in the phase equilibria at 800 °C.

  9. Rhodium-catalyzed restructuring of carbon frameworks.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Metal-catalyzed reactions involving an elementary step which cleaves a carbon-carbon bond provide unique organic transformations. Restructuring reactions recently developed in our laboratory, through which the carbon framework of a starting substance is restructured into a totally different carbon framework, are discussed, with the possibility of applying such methods to the synthesis of natural products.

  10. The ternary system cerium-rhodium-silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, Alexey; Gribanov, Alexander; Grytsiv, Andriy; Safronov, Sergey; Rogl, Peter; Rousnyak, Julia; Seropegin, Yurii; Giester, Gerald

    2010-04-15

    Phase relations have been established in the ternary system Ce-Rh-Si for the isothermal section at 800 deg. C based on X-ray powder diffraction and EPMA on about 80 alloys, which were prepared by arc melting under argon or by powder reaction sintering. From the 25 ternary compounds observed at 800 deg. C 13 phases have been reported earlier. Based on XPD Rietveld refinements the crystal structures for 9 new ternary phases were assigned to known structure types. Structural chemistry of these compounds follows the characteristics already outlined for their prototype structures: tau{sub 7}-Ce{sub 3}RhSi{sub 3}, (Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type), tau{sub 8}-Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 3-x}Si{sub 3+x} (Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 1.35}Ge{sub 4.65}-type), tau{sub 10}-Ce{sub 3}Rh{sub 4-x}Si{sub 4+x} (U{sub 3}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 4}-type), tau{sub 11}-CeRh{sub 6}Si{sub 4} (LiCo{sub 6}P{sub 4}-type), tau{sub 13}-Ce{sub 6}Rh{sub 30}Si{sub 19.3} (U{sub 6}Co{sub 30}Si{sub 19}-type), tau{sub 18}-Ce{sub 4}Rh{sub 4}Si{sub 3} (Sm{sub 4}Pd{sub 4}Si{sub 3}-type), tau{sub 21}-CeRh{sub 2}Si (CeIr{sub 2}Si-type), tau{sub 22}-Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 3+x}Si{sub 1-x} (Y{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}Ge-type) and tau{sub 24}-Ce{sub 8}(Rh{sub 1-x}Si{sub x}){sub 24}Si (Ce{sub 8}Pd{sub 24}Sb-type). For tau{sub 25}-Ce{sub 4}(Rh{sub 1-x}Si{sub x}){sub 12}Si a novel bcc structure was proposed from Rietveld analysis. Detailed crystal structure data were derived for tau{sub 3}-CeRhSi{sub 2} (CeNiSi{sub 2}-type) and tau{sub 6}-Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}Si{sub 5} (U{sub 2}Co{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-type) by X-ray single crystal experiments, confirming the structure types. The crystal structures of tau{sub 4}-Ce{sub 22}Rh{sub 22}Si{sub 56}, tau{sub 5}-Ce{sub 20}Rh{sub 27}Si{sub 53} and tau{sub 23}-Ce{sub 33.3}Rh{sub 58.2-55.2}Si{sub 8.5-11.5} are unknown. High temperature compounds with compositions Ce{sub 10}Rh{sub 51}Si{sub 33} (U{sub 10}Co{sub 51}Si{sub 33}-type) and CeRhSi (LaIrSi-type) have been observed in as-cast alloys but these phases do not participate in the phase equilibria at 800 deg. C. - Graphical abstract: Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Rh-Si have been established for the isothermal section at 800 deg. C based on X-ray powder and single-crystal diffraction, metallography, SEM and EMPA techniques on about 80 alloys. 25 ternary compounds were observed.

  11. ADHD Diet: Do Food Additives Cause Hyperactivity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... There's no solid evidence that food additives cause attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the topic of food additives and their possible effects is controversial. Some studies indicate that certain food ...

  12. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  13. [Safety of food additives in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ito, Sumio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many accidents relating to food happened in Japan. The consumer's distrust for food, food companies, and the administration is increasing. The consumer especially has an extreme refusal feeling for chemicals such as food additives and agricultural chemicals, and begins to request agricultural chemical-free vegetables and food additive-free food. Food companies also state no agricultural chemicals and no food additives to correspond with consumers' request and aim at differentiating. The food additive is that the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare specifies the one that person's health might not be ruined by providing for Food Sanitation Law Article 10 in our country. The standard for food additives and standard for use of food additives are provided according to regulations of Food Sanitation Law Article 11. Therefore, it is thought that the food additive used is safe now. Then, it reports on the procedure and the safety examination, etc. in our country for designation for food additive this time.

  14. Additive-driven assembly of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying; Daga, Vikram; Anderson, Eric; Watkins, James

    2011-03-01

    One challenge to the formation of well ordered hybrid materials is the incorporation of nanoscale additives including metal, semiconductor and dielectric nanoparticles at high loadings while maintaining strong segregation. Here we describe the molecular and functional design of small molecule and nanoparticle additives that enhance phase segregation in their block copolymer host and enable high additive loadings. Our approach includes the use of hydrogen bond interactions between the functional groups on the additive or particle that serve as hydrogen bond donors and one segment of the block copolymer containing hydrogen bond acceptors. Further, the additives show strong selectively towards the targeted domains, leading to enhancements in contrast between properties of the phases. In addition to structural changes, we explore how large changes in the thermal and mechanical properties occur upon incorporation of the additives. Generalization of this additive-induced ordering strategy to various block copolymers will be discussed.

  15. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  16. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  17. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  18. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  19. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  20. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  1. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  2. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  3. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  4. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  5. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  6. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  7. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  8. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  9. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10...) REGISTRATION OF FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading...

  10. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10... FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading by...

  11. 12 CFR 615.5460 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional provisions. 615.5460 Section 615.5460 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN... Additional provisions. (a) Additional requirements. In any case or any class of cases arising under...

  12. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  13. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  14. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  15. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  16. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  17. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  18. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  19. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  20. 5 CFR 841.1006 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional provisions. 841.1006 Section....1006 Additional provisions. These additional provisions are also binding on the State and OPM: (a) A... will issue an accounting. If the State finds this accounting unacceptable, it may then and only...

  1. 5 CFR 831.1905 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional provisions. 831.1905 Section... (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT State Income Tax Withholding § 831.1905 Additional provisions. These additional provisions are also binding on the State and OPM: (a) A request or revocation is effective when processed...

  2. Nitrogen as a friendly addition to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Interstitial alloying with nitrogen or carbon is a common means of enhancing properties of iron-based alloys. Interstitial nitrogen addition to fcc-phase Fe-Cr-Mn/Ni alloys results in improved mechanical properties, whereas addition of carbon can result in the formation of unwanted carbides. Carbon addition to low alloy, bcc-phase iron alloys significantly improves strength through the formation of carbides, whereas addition of nitrogen in bcc-phase iron alloys can result in porous casting and reduced mechanical properties. This study will show that alloying iron-based alloys with both nitrogen and carbon can produce positive results. Nitrogen addition to Fe-C and Fe-Cr-C alloys, and both nitrogen and nitrogen-carbon additions to Fe-Cr-Mn/Ni alloys altered the microstructure, improved mechanical properties, increased hardness, and reduced wear by stabilizing the fcc-phase and altering (possibly eliminating) precipitate formation.

  3. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-03-04

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) to demonstrate Big Area Additive Manufacturing which increases the speed of the additive manufacturing (AM) process by over 1000X, increases the size of parts by over 10X and shows a cost reduction of over 100X. ORNL worked with CI to transition the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology from a proof-of-principle (TRL 2-3) demonstration to a prototype product stage (TRL 7-8).

  4. 42 CFR 67.22 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE POLICY AND RESEARCH GRANTS AND CONTRACTS Research Grants for Health Services Research, Evaluation, Demonstration, and Dissemination Projects § 67.22 Additional conditions....

  5. Selection of color additives: a regulatory view.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Dureja, Harish; Madan, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Color additives have a unique place in the categories of the excipients. However, most of the color additives are complex heterogeneous organic compounds. In pharmaceuticals, colors are used in various oral (solid, liquid) and topical dosage form. Different regulatory authorities have their own specific set of regulation for registration, approval, and control of color additives. However, at this time of globalization, selection of appropriate color is not an easy task when a company wants to sale its product in many countries. In this article, the authors have explored various important factors which should be considered in the selection of color additives.

  6. Allergic and immunologic reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, Fatih; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul

    2013-08-01

    For centuries, food additives have been used for flavouring, colouring and extension of the useful shelf life of food, as well as the promotion of food safety. During the last 20 years, the studies implicating the additives contained in foods and medicine as a causative factor of allergic reactions have been proliferated considerably. In this review, we aimed to overview all of the food additives which were approved to consume in EU and find out how common and serious allergic reactions come into existence following the consuming of food additives.

  7. Classification of additives for organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Machui, Florian; Maisch, Philipp; Burgués-Ceballos, Ignasi; Langner, Stefan; Krantz, Johannes; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-04-27

    The use of additives to improve the performance of organic photovoltaic cells has been intensely researched in recent years. However, so far, no system has been reported for the classification of additives and their functions. In this report, a system for classifying additives according to the fundamental mechanism by which they influence microstructure formation for P3HT:PCBM is suggested. The major parameters used for their classification are solubility and drying kinetics. Both are discussed in detail and their consequences on processing are analyzed. Furthermore, a general mechanism to classify the impact of additives on structure formation is suggested and discussed for different materials relevant to organic photovoltaic devices.

  8. 49 CFR 1108.12 - Additional matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional matters. 1108.12 Section 1108.12 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT... JURISDICTION OF THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD § 1108.12 Additional matters. Where an arbitration demand...

  9. 49 CFR 1108.12 - Additional matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional matters. 1108.12 Section 1108.12 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT... JURISDICTION OF THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD § 1108.12 Additional matters. Where an arbitration demand...

  10. 49 CFR 1108.12 - Additional matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional matters. 1108.12 Section 1108.12 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT... JURISDICTION OF THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD § 1108.12 Additional matters. Where an arbitration demand...

  11. 15 CFR 990.66 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional considerations. 990.66 Section 990.66 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.66 Additional...

  12. 10 CFR 2.605 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional considerations. 2.605 Section 2.605 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS... Permit § 2.605 Additional considerations. (a) The Commission will not conduct more than one review...

  13. 10 CFR 2.625 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional considerations. 2.625 Section 2.625 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS... License Under 10 Cfr Part 52 § 2.625 Additional considerations. (a) The Commission will not conduct...

  14. 42 CFR 52d.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52d.9 Section 52d.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.9 Additional conditions. The Director, NCI, may with respect to...

  15. 42 CFR 52d.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52d.9 Section 52d.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.9 Additional conditions. The Director, NCI, may with respect to...

  16. 42 CFR 52d.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52d.9 Section 52d.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.9 Additional conditions. The Director, NCI, may with respect to...

  17. 42 CFR 52d.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52d.9 Section 52d.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.9 Additional conditions. The Director, NCI, may with respect to...

  18. 42 CFR 52d.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52d.9 Section 52d.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL CANCER EDUCATION PROGRAM § 52d.9 Additional conditions. The Director, NCI, may with respect to...

  19. 43 CFR 3154.2 - Additional bonding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional bonding. 3154.2 Section 3154.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Requirements § 3154.2 Additional bonding. The authorized officer may increase the amount of any bond that...

  20. Asthma and anaphylactoid reactions to food additives.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.; Sussman, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Presumed allergic reactions to hidden food additives are both controversial and important. Clinical manifestations include asthma, urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylactic-anaphylactoid events. Most adverse reactions are caused by just a few additives, such as sulfites and monosodium glutamate. Diagnosis is suspected from the history and confirmed by specific challenge. The treatment is specific avoidance. PMID:8499792

  1. 42 CFR 52e.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52e.9 Section 52e.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.9 Additional conditions. The...

  2. 42 CFR 52e.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52e.9 Section 52e.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.9 Additional conditions. The...

  3. 42 CFR 52e.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52e.9 Section 52e.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.9 Additional conditions. The...

  4. Fuel compositions containing deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lilburn, J.E.

    1980-11-18

    Fuel compositions are provided which contain a deposit control additive. The deposit control additive is produced by reacting a hydrocarbylpoly(oxyalkylene) alcohol with excess phosgene and an excess amount of certain polyamines. The product comprises hydrocarbylpoly(oxyalkylene) ureylene carbamates.

  5. 42 CFR 52a.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52a.9 Section 52a.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.9 Additional conditions. The Director may, with respect to any grant...

  6. 42 CFR 52b.13 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52b.13 Section 52b.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.13 Additional conditions. The Director may with respect to any...

  7. 42 CFR 52b.13 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52b.13 Section 52b.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.13 Additional conditions. The Director may with respect to any...

  8. 42 CFR 52a.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52a.9 Section 52a.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.9 Additional conditions. The Director may, with respect to any grant...

  9. 42 CFR 52a.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52a.9 Section 52a.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.9 Additional conditions. The Director may, with respect to any grant...

  10. 42 CFR 52a.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52a.9 Section 52a.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.9 Additional conditions. The Director may, with respect to any grant...

  11. 42 CFR 52b.13 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52b.13 Section 52b.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.13 Additional conditions. The Director may with respect to any...

  12. 42 CFR 52b.13 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52b.13 Section 52b.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.13 Additional conditions. The Director may with respect to any...

  13. 42 CFR 52b.13 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52b.13 Section 52b.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.13 Additional conditions. The Director may with respect to any...

  14. 42 CFR 52a.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52a.9 Section 52a.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CENTER GRANTS § 52a.9 Additional conditions. The Director may, with respect to any grant...

  15. 42 CFR 52c.8 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52c.8 Section 52c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.8 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any grant award...

  16. 42 CFR 52c.8 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52c.8 Section 52c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.8 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any grant award...

  17. 42 CFR 52c.8 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52c.8 Section 52c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.8 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any grant award...

  18. 42 CFR 52c.8 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52c.8 Section 52c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.8 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any grant award...

  19. 42 CFR 52c.8 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52c.8 Section 52c.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAM § 52c.8 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any grant award...

  20. 77 FR 47823 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... Administration, New York, NY Coverage: A-List for the Total Government Requirement as aggregated by the General... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement...

  1. 78 FR 45183 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Services Administration, New York, NY. COVERAGE: A-List for the Total Government Requirement as aggregated... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  2. 11 CFR 9007.4 - Additional audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional audits. 9007.4 Section 9007.4 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: GENERAL ELECTION FINANCING EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS; REPAYMENTS § 9007.4 Additional audits. In accordance with 11 CFR...

  3. 11 CFR 9008.13 - Additional audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional audits. 9008.13 Section 9008.13... Convention Committees § 9008.13 Additional audits. In accordance with 11 CFR 104.16(c), the Commission, pursuant to 11 CFR 111.10, may upon affirmative vote of four members conduct an audit and...

  4. 11 CFR 9007.4 - Additional audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional audits. 9007.4 Section 9007.4... FINANCING EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS; REPAYMENTS § 9007.4 Additional audits. In accordance with 11 CFR 104.16(c), the Commission, pursuant to 11 CFR 111.10, may upon affirmative vote of four members conduct an...

  5. 11 CFR 9008.13 - Additional audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Additional audits. 9008.13 Section 9008.13... Convention Committees § 9008.13 Additional audits. In accordance with 11 CFR 104.16(c), the Commission, pursuant to 11 CFR 111.10, may upon affirmative vote of four members conduct an audit and...

  6. 11 CFR 9007.4 - Additional audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Additional audits. 9007.4 Section 9007.4 Federal... EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS; REPAYMENTS § 9007.4 Additional audits. In accordance with 11 CFR 104.16(c), the Commission, pursuant to 11 CFR 111.10, may upon affirmative vote of four members conduct an audit and...

  7. Developing Multiplicative Thinking from Additive Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Jennifer M.; Andreasen, Janet B.

    2013-01-01

    As students progress through elementary school, they encounter mathematics concepts that shift from additive to multiplicative situations (NCTM 2000). When they encounter fraction problems that require multiplicative thinking, they tend to incorrectly extend additive properties from whole numbers (Post et al. 1985). As a result, topics such as …

  8. 12 CFR 619.9010 - Additional security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional security. 619.9010 Section 619.9010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9010 Additional security. Supplementary collateral to the primary security taken in connection with the loan....

  9. 12 CFR 619.9010 - Additional security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional security. 619.9010 Section 619.9010 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9010 Additional security. Supplementary collateral to the primary security taken in connection with the loan....

  10. 42 CFR 68.16 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional conditions. 68.16 Section 68.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.16 Additional conditions. (a)...

  11. 42 CFR 68.16 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional conditions. 68.16 Section 68.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.16 Additional conditions. (a)...

  12. 46 CFR 308.502 - Additional insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional insurance. 308.502 Section 308.502 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance I-Introduction § 308.502 Additional insurance. The assured may place increased value...

  13. 46 CFR 308.502 - Additional insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional insurance. 308.502 Section 308.502 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance I-Introduction § 308.502 Additional insurance. The assured may place increased value...

  14. 46 CFR 308.502 - Additional insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional insurance. 308.502 Section 308.502 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Introduction § 308.502 Additional insurance. The assured may place increased value...

  15. 77 FR 27737 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List... nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. Comments Must...

  16. 77 FR 55195 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This... persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. DATES: Effective Date: 10/8/2012....

  17. 78 FR 5423 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the... furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities....

  18. 77 FR 44220 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List... nonprofit agency employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. DATES: Comments Must...

  19. 42 CFR 59.12 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional conditions. 59.12 Section 59.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS FOR FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES Project Grants for Family Planning Services § 59.12 Additional conditions. The Secretary may,...

  20. 42 CFR 59.12 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 59.12 Section 59.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS FOR FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES Project Grants for Family Planning Services § 59.12 Additional conditions. The Secretary may,...

  1. 46 CFR 117.25 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements. 117.25 Section 117.25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... General Provisions § 117.25 Additional requirements. (a) Each item of lifesaving equipment carried...

  2. 46 CFR 117.25 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements. 117.25 Section 117.25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... General Provisions § 117.25 Additional requirements. (a) Each item of lifesaving equipment carried...

  3. 46 CFR 117.25 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements. 117.25 Section 117.25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... General Provisions § 117.25 Additional requirements. (a) Each item of lifesaving equipment carried...

  4. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  5. 10 CFR 71.65 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional requirements. 71.65 Section 71.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.65 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or...

  6. 10 CFR 781.53 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional licenses. 781.53 Section 781.53 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE PATENT LICENSING REGULATIONS Types of Licenses and Conditions for Licensing § 781.53... of Energy from granting additional nonexclusive, or exclusive, or partially exclusive licenses...

  7. 10 CFR 781.53 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional licenses. 781.53 Section 781.53 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE PATENT LICENSING REGULATIONS Types of Licenses and Conditions for Licensing § 781.53... of Energy from granting additional nonexclusive, or exclusive, or partially exclusive licenses...

  8. 78 FR 22209 - Additional Synthetic Drug Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 26 Additional Synthetic Drug Testing AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... NRC amend its Fitness for Duty program regulations to amend drug testing requirements to test for additional synthetic drugs currently not included in the regulations. The NRC determined that the...

  9. 31 CFR 354.10 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY SECURITIES OF THE STUDENT LOAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION (SALLIE MAE) § 354.10 Additional provisions. (a) Additional... Securities in Book-entry System. The interest of a debtor in a Security Entitlement may be reached by...

  10. 31 CFR 354.10 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY SECURITIES OF THE STUDENT LOAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION (SALLIE MAE) § 354.10 Additional provisions. (a) Additional... Securities in Book-entry System. The interest of a debtor in a Security Entitlement may be reached by...

  11. 31 CFR 354.10 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY SECURITIES OF THE STUDENT LOAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION (SALLIE MAE) § 354.10 Additional provisions. (a) Additional... Securities in Book-entry System. The interest of a debtor in a Security Entitlement may be reached by...

  12. 31 CFR 354.10 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY SECURITIES OF THE STUDENT LOAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION (SALLIE MAE) § 354.10 Additional provisions. (a) Additional... Securities in Book-entry System. The interest of a debtor in a Security Entitlement may be reached by...

  13. 10 CFR 81.50 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional licenses. 81.50 Section 81.50 Energy NUCLEAR... Inventions-Patents and Applications § 81.50 Additional licenses. Subject to any outstanding licenses, nothing... exclusive licenses for inventions covered by this subpart when the Commission determines that to do so...

  14. 10 CFR 81.50 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional licenses. 81.50 Section 81.50 Energy NUCLEAR... Inventions-Patents and Applications § 81.50 Additional licenses. Subject to any outstanding licenses, nothing... exclusive licenses for inventions covered by this subpart when the Commission determines that to do so...

  15. 10 CFR 81.50 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional licenses. 81.50 Section 81.50 Energy NUCLEAR... Inventions-Patents and Applications § 81.50 Additional licenses. Subject to any outstanding licenses, nothing... exclusive licenses for inventions covered by this subpart when the Commission determines that to do so...

  16. 10 CFR 81.50 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional licenses. 81.50 Section 81.50 Energy NUCLEAR... Inventions-Patents and Applications § 81.50 Additional licenses. Subject to any outstanding licenses, nothing... exclusive licenses for inventions covered by this subpart when the Commission determines that to do so...

  17. 10 CFR 81.50 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional licenses. 81.50 Section 81.50 Energy NUCLEAR... Inventions-Patents and Applications § 81.50 Additional licenses. Subject to any outstanding licenses, nothing... exclusive licenses for inventions covered by this subpart when the Commission determines that to do so...

  18. Contexts for Column Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Fernandez, Jorge M.; Velazquez Estrella, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss their approach to column addition and subtraction algorithms. Adapting an original idea of Paul Cobb and Erna Yackel's from "A Contextual Investigation of Three-Digit Addition and Subtraction" related to packing and unpacking candy in a candy factory, the authors provided an analogous context by…

  19. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  20. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...