Science.gov

Sample records for rhodium additions

  1. Rhodium-catalyzed anti-Markovnikov addition of secondary amines to arylacetylenes at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kazunori; Kochi, Takuya; Kakiuchi, Fumitoshi

    2011-08-01

    An efficient method for synthesis of E-enamines by the anti-Markovnikov addition of secondary amines to terminal alkynes is described. The reaction of a variety of aryl- and heteroarylacetylenes proceeded at room temperature using a combination of a 8-quinolinolato rhodium complex and P(p-MeOC(6)H(4))(3) as a catalyst. The products were obtained as enamines by simple bulb-to-bulb distillation. PMID:21699251

  2. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  3. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric addition of arylboronic acids to cyclic N-sulfonyl ketimines towards the synthesis of α,α-diaryl-α-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    Rhodium/chiral diene complex-catalyzed asymmetric addition of arylboronic acids to cyclic ketimines having an ester group proceeded to give the corresponding α-amino acid derivatives in high yields with high enantioselectivity. The cyclic amino acid derivative was transformed into a linear α,α-diaryl-substituted α-N-methylamino acid ester.

  4. RHODIUM CATALYZED CONJUGATED ADDITION OF UNSATURATED CARBONYL COMPOUNDS BY TRIPHENYLBISMUTH IN AQUEOUS MEDIA AND UNDER AN AIR ATMOSPHERE. (R822668)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In the presence of a rhodium catalyst, small alpha, Greek,small beta, Greek-unsaturated est...

  5. Highly Enantioselective Rhodium-Catalyzed Addition of Arylboroxines to Simple Aryl Ketones: Efficient Synthesis of Escitalopram.

    PubMed

    Huang, Linwei; Zhu, Jinbin; Jiao, Guangjun; Wang, Zheng; Yu, Xingxin; Deng, Wei-Ping; Tang, Wenjun

    2016-03-24

    Highly enantioselective additions of arylboroxines to simple aryl ketones have been achieved for the first time with a Rh/(R,R,R,R)-WingPhos catalyst, thus providing a range of chiral diaryl alkyl carbinols with excellent ee values and yields. (R,R,R,R)-WingPhos has been proven to be crucial for the high reactivity and enantioselectivity. The method has enabled a new, concise, and enantioselective synthesis of the antidepressant drug escitalopram. PMID:26933831

  6. Preparation of arylzinc reagents and their use in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric 1,4-addition for the synthesis of 2-aryl-4-piperidones.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Ryo; Hayashi, Tamio

    2007-01-01

    A protocol for the catalytic asymmetric synthesis of 2-aryl-4-piperidones with high enantiomeric excess (ee) (typically > or = 99% ee) has been described here. The preparation of arylzinc reagents, which are used as nucleophiles in catalysis, is also included. The whole protocol can be completed in 10-20 h, starting from the preparation of the arylzinc reagents, depending on the reaction time of the rhodium-catalyzed process. A detailed protocol is described using the preparation of 4-fluorophenylzinc chloride and its addition to benzyl 3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-1(2H)-pyridinecarboxylate in the presence of [RhCl((R)-binap)]2 as an example.

  7. Multiferroic rhodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Moro, Ramiro; Bowlan, John; de Heer, Walt A; Kirilyuk, Andrei

    2014-10-10

    Simultaneous magnetic and electric deflection measurements of rhodium clusters (Rh(N), 6 ≤ N ≤ 40) reveal ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at low temperatures, while neither property exists in the bulk metal. Temperature-independent magnetic moments (up to 1 μ(B) per atom) are observed, and superparamagnetic blocking temperatures up to 20 K. Ferroelectric dipole moments on the order of 1D with transition temperatures up to 30 K are observed. Ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity coexist in rhodium clusters in the measured size range, with size-dependent variations in the transition temperatures that tend to be anticorrelated in the range n = 6-25. Both effects diminish with size and essentially vanish at N = 40. The ferroelectric properties suggest a Jahn-Teller ground state. These experiments represent the first example of multiferroic behavior in pure metal clusters. PMID:25375737

  8. EVIDENCE FOR CO DISSOCIATION ON RHODIUM SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, D.G.; Dubois, L.H.; Sexton, B.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-06-01

    Carbon monoxide adsorbs molecularly on rhodium surfaces at 300K, but if the rhodium samples are heated in the presence of carbon monoxide, there is evidence for carbon-oxygen bond breaking at step and/or defect sites. The effects of step and defect site density, subsurface oxygen concentration, and oxygen dissolution into the rhodium lattice on CO dissociation are discussed.

  9. Asymmetric dual catalysis via fragmentation of a single rhodium precursor complex.

    PubMed

    Song, Liangliang; Gong, Lei; Meggers, Eric

    2016-06-01

    A strategy for dual transition metal catalysis and organocatalysis is reported via the in situ disintegration of a single rhodium complex. The hereby generated chiral Lewis acid and l-β-phenylalanine synergistically catalyze the Michael addition of α,α-disubstituted aldehydes to α,β-unsaturated 2-acyl imidazoles under the formation of vicinal quaternary/tertiary stereocenters. Conveniently, the chiral-at-metal rhodium catalyst can be synthesized in just two steps starting from rhodium trichloride without the need for any chromatography. PMID:27231188

  10. Degradation of nonmodified and rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Wierzbińska, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Kamil; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-base superalloy CMSX 4 used in the turbine blades of aircraft engines was coated with rhodium layer (0.5-μm thick). Next coated CMSX 4 superalloy was aluminized by the CVD method. The rhodium modified aluminide coating and nonmodified aluminide coating were oxidized at 1100°C at the air atmosphere. The rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. The spallation equal 62% of the total area was observed on the surface of the nonmodified coating whereas only 36% spallation area was observed on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating after the oxidation test. The oxide layer formed on the surface of the nonmodified coating was composed of nonprotective (Ni,Cr)Al2 O4 and (Ni,Cr)O phases. Aluminium in the coating reacts with oxygen, forming a protective α-Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating. When the oxide cracks and spalls due to oxidation, additional aluminium from the coating diffuses to the surface to form the oxide. The presence of protective Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating slows coating degradation. Therefore, rhodium modified aluminide coating has better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one.

  11. Degradation of nonmodified and rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Wierzbińska, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Kamil; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-base superalloy CMSX 4 used in the turbine blades of aircraft engines was coated with rhodium layer (0.5-μm thick). Next coated CMSX 4 superalloy was aluminized by the CVD method. The rhodium modified aluminide coating and nonmodified aluminide coating were oxidized at 1100°C at the air atmosphere. The rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. The spallation equal 62% of the total area was observed on the surface of the nonmodified coating whereas only 36% spallation area was observed on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating after the oxidation test. The oxide layer formed on the surface of the nonmodified coating was composed of nonprotective (Ni,Cr)Al2 O4 and (Ni,Cr)O phases. Aluminium in the coating reacts with oxygen, forming a protective α-Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating. When the oxide cracks and spalls due to oxidation, additional aluminium from the coating diffuses to the surface to form the oxide. The presence of protective Al2 O3 oxide on the surface of the rhodium modified aluminide coating slows coating degradation. Therefore, rhodium modified aluminide coating has better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. PMID:27018853

  12. Rhodium Nanoparticles for Ultraviolet Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Anne M.; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Sanz, Juan Marcos; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O.

    2015-02-01

    The non-oxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photo-damage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 minutes. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically-enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  13. Rhodium nanoparticles for ultraviolet plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne M; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Marcos Sanz, Juan; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O

    2015-02-11

    The nonoxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photodamage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 min. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  14. Structure and transport behavior of In-filled cobalt rhodium antimonide skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Eilertsen, James; Berthelot, Romain; Sleight, Arthur W.; Subramanian, M.A.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of indium icosahedral void-site filling on the transport properties of cobalt and rhodium antimonide solid solutions is investigated. Co{sub 4-x}Rh{sub x}Sb{sub 12} and indium-filled In{sub 0.1}Co{sub 4-x}Rh{sub x}Sb{sub 12} solid solutions were synthesized. Partial rhodium substitution produces a distinct clustering-induced lattice strain that is partly relieved upon indium substitution into the skutterudite icosahedral void-sites. Indium lowers the thermal conductivity of all samples near room temperature. A distinct increase in thermal conductivity is observed in all indium-filled rhodium substituted samples at elevated temperatures and is attributed to bipolar thermal conductivity. In addition, the indium-filled samples were subjected to a 6-day heat treatment at 673 K. Void-site filled indium was found to be metastable at this temperature, and was found to partially precipitate during the 6-day heat treatment; thereby presenting concerns over the long-term stability of thermoelectric devices based on indium-filled skutterudites. - Graphical Abstract: Strain in the cobalt rhodium skutterudite solid solutions decreases upon indium filling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unfilled and indium-filled cobalt and rhodium skutterudite solid solutions were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indium filling stabilizes the cobalt and rhodium skutterudite solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermoelectric properties of all compositions are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal conductivity of rhodium-rich compositions is strongly affected by indium filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Void-site filled indium was found to be metastable.

  15. Microstructure and oxidation behaviour investigation of rhodium modified aluminide coating deposited on CMSX 4 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Morgiel, Jerzy; Romanowska, Jolanta; Sieniawski, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The CMSX 4 superalloy was coated with rhodium 0.5-μm thick layer and next aluminized by the CVD method. The coating consisted of two layers: the additive and the interdiffusion one. The outward diffusion of nickel from the substrate turned out to be a coating growth dominating factor. The additive layer consists of the β-NiAl phase, whereas the interdiffusion layer consists of the β-NiAl phase with precipitates of σ and μ phases. Rhodium has dissolved in the coating up to the same level in the matrix and in the precipitates. The oxidation test proved that the rhodium modified aluminide coating showed about twice better oxidation resistance than the nonmodified one. PMID:26892917

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of rhodium-ligand interaction in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shuang; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Licence, Peter

    2016-02-01

    We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the interaction between the rhodium atom and phosphine ligands in six 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C8C1Im][X]). The formation of a mono-phosphine rhodium complex based upon addition of triphenylphosphine (PPh3) is confirmed by XPS in all ionic liquids studied herein. Due to the electron donation effect of the ligand, the rhodium atom becomes more negatively charged and thus exhibits a lower measured binding energy. The influence of the anion basicity on the formation of different types of rhodium complexes is also investigated. By introducing a biphosphine ligand, a chelated diphosphine rhodium complex is formed in ionic liquids with more basic anions and verified by both XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). The measured Rh 3d binding energies are correlated to the reaction selectivity of a hydroformylation reaction which inspires a method to design a metal catalyst to control the chemical reaction towards desired products in the future.

  17. From para-Benziporphyrin to Rhodium(III) 21-Carbaporphyrins: Imprinting Rh⋅⋅⋅η(2)-CC, Rh⋅⋅⋅η(2)-CO, and Rh⋅⋅⋅η(2)-CH Coordination Motifs.

    PubMed

    Idec, Aneta; Szterenberg, Ludmiła; Latos-Grażyński, Lechosław

    2015-08-24

    Rhodium(III) para-benziporphyrin alters the fundamental reactivity of the built-in para-phenylene moiety. Due to additional macrocyclic stabilization, a sequence of intramolecular rearrangements are triggered to afford rhodium(III) 21-carbaporphyrin, which incorporates the rhodacyclopropane motif. The peculiar reversible transformations of the bridging methylene unit provide an example of selective and reversible aliphatic C-H bond elimination. Rhodium(III) 21-carbaporphyrin can be oxygenated to rhodium(III) 21-oxy-21-carbaporphyrin, whereas the metal ion interacts with the C(21)-O(25) fragment in an η(2) fashion. This species demonstrates a remarkable axial affinity toward alkenes.

  18. Rhodium(i), rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) carbaporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Adiraju, Venkata A K; Ferrence, Gregory M; Lash, Timothy D

    2016-09-21

    Treatment of a benzocarbaporphyrin with [Rh(CO)2Cl]2 in refluxing dichloromethane gave a rhodium(i) dicarbonyl complex, and further reaction in refluxing pyridine afforded an organometallic rhodium(iii) derivative. The carbaporphyrin also reacted with [Ir(COD)Cl]2 and pyridine in refluxing p-xylene to generate a related iridium(iii) compound. These novel metalated porphyrinoids retained strongly diatropic characteristics and were fully characterized by XRD. PMID:27529466

  19. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Stabilized and Manganese-Modified Rhodium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Highly Selective Synthesis of Ethanol and Acetaldehyde from Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yulin; Deng, Weihua; Guo, Enruo; Chung, Po-Wen; Chen, Senniang; Trewyn, Brian; Brown, Robert; Lin, Victor

    2012-03-30

    Well-defined and monodispersed rhodium nanoparticles as small as approximately 2 nm were encapsulated in situ and stabilized in a mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) framework during the synthesis of the mesoporous material. Although both the activity and selectivity of MSN-encapsulated rhodium nanoparticles in CO hydrogenation could be improved by the addition of manganese oxide as expected, the carbon selectivity for C2 oxygenates (including ethanol and acetaldehyde) was unprecedentedly high at 74.5 % with a very small amount of methanol produced if rhodium nanoparticles were modified by manganese oxide with very close interaction.

  20. Oxygen Reduction Mechanism of Monometallic Rhodium Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Robert L; Teets, Thomas S; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-08-01

    The reduction of O2 to H2O mediated by a series of electronically varied rhodium hydride complexes of the form cis,trans-Rh(III)Cl2H(CNAd)(P(4-X-C6H4)3)2 (2) (CNAd = 1-adamantylisocyanide; X = F (2a), Cl (2b), Me (2c), OMe (2d)) was examined through synthetic and kinetic studies. Rhodium(III) hydride 2 reacts with O2 to afford H2O with concomitant generation of trans-Rh(III)Cl3(CNAd)(P(4-X-C6H4)3)2 (3). Kinetic studies of the reaction of the hydride complex 2 with O2 in the presence of HCl revealed a two-term rate law consistent with an HX reductive elimination (HXRE) mechanism, where O2 binds to a rhodium(I) metal center and generates an η(2)-peroxo complex intermediate, trans-Rh(III)Cl(CNAd)(η(2)-O2)(P(4-X-C6H4)3)2 (4), and a hydrogen-atom abstraction (HAA) mechanism, which entails the direct reaction of O2 with the hydride. Experimental data reveal that the rate of reduction of O2 to H2O is enhanced by electron-withdrawing phosphine ligands. Complex 4 was independently prepared by the addition of O2 to trans-Rh(I)Cl(CNAd)(P(4-X-C6H4)3)2 (1). The reactivity of 4 toward HCl reveals that such peroxo complexes are plausible intermediates in the reduction of O2 to H2O. These results show that the given series of electronically varied rhodium(III) hydride complexes facilitate the reduction of O2 to H2O according to a two-term rate law comprising HXRE and HAA pathways and that the relative rates of these two pathways, which can occur simultaneously and competitively, can be systematically modulated by variation of the electronic properties of the ancillary ligand set. PMID:26168057

  1. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  2. Effet de la concentration du cuivre ou de l'argent sur les propriétés des agrégats de rhodium déposés sur silice amorphe dans l'hydrogénation du 1,3 butadiène

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksibi, Z.; Ghorbel1, A.; Bellamy, B.

    1999-02-01

    Some samples with rhodium, rhodium-copper and rhodium-silver deposited on amorphous silica by vapor deposition of the metallic phase under high-vacuum (P < 5.10-7 Pa) have been prepared. The effect of rhodium cluster size and copper or silver addition on catalytic properties of rhodium in the 1,3 butadiène hydrogenation was studied. Results show that the reaction is sensitive to the size of rhodium aggregates and that there is an important difference between the effect of copper and silver on the rhodium properties. Indeed copper forms an alloy with rhodium and provokes a poison effect on the activity of the noble metal, whereas silver exhibits a mask effect on the rhodium particles without forming alloy with it. Des échantillons mono-métalliques au rhodium et bimétalliques rhodium-cuivre et rhodium-argent déposés sur une silice amorphe par vapodéposition d'une phase métallique dans des conditions ultra-vide (P < 5.10-7 Pa) ont été préparés. L'effet de la taille des agrégats de rhodium ainsi que celui de l'addition du cuivre ou de l'argent sur les propriétés catalytiques du rhodium dans l'hydrogénation du 1,3 butadiène ont été étudiés. Les résultats montrent que la réaction étudiée est sensible à la taille des agrégats de rhodium et nous notons une différence importante entre l'effet du cuivre et de l'argent sur les propriétés du rhodium. En effet le cuivre forme un alliage avec le rhodium et provoque un effet poison d?où une modification de l'activité du métal noble, alors que l'argent exerce un effet de masque sur les particules de rhodium sans toutefois former d'alliage avec ce dernier.

  3. Spectroscopic and electron microscopic investigation of iron oxides formed in a highly alkaline medium in the presence of rhodium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the presence of rhodium ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Acicular α-FeOOH particles precipitated in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. Characterization of α-FeOOH samples formed in the presence of rhodium ions showed a somewhat smaller mean crystallite size, increased unit-cell dimensions, a reduced average hyperfine magnetic field and a slight shift in the position of IR absorption bands in comparison with the reference α-FeOOH sample. By additional heating of the precipitation system, α-FeOOH precipitated in the presence of rhodium ions transformed to α-Fe 2O 3 crystals in the form of hexagonal bipyramids via a dissolution-recrystallization process. Metallic rhodium nanoparticles were formed simultaneously by the reduction of Rh 3+ ions in the presence of the products of TMAH thermal decomposition (trimethylamine and methanol). These rhodium nanoparticles acted as a catalyst for the reductive dissolution of α-Fe 2O 3 particles and the formation of Fe 3O 4 crystals in the form of octahedrons.

  4. Distribution of Rhodium in Mice Submitted to Treatment With the Adduct of Rhodium Propionate and Sodium Isonicotinate

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Renato; de Oliveira, Elizabeth; Zyngier, Szulim Ber

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of rhodium in Balb/c mice following intraperitoneal (ip) administration of a solution of adduct of rhodium propionate and sodium isonicotinate has been investigated. The metal concentration was determined in blood and in the following organ tissues: brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, testes, and uterus/ovary, and the rhodium concentration was obtained by Inductively Coupled Argon Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The metal was detected in all organ tissues examined, mainly in spleen, liver, uterus/ovary and heart. Nine days after the injection, traces of rhodium were found in the liver and kidneys and, twenty days after the injection, only in the liver. PMID:18475764

  5. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  6. Cyclopentadiene-mediated hydride transfer from rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Pitman, C L; Finster, O N L; Miller, A J M

    2016-07-12

    Attempts to generate a proposed rhodium hydride catalytic intermediate instead resulted in isolation of (Cp*H)Rh(bpy)Cl (1), a pentamethylcyclopentadiene complex, formed by C-H bond-forming reductive elimination from the fleeting rhodium hydride. The hydride transfer ability of diene 1 was explored through thermochemistry and hydride transfer reactions, including the reduction of NAD(+). PMID:26949917

  7. Rhodium oxides in unusual oxidation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Barbara Alice

    Mixed valence RhIII/RhIV oxides have been proposed as a promising class of candidate compounds for superconductivity. Unfortunately, it is difficult to stabilize rhodates with a formal oxidation state approaching RhIV, as other techniques used for the synthesis of rhodium. oxides favor the most commonly observed formal oxidation state, RhIII. One technique which has been used to stabilize metal oxides in high formal oxidation states is crystallization from molten hydroxides. This thesis explores the use of molten hydroxides to enhance the reactivity of rhodium oxides in order to synthesize rhodates with high formal oxidation states. K0.5RhO2, Rb0.2RhO2, and CsxRhO2 were synthesized from pure alkali metal hydroxides. All crystallized with a previously unobserved polytype in the alkali metal rhodate system. Due to the low activity of dissolved oxygen species in LiOH and NaOH, LiRhO2 and NaRhO2 cannot be crystallized. The formal oxidation state of rhodium in AxRhO2 (A = K, Rb, Cs) is a function of the alkali metal hydroxide used to synthesize these oxides. These materials exhibit remarkable stability for layered metal oxides containing the heavier alkali metals, but all phases are susceptible to intercalation by water. The synthesis, structural characterization, magnetic susceptibility, and reactivity of these oxides are reported. Sr2RhO4 and a new rhodate were crystallized from a KOH-Sr(OH)2 flux. The synthesis and characterization of these materials is reported. Efforts to substitute platinum for rhodium in Sr 2RhO4 are also discussed. Mixed alkali metal-alkaline earth metal hydroxide fluxes were used to crystallize LiSr3RhO6, and NaSr3RhO 6. The synthesis of LiSr3RhO6 and NaSr3RhO 6 represents the first example of the stabilization of a rhodium oxide with a formal oxidation state approaching RhV. X-ray diffraction, electron beam microprobe analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, potentiometric titrations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility

  8. Terminal phosphanido rhodium complexes mediating catalytic P-P and P-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Geer, Ana M; Serrano, Ángel L; de Bruin, Bas; Ciriano, Miguel A; Tejel, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Complexes with terminal phosphanido (M-PR2) functionalities are believed to be crucial intermediates in new catalytic processes involving the formation of P-P and P-C bonds. We showcase here the isolation and characterization of mononuclear phosphanide rhodium complexes ([RhTp(H)(PR2)L]) that result from the oxidative addition of secondary phosphanes, a reaction that was also explored computationally. These compounds are active catalysts for the dehydrocoupling of PHPh2 to Ph2P-PPh2. The hydrophosphination of dimethyl maleate and the unactivated olefin ethylene is also reported. Reliable evidence for the prominent role of mononuclear phosphanido rhodium species in these reactions is also provided.

  9. Chemical Posttranslational Modification with Designed Rhodium(II) Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, S C; Minus, M B; Ball, Z T

    2016-01-01

    Natural enzymes use molecular recognition to perform exquisitely selective transformations on nucleic acids, proteins, and natural products. Rhodium(II) catalysts mimic this selectivity, using molecular recognition to allow selective modification of proteins with a variety of functionalized diazo reagents. The rhodium catalysts and the diazo reactivity have been successfully applied to a variety of protein folds, the chemistry succeeds in complex environments such as cell lysate, and a simple protein blot method accurately assesses modification efficiency. The studies with rhodium catalysts provide a new tool to study and probe protein-binding events, as well as a new synthetic approach to protein conjugates for medical, biochemical, or materials applications. PMID:27586326

  10. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Lim, Thong Leng; Yoon, Tiem Leong

    2015-04-01

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  11. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  12. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  13. Polyethylene-bound rhodium(I) hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergbreiter, D.E.; Chandran, R.

    1987-01-07

    Homogeneous, recoverable hydrogenation catalysts were prepared with use of functionalized ethylene oligomers as ligands. Phosphine groups were introduced onto ethylene oligomers following anionic oligomerization of ethylene. The product polyethylenediphenylphosphine ligands were then exchanged with triphenylphosphine or ethylene ligands to prepare ethylene oligomer ligated rhodium(I) complexes. These Rh(I) complexes had the solubility of polyethylene and dissolved at 90-110/sup 0/C in hydrocarbon solvents but quantitatively precipitated at 25/sup 0/C. Less than 0.1% of the charged rhodium was lost in each dissolution precipitation cycle. The rhodium(I) complexes so prepared were shown to have about 80% of the activity of tris(triphenylphosphine)rhodium chloride in hydrogenation of various alkenes including 1-octene, ..delta../sup 2/-cholestene, cyclooctene, cyclododecene, styrene, and ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene. /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy and reactivity studies were used to characterize these catalysts.

  14. Low gravity containerless processing of immiscible gold rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry

    1986-01-01

    Under normal one-g conditions immiscible alloys segregate extensively during solidification due to sedementation of the more dense of the immiscible liquid phases. However, under low-g conditions it should be possible to form a dispersion of the two immiscible liquids and maintain this dispersed structure during solidification. Immiscible (hypermonotectic) gold-rhodium alloys were processed in the Marshall Space Flight Center 105 meter drop tube in order to investigate the influence of low gravity, containerless solidification on their microstructure. Hypermonotectic alloys composed of 65 atomic % rhodium exhibited a tendency for the gold rich liquid to wet the outer surface of the containerless processed samples. This tendency led to extensive segregation in several cases. However, well dispersed microstructures consisting of 2 to 3 micron diameter rhodium-rich spheres in a gold-rich matrix were produced in 23.4 atomic % rhodium alloys. This is one of the best dispersions obtained in research on immiscible alloy-systems to data.

  15. Branching Out: Rhodium-Catalyzed Allylation with Alkynes and Allenes.

    PubMed

    Koschker, Philipp; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-08-16

    We present a new and efficient strategy for the atom-economic transformation of both alkynes and allenes to allylic functionalized structures via a Rh-catalyzed isomerization/addition reaction which has been developed in our working group. Our methodology thus grants access to an important structural class valued in modern organic chemistry for both its versatility for further functionalization and the potential for asymmetric synthesis with the construction of a new stereogenic center. This new methodology, inspired by mechanistic investigations by Werner in the late 1980s and based on preliminary work by Yamamoto and Trost, offers an attractive alternative to other established methods for allylic functionalization such as allylic substitution or allylic oxidation. The main advantage of our methodology consists of the inherent atom economy in comparison to allylic oxidation or substitution, which both produce stoichiometric amounts of waste and, in case of the substitution reaction, require prefunctionalization of the starting material. Starting out with the discovery of a highly branched-selective coupling reaction of carboxylic acids with terminal alkynes using a Rh(I)/DPEphos complex as the catalyst system, over the past 5 years we were able to continuously expand upon this chemistry, introducing various (pro)nucleophiles for the selective C-O, C-S, C-N, and C-C functionalization of both alkynes and the double-bond isomeric allenes by choosing the appropriate rhodium/bidentate phosphine catalyst. Thus, valuable compounds such as branched allylic ethers, sulfones, amines, or γ,δ-unsaturated ketones were successfully synthesized in high yields and with a broad substrate scope. Beyond the branched selectivity inherent to rhodium, many of the presented methodologies display additional degrees of selectivity in regard to regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective transformations, with one example even proceeding via a dynamic kinetic resolution. Many advances

  16. Size control of rhodium particles of silica-supported catalysts using water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Toshiaki; Kim, Won Young; Nagata, Hideo; Wakabayashi, Katsuhiko

    1997-11-01

    Effects of components of water-in-oil microemulsions on rhodium particle sizes of silica-supported rhodium catalysts were investigated in the catalyst preparation method using microemulsion. In the case of the microemulsion of polyoxyethylene(23)dodecyl ether/ n-alcohols/RhCl 3 aq., the rhodium particle size increased from 3.4 to 5.0 nm as the specific permittivity of the organic solvent increased. The chain length of hydrophilic group of polyoxyethylene- p-nonylphenyl ether ( n = 5 to 15) employed as surfactants had an effect on the rhodium particle size where the rhodium size ranged between 2.0 and 3.6 nm. The rhodium particle size was 1.5 nm in the case of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfocuccinate and this value was found to be the smallest. These results could be interpreted in terms of the adsorption of the surfactant on rhodium-hydrazine particle surface.

  17. Dicarba-closo-dodecarborane-containing half-sandwich complexes of ruthenium, osmium, rhodium and iridium: biological relevance and synthetic strategies.

    PubMed

    Barry, Nicolas P E; Sadler, Peter J

    2012-04-21

    This review describes how the incorporation of dicarba-closo-dodecarboranes into half-sandwich complexes of ruthenium, osmium, rhodium and iridium might lead to the development of a new class of compounds with applications in medicine. Such a combination not only has unexplored potential in traditional areas such as Boron Neutron Capture Therapy agents, but also as pharmacophores for the targeting of biologically important proteins and the development of targeted drugs. The synthetic pathways used for the syntheses of dicarba-closo-dodecarboranes-containing half-sandwich complexes of ruthenium, osmium, rhodium and iridium are also reviewed. Complexes with a wide variety of geometries and characteristics can be prepared. Examples of addition reactions on the metal centre, B-H activation, transmetalation reactions and/or direct formation of metal-metal bonds are discussed (103 references).

  18. Discovery of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, and rhodium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, A.M.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Currently, 31 rubidium, 35 strontium, 35 molybdenum, and 38 rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. In vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through Caucasian skin.

    PubMed

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; Du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Jordaan, A; Du Plessis, J L

    2014-12-01

    During platinum group metals (PGMs) refining the possibility exists for dermal exposure to PGM salts. The dermal route has been questioned as an alternative route of exposure that could contribute to employee sensitisation, even though literature has been focused on respiratory exposure. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through intact Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3mg/ml of metal, K2PtCl4 and RhCl3 respectively, was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24h experiment, and analysed with high resolution ICP-MS. Skin was digested and analysed by ICP-OES. Results indicated cumulative permeation with prolonged exposure, with a significantly higher mass of platinum permeating after 24h when compared to rhodium. The mass of platinum retained inside the skin and the flux of platinum across the skin was significantly higher than that of rhodium. Permeated and skin retained platinum and rhodium may therefore contribute to sensitisation and indicates a health risk associated with dermal exposure in the workplace.

  20. Electronic and magnetic properties of small rhodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of rhodium-atomic clusters. The lowest energy structures at the semi-empirical level of rhodium clusters are first obtained from a novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as PTMBHGA, where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. The structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation. For the purpose of calculating the magnetic moment of a given cluster, we calculate the optimized structure as a function of the spin multiplicity within the DFT framework. The resultant magnetic moments with the lowest energies so obtained allow us to work out the magnetic moment as a function of cluster size. Rhodium atomic clusters are found to display a unique variation in the magnetic moment as the cluster size varies. However, Rh{sub 4} and Rh{sub 6} are found to be nonmagnetic. Electronic structures of the magnetic ground-state structures are also investigated within the DFT framework. The results are compared against those based on different theoretical approaches available in the literature.

  1. Ring Expansion and Rearrangements of Rhodium(II) Azavinyl Carbenes

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Nicklas; Worrell, Brady T.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient, regioselective and convergent method for the ring expansion and rearrangement of 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles under rhodium(II)-catalyzed conditions is described. These denitrogenative reactions form substituted enaminone and olefin-based products, which in the former case can be further functionalized to unique products rendering the sulfonyl triazole traceless. PMID:23161725

  2. Interfacial bonding stabilizes rhodium and rhodium oxide nanoparticles on layered Nb oxide and Ta oxide supports.

    PubMed

    Strayer, Megan E; Binz, Jason M; Tanase, Mihaela; Shahri, Seyed Mehdi Kamali; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2014-04-16

    Metal nanoparticles are commonly supported on metal oxides, but their utility as catalysts is limited by coarsening at high temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously stable. To understand this, the nanoparticle-support interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), and synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques. Nanosheets derived from the layered oxides KCa2Nb3O10, K4Nb6O17, and RbTaO3 were compared as supports to nanosheets of Na-TSM, a synthetic fluoromica (Na0.66Mg2.68(Si3.98Al0.02)O10.02F1.96), and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O. High surface area SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports were also used for comparison in the ITC experiments. A Born-Haber cycle analysis of ITC data revealed an exothermic interaction between Rh(OH)3 nanoparticles and the layered niobate and tantalate supports, with ΔH values in the range -32 kJ·mol(-1) Rh to -37 kJ·mol(-1) Rh. In contrast, the interaction enthalpy was positive with SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports. The strong interfacial bonding in the former case led to "reverse" ripening of micrometer-size Rh(OH)3, which dispersed as 0.5 to 2 nm particles on the niobate and tantalate supports. In contrast, particles grown on Na-TSM and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O nanosheets were larger and had a broad size distribution. ETEM, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analyses were used to study the growth of supported nanoparticles under oxidizing and reducing conditions, as well as the transformation from Rh(OH)3 to Rh nanoparticles. Interfacial covalent bonding, possibly strengthened by d-electron acid/base interactions, appear to stabilize Rh(OH)3, Rh2O3, and Rh nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports. PMID:24654835

  3. Osazone anion radical complex of rhodium(III).

    PubMed

    Patra, Sarat Chandra; Biswas, Manas Kumar; Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2011-02-21

    One electron paramagnetic parent osazone complex of rhodium of type trans-Rh(L(NHPh)H(2))(PPh(3))(2)Cl(2) (1), defined as an osazone anion radical complex of rhodium(III), trans-Rh(III)(L(NHPh)H(2)(•-))(PPh(3))(2)Cl(2), 1((t-RhL•)), with a minor contribution (∼2%) of rhodium(II) electromer, trans-Rh(II)(L(NHPh)H(2))(PPh(3))(2)Cl(2), 1((t-Rh•L)), and their nonradical congener, trans-[Rh(III)(L(NHPh)H(2))(PPh(3))(2)Cl(2)]I(3) ([t-1](+)I(3)(-)), have been isolated and are substantiated by spectra, bond parameters, and DFT calculations on equivalent soft complexes [Rh(L(NHPh)H(2))(PMe(3))(2)Cl(2)] (3) and [Rh(L(NHPh)H(2))(PMe(3))(2)Cl(2)](+) (3(+)). 1 is not stable in solution and decomposes to [t-1](+) and a new rhodium(I) osazone complex, [Rh(I)(L(NHPh)H(2))(PPh(3))Cl] (2). 1 absorbs strongly at 351 nm due to MLCT and LLCT, while [t-1](+) and 2 absorb moderately in the range of 300-450 nm, respectively, due to LMCT and MLCT elucidated by TD-DFT calculations on 3((t-RhL•)), [t-3](+), and Rh(I)(L(NHPh)H(2))(PMe(3))Cl (4). EPR spectra of solids at 295 and 77 K, and dichloromethane-toluene frozen glass at 77 K of 1 are similar with g = 1.991, while g = 2.002 for the solid at 25 K. The EPR signal of 1 in dichloromethane solution is weaker (g = 1.992). In cyclic voltammetry, 1 displays two irreversible one electron transfer waves at +0.13 and -1.22 V, with respect to Fc(+)/Fc coupling, due to oxidation of 1((t-RhL•)) to [t-1](+) at the anode and reduction of rhodium(III) to rhodium(II), i.e., [t-1](+) to electromeric 1((t-Rh•L)) at the cathode. PMID:21261283

  4. Plasmonics in the UV range with Rhodium nanocubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Gutiérrez, Y.; Li, P.; Barreda, Á. I.; Watson, A. M.; Alcaraz de la Osa, R.; Finkelstein, G.; González, F.; Ortiz, D.; Saiz, J. M.; Sanz, J. M.; Everitt, H. O.; Liu, J.; Moreno, F.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonics in the UV-range constitutes a new challenge due to the increasing demand to detect, identify and destroy biological toxins, enhance biological imaging, and characterize semiconductor devices at the nanometer scale. Silver and aluminum have an efficient plasmonic performance in the near UV region, but oxidation reduces its performance in this range. Recent studies point out rhodium as one of the most promising metals for this purpose: it has a good plasmonic response in the UV and, as gold in the visible, it presents a low tendency to oxidation. Moreover, its easy fabrication through chemical means and its potential for photocatalytic applications, makes this material very attractive for building plasmonic tools in the UV. In this work, we will show an overview of our recent collaborative research with rhodium nanocubes (NC) for Plasmonics in the UV.

  5. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    Macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)(2+) (L = L-1 = cyclam and L-2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)(2)OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)(2)(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF(2))(2)(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)(2+). The new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

    2011-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

  7. Arylation of rhodium(II) azavinyl carbenes with boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Selander, Nicklas; Worrell, Brady T; Chuprakov, Stepan; Velaparthi, Subash; Fokin, Valery V

    2012-09-12

    A highly efficient and stereoselective arylation of in situ-generated azavinyl carbenes affording 2,2-diaryl enamines at ambient temperatures has been developed. These transition-metal carbenes are directly produced from readily available and stable 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles in the presence of a rhodium carboxylate catalyst. In several cases, the enamines generated in this reaction can be cyclized into substituted indoles employing copper catalysis. PMID:22913576

  8. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2009 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.; White, J. F.; Rummel, Becky L.

    2010-12-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been conducting research for the United States Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy, Biomass Program to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). This research has involved the screening of potential catalysts, and optimization of the more promising ones, using laboratory scale reactors. During 2009, the main goal of the testing program focused on optimizing selected supported catalysts containing rhodium (Rh) and manganese (Mn). Optimization involved examining different total concentrations and atomic ratios of Rh and Mn as well as that of the more promising promoters (Ir and Li) identified in the earlier screening studies. Evaluation of catalyst performance focused on attaining improvements with respect to the space-time-yield and converted carbon selectivity to C2+ oxygenates, with additional consideration given to the fraction of the oxygenates that were C2+ alcohols.

  9. Methoxy-Directed Aryl-to-Aryl 1,3-Rhodium Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jun-Feng; Ugrinov, Angel; Pillai, Anthony F. X.; Sun, Zhong-Ming; Zhao, Pinjing

    2015-01-01

    Through-space metal/hydrogen shift is an important strategy for transition metal-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of a Rh(I) 2,6-dimethoxybenzoate complex that underwent stoichiometric rearrangement via a highly unusual 1,3- rhodium migration. This aryl-to-aryl 1,3-Rh/H shift was also demonstrated in a Rh(I)-catalyzed decarboxylative conjugate addition to form a C-C bond at a meta position instead of the ipso-carboxyl position. A deuterium-labeling study under the conditions of Rh(I)-catalyzed protodecarboxylation revealed the involvement of an ortho-methoxy group in a multi-step pathway of consecutive sp3 and sp2 C-H bond activations. PMID:24171626

  10. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cernota, Paul D.

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with ({radical}7x{radical}7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  11. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

  12. Rhodium-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in cycloadditions, inspiration from the recent "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Shu, Xing-Zhong; Shu, Dongxu; Schienebeck, Casi M; Tang, Weiping

    2012-12-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters offers versatile entries to allene and vinyl carbene intermediates for various fascinating subsequent transformations. Most π-acidic metals (e.g. gold and platinum) are capable of facilitating these acyloxy migration events. However, very few of these processes involve redox chemistry, which are well-known for most other transition metals such as rhodium. The coupling of acyloxy migration of propargylic esters with oxidative addition, migratory insertion, and reductive elimination may lead to ample new opportunities for the design of new reactions. This tutorial review summarizes recent developments in Rh-catalyzed 1,3- and 1,2-acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in a number of cycloaddition reactions. Related Au- and Pt-catalyzed cycloadditions involving acyloxy migration are also discussed.

  13. Free Rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate magnetic carriers as potential strategies for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2(H2cit)4) has significant antitumor, cytotoxic, and cytostatic activity on Ehrlich ascite tumor. Although toxic to normal cells, its lower toxicity when compared to carboxylate analogues of rhodium (II) indicates Rh2(H2cit)4 as a promising agent for chemotherapy. Nevertheless, few studies have been performed to explore this potential. Superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (SPIOs) represent an attractive platform as carriers in drug delivery systems (DDS) because they can present greater specificity to tumor cells than normal cells. Thus, the association between Rh2(H2cit)4 and SPIOs can represent a strategy to enhance the former's therapeutic action. In this work, we report the cytotoxicity of free rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2(H2cit)4) and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles or magnetoliposomes, used as drug delivery systems, on both normal and carcinoma breast cell cultures. Results Treatment with free Rh2(H2cit)4 induced cytotoxicity that was dependent on dose, time, and cell line. The IC50 values showed that this effect was more intense on breast normal cells (MCF-10A) than on breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7 and 4T1). However, the treatment with 50 μM Rh2(H2cit)4-loaded maghemite nanoparticles (Magh-Rh2(H2cit)4) and Rh2(H2cit)4-loaded magnetoliposomes (Lip-Magh-Rh2(H2cit)4) induced a higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 and 4T1 than on MCF-10A (p < 0.05). These treatments enhanced cytotoxicity up to 4.6 times. These cytotoxic effects, induced by free Rh2(H2cit)4, were evidenced by morphological alterations such as nuclear fragmentation, membrane blebbing and phosphatidylserine exposure, reduction of actin filaments, mitochondrial condensation and an increase in number of vacuoles, suggesting that Rh2(H2cit)4 induces cell death by apoptosis. Conclusions The treatment with rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles and magnetoliposomes induced more specific cytotoxicity on breast carcinoma cells than on breast

  14. Conclusive evidence on the mechanism of the rhodium-mediated decyanative borylation.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; Oliván, Montserrat; Vélez, Andrea

    2015-09-30

    The stoichiometric reactions proposed in the mechanism of the rhodium-mediated decyanative borylation have been performed and all relevant intermediates isolated and characterized including their X-ray structures. Complex RhCl{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (1, xant(P(i)Pr2)2 = 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(diisopropylphosphino)xanthene) reacts with bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2pin2), in benzene, to give the rhodium(III) derivative RhHCl(Bpin){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (4) and PhBpin. The reaction involves the oxidative addition of B2pin2 to 1 to give RhCl(Bpin)2{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}, which eliminates ClBpin generating Rh(Bpin){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (2). The reaction of the latter with the solvent yields PhBpin and the monohydride RhH{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (6), which adds the eliminated ClBpin. Complex 4 and its catecholboryl counterpart RhHCl(Bcat){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (7) have also been obtained by oxidative addition of HBR2 to 1. Complex 2 is the promoter of the decyanative borylation. Thus, benzonitrile and 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile insert into the Rh-B bond of 2 to form Rh{C(R-C6H4)═NBpin}{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (R = H (8), p-CF3 (9)), which evolve into the aryl derivatives RhPh{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (3) and Rh(p-CF3-C6H4){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (10), as a result of the extrusion of CNBpin. The reactions of 3 and 10 with B2pin2 yield the arylBpin products and regenerate 2.

  15. Rhodium-Catalyzed Cyclization of 2-Ethynylanilines in the Presence of Isocyanates: Approach toward Indole-3-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Akiho; Ise, Yumi; Kimachi, Tetsutaro; Inamoto, Kiyofumi

    2016-02-19

    Catalytic synthesis of indole-3-carboxamides from 2-ethynylanilines and isocyanates was achieved in the presence of a rhodium catalyst through a tandem-type, cyclization-addition sequence. This tandem-type process can be performed under mild reaction conditions, affording 2,3-disubstituted indoles in a one-pot manner generally in good to excellent yields. The broad substrate scope and good functional group compatibility make the method highly efficient and widely applicable, providing a facile and entirely novel route toward variously substituted indole-3-carboxamides.

  16. Enantioselective Alkynylation of 2-Trifluoroacetyl Imidazoles Catalyzed by Bis-Cyclometalated Rhodium(III) Complexes Containing Pinene-Derived Ligands.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Harms, Klaus; Zhang, Lilu; Meggers, Eric

    2016-08-16

    Chiral rhodium(III) complexes containing two cyclometalating 2-phenyl-5,6-(S,S)-pinenopyridine ligands and two additional acetonitriles are introduced as excellent catalysts for the highly enantioselective alkynylation of 2-trifluoroacetyl imidazoles. Whereas the ligand-based chirality permits the straightforward synthesis of the complexes in a diastereomerically and enantiomerically pure fashion, the metal-centered chirality is responsible for the asymmetric induction over the course of the catalysis. For comparison, the analogous iridium congeners provide only low enantioselectivity, and previously reported benzoxazole- and benzothiazole-based catalysts do not show any catalytic activity for this reaction under standard reaction conditions. PMID:27312941

  17. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls. PMID:26573993

  18. The solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Oates, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature variation of the solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and nickel in equilibrium with H2 gas at 1 atm pressure has been measured by a technique involving saturating the solvent metal with hydrogen, quenching, and analyzing in resultant solid solutions. The solubilities determined are small (atom fraction of H is in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00001, and the results are consistent with the simple quasi-regular model for dilute interstitial solid solutions. The relative partial enthalpy and excess entropy of the dissolved hydrogen atoms have been calculated from the solubility data and compared with well-known correlations between these quantities.

  19. Atomic-absorption determination of rhodium in chromite concentrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Rhodium is determined in chromite concentrates by atomic absorption after concentration either by co-precipitation with tellurium formed by the reduction of tellurite with tin(II) chloride or by fire assay into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed by buffering the solutions with lanthanum sulphate (lanthanum concentration 1%). Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated. A lower limit of approximately 0.07 ppm Rh can be determined in a 3-g sample. ?? 1969.

  20. Molecular recognition in protein modification with rhodium metallopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical manipulation of natural, unengineered proteins is a daunting challenge which tests the limits of reaction design. By combining transition-metal or other catalysts with molecular recognition ideas, it is possible to achieve site-selective protein reactivity without the need for engineered recognition sequences or reactive sites. Some recent examples in this area have used ruthenium photocatalysis, pyridine organocatalysis, and rhodium(II) metallocarbene catalysis, indicating that the fundamental ideas provide opportunities for using diverse reactivity on complex protein substrates and in complex cell-like environments. PMID:25588960

  1. Complexation of heteroaromatic N-oxides with rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates in solution: DFT and NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2014-03-01

    Complexation of rhodium(II) tetraacetate and rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate with a set of heteroaromatic N-oxides containing additional functional groups was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and 1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in CDCl3 solutions. Chemical shifts for five N-oxides and their 1:1 adducts with rhodium tetraacetate were computed at the B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart ECP)//B3LYP/[6-31G(2d), LANL2DZ] theory level applying IEF PCM (CHCl3) solvation model and taking into account various complexation modes and conformational variety. Calculated values were used for the estimation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δadduct - δligand). The largest negative complexation shift were estimated for heteroatoms bonded to Rh, from -37 to -70 ppm (N), from -100 to -160 ppm (O in NO group), from -13 to -23 ppm (O in OCH3 group), and from -12 to -22 ppm (Cl). For the remaining heteroatoms in adducts, the corresponding Δδ values ranged from -22 to +8.2 ppm (N), from +3 to +58 ppm (O) and from +6 to +51 ppm (Cl). The Δδ(1H) usually did not exceed 1 ppm, whereas Δδ(13C) varied from ca. -1 to +7 ppm. Some trends useful for the determination of the complexation site were extracted from calculated data sets. Theoretical findings were applied to analyse experimental NMR data.

  2. Determination of rhodium: Since the origins until today Atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, C; Sánchez Rojas, F

    2006-02-28

    Rhodium is present at about 0.001ppm in the earths crust. Rhodium metal is known for its stability in corrosive environments, physical beauty and unique physical and chemical properties. Recent interest in the medical and industrial significance of platinum and to a lesser extent palladium and rhodium has been accompanied by an increasing interest in their determination at low levels. Platinum group elements (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os) play a decisive role in the performance of catalytic converters, world-wide applied in vehicles and in some household utensils, to reduce the emission of gaseous pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. Since then, approximately 73% of the world production of rhodium is consumed in the production of autocatalyst. However, the hot exhaust gases flowing through the converter cause abrasion of these units, leading to the emission of these elements to the environment. The concentration level of rhodium (also platinum and palladium) is still very low in the nature; accordingly, their determination in environmental samples specially appears to be a challenging task for analytical chemists. In recent years, the development of analytical methods for the determination of rhodium has increased. The aim of the present review is to evaluate the utility of atomic absorption spectrometry, applied for the quantification of rhodium in different materials, such as environmental, biological, metallurgical and geological samples. PMID:18970480

  3. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Amidation of Unactivated C(sp(3) )-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Tang, Guodong; Li, Xingwei

    2015-10-26

    Nitrogenation by direct functionalization of C-H bonds represents an important strategy for constructing C-N bonds. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct amidation of unactivated C(sp(3) )-H bonds is rare, especially under mild reaction conditions. Herein, a broad scope of C(sp(3) )-H bonds are amidated under rhodium catalysis in high efficiency using 3-substituted 1,4,2-dioxazol-5-ones as the amide source. The protocol broadens the scope of rhodium(III)-catalyzed C(sp(3) )-H activation chemistry, and is applicable to the late-stage functionalization of natural products.

  4. Separation preconcentration method for platinum and rhodium from environmental samples using a chelating resin.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, C; Sánchez Rojas, F; Cano Pavón, J M

    2006-01-01

    A method of determining trace levels of platinum and rhodium in different samples was investigated. The method involves separation and preconcentration of the platinum and rhodium from the matrix by flow injection (FI) on-line coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with Zeeman effect background correction. Platinum and rhodium were adsorbed on a microcolumn packed with 1,5-bis(di-2-pyridyl)methylene thiocarbohydrazide immobilized on silica gel (DPTH-gel). The sorbed metals were directly eluted with nitric acid into the graphite furnace and determined by AAS.

  5. Cross-conjugated hexaphyrins and their bis-rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Naoda, Koji; Sung, Young Mo; Lim, Jong Min; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2014-06-16

    A cross-conjugated hexaphyrin that carries two meso-oxacyclohexadienylidenyl (OCH) groups 9 was synthesized from the condensation of 5,10-bis(pentafluorophenyl)tripyrrane with 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. The reduction of 9 with NaBH4 afforded the Möbius aromatic [28]hexaphyrin 10. Bis-rhodium complex 11, prepared from the reaction of 10 with [{RhCl(CO)2}2], displays strong Hückel antiaromatic character because of the 28 π electrons that occupy the conjugated circuit on the enforced planar structure. The oxidation of 11 with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) yielded complexes 12 and 13 depending upon the reaction conditions. Both 12 and 13 are planar owing to bis-rhodium metalation. Although complex 12 bears two meso-OCH groups at the long sides and is quinonoidal and nonaromatic in nature, complex 13 bears 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl and OCH groups and exhibits a moderate diatropic ring current despite its cross-conjugated electronic circuit. The diatropic ring current increases upon increasing the solvent polarity, most likely due to an increased contribution of an aromatic zwitterionic resonance hybrid. PMID:24805261

  6. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    We found that the macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)2+ (L = L1 = cyclam and L2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)2OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)2(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF2)2(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)2+. Moreover, the new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis.

  7. Isomerisation and controlled condensation in an aqueous medium of allyl alcohol catalysed by new water-soluble rhodium complexes with 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (PTA).

    PubMed

    Smoleński, Piotr; Kirillova, Marina V; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2013-08-14

    New aqua-soluble rhodium(I) [Rh(CO)(PTA)4]Cl (1) (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) and rhodium(III) [RhCl2(PTA)4]Cl (2) complexes have been synthesized via the reaction of [{Rh(CO)2(μ-Cl)}2] or RhCl3·3H2O, respectively, with stoichiometric amounts of PTA in ethanol. Compound 1 is also obtained upon reduction of 2 in an H2/CO atmosphere. They have been characterized by IR, (1)H and (31)P{H} NMR spectroscopies, elemental and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. While compound 1 shows distorted square-pyramid geometry (τ5 = 0.09) with a P3C-type basal plane, compound 2 is octahedral with the chloro ligands in the cis position. The hydride rhodium(I) complex [RhH(PTA)4] (3) is formed upon the addition of NaBH4 to an aqueous solution of 1 or 2. Compounds 1-3 (in the case of 2 upon reduction by H2) act as homogeneous catalysts, or catalyst precursors, in the isomerisation and condensation of allyl alcohol at room temperature and in an aqueous medium. The product selectivity is easily controlled by changing the concentration of the base in the reaction mixture, thus resulting in the exclusive formation of either 3-hydroxy-2-methylpentanal (HP) or 2-methyl-2-pentenal (MP) in quantitative yields. PMID:23793921

  8. Rhodium, iridium and nickel complexes with a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene tris-MIC ligand. Study of the electronic properties and catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Mejuto, Carmen; Royo, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Summary The coordination versatility of a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-mesoionic carbene ligand is illustrated by the preparation of complexes with three different metals: rhodium, iridium and nickel. The rhodium and iridium complexes contained the [MCl(COD)] fragments, while the nickel compound contained [NiCpCl]. The preparation of the tris-MIC (MIC = mesoionic carbene) complex with three [IrCl(CO)2] fragments, allowed the estimation of the Tolman electronic parameter (TEP) for the ligand, which was compared with the TEP value for a related 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-NHC ligand. The electronic properties of the tris-MIC ligand were studied by cyclic voltammetry measurements. In all cases, the tris-MIC ligand showed a stronger electron-donating character than the corresponding NHC-based ligands. The catalytic activity of the tri-rhodium complex was tested in the addition reaction of arylboronic acids to α,β-unsaturated ketones. PMID:26734104

  9. Rhodium complex immobilized on graphene oxide as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for hydrogenation of cyclohexene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingshan; Chen, Dafa; Li, Yang; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao; Fan, Xiaobin

    2013-02-01

    Rhodium complexes can be homogeneously immobilized on functionalized graphene oxide through coordination interaction. The obtained catalyst can be readily recycled and shows enhanced activity in the catalytic hydrogenation of cyclohexene. PMID:23238302

  10. Cationic mono and dicarbonyl pincer complexes of rhodium and iridium to assess the donor properties of PCcarbeneP ligands.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joel D; Logan, Jessamyn R; Doyle, Lauren E; Burford, Richard J; Sugawara, Shun; Ohnita, Chiho; Yamamoto, Yohsuke; Piers, Warren E; Spasyuk, Denis M; Borau-Garcia, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The donor properties of five different PCcarbeneP ligands are assessed by evaluation of the CO stretching frequencies in iridium(i) and rhodium(i) carbonyl cations. The ligands feature dialkyl phosphine units (R = (i)Pr or (t)Bu) linked to the central benzylic carbon by either an ortho-phenylene bridge, or a 2,3-benzo[b]thiophene linker; in the former, substituent patterns on the phenyl linker are varied. The carbonyl complexes are synthesized from the (PCcarbeneP)M-Cl starting materials via abstraction of the chlorides in the presence of CO gas. In addition to the expected mono carbonyl cations, products with two carbonyl ligands are produced, and for the rhodium example, a novel product in which the second carbonyl ligand adds reversibly across the Rh[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond to give an η(2) ketene moiety was characterized. The IR data for the complexes shows the 2,3-benzo[b]thiophene linked system to be the poorest overall donor, while the phenyl bridged ligands incorporating electron donating dialkyl amino groups para to the anchoring carbene are very strongly donating pincer arrays. PMID:27465584

  11. Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2013-09-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

  12. Rhodium-Catalyzed Ketone Methylation Using Methanol Under Mild Conditions: Formation of α-Branched Products**

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Louis K M; Poole, Darren L; Shen, Di; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed methylation of ketones has been accomplished using methanol as the methylating agent and the hydrogen-borrowing method. The sequence is notable for the relatively low temperatures that are required and for the ability of the reaction system to form α-branched products with ease. Doubly alkylated ketones can be prepared from methyl ketones and two different alcohols by using a sequential one-pot iridium- and rhodium-catalyzed process. PMID:24288297

  13. Chloride-Bridged Dinuclear Rhodium(III) Complexes Bearing Chiral Diphosphine Ligands: Catalyst Precursors for Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Simple Olefins.

    PubMed

    Kita, Yusuke; Hida, Shoji; Higashihara, Kenya; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Higashida, Kosuke; Mashima, Kazushi

    2016-07-11

    Efficient rhodium(III) catalysts were developed for asymmetric hydrogenation of simple olefins. A new series of chloride-bridged dinuclear rhodium(III) complexes 1 were synthesized from the rhodium(I) precursor [RhCl(cod)]2 , chiral diphosphine ligands, and hydrochloric acid. Complexes from the series acted as efficient catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of (E)-prop-1-ene-1,2-diyldibenzene and its derivatives without any directing groups, in sharp contrast to widely used rhodium(I) catalytic systems that require a directing group for high enantioselectivity. The catalytic system was applied to asymmetric hydrogenation of allylic alcohols, alkenylboranes, and unsaturated cyclic sulfones. Control experiments support the superiority of dinuclear rhodium(III) complexes 1 over typical rhodium(I) catalytic systems. PMID:27088539

  14. Capsule-controlled selectivity of a rhodium hydroformylation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocokić, Vladica; Kalkan, Ayfer; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2013-10-01

    Chemical processes proceed much faster and more selectively in the presence of appropriate catalysts, and as such the field of catalysis is of key importance for the chemical industry, especially in light of sustainable chemistry. Enzymes, the natural catalysts, are generally orders of magnitude more selective than synthetic catalysts and a major difference is that they take advantage of well-defined cavities around the active site to steer the selectivity of a reaction via the second coordination sphere. Here we demonstrate that such a strategy also applies for a rhodium catalyst; when used in the hydroformylation of internal alkenes, the selectivity of the product formed is steered solely by changing the cavity surrounding the metal complex. Detailed studies reveal that the origin of the capsule-controlled selectivity is the capsule reorganization energy, that is, the high energy required to accommodate the hydride migration transition state, which leads to the minor product.

  15. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hung-An

    2012-01-01

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, ToR, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the ToR-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[ToR] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 and [Rh(μ- Cl)(COE)]2 gives ToMRh(CO)2 (2.2) and ToMRhH(β3-C8H13) (3.1) respectively while Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 affords ToPRh(CO)2 (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brønsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex ToMRh(H)2CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary

  16. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  17. Short communication: kilovoltage measurement with rhodium target and filters on mammography X-ray machines.

    PubMed

    Underwood, A C; Law, J; Goodman, D A; Robinson, A; Rust, A

    1996-08-01

    X-ray machines used for mammography have, until recently, almost exclusively employed molybdenum (Mo) as anode material and filtration. In the UK, the RMI model 232 kVp meter is used extensively for the measurement of kilovoltage on such equipment. This unit is provided with switchable internal calibration only for molybdenum and molybdenum, or tungsten and aluminium, as anode and filtration, respectively. However, rhodium (Rh) has recently been introduced for filtration with either a molybdenum or rhodium anode in mammography equipment but, as yet, calibration facilities are not available for rhodium spectra. In this work, appropriate corrections for readings obtained with the RMI 232 kVp meter are derived for use with rhodium as filtration material with either molybdenum or rhodium anode material. An intercomparison between measurements made with four RMI model 232 kVp meters and nine IGE DMR X-ray sets was undertaken. The reproducibility of the instruments was confirmed and measurements of tube potential made on each of the X-ray sets pooled. Measurements were made from a nominal 25-35 kVp using Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh target/filter combinations. Corrections for readings obtained with Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh were produced by comparison with readings obtained with Mo/Mo, assuming stability of tube potential between anodes. The results are compared with data recently produced by the manufacturer of the meter. PMID:8949681

  18. Rhodium-Catalyzed Acyloxy Migration of Propargylic Esters in Cycloadditions, Inspiration from Recent “Gold Rush”

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xing-Zhong; Shu, Dongxu; Schienebeck, Casi M.

    2012-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed acyloxy migration of propargylic esters offers versatile entries to allene and vinyl carbene intermediates for various fascinating subsequent transformations. Most π-acidic metals (e.g. gold and platinum) are capable of facilitating these acyloxy migration events. However, very few of these processes involve redox chemistry, which are well-known for most other transition metals such as rhodium. The coupling of acyloxy migration of propargylic esters with oxidative addition, migratory insertion, and reductive elimination may lead to ample new opportunities for the design of new reactions. This tutorial review summarizes recent developments in Rh-catalyzed 1,3- and 1,2-acyloxy migration of propargylic esters in a number of cycloaddition reactions. Related Au- and Pt-catalyzed cycloadditions involving acyloxy migration are also discussed. PMID:22895533

  19. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael Edward

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  20. Molecular beam optical Stark study of rhodium mononitride.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tongmei; Gengler, Jamie; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Hailing; Steimle, Timothy C

    2007-06-28

    The optical Stark effect in the Q(1) and R(0) lines of the [15.1]1-X (1)Sigma+ (1,0) band of rhodium mononitride (RhN) were recorded and analyzed to determine the permanent electric dipole moments mu for the X (1)Sigma+(upsilon=0) and [15.1]1(upsilon=1) states to be 2.43(5) and 1.75(1) D, respectively. The determined dipole moments are compared to predicted values obtained from density functional theory [Stevens et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 421, 281 (2006)] and an all-electron ab initio calculation [Shim et al., J. Mol. Struct. THEOCHEM 393, 127 (1997)]. A simple single configuration molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to rationalize the relative values of mu for the 4d mononitrides and RhO. An electronic configuration for the [15.1]1 state is proposed based on the interpretation of the (103)Rh and (14)N magnetic hyperfine interactions.

  1. Complexes of ruthenium and rhodium with aliphatic amines in the catalysis of hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Turisbekova, K.K.; Shuikina, L.P.; Parenago, O.P.; Frolov, V.F.

    1989-02-01

    The authors synthesized new catalysts highly active in the hydrogenations of unsaturated hydrocarbons, based on complexes of ruthenium and rhodium with higher aliphatic amines, which are soluble in aromatic solvents. The complexes acquired catalytic activity in hydrogenation as a result of their treatment with diisobutyl aluminum hydride. Olefins (1-hexene, cyclopentene, cyclohexene) or dienes (isoprene) were used as the unsaturated compounds. For the ruthenium based catalysts, the highest activity was observed during the hydrogenation of 1-hexene. For the rhodium-based catalysts, the activity in the hydrogenation of olefins and dienes was approximately the same. In the case of the rhodium complex catalysts, the hydrogenation of 1-hexene was accompanied by a side-reaction consisting in isomerization into olefins with inner double bonds.

  2. Chiral Phosphate in Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric [2+2+2] Cycloaddition: Ligand, Counterion, or Both?

    PubMed

    Barbazanges, Marion; Caytan, Elsa; Lesage, Denis; Aubert, Corinne; Fensterbank, Louis; Gandon, Vincent; Ollivier, Cyril

    2016-06-13

    Investigations based on NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and DFT calculations shed light on the metallic species generated in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric [2+2+2] cycloaddition reaction between diynes and isocyanates with the chiral phosphate TRIP. The catalytic mixture comprising [{Rh(cod)Cl}2 ], 1,4-diphenylphosphinobutane (dppb), and Ag(S)-TRIP actually gives rise to two species, both having an effect on the stereoselectivity. One is a rhodium(I) complex in which TRIP is a weakly coordinating counterion, whereas the other is a bimetallic Rh/Ag complex in which TRIP is a strongly coordinating X-type ligand. PMID:27167983

  3. Probing the structures of gas-phase rhodium cluster cations by far-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D. J.; Gruene, P.; Haertelt, M.; Meijer, G.; Fielicke, A.; Hamilton, S. M.; Hopkins, W. S.; Mackenzie, S. R.; Neville, S. P.; Walsh, T. R.

    2010-12-07

    The geometric structures of small cationic rhodium clusters Rh{sub n}{sup +} (n = 6-12) are investigated by comparison of experimental far-infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra with spectra calculated using density functional theory. The clusters are found to favor structures based on octahedral and tetrahedral motifs for most of the sizes considered, in contrast to previous theoretical predictions that rhodium clusters should favor cubic motifs. Our findings highlight the need for further development of theoretical and computational methods to treat these high-spin transition metal clusters.

  4. Geometric effects on the mechanical strengths of strong nanocrystalline rhodium sub-micron structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Ting Y.; Jahed, Zeinab; Evans, R. D.; Burek, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    Sub-micron scale nanocrystalline rhodium pillars were fabricated by electron beam lithography and electroplating techniques. The fabricated specimens included solid core pillars and columnar structure with more complex cross-sectional geometries, including x-shaped and annulus shaped. Among these specimens, two groups of sub-micron scale annulus structures with sidewall thicknesses of 250 and 205 nm were fabricated. All of the structures have outer diameters of ~1 μm and consist of average grain size smaller than 22 nm. Uniaxial compression results reveal these rhodium pillars are very strong with true flow stresses exceeding 5 GPa and are not sensitive to the sample cross-sectional geometries.

  5. Rhodium-Catalyzed Geminal Oxyfluorination and Oxytrifluoro-Methylation of Diazocarbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weiming; Eriksson, Lars; Szabó, Kálmán J

    2016-07-11

    A new reaction for the rhodium-catalyzed geminal-difunctionalization-based fluorination is presented. The substrates are aromatic and aliphatic diazocarbonyl compounds. As the fluorine source a stable and easily accessible benziodoxole reagent was used. A variety of alcohol, phenol, and carboxylic acid reagents were employed to introduce the second functionality. The reaction was extended to trifluoromethylation using a benziodoxolon reagent. The fluorination and trifluoromethylation reactions probably proceed by a rhodium-containing onium ylide type intermediate, which is trapped by either the F or CF3 electrophiles. PMID:27219856

  6. Photochemical oxidative addition of B-H bonds at ruthenium and rhodium.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Philip L; Fernández-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Jasim, Naser; Lachaize, Sébastien; Marder, Todd B; Perutz, Robin N; Rivalta, Eleonora; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane

    2004-01-21

    Metal phosphine hydrides of type RuP(4)H(2) and RhP(3)H(3) react photochemically with HB(pin)(pin = pinacolate) to form metal boryl hydride complexes via 16-electron intermediates generated by H(2) loss; the second order rate constants for reaction of the intermediates with HB(pin) are even larger than those for reaction with Et(3)SiH. PMID:14737569

  7. Investigation of the active sites of rhodium sulfide for hydrogen evolution/oxidation using carbon monoxide as a probe.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirala; Upham, David C; Liu, Ru-Fen; Burk, Jonathan; Economou, Nick; Buratto, Steven; Metiu, Horia; McFarland, Eric W

    2014-05-20

    Carbon monoxide (CO) was observed to decrease the activity for hydrogen evolution, hydrogen oxidation, and H2-D2 exchange on rhodium sulfide, platinum, and rhodium metal. The temperature at which the CO was desorbed from the catalyst surface (detected by recovery in the H2-D2 exchange activity of the catalyst) was used as a descriptor for the CO binding energy to the active site. The differences in the CO desorption temperature between the different catalysts showed that the rhodium sulfide active site is not metallic rhodium. Using density functional theory, the binding energy of CO to the Rh sites in rhodium sulfide is found comparable to the binding energy on Pt. Coupled with experiment this supports the proposition that rhodium rather than sulfur atoms in the rhodium sulfide are the active site for the hydrogen reaction. This would indicate the active sites for hydrogen evolution/oxidation as well as oxygen reduction (determined by other groups using X-ray absorption spectroscopy) may be the same.

  8. Time-resolved, in situ DRIFTS/EDE/MS studies on alumina-supported rhodium catalysts: effects of ceriation and zirconiation on rhodium-CO interactions.

    PubMed

    Kroner, Anna B; Newton, Mark A; Tromp, Moniek; Roscioni, Otello M; Russell, Andrea E; Dent, Andrew J; Prestipino, Carmelo; Evans, John

    2014-10-01

    The effects of ceria and zirconia on the structure-function properties of supported rhodium catalysts (1.6 and 4 wt % Rh/γ-Al2O3) during CO exposure are described. Ceria and zirconia are introduced through two preparation methods: 1) ceria is deposited on γ-Al2O3 from [Ce(acac)3] and rhodium metal is subsequently added, and 2) through the controlled surface modification (CSM) technique, which involves the decomposition of [M(acac)x] (M=Ce, x=3; M=Zr, x=4) on Rh/γ-Al2O3. The structure-function correlations of ceria and/or zirconia-doped rhodium catalysts are investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy/energy-dispersive extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy/mass spectrometry (DRIFTS/EDE/MS) under time-resolved, in situ conditions. CeOx and ZrO2 facilitate the protection of Rh particles against extensive oxidation in air and CO. Larger Rh core particles of ceriated and zirconiated Rh catalysts prepared by CSM are observed and compared with Rh/γ-Al2O3 samples, whereas supported Rh particles are easily disrupted by CO forming mononuclear Rh geminal dicarbonyl species. DRIFTS results indicate that, through the interaction of CO with ceriated Rh particles, a significantly larger amount of linear CO species form; this suggests the predominance of a metallic Rh phase. PMID:25044889

  9. Synthesis of Chiral β-Amino Nitroalkanes via Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Qingyang; Wu, Weilong; Hu, Xinquan; Dong, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric hydrogenation of β-amino nitroolefins has been successfully achieved by rhodium/bis(phosphine)-thiourea L1 with excellent enantioselectivities and yields (up to 96% ee, 96% yield, >99% conversion, TON up to 1000) under mild conditions. Chiral β-amino nitroalkane products and their derivatives are versatile intermediates in organic synthesis. PMID:26652759

  10. Rhodium dihydride (RhH[subscript 2]) with high volumetric hydrogen density

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bing; Ding, Yang; Kim, Duck Young; Ahuja, Rajeev; Zou, Guangtian; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2012-03-14

    Materials with very high hydrogen density have attracted considerable interest due to a range of motivations, including the search for chemically precompressed metallic hydrogen and hydrogen storage applications. Using high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique and theoretical calculations, we have discovered a new rhodium dihydride (RhH{sub 2}) with high volumetric hydrogen density (163.7 g/L). Compressing rhodium in fluid hydrogen at ambient temperature, the fcc rhodium metal absorbs hydrogen and expands unit-cell volume by two discrete steps to form NaCl-typed fcc rhodium monohydride at 4 GPa and fluorite-typed fcc RhH{sub 2} at 8 GPa. RhH{sub 2} is the first dihydride discovered in the platinum group metals under high pressure. Our low-temperature experiments show that RhH{sub 2} is recoverable after releasing pressure cryogenically to 1 bar and is capable of retaining hydrogen up to 150 K for minutes and 77 K for an indefinite length of time.

  11. Toward the Synthesis of Nuphar Sesquiterpene Thioalkaloids: Stereodivergent Rhodium-Catalyzed Synthesis of the Thiolane Subunit.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Herrmann, Aaron T; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-08-01

    A stereodivergent approach to the central thiolane subunit of Nuphar sesquiterpene thioalkaloids has been developed. This approach features a rhodium-catalyzed Stevens-type rearrangement in conjunction with an enzyme resolution reaction. Further elaboration into a polycyclic ring system via alcohol oxidation and ring-closing metathesis is also described.

  12. Toward the Synthesis of Nuphar Sesquiterpene Thioalkaloids: Stereodivergent Rhodium-Catalyzed Synthesis of the Thiolane Subunit.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Herrmann, Aaron T; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-08-01

    A stereodivergent approach to the central thiolane subunit of Nuphar sesquiterpene thioalkaloids has been developed. This approach features a rhodium-catalyzed Stevens-type rearrangement in conjunction with an enzyme resolution reaction. Further elaboration into a polycyclic ring system via alcohol oxidation and ring-closing metathesis is also described. PMID:26147579

  13. High-temperature, long-term drift of platinum-rhodium thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szaniszlo, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Contamination of thermocouples is minimized by use of pure alumina insulators and a controlled low-impurity-level high-vacuum environment. Average thermal electromotive force change for platinum-rhodium thermocouples was -2.8 deg K after 3700 hours exposure to a mean temperature of 1530 deg K.

  14. Synthesis of C60H2 by rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation of C60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, L.; Evans, T. P.; Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Reduction of C60 with rhodium(0) on alumina and hydrogen in deuterated benzene (C6D6) at ambient temperature and pressure yields a mixture of hydrogenated compounds; C60H2 has been characterized as the major product in 14% yield based on 1H NMR.

  15. A Rhodium Nanoparticle-Lewis Acidic Ionic Liquid Catalyst for the Chemoselective Reduction of Heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Karakulina, Alena; Gopakumar, Aswin; Akçok, İsmail; Roulier, Bastien L; LaGrange, Thomas; Katsyuba, Sergey A; Das, Shoubhik; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    We describe a catalytic system composed of rhodium nanoparticles immobilized in a Lewis acidic ionic liquid. The combined system catalyzes the hydrogenation of quinolines, pyridines, benzofurans, and furan to access the corresponding heterocycles, important molecules present in fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The catalyst is highly selective, acting only on the heteroaromatic ring, and not interfering with other reducible functional groups.

  16. Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in the Reduction of NO by CO

    SciTech Connect

    Renzas, J.R.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, W.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-07-13

    The shape dependence of the catalytic reduction of NO by CO on Rhodium nanopolyhedra and nanocubes was studied from 230-270 C. The nanocubes are found to exhibit higher turnover frequency and lower activation energy than the nanopolyhedra. These trends are compared to previous studies on Rh single crystals.

  17. Direct C-H alkylation and indole formation of anilines with diazo compounds under rhodium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Choi, Miji; Jo, Hyeim; Oh, Yongguk; Sharma, Satyasheel; Han, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Taejoo; Han, Sangil; Lee, Seok-Yong; Kim, In Su

    2015-12-18

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct functionalization of aniline C-H bonds with α-diazo compounds is described. These transformations provide a facile construction of ortho-alkylated anilines with diazo malonates or highly substituted indoles with diazo acetoacetates.

  18. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, M.A. |

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  19. Chemo- and regioselective homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed hydroamidomethylation of terminal alkenes to N-alkylamides.

    PubMed

    Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Drent, Eite; Bouwman, Elisabeth

    2013-09-01

    A rhodium/xantphos homogeneous catalyst system has been developed for direct chemo- and regioselective mono-N-alkylation of primary amides with 1-alkenes and syngas through catalytic hydroamidomethylation with 1-pentene and acetamide as model substrates. For appropriate catalyst performance, it appears to be essential that catalytic amounts of a strong acid promoter, such as p-toluenesulfonic acid (HOTs), as well as larger amounts of a weakly acidic protic promoter, particularly hexafluoroisopropyl alcohol (HOR(F) ) are applied. Apart from the product N-1-hexylacetamide, the isomeric unsaturated intermediates, hexanol and higher mass byproducts, as well as the corresponding isomeric branched products, can be formed. Under optimized conditions, almost full alkene conversion can be achieved with more than 80% selectivity to the product N-1-hexylamide. Interestingly, in the presence of a relatively high concentration of HOR(F) , the same catalyst system shows a remarkably high selectivity for the formation of hexanol from 1-pentene with syngas, thus presenting a unique example of a selective rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation-hydrogenation tandem reaction under mild conditions. Time-dependent product formation during hydroamidomethylation batch experiments provides evidence for aldehyde and unsaturated intermediates; this clearly indicates the three-step hydroformylation/condensation/hydrogenation reaction sequence that takes place in hydroamidomethylation. One likely role of the weakly acidic protic promoter, HOR(F) , in combination with the strong acid HOTs, is to establish a dual-functionality rhodium catalyst system comprised of a neutral rhodium(I) hydroformylation catalyst species and a cationic rhodium(III) complex capable of selectively reducing the imide and/or ene-amide intermediates that are in a dynamic, acid-catalyzed condensation equilibrium with the aldehyde and amide in a syngas environment.

  20. Stabilized rhodium(0) nanoparticles: a reusable hydrogenation catalyst for arene derivatives in a biphasic water-liquid system.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Roucoux, A; Patin, H

    2000-02-18

    A colloidal system based on an aqueous suspension of rhodium(o) nanoparticles proved to be an efficient catalyst for the hydrogenation of arene derivatives under biphasic conditions. The rhodium nanoparticles (2-2.5 nm) were synthesized by the reduction of RhCl3 x 3H2O with sodium borohydride and were stabilized by highly water-soluble N-alkyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium salts (HEA-Cn). These surfactant molecules were characterized by measurements of the surface tension and the aqueous dispersions with rhodium were observed by transmission electron cryomicroscopy. The catalytic system is efficient under ultramild conditions, namely room temperature and 1 atm H2 pressure. The aqueous phase which contains the protected rhodium(0) colloids can be reused without significant loss of activity. The microheterogeneous behavior of this catalytic system was confirmed on a mercury poisoning experiment.

  1. Double hydrophosphination of alkynes promoted by rhodium: the key role of an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Andrea; De Luca, Roberto; Castarlenas, Ricardo; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Crucianelli, Marcello; Oro, Luis A

    2016-04-25

    The regioselective double hydrophosphination of alkynes mediated by rhodium catalysts is presented. The distinctive stereoelectronic properties of the NHC ligand prevent the catalyst deactivation by diphosphine coordination thereby allowing for the closing of a productive catalytic cycle.

  2. Promoting Effect of CeO2 in the Electrocatalytic Activity of Rhodium for Ethanol Electro-Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Q.; Mukerjee, S; Shyam, B; Ramaker, D; Parres-Esclapex, D; Illan-Gomez, M; Bueno-Lopez, A

    2009-01-01

    The promoting effect of ceria in the electrocatalytic activity of rhodium for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkali media has been studied. Rh/C, CeO2/C and RhCeO2/C catalysts were synthesized and characterized by TEM, XRD, XPS, TG-MS, H2-TPR and XAS. The electrocatalytic activity was studied by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry. The onset potential of oxidation on RhCeO2/C was shifted negatively as compared to that on Rh/C, despite ceria itself does not show any electrocatalytic activity. The promoting effect of ceria has been attributed to the improved rhodium dispersion, and differences in the oxidation state of rhodium between Rh/C and RhCeO2/C were not found. The carbon support reduces rhodium species to Rh0, and also partially reduces ceria, during the samples preparation, and the surface of the carbon support is oxidised.

  3. Preparation of alumina-supported ceria. II. Measurement of ceria surface area after impregnation with platinum or rhodium

    SciTech Connect

    Rogemond, E.; Frety, R.; Perrichon, V.; Primet, M. |

    1997-07-01

    The surface area of cerium oxide was evaluated in an aluminium oxide supported catalyst. The catalyst were impregnated with rhodium chlorides and platinum chlorides. The adsorption of carbon dioxide is discussed.

  4. Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Promoted by a Pincer-Square-Planar Rhodium(I) Monohydride: A Stepwise Hydrogen Transfer from the Substrate to the Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; Nolis, Pau; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique; Vallribera, Adelina; Vélez, Andrea

    2016-07-18

    The pincer d(8)-monohydride complex RhH{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (xant(P(i)Pr2)2 = 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(diisopropylphosphino)xanthene) promotes the release of 1 equiv of hydrogen from H3BNH3 and H3BNHMe2 with TOF50% values of 3150 and 1725 h(-1), to afford [BH2NH2]n and [BH2NMe2]2 and the tandem ammonia borane dehydrogenation-cyclohexene hydrogenation. DFT calculations on the ammonia borane dehydrogenation suggest that the process takes place by means of cis-κ(2)-PP-species, through four stages including: (i) Shimoi-type coordination of ammonia borane, (ii) homolytic addition of the coordinated H-B bond to afford a five-coordinate dihydride-boryl-rhodium(III) intermediate, (iii) reductive intramolecular proton transfer from the NH3 group to one of the hydride ligands, and (iv) release of H2 from the resulting square-planar hydride dihydrogen rhodium(I) intermediate.

  5. Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Promoted by a Pincer-Square-Planar Rhodium(I) Monohydride: A Stepwise Hydrogen Transfer from the Substrate to the Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; Nolis, Pau; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique; Vallribera, Adelina; Vélez, Andrea

    2016-07-18

    The pincer d(8)-monohydride complex RhH{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (xant(P(i)Pr2)2 = 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(diisopropylphosphino)xanthene) promotes the release of 1 equiv of hydrogen from H3BNH3 and H3BNHMe2 with TOF50% values of 3150 and 1725 h(-1), to afford [BH2NH2]n and [BH2NMe2]2 and the tandem ammonia borane dehydrogenation-cyclohexene hydrogenation. DFT calculations on the ammonia borane dehydrogenation suggest that the process takes place by means of cis-κ(2)-PP-species, through four stages including: (i) Shimoi-type coordination of ammonia borane, (ii) homolytic addition of the coordinated H-B bond to afford a five-coordinate dihydride-boryl-rhodium(III) intermediate, (iii) reductive intramolecular proton transfer from the NH3 group to one of the hydride ligands, and (iv) release of H2 from the resulting square-planar hydride dihydrogen rhodium(I) intermediate. PMID:27367792

  6. On the Reaction Mechanism of the Rhodium-Catalyzed Arylation of Fullerene (C60) with Organoboron Compounds in the Presence of Water.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Juan Pablo; Solà, Miquel; Poater, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to study the reaction mechanism of the Suzuki-Miyaura rhodium-catalyzed hydroarylation of fullerene (C60) by phenylboronic acid in the presence of water. As found experimentally, our results confirm that addition of the phenyl group and the hydrogen atom in C60 occurs at the [6,6] bond. The rate-determining step corresponds to the simultaneous transfer of a hydrogen atom from a water molecule to C60 and the recovery of the active species. The use of 2-phenyl-1,3,2-dioxaborinane and the 4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-2-phenyl-1,3,2,-dioxaborolane instead of phenylboronic acid as organoborate agents does not lead to great modifications of the energy profile. The possible higher steric hindrance of 4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-2-phenyl-1,3,2,-dioxaborolane should not inhibit its use in the hydroarylation of C60. Overall, we show how organoboron species arylate C60 in rhodium-based catalysis assisted by water as a source of protons. PMID:27308203

  7. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  8. Dissolution Behavior of Rhodium in the Na2O-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2 Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiraseranee, Chompunoot; Okabe, Toru H.; Morita, Kazuki

    2013-06-01

    To understand the behavior of rhodium during its recovery process, the dissolution behaviors of rhodium in Na2O-SiO2 and in CaO-SiO2 slags at temperatures ranging from 1423 K to 1623 K (from 1150 °C to 1350 °C) and from 1773 K to 1873 K (from 1500 °C to 1600 °C), respectively, in an oxidizing atmosphere were investigated. The solubility of rhodium in the slags was found to increase with increasing oxygen partial pressure, temperature, and the basic oxide content. The correlation between the solubility of rhodium and the oxygen partial pressure suggested that rhodium dissolved into the slags as RhO1.5. The dissolution of rhodium was slightly endothermic: the enthalpy change of the dissolution of solid rhodium was determined to be 50 ± 10 kJ/mol for the 50(mass pct)Na2O-50SiO2; and 188 ± 94 kJ/mol for the 56(mass pct)CaO-44SiO2 slag systems. The increase in the solubility of rhodium with the basic oxide content indicated that rhodium exhibits acidic behavior in slags. The correlation between the solubility of rhodium and the sulfide capacity of the slags suggested that the ionic species of rhodium in slags is the rhodate ion, RhO{2/-}. The rhodate capacity of the slags was defined, and its application to estimate the possible rhodium content in various slag systems was proposed.

  9. Antitumor effect of free rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles on mice bearing breast cancer: a systemic toxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Raphael Cândido Apolinário; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; de Souza Filho, José; Carneiro, Marcella Lemos' Brettas; Oliveira, Ricardo G S; da Silva, Matheus Oliveira; de Souza, Aparecido R; Báo, Sônia Nair

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancer types among women. The use of magnetic fluids for specific delivery of drugs represents an attractive platform for chemotherapy. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate (Magh-Rh2Cit) induced in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo antitumor activity, followed by intratumoral administration in breast carcinoma cells. In this study, our aim was to follow intravenous treatment to evaluate the systemic antitumor activity and toxicity induced by these formulations in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast carcinoma. Female Balb/c mice were evaluated with regard to toxicity of intravenous treatments through analyses of hemogram, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, iron, and creatinine and liver, kidney, and lung histology. The antitumor activity of rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2Cit), Magh-Rh2Cit, and maghemite nanoparticles coated with citrate (Magh-Cit), used as control, was evaluated by tumor volume reduction, histology, and morphometric analysis. Magh-Rh2Cit and Magh-Cit promoted a significant decrease in tumor area, and no experimental groups presented hematotoxic effects or increased levels of serum ALT and creatinine. This observation was corroborated by the histopathological examination of the liver and kidney of mice. Furthermore, the presence of nanoparticles was verified in lung tissue with no morphological changes, supporting the idea that our nanoformulations did not induce toxicity effects. No studies about the systemic action of rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles have been carried out, making this report a suitable starting point for exploring the therapeutic potential of these compounds in treating breast cancer.

  10. Enantioselective rhodium/ruthenium photoredox catalysis en route to chiral 1,2-aminoalcohols.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiajia; Harms, Klaus; Meggers, Eric

    2016-08-01

    A rhodium-based chiral Lewis acid catalyst combined with [Ru(bpy)3](PF6)2 as a photoredox sensitizer allows for the visible-light-activated redox coupling of α-silylamines with 2-acyl imidazoles to afford, after desilylation, 1,2-amino-alcohols in yields of 69-88% and with high enantioselectivity (54-99% ee). The reaction is proposed to proceed via an electron exchange between the α-silylamine (electron donor) and the rhodium-chelated 2-acyl imidazole (electron acceptor), followed by a stereocontrolled radical-radical reaction. Substrate scope and control experiments reveal that the trimethylsilyl group plays a crucial role in this reductive umpolung of the carbonyl group. PMID:27462824

  11. The mechanism of the rhodium(I)-catalyzed [2 + 2 + 1] carbocyclization reaction of dienes and CO: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Pitcock, William H; Lord, Richard L; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2008-04-30

    The rhodium(I) catalyzed [2 + 2 + 1] carbocyclization of tethered diene-enes to afford substituted hexahydropentalenones with high levels of diastereoselectivity was modeled using density functional theory. Previously, this transformation was observed to be facile, whereas the analogous bis-ene substrate could not be cyclized under any reasonable conditions. To establish a conceptual understanding of the carbocyclization mechanism and to identify the functional role of the diene fragment we analyzed the simulated reaction mechanisms using the two parent systems. We discovered a thus far unrecognized, but intuitively plausible, role of the CO ligand for controlling the electron density at the metal center, which affects the feasibility of oxidative addition and reductive elimination steps that are key components of the mechanism. Our calculations suggest that the diene moiety is unique and required because of its ability to undergo a eta(2)-->eta(4) reorganization allowing for the thermoneutral expulsion of one CO ligand, which in turn generates an electron-rich, coordinatively saturated Rh(I) center that can efficiently promote the oxidative addition with a low barrier. A number of functionalization strategies were considered explicitly to derive a rational plan for optimizing the catalysis and to expose the roles of the different components of the reactant-catalyst complex. PMID:18380438

  12. Asymmetric Hydroformylation of Heterocyclic Olefins Mediated by Supramolecularly Regulated Rhodium-Bisphosphite Complexes.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Laura; Vaquero, Mónica; Vidal-Ferran, Anton

    2015-10-16

    Rhodium complexes derived from conformationally transformable α,ω-bisphosphite ligands combined with a suitable alkali metal BArF salt as a regulation agent (RA) provide high regio- and enantioselectivities in the asymmetric hydroformylation (AHF) of three heterocyclic olefins. The outcome of the AHF could be exquisitely regulated by choosing the appropriate RA with an increase in the ee, the reversal of the regioselectivity, or the complete suppression of one byproduct. PMID:26355601

  13. Pyridazine N-Oxides as Precursors of Metallocarbenes: Rhodium-Catalyzed Transannulation with Pyrroles.

    PubMed

    Kanchupalli, Vinaykumar; Joseph, Desna; Katukojvala, Sreenivas

    2015-12-01

    Pyridazine N-oxides are used for the first time as precursors of metallocarbenes. These nitrogen-rich heterocycles led to the discovery of a novel acceptor and donor-acceptor enalcarbenoids. The synthetic utility of these metallocarbenes was demonstrated in the rhodium-catalyzed denitrogenative transannulation of pyridazine N-oxides with pyrroles to the valuable alkyl, 7-aryl, and 7-styryl indoles. The transannulation strategy was applied to the synthesis of a potent anticancer agent.

  14. Mild partial deoxygenation of esters catalyzed by an oxazolinylborate-coordinated rhodium silylene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Songchen; Boschen, Jeffery S.; Biswas, Abhranil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-08-17

    An electrophilic, coordinatively unsaturated rhodium complex supported by borate-linked oxazoline, oxazoline-coordinated silylene, and N-heterocyclic carbene donors [{κ³-N,Si,C-PhB(OxMe²)(OxMe²SiHPh)ImMes}Rh(H)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] (2, OxMe² = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImMes = 1-mesitylimidazole) is synthesized from the neutral rhodium silyl {PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (1) and B(C6F5)3. The unusual oxazoline-coordinated silylene structure in 2 is proposed to form by rearrangement of an unobserved isomeric cationic rhodium silylene species [{PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiHPh)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] generated by H abstraction. Complex 2 catalyzes reductions of organic carbonyl compounds with silanes to give hydrosilylation products or deoxygenation products. The pathway to these reactions is primarily influenced by the degree of substitution of the organosilane. Reactions with primary silanes give deoxygenationmore » of esters to ethers, amides to amines, and ketones and aldehydes to hydrocarbons, whereas tertiary silanes react to give 1,2-hydrosilylation of the carbonyl functionality. In contrast, the strong Lewis acid B(C₆F₅)₃ catalyzes the complete deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to hydrocarbons with PhSiH₃ as the reducing agent.« less

  15. Mild partial deoxygenation of esters catalyzed by an oxazolinylborate-coordinated rhodium silylene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Songchen; Boschen, Jeffery S; Biswas, Abhranil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Windus, Theresa L; Sadow, Aaron D

    2015-09-28

    An electrophilic, coordinatively unsaturated rhodium complex supported by borate-linked oxazoline, oxazoline-coordinated silylene, and N-heterocyclic carbene donors [{κ(3)-N,Si,C-PhB(Ox(Me2))(Ox(Me2)SiHPh)Im(Mes)}Rh(H)CO][HB(C6F5)3] (, Ox(Me2) = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; Im(Mes) = 1-mesitylimidazole) is synthesized from the neutral rhodium silyl {PhB(Ox(Me2))2Im(Mes)}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO () and B(C6F5)3. The unusual oxazoline-coordinated silylene structure in is proposed to form by rearrangement of an unobserved isomeric cationic rhodium silylene species [{PhB(Ox(Me2))2Im(Mes)}RhH(SiHPh)CO][HB(C6F5)3] generated by H abstraction. Complex catalyzes reductions of organic carbonyl compounds with silanes to give hydrosilylation products or deoxygenation products. The pathway to these reactions is primarily influenced by the degree of substitution of the organosilane. Reactions with primary silanes give deoxygenation of esters to ethers, amides to amines, and ketones and aldehydes to hydrocarbons, whereas tertiary silanes react to give 1,2-hydrosilylation of the carbonyl functionality. In contrast, the strong Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 catalyzes the complete deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to hydrocarbons with PhSiH3 as the reducing agent. PMID:26278517

  16. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  17. Adducts of nitrogenous ligands with rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates and tetraformamidinate: NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Cmoch, Piotr; Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Kamieński, Bohdan; Senkara, Elżbieta

    2014-03-01

    Complexation of tetrakis(μ2-N,N'-diphenylformamidinato-N,N')-di-rhodium(II) with ligands containing nitrile, isonitrile, amine, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl, isocyanate, and isothiocyanate functional groups has been studied in liquid and solid phases using (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR, (13)C and (15)N cross polarisation-magic angle spinning NMR, and absorption spectroscopy in the visible range. The complexation was monitored using various NMR physicochemical parameters, such as chemical shifts, longitudinal relaxation times T1 , and NOE enhancements. Rhodium(II) tetraformamidinate selectively bonded only unbranched amine (propan-1-amine), pentanenitrile, and (1-isocyanoethyl)benzene. No complexation occurred in the case of ligands having hydroxyl, sulfhydryl, isocyanate, and isothiocyanate functional groups, and more expanded amine molecules such as butan-2-amine and 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane. Such features were opposite to those observed in rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates, forming adducts with all kind of ligands. Special attention was focused on the analysis of Δδ parameters, defined as a chemical shift difference between signal in adduct and corresponding signal in free ligand. In the case of (1)H NMR, Δδ values were either negative in adducts of rhodium(II) tetraformamidinate or positive in adducts of rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates. Experimental findings were supported by density functional theory molecular modelling and gauge independent atomic orbitals chemical shift calculations. The calculation of chemical shifts combined with scaling procedure allowed to reproduce qualitatively Δδ parameters.

  18. Determination of rhodium in metallic alloy and water samples using cloud point extraction coupled with spectrophotometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassem, Mohammed A.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2015-02-01

    A new method to estimate rhodium in different samples at trace levels had been developed. Rhodium was complexed with 5-(4‧-nitro-2‧,6‧-dichlorophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (NDPHPD) as a complexing agent in an aqueous medium and concentrated by using Triton X-114 as a surfactant. The investigated rhodium complex was preconcentrated with cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract rhodium complex from aqueous solutions at pH 4.75. After the phase separation at 50 °C, the surfactant-rich phase was heated again at 100 °C to remove water after decantation and the remaining phase was dissolved using 0.5 mL of acetonitrile. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear for the concentration range of 0.5-75 ng mL-1 and the detection limit was 0.15 ng mL-1 of the original solution. The enhancement factor of 500 was achieved for 250 mL samples containing the analyte and relative standard deviations were ⩽1.50%. The method was found to be highly selective, fairly sensitive, simple, rapid and economical and safely applied for rhodium determination in different complex materials such as synthetic mixture of alloys and environmental water samples.

  19. Determination of rhodium in metallic alloy and water samples using cloud point extraction coupled with spectrophotometric technique.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Mohammed A; Amin, Alaa S

    2015-02-01

    A new method to estimate rhodium in different samples at trace levels had been developed. Rhodium was complexed with 5-(4'-nitro-2',6'-dichlorophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (NDPHPD) as a complexing agent in an aqueous medium and concentrated by using Triton X-114 as a surfactant. The investigated rhodium complex was preconcentrated with cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract rhodium complex from aqueous solutions at pH 4.75. After the phase separation at 50°C, the surfactant-rich phase was heated again at 100°C to remove water after decantation and the remaining phase was dissolved using 0.5mL of acetonitrile. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear for the concentration range of 0.5-75ngmL(-1) and the detection limit was 0.15ngmL(-1) of the original solution. The enhancement factor of 500 was achieved for 250mL samples containing the analyte and relative standard deviations were ⩽1.50%. The method was found to be highly selective, fairly sensitive, simple, rapid and economical and safely applied for rhodium determination in different complex materials such as synthetic mixture of alloys and environmental water samples.

  20. The structures of the crystalline phase and columnar mesophase of rhodium (II) heptanoate and of its binary mixture with copper (II) heptanoate probed by EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inb-Elhaj, M.; Guillon, D.; Skoulios, A.; Maldivi, P.; Giroud-Godquin, A. M.; Marchon, J.-C.

    1992-12-01

    EXAFS was used to investigate the local structure of the polar spines of rhodium (II) soaps in the columnar liquid crystalline state. It was also used to ascertain the degree of blending of the cores in binary mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps. For the pure rhodium soaps, the columns are shown to result from the stacking of binuclear metal-metal bonded dirhodium tetracarboxylate units bonded to one another by apical ligation of the metal atom of each complex with one of the oxygen atoms of the adjacent molecule. Mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps give a hexagonal columnar mesophase in which pure rhodium and pure copper columns are randomly distributed.

  1. Coordination and organometallic chemistry of relevance to the rhodium-based catalyst for ethylene hydroamination.

    PubMed

    Béthegnies, Aurélien; Kirkina, Vladislava A; Filippov, Oleg A; Daran, Jean-Claude; Belkova, Natalia V; Shubina, Elena; Polic, Rinaldo

    2011-12-19

    The RhCl(3)·3H(2)O/PPh(3)/nBu(4)PI catalytic system for the hydroamination of ethylene by aniline is shown to be thermally stable by a recycle experiment and by a kinetic profile study. The hypothesis of the reduction under catalytic conditions to a Rh(I) species is supported by the observation of a high catalytic activity for complex [RhI(PPh(3))(2)](2). New solution equilibrium studies on [RhX(PPh(3))(2)](2) (X = Cl, I) in the presence of ligands of relevance to the catalytic reaction (PPh(3), C(2)H(4), PhNH(2), X(-), and the model Et(2)NH amine) are reported. Complex [RhCl(PPh(3))(2)](2) shows broadening of the (31)P NMR signal upon addition of PhNH(2), indicating rapid equilibrium with a less thermodynamically stable adduct. The reaction with Et(2)NH gives extensive conversion into cis-RhCl(PPh(3))(2)(NHEt(2)), which is however in equilibrium with the starting material and free Et(2)NH. Excess NHEt(2) yields a H-bonded adduct cis-RhCl(PPh(3))(2)(Et(2)NH)···NHEt(2), in equilibrium with the precursors, as shown by IR spectroscopy. The iodide analogue [RhI(PPh(3))(2)](2) shows less pronounced reactions (no change with PhNH(2), less extensive addition of Et(2)NH with formation of cis-RhI(PPh(3))(2)(NHEt(2)), less extensive reaction of the latter with additional Et(2)NH to yield cis-RhI(PPh(3))(2)(Et(2)NH)···NHEt(2). The two [RhX(PPh(3))(2)](2) compounds do not show any evidence for addition of the corresponding X(-) to yield a putative [RhX(2)(PPh(3))(2)](-) adduct. The product of C(2)H(4) addition to [RhI(PPh(3))(2)](2), trans-RhI(PPh(3))(2)(C(2)H(4)), has been characterized in solution. Treatment of the RhCl(3)·3H(2)O/PPh(3)/nBu(4)PI/PhNH(2) mixture under catalytic conditions yields mostly [RhCl(PPh(3))(2)](2), and no significant halide exchange, demonstrating that the promoting effect of iodide must take place at the level of high energy catalytic intermediates. The equilibria have also been investigated at the computational level by DFT with treatment

  2. A rhodium/silicon co-electrocatalyst design concept to surpass platinum hydrogen evolution activity at high overpotentials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lili; Lin, Haiping; Li, Youyong; Liao, Fan; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Sheng, Minqi; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-01-01

    Currently, platinum-based electrocatalysts show the best performance for hydrogen evolution. All hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts should however obey Sabatier's principle, that is, the adsorption energy of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should be neither too high nor too low to balance between hydrogen adsorption and desorption. To overcome the limitation of this principle, here we choose a composite (rhodium/silicon nanowire) catalyst, in which hydrogen adsorption occurs on rhodium with a large adsorption energy while hydrogen evolution occurs on silicon with a small adsorption energy. We show that the composite is stable with better hydrogen evolution activity than rhodium nanoparticles and even exceeding those of commercial platinum/carbon at high overpotentials. The results reveal that silicon plays a key role in the electrocatalysis. This work may thus open the door for the design and fabrication of electrocatalysts for high-efficiency electric energy to hydrogen energy conversion. PMID:27447292

  3. A rhodium/silicon co-electrocatalyst design concept to surpass platinum hydrogen evolution activity at high overpotentials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lili; Lin, Haiping; Li, Youyong; Liao, Fan; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Sheng, Minqi; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-01-01

    Currently, platinum-based electrocatalysts show the best performance for hydrogen evolution. All hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts should however obey Sabatier's principle, that is, the adsorption energy of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should be neither too high nor too low to balance between hydrogen adsorption and desorption. To overcome the limitation of this principle, here we choose a composite (rhodium/silicon nanowire) catalyst, in which hydrogen adsorption occurs on rhodium with a large adsorption energy while hydrogen evolution occurs on silicon with a small adsorption energy. We show that the composite is stable with better hydrogen evolution activity than rhodium nanoparticles and even exceeding those of commercial platinum/carbon at high overpotentials. The results reveal that silicon plays a key role in the electrocatalysis. This work may thus open the door for the design and fabrication of electrocatalysts for high-efficiency electric energy to hydrogen energy conversion. PMID:27447292

  4. Base-Free Conditions for Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Arylation To Produce Stereochemically Labile α-Aryl Ketones.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaowei; Lu, Yixin; Hayashi, Tamio

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric arylation of 2,2-dialkyl cyclopent-4-ene-1,3-diones with aryl boronic acids was found to be efficiently catalyzed by a chiral diene-rhodium μ-chloro dimer, [{RhCl((R)-diene*)}2 ], in the absence of bases in toluene/H2 O to give 2,2-dialkyl 4-aryl cyclopentane-1,3-diones in high yields with high enantioselectivity. Such compounds can not be obtained with high enantiomeric purity under the standard basic conditions used for rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric arylation because the α-aryl ketone products undergo racemization under the basic conditions. PMID:27100902

  5. Mild partial deoxygenation of esters catalyzed by an oxazolinylborate-coordinated rhodium silylene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Boschen, Jeffery S.; Biswas, Abhranil; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2015-08-17

    An electrophilic, coordinatively unsaturated rhodium complex supported by borate-linked oxazoline, oxazoline-coordinated silylene, and N-heterocyclic carbene donors [{κ³-N,Si,C-PhB(OxMe²)(OxMe²SiHPh)ImMes}Rh(H)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] (2, OxMe² = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImMes = 1-mesitylimidazole) is synthesized from the neutral rhodium silyl {PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (1) and B(C6F5)3. The unusual oxazoline-coordinated silylene structure in 2 is proposed to form by rearrangement of an unobserved isomeric cationic rhodium silylene species [{PhB(OxMe²)₂ImMes}RhH(SiHPh)CO][HB(C₆F₅)₃] generated by H abstraction. Complex 2 catalyzes reductions of organic carbonyl compounds with silanes to give hydrosilylation products or deoxygenation products. The pathway to these reactions is primarily influenced by the degree of substitution of the organosilane. Reactions with primary silanes give deoxygenation of esters to ethers, amides to amines, and ketones and aldehydes to hydrocarbons, whereas tertiary silanes react to give 1,2-hydrosilylation of the carbonyl functionality. In contrast, the strong Lewis acid B(C₆F₅)₃ catalyzes the complete deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to hydrocarbons with PhSiH₃ as the reducing agent.

  6. Intrinsic Selectivity and Structure Sensitivity of Rhodium Catalysts for C(2+) Oxygenate Production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nuoya; Medford, Andrew J; Liu, Xinyan; Studt, Felix; Bligaard, Thomas; Bent, Stacey F; Nørskov, Jens K

    2016-03-23

    Synthesis gas (CO + H2) conversion is a promising route to converting coal, natural gas, or biomass into synthetic liquid fuels. Rhodium has long been studied as it is the only elemental catalyst that has demonstrated selectivity to ethanol and other C2+ oxygenates. However, the fundamentals of syngas conversion over rhodium are still debated. In this work a microkinetic model is developed for conversion of CO and H2 into methane, ethanol, and acetaldehyde on the Rh (211) and (111) surfaces, chosen to describe steps and close-packed facets on catalyst particles. The model is based on DFT calculations using the BEEF-vdW functional. The mean-field kinetic model includes lateral adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and the BEEF-vdW error estimation ensemble is used to propagate error from the DFT calculations to the predicted rates. The model shows the Rh(211) surface to be ∼6 orders of magnitude more active than the Rh(111) surface, but highly selective toward methane, while the Rh(111) surface is intrinsically selective toward acetaldehyde. A variety of Rh/SiO2 catalysts are synthesized, tested for catalytic oxygenate production, and characterized using TEM. The experimental results indicate that the Rh(111) surface is intrinsically selective toward acetaldehyde, and a strong inverse correlation between catalytic activity and oxygenate selectivity is observed. Furthermore, iron impurities are shown to play a key role in modulating the selectivity of Rh/SiO2 catalysts toward ethanol. The experimental observations are consistent with the structure-sensitivity predicted from theory. This work provides an improved atomic-scale understanding and new insight into the mechanism, active site, and intrinsic selectivity of syngas conversion over rhodium catalysts and may also guide rational design of alloy catalysts made from more abundant elements. PMID:26958997

  7. Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Rhodium and Platinum Catalysts Used in Hydrosilylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Witold; Kukawka, Rafal; Maciejewski, Hieronim; Smiglak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    A group of imidazolium and pyridinium based ionic liquids has been synthetized, and their ability to dissolve and activate the catalysts used in hydrosilylation reaction of 1-octane and 1,1,1,3,5,5,5-heptamethyltrisiloxane was investigated. An organometallic catalyst as well as inorganic complexes of platinum and rhodium dissolved in ionic liquids were used, forming liquid solutions not miscible with the substrates or with the products of the reaction. The results show that application of such a simple biphasic catalytic system enables reuse of ionic liquid phase with catalysts in multiple reaction cycles reducing the costs and decreasing the amount of catalyst needed per mole of product. PMID:27563869

  8. AMTEC cell testing, optimization of rhodium/tungsten electrodes, and tests of other components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Underwood, Mark L.; O'Connor, Dennis; Kikkert, Stan

    1991-01-01

    Electrodes, current collectors, ceramic to metal braze seals, and metallic components exposed to the high 'hot side' temperatures and sodium liquid and vapor environment have been tested and evaluated in laboratory cells running for hundreds of hours at 1100-1200 K. Rhodium/tungsten electrodes have been selected as the optimum electrodes based on performance parameters and durability. Current collectors have been evaluated under simulated and actual operating conditions. The microscopic effects of metal migration between electrode and current collector alloys as well as their thermal and electrical properties determined the suitability of current collector and lead materials. Braze seals suitable for long term application to AMTEC devices are being developed.

  9. Stereoselective 1,3-Insertions of Rhodium(II) Azavinyl Carbenes

    PubMed Central

    Chuprakov, Stepan; Worrell, Brady T.; Selander, Nicklas; Sit, Rakesh K.; Fokin, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodium(II) azavinyl carbenes, conveniently generated from 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles, undergo a facile, mild and convergent formal 1,3-insertion into N–H and O–H bonds of primary and secondary amides, various alcohols, and carboxylic acids to afford a wide range of vicinally bis-functionalized Z-olefins with perfect regio- and stereoselectively. Utilizing the distinctive functionality installed through these reactions, a number of subsequent rearrangements and cyclizations expand the repertoire of valuable organic building blocks constructed by reactions of transition metal carbene complexes, including α-allenyl ketones and amino-substituted heterocycles. PMID:24295389

  10. A facile one-step synthesis of polymer supported rhodium nanoparticles in organic medium and their catalytic performance in the dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Senem; Zahmakıran, Mehmet; Özkar, Saim

    2012-01-28

    A new type of supported rhodium nanoparticles were reproducibly prepared from N(2)H(4)BH(3) reduction of [Rh(μ-Cl)(1,5-cod)](2) without using any solid support and pre-treatment technique. Their characterization shows the formation of well dispersed rhodium(0) nanoparticles within the framework of a polyaminoborane based polymeric support. These new rhodium(0) nanoparticles were found to be the most active supported catalyst in the catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane in water at room temperature. PMID:22158916

  11. Bimetallic poly- and oligo-nuclear complexes based on a rhodium(III) metalloligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilchenko, Danila B.; Venediktov, Anatoliy B.; Korenev, Sergey V.; Filatov, Evgeniy Yu.; Baidina, Iraida A.; Nadolinnyi, Vladimir A.

    2012-10-01

    Interaction of trans-[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]3- anions (i-Nic- - isonicotinate anion) with Cuaq2+ and Coaq2+ cations in water has afforded complex salts Co3[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]2·17H2O (1) and Cu3[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]2·14H2O (2). Oligonuclear character of 1 and 2 has been established. A coordination polymer Cu5[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]2(i-Nic)2(OH)2·2H2O (3) has been crystallized by hydrothermal treatment of 2 at 160 °C, and its structure was determined by X-ray structural analysis. EPR data for the complexes has been collected and interpreted. Thermal decomposition of the salts was studied by c-DTA. Bimetallic alloys rhodium-copper and rhodium-cobalt have been obtained as final products of thermal decomposition.

  12. Application of flow injection on-line electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry to the determination of rhodium.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Rojas, Fuensanta; Bosch Ojeda, Catalina; Cano Pavón, José Manuel

    2005-06-01

    A fully automated procedure for the determination of rhodium has been developed using flow injection (FI) on-line microcolumn preconcentration coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The proposed FI manifold and its operation make possible the introduction of the total eluate volume into the graphite atomizer, avoiding the necessity for optimisation of subsampling the eluate. Rhodium is adsorbed on a microcolumn packed with 1,5-bis(di-2-pyridyl)methylene thiocarbohydrazide immobilized on silica gel (DPTH-gel). Under the optimum conditions, using a 60 s preconcentration time, a sample flow rate of 3.5 mL min(-1) and an injection volume of eluent of 50 microL, a linear calibration graph was obtained from 1 to at least 40 ng mL(-1) and the detection limit was 1 ng mL(-1). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of samples. Its performance was investigated against certified reference catalyst sample SRM-2557 and by recovery measurements on spiked samples (soil, foods and beverages).

  13. Characterization of acetylacetonato carbonyl diphenyl-2-pyridylphosphine rhodium(I): Comparison with other carbonyl complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Walter; Conradie, Jeanet; Chiweshe, Trevor T.; Venter, Johan A.; Visser, Hendrik G.; Coetzee, Michael P.

    2013-04-01

    Different rhodium(I)/(III) diphenyl-2-pyridylphosphine complexes were isolated and successfully characterized. The [Rh(acac)(CO)(DPP)] (DPP = diphenyl-2-pyridylphosphine) complex crystallizes in the P1¯ space group with four molecules per unit cell. The results clearly show that the differences between the two independent molecules are mainly centered around the orientation of the pyridyl ring within the two square planer molecules. The results also indicate that the phosphine ligands act as monodentate ligands in both molecules, with Rh-P and Rh-CO bond distances of 2.243(1); 2.235(1) and 1.791(4); 1.776(4) Å respectively. A comparison of the ν(CO) stretching frequencies of a relatively large number of rhodium complexes indicated little overlap between the ν(CO) of different types of complexes (e.g. Rh(I) vs Rh(III)) and relatively small standard deviations within each type of complex. DFT calculations were used to determine the preferred pyridyl ring orientation. These calculations indicated that at least 12 areas of minimum energy, which exists as broad, low energy wells, are theoretically suitable for DPP group orientation within this kind of structure.

  14. Tracking the shape-dependent sintering of platinum-rhodium model catalysts under operando conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejral, Uta; Müller, Patrick; Balmes, Olivier; Pontoni, Diego; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticle sintering during catalytic reactions is a major cause for catalyst deactivation. Understanding its atomic-scale processes and finding strategies to reduce it is of paramount scientific and economic interest. Here, we report on the composition-dependent three-dimensional restructuring of epitaxial platinum-rhodium alloy nanoparticles on alumina during carbon monoxide oxidation at 550 K and near-atmospheric pressures employing in situ high-energy grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, online mass spectrometry and a combinatorial sample design. For platinum-rich particles our results disclose a dramatic reaction-induced height increase, accompanied by a corresponding reduction of the total particle surface coverage. We find this restructuring to be progressively reduced for particles with increasing rhodium composition. We explain our observations by a carbon monoxide oxidation promoted non-classical Ostwald ripening process during which smaller particles are destabilized by the heat of reaction. Its driving force lies in the initial particle shape which features for platinum-rich particles a kinetically stabilized, low aspect ratio.

  15. Rhodium-catalysed syn-carboamination of alkenes via a transient directing group.

    PubMed

    Piou, Tiffany; Rovis, Tomislav

    2015-11-01

    Alkenes are the most ubiquitous prochiral functional groups--those that can be converted from achiral to chiral in a single step--that are accessible to synthetic chemists. For this reason, difunctionalization reactions of alkenes (whereby two functional groups are added to the same double bond) are particularly important, as they can be used to produce highly complex molecular architectures. Stereoselective oxidation reactions, including dihydroxylation, aminohydroxylation and halogenation, are well established methods for functionalizing alkenes. However, the intermolecular incorporation of both carbon- and nitrogen-based functionalities stereoselectively across an alkene has not been reported. Here we describe the rhodium-catalysed carboamination of alkenes at the same (syn) face of a double bond, initiated by a carbon-hydrogen activation event that uses enoxyphthalimides as the source of both the carbon and the nitrogen functionalities. The reaction methodology allows for the intermolecular, stereospecific formation of one carbon-carbon and one carbon-nitrogen bond across an alkene, which is, to our knowledge, unprecedented. The reaction design involves the in situ generation of a bidentate directing group and the use of a new cyclopentadienyl ligand to control the reactivity of rhodium. The results provide a new way of synthesizing functionalized alkenes, and should lead to the convergent and stereoselective assembly of amine-containing acyclic molecules.

  16. Tracking the shape-dependent sintering of platinum–rhodium model catalysts under operando conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hejral, Uta; Müller, Patrick; Balmes, Olivier; Pontoni, Diego; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle sintering during catalytic reactions is a major cause for catalyst deactivation. Understanding its atomic-scale processes and finding strategies to reduce it is of paramount scientific and economic interest. Here, we report on the composition-dependent three-dimensional restructuring of epitaxial platinum–rhodium alloy nanoparticles on alumina during carbon monoxide oxidation at 550 K and near-atmospheric pressures employing in situ high-energy grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, online mass spectrometry and a combinatorial sample design. For platinum-rich particles our results disclose a dramatic reaction-induced height increase, accompanied by a corresponding reduction of the total particle surface coverage. We find this restructuring to be progressively reduced for particles with increasing rhodium composition. We explain our observations by a carbon monoxide oxidation promoted non-classical Ostwald ripening process during which smaller particles are destabilized by the heat of reaction. Its driving force lies in the initial particle shape which features for platinum-rich particles a kinetically stabilized, low aspect ratio. PMID:26957204

  17. Development and testing of a compact basis set for use in effective core potential calculations on rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Roscioni, Otello M; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2012-10-01

    We present a set of effective core potential (ECP) basis sets for rhodium atoms which are of reasonable size for use in electronic structure calculations. In these ECP basis sets, the Los Alamos ECP is used to simulate the effect of the core electrons while an optimized set of Gaussian functions, which includes polarization and diffuse functions, is used to describe the valence electrons. These basis sets were optimized to reproduce the ionization energy and electron affinity of atomic rhodium. They were also tested by computing the electronic ground state geometry and harmonic frequencies of [Rh(CO)(2) μ-Cl](2) , Rh(CO)(2) ClPy, and RhCO (neutral and its positive, and negative ions) as well as the enthalpy of the reaction of [Rh(CO)(2) μ-Cl](2) with pyridine (Py) to give Rh(CO)(2) ClPy, at different levels of theory. Good agreement with experimental values was obtained. Although the number of basis functions used in our ECP basis sets is smaller than those of other ECP basis sets of comparable quality, we show that the newly developed ECP basis sets provide the flexibility and precision required to reproduce a wide range of chemical and physical properties of rhodium compounds. Therefore, we recommend the use of these compact yet accurate ECP basis sets for electronic structure calculations on molecules involving rhodium atoms.

  18. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-06-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES).

  19. Simultaneous determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in crude platinum samples by activation analysis and high-resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Turkstra, J; de Wet, W J

    1969-08-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation analysis using a Ge(Li) detector has been investigated for the simultaneous determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in crude platinum samples contained in lead cupels. This technique proved feasible and appears promising for extension to the determination of most of the noble metals.

  20. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). PMID:27283394

  1. Rhodium(II)-catalyzed alkyne amination of homopropargylic sulfamate esters: stereoselective synthesis of functionalized norcaradienes by arene cyclopropanation.

    PubMed

    Brawn, Ryan A; Zhu, Kaicheng; Panek, James S

    2014-01-01

    A rhodium(II) catalyzed nitrene-alkyne cycloaddition of stereochemically well-defined homopropargylic ethers is followed by arene cyclopropanation to afford unique tetracyclic norcaradiene products bearing a cyclic sulfamate. Products from the arene cyclopropanation (Buchner reaction) can be converted to fused cycloheptatrienes via a ring enlarging electrocyclization after nucleophilic ring opening of the cyclic sulfamate ester.

  2. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  3. Rhodium-Catalyzed Regiodivergent Hydrothiolation of Allyl Amines and Imines.

    PubMed

    Kennemur, Jennifer L; Kortman, Gregory D; Hull, Kami L

    2016-09-14

    The regiodivergent Rh-catalyzed hydrothiolation of allyl amines and imines is presented. Bidentate phosphine ligands with larger natural bite angles (βn ≥ 99°), for example, DPEphos, dpph, or L1, promote a Markovnikov-selective hydrothiolation in up to 88% yield and >20:1 regioselectivity. Conversely, when smaller bite angle ligands (βn ≤ 86°), for example, dppbz or dppp, are employed, the anti-Markovnikov product is formed in up to 74% yield and >20:1 regioselectivity. Initial mechanistic investigations are performed and are consistent with an oxidative addition/olefin insertion/reductive elimination mechanism for each regioisomeric pathway. We hypothesize that the change in regioselectivity is an effect of diverging coordination spheres to favor either Rh-S or Rh-H insertion to form the branched or linear isomer, respectively. PMID:27547858

  4. Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, Enrique J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2011-08-01

    Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

  5. Ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, and iridium complexes of osazones (osazones = bis-arylhydrazones of glyoxal): radical versus nonradical states.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sarat Chandra; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2014-03-01

    Phenyl osazone (L(NHPh)H2), phenyl osazone anion radical (L(NHPh)H2(•-)), benzoyl osazone (L(NHCOPh)H2), benzoyl osazone anion radical (L(NHCOPh)H2(•-)), benzoyl osazone monoanion (L(NCOPh)HMe(-)), and anilido osazone (L(NHCONHPh)HMe) complexes of ruthenium, osmium, rhodium, and iridium of the types trans-[Os(L(NHPh)H2)(PPh3)2Br2] (3), trans-[Ir(L(NHPh)H2(•-))(PPh3)2Cl2] (4), trans-[Ru(L(NHCOPh)H2)(PPh3)2Cl2] (5), trans-[Os(L(NHCOPh)H2)(PPh3)2Br2] (6), trans- [Rh(L(NHCOPh)H2(•-))(PPh3)2Cl2] (7), trans-[Rh(L(NHCOPh)HMe(-))(PPh3)2Cl]PF6 ([8]PF6), and trans-[Ru(L(NHCONHPh)HMe)(PPh3)2Cl]Cl ([9]Cl) have been isolated and compared (osazones = bis-arylhydrazones of glyoxal). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses and IR, mass, and (1)H NMR spectra; in addition, single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of 5, 6, [8]PF6, and [9]Cl have been carried out. EPR spectra of 4 and 7 reveal that in the solid state they are osazone anion radical complexes (4, gav = 1.989; 7, 2.028 (Δg = 0.103)), while in solution the contribution of the M(II) ions is greater (4, gav = 2.052 (Δg = 0.189); 7, gav = 2.102 (Δg = 0.238)). Mulliken spin densities on L(NHPh)H2 and L(NHCOPh)H2 obtained from unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) calculations on trans-[Ir(L(NHPh)H2)(PMe3)2Cl2] (4(Me)) and trans-[Rh(L(NHCOPh)H2)(PMe3)2Cl2] (7(Me)) in the gas phase with doublet spin states authenticated the existence of L(NHPh)H2(•-) and L(NHCOPh)H2(•-) anion radicals in 4 and 7 coordinated to iridium(III) and rhodium(III) ions. DFT calculations on trans-[Os(L(NHPh)H2)(PMe3)2Br2] (3(Me)), trans-[Os(L(NHCOPh)H2)(PMe3)2Br2] (6(Me)), and trans-[Ru(L(NHCONHPh)HMe(-))(PMe3)2Cl] [9(Me)](+) with singlet spin states established that the closed-shell singlet state (CSS) solutions of 3, 5, 6, and [9]Cl are stable. The lower value of M(III)/M(II) reduction potentials and lower energy absorption bands corroborate the higher extent of mixing of d orbitals with the π* orbital

  6. MERCURY-NITRITE-RHODIUM-RUTHENIUM INTERACTIONS IN NOBLE METAL CATALYZED HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM FORMIC ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136C

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Chemical pre-treatment of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site is performed to prepare the waste for vitrification into a stable waste glass form. During pre-treatment, compounds in the waste become catalytically active. Mercury, rhodium, and palladium become active for nitrite destruction by formic acid, while rhodium and ruthenium become active for catalytic conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Nitrite ion is present during the maximum activity of rhodium, but is consumed prior to the activation of ruthenium. Catalytic hydrogen generation during pre-treatment can exceed radiolytic hydrogen generation by several orders of magnitude. Palladium and mercury impact the maximum catalytic hydrogen generation rates of rhodium and ruthenium by altering the kinetics of nitrite ion decomposition. New data are presented that illustrate the interactions of these various species.

  7. Synthesis of α-amino ketones from terminal alkynes via rhodium-catalyzed denitrogenative hydration of N-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomoya; Biyajima, Tsuneaki; Fujii, Tetsuji; Murakami, Masahiro

    2012-01-11

    N-Sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles react with water in the presence of a rhodium catalyst to produce α-amino ketones in high yield. An intermediary α-imino rhodium(II) carbenoid undergoes insertion into the O-H bond of water. This transformation formally achieves 1,2-aminohydroxylation of terminal alkynes in a regioselective fashion when combined with the copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition with N-sulfonyl azides. PMID:22129424

  8. Methyl iodide oxidative addition to [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh3)]: an experimental and theoretical study of the stereochemistry of the products and the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Marrigje M; Conradie, Jeanet

    2011-08-28

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the oxidative addition and subsequent carbonyl insertion and deinsertion steps of the reaction of methyl iodide to a rhodium(I) acetylacetonato complex of the formula [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh(3))] (Hacac = acetylacetone). This process has been studied experimentally for many rhodium β-diketonato complexes, but, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic computational study of the complete reaction sequence. Experimental (1)H techniques complement the theoretical results on the stereochemistry of the reaction intermediates and products. (1)H NMR also revealed the existence of a second rhodium(III)-acyl product, which has not been previously observed in this reaction. The calculated Gibbs free energy of activation of the oxidative addition reaction is 71 kJ mol(-1), which is in agreement with the experimental value of 82(1) kJ mol(-1). The DFT-calculated oxidative addition corresponds to an associative S(N)2 nucleophilic attack by the rhodium metal centre on the methyl iodide, which is in agreement with calculated and experimental (in brackets) activation parameters of the reaction, 27 (38.8) kJ mol(-1) for ΔH((≠)) and -147 (-146) J K(-1) mol(-1) for ΔS((≠)). PMID:21761056

  9. Highly enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes via rhodium catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jong Uk; Krische, Michael J

    2006-08-23

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetylenic aldehydes 1a-12a using chirally modified cationic rhodium catalysts enables highly enantioselective reductive cyclization to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 1b-12b. Using an achiral hydrogenation catalyst, the chiral racemic acetylenic aldehydes 13a-15a engage in highly syn-diastereoselective reductive cyclizations to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 13b-15b. Ozonolysis of cyclization products 7b and 9b allows access to optically enriched alpha-hydroxy ketones 7c and 9c. Reductive cyclization of enyne 7a under a deuterium atmosphere provides the monodeuterated product deuterio-7b, consistent with a catalytic mechanism involving alkyne-carbonyl oxidative coupling followed by hydrogenolytic cleavage of the resulting oxametallacycle. These hydrogen-mediated transformations represent the first examples of the enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes. PMID:16910650

  10. Hydrogenation of aniline on a low-percentage, supported rhodium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ualikhanova, A.; Temirbulatova, A.E.

    1992-01-10

    The products of hydrogenation of aniline and their derivatives exhibit biological activity and are used in the pharmaceutical industry for preparation of analgesic, antipyretic, and sulfanilamide drugs. Up to 30% of the total consumption of aniline is for synthesis of drugs. Hydrogenation of aniline on platinum metals supported on carbon was studied by Rylander et al. The authors investigated the catalytic properties of rhodium supported on oxides in saturation of aniline with hydrogen in water. In most cases, the amount of noble metal in the supported catalyst was 5%. Decreasing the concentration of active phase in the catalyst is economically advantageous. The features of hydrogenation of aniline in the presence of 1% Rh/MgO in solutions with wide variation of the technological parameters of the process were investigated in the present study. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Classically exact overlayer dynamics: Diffusion of rhodium clusters on Rh(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.

    1986-11-15

    A new method is presented for describing the classical dynamics (e.g., diffusion, desorption) of adsorbed overlayers of atoms or molecules, starting from arbitrary interatomic potentials. Provided that a certain dynamical criterion is met, the method yields classically exact results, but with many orders of magnitude less computation than direct molecular dynamics. The approach provides, for what we believe to be the first time, a connection between stochastic lattice-gas dynamical methods and the interatomic potential function. As a sample application, the diffusion constants are computed for two-dimensional rhodium clusters of up to 75 atoms on the Rh(100) surface at T = 2000 K. For clusters larger than n = 15 atoms, the diffusion constant scales as n/sup -1.76//sup +- //sup 0.06/, and the dominant mechanism for the diffusion is found to be atoms running along the edges of the cluster blocks.

  12. Dimerisation, rhodium complex formation and rearrangements of N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zong; Namyslo, Jan C; Drafz, Martin H H; Nieger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Deprotonation of indazolium salts at low temperatures gives N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles (indazol-3-ylidenes) which can be trapped as rhodium complexes (X-ray analysis). In the absence of Rh, the indazol-3-ylidenes spontaneously dimerize under ring cleavage of one of the N,N-bonds and ring closure to an indazole–indole spiro compound which possesses an exocyclic imine group. The E/Z isomers of the imines can be separated by column chromatography when methanol is used as eluent. We present results of a single crystal X-ray analysis of one of the E-isomers, which equilibrate in solution as well as in the solid state. Heating of the indazole–indole spiro compounds results in the formation of quinazolines by a ring-cleavage/ring-closure sequence (X-ray analysis). Results of DFT calculations are presented. PMID:24778738

  13. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2010 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; White, J. F.; Rummel, Becky L.; Stevens, Don J.

    2010-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research for the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy, Biomass Program to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas. In recent years this research has primarily involved the further development of a silica-supported catalyst containing rhodium and manganese that was selected from earlier catalyst screening tests. A major effort during 2010 was to examine alternative catalyst supports to determine whether other supports, besides the Davisil 645 silica, would improve performance. Optimization of the Davisil 645 silica-supported catalyst also was continued with respect to candidate promoters iridium, platinum, and gallium, and examination of selected catalyst preparation and activation alternatives for the baseline RhMn/SiO2 catalyst.

  14. Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D.; Maier, L.; Deutschmann, O.

    2010-09-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

  15. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial study of cyclometalated rhodium(III) complex containing dithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Ghobad; Heidarizadi, Fateme; Naghipour, Ali; Notash, Behrouz

    2016-10-01

    The novel cyclometalated Rh(III) complex, [Rh(phpy)2(SˆS)], Where phpy is 2-phenylpyridine and (SˆS) is diethyldithiocarbamate, has been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 13C and 1H NMR, electronic absorption and Fluorescence spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of [Rh(phpy)2(SˆS)] shows that the coordination geometry around the Rh(III) is a distorted octahedron, with bite angles of 71.19-81.04° for all three bidentate ligands. Electrochemical analysis by cyclic voltammetry reveals irreversible redox behavior of the rhodium centre. Antibacterial activity of the complex has also been studied by agar disc diffusion method against three Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli) and two Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Corynebacterium renale).

  16. Rhodium Nanoparticle-mesoporous Silicon Nanowire Nanohybrids for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection with High Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhiqian; Chang, Hucheng; Zhu, Weiqin; Xu, Chenlong; Feng, Xinjian

    2015-01-01

    Developing nanostructured electrocatalysts, with low overpotential, high selectivity and activity has fundamental and technical importance in many fields. We report here rhodium nanoparticle and mesoporous silicon nanowire (RhNP@mSiNW) hybrids for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection with high electrocatalytic activity and selectivity. By employing electrodes that loaded with RhNP@mSiNW nanohybrids, interference caused from both many electroactive substances and dissolved oxygen were eliminated by electrochemical assaying at an optimal potential of +75 mV. Furthermore, the electrodes exhibited a high detection sensitivity of 0.53 μA/mM and fast response (< 5 s). This high-performance nanohybrid electrocatalyst has great potential for future practical application in various oxidase-base biosensors. PMID:25588953

  17. Screen-Printed Carbon Electrodes Modified by Rhodium Dioxide and Glucose Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Polan, Vojtěch; Soukup, Jan; Vytřas, Karel

    2010-01-01

    The described glucose biosensor is based on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modified by rhodium dioxide, which functions as a mediator. The electrode is further modified by the enzyme glucose dehydrogenase, which is immobilized on the electrode's surface through electropolymerization with m-phenylenediamine. The enzyme biosensor was optimized and tested in model glucose samples. The biosensor showed a linear range of 500–5000 mg L−1 of glucose with a detection limit of 210 mg L−1 (established as 3σ) and response time of 39 s. When compared with similar glucose biosensors based on glucose oxidase, the main advantage is that neither ascorbic and uric acids nor paracetamol interfere measurements with this biosensor at selected potentials. PMID:21528113

  18. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed. PMID:26189442

  19. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed.

  20. Determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in geologic materials by fire assay and emission spectrography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapfty, J.; Riley, L.B.

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of palladium down to 4ppb (parts per billion, 109), platinum down to 10 ppb and rhodium down to 5 ppb in 15 g of sample. Fire-assay techniques are used to preconcentrate the platinum metals into a gold bead, then the bead is dissolved in aqua regia and diluted to volume with 1M hydrochloric acid. The solution is analysed by optical emission spectrography of the residue from 200 ??l of it evaporated on a pair of flat-top graphite electrodes. This method requires much less sample handling than most published methods for these elements. Data are presented for G-1, W-1, and six new standard rocks of the U.S. Geological Survey. The values for palladium in W-1 are in reasonable agreement with previously published data. ?? 1968.

  1. The activity of platinum, iridium and rhodium drug complexes against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Croft, S L; Neal, R A; Craciunescu, D G; Certad-Fombona, G

    1992-03-01

    The activities of twenty seven Platinum, Rhodium and Iridium drug complexes were determined against Leishmania donovani amastigotes in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Eight compounds showed antileishmanial activity of which only three, Rh(III)-mepacrine, Ir(III) pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Ir(III) diethyl dithiocarbamate had ED50 values of less than 1 microM. The two Iridium complexes produced, respectively, a 50% and 39% suppression of L. donovani amastigotes in the liver of BALB/c mice following the subcutaneous administration of 200 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days. Ultrastructural studies suggest that the amastigote kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex is the primary site of action of the Ir and Rh complexes. PMID:1598504

  2. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  3. Gravimetric preparation and characterization of primary reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Angela; Noordmann, Janine; Görlitz, Volker; Pape, Carola; Richter, Silke; Kipphardt, Heinrich; Kopp, Gernot; Jährling, Reinhard; Rienitz, Olaf; Güttler, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Gravimetrically prepared mono-elemental reference solutions having a well-known mass fraction of approximately 1 g/kg (or a mass concentration of 1 g/L) define the very basis of virtually all measurements in inorganic analysis. Serving as the starting materials of all standard/calibration solutions, they link virtually all measurements of inorganic analytes (regardless of the method applied) to the purity of the solid materials (high-purity metals or salts) they were prepared from. In case these solid materials are characterized comprehensively with respect to their purity, this link also establishes direct metrological traceability to The International System of Units (SI). This, in turn, ensures the comparability of all results on the highest level achievable. Several national metrology institutes (NMIs) and designated institutes (DIs) have been working for nearly two decades in close cooperation with commercial producers on making an increasing number of traceable reference solutions available. Besides the comprehensive characterization of the solid starting materials, dissolving them both loss-free and completely under strict gravimetric control is a challenging problem in the case of several elements like molybdenum and rhodium. Within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), in the Joint Research Project (JRP) called SIB09 Primary standards for challenging elements, reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium were prepared directly from the respective metals with a relative expanded uncertainty associated with the mass fraction of U rel(w) < 0.05 %. To achieve this, a microwave-assisted digestion procedure for Rh and a hotplate digestion procedure for Mo were developed along with highly accurate and precise inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) methods required to assist with the preparation and as dissemination tools.

  4. Asymmetric hydrogenation in the presence of bisdiphenylphosphine complexes of rhodium. 3. Molecular structure of 2R-3-phenyl-2-(N-methyldiphenylphosphinamino)-1-diphenylphosphinoxypropane (1,5-cyclooctadiene)rhodium(I) perchlorate and its effectiveness as an enantioselective catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Struchkov, Yu.T.; Yanovskii, A.I.; Pavlov, V.A.; Voloboev, A.A.; Klabunovskii, E.I.

    1987-09-10

    The structure of 2R-3-phenyl-2-methyl-diphenylphosphinamino-1-diphenylphosphinoxypropane(1,5-cyclooctadiene)rhodium (I) perchlorate was determined by x-ray crystallographic analysis, and the asymmetric arrangement of the phosphine phenyl groups was established. Examination of the established structure of the complex in comparison with the previously investigated structures of asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts showed the existence of a correlation between the configuration of the phosphorus atoms in the catalytic complexes and the configuration of the hydrogenation product.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of the interaction between rhodium acetate and ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shuang; Jiang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used as a probe of the interaction between rhodium acetate ([Rh2(OAc)4]) and ionic liquids. Due to the impact of the anion of ionic liquids on the electronic environment of the rhodium centre, the measured Rh 3d binding energies of [Rh2(OAc)4] dissolved in a series of ionic liquids were found to decrease along with the increasing of the basicity of anions. The reduction of Rh(II) to Rh(0) in 1-octyl-3methylimidazolium acetate ([C8C1Im][OAc]) under UHV condition was monitored by XPS. The intensity of the new formed metallic Rh(0) peak was found increased along with time. The surface enrichment of the new formed Rh(0) species in the system was also concluded.

  6. Chiral ammonium-capped rhodium(0) nanocatalysts: synthesis, characterization, and advances in asymmetric hydrogenation in neat water.

    PubMed

    Bilé, Elodie Guyonnet; Cortelazzo-Polisini, Elodie; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Sassine, Rita; Launay, Franck; Roucoux, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Optically active amphiphilic compounds derived from N-methylephedrine, N-methylprolinol, or cinchona derivatives possessing bromide or chiral lactate counterions were efficiently used as protective agents for rhodium(0) nanoparticles. The full characterization of these surfactants and the obtained nanocatalysts was performed by means of different techniques. These spherical nanoparticles, with sizes between 0.8-2.5 nm depending on the stabilizer, were evaluated in the hydrogenation of model substrates in neat water as a green solvent. The rhodium catalysts showed relevant kinetic properties, but modest enantiomeric excess values of up to 13 % in the hydrogenation of ethyl pyruvate. They were also investigated in the hydrogenation of disubstituted arenes, such as m-methylanisole, providing interesting catalytic activities and a preferential cis selectivity of around 80 %; however, no asymmetric induction was observed.

  7. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of α-Purine Nucleobase-Substituted Acrylates with Rhodium Diphosphine Complexes: Access to Tenofovir Analogues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huan-Li; Chen, Fei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Guo, Hai-Ming; Qu, Gui-Rong; He, Yan-Mei; Fan, Qing-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The first asymmetric hydrogenation of α-purine nucleobase-substituted α,β-unsaturated esters, catalyzed by a chiral rhodium (R)-Synphos catalyst, has been developed. A wide range of mono- and disubstituted acrylates were successfully hydrogenated under very mild conditions in high yields with good to excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee). This method provides a convenient approach to the synthesis of a new kind of optically pure acyclic nucleoside and Tenofovir analogues. PMID:27112983

  8. Rhodium-Catalyzed Regioselective Hydroxylation of Cage B-H Bonds of o-Carboranes with O2 or Air.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Hairong; Quan, Yangjian; Xie, Zuowei

    2016-09-19

    A rhodium-catalyzed hydroxylation of a cage B4-H bond in o-carboranes with either O2 or air as the oxygen source is described, and serves as a new methodology for the regioselective generation of a series of 4-OH-o-carboranes in a one-pot process. The use of either O2 or air as both the oxidant and the oxygen source makes this protocol very environmentally friendly and practical. PMID:27599774

  9. Asymmetric Conjugate Alkynylation of Cyclic α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds with a Chiral Diene Rhodium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaowei; Huang, Yinhua; Hayashi, Tamio

    2016-01-18

    Asymmetric conjugate alkynylation of cyclic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (ketones, esters, and amides) was realized by use of diphenyl[(triisopropylsilyl)ethynyl]methanol as an alkynylating reagent in the presence of a rhodium catalyst coordinated with a new chiral diene ligand (Fc-bod; bod=bicyclo[2.2.2]octa-2,5-diene, Fc=ferrocenyl) to give high yields of the corresponding β-alkynyl-substituted carbonyl compounds with 95-98% ee. PMID:26636764

  10. Rhodium-catalyzed dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformations of racemic allenes by the [3+2] annulation of aryl ketimines.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc N; Cramer, Nicolai

    2013-09-27

    Racemization required: Rhodium(I)-catalyzed C-H activation directed by unprotected ketimines initiates selective [3+2] cycloaddition with allenes, providing access to highly substituted indenylamines. The reaction proceeds through the dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation of racemic allenes. The catalyst controls the enantio- and diastereoselectivity, the regioselectivities of the C-H activation and allene incorporation, as well as the E/Z ratio.

  11. Rhodium-catalyzed carbonylation of cyclopropyl substituted propargyl esters: a tandem 1,3-acyloxy migration [5 + 1] cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Shu, Dongxu; Li, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Min; Robichaux, Patrick J; Guzei, Ilia A; Tang, Weiping

    2012-08-01

    We have developed two different types of tandem reactions for the synthesis of highly functionalized cyclohexenones from cyclopropyl substituted propargyl esters. Both reactions were initiated by rhodium-catalyzed Saucy-Marbet 1,3-acyloxy migration. The resulting cyclopropyl substituted allenes derived from acyloxy migration then underwent [5 + 1] cycloaddition with CO. The acyloxy group not only eased the access to allene intermediates but also provided a handle for further selective functionalizations.

  12. Rhodium-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Cyclopropyl Substituted Propargyl Esters: A Tandem 1,3-Acyloxy Migration [5+1] Cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Dongxu; Li, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Min; Robichaux, Patrick J.; Guzei, Ilia A.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed two different types of tandem reactions for the synthesis of highly functionalized cyclohexenones from cyclopropyl substituted propargyl esters. Both reactions were initiated by rhodium-catalyzed Saucy-Marbet 1,3-acyloxy migration. The resulting cyclopropyl substituted allenes derived from acyloxy migration then underwent [5+1] cycloaddition with CO. The acyloxy group not only eased the access to allene intermediates but also provided a handle for further selective functionalizations. PMID:22793991

  13. Carboxylated polymers functionalized by cyclodextrins for the stabilization of highly efficient rhodium(0) nanoparticles in aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Noël, Sébastien; Léger, Bastien; Herbois, Rudy; Ponchel, Anne; Tilloy, Sébastien; Wenz, Gerhard; Monflier, Eric

    2012-11-21

    Rhodium(0) nanoparticles stabilized by a polymer containing carboxylate and β-cyclodextrin moieties have high stability and catalytic activity for aqueous hydrogenation reactions of olefins and aromatic substrates. This catalytic system can be recycled and reused without loss of activity. These high catalytic performances can be attributed to conjugated electrostatic interactions (carboxylate groups) and steric interactions (polymer structure and β-cyclodextrin moiety). PMID:23007202

  14. Rhodium-catalyzed annulative coupling of 3-phenylthiophenes with alkynes involving double C-H bond cleavages.

    PubMed

    Iitsuka, Tomonori; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Double CH bond activation took place efficiently upon treatment of 3-phenylthiophenes with alkynes in the presence of a rhodium catalyst and a copper salt oxidant to form the corresponding naphthothiophene derivatives. Dehydrogenative coupling with alkenes was also found to occur on the phenyl moiety rather than the thiophene ring. These reactions provide straightforward synthetic methods for π-conjugated molecules involving a thiophene unit from readily available, simple building blocks. PMID:24288235

  15. Sequential rhodium/palladium catalysis: enantioselective formation of dihydroquinolinones in the presence of achiral and chiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qureshi, Zafar; Sonaglia, Lorenzo; Lautens, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Compatible combinations of achiral and chiral ligands can be used in rhodium/palladium catalysis to achieve highly enantioselective domino reactions. The difference in rates of catalysis and minimal effects of ligand interference confer control in the domino sequence. The "all-in-one" 1,4-conjugate arylation and C-N cross-coupling through sequential Rh/Pd catalysis provides access to enantioenriched dihydroquinolinone building blocks.

  16. Surface organometallic chemistry: Reaction of tris-allyl rhodium with surfaces of silica, alumina, titania, and magnesia

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, P.; Houtman, C.; Santini, C.C.

    1992-05-20

    The reaction of Rh({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}){sub 3}, 1, with silica, alumina, titania, and magnesia has been followed by infrared spectroscopy, isotopic labeling experiments, quantitative analysis of gaseous products, and elemental analysis. Complex 1 reacts rapidly with alumina pretreated to 350{degrees}C and with silica and titania to form a bis-allylic rhodium species grafted to the surface, but no immediate reaction was observed between 1 and alumina pretreated to 200 {degrees}C or magnesia. This reaction likely proceeds via electrophilic cleavage of Rh-C bonds of 1 by a surface OH group. On silica, the results of IR experiments after labeling the surface with {sup 16}O-D and {sup 18}O-H and structural arguments suggest that two 18-electron species are possible on the surface: one for which the rhodium is coordinated both to an oxygen and a hydroxyl group linked to the same silicon atom and another for which the oxygen atom and the OH group are linked to two different silicon atoms. Molecular mechanics modeling of silica, alumina, and titania was used as a complement to the experimental work to test the plausibility of various modes of attachment of the rhodium allyl complex. 40 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Enhancement of ethanol oxidation at Pt and PtRu nanoparticles dispersed over hybrid zirconia-rhodium supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Koster, Margaretta D.; Blanchard, Gary J.; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    2014-12-01

    A catalytic material for electrooxidation of ethanol that utilizes PtRu nanoparticles dispersed over thin films of rhodium-free and rhodium-containing zirconia (ZrO2) supports is described here. The enhancement of electrocatalytic activity (particularly in the potential range as low as 0.25-0.5 V vs. RHE), that has been achieved by dispersing PtRu nanoparticles (loading, 100 μg cm-2) over the hybrid Rh-ZrO2 support composed of nanostructured zirconia and metallic rhodium particles, is clearly evident from comparison of the respective voltammetric and chronoamperometric current densities recorded at room temperature (22 °C) in 0.5 mol dm-3 H2SO4 containing 0.5 mol dm-3 ethanol. Porous ZrO2 nanostructures, that provide a large population of hydroxyl groups in acidic medium in the vicinity of PtRu sites, are expected to facilitate the ruthenium-induced removal of passivating CO adsorbates from platinum, as is apparent from the diagnostic experiments with a small organic molecule such as methanol. Although Rh itself does not show directly any activity toward ethanol oxidation, the metal is expected to facilitate C-C bond splitting in C2H5OH. It has also been found during parallel voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements that the hybrid Rh-ZrO2 support increases activity of the platinum component itself toward ethanol oxidation in the low potential range.

  18. Simultaneous nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticles using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Haidi D; Drinkel, Emma E; Orzechovicz, Beatriz; Leopoldino, Elder C; Souza, Franciane D; Almerindo, Gizelle I; Perdona, Cristian; Nome, Faruk

    2013-11-01

    A selective method is proposed for the determination of palladium, gold, and sulfur in catalytic systems, by direct liquid analysis using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), under an atmosphere of helium or air. This method allows a nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticulate catalysts stabilized by imidazolium propane sulfonate based zwitterionic surfactants, allowing the samples to be reused for catalytic studies. The signals from palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold samples in the presence of imidazolium propane sulfonate-based zwitterionic surfactants obtained using EDXRF before (Pd(2+), Rh(2+), Pt(2+), and Au(3+)) and after (Pd(0), Rh(0), Pt(0), and Au(0)) formation of nanoparticles are essentially identical. The results show that the EDXRF method is nondestructive and allows detection and quantification of the main components of platinum, gold, rhodium, and palladium NPs, including the surfactant concentration, with detection and quantification limits in the range of 0.4-3 mg L(-1). The matrices used in such samples present no problems, even allowing the detection and quantification of interfering elements.

  19. Characterization of model three-way catalysts. 3: Infrared study of the surface composition of platinum-rhodium ceria-alumina catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rogemond, E.; Frety, R.; Perrichon, V.; Primet, M.; Chevrier, M.; Gauthier, C.; Mathis, F.

    1999-09-10

    The surface composition of model and commercial bimetallic PtRh catalysts supported on ceria-alumina was tentatively determined by FTIR spectroscopy using the successive adsorption of NO at 473 K and CO at 298 K method which was previously applied to the case of PtRh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The study of monometallic model catalysts shows that the adsorption of NO at 473 K on rhodium gives an intense band at 1912 cm{sup {minus}1} which is not modified by the presence of ceria and therefore can be used to quantify the number of surface rhodium atoms. However, the chemisorption properties of platinum toward the subsequent adsorption of CO at 298 K are strongly modified and the quantification of the surface platinum atoms could not be directly measured. However, their number could be indirectly obtained by combining the NO adsorption for rhodium and hydrogen volumetric adsorption for the total number of surface metal atoms, assuming that NO adsorption does not induce an important segregation of rhodium for bimetallic particles. Thus, for the fresh bimetallic model catalyst, the same composition was obtained at the surface and in the bulk. After aging at 1273 K, no rhodium was detected at the surface. This absence of surface rhodium atoms was confirmed by the data obtained from the direct adsorption of CO on platinum at room temperature, which gave the same number of surface atoms as hydrogen chemisorption. Similar results have been obtained with two commercial three-way catalysts. In particular, after aging at 1273 K, rhodium was practically not detected on the surface.

  20. Iodide-mediated control of rhodium epitaxial growth on well-defined noble metal nanocrystals: synthesis, characterization, and structure-dependent catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Brian T; Kuo, Chun-Hong; Brodsky, Casey N; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2012-11-01

    Metal nanocrystals (NCs) comprising rhodium are heterogeneous catalysts for CO oxidation, NO reduction, hydrogenations, electro-oxidations, and hydroformylation reactions. It has been demonstrated that control of structure at the nanoscale can enhance the performance of a heterogeneous metal catalyst, such as Rh, but molecular-level control of NCs comprising this metal is less studied compared to gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. We report an iodide-mediated epitaxial overgrowth of Rh by using the surfaces of well-defined foreign metal crystals as substrates to direct the Rh surface structures. The epigrowth can be accomplished on different sizes, morphologies, and identities of metal substrates. The surface structures of the resulting bimetallic NCs were studied using electron microscopy, and their distinct catalytic behaviors were examined in CO stripping and the electro-oxidation of formic acid. Iodide was found to play a crucial role in the overgrowth mechanism. With the addition of iodide, the Rh epigrowth can even be achieved on gold substrates despite the rather large lattice mismatch of ~7%. Hollow Rh nanostructures have also been generated by selective etching of the core substrates. The new role of iodide in the overgrowth and the high level of control for Rh could hold the key to future nanoscale control of this important metal's architecture for use in heterogeneous catalysis.

  1. Merging rhodium-catalysed C–H activation and hydroamination in a highly selective [4+2] imine/alkyne annulation

    PubMed Central

    Manan, Rajith S.; Zhao, Pinjing

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic C–H activation and hydroamination represent two important strategies for eco-friendly chemical synthesis with high atom efficiency and reduced waste production. Combining both C–H activation and hydroamination in a cascade process, preferably with a single catalyst, would allow rapid access to valuable nitrogen-containing molecules from readily available building blocks. Here we report a single metal catalyst-based approach for N-heterocycle construction by tandem C–H functionalization and alkene hydroamination. A simple catalyst system of cationic rhodium(I) precursor and phosphine ligand promotes redox-neutral [4+2] annulation between N–H aromatic ketimines and internal alkynes to form multi-substituted 3,4-dihydroisoquinolines (DHIQs) in high chemoselectivity over competing annulation processes, exclusive cis-diastereoselectivity, and distinct regioselectivity for alkyne addition. This study demonstrates the potential of tandem C–H activation and alkene hydrofunctionalization as a general strategy for modular and atom-efficient assembly of six-membered heterocycles with multiple chirality centres. PMID:27321650

  2. Organogold reactivity with palladium, nickel, and rhodium: transmetalation, cross-coupling, and dual catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hirner, Joshua J; Shi, Yili; Blum, Suzanne A

    2011-08-16

    Using two transition metals to simultaneously catalyze a reaction can offer distinct opportunities for reactivity and selectivity when compared to using single-metal catalyst systems. Creating dual transition metal catalytic systems is complicated, however, by challenges in predicting compatible reactivities and designing turnover pathways for both metals. In this Account, we describe our development of dual-metal catalysis reactions involving gold and a second transition metal. The unique rearrangement intermediates accessible through gold-only catalysis, which exploits the soft Lewis acidity of Au(I), make gold an attractive partner for dual-metal catalysis reactions. Because of the complexity of achieving simultaneous turnover of two catalysts and predicting compatibilities, our approach has been to first gain a fundamental understanding of the reactivity of the two metals with each other, both in stoichiometric and monocatalyzed reactions. To this end, we have investigated the combined reactivity of organogold compounds with palladium, nickel, and rhodium. We narrate the intricacies of turning over two catalysts simultaneously and thereby illuminate the valuable role of fundamental studies in identifying the optimal conditions to promote desirable two-metal reactivity and compatibility. Transmetalation, redox reactivity, and new mechanisms for dual-metal catalytic turnover were probed from this standpoint. We have applied the knowledge gained through these studies to the development of reactions that are dual-catalyzed by gold and palladium, as well as nickel- and rhodium-catalyzed reactions of organogold compounds. More broadly, these new reactions expand the reactivity available to catalytic organogold intermediates via trapping and functionalization reactions with other transition metals. Our investigations reveal strategies useful for designing dual-metal reactions with gold. First, the versatility of gold as a transmetalation partner suggests that many

  3. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Silylation of Acetophenone Derivatives: Formation of Silyl Enol Ethers versus Silyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Karin; Lalrempuia, Ralte; Polo, Víctor; Fernández-Alvarez, Francisco J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    A series of rhodium-NSiN complexes (NSiN=bis (pyridine-2-yloxy)methylsilyl fac-coordinated) is reported, including the solid-state structures of [Rh(H)(Cl)(NSiN)(PCy3 )] (Cy=cyclohexane) and [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] (coe=cis-cyclooctene). The [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)]-catalyzed reaction of acetophenone with silanes performed in an open system was studied. Interestingly, in most of the cases the formation of the corresponding silyl enol ether as major reaction product was observed. However, when the catalytic reactions were performed in closed systems, formation of the corresponding silyl ether was favored. Moreover, theoretical calculations on the reaction of [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] with HSiMe3 and acetophenone showed that formation of the silyl enol ether is kinetically favored, while the silyl ether is the thermodynamic product. The dehydrogenative silylation entails heterolytic cleavage of the Si-H bond by a metal-ligand cooperative mechanism as the rate-determining step. Silyl transfer from a coordinated trimethylsilyltriflate molecule to the acetophenone followed by proton transfer from the activated acetophenone to the hydride ligand results in the formation of H2 and the corresponding silyl enol ether.

  4. Synthesis, Structure, and Conformational Dynamics of Rhodium and Iridium Complexes of Dimethylbis(2-pyridyl)borate†

    PubMed Central

    Pennington-Boggio, Megan K.; Conley, Brian L.; Richmond, Michael G.; Williams, Travis J.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodium(I) and Iridium(I) borate complexes of the structure [Me2B(2-py)2]ML2 (L2 = (tBuNC)2, (CO)2, (C2H4)2, cod, dppe) were prepared and structurally characterized (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene; dppe = 1,2-diphenylphosphinoethane). Each contains a boat-configured chelate ring that participates in a boat-to-boat ring flip. Computational evidence shows that the ring flip proceeds through a transition state that is near planarity about the chelate ring. We observe an empirical, quantitative correlation between the barrier of this ring flip and the π acceptor ability of the ancillary ligand groups on the metal. The ring flip barrier correlates weakly to the Tolman and Lever ligand parameterization schemes, apparently because these combine both σ and π effects while we propose that the ring flip barrier is dominated by π bonding. This observation is consistent with metal-ligand π interactions becoming temporarily available only in the near-planar transition state of the chelate ring flip and not the boat-configured ground state. Thus, this is a first-of-class observation of metal-ligand π bonding governing conformational dynamics. PMID:25435645

  5. Unravelling the mechanism of glycerol hydrogenolysis over rhodium catalyst through combined experimental-theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Auneau, Florian; Michel, Carine; Delbecq, Françoise; Pinel, Catherine; Sautet, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    We report herein a detailed and accurate study of the mechanism of rhodium-catalysed conversion of glycerol into 1,2-propanediol and lactic acid. The first step of the reaction is particularly debated, as it can be either dehydration or dehydrogenation. It is expected that these elementary reactions can be influenced by pH variations and by the nature of the gas phase. These parameters were consequently investigated experimentally. On the other hand, there was a lack of knowledge about the behaviour of glycerol at the surface of the metallic catalyst. A theoretical approach on a model Rh(111) surface was thus implemented in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) to describe the above-mentioned elementary reactions and to calculate the corresponding transition states. The combination of experiment and theory shows that the dehydrogenation into glyceraldehyde is the first step for the glycerol transformation on the Rh/C catalyst in basic media under He or H(2) atmosphere. PMID:22069214

  6. Vapour phase hydrogenation of phenol over rhodium on SBA-15 and SBA-16.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Liliana; Bastidas-Barranco, Marlon; Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos

    2014-12-10

    In the present work, mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 were synthesised using classical methods, and their physicochemical properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, TEM and N2 adsorption-desorption. Rhodium (Rh, 1 wt %) was loaded on the mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 by an impregnation method. The Rh surface coverage, dispersion and crystallite size were determined by room temperature H2 chemisorption on reduced samples. The catalytic activity of Rh supported on mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 was evaluated for the first time in the hydrogenation of phenol in vapour phase in a temperature range between 130 and 270 °C at atmospheric pressure. The reaction over Rh/SBA-15 at 180 °C produced cyclohexanone as the major product (about 60%) along with lower amounts of cyclohexanol (about 35%) and cyclohexane (about 15%). The influences of temperature, H2/phenol ratio, contact time and the nature of the solvent on the catalytic performance were systematically investigated. The Rh/SBA-16 system offered lower phenol conversion compared to Rh/SBA-15, but both have a very high selectivity for cyclohexanone (above 60%).

  7. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Silylation of Acetophenone Derivatives: Formation of Silyl Enol Ethers versus Silyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Karin; Lalrempuia, Ralte; Polo, Víctor; Fernández-Alvarez, Francisco J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    A series of rhodium-NSiN complexes (NSiN=bis (pyridine-2-yloxy)methylsilyl fac-coordinated) is reported, including the solid-state structures of [Rh(H)(Cl)(NSiN)(PCy3 )] (Cy=cyclohexane) and [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] (coe=cis-cyclooctene). The [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)]-catalyzed reaction of acetophenone with silanes performed in an open system was studied. Interestingly, in most of the cases the formation of the corresponding silyl enol ether as major reaction product was observed. However, when the catalytic reactions were performed in closed systems, formation of the corresponding silyl ether was favored. Moreover, theoretical calculations on the reaction of [Rh(H)(CF3 SO3 )(NSiN)(coe)] with HSiMe3 and acetophenone showed that formation of the silyl enol ether is kinetically favored, while the silyl ether is the thermodynamic product. The dehydrogenative silylation entails heterolytic cleavage of the Si-H bond by a metal-ligand cooperative mechanism as the rate-determining step. Silyl transfer from a coordinated trimethylsilyltriflate molecule to the acetophenone followed by proton transfer from the activated acetophenone to the hydride ligand results in the formation of H2 and the corresponding silyl enol ether. PMID:27553810

  8. Versatile deprotonated NHC: C,N-bridged dinuclear iridium and rhodium complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bearing the versatility of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands, here density functional theory (DFT) calculations unravel the capacity of coordination of a deprotonated NHC ligand (pNHC) to generate a doubly C2,N3-bridged dinuclear complex. Here, in particular the discussion is based on the combination of the deprotonated 1-arylimidazol (aryl = mesityl (Mes)) with [M(cod)(μ-Cl)] (M = Ir, Rh) generated two geometrical isomers of complex [M(cod){µ-C3H2N2(Mes)-κC2,κN3}]2). The latter two isomers display conformations head-to-head (H-H) and head-to-tail (H-T) of C S and C 2 symmetry, respectively. The isomerization from the H-H to the H-T conformation is feasible, whereas next substitutions of the cod ligand by CO first, and PMe3 later confirm the H-T coordination as the thermodynamically preferred. It is envisaged the exchange of the metal, from iridium to rhodium, confirming here the innocence of the nature of the metal for such arrangements of the bridging ligands. PMID:26877814

  9. Study of the reference standard facility of rhodium-iron resistance thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Lin, P.; Qi, X.

    2014-03-01

    A 704 type 4He cryostat is designed and the "National (China) Temperature Working Standard Group of the ITS-90 at 1.2-24 K" have been composed. A 703 type 3He cryostat have been established and the working temperature of the "National Temperature Working Standard Group of the ITS-90 at 1.2-24 K" is extended to 0.65 K, which is the lowest limit temperature of ITS-90. The 5 rhodium-iron resistance thermometers (RIRTs) which compose the Working Standard Group have been transformed to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). A set of indexing data is fitted and calculated as the indexing table of the standard facility of RIRT. 42 basis temperature points have been measured at 0.67-26.37 K. The results show that the temperature control level could reach 0.5 mK/30 min. The difference between the temperature value of the 5 RIRTs and the average is less than 1.1 mK, and the comparison measurements uncertainty is 0.95 mK.

  10. Properties of Binuclear Rhodium(II) Complexes and Their Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pruchnik, Florian P.; Bień, Małgorzata; Lachowicz, Tadeusz

    1996-01-01

    Binuclear rhodium(II) complexes [Rh2Cl2(μ-OOCR)2(N-N)2], [Rh2(μ-OOCR)2(N-N)2(H2O)2](RCOO)2 and [Rh2Cl2(μ-OOCCH3)(terpy)2](H3O)Cl2.9H2O (R = H, Me, Bun, ph, PhCHOH; N-N = 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmp) and 6,7-dimethyl-2,3- di(2-pyridyl)quinoxaline (dmpq); terpy 2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine) have been synthesized and their structure and properties have been studied by electronic, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of these complexes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli has been investigated. The most active antibacterial agents against S. aureus were [Rh2(OOCPh)2(phen)2(H2O)2]2+, [Rh2(OOCPh)2(dmpq)2(H2O)2]2+, [Rh2(OOCBu)2(phen)2(H2O)2]2+ and [Rh2-(OOCBu)2(bpy)2(H2O)2]2+ which were considerably more active than the appropriate nitrogen ligands. The complexes show rather low activity against E. coli. PMID:18475754

  11. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  12. Rhodium-catalyzed (5+1) annulations between 2-alkenylphenols and allenes: a practical entry to 2,2-disubstituted 2H-chromenes.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Noelia; Seoane, Andrés; Mascareñas, José L; Gulías, Moisés

    2015-02-16

    Readily available alkenylphenols react with allenes under rhodium catalysis to provide valuable 2,2-disubstituted 2H-chromenes. The whole process, which involves the cleavage of one C-H bond of the alkenyl moiety and the participation of the allene as a one-carbon cycloaddition partner, can be considered a simple, versatile, and atom-economical (5+1) heteroannulation. The reaction tolerates a broad range of substituents both in the alkenylphenol and in the allene, and most probably proceeds through a mechanism involving a rhodium-catalyzed C-C coupling followed by two sequential pericyclic processes.

  13. One-pot synthesis of 2,5-dihydropyrroles from terminal alkynes, azides, and propargylic alcohols by relay actions of copper, rhodium, and gold.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomoya; Tanaka, Takamasa; Matsumoto, Kohei; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Relay actions of copper, rhodium, and gold formulate a one-pot multistep pathway, which directly gives 2,5-dihydropyrroles starting from terminal alkynes, sulfonyl azides, and propargylic alcohols. Initially, copper-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal alkynes with sulfonyl azides affords 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles, which then react with propargylic alcohols under the catalysis of rhodium. The resulting alkenyl propargyl ethers subsequently undergo the thermal Claisen rearrangement to give α-allenyl-α-amino ketones. Finally, a gold catalyst prompts 5-endo cyclization to produce 2,5-dihydropyrroles. PMID:25345587

  14. Reactions of rhodium and ruthenium atoms with nitrous oxide: a combined matrix infrared spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Xu, Qiang

    2009-05-14

    Reactions of laser-ablated Rh and Ru atoms with N(2)O molecules in excess argon have been investigated using matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy. Rhodium and ruthenium nitrous oxide complexes, M(NNO)(x) (M = Rh, Ru; x = 1, 2), have been observed and identified on the basis of isotopic shifts, mixed isotopic splitting patterns, and CCl(4)-doping experiments. Density functional theory calculations have been performed on the products. The overall agreement between the experimental and calculated vibrational frequencies, relative absorption intensities, and isotopic shifts supports the identification of these species from the matrix infrared spectra. Furthermore, a plausible reaction mechanism for the formation of the products has been proposed.

  15. Rhodium-Catalyzed Stereoselective Intramolecular [5 + 2] Cy-cloaddition of 3-Acyloxy-1,4-enyne and Alkene

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xing-zhong; Schienebeck, Casi M.; Li, Xiaoxun; Zhou, Xin; Song, Wangze; Chen, Lianqing; Guzei, Ilia A.; Tang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    The first rhodium-catalyzed intramolecular [5 + 2] cycloaddition of 3-acyloxy-1,4-enyne and alkene was developed. The cycloaddition is highly diastereoselective in most cases. Various cis-fused bicyclo[5.3.0]decadienes were prepared stereoselectively. The chirality in the propargylic ester starting materials could be transferred to the bicyclic products with high efficiency. Electron-deficient phosphine ligand greatly facilitated the cycloaddition. Up to three new stereogenic centers could be generated. The resulting diene in the products could be hydrolyzed to enones, which allowed the introduction of more functional groups to the seven-membered ring. PMID:26440751

  16. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  17. Collisional activation of N2O decomposition and CO oxidation reactions on isolated rhodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Parry, Imogen S; Kartouzian, Aras; Hamilton, Suzanne M; Balaj, O Petru; Beyer, Martin K; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2013-09-12

    The reactions of nitrous oxide decorated rhodium clusters, RhnN2O(+) (n = 5, 6), have been studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Collision induced dissociation with Ar is shown to lead to one of two processes; desorption of the intact N2O moiety (indicating molecular adsorption in the parent cluster) or N2O decomposition liberating molecular nitrogen with the latter becoming increasingly dominant at higher collision energies. Consistent with the results of earlier studies, which employed infrared excitation [Hermes, A. C.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2011, 2, 3053], Rh5ON2O(+) is observed to behave qualitatively differently to Rh5N2O(+) with decomposition of the nitrous oxide dominating the chemistry of the former. In other experiments, the reactivity of RhnN2O(+) clusters with CO has been studied. Chemisorption of (13)CO is calculated to deposit ca. 2 eV into the parent cluster, initiating a range of chemical processes on the cluster surface, which are fit to a simple reaction mechanism. Clear differences are again observed in the reaction branching ratios for Rh5N2O(+) and Rh6N2O(+) parent cluster ions. For the n = 5 cluster, the combined N2O reduction/CO oxidation is the most significant reaction channel, while the n = 6 cluster preferentially is oxidized to Rh6O(+) with loss of N2 and CO. Even larger differences are observed in the reactions of the N2O decorated cluster oxides, RhnON2O(+), for which more reaction possibilities arise. The results of all studies are discussed in relation to infrared driven processes on the same parent cluster species [Hamilton, S. M.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 1448; J. Phys. Chem. A, 2011, 115, 2489].

  18. Isotopic exchange between 2,2-dimethylbutane and deuterium on rhodium/silica gel catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Takehara, D.K.; Butt, J.B.; Burwell, R.L. Jr. )

    1992-02-01

    Isotropic exchange between 2.2-dimethylbutane and deuterium has been investigated at 75 C on 10 rhodium on wide-pore silica gel catalysts with H(chemisorbed)/Rh(D{sub h}) ranging from 11 to 108% and subjected to a variety of pretreatment conditions. Some catalysts were prepared by ion exchange with Rh(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sup 3-} and some by impregnation to incipient wetness with Rh{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} or Rh{sub 6}(CO){sub 16}. The turnover frequency (N{sub t}) is affected both by D{sub h} and by the conditions of pretreatment. The extreme variation was a factor of 330. Exchange into the ethyl group was about 10 times faster than into the t-butyl group. In general, the catalysts of largest D{sub h} gave the largest N{sub t} and the smallest degree of multiple exchange in the ethyl group. The pretreatment, H{sub 2}, 450 C gave the largest N{sub t}. Mere removal of H* from catalysts so treated by He, 300 C had little effect, but He, 450 C led to a substantial decrease in N{sub t} except for 11-Rh/SiO{sub 2}. The various coupled values of N{sub t} and selectivity resulting from variations in D{sub h} and pretreatment require a minimum of eight different sites. N{sub t}'s and selectivities in the hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopropane on these same catalysts parallel those in the exchange of neohexane.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of rhodium at high temperature and pressure by using mean field potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Priyank; Bhatt, Nisarg K.; Vyas, Pulastya R.; Gohel, Vinod B.

    2016-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of rhodium are studied up to melting temperature by incorporating anharmonic effects due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons. In order to account anharmonic effects due to lattice vibrations, we have employed mean field potential (MFP) approach and for thermally excited electrons Mermin functional. The local form of the pseudopotential with only one effective adjustable parameter rc is used to construct MFP and hence vibrational free energy due to ions - Fion. We have studied equation of state at 300 K and further, to access the applicability of present conjunction scheme, we have also estimated shock-Hugoniot and temperature along principle Hugoniot. We have carried out the study of temperature variation of several thermophysical properties like thermal expansion (βP), enthalpy (EH), specific heats at constant pressure and volume (CP and CV), specific heats due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons ( and , isothermal and adiabatic bulk moduli (BT and Bs) and thermodynamic Gruneisen parameter (γth) in order to examine the inclusion of anharmonic effects in the present study. The computed results are compared with available experimental results measured by using different methods and previously obtained theoretical results using different theoretical philosophy. Our computed results are in good agreement with experimental findings and for some physical quantities better or comparable with other theoretical results. We conclude that local form of the pseudopotential used accounts s-p-d hybridization properly and found to be transferable at extreme environment without changing the values of the parameter. Thus, even the behavior of transition metals having complexity in electronic structure can be well understood with local pseudopotential without any modification in the potential at extreme environment. Looking to the success of present scheme (MFP + pseudopotential) we would like to extend it further for the

  20. Iridium, platinum and rhodium baseline concentration in lichens from Tierra del Fuego (South Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Pino, Anna; Alimonti, Alessandro; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Bocca, Beatrice

    2010-10-01

    Lichen samples of Usnea barbata were used as possible biomonitors of the atmospheric background level of iridium (Ir), platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh) in the remote region of Tierra del Fuego (South Patagonia, Argentina). Lichens were collected in 2006 at 53 sites covering 7 different areas of the region (24 transplanted lichens of the northern region and 29 native lichen samples of the central-southern region). A microwave acidic digestion procedure was used to mineralize the samples and a sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method was developed to quantify the elements. The study of the influence of interferences on analyte signals and a quality control procedure were carried out. The analytical protocol was further applied to evaluate Ir, Pt and Rh bioaccumulation in lichens. The detection limits obtained were 0.010 ng g⁻¹, 0.013 ng g⁻¹ and 0.030 ng g⁻¹ for Ir, Pt and Rh, respectively. Recoveries at different fortification levels were between 96.3% and 106% and precision was 3.3% on average. The metals concentration (as dry weight) spanned the following ranges: Ir, <0.010-1.011 ng g⁻¹; Pt, 0.016-2.734 ng g⁻¹; and Rh, 0.063-1.298 ng g⁻¹. Data on 7 areas were similar suggesting that no specific source, for example traffic or anthropogenic activity, influenced directly the metal concentrations in Tierra del Fuego. Values detected are more likely influenced by the long-range atmospheric transport of these pollutants and, in comparison with densely populated areas in the world, they can represent the baseline for low impacted areas.

  1. Complexation of oxygen ligands with dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate in chloroform: 1H, 13C NMR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2013-03-01

    The complexation of dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetylate with 25 ligands containing oxygen atoms: alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters in chloroform solution have been investigated by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. Investigated ligands form 1:1 adducts in our experimental conditions, with stability constants in the order of several hundred mol-1. The exchange of ligands in solution is fast on the NMR spectroscopic timescale. The decrease of longitudinal relaxation times T1 in ligands in the presence of rhodium salt has been tested as the means of determination of the complexation site in ligands. The influence of complexation on chemical shifts in ligands was evaluated by a parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δadd - δlig). These parameters were positive (>0 ppm) and did not exceed 1 ppm for 1H NMR; and varied from ca. -5 to +15 ppm in the case of 13C NMR. The calculation by DFT methods using the B3LYP functional (structure optimization, electronic energy) and B3PW91 functional (shielding), and combinations of the (6-31G(2d), 6-311G++(2d,p), and LANL2DZ basis sets, followed by scaling procedures reproduced satisfactorily 1H and 13C chemical shifts and, with some limitations, allowed to estimate Δδ parameters.

  2. Reversed reactivity of anilines with alkynes in the rhodium-catalysed C–H activation/carbonylation tandem

    PubMed Central

    Midya, Siba P.; Sahoo, Manoj K.; Landge, Vinod G.; Rajamohanan, P. R.; Balaraman, Ekambaram

    2015-01-01

    Development of multicatalytic approach consisting of two or more mechanistically distinct catalytic steps using a single-site catalyst for rapid and straightforward access of structurally complex molecules under eco-benign conditions has significance in contemporary science. We have developed herein a rhodium-catalysed C–H activation strategy which uses an unprotected anilines and an electron-deficient alkynes to C–C bonded products as a potential intermediate in contrast to the archetypical C–N bonded products with high levels of regioselectivity. This is followed by carbonylation of C–H bond activated intermediate and subsequent annulation into quinolines has been described. This rhodium-catalysed auto-tandem reaction operates under mild, environmentally benign conditions using water as the solvent and CO surrogates as the carbonyl source with the concomitant generation of hydrogen gas. The strategy may facilitate the development of new synthetic protocols for the efficient and sustainable production of chemicals in an atom-economic way from simple, abundant starting materials. PMID:26486182

  3. Liquid-liquid extraction/separation of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) from acidic chloride solutions using tri-iso-octylamine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Young; Rajesh Kumar, J; Kim, Joon-Soo; Park, Hyung-Kyu; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2009-08-30

    Liquid-liquid extraction/separation of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) from acidic chloride solutions was carried out using tri-iso-octylamine (Alamine 308) as an extractant diluted in kerosene. The percentage extraction of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) increased with increase in acid concentration up to 8 mol L(-1). However, at 10 mol L(-1) HCl concentration, the extraction behavior was reversed, indicating the solvation type mechanism during extraction. The quantitative extraction of approximately 98% platinum(IV) and 36% rhodium(III) was achieved with 0.01 mol L(-1) Alamine 308. The highest separation factor (S.F.=184.7) of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) was achieved with 0.01 mol L(-1) Alamine 308 at 1.0 mol L(-1) of hydrochloric acid concentration. Alkaline metal salts like sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, sodium thiocyanate, lithium chloride, lithium nitrate, potassium chloride and potassium thiocyanate used for the salting-out effect. LiCl proved as best salt for the extraction of platinum(IV). Temperature effect demonstrates that the extraction process is exothermic. Hydrochloric acid and thiourea mixture proved to be better stripping reagents when compared with other mineral acids and bases. PMID:19285802

  4. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has

  5. Synthesis, structural characterization, and ligand replacement reactions of gem-dithiolato-bridged rhodium and iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Angel B; Gascón, José M; Lahoz, Fernando J; Balana, Ana I; Pardey, Alvaro J; Oro, Luis A; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J

    2008-07-01

    The reaction of gem-dithiol compounds R 2C(SH) 2 (R = Bn (benzyl), (i) Pr; R 2 = -(CH 2) 4-) with dinuclear rhodium or iridium complexes containing basic ligands such as [M(mu-OH)(cod)] 2 and [M(mu-OMe)(cod)] 2, or the mononuclear [M(acac)(cod)] (M = Rh, Ir, cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) in the presence of a external base, afforded the dinuclear complexes [M 2(mu-S 2CR 2)(cod) 2] ( 1- 4). The monodeprotonation of 1,1-dimercaptocyclopentane gave the mononuclear complex [Rh(HS 2Cptn)(cod)] ( 5) that is a precursor for the dinuclear compound [Rh 2(mu-S 2Cptn)(cod) 2] ( 6). Carbonylation of the diolefin compounds gave the complexes [Rh 2(mu-S 2CR 2)(CO) 4] ( 7- 9), which reacted with P-donor ligands to stereoselectively produce the trans isomer of the disubstituted complexes [Rh 2(mu-S 2CR 2)(CO) 2(PR' 3) 2] (R' = Ph, Cy (cyclohexyl)) ( 10- 13) and [Rh 2(mu-S 2CBn 2)(CO) 2{P(OR') 3} 2] (R' = Me, Ph) ( 14- 15). The substitution process in [Rh 2(mu-S 2CBn 2)(CO) 4] ( 7) by P(OMe) 3 has been studied by spectroscopic means and the full series of substituted complexes [Rh 2(mu-S 2CBn 2)(CO) 4- n {P(OR) 3} n ] ( n = 1, 4) has been identified in solution. The cis complex [Rh 2(mu-S 2CBn 2)(CO) 2(mu-dppb)] ( 16) was obtained by reaction of 7 with the diphosphine dppb (1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane). The molecular structures of the diolefinic dinuclear complexes [Rh 2(mu-S 2CR 2)(cod) 2] (R = Bn ( 1), (i) Pr ( 2); R 2 = -(CH 2) 4- ( 6)) and that of the cis complex 16 have been studied by X-ray diffraction. PMID:18507456

  6. New SSMS Techniques for the Determination of Rhodium and Other Platinum- Group Elements in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, K. P.; Seufert, H. M.

    1995-09-01

    system (about 10 - 15 %). Both data sets agree within error limits. Rhodium correlates well with Pt and other PGE indicating no significant fractionation between the different types of carbonaceous chondrites (Tab. 1). References: [1] Jochum K. P. et al. (1994) Fresenius J. Anal. Chem., 350, 642-644. [2] Anders E. and Grevesse N. (1989) GCA, 53, 197-214.

  7. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  8. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  9. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a...,” and “osmium,” or any abbreviation to mark or describe all or part of an industry product if such... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  10. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a...,” and “osmium,” or any abbreviation to mark or describe all or part of an industry product if such... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  11. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a...,” and “osmium,” or any abbreviation to mark or describe all or part of an industry product if such... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  12. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a...,” and “osmium,” or any abbreviation to mark or describe all or part of an industry product if such... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  13. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a...,” and “osmium,” or any abbreviation to mark or describe all or part of an industry product if such... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  14. A Monofunctional Platinum Complex Coordinated to a Rhodium Metalloinsertor Selectively Binds Mismatched DNA in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh—O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA non-classically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors. PMID:26397309

  15. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  16. Combined homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. Rhodium and platinum isocyanide complexes tethered on silica-supported metal heterogeneous catalysts: Arene and cyclohexanone hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Angelici, R.J. |

    1999-03-15

    Rhodium and platinum isocyanide complexes RhCl(CO)[CN(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}]{sub 2} (Rh-CNR{sub 2}), RhCl[CN(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}]{sub 3} (Rh-CNR{sub 3}), and PtCl{sub 2}[CN(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}]{sub 2} (Pt-CNR{sub 2}) were tethered to the silica-supported metal heterogeneous catalysts M-SiO{sub 2} (M = Pd, Pt, Ru) to give the TCSM (tethered complex on supported metal) catalysts Rh-CNR{sub 2}/Pd-SiO{sub 2}, Rh-CNR{sub 3}/M-SiO{sub 2} (M = Pd, Pt, Ru), and Pt-CNR{sub 2}/Pd-SiO{sub 2}. These TCSM catalysts were used to catalyze the hydrogenation of arenes (Rh-CNR{sub 2}/Pd-SiO{sub 2} and Rh-CNR{sub 3}/M-SiO{sub 2}) and cyclohexanone (Pt-CNR{sub 2}/Pd-SiO{sub 2}) under the mild conditions of 40 C and 1 atm. They exhibit activities that are higher than those of the separate homogeneous rhodium (or platinum) isocyanide complex, the separate silica-supported metal heterogeneous catalyst, or the rhodium (or platinum) complex catalyst tethered on just SiO{sub 2}. The activities of the TCSM catalysts are strongly affected by the nature and loading of the supported metal in the catalyst. Among the three silica-supported metal M-SiO{sub 2} (M = Pd, Pt, Ru) catalysts, the rhodium complex Rh-CNR{sub 3} tethered on Pd-SiO{sub 2} exhibits the highest activity for the hydrogenation of toluene (TOF = 5.5 mol H{sub 2}/(mol Rh min) and TO = 2,420 mol H{sub 2}/mol Rh during 8.5 h). The Rh-CNR{sub 3}/Pd-SiO{sub 2} catalyst with 10 wt % Pd is more active than its counterparts with higher or lower palladium loadings. IR (DRIFT) spectral studies of the TCSM catalysts before and after being used for toluene hydrogenation show that the isocyanide ligands remain coordinated to the rhodium (or platinum) center even after extended use. Atomic emission spectroscopic analysis of hydrogenation solutions shows that there is no rhodium (or platinum) leaching into the solutions.

  17. Real-time sub-Ångstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielowski, Christian; Wang, Lin-Wang; Specht, Petra; Calderon, Hector A.; Barton, Bastian; Jiang, Bin; Kang, Joo H.; Cieslinski, Robert

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic responses of a rhodium catalyst and a graphene sheet are investigated upon random excitation with 80 kV electrons. An extraordinary electron microscope stability and resolution allow studying temporary atom displacements from their equilibrium lattice sites into metastable sites across projected distances as short as 60 pm. In the rhodium catalyst, directed and reversible atom displacements emerge from excitations into metastable interstitial sites and surface states that can be explained by single atom trajectories. Calculated energy barriers of 0.13 eV and 1.05 eV allow capturing single atom trapping events at video rates that are stabilized by the Rh [110] surface corrugation. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that randomly delivered electrons can also reversibly enhance the sp3 and the sp1 characters of the sp2-bonded carbon atoms in graphene. The underlying collective atom motion can dynamically stabilize characteristic atom displacements that are unpredictable by single atom trajectories. We detect three specific displacements and use two of them to propose a path for the irreversible phase transformation of a graphene nanoribbon into carbene. Collectively stabilized atom displacements greatly exceed the thermal vibration amplitudes described by Debye-Waller factors and their measured dose rate dependence is attributed to tunable phonon contributions to the internal energy of the systems. Our experiments suggest operating electron microscopes with beam currents as small as zepto-amperes/nm2 in a weak-excitation approach to improve on sample integrity and allow for time-resolved studies of conformational object changes that probe for functional behavior of catalytic surfaces or molecules.

  18. Synthesis and application of Amberlite xad-4 functionalized with alizarin red-s for preconcentration and adsorption of rhodium (III)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A new chelating resin was prepared by coupling Amberlite XAD-4 with alizarin red-s through an azo spacer, characterized by infra-red spectroscopy and thermal analysis and studied for Rh(III) preconcentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for rhodium monitoring in the environment. The optimum pH for sorption of the metal ion was 6.5. The sorption capacity was found 2.1 mg/g of resin for Rh(III). A recovery of 88% was obtained for the metal ion with 1.5 M HCl as eluting agent. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed by adsorption and desorption times of Rh(III) on modified resin. Scat chard analysis revealed that the homogeneous binding sites were formed in the polymers. The linear regression equation was Q/C = –1.3169Q + 27.222 (R2 = 0.9239), for Rh were formed in the SPE sorbent,Kd and Qmax for the affinity binding sites were calculated to be 0.76 μmol/mL and 20.67 μmol/g, respectively. The equilibrium data and parameters of Rh(III) adsorption on modified resin were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Redlich–Peterson models. The experimental adsorption isotherm was in good concordance with Langmuir and Freundlich models (R2 > 0.998) and based on the Langmuir isotherm the maximum amount of adsorption (qmax) was 4.842 mg/g. The method was applied for rhodium ions determination in environmental samples. with high recovery (>80%). PMID:23369526

  19. Bottom-Up Construction of a CO2-Based Cycle for the Photocarbonylation of Benzene, Promoted by a Rhodium(I) Pincer Complex.

    PubMed

    Anaby, Aviel; Feller, Moran; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2016-08-10

    The use of carbon dioxide for synthetic applications presents a major goal in modern homogeneous catalysis. Rhodium-hydride PNP pincer complex 1 is shown to add CO2 in two disparate pathways: one is the expected insertion of CO2 into the metal-hydride bond, and the other leads to reductive cleavage of CO2, involving metal-ligand cooperation. The resultant rhodium-carbonyl complex was found to be photoactive, enabling the activation of benzene and formation of a new benzoyl complex. Organometallic intermediate species were observed and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Based on the series of individual transformations, a sequence for the photocarbonylation of benzene using CO2 as the feedstock was constructed and demonstrated for the production of benzaldehyde from benzene. PMID:27400288

  20. Monodisperse colloidal metal particle from nonaqueous solutions: catalytic behavior in hydrogenation of but-1-ene of platinum, palladium, and rhodium particles supported on pumice

    SciTech Connect

    Boutonnet, M.; Kizling, J.; Mintsa-Eya, V.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Maire, G.; Stenius, P.

    1987-01-01

    Metal catalysts have been prepared by depositing monodisperse particles of platinum (2-3 nm), rhodium (2-3 nm), or palladium (5 nm) prepared in reversed micellar solutions on pumice. The particles are well dispersed on the support whereas particles deposited from aqueous or alcoholic solution give large aggregates. The catalytic properties of these different catalysts in the deuteration, isomerization, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange of but-1-ene have been compared. The activities calculated per metal surface atom are similar. However, platinum prepared from microemulsions show unusually high selectivity in the isomerization reaction, and for such particles dehydrogenated species are active in the exchange reaction. The specificity of rhodium and palladium catalysts is independent of the mode of preparation. The reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  1. Direct detection of key intermediates in rhodium(I)-catalyzed [2+2+2] cycloadditions of alkynes by ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Parera, Magda; Dachs, Anna; Solà, Miquel; Pla-Quintana, Anna; Roglans, Anna

    2012-10-01

    The mechanism of the Rh-catalysed [2+2+2] cycloaddition reaction of diynes with monoynes has been examined using ESI-MS and ESI-CID-MS analysis. The catalytic system used consisted of the combination of a cationic rhodium(I) complex with bisphosphine ligands, which generates highly active complexes that can be detected by ESI(+) experiments. ESI-MS on-line monitoring has allowed the detection for the first time of all of the intermediates in the catalytic cycle, supporting the mechanistic proposal based mainly on theoretical calculations. For all ESI-MS experiments, the structural assignments of ions are supported by tandem mass spectrometry analyses. Computer model studies based on density functional theory (DFT) support the structural proposal made for the monoyne insertion intermediate. The collective studies provide new insight into the reactivity of cationic rhodacyclopentadienes, which should facilitate the design of related rhodium-catalysed C-C couplings.

  2. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds.

  3. Time-Resolved, In Situ DRIFTS/EDE/MS Studies on Alumina-Supported Rhodium Catalysts: Effects of Ceriation and Zirconiation on Rhodium–CO Interactions**

    PubMed Central

    Kroner, Anna B; Newton, Mark A; Tromp, Moniek; Roscioni, Otello M; Russell, Andrea E; Dent, Andrew J; Prestipino, Carmelo; Evans, John

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ceria and zirconia on the structure–function properties of supported rhodium catalysts (1.6 and 4 wt % Rh/γ-Al2O3) during CO exposure are described. Ceria and zirconia are introduced through two preparation methods: 1) ceria is deposited on γ-Al2O3 from [Ce(acac)3] and rhodium metal is subsequently added, and 2) through the controlled surface modification (CSM) technique, which involves the decomposition of [M(acac)x] (M=Ce, x=3; M=Zr, x=4) on Rh/γ-Al2O3. The structure–function correlations of ceria and/or zirconia-doped rhodium catalysts are investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy/energy-dispersive extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy/mass spectrometry (DRIFTS/EDE/MS) under time-resolved, in situ conditions. CeOx and ZrO2 facilitate the protection of Rh particles against extensive oxidation in air and CO. Larger Rh core particles of ceriated and zirconiated Rh catalysts prepared by CSM are observed and compared with Rh/γ-Al2O3 samples, whereas supported Rh particles are easily disrupted by CO forming mononuclear Rh geminal dicarbonyl species. DRIFTS results indicate that, through the interaction of CO with ceriated Rh particles, a significantly larger amount of linear CO species form; this suggests the predominance of a metallic Rh phase. PMID:25044889

  4. Mechanistic Insights into Carbonyl-Directed Rhodium-Catalyzed Hydroboration: ab Initio Study of a Cyclic γ,δ-Unsaturated Amide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao-Di; Pal, Rhitankar; Hoang, Gia L; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Takacs, James M

    2014-03-01

    A two-point binding mechanism for the cationic rhodium(I)-catalyzed carbonyl-directed catalytic asymmetric hydroboration of a cyclic γ,δ-unsaturated amide is investigated using density functional theory. Geometry optimizations and harmonic frequency calculations for the model reaction are carried out using the basis set 6-31+G** for C, O, P, B, N, and H and LANL2DZ for Rh atoms. The Gibbs free energy of each species in THF solvent is obtained based on the single-point energy computed using the PCM model at the ECP28MWB/6-311+G(d,p) level plus the thermal correction to Gibbs free energy by deducting translational entropy contribution. The Rh-catalyzed reaction cycle involves the following sequence of events: (1) chelation of the cyclic γ,δ-unsaturated amide via alkene and carbonyl complexation in a model active catalytic species, [Rh(L2)2S2](+), (2) oxidative addition of pinacol borane (pinBH), (3) migratory insertion of the alkene double bond into Rh-H (preferred pathway) or Rh-B bond, (4) isomerization of the resulting intermediate, and finally, (5) reductive elimination to form the B-C or H-C bond with regeneration of the catalyst. Free energy profiles for potential pathways leading to the major γ-borylated product are computed and discussed in detail. The potential pathways considered include (1) pathways proceeding via migratory insertion into the Rh-H bond (pathways I, I-1, and I-2), (2) a potential pathway proceeding via migratory insertion into the Rh-B bond (pathway II), and two potential competing routes to a β-borylated byproduct (pathway III). The results find that the Rh-H migratory insertion pathway I-2, followed in sequence by an unanticipated isomerization via amide rotation and reductive elimination, is the most favorable reaction pathway. A secondary consequence of amide rotation is access to a competing β-hydride elimination pathway. The pathways computed in this study are supported by and help explain related experimental results. PMID

  5. Synthesis, x-ray, and low-temperature neutron diffraction study of a rhodium (V) complex: dihydridobis(triethylsilyl)-pentamethylcyclopentadienylrhodium

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, M.J.; Bailey, P.M.; Bentz, P.O.; Ricci, J.S.; Koetzle, T.F.; Maitlis, P.M.

    1984-09-19

    Reaction of (C/sub 5/ qentamethyl Rh)/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/) (1) with triethylsilane leads to the novel rhodium(V) complex (eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/Rh(H)/sub 2/(SiE-triethyl/sub 3/)/sub 2/) (2) characterized by NMR spectra (/sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 29/Si, and /sup 103/Rh), X-ray diffraction, and neutron diffraction at 20 K. The complex shows a four-legged piano stool geometry with the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl eta/sub 5/-bonded to the rhodium (average Rh-C, 2.283 (9) A) on top and the two triethylsilyl ligands trans in the basal plane (Rh-Si, 2.379 (2) A). The neutron diffraction analysis located the two hydrides, which are trans to each other and cis to the triethylsilyls in the basal plane. The mean Rh-H distance is 1.581 (3) A, and the H-Rh-H angle is 94.8 (2)/sup 0/. Complex 2 is rather stable, but it reacts under forcing conditions with neutral ligands (triphenylphosphine, CO, or maleic anhydride) to give (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/Rh(PPh/sub 3/)H(SiEt/sub 3/)), (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/Rh(CO)/sub 2/), or (C/sub 5/M3/5Rh(maleic anhydride)/sup 2/). It reacts more easily with electrophiles such as HBF/sub 4/ to give (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/Rh)/sub 4/H/sub 4/)/sup 2 +/, with HCl to give 1, with AgBF/sub 4/ in MeCN to give (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/Rh(MeCN)/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/, and with I/sub 2/ to give ((C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/Rh)/sub 2/I/sub 4/). The predominant mode of reaction involves reductive elimination of Et/sub 3/Si-H, which can be strongly promoted by an electrophile. 43 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distancesmore » determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction of the catalytic properties of numerous supported metal complexes, as summarized in detail here.« less

  7. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distances determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction

  8. Well-defined coinage metal transfer agents for the synthesis of NHC-based nickel, rhodium and palladium macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rhiann E; Storey, Caroline M; Chaplin, Adrian B

    2016-06-01

    With a view to use as carbene transfer agents, well-defined silver(i) and copper(i) complexes of a macrocyclic NHC-based pincer ligand, bearing a central lutidine donor and a dodecamethylene spacer [CNC-(CH2)12, 1], have been prepared. Although the silver adduct is characterised by X-ray diffraction as a dinuclear species anti-[Ag(μ-1)]2(2+), variable temperature measurements indicate dynamic structural interchange in solution involving fragmentation into mononuclear [Ag(1)](+) on the NMR time scale. In contrast, a mononuclear structure is evident in both solution and the solid-state for the analogous copper adduct partnered with the weakly coordinating [BAr(F)4](-) counter anion. A related copper derivative, bearing instead the more coordinating cuprous bromide dianion [Cu2Br4](2-), is notable for the adoption of an interesting tetranuclear assembly in the solid-state, featuring two cuprophilic interactions and two bridging NHC donors, but is not retained on dissolution. Coinage metal precursors [M(1)]n[BAr(F)4]n (M = Ag, n = 2; M = Cu, n = 1) both act as carbene transfer agents to afford palladium, rhodium and nickel complexes of 1 and the effectiveness of these precursors has been evaluated under equivalent reaction conditions. PMID:27157720

  9. Adsorption of Ruthenium, Rhodium and Palladium from Simulated High-Level Liquid Waste by Highly Functional Xerogel - 13286

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Takashi; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    Fission products are generated by fission reactions in nuclear fuel. Platinum group (Pt-G) elements, such as palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh) and ruthenium (Ru), are also produced. Generally, Pt-G elements play important roles in chemical and electrical industries. Highly functional xerogels have been developed for recovery of these useful Pt-G elements from high - level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW). An adsorption experiment from simulated HLLW was done by the column method to study the selective adsorption of Pt-G elements, and it was found that not only Pd, Rh and Ru, but also nickel, zirconium and tellurium were adsorbed. All other elements were not adsorbed. Adsorbed Pd was recovered by washing the xerogel-packed column with thiourea solution and thiourea - nitric acid mixed solution in an elution experiment. Thiourea can be a poison for automotive exhaust emission system catalysts, so it is necessary to consider its removal. Thermal decomposition and an acid digestion treatment were conducted to remove sulfur in the recovered Pd fraction. The relative content of sulfur to Pd was decreased from 858 to 0.02 after the treatment. These results will contribute to design of the Pt-G element separation system. (authors)

  10. Well-defined coinage metal transfer agents for the synthesis of NHC-based nickel, rhodium and palladium macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rhiann E; Storey, Caroline M; Chaplin, Adrian B

    2016-06-01

    With a view to use as carbene transfer agents, well-defined silver(i) and copper(i) complexes of a macrocyclic NHC-based pincer ligand, bearing a central lutidine donor and a dodecamethylene spacer [CNC-(CH2)12, 1], have been prepared. Although the silver adduct is characterised by X-ray diffraction as a dinuclear species anti-[Ag(μ-1)]2(2+), variable temperature measurements indicate dynamic structural interchange in solution involving fragmentation into mononuclear [Ag(1)](+) on the NMR time scale. In contrast, a mononuclear structure is evident in both solution and the solid-state for the analogous copper adduct partnered with the weakly coordinating [BAr(F)4](-) counter anion. A related copper derivative, bearing instead the more coordinating cuprous bromide dianion [Cu2Br4](2-), is notable for the adoption of an interesting tetranuclear assembly in the solid-state, featuring two cuprophilic interactions and two bridging NHC donors, but is not retained on dissolution. Coinage metal precursors [M(1)]n[BAr(F)4]n (M = Ag, n = 2; M = Cu, n = 1) both act as carbene transfer agents to afford palladium, rhodium and nickel complexes of 1 and the effectiveness of these precursors has been evaluated under equivalent reaction conditions.

  11. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  12. Diastereo- and Enantioselective Reductive Aldol Addition of Vinyl Ketones via Catalytic Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo Bong; Hassan, Abbas; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    An overview of studies on hydrogenative reductive aldol addition is presented. By simply hydrogenating enones in the presence of aldehydes at ambient temperature and pressure, aldol adducts are generated under neutral conditions in the absence of any stoichiometric byproducts. Using cationic rhodium complexes modified by tri(2-furyl)phosphine, highly syn-diastereoselective reductive aldol additions of vinyl ketones are achieved. Finally, using novel monodentate TADDOL-like phosphonite ligands, the first highly diastereo- and enantioselective reductive aldol couplings of vinyl ketones were devised. These studies, along with other works from our laboratory, demonstrate that organometallics arising transiently in the course of catalytic hydrogenation offer byproduct-free alternatives to preformed organometallic reagents employed in classical carbonyl addition processes. PMID:21866204

  13. Determination of rhodium by resonance light-scattering technique coupled with solid phase extraction using Rh(III) ion-imprinted polymers as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Zhang, Ting; Tan, Wenxiang; Liu, Peng; Ding, Zhongtao; Cao, Qiue

    2013-02-15

    A resonance light-scattering method (RLS) for the determination of Rh(III) was initially developed, based on the reaction among Rh(III), WO4(2-) and ethylrhodamine B. The method possesses high sensitivity, but lacks selectivity. Therefore, a Rh(III) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP), prepared by precipitation polymerization using 2-(allylthio)nicotinic acid (ANA) as functional monomer, was used as sorbent to construct a ion-imprint based solid-phase extraction (IIP-SPE) method for separation of rhodium from complicated matrices prior to its determination by RLS. The experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and selectivity of IIP-SPE were studied carefully. Under the optimal conditions, the IIP-SPE column with the enrichment factor (EF) of 10 could be used at least 20 times without decreasing its extraction recovery (above 90%) significantly. The calibration graph for the determination of rhodium by RLS coupled with IIP-SPE procedure was linear in the range of 0.06-1.5 ng mL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.024 ng mL(-1). There is no metal ions tested at the concentration below 10 ng mL(-1) interfered in the determination of 0.8 ng mL(-1) Rh(III). The proposed IIP-SPE-RLS method was successfully applied to the extraction and measurement of trace rhodium in catalyst, water and geochemical samples with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (n=4).

  14. Structural and electronic study of neutral, positive, and negative small rhodium clusters [Rh(n), Rh(n)(+), Rh(n)(-) ; n = 10-13].

    PubMed

    Mora, M A; Mora-Ramirez, M A

    2014-07-01

    We have carried out a systematic study for the determination of the structure and the fundamental state of neutral and ionic small rhodium clusters [Rhn, Rhn(+), Rhn(-); n = 10-13] using ab initio Hartree-Fock methods with a LANL2DZ basis set. A range of spin multiplicities is investigated for each cluster. We present the bond lengths, angles, and geometric configuration adopted by the clusters in its minimum energy conformation showing the differences when the clusters have different number of unpaired electrons. Also we report the vertical ionization potential and the adiabatic one calculated by the Koopmans' theorem.

  15. Structural and electronic study of neutral, positive, and negative small rhodium clusters [Rh(n), Rh(n)(+), Rh(n)(-) ; n = 10-13].

    PubMed

    Mora, M A; Mora-Ramirez, M A

    2014-07-01

    We have carried out a systematic study for the determination of the structure and the fundamental state of neutral and ionic small rhodium clusters [Rhn, Rhn(+), Rhn(-); n = 10-13] using ab initio Hartree-Fock methods with a LANL2DZ basis set. A range of spin multiplicities is investigated for each cluster. We present the bond lengths, angles, and geometric configuration adopted by the clusters in its minimum energy conformation showing the differences when the clusters have different number of unpaired electrons. Also we report the vertical ionization potential and the adiabatic one calculated by the Koopmans' theorem. PMID:24944092

  16. Some Effects of Exposure to Exhaust-gas Streams on Emittance and Thermoelectric Power of Bare-wire Platinum Rhodium - Platinum Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, George E; Shepard, Charles E

    1954-01-01

    Thermocouples were exposed to exhaust gases from the combustion of propane, 72-octane gasoline, and JP-4 fuel. Exposure increased the emissivity of the thermocouple wire, which increased its radiation error. Two methods are presented for determining the emittance of the wires. The emissivity of a clean platinum rhodium-platinum thermocouple was approximately 0.2 in the temperature range investigated, while the emittance of an exposed thermocouple coated with exhaust residue was about 0.5. The exposure caused negligible change in the thermoelectric power of the thermocouples.

  17. Introduction of luminescent rhenium(I), ruthenium(II), iridium(III) and rhodium(III) systems into rhodamine-tethered ligands for the construction of bichromophoric chemosensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Lam, Ho-Chuen; Zhu, Nianyong; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2015-09-14

    Several classes of luminescent transition metal complexes, including rhenium(I) tricarbonyl diimine, ruthenium(II) diimine, cyclometallated iridium(III) and rhodium(III) diimine, as well as ruthenium(II) and iridium(III) terpyridine systems, tethered with rhodamine moieties, have been synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal structure of one cyclometallated rhodium(III) diimine (11) with a rhodamine pendant was determined. Most of the complexes were found to exhibit emission in fluid solution at room temperature. Depending on the nature of the transition metal system, the emission origin was mainly assigned to be derived from the triplet excited state of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) or the intraligand ((3)IL) transition. The cation-binding properties of these complexes toward various cations were investigated by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy. Some of them were found to exhibit new low-energy absorption and emission bands, attributed to the ring opening of the rhodamine moiety, with high selectivity and/or high sensitivity for various cations, in agreement with sensing and spectroscopic behaviours of the rhodamine derivative. Depending on the nature of the transition metal centres, the chelating ligands as well as the linker to the rhodamine derivative, different sensing properties in terms of selectivity, sensitivity and binding stability, could be obtained.

  18. Essentially Molecular Metal Complexes Anchored to Zeolite: Synthesis and Characterization of Rhodium Complexes and Ruthenium Complexes Prepared from Rh(acac)(2-C2H4)2 and cis-Ru(acac)2( -C2H4)2

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, I.; Gates, B

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear complexes of rhodium and of ruthenium, Rh(acac)({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} and cis-Ru(acac)2({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} (acac = C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}{sup -}), were used as precursors to synthesize metal complexes bonded to zeolite {beta}. Infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra show that the species formed from Rh(acac)({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} was Rh({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +}, which was bonded to the zeolite at aluminum sites via two Rh-O bonds. Reaction of this supported rhodium complex with CO gave the supported rhodium gem-dicarbonyl Rh(CO){sub 2}{sup +}, which was characterized by two {nu}{sub CO} bands in the IR spectrum, at 2048 and 2115 cm{sup -1}, that were sharp (fwhm of 2115-cm{sup -1} band = 5 cm{sup -1}), indicating a high degree of uniformity of the supported species. Nearly the same result was observed (Liang, A. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 8460) for the isostructural rhodium complex supported on dealuminated HY zeolite, which was characterized by frequencies of the {nu}{sub CO} bands that were 4 and 2 cm{sup -1}, respectively, greater than those characterizing the zeolite {beta}-supported complex. This comparison indicates that the Rh atoms in Rh({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +} anchored on zeolite {beta} were slightly more electron-rich than those on zeolite Y. This inference is supported by EXAFS results showing shorter Rh-C bonds in the zeolite {beta}-supported rhodium ethene complex than in the zeolite Y-supported rhodium ethene complex. In contrast to these supported rhodium complexes, the zeolite {beta}-supported ruthenium samples were shown by IR and EXAFS spectroscopies to consist of mixtures of mononuclear ruthenium complexes with various numbers of acac ligands; when CO reacted with the supported ruthenium complexes, the resultant ruthenium carbonyls were characterized by {nu}{sub CO} spectra characteristic of both

  19. Resistivity, Specific Heat, and Susceptibility of the Intermediate Valence System Cerium ((RHODIUM(X)PALLADIUM(1 -X))(3))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoboria, Clarence Preston, III

    In the mixed valent system Ce(Rh(,x)Pd(,1-x))(,3), the dependence of resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and specific heat on the rhodium concentration x has been experimentally studied. Ce(Rh(,x)Pd(,1-x))(,3) is tetravalent from x = .216 to 1.00, and mixed valent from x = .216 to x = 0. Based on Vegard's rule and lattice constant data, n(,f) is considered to vary linearly with x, ranging from n(,f) = 0 at x = .216 to n(,f) (TURNEQ) .55 at x = 0. The resistivity was measured from 1.5K to 300K for x from 0 to 1. In the tetravalent range the temperature dependence was independent of x. In the mixed valent region (rho) at all temperatures increased rapidly with n(,f). (rho) (T = 0) was found to be proportional to n(,f)('2) in the mixed valent range. Application of pressures up to seven kilobars were found to produce very little change in resistivity in the mixed valent range. The specific heat was measured from 2K to 15K in the mixed valent range and for CeRh(,3). C/T versus T('2) plots were well-fitted by a straight line at low temperature except for a bump at 6K, which is not understood. The mixed valence component of the electronic specific heat coefficient (gamma) is found to be proportional to n(,f)('2). Magnetic susceptibility was measured from 2K to 300K in the mixed valent range. For each x, (chi) (T) was approximately independent of temperature below (TURN) 150K, except for an impurity tail below 40K. (chi)(,0) (the plateau value) was found to be approximately proportional to n(,f) in the mixed valent range. All three quantities (rho), (gamma), and (chi) are compared to the theories of Yosida and Sakurai, and Newns and Hewson. The best fits indicate that the f level density of states is well represented by a lorentzian which can accommodate six electrons.

  20. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, C; Silwana, B; Iwuoha, E; Somerset, V

    2012-01-01

    Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent assessments of aquatic samples have shown increased levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in aquatic ecosystems, caused by automobile exhaust emissions and mining activities. The development of an analytical sensor for the detection and characterisation of PGMs were investigated, since there is an ongoing need to find new sensing materials with suitable recognition elements that can respond selectively and reversibly to specific metal ions in environmental samples. The work reported shows the successful application of another mercury-free sensor electrode for the determination of platinum group metals in environmental samples. The work reported in this study entails the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bismuth film for the determination of platinum (Pt(2+)), palladium (Pd(2+)) or rhodium (Rh(2+)) by means of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Optimised experimental conditions included composition of the supporting electrolyte, complexing agent concentration, deposition potential, deposition time and instrumental voltammetry parameters for Pt(2+), Pd(2+) and Rh(2+) determination. Adsorptive differential pulse stripping voltammetric measurements for PGMs were performed in the presence of dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as complexing agent. The glassy carbon bismuth film electrode (GC/BiFE) employed in this study exhibit good and reproducible sensor characteristics. Application of GC/BiFE sensor exhibited well-defined peaks and highly linear behaviour for the stripping analysis of the PGMs in the concentration range between 0 and 3.5 μg/L. The detection limit of Pd, Pt and Rh was found to be 0.12 μg/L, 0.04 μg/L and 0.23 μg/L, respectively for the deposition times of 90 s (Pd) and 150 s (for both Pt and Rh). Good

  1. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, C; Silwana, B; Iwuoha, E; Somerset, V

    2012-01-01

    Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent assessments of aquatic samples have shown increased levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in aquatic ecosystems, caused by automobile exhaust emissions and mining activities. The development of an analytical sensor for the detection and characterisation of PGMs were investigated, since there is an ongoing need to find new sensing materials with suitable recognition elements that can respond selectively and reversibly to specific metal ions in environmental samples. The work reported shows the successful application of another mercury-free sensor electrode for the determination of platinum group metals in environmental samples. The work reported in this study entails the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bismuth film for the determination of platinum (Pt(2+)), palladium (Pd(2+)) or rhodium (Rh(2+)) by means of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Optimised experimental conditions included composition of the supporting electrolyte, complexing agent concentration, deposition potential, deposition time and instrumental voltammetry parameters for Pt(2+), Pd(2+) and Rh(2+) determination. Adsorptive differential pulse stripping voltammetric measurements for PGMs were performed in the presence of dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as complexing agent. The glassy carbon bismuth film electrode (GC/BiFE) employed in this study exhibit good and reproducible sensor characteristics. Application of GC/BiFE sensor exhibited well-defined peaks and highly linear behaviour for the stripping analysis of the PGMs in the concentration range between 0 and 3.5 μg/L. The detection limit of Pd, Pt and Rh was found to be 0.12 μg/L, 0.04 μg/L and 0.23 μg/L, respectively for the deposition times of 90 s (Pd) and 150 s (for both Pt and Rh). Good

  2. Pyridine versus acetonitrile coordination in rhodium-N-heterocyclic carbene square-planar complexes.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Laura; Di Giuseppe, Andrea; Castarlenas, Ricardo; Lahoz, Fernando J; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2015-03-28

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the factors that control the coordination chemistry of N-donor ligands in square-planar complexes of the type RhCl(NHC)L(1)L(2) (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) are presented. The dinuclear complexes [Rh(μ-Cl)(IPr)(η(2)-olefin)]2 {IPr = 1,3-bis-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-carbene} have been reacted with different combinations of ligands including pyridine, acetonitrile, 2-pyridylacetonitrile, triphenylphosphine, tricyclohexylphosphine, carbon monoxide or molecular oxygen. In addition, the reactivity of RhCl(IPr)(PPh3)2 has also been studied. Pyridine preferentially coordinates trans to the carbene ligand whereas π-acceptor ligands (olefin, CO or PPh3) are prone to bind cis to IPr and trans to chlorido, unless steric bulk hinders the coordination of the ligand (PCy3). In contrast, acetonitrile is more labile than pyridine but is able to form complexes coordinated cis-to-IPr. Molecular dioxygen also displaces the labile cyclooctene ligand in RhCl(IPr)(η(2)-coe)(py) to give a square-planar dioxygen adduct which can be transformed into a peroxo derivative by additional coordination of pyridine. Charge decomposition analysis (CDA) shows that σ-donation values are similar for coordination at cis- or trans-IPr positions, whereas efficient π-backbonding is significantly observed at cis position being the favoured coordination site for π-acceptor ligands. The Rh-IPr rotational barrier in a series of square-planar complexes has been analysed. It has been found that the main contribution is the steric hindrance of the ancillary ligand. The presence of a π-donor ligand such as chlorido slows down the dynamic process.

  3. Determination of Rhodium-Alkoxide Bond Strengths in Tp'Rh(PMe3)(OR)H.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Jing; Jiao, Yunzhe; Brennessel, William W; Jones, William D

    2016-09-19

    The active fragment [Tp'Rh(PMe3)], generated from a thermal precursor Tp'Rh(PMe3)(CH3)H, underwent oxidative addition of water and alcohols to give O-H adducts of the type Tp'Rh(PMe3)(OR)H (R = H, Me, Et, (n)Pr, (n)Bu, CH2Ph, (i)Pr, c-pentyl, CH2CF3, CH2CH2OH) at ambient temperature. These activation products eliminate water or alcohols in benzene, which allows determination of the relative metal-oxygen bond energies by using previously established kinetics techniques. Analysis of the relationship between the relative M-O bond strengths and O-H bond strengths showed a linear correlation with RM-O/O-H of 0.97 (3) for aliphatic alcohols. The two extraordinary substrates (R = CH2CF3, CH2CH2OH) both have stronger M-O bonds than would be predicted from this trend, suggesting the stabilization of the M-O bond when an electron-withdrawing substituent is present as previously seen in M-C bond strengths. In addition, the O-H activation products of aliphatic alcohols are thermally unstable at 80 °C, as rearrangement to form Tp'Rh(PMe3)H2 from β-elimination is observed after 1 or 2 d. Benzyl alcohol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol activation products were stable. For benzyl alcohol, although the O-H activation product was kinetically favored, the C-H activation products of the benzene ring were thermodynamically preferred. PMID:27602591

  4. Photochemical Reactions of Fluorinated Pyridines at Half-Sandwich Rhodium Complexes: Competing Pathways of Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation of CpRh(PMe3)(C2H4) (1; Cp = η5-C5H5) in the presence of pentafluoropyridine in hexane solution at low temperature yields an isolable η2-C,C-coordinated pentafluoropyridine complex, CpRh(PMe3)(η2-C,C-C5NF4) (2). The molecular structure of 2 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, showing coordination by C3–C4, unlike previous structures of pentafluoropyridine complexes that show N-coordination. Corresponding experiments with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoropyridine yield the C–H oxidative addition product CpRh(PMe3)(C5NF4)H (3). In contrast, UV irradiation of 1 in hexane, in the presence of 4-substituted tetrafluoropyridines C5NF4X, where X = NMe2, OMe, results in elimination of C2H4 and HF to form the metallacycles CpRh(PMe3)(κ2-C,C-CH2N(CH3)C5NF3) (4) and CpRh(PMe3)(κ2-C,C-CH2OC5NF3) (5), respectively. The X-ray structure of 4 shows a planar RhCCNC-five-membered ring. Complexes 2–5 may also be formed by thermal reaction of CpRh(PMe3)(Ph)H with the respective pyridines at 50 °C. PMID:24563575

  5. Relationship between electrochemical potentials and substitution reaction rates of ferrocene-containing β-diketonato rhodium(I) complexes; cytotoxicity of [Rh(FcCOCHCOPh)(cod)].

    PubMed

    Conradie, Jeanet; Swarts, Jannie C

    2011-06-14

    A series of ferrocene-containing rhodium complexes of the type [Rh(FcCOCHCOR)(cod)] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) with R = CF(3), 1, (E(pa)(Rh) = 269; E(o)'(Fc) = 329 mV vs. Fc/Fc(+)), CCl(3), 2, (E(pa) = 256; E(o)' = 312 mV), CH(3), 3, (E(pa) = 177; E(o)' = 232 mV), Ph = C(6)H(5), 4, (E(pa) = 184; E(o)' = 237 mV), and Fc = ferrocenyl = (C(5)H(5))Fe(C(5)H(4)), 5, (E(pa) = 135; E(o)'(Fc1) = 203; E(o)'(Fc2) = 312 mV), have been studied electrochemically in CH(3)CN. Results indicated that the rhodium(I) centre is irreversibly oxidised to Rh(III) in a two-electron transfer process before the ferrocenyl fragment is reversibly oxidized in a one-electron transfer process. The peak anodic (oxidation) potential, E(pa), (in V vs. Fc/Fc(+)) of the rhodium core in 1-5 relates to k(2), the second-order rate constant for the substitution of (FcCOCHCOR)(-) with 1,10-phenanthroline in [Rh(FcCOCHCOR)(cod)] to form [Rh(phen)(cod)](+) in methanol at 25 °C with the equation lnk(2) = 39.5 E(pa)(Rh) - 3.69, while the formal oxidation potential of the ferrocenyl groups in 1-5 relates to k(2) by lnk(2) = 40.8 E(o)'(Fc)-6.34. Complex 4 (IC(50) = 28.2 μmol dm(-3)) was twice as cytotoxic as the free FcCOCH(2)COPh ligand having IC(50) = 54.2 μmol dm(-3), but approximately one order of magnitude less toxic to human HeLa neoplastic cells than cisplatin (IC(50) = 2.3 μmol dm(-3)). PMID:21423964

  6. Effect of support on iron promoted rhodium nanocatalysts for ethanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo Sanchez, Pamela Carolina

    Depleting fossil fuel sources coupled with the deleterious effects of petroleum-based fuel combustion have led to the development of sustainable ways for energy production. One alternative is the production of biofuels like ethanol. Ethanol's biggest advantages are its high energy density, biodegradability and carbon neutrality. A potential scalable process is the conversion of synthetic gas (syngas: CO, CO2, H 2) produced from gasification of biomass with the use of Rh-based catalysts. The work presented in this thesis aimed to study the effect of the introduction of 1, 5, and 10 wt % CeO2 into a TiO2 support on Fe promoted-Rh catalysts for ethanol production from CO hydrogenation. The mixed-oxide CeO2-TiO2 support was synthesized by a sol-gel method where Rh and Fe nanoparticles were deposited by wet incipient impregnation. Reactivity studies were carried under CO hydrogenation conditions with the use of gas chromatography. Characterization of the bare support and the catalyst that showed the best ethanol selectivity were performed by in-situ X-ray diffraction synchrotron experiments. Ethanol selectivity increases with ceria content with a shift on product distribution and CO conversion rates compared to Rh supported on single TiO2 and CeO2. This could be explained by a synergetic effect between CeO2 and TiO2 and to the to the formation of amorphous and mobile species of CeOx that can act as dispersing agents for the Rh particles increasing catalytic sites for CO insertion and for the stabilization of HCOx species. XRD characterization analysis of 10%CeO2-90%TiO2 identified three crystallographic phases: anatase, TiO2(B), and cerianite. The unpromoted 2%Rh/10%CeO2-90%TiO2 in-situ XRD analysis showed an absence of Rh0 under CO hydrogenation conditions. Conversely, the addition of Fe to the different mixed-oxide compositions showed comparable ethanol selectivity at the expense of methane formation. Therefore, the introduction of ceria into the titania support on

  7. Regio- and enantiospecific rhodium-catalyzed allylic etherification reactions using copper(I) alkoxides: influence of the copper halide salt on selectivity.

    PubMed

    Evans, P Andrew; Leahy, David K

    2002-07-10

    The transition metal-catalyzed allylic etherification represents a fundamentally important cross-coupling reaction for the construction of allylic ethers. We have developed a new regio- and enantiospecific rhodium-catalyzed allylic etherification of acyclic unsymmetrical allylic alcohol derivatives using copper(I) alkoxides derived from primary, secondary and tertiary alcohols. This study demonstrates that the choice of copper(I) halide salt is crucial for obtaining excellent regio- and enantiospecificity, providing another example of the effect of halide ions in asymmetric transition metal-catalyzed reactions. Finally, the ability to alter the reactivity of the alkali metal alkoxides in this manner may provide a useful method for related metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions involving heteroatoms.

  8. Synthesis and crystal structure of the rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with bis(3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.; Shao, K.-J.; Xiao, Y.-C.; Pu, X.-J.; Zhu, B.; Jiang, M.-J.

    2015-12-15

    The rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with the bis(3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand [H{sub 2}B(Im{sup t}Bu){sup 2}]Rh(COD) C{sup 22}H{sup 36}BN{sup 4}Rh, has been prepared, and its crystal structure is determined by X-ray diffraction. Complex exhibits slightly distorted square planar configurations around the metal center, which is coordinated by the bidentate H{sup 2}B(Im{sup t}Bu){sub 2} and one cyclooctadiene group. The Rh–C{sub carbene} bond lengths are 2.043(4) and 2.074(4) Å, and the bond angle C–Rh1–C is 82.59°. The dihedral angle between two imidazol-2-ylidene rings is 67.30°.

  9. The role of fluctuations in bistability and oscillations during the H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} reaction on nanosized rhodium crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grosfils, P.; Gaspard, P.; Visart de Bocarmé, T.

    2015-08-14

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is presented of fluctuations observed by field ion microscopy in the catalytic reaction of water production on a rhodium tip. A stochastic approach is developed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the different phenomena observed in the experiment, including burst noise manifesting itself in a bistability regime, noisy oscillations, and nanopatterns with a cross-like oxidized zone separating the surface into four quadrants centered on the (111) facets. The study is based on a stochastic model numerically simulating the processes of adsorption, desorption, reaction, and transport. The surface diffusion of hydrogen is described as a percolation process dominated by large clusters corresponding to the four quadrants. The model reproduces the observed phenomena in the ranges of temperature, pressures, and electric field of the experiment.

  10. Synthesis and crystal structure of the rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with bis(3- tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Shao, K.-J.; Xiao, Y.-C.; Pu, X.-J.; Zhu, B.; Jiang, M.-J.

    2015-12-01

    The rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with the bis(3- tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand [H2B( Im t Bu)2]Rh(COD) C22H36BN4Rh, has been prepared, and its crystal structure is determined by X-ray diffraction. Complex exhibits slightly distorted square planar configurations around the metal center, which is coordinated by the bidentate H2B( Im t Bu)2 and one cyclooctadiene group. The Rh-Ccarbene bond lengths are 2.043(4) and 2.074(4) Å, and the bond angle C-Rh1-C is 82.59°. The dihedral angle between two imidazol-2-ylidene rings is 67.30°.

  11. Factors affecting the electrochemical regeneration of NADH by (2,2'-bipyridyl) (pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)-rhodium complexes: impact on their immobilization onto electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Walcarius, Alain; Nasraoui, Rihab; Wang, Zhijie; Qu, Fengli; Urbanova, Veronika; Etienne, Mathieu; Göllü, Mehmet; Demir, Ayhan S; Gajdzik, Janine; Hempelmann, Rolf

    2011-08-01

    Complexes of the (2,2'-bipyridyl) (pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)-rhodium family ([Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+), which is actually hydrolyzed in the form of [Cp*Rh(bpy)H(2)O](2+) in aqueous medium) are suitable solution-phase mediators likely to regenerate nicotinamide cofactors associated to dehydrogenases involved in many biocatalytic applications. Their practical application as bioelectrocatalysts, e.g., in fine chemicals synthesis or biosensors, remains however restricted to their durable immobilization in an active form onto solid electrode surfaces. This paper reports some new observations on the electrocatalytic properties of this mediator towards NAD(+) reduction, notably the critical effect of pH and cofactor-to-mediator concentration ratio, and investigates the behavior of a series of ([Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+)) derivatives bearing various substituents on the bipyridine ligand in view of their subsequent integration in electrochemical bioreactors. It will be shown that such compounds containing S- or N- moieties (i.e., often used as precursors to functionalize electrode surfaces) lead to inactivation of the electrocatalyst because their interaction with the Rh center prevents the formation of the active rhodium hydride complex. It was thus necessary to find another strategy of immobilization, and we found that adsorption of [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+) by π-stacking on single-walled carbon nanotubes is an effective mean to reach this goal, leading to efficient and stable catalytic responses for NAD(+) reduction. Preliminary electroenzymatic experiments in the presence of d-sorbitol dehydrogenase further point out the interest of this approach for bioelectrocatalysis purposes and provide the proof-of-concept for this immobilization strategy. PMID:21700510

  12. Factors affecting the electrochemical regeneration of NADH by (2,2'-bipyridyl) (pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)-rhodium complexes: impact on their immobilization onto electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Walcarius, Alain; Nasraoui, Rihab; Wang, Zhijie; Qu, Fengli; Urbanova, Veronika; Etienne, Mathieu; Göllü, Mehmet; Demir, Ayhan S; Gajdzik, Janine; Hempelmann, Rolf

    2011-08-01

    Complexes of the (2,2'-bipyridyl) (pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)-rhodium family ([Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+), which is actually hydrolyzed in the form of [Cp*Rh(bpy)H(2)O](2+) in aqueous medium) are suitable solution-phase mediators likely to regenerate nicotinamide cofactors associated to dehydrogenases involved in many biocatalytic applications. Their practical application as bioelectrocatalysts, e.g., in fine chemicals synthesis or biosensors, remains however restricted to their durable immobilization in an active form onto solid electrode surfaces. This paper reports some new observations on the electrocatalytic properties of this mediator towards NAD(+) reduction, notably the critical effect of pH and cofactor-to-mediator concentration ratio, and investigates the behavior of a series of ([Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+)) derivatives bearing various substituents on the bipyridine ligand in view of their subsequent integration in electrochemical bioreactors. It will be shown that such compounds containing S- or N- moieties (i.e., often used as precursors to functionalize electrode surfaces) lead to inactivation of the electrocatalyst because their interaction with the Rh center prevents the formation of the active rhodium hydride complex. It was thus necessary to find another strategy of immobilization, and we found that adsorption of [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+) by π-stacking on single-walled carbon nanotubes is an effective mean to reach this goal, leading to efficient and stable catalytic responses for NAD(+) reduction. Preliminary electroenzymatic experiments in the presence of d-sorbitol dehydrogenase further point out the interest of this approach for bioelectrocatalysis purposes and provide the proof-of-concept for this immobilization strategy.

  13. Ruthenium, osmium and rhodium complexes of 1,4-diaryl 1,4-diazabutadiene: radical versus non-radical states.

    PubMed

    Chandra Patra, Sarat; Saha Roy, Amit; Manivannan, Vadivelu; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2014-09-28

    Ruthenium, osmium and rhodium complexes of 1,4-di(3-nitrophenyl)-1,4-diazabutadiene (LDAB) of types trans-[RuII(LDAB)(PPh3)2Cl2] (1), trans-[OsII(LDAB)(PPh3)2Br2] (2) and trans-[Rh(LDAB)(PPh3)2Cl2] (3) are isolated and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, mass and 1H NMR spectra including the single crystal X-ray structure determination of 1·2toluene. The α-diimine fragment of the LDAB ligand in 1·2toluene is deformed, showing a relatively longer -C=N- bond, 1.320 Å, and a shorter =CH–CH= bond, 1.395 Å. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on trans-[Ru(LDAB)(PMe3)2Cl2] (1Me) and trans-[Os(LDAB)(PMe3)2Br2] (2Me) with singlet spin states authenticated that the closed shell singlet state (CSS) solutions of 1 and 2 are stable and no perturbation occurs because of the diradical open shell singlet (OSS) state. The EPR spectra of 3 and the Mulliken spin density distribution obtained from the DFT calculation on trans-[Rh(LDAB)(PMe3)2Cl2] (3Me) imply that the ground electronic state of 3 can be defined by the [RhIII(LDAB˙−)(PPh3)2Cl2] (3RhL˙) ↔ [RhII(LDAB)(PPh3)2Cl2] (3Rh˙L) resonating states. In solid, the contribution of 3RhL˙ is higher and the gav is 2.018 with Δg = 0.10, whereas in frozen glasses the contribution of 3Rh˙L is higher and the gav is 2.026 with Δg (frozen glasses) = 0.13. The g parameters of the electrogenerated [1]+ (g1 = 2.456, g2 = 2.128 and g3 = 1.624, Δg = 0.824), [2]+ (g1 = 2.599, g2 = 2.041 and g3 = 1.965, Δg = 0.634), [1]− (g1 = 2.138, g2 = 2.109, g3 = 1.978 and Δg = 0.160) and [2]− (g1 = 2.168, g2 = 2.097, g3 = 1.987 and Δg = 0.181) ions and the spin density distributions obtained from the DFT calculations on [1Me]+, [2Me]+, [1Me]− and [2Me]− reveal that the reversible anodic peaks of 1 and 2 at 0.11 and 0.34 V, referenced versus Fc+/Fc couple, are due to the M(III)/M(II) redox couple, while the reversible cathodic waves at −1.27 V and −0.82 V of 1 and 2 are caused by the LDAB/LDAB˙− redox couple

  14. Improved synthesis of cyclic tertiary allylic alcohols by asymmetric 1,2-addition of AlMe3 to enones.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Andreas; Zuo, Wei; Siewert, Jürgen; Harms, Klaus; von Zezschwitz, Paultheo

    2013-11-25

    The development of an improved protocol for the enantioselective Rh(I) /binap-catalysed 1,2-addition of AlMe3 to cyclic enones is reported. (31)P NMR analysis of the reaction revealed that the catalyst in its resting state is a chloride-bridged dimer. This insight led to the use of AgBF4 as an additive for in situ activation of the dimeric precatalyst. Thus, the catalyst loading can now be reduced to only 1 mol% with respect to rhodium. Various 5-7-membered cyclic enones can be transformed into tertiary allylic alcohols with excellent levels of enantioselectivity and high yields. The obtained products are versatile synthetic building blocks, shown by a highly enantioselective formal total synthesis of the pheromone (-)-frontalin as well as formation of a bicyclic lactone that has the core structure of the natural flavour component "wine lactone".

  15. Redox-neutral rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization of arylamine N-oxides with diazo compounds: primary C(sp(3))-H/C(sp(2))-H activation and oxygen-atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Yang, Yaxi; Ai, Wen; Tang, Huanyu; Wu, Yunxiang; Zhu, Weiliang; Li, Yuanchao

    2015-10-01

    An unprecedented rhodium(III)-catalyzed regioselective redox-neutral annulation reaction of 1-naphthylamine N-oxides with diazo compounds was developed to afford various biologically important 1H-benzo[g]indolines. This coupling reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions and does not require external oxidants. The only by-products are dinitrogen and water. More significantly, this reaction represents the first example of dual functiaonalization of unactivated a primary C(sp(3) )H bond and C(sp(2) )H bond with diazocarbonyl compounds. DFT calculations revealed that an intermediate iminium is most likely involved in the catalytic cycle. Moreover, a rhodium(III)-catalyzed coupling of readily available tertiary aniline N-oxides with α-diazomalonates was also developed under external oxidant-free conditions to access various aminomandelic acid derivatives by an O-atom-transfer reaction.

  16. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  17. Rhodium-Coordinated Poly(arylene-ethynylene)-alt-Poly(arylene-vinylene) Copolymer Acting as Photocatalyst for Visible-Light-Powered NAD+/NADH Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 2,2′-bipyridyl-containing poly(arylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(arylene-vinylene) polymer, acting as a light-harvesting ligand system, was synthesized and coupled to an organometallic rhodium complex designed for photocatalytic NAD+/NADH reduction. The material, which absorbs over a wide spectral range, was characterized by using various analytical techniques, confirming its chemical structure and properties. The dielectric function of the material was determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Photocatalytic reduction of nucleotide redox cofactors under visible light irradiation (390–650 nm) was performed and is discussed in detail. The new metal-containing polymer can be used to cover large surface areas (e.g. glass beads) and, due to this immobilization step, can be easily separated from the reaction solution after photolysis. Because of its high stability, the polymer-based catalyst system can be repeatedly used under different reaction conditions for (photo)chemical reduction of NAD+. With this concept, enzymatic, photo-biocatalytic systems for solar energy conversion can be facilitated, and the precious metal catalyst can be recycled. PMID:25130570

  18. Rhodium nanoparticle-modified screen-printed graphite electrodes for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in tea extracts in the presence of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Gatselou, Vasiliki A; Giokas, Dimothenis L; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Prodromidis, Mamas I

    2015-03-01

    In this work we describe the fabrication of nanostructured electrocatalytic surfaces based on polyethyleneimine (PEI)-supported rhodium nanoparticles (Rh-NP) over graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. Rh-NP, electrostatically stabilized by citrate anions, were immobilized over graphite SPEs, through coulombic attraction on a thin film of positively charged PEI. The functionalized sensors, polarized at 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl/3 M KCl, exhibited a linear response to H2O2 over the concentration range from 5 to 600 μmol L(-1) H2O2 in the presence of oxygen. The 3σ limit of detection was 2 μmol L(-1) H2O2, while the reproducibility of the method at the concentration level of 10 μmol L(-1) H2O2 (n=10) and between different sensors (n=4) was lower than 3 and 5%, respectively. Most importantly, the sensors showed an excellent working and storage stability at ambient conditions and they were successfully applied to the determination of H2O2 produced by autooxidation of polylphenols in tea extracts with ageing. Recovery rates ranged between 97 and 104% suggesting that the as-prepared electrodes can be used for the development of small-scale, low-cost chemical sensors for use in on-site applications.

  19. Hollow-shell-structured nanospheres: a recoverable heterogeneous catalyst for rhodium-catalyzed tandem reduction/lactonization of ethyl 2-acylarylcarboxylates to chiral phthalides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Jin, Ronghua; An, Juzeng; Zhao, Qiankun; Cheng, Tanyu; Liu, Guohua

    2014-05-01

    Chiral organorhodium-functionalized hollow-shell-structured nanospheres were prepared by immobilization of a chiral N-sulfonylated diamine-based organorhodium complex within an ethylene-bridged organosilicate shell. Structural analysis and characterization reveal its well-defined single-site rhodium active center, and transmission electron microscopy images reveal a uniform dispersion of hollow-shell-structured nanospheres. As a heterogenous catalyst, it exhibits excellent catalytic activity and enantioselectivity in synthesis of chiral phthalides by a tandem reduction/lactonization of ethyl 2-acylarylcarboxylates in aqueous medium. The high catalytic performance is attributed to the synergistic effect of the high hydrophobicity and the confined chiral organorhodium catalytic nature. The organorhodium-functionalized nanospheres could be conveniently recovered and reused at least 10 times without loss of catalytic activity. This feature makes it an attractive catalyst in environmentally friendly organic reactions. The results of this study offer a new approach to immobilize chiral organometal functionalities within the hollow-shell-structured nanospheres to prepare materials with high activity in heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis.

  20. Temporal and spatial studies of autocatalyst-derived platinum, rhodium, and palladium and selected vehicle-derived trace elements in the environment.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, K E; Parry, S J; Piper, J M

    2001-03-15

    The distribution of platinum, rhodium, and palladium (platinum-group elements; PGEs) adjacent to two major U.K. roads shows a rapid decrease (more than 1 order of magnitude) away from the road and reflects patterns shown by other traffic-derived trace elements such as Pb and Zn. However, ratios of Pt:Rh remain relatively constant from 0 to 10 m distance, suggesting that at least some of the PGEs are transported away from the source. A temporal study over a 12-month period, of road dust and surface samples, reveals elevated concentrations above background levels, with maximum values of Pt >500 ng g(-1), Rh 70 ng g(-1), and Pd 70 ng g(-1). Concentrations vary considerably throughout the year and show some tentative correlation with rainfall. Element speciation, an essential control on mobility and hence distribution, was investigated, and the results of solubility experiments show that up to 30% of the Pd present dissolves in acid solutions. This indicates that at least some of the Pd is present in a soluble form and is therefore potentially highly mobile.

  1. Enantioselective Arylation of N-Tosylimines by Phenylboronic Acid Catalysed by a Rhodium/Diene Complex: Reaction Mechanism from Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Sieffert, Nicolas; Boisson, Julien; Py, Sandrine

    2015-06-26

    A DFT study of the reaction mechanism of the rhodium-catalysed enantioselective arylation of (E)-N-propylidene-4-methyl-benzenesulfonamide by phenylboronic acid [Lin et al J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 12394] is reported. The catalyst ([{Rh(OH)(diene)}2]) includes a chiral diene ligand and the reaction is conducted in 1,4-dioxane in the presence of drying agents (4 Å molecular sieves). Because phenylboronic acid is in equilibrium with phenylboroxin and water under the reaction conditions, three catalytic cycles are proposed that differ in the way the transmetallation and the release of the product are brought about, depending on the availability of phenylboronic acid, water and boroxin in the reaction medium. Based on computations, a new mechanism for the title reaction is proposed, in which phenylboronic acid plays the double role of "aryl source" and proton donor. This path does not require the presence of adventitious water molecules, in keeping with a reaction conducted in a dry medium. Comparisons with the generally accepted mechanism for arylation of enones proposed by Hayashi and co-workers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 5052) show that the latter mechanism is less favourable and is not expected to operate in the case of the N-tosylimine substrate considered herein. Finally, the possibility that phenylboroxin is the aryl source has also been investigated, but is not found to be competitive. PMID:26032123

  2. Labile behavior of carbonyl ligands in butadienecarbonyl and ethylenecarbonyl complexes of rhodium(I) under the action of 1,5-cyclooctadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Varshavskii, Yu.S.; Cherkasov, T.G.; Bresler, L.S.

    1987-04-01

    The processes resulting in the redistribution of the carbonyl groups between the rhodium(I) complexes in a solution of (Rh(C2H4)COCl)2 (I) in chloroform under the action 1,5-cyclooctadiene (cod) have been studied by the methods of IR, TC NMR, and H NMR spectroscopy. It has been shown that in reaction mixtures containing I + x mole cod/Rh the asymmetric complex (cod)RhCl2Rh(CO)2 (II) with nu(CO) = 2092 and 2022 cm , delta( TC) = 178.7 ppm, and J(CRh) = 75.2 Hz forms when x less than or equal to 0.5. When x > 0.5, the pentacoordinate monocarbonyl complex (cod) CORhCl2RhCO(cod)(III) with nu(CO) = 2050 cm , which is stable in the presence of cod, forms. When x greater than or equal to 3, III is the main product present in the reaction mixtures. In the spectra of such mixtures the TC signal is a singlet with delta( TC) = 178.4 ppm. The butadienecarbonyl complex ((RhCOCl)2C4H6)/sub n/ behaves similarly to I. The reaction involving the replacement of CO ligands by cod in (Rh(CO)2)Cl)2 in a chloroform medium with cod;Rh = 1 passes through a step involving the formation of III; when the reaction is conducted in heptane, the formation of III is not detected.

  3. Toward new organometallic architectures: synthesis of carbene-centered rhodium and palladium bisphosphine complexes. stability and reactivity of [PC(BIm)PRh(L)][PF6] pincers.

    PubMed

    Plikhta, Andriy; Pöthig, Alexander; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Rieger, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we report the synthesis of a tridentate carbene-centered bisphosphine ligand precursor and its complexes. The developed four-step synthetic strategy of a new PC(BIm)P pincer ligand represents the derivatization of benzimidazole in the first and third positions by (diphenylphosphoryl)methylene synthone, followed by phosphine deprotection and subsequent insertion of a noncoordinating anion. The obtained ligand precursor undergoes complexation, with PdCl2 and [μ-OCH3Rh(COD)]2 smoothly forming the target organometallics [PC(BIm)PPdCl][PF6] and [PC(BIm)PRh(L)][PF6] under mild hydrogenation conditions. A more detailed study of the rhodium complexes [PC(BIm)PRh(L)][PF6] reveals significant thermal stability of the PC(BIm)PRh moiety in the solid state as well as in solution. The chemical behavior of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphinomethylene)benzimidazol-2-ylrhodium acetonitrile hexafluorophosphate has been screened under decarbonylation, hydrogenation, and hydroboration reaction conditions. Thus, the PC(BIm)PRh(I) complex is a sufficiently stable compound, with the potential to be applied in catalysis.

  4. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  7. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  8. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  9. Rhodium-catalyzed [5 + 2 + 1] cycloaddition of ene-vinylcyclopropanes and CO: reaction design, development, application in natural product synthesis, and inspiration for developing new reactions for synthesis of eight-membered carbocycles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-08-18

    Practical syntheses of natural products and their analogues with eight-membered carbocyclic skeletons are important for medicinal and biological investigations. However, methods and strategies to construct the eight-membered carbocycles are limited. Therefore, developing new methods to synthesize the eight-membered carbocycles is highly desired. In this Account, we describe our development of three rhodium-catalyzed cycloadditions for the construction of the eight-membered carbocycles, which have great potential in addressing the challenges in the synthesis of medium-sized ring systems. The first reaction described in this Account is our computationally designed rhodium-catalyzed two-component [5 + 2 + 1] cycloaddition of ene-vinylcyclopropanes (ene-VCPs) and CO for the diastereoselective construction of bi- and tricyclic cyclooctenones. The design of this reaction is based on the hypothesis that the C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination of the eight-membered rhodacycle intermediate generated from the rhodium-catalyzed cyclopropane cleavage and alkene insertion, giving Wender's [5 + 2] cycloadduct, is not easy. Under CO atmosphere, CO insertion may occur rapidly, converting the eight-membered rhodacycle into a nine-membered rhodacycle, which then undergoes an easy C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) reductive elimination process and furnishes the [5 + 2 + 1] product. This hypothesis was supported by our preliminary DFT studies and also served as inspiration for the development of two [7 + 1] cycloadditions: the [7 + 1] cycloaddition of buta-1,3-dienylcyclopropanes (BDCPs) and CO for the construction of cyclooctadienones, and the benzo/[7 + 1] cycloaddition of cyclopropyl-benzocyclobutenes (CP-BCBs) and CO to synthesize the benzocyclooctenones. The efficiency of these rhodium-catalyzed cycloadditions can be revealed by the application in natural product synthesis. Two eight-membered ring-containing natural products, (±)-asterisca-3(15),6-diene and (+)-asteriscanolide, have been

  10. Crystal structures of bis-[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ(2) N,C (1)]rhodium(III) complexes containing an aceto-nitrile or monodentate thyminate(1-) ligand.

    PubMed

    Sakate, Mika; Hosoda, Haruka; Suzuki, Takayoshi

    2016-04-01

    The crystal structures of bis-[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phen-yl]rhodium(III) complexes with the metal in an octahedral coordination containing chloride and aceto-nitrile ligands, namely (OC-6-42)-aceto-nitrile-chlorido-bis-[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ(2) N,C (1)]rhodium(III), [RhCl(C11H8N)2(CH3CN)] (1), thyminate(1-) and methanol, namely (OC-6-42)-methanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidin-1-ido-κN (1))bis-[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ(2) N,C (1)]rhodium(III), [Rh(C11H8N)2(C5H5N2O2)(CH3OH)]·CH3OH·0.5H2O (2), and thy-min-ate(1-) and ethanol, namely (OC-6-42)-ethanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetra-hydro-pyrimidin-1-ido-κN (1))bis[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ(2) N,C (1)]rhodium(III), [Rh(C11H8N)2(C5H5N2O2)(C2H5OH)]·C2H5OH (3), are reported. The aceto-nitrile complex, 1, is isostructural with the Ir(III) analog. In complexes 2 and 3, the monodeprotonated thyminate (Hthym(-)) ligand coordinates to the Rh(III) atom through the N atom, and the resulting Rh-N(Hthym) bond lengths are relatively long [2.261 (2) and 2.252 (2) Å for 2 and 3, respectively] as compared to the Rh-N bonds in the related thyminate complexes. In each of the crystals of 2 and 3, the complexes are linked via a pair of inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between neighbouring Hthym(-) ligands, forming an inversion dimer. A strong intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond between the thyminate(1-) and alcohol ligands in mutually cis positions to each other is also observed. PMID:27375885

  11. Crystal structures of bis­[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ2 N,C 1]rhodium(III) complexes containing an aceto­nitrile or monodentate thyminate(1−) ligand

    PubMed Central

    Sakate, Mika; Hosoda, Haruka; Suzuki, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of bis­[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phen­yl]rhodium(III) complexes with the metal in an octahedral coordination containing chloride and aceto­nitrile ligands, namely (OC-6-42)-aceto­nitrile­chlorido­bis­[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ2 N,C 1]rhodium(III), [RhCl(C11H8N)2(CH3CN)] (1), thyminate(1−) and methanol, namely (OC-6-42)-methanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro­pyrimidin-1-ido-κN 1)bis­[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ2 N,C 1]rhodium(III), [Rh(C11H8N)2(C5H5N2O2)(CH3OH)]·CH3OH·0.5H2O (2), and thy­min­ate(1−) and ethanol, namely (OC-6-42)-ethanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetra­hydro­pyrimidin-1-ido-κN 1)bis[2-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl-κ2 N,C 1]rhodium(III), [Rh(C11H8N)2(C5H5N2O2)(C2H5OH)]·C2H5OH (3), are reported. The aceto­nitrile complex, 1, is isostructural with the IrIII analog. In complexes 2 and 3, the monodeprotonated thyminate (Hthym−) ligand coordinates to the RhIII atom through the N atom, and the resulting Rh—N(Hthym) bond lengths are relatively long [2.261 (2) and 2.252 (2) Å for 2 and 3, respectively] as compared to the Rh—N bonds in the related thyminate complexes. In each of the crystals of 2 and 3, the complexes are linked via a pair of inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between neighbouring Hthym− ligands, forming an inversion dimer. A strong intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the thyminate(1−) and alcohol ligands in mutually cis positions to each other is also observed. PMID:27375885

  12. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  13. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  14. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  15. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  16. DFT calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants, chemical shifts and complexation shifts in complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with some nitrogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Benchmark calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants for a set of model complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with nine organic ligands using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been carried out. The calculations were performed by means of several methods: the non-relativistic, relativistic scalar ZORA, and spin-orbit ZORA approaches at the CGA-PBE/QZ4P theory level, and the GIAO NMR method using the B3PW91 functional with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and the Stuttgart basis set for the Rh atom. The geometry of compounds was optimised either by the same basis set as for the NMR calculations or applying the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G(2d) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and LANL2DZ for the Rh atom. Computed 15N NMR shielding constants σ were compatible with experimental 15N chemical shifts δ of complexes exhibiting similar structure and fulfil the linear equation δ = aσ + b. The a and b parameters for all data sets have been estimated by means of linear regression analysis. In contrast to the correlation method giving "scaled" chemical shifts, the conversion of shielding constants to chemical shifts with respect to the reference shielding of CH3NO2 provided very inaccurate "raw" δ values. The application of the former to the calculation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δcompl - δlig) reproduced experimental values qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. The non-relativistic B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] theory level reproduced the NMR parameters as good as the more expensive relativistic CGA-PBE//QZ4P ZORA approaches.

  17. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  18. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  19. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  20. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  1. Rhodium-Catalyzed/Copper-Mediated Tandem C(sp(2))-H Alkynylation and Annulation: Synthesis of 11-Acylated Imidazo[1,2-a:3,4-a']dipyridin-5-ium-4-olates from 2H-[1,2'-Bipyridin]-2-ones and Propargyl Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Wang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Kun; Liu, Wenmin; Zhang, Xu; Mao, Wutao; Guo, Yongming; Ge, Xiaolin; Pan, Fei

    2016-03-01

    A rhodium-catalyzed/copper-mediated tandem C(sp(2))-H alkynylation and intramolecular annulation of 2H-[1,2'-bipyridin]-2-ones with propargyl alcohols for the synthesis of 11-acylated imidazo[1,2-a:3,4-a']dipyridin-5-ium-4-olates is described.

  2. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  3. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  4. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  5. Sarks as additional fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Frampton, Paul H.; Jack Ng, Y.; Nishino, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Osamu

    1991-03-01

    An extension of the standard model is proposed. The gauge group is SU(2) X ⊗ SU(3) C ⊗ SU(2) S ⊗ U(1) Q, where all gauge symmetries are unbroken. The colour and electric charge are combined with SU(2) S which becomes strongly coupled at approximately 500 GeV and binds preons to form fermionic and vector bound states. The usual quarks and leptons are singlets under SU(2) X but additional fermions, called sarks. transform under it and the electroweak group. The present model explains why no more than three light quark-lepton families can exist. Neutral sark baryons, called narks, are candidates for the cosmological dark matter having the characteristics designed for WIMPS. Further phenomenological implications of sarks are analyzed i including electron-positron annihilation. Z 0 decay, flavor-changing neutral currents. baryon-number non-conservation, sarkonium and the neutron electric dipole moment.

  6. Synthetic, thermochemical, and catalytic studies of fluorinated tertiary phosphine ligands R{sub 2}PR{sub f} [R = Cy, Ph, {sup i}Pr; R{sub f} = CH{prime}{sub 2}CH{sub 2}(CF{sub 2}){sub 5}CF{sub 3}] in rhodium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.C. Jr.; Stevens, E.D.; Nolan, S.P.

    1999-11-15

    The fluoroalkylphosphine compounds PR{sub 2}R{sub f} (R = Cy (1); {sup i}Pr (2); R{sub f} = CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}(CF{sub 2}){sub 5}CF{sub 3}) have been prepared from the reactions of the Grignard reagent IMgR{sub f} and appropriate ClPR{sub 2} (R = Cy, {sup i}PR). The fluorinated phosphine ligands [PR{sub 2}R{sub f} (R = Cy) (1); {sup i}Pr (2); Ph (3); R{sub f} = CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}(CF{sub 2}){sub 5}CF{sub 3}] react with [Rh(CO){sub 2}Cl]{sub 2} to yield the corresponding [Rh(CO)Cl(PR{sub 2}R{sub f}){sub 2}] (R = Cy) (4); {sup i}Pr (5); Ph (6) complexes. Infrared studies on the carbonyl complexes and solution calorimetry studies of the reaction of [Rh(CO){sub 2}Cl]{sub 2} with PR{sub 2}R{sub f} (R = Ph, {sup i}Pr, Cy) have been used to quantify the relative ligand donor strength for the series: PCy{sub 2}R{sub f} {approx} P{sup i}Pr{sub 2}R{sub f} {gt} PPh{sub 2}R{sub f}. The solid-state crystal structure of [Rh(CO)Cl(PPh{sub 2}R{sub f}){sub 2}] (6) is reported. Additionally, these partially fluorinated phosphine ligands (1 and 3) can be used as supporting ligation in rhodium-mediated hydrogenation reactions.

  7. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  8. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  9. Comparative solution equilibrium studies on pentamethylcyclopentadienyl rhodium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine and ethylenediamine and their interaction with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Enyedy, Éva A; Mészáros, János P; Dömötör, Orsolya; Hackl, Carmen M; Roller, Alexander; Keppler, Bernhard K; Kandioller, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Complex formation equilibrium processes of the (N,N) donor containing 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and ethylenediamine (en) with (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) were investigated in aqueous solution via pH-potentiometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectrophotometry in the absence and presence of chloride ions. The structure of [RhCp*(en)Cl]ClO4 (Cp*, pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) was also studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. pKa values of 8.56 and 9.58 were determined for [RhCp*(bpy)(H2O)](2+) and [RhCp*(en)(H2O)](2+), respectively resulting in the formation of negligible amount of mixed hydroxido complexes at pH 7.4. Stability and the H2O/Cl(-) co-ligand exchange constants of bpy and en complexes considerably exceed those of the bidentate O-donor deferiprone. The strong affinity of the bpy and en complexes to chloride ions most probably contributes to their low antiproliferative effect. Interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+), its complexes formed with deferiprone, bpy and en were also monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, ultrafiltration/UV-vis and spectrofluorometry. Numerous binding sites (≥ 8) are available for [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+); and the interaction takes place most probably via covalent bonds through the imidazole nitrogen of His. According to the various fluorescence studies [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+) binds on sites I and II, and coordination of surface side chain donor atoms of the protein is also feasible. The binding of the bpy and en complex is weaker and slower compared to that of [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+), and formation of ternary HSA-RhCp*-ligand adducts was proved. In the case of the deferiprone complex, the RhCp* fragment is cleaved off when HSA is loaded with low equivalents of the compound.

  10. In vitro investigations of platinum, palladium, and rhodium mobility in urban airborne particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5, and PM1) using simulated lung fluids.

    PubMed

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2012-09-18

    Environmental concentrations of platinum group elements (PGE) have been increasing since the introduction of automotive catalytic converters to control harmful emissions. Assessments of the human health risks of exposures to these elements, especially through the inhalation of PGE-associated airborne particulate matter (PM), have been hampered by a lack of data on their bioaccessibility. The purpose of this study is to apply in vitro methods using simulated human lung fluids [artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF) and Gamble's solution] to assess the mobility of the PGE, platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), and rhodium (Rh) in airborne PM of human health concern. Airborne PM samples (PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1)) were collected in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. For comparison, the same extraction experiments were conducted using the standard reference material, Used Auto Catalyst (monolith) (NIST 2557). Pt and Pd concentrations were measured using isotope dilution ICP-Q-MS, while Rh was measured directly with ICP-Q-MS (in collision mode with He), following established matrix separation and enrichment procedures, for both solid (filtered residues) and extracted sample phases. The mobilized fractions measured for PGE in PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1) were highly variable, which can be attributed to the heterogenic nature of airborne PM and its composition. Overall, the mobility of PGE in airborne PM samples was notable, with a mean of 51% Rh, 22% Pt, and 29% Pd present in PM(1) being mobilized by ALF after 24 h. For PM(1) exposed to Gamble's solution, a mean of 44% Rh, 18% Pt, and 17% Pd was measured in solution after 24 h. The mobility of PGE associated with airborne PM was also determined to be much higher compared to that measured for the auto catalyst standard reference material. The results suggest that PGE emitted from automotive catalytic converters are likely to undergo chemical transformations during and/or after being emitted in the environment. This study highlights the need

  11. In vitro investigations of platinum, palladium, and rhodium mobility in urban airborne particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5, and PM1) using simulated lung fluids.

    PubMed

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2012-09-18

    Environmental concentrations of platinum group elements (PGE) have been increasing since the introduction of automotive catalytic converters to control harmful emissions. Assessments of the human health risks of exposures to these elements, especially through the inhalation of PGE-associated airborne particulate matter (PM), have been hampered by a lack of data on their bioaccessibility. The purpose of this study is to apply in vitro methods using simulated human lung fluids [artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF) and Gamble's solution] to assess the mobility of the PGE, platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), and rhodium (Rh) in airborne PM of human health concern. Airborne PM samples (PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1)) were collected in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. For comparison, the same extraction experiments were conducted using the standard reference material, Used Auto Catalyst (monolith) (NIST 2557). Pt and Pd concentrations were measured using isotope dilution ICP-Q-MS, while Rh was measured directly with ICP-Q-MS (in collision mode with He), following established matrix separation and enrichment procedures, for both solid (filtered residues) and extracted sample phases. The mobilized fractions measured for PGE in PM(10), PM(2.5), and PM(1) were highly variable, which can be attributed to the heterogenic nature of airborne PM and its composition. Overall, the mobility of PGE in airborne PM samples was notable, with a mean of 51% Rh, 22% Pt, and 29% Pd present in PM(1) being mobilized by ALF after 24 h. For PM(1) exposed to Gamble's solution, a mean of 44% Rh, 18% Pt, and 17% Pd was measured in solution after 24 h. The mobility of PGE associated with airborne PM was also determined to be much higher compared to that measured for the auto catalyst standard reference material. The results suggest that PGE emitted from automotive catalytic converters are likely to undergo chemical transformations during and/or after being emitted in the environment. This study highlights the need

  12. Determination of platinum and rhodium in environmental matrixes by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, F; Resano, M; Pruneda-Lopez, M; Moens, L

    2002-12-01

    Electrothermal vaporization from a graphite furnace was used in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for the determination of Pt and Rh in environmental matrixes. Solid samples of tunnel dust, grass, and atmospheric aerosol collected on a cellulose filter could be analyzed directly, such that sample dissolution-which is not self-evident for the determination of platinum group metals-could be avoided. By heating the graphite furnace according to a multistep temperature program, spectral interferences were avoided, since a "dry" plasma was obtained, while "parent" ions such as Cu, Zn, and Pb, giving origin to interfering molecular ions, were vaporized during the thermal pretreatment step. For tunnel dust, the most demanding sample matrix, a mixture of HCl and HF was used as a modifier to stimulate the vaporization of matrix components during the thermal pretreatment step and, hence, to alleviate matrix-induced analyte signal suppression during the actual vaporization step. Calibration was accomplished by means of single standard addition with an aqueous standard solution. The results obtained agreed within the experimental uncertainty with the corresponding reference values (certified values or results obtained using pneumatic nebulization ICPMS), while relative standard deviations of < or = 15% were typical for both Pt and Rh. In all samples, a Pt/Rh ratio of approximately 6-8 was established. For a typical sample mass of 2 mg, limits of detection were 0.35 ng/g for Pt and 0.05 ng/g for Rh.

  13. Permeation of iridium(IV) and metal impurity chlorocomplexes through a supported liquid membrane designed for rhodium separation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashrafizadeh, S.N.; Demopoulos, G.P.; Rovira, M.; Sastre, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    A supported liquid membrane (SLM) system previously designed for Rh separation has been examined for its capability to reject the metal impurities which are commonly encountered in industrial Rh chloride solutions. Special attention was paid to Ir(IV) chlorocomplexes and their extraction/transport behavior against both conventional solvent extraction and supported liquid membrane systems of Kelex 100. A lab-scale SLM cell with an effective membrane area of 44 cm{sup 2} was used to conduct the SLM permeation tests. The SLM was composed of a Gore-Tex polymer substrate impregnated with an organic solution of Kelex 100, tridecanol, and kerosene. The impurities tested [in addition to Ir(IV)] were AG(I), As(V), Bi(III), Cd(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II), Pd(II), Pt(IV), Se(IV), Te(IV), and Zn(II). These impurities, based on their response against the SLM, were classified into three groups, i.e., those permeated through [Zn(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), Bi(III), Te(IV), and Ir(IV)], those nonpermeated at all [Ni(II), Co(II), As(V), Se(IV), Cu(II), and Fe(III)], and those blocking the membrane [Pt(IV), Pd(II), Ag(I), Pb(II), and Bi(III)]. The SLM was not capable of discriminating between Rh(III) and Ir(IV) transport at the optimum operating conditions. Complementary upstream and downstream processes are required to separate the impurities from the feed and the product solutions, respectively. Overall, this work revealed the great limitations of SLMs as effective and potentially useful separation media for the extraction of metals from industrial-like multicomponent aqueous feed solutions.

  14. Synthesis and reactivity of fluoro complexes: Part 2. Rhodium(I) fluoro complexes with alkene and phosphine ligands. Synthesis of the first isolated rhodium(I) bifluoride complexes. Structure of [Rh3(mu3-OH)2(COD)(3)](HF2) by X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Vicente, José; Gil-Rubio, Juan; Bautista, Delia; Sironi, Angelo; Masciocchi, Norberto

    2004-09-01

    The reaction between [Rh(mu-OH)(COD)](2) (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) and 73% HF in THF gives [Rh(3)(mu(3)-OH)(2)(COD)(3)](HF(2)) (1). Its crystal structure, determined by ab initio X-ray powder diffraction methods (from conventional laboratory data), contains complex trimetallic cations linked together in 1D chains by a mu(3)-OH...F-H-F...HO-mu(3) sequence of strong hydrogen bonds. The complex [Rh(mu-F)(COE)(2)](2) (COE = cyclooctene; 2), prepared by reacting [Rh(mu-OH)(COE)(2)](2) with NEt(3).3HF (3:2), has been characterized. Complex 1 reacts with PR(3) (1:3) to give [RhF(COD)(PR(3))] [R = Ph (3), C(6)H(4)OMe-4 (4), (i)Pr (5), Cy (6)] that can be prepared directly by reacting [Rh(mu-OH)(COD)](2) with 73% HF and PR(3) (1:2:2). The reactions of 1 with PPh(3) or Et(3)P have been studied by NMR spectroscopy at different molar ratios. Complexes [RhF(PEt(3))(3)] (7), [RhF(COD)(PEt(3))] (8), and [RhF(PPh(3))(3)] (9) have been detected. The complex [Rh(F)(NBD)(iPr(3)P)] (NBD = norbornadiene; 10) was prepared by the sequential treatment of [Rh(mu-OMe)(NBD)](2) with 1 equiv of NEt(3).3HF and (i)Pr(3)P. The first isolated bifluoride rhodium(I) complexes [Rh(FHF)(COD)(PR(3))] [R = Ph (11), (i)Pr (12), Cy (13)], obtained by reacting fluoro complexes 3, 5, and 6 with NEt(3).3HF (3:1), have been characterized. The crystal structures of 3 and 11 have been determined.

  15. A rapid and practical strategy for the determination of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, iridium and gold in large amounts of ultrabasic rock by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry combined with ultrasound extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gai; Tian, Min

    2015-04-01

    This proposed method regulated the determination of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, iridium and gold in platinum-group ores by nickel sulfide fire assay—inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) combined with ultrasound extraction for the first time. The quantitative limits were 0.013-0.023μg/g. The samples were fused to separate the platinum-group elements from matrix. The nickel sulfide button was then dissolved with hydrochloric acid and the insoluble platinum-group sulfide residue was dissolved with aqua regia by ultrasound bath and finally determined by ICP-OES. The proposed method has been applied into the determination of platinum-group element and gold in large amounts of ultrabasic rocks from the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe.

  16. Rhodium-catalyzed cascade oxidative annulation leading to substituted naphtho[1,8-bc]pyrans by sequential cleavage of C(sp2)-H/C(sp3)-H and C(sp2)-H/O-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xing; Liu, Bingxian; Li, Xiangyu; Li, Bin; Xu, Shansheng; Song, Haibin; Wang, Baiquan

    2012-10-01

    The cascade oxidative annulation reactions of benzoylacetonitrile with internal alkynes proceed efficiently in the presence of a rhodium catalyst and a copper oxidant to give substituted naphtho[1,8-bc]pyrans by sequential cleavage of C(sp(2))-H/C(sp(3))-H and C(sp(2))-H/O-H bonds. These cascade reactions are highly regioselective with unsymmetrical alkynes. Experiments reveal that the first-step reaction proceeds by sequential cleavage of C(sp(2))-H/C(sp(3))-H bonds and annulation with alkynes, leading to 1-naphthols as the intermediate products. Subsequently, 1-naphthols react with alkynes by cleavage of C(sp(2))-H/O-H bonds, affording the 1:2 coupling products. Moreover, some of the naphtho[1,8-bc]pyran products exhibit intense fluorescence in the solid state. PMID:22989331

  17. 2-(Methylamido)pyridine-Borane: A Tripod κ(3)-N,H,H Ligand in Trigonal Bipyramidal Rhodium(I) and Iridium(I) Complexes with an Asymmetric Coordination of Its BH3 Group.

    PubMed

    Brugos, Javier; Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique; Van der Maelen, Juan F

    2016-09-01

    The complexes [M(κ(3)-N,H,H-mapyBH3)(cod)] (M = Rh, Ir; HmapyBH3 = 2-(methylamino)pyridine-borane; cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), which contain a novel anionic tripod ligand coordinated to the metal atom through the amido N atom and through two H atoms of the BH3 group, were prepared by treating the corresponding [M2(μ-Cl)2(cod)2] (M = Rh, Ir) precursor with K[mapyBH3]. X-ray diffraction studies and a theoretical Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis of their electron density confirmed that the metal atoms of both complexes are in a very distorted trigonal bipyramidal coordination environment, in which two equatorial sites are asymmetrically spanned by the H-B-H fragment. While both 3c-2e BH-M interactions are more κ(1)-H (terminal σ coordination of the B-H bond) than κ(2)-H,B (agostic-type coordination of the B-H bond), one BH-M interaction is more agostic than the other, and this difference is more marked in the iridium complex than in the rhodium one. This asymmetry is not evident in solution, where the cod ligand and the BH3 group of these molecules participate in two concurrent dynamic processes of low activation energies (variable-temperature NMR and density functional theory studies), namely, a rotation of the cod ligand that interchanges its two alkene fragments (through a square pyramidal transition state) and a rotation of the BH3 group about the B-N bond that equilibrates the three B-H bonds (through a square planar transition state). While the cod rotation has similar activation energy in 2 and 3, the barrier to the BH3 group rotation is higher in the iridium complex than in the rhodium one. PMID:27518763

  18. 2-(Methylamido)pyridine-Borane: A Tripod κ(3)-N,H,H Ligand in Trigonal Bipyramidal Rhodium(I) and Iridium(I) Complexes with an Asymmetric Coordination of Its BH3 Group.

    PubMed

    Brugos, Javier; Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique; Van der Maelen, Juan F

    2016-09-01

    The complexes [M(κ(3)-N,H,H-mapyBH3)(cod)] (M = Rh, Ir; HmapyBH3 = 2-(methylamino)pyridine-borane; cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), which contain a novel anionic tripod ligand coordinated to the metal atom through the amido N atom and through two H atoms of the BH3 group, were prepared by treating the corresponding [M2(μ-Cl)2(cod)2] (M = Rh, Ir) precursor with K[mapyBH3]. X-ray diffraction studies and a theoretical Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis of their electron density confirmed that the metal atoms of both complexes are in a very distorted trigonal bipyramidal coordination environment, in which two equatorial sites are asymmetrically spanned by the H-B-H fragment. While both 3c-2e BH-M interactions are more κ(1)-H (terminal σ coordination of the B-H bond) than κ(2)-H,B (agostic-type coordination of the B-H bond), one BH-M interaction is more agostic than the other, and this difference is more marked in the iridium complex than in the rhodium one. This asymmetry is not evident in solution, where the cod ligand and the BH3 group of these molecules participate in two concurrent dynamic processes of low activation energies (variable-temperature NMR and density functional theory studies), namely, a rotation of the cod ligand that interchanges its two alkene fragments (through a square pyramidal transition state) and a rotation of the BH3 group about the B-N bond that equilibrates the three B-H bonds (through a square planar transition state). While the cod rotation has similar activation energy in 2 and 3, the barrier to the BH3 group rotation is higher in the iridium complex than in the rhodium one.

  19. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  20. Synthesis and sup 31 P NMR spectroscopy of trinuclear, phosphido-bridged iridium and rhodium clusters. Crystal and molecular structures of (M sub 3 (. mu. -PPh sub 2 ) sub 3 (CO) sub n L sub 2 ) (M = Ir or Rh, n = 3, L sub 2 = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane: M = Ir, n = 5, L = t-BuNC)

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.E.; Browning, J.; Dehghan, K.; Dixon, K.R.; Meanwell, N.J.; Phillips, A.J. )

    1991-02-06

    Reaction of (Ir{sub 2}(cyclooctene){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}) with CO, NHEt{sub 2}, and PHPh{sub 2} provides a synthetic route to the trinuclear, phosphido-bridged iridium clusters (Ir{sub 3}({mu}-PPh{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO){sub n}L{sub 2}) (n = 3, L = CO or PPh{sub 3}, L{sub 2} = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm); n = 5, L = t-BuNC). The CO and PPh{sub 3} complexes are analogues of previously known rhodium derivatives, and rhodium analogues of the dppm and t-BuNC complexes are also reported. The crystal structure of both the Ir and Rh complexes was determined and are reported. The molecular structure was also determined. Complete analyses of the {sup 31}P NMR spectra of the prepared complexes are also reported.

  1. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  2. [Patch-testing methods: additional specialised or additional series].

    PubMed

    Cleenewerck, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The tests in the European standard battery must occasionally be supplemented by specialised or additional batteries, particularly where the contact allergy is thought to be of occupational origin. These additional batteries cover all allergens associated with various professional activities (hairdressing, baking, dentistry, printing, etc.) and with different classes of materials and chemical products (glue, plastic, rubber...). These additional tests may also include personal items used by patients on a daily basis such as cosmetics, shoes, plants, textiles and so on.

  3. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  4. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  5. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  6. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  7. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  8. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  9. Teebi hypertelorism syndrome: additional cases.

    PubMed

    Machado-Paula, Ligiane Alves; Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine

    2003-03-01

    We report on two unrelated Brazilian boys who have craniofacial and digital anomalies resembling those reported with Teebi hypertelorism syndrome. Additional features such as cleft lip and palate, large uvula, atypical chin and abnormal scapulae were observed.

  10. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  11. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  12. Extension of the standard addition method by blank addition.

    PubMed

    Steliopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Standard addition involves adding varying amounts of the analyte to sample portions of fixed mass or fixed volume and submitting those portions to the sample preparation procedure. After measuring the final extract solutions, the observed signals are linearly regressed on the spiked amounts. The original unknown amount is estimated by the opposite of the abscissa intercept of the fitted straight line [1]. A limitation of this method is that only data points with abscissa values equal to and greater than zero are available so that there is no information on whether linearity holds below the spiking level zero. An approach to overcome this limitation is introduced.•Standard addition is combined with blank addition.•Blank addition means that defined mixtures of blank matrix and sample material are subjected to sample preparation to give final extract solutions.•Equations are presented to estimate the original unknown amount and to calculate the 1-2α confidence interval about this estimate using the combined data set.

  13. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  14. Extension of the standard addition method by blank addition

    PubMed Central

    Steliopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Standard addition involves adding varying amounts of the analyte to sample portions of fixed mass or fixed volume and submitting those portions to the sample preparation procedure. After measuring the final extract solutions, the observed signals are linearly regressed on the spiked amounts. The original unknown amount is estimated by the opposite of the abscissa intercept of the fitted straight line [1]. A limitation of this method is that only data points with abscissa values equal to and greater than zero are available so that there is no information on whether linearity holds below the spiking level zero. An approach to overcome this limitation is introduced.•Standard addition is combined with blank addition.•Blank addition means that defined mixtures of blank matrix and sample material are subjected to sample preparation to give final extract solutions.•Equations are presented to estimate the original unknown amount and to calculate the 1-2α confidence interval about this estimate using the combined data set. PMID:26844210

  15. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  16. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  17. Clinical effects of sulphite additives.

    PubMed

    Vally, H; Misso, N L A; Madan, V

    2009-11-01

    Sulphites are widely used as preservative and antioxidant additives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Topical, oral or parenteral exposure to sulphites has been reported to induce a range of adverse clinical effects in sensitive individuals, ranging from dermatitis, urticaria, flushing, hypotension, abdominal pain and diarrhoea to life-threatening anaphylactic and asthmatic reactions. Exposure to the sulphites arises mainly from the consumption of foods and drinks that contain these additives; however, exposure may also occur through the use of pharmaceutical products, as well as in occupational settings. While contact sensitivity to sulphite additives in topical medications is increasingly being recognized, skin reactions also occur after ingestion of or parenteral exposure to sulphites. Most studies report a 3-10% prevalence of sulphite sensitivity among asthmatic subjects following ingestion of these additives. However, the severity of these reactions varies, and steroid-dependent asthmatics, those with marked airway hyperresponsiveness, and children with chronic asthma, appear to be at greater risk. In addition to episodic and acute symptoms, sulphites may also contribute to chronic skin and respiratory symptoms. To date, the mechanisms underlying sulphite sensitivity remain unclear, although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed. Physicians should be aware of the range of clinical manifestations of sulphite sensitivity, as well as the potential sources of exposure. Minor modifications to diet or behaviour lead to excellent clinical outcomes for sulphite-sensitive individuals.

  18. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  19. Postmarketing surveillance of food additives.

    PubMed

    Butchko, H H; Tschanz, C; Kotsonis, F N

    1994-08-01

    Postmarketing surveillance of consumption and of anecdotal reports of adverse health effects has been recognized by a number of regulatory authorities as a potentially useful method to provide further assurance of the safety of new food additives. Surveillance of consumption is used to estimate more reliably actual consumption levels relative to the acceptable daily intake of a food additive. Surveillance of anecdotal reports of adverse health effects is used to determine the presence of infrequent idiosyncratic responses that may not be predictable from premarket evaluations. The high-intensity sweetner, aspartame, is a food additive that has been the subject of extensive evaluation during the postmarketing period and is thus used as an example to discuss postmarketing surveillance.

  20. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  1. Lubricating additive for drilling muds

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, A.; Brois, S. J.; Brownawell, D. W.; Walker, T. O.

    1985-01-01

    Aqueous drilling fluids containing a minor amount of an additive composition featuring oxazolines of C/sub 1/-C/sub 30/ alkylthioglycolic acid. Such fluids are especially useful where reduced torque drilling fluids are needed. Another embodiment of this invention relates to a method of drilling utilizing the above-described fluids.

  2. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  3. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  4. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  5. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  6. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  7. Additional Financial Resources for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Ben C.

    This paper discusses the continuing need for additional educational funds and suggests that the only way to gain these funds is through concerted and persistent political efforts by supporters of education at both the federal and state levels. The author first points out that for many reasons declining enrollment may not decrease operating costs…

  8. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  9. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  10. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  11. Additive-free digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Freire, Sergio L S; Tanner, Brendan

    2013-07-16

    Digital microfluidics, a technique for manipulation of droplets, is becoming increasingly important for the development of miniaturized platforms for laboratory processes. Despite the enthusiasm, droplet motion is frequently hindered by the desorption of proteins or other analytes to surfaces. Current approaches to minimize this unwanted surface fouling involve the addition of extra species to the droplet or its surroundings, which might be problematic depending on the droplet content. Here, a new strategy is introduced to move droplets containing cells and other analytes on solid substrates, without extra moieties; in particular, droplets with bovine serum albumin could be moved at a concentration 2000 times higher than previously reported (without additives). This capability is achieved by using a soot-based superamphiphobic surface combined with a new device geometry, which favors droplet rolling. Contrasting with electrowetting, wetting forces are not required for droplet motion.

  12. Additive concentrates for distillate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A.; Lewtas, K.

    1985-08-27

    An additive concentrate for incorporation into wax containing petroleum fuel oil compositions to improve low temperature flow properties comprising an oil solution containing: 3% to 90 wt. % of a C30-C300 oil-soluble nitrogen compound wax crystal growth inhibitor having at least one straight C8-C40 alkyl chain and partial esters, and at least one mole per mole of an organic acid capable of hydrogen bonding to improve the solubility in the oil.

  13. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  14. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  15. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  16. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  17. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  18. The Mozart Effect: Additional Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R.

    2002-04-01

    After the review of the Mozart effect was published in this journal (Hughes JR. Epilepsy Behav 2001;2:369-417), additional data from the music of Haydn and Liszt have been analyzed that may account for the decrease in seizure activity originally reported during Mozart music. Even with these added data Mozart music continued to score significantly higher than the selections from the other six composers in one of the important characteristics of this music, namely, the repetition of the melody. However Haydn's values were second highest among Mozart, J. S. Bach, Wagner, Beethoven, Chopin, and Liszt.

  19. Rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of ketal-masked β-isophorone: computational explanation for the unexpected reaction evolution of the tertiary Rh-alkyl via an exocyclic β-elimination derivative.

    PubMed

    Alagona, Giuliano; Ghio, Caterina

    2015-05-28

    Ketal-masked β-isophorone (7,9,9-trimethyl-1,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]dec-7-ene) is an interesting case study of Rh-catalyzed hydroformylations not only for the competition between secondary and tertiary rhodium alkyls but also for the unexpected isomerization of the tertiary Rh-alkyl to the exocyclic olefin which undergoes hydroformylation, yielding the acetaldehyde derivative (2) of 7,9,9-trimethyl-1,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane. Although experimental results at 100 °C pointed to reaction reversibility, the reason for this kind of behavior was however obscure. A thorough density functional theory (DFT) computational investigation of the various transition states (TS) and intermediates along the reaction pathways making use of B3P86 hybrid functionals and the 6-31G* basis set, coupled to effective core potentials for Rh in the LanL2DZ valence basis set, has been carried out to shed some light on the reaction mechanism. The TS barrier heights, based on alkyl-Rh TS free energies, computed under the hypothesis of nonreversibility were in favor of a normal hydroformylation reaction (III:II = 70:30). While the endocyclic olefins produced skew or twisted arrangements of the six-membered ring similarly to the CO insertion TS that can be even higher than the alkyl-Rh ones, grid-point calculations during the potential energy surface (PES) scan produced the much more stable chair conformation for the exocyclic olefin complex. The relevant TS were found to be very favorable as well, thus explaining the preference for the exocyclic arrangement of the tertiary intermediate, for which the reaction is therefore entirely reversible and invariably proceeds to the acetaldehyde derivative (2). Conversely for the secondary isomers, the reaction is only partially reversible, thus enriching the tertiary fraction and producing the secondary aldehyde (3) in a very limited amount. PMID:25416149

  20. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  1. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  2. Ligand effects on the oxidative addition of halogens to (dpp-nacnac(R))Rh(phdi).

    PubMed

    Shaffer, David W; Ryken, Scott A; Zarkesh, Ryan A; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-11-19

    The treatment of (dpp-nacnac(R))Rh(phdi) {(dpp-nacnac(R))(-) = CH[C(R)(N-(i)Pr2C6H3)]2(-); R = CH3, CF3; phdi = 9,10-phenanthrenediimine} with X2 oxidants afforded octahedral rhodium(III) products in the case of X = Cl and Br. The octahedral complexes exhibit well-behaved cyclic voltammograms in which a two-electron reduction is observed to regenerate the initial rhodium(I) complex. When treated with I2, (dpp-nacnac(CH3))Rh(phdi) produced a square pyramidal η(1)-I2 complex, which was characterized by NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. The more electron poor complex (dpp-nacnac(CF3))Rh(phdi) reacted with I2 to give a mixture of two products that were identified by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a square pyramidal η(1)-I2 complex and an octahedral diiodide complex. Reaction of the square pyramidal (dpp-nacnac(CH3))Rh(I2)(phdi) with HBF4 resulted in protonation of the (dpp-nacnac(CH3))(-) backbone to provide an octahedral rhodium(III) diiodide species. These reactions highlight the impact that changes in the electron-withdrawing nature of the supporting ligands can have on the reactivity at the metal center.

  3. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  4. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  5. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  6. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  7. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  8. SIPSEY WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mineral surveys the Sipsey Wilderness and additions are deemed to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Although limestone, shale, and sandstone resources that occur in the area are physically suitable for a variety of uses, similar materials are available outside the area closer to transportation routes and potential markets. A small amount of coal has been identified in the area, occurring as nonpersistent beds less than 28 in. thick. Oil and (or) natural gas resources may be present if suitable structural traps exist in the subsurface. Therefore, the area has a probable oil and gas potential. Small amounts of asphaltic sandstone and limestone, commonly referred to as tar sands, may also occur in the subsurface. 5 refs.

  9. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system.

  10. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  11. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate.

  12. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  13. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  14. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  15. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting.

  16. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting. PMID:25500631

  17. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts.

  18. Evidence from bond lengths and bond angles for enneacovalence of cobalt, rhodium, iridium, iron, ruthenium, and osmium is compounds with elements of medium electronegativity

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L.

    1984-03-01

    Enneacovalence of neutral atoms can be achieved for Co, Rh, and Ir by promoting some electrons from the nd orbital to the (n + 1)s and (n + 1)p orbitals and for Fe, Ru, and Os by a similar promotion together with the addition of an electron, which may be provided by an electron pair from a singly bonded carbonyl group or other group. The bond lengths and bond angles are predicted by the theory of enneacovalence to be significantly different for the different transition metals. Recently reported experimental values are shown to be in good agreement with the predicted values, providing support for the theory of enneacovalence and the theory of hybrid spTdV bond orbitals. 48 references, 4 tables.

  19. Evidence from bond lengths and bond angles for enneacovalence of cobalt, rhodium, iridium, iron, ruthenium, and osmium in compounds with elements of medium electronegativity

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1984-01-01

    Enneacovalence of neutral atoms can be achieved for Co, Rh, and Ir by promoting some electrons from the nd orbital to the (n + 1)s and (n + 1)p orbitals and for Fe, Ru, and Os by a similar promotion together with the addition of an electron, which may be provided by an electron pair from a singly bonded carbonyl group or other group. The bond lengths and bond angles are predicted by the theory of enneacovalence to be significantly different for the different transition metals. Recently reported experimental values are shown to be in good agreement with the predicted values, providing support for the theory of enneacovalence and the theory of hybrid sp3d5 bond orbitals. PMID:16593439

  20. The Simplest Amino-borane H2 B=NH2 Trapped on a Rhodium Dimer: Pre-Catalysts for Amine-Borane Dehydropolymerization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Beattie, Nicholas A; Pike, Sebastian D; Macgregor, Stuart A; Weller, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    The μ-amino-borane complexes [Rh2 (L(R) )2 (μ-H)(μ-H2 B=NHR')][BAr(F) 4 ] (L(R) =R2 P(CH2 )3 PR2 ; R=Ph, (i) Pr; R'=H, Me) form by addition of H3 B⋅NMeR'H2 to [Rh(L(R) )(η(6) -C6 H5 F)][BAr(F) 4 ]. DFT calculations demonstrate that the amino-borane interacts with the Rh centers through strong Rh-H and Rh-B interactions. Mechanistic investigations show that these dimers can form by a boronium-mediated route, and are pre-catalysts for amine-borane dehydropolymerization, suggesting a possible role for bimetallic motifs in catalysis. PMID:27100775

  1. Catalytic reduction of NO by CO over rhodium catalysts. 2. Effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondarides, D.I.; Chafik, T.; Verykios, X.E.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed during reduction of NO by CO over Rh/TiO{sub 2} catalysts has been examined employing FTIR and transient MS techniques. It has been found that the activity of Rh is hindered by accumulation of surface oxygen originating from NO decomposition and gas-phase oxygen in the feed. Adsorbed CO and reduced TiO{sub 2{minus}x} species in the vicinity of Rh particles act as oxygen atom scavengers and, under fuel-rich conditions, remove atomic oxygen from the surface and restore the catalytic properties. Results of the present study provide additional evidence that production of N{sub 2} is related to dissociation of adsorbed Rh-NO{sup {minus}} while production of N{sub 2}O is related to the presence of Rh(NO){sub 2}. The presence of reduced RH{sup 0} sites is necessary for the formation of both reduction products. In the absence of oxygen in the feed, surface isocyanate species are also observed under reaction conditions. Their formation requires the presence of adjacent Rh{sup 0}-CO and reduced Rh{sup 0} sites. Although these species are favored under conditions in which NO conversion to reduction products is observed, there is no evidence that they are catalytically active species.

  2. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  3. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  4. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  5. Effects of irradiation and annealing on deep levels in rhodium-doped p-GaAs grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, Nazir A.; Qurashi, Umar S.; Iqbal, M. Zafar

    2011-06-01

    This paper reports a detailed study of the effects of irradiation and thermal annealing on deep levels in Rh-doped p-type GaAs grown by low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition, using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. It is found upon irradiation with alpha particles that, in addition to the radiation-induced defect peaks, all the Rh-related peaks observed in majority, as well as minority-carrier emission DLTS scans show an increase in their respective concentrations. The usually observed α-induced defects Hα1, Hα2, and Hα3 are found to have lower introduction rates in Rh-doped samples, as compared to reference samples (not doped with Rh). Alpha-irradiation has been found to decompose the two minority carrier emitting bands (one at low temperature ˜150 K and the other at ˜380 K) observed prior to irradiation into distinct peaks corresponding to deep levels Rh1 and Rh2 and EL2 and Rh3, respectively. A similar effect is also observed for the majority-carrier emitting band composed of hole emission from deep levels RhA and RhB, which separate out well upon irradiation. Further, from the double-correlation DLTS measurements, the emission rates of carriers from the radiation-enhanced peaks corresponding to deep levels Rh1, Rh2, Rh3, and RhC were found to be dependent on junction electric field. For RhC, the field dependence data have been analyzed in terms of the Poole-Frenkel model employing a 3-dimensional Coulomb potential with q = 2e (electronic charge). Temperature dependence of the hole capture cross-sections of the levels RhA and RhC was also studied quantitatively. The observed dependence of the hole capture cross-section of RhC on temperature can be interpreted in terms of multiphonon capture model, yielding a capture barrier of 0.2 eV and σ(∞) = 2.3 × 10-14 cm2. The results of irradiation and isochronal thermal annealing study, in combination with the theoretical analysis of the field dependence of hole emission data

  6. Dinuclear iridium and rhodium complexes with bridging arylimidazolide-N(3),C(2) ligands: synthetic, structural, reactivity, electrochemical and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Ruhlmann, Laurent; Gisselbrecht, Jean-Paul; Choua, Sylvie; Orio, Maylis; Wesolek, Marcel; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2015-10-21

    Deprotonation of 1-arylimidazoles (aryl = mesityl (Mes), 2,6-diisopropylphenyl (Dipp)), with n-butyl lithium afforded the corresponding derivatives (1-aryl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)lithium (1a, Ar = Mes; 1b, Ar = Dipp) in good yield. Reaction of 1a with 0.5 equiv. of [Ir(cod)(μ-Cl)]2 yielded two geometrical isomers of a doubly C2,N3-bridged dinuclear complex [Ir(cod){μ-C3H2N2(Mes)-κC2,κN3}]2 (3), 3H-H, a head-to-head (H-H) isomer of CS symmetry, and 3H-T, the thermodynamically preferred head-to-tail (H-T) isomer of C2 symmetry. The metallated carbon of the 4 electron donor anionic bridging ligands has some carbene character, reminiscent of the situation in N-metallated protic NHC complexes. Displacement of cod ligands from 3H-H and 3H-T afforded the tetracarbonyl complexes [Ir(CO)2{μ-C3H2N2(Mes)-κC2,κN3}]24H-H and 4H-T, respectively. The reaction with PMe3, which gave only one complex, [Ir(CO)(PMe3){μ-C3H2N2(Mes)-κC2,κN3}]2 (5), demonstrates that the isomerization of the central core Ir[μ-C3H2N2(Mes)-κC2,κN3]2Ir from H-H to H-T on going from 4H-H to 5 is readily triggered by phosphine substitution under mild conditions. Oxidative-addition of MeI to 5 afforded the formally metal-metal bonded d(7)-d(7) complex [Ir2(CO)2(PMe3)2(Me)I{μ-C3H2N2(Mes)-κC2,κN3}2] (6). The blue [Ir(C2H4)2{μ-C3H2N2(Mes)-κC2,κN3}]2 (7) and purple [Rh(C2H4)2{μ-C3H2N2(Dipp)-κC2,κN3}]2 (9) tetraethylene complexes were also obtained with only a H-T arrangement of the bridging ligands. Although only modestly efficient in alkane dehydrogenation, complex 7 was found to be a more active pre-catalyst than 3H-T, 4H-T and 5, probably because of the favorable lability of the ethylene ligands. From cyclic voltammetry, exhaustive coulometry and spectroelectrochemistry studies, it was concluded that 3H-T undergoes a metal-based one electron oxidation to generate the mixed-valent Ir(i)/Ir(ii) system. The energy of the intervalence band for the orange dirhodium complex [Rh(cod){μ-C3H2N2(Mes

  7. Carbon-yl{3,3'-di-tert-butyl-5,5'-dimeth-oxy-2,2'-bis-[(4,4,5,5-tetra-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospho-lan-2-yl)-oxy]biphenyl-κ(2) P,P'}hydrido(triphenyl-phosphane-κP)rhodium(I) diethyl ether tris-olvate.

    PubMed

    Selent, Detlef; Spannenberg, Anke; Börner, Armin

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, [RhH(C74H68O8P2)(C18H15P)(CO)]·3C4H10O, the CHP3 coordination set at the Rh(I) ion is arranged in a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry with the P atoms adopting equatorial coordination sites and the C atom of the carbonyl ligand as well as the H atom adopting the axial sites. The asymmetric unit contains two very similar mol-ecules of the rhodium complex, two half-occupied diethyl ether mol-ecules and further diethyl ether solvent mol-ecules which could not be modelled successfully. Therefore contributions of the latter were removed from the diffraction data using the SQUEEZE procedure in PLATON [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148-155]. PMID:23476316

  8. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  9. A quantum chemical study of the mechanisms of olefin addition to group 9 transition metal dioxo compounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Issahaku; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic aspects of ethylene addition to MO2(CH2)(CH3) (M=Co, Rh, Ir) have been investigated with a Hartree-Fock/DFT hybrid functional at the MO6/LACVP* and B3LYP/LACVP* levels of theory to elucidate the reaction pathways on the singlet, doublet and triplet potential energy surfaces (PES). In the reaction of the IrO2CH2CH3 complex with ethylene, [3 + 2]C,O addition is the most plausible pathway on the singlet PES, the [3 + 2]O,O addition is the most favoured pathway on the doublet surface whiles the stepwise [1 + 1] addition involving the oxygen atom of the complex in the first step and the carbon atom of the complex in the second step is the most plausible pathway on the triplet PES. For the reaction of the RhO2(CH2)(CH3) complex, the [2 + 2]Rh,O addition pathway is the most favoured on the singlet surface, the [2 + 2]Rh,C is the most plausible pathway on the triplet PES and [3 + 2]C,O is the most plausible on the doublet surface. For the reactions of the CoO2(CH2)(CH3) complex, the [1 + 2]O addition is the most plausible on the singlet PES, [3 + 2]C=Co=O cycloaddition to form the five-membered intermediate is the most preferred pathway on the doublet PES, whiles on the triplet PES the preferred pathway is the [3 + 2] addition across the O=Co=O bond of the metal complex. The reactions of olefins with the Co dioxo complex have lower activation barriers for the preferred [3 + 2] and [2 + 2] addition pathways as well as fewer side reactions than those of the rhodium and iridium systems. This could imply that the cobalt dioxo complexes can efficiently and selectively catalyze specific reactions in oxidation of olefins than Rh and Ir oxo complexes will do and therefore Co oxo complexes may be better catalysts for specific oxidation reactions of olefins than Rh and Ir complexes are. The activation barriers for the formation of the four-or five-membered metallacycle intermediates through [2 + 2] or [3 + 2] cyclo-addition are lower on the

  10. Orthometalation of dibenzo[1,2]quinoxaline with ruthenium(II/III), osmium(II/III/IV), and rhodium(III) ions and orthometalated [RuNO](6/7) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Maity, Suvendu; Kundu, Suman; Saha Roy, Amit; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2015-02-16

    A new family of organometallics of ruthenium(II/III), osmium(II/III/IV), and rhodium(III) ions isolated from C-H activation reactions of dibenzo[1,2]quinoxaline (DBQ) using triphenylphosphine, carbonyl, and halides as coligands is reported. The CN-chelate complexes isolated are trans-[Ru(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (1), trans-[Ru(II)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Cl] (2), trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Br2] (3), trans-[Os(II)(DBQ)(PPh3)2(CO)Br] (4), and trans-[Rh(III)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (5). Reaction of 1 with NO affords trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PPh3)2Cl]Cl (6(+)Cl(-)), isoelectronic to 2, with a byproduct, [Ru(NO)(PPh3)2Cl3] (7). Complexes 1-5 and 6(+) were characterized by elemental analyses, mass, IR, NMR, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra including the single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1-3 and 5. The Ru(III)-C, Ru(II)-C, Os(III)-C, and Rh(III)-C lengths are 2.049(2), 2.074(3), 2.105(16), and 2.012(3) Å in 1, 2, 3, and 5. In cyclic voltammetry, 2, 3, and 4 undergo oxidation at 0.59, 0.39, and 0.46 V, versus Fc(+)/Fc couple, to trans-[Ru(III)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Cl](+) (2(+)), trans-[Os(IV)(DBQ)(PPh3)2Br2](+) (3(+)), and trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(CO)(PPh3)2Br](+) (4(+)) ions. Complex 3(+) incorporates an Os(IV)(d(4) ion)-C bond. The 6(+)/trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PPh3)2Cl] (6) reduction couple at -0.65 V is reversible. 2(+), 3(+), 4(+) and 6 were substantiated by spectroelectrochemical measurements, EPR spectra, and density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. The frozen-glass EPR spectrum of the electrogenerated 6 exhibits hyperfine couplings due to (99,101)Ru and (14)N nuclei. DFT calculations on trans-[Os(III)(DBQ)(PMe3)2Br2] (3(Me)), St = 1/2 and trans-[Os(IV)(DBQ)(PMe3)2Br2](+) (3(Me+)), St = 0, trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PMe3)2Cl](+) (6(Me+)), St = 0 and trans-[Ru(DBQ)(NO)(PMe3)2Cl] (6(Me)), St = 1/2, authenticated a significant mixing between dOs and πaromatic* orbitals, which stabilizes M(II/III/IV)-C bonds and the [RuNO](6) and [RuNO](7) states

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  12. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  13. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  14. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  15. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  16. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  17. [Safety of food additives in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ito, Sumio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many accidents relating to food happened in Japan. The consumer's distrust for food, food companies, and the administration is increasing. The consumer especially has an extreme refusal feeling for chemicals such as food additives and agricultural chemicals, and begins to request agricultural chemical-free vegetables and food additive-free food. Food companies also state no agricultural chemicals and no food additives to correspond with consumers' request and aim at differentiating. The food additive is that the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare specifies the one that person's health might not be ruined by providing for Food Sanitation Law Article 10 in our country. The standard for food additives and standard for use of food additives are provided according to regulations of Food Sanitation Law Article 11. Therefore, it is thought that the food additive used is safe now. Then, it reports on the procedure and the safety examination, etc. in our country for designation for food additive this time.

  18. 42 CFR 412.115 - Additional payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Payment Systems § 412.115 Additional payments. (a) Bad debts. An additional payment is made to each hospital in accordance with § 413.89 of this chapter for bad debts attributable to deductible...

  19. 42 CFR 412.115 - Additional payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Payment Systems § 412.115 Additional payments. (a) Bad debts. An additional payment is made to each hospital in accordance with § 413.89 of this chapter for bad debts attributable to deductible...

  20. 42 CFR 412.115 - Additional payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Payment Systems § 412.115 Additional payments. (a) Bad debts. An additional payment is made to each hospital in accordance with § 413.89 of this chapter for bad debts attributable to deductible...

  1. 17 CFR 230.408 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional information. 230... RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General Requirements § 230.408 Additional information. (a) In addition to the information expressly required to be included in a registration statement,...

  2. 17 CFR 230.408 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional information. 230... RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General Requirements § 230.408 Additional information. (a) In addition to the information expressly required to be included in a registration statement,...

  3. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  4. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The... activity to submit additional information....

  5. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  6. 10 CFR 725.13 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional information. 725.13 Section 725.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Applications § 725.13 Additional information. The... and before the termination of the permit, require additional information in order to enable the...

  7. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  8. 20 CFR 802.215 - Additional briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional briefs. 802.215 Section 802.215 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview Procedures Initial Processing § 802.215 Additional briefs. Additional briefs may be filed or ordered in...

  9. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  10. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  11. 77 FR 53180 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/15/2012 (77 FR 35942-35944) and 6/29/2012 (77 FR 38775-38776), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  12. 76 FR 35415 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 4/29/2011 (76 FR 23998), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  13. 78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/30/2012 (77 FR 71400-71401), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  14. 77 FR 31335 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On March 16, 2012 (77 FR 15736) and March 23, 2012 (77 FR 17035), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  15. 76 FR 19751 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 1/28/2011 (76 FR 5142-5143), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  16. 75 FR 4784 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/16/2009 (74 FR 58949-58950), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  17. 76 FR 23997 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 2/25/2011 (76 FR 10571), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  18. 75 FR 22745 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 10/23/2009 (74 FR 54783-54784) and 3/5/2010 (75 FR 10223-10224), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  19. 77 FR 71400 - Procurement List, Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 8/24/2012 (77 FR 51522-51523) and 10/5/2012 (77 FR 60969), the Committee... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  20. 75 FR 72815 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/4/2010 (75 FR 31768-31769) and 10/1/2010 (75 FR 60739-60740), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  1. 77 FR 59595 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 7/9/2012 (77 FR 40344-40345) and 7/20/2012 (77 FR 42701-42702), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  2. 77 FR 34025 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... INFORMATION: ] Addition On 4/132012 (77 FR 22289-22290), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  3. 78 FR 2378 - Procurement List, Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/9/2012 (77 FR 67343-67344), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  4. 76 FR 54741 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 7/8/2011 (76 FR 40342-40343), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  5. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  6. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  7. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  8. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  9. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  10. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  11. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  12. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  13. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  14. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  15. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  16. 24 CFR 964.410 - Additional definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Additional definitions. 964.410... Additional definitions. The following additional definitions apply to this subpart only: Directly assisted... assisted by a public housing agency; (2) Whose name appears on the lease; and (3) Is eighteen years of...

  17. 24 CFR 964.410 - Additional definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional definitions. 964.410... Additional definitions. The following additional definitions apply to this subpart only: Directly assisted... assisted by a public housing agency; (2) Whose name appears on the lease; and (3) Is eighteen years of...

  18. 24 CFR 964.410 - Additional definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional definitions. 964.410... Additional definitions. The following additional definitions apply to this subpart only: Directly assisted... assisted by a public housing agency; (2) Whose name appears on the lease; and (3) Is eighteen years of...

  19. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition to those established in...

  20. 44 CFR 6.81 - Additional copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional copies. 6.81... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Fees § 6.81 Additional copies. A reasonable number of additional copies shall be provided for the applicable fee to a requestor who...

  1. Rhodium-catalyzed restructuring of carbon frameworks.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Metal-catalyzed reactions involving an elementary step which cleaves a carbon-carbon bond provide unique organic transformations. Restructuring reactions recently developed in our laboratory, through which the carbon framework of a starting substance is restructured into a totally different carbon framework, are discussed, with the possibility of applying such methods to the synthesis of natural products.

  2. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-03-04

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) to demonstrate Big Area Additive Manufacturing which increases the speed of the additive manufacturing (AM) process by over 1000X, increases the size of parts by over 10X and shows a cost reduction of over 100X. ORNL worked with CI to transition the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology from a proof-of-principle (TRL 2-3) demonstration to a prototype product stage (TRL 7-8).

  3. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  4. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  5. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  6. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  7. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  8. Allergic and immunologic reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, Fatih; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul

    2013-08-01

    For centuries, food additives have been used for flavouring, colouring and extension of the useful shelf life of food, as well as the promotion of food safety. During the last 20 years, the studies implicating the additives contained in foods and medicine as a causative factor of allergic reactions have been proliferated considerably. In this review, we aimed to overview all of the food additives which were approved to consume in EU and find out how common and serious allergic reactions come into existence following the consuming of food additives.

  9. Classification of additives for organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Machui, Florian; Maisch, Philipp; Burgués-Ceballos, Ignasi; Langner, Stefan; Krantz, Johannes; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-04-27

    The use of additives to improve the performance of organic photovoltaic cells has been intensely researched in recent years. However, so far, no system has been reported for the classification of additives and their functions. In this report, a system for classifying additives according to the fundamental mechanism by which they influence microstructure formation for P3HT:PCBM is suggested. The major parameters used for their classification are solubility and drying kinetics. Both are discussed in detail and their consequences on processing are analyzed. Furthermore, a general mechanism to classify the impact of additives on structure formation is suggested and discussed for different materials relevant to organic photovoltaic devices.

  10. 15 CFR 292.6 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST EXTRAMURAL PROGRAMS MANUFACTURING EXTENSION PARTNERSHIP; INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 292.6 Additional requirements. Federal policies...

  11. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  12. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  13. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  14. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  15. 42 CFR 67.22 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 67.22 Section 67.22 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING... Research, Evaluation, Demonstration, and Dissemination Projects § 67.22 Additional conditions....

  16. 42 CFR 67.22 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional conditions. 67.22 Section 67.22 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING... Research, Evaluation, Demonstration, and Dissemination Projects § 67.22 Additional conditions....

  17. 42 CFR 67.22 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional conditions. 67.22 Section 67.22 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING... Research, Evaluation, Demonstration, and Dissemination Projects § 67.22 Additional conditions....

  18. 42 CFR 67.22 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional conditions. 67.22 Section 67.22 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING... Research, Evaluation, Demonstration, and Dissemination Projects § 67.22 Additional conditions....

  19. 42 CFR 67.22 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional conditions. 67.22 Section 67.22 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING... Research, Evaluation, Demonstration, and Dissemination Projects § 67.22 Additional conditions....

  20. 77 FR 56813 - Procurement List, Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a product and services to the Procurement List that will...

  1. 77 FR 49784 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee... Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be... connection with the services proposed for addition to the Procurement List. Comments on this...

  2. 77 FR 62220 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds products and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit...

  3. 28 CFR 80.7 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional information. 80.7 Section 80.7... § 80.7 Additional information. If an issuer's or domestic concern's submission does not contain all of the information required by § 80.6, the Department of Justice may request whatever...

  4. 25 CFR 214.5 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional information. 214.5 Section 214.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.5 Additional information. The officer in...

  5. 25 CFR 214.5 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Additional information. 214.5 Section 214.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.5 Additional information. The officer in charge may, at...

  6. 25 CFR 214.5 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional information. 214.5 Section 214.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.5 Additional information. The officer in...

  7. 25 CFR 214.5 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional information. 214.5 Section 214.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.5 Additional information. The officer in...

  8. 25 CFR 214.5 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional information. 214.5 Section 214.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.5 Additional information. The officer in...

  9. 7 CFR 958.90 - Additional parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional parties. 958.90 Section 958.90 Agriculture... Additional parties. After the effective date hereof, any handler may become a party to this agreement if a... contracting party at the time such counterpart is delivered to the Secretary, and the benefits,...

  10. 7 CFR 958.90 - Additional parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional parties. 958.90 Section 958.90 Agriculture... Additional parties. After the effective date hereof, any handler may become a party to this agreement if a... contracting party at the time such counterpart is delivered to the Secretary, and the benefits,...

  11. 40 CFR 412.47 - Additional measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Additional measures. 412.47 Section 412.47 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND... Calves § 412.47 Additional measures. (a) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must implement...

  12. 40 CFR 412.47 - Additional measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Additional measures. 412.47 Section 412.47 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND... Calves § 412.47 Additional measures. (a) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must implement...

  13. 75 FR 51444 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 6/4/2010 (75 FR 31768-31769); 6/11/2010 (75 FR 33270-33271); 6/ 18/2010 (75 FR 34701-34702); and 6/25/2010 (75 FR 36363-36371), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are... factors considered for this certification were: 1. The action will not result in any additional...

  14. 34 CFR 75.231 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How Grants Are Made Procedures to Make A Grant § 75.231 Additional information. After selecting an application for funding, the Secretary may require the applicant to submit additional information. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3 and 3474)...

  15. 34 CFR 75.231 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How Grants Are Made Procedures to Make A Grant § 75.231 Additional information. After selecting an application for funding, the Secretary may require the applicant to submit additional information. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3 and 3474)...

  16. 34 CFR 75.231 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How Grants Are Made Procedures to Make A Grant § 75.231 Additional information. After selecting an application for funding, the Secretary may require the applicant to submit additional information. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3 and 3474)...

  17. 34 CFR 75.231 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How Grants Are Made Procedures to Make A Grant § 75.231 Additional information. After selecting an application for funding, the Secretary may require the applicant to submit additional information. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3 and 3474)...

  18. 34 CFR 75.231 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How Grants Are Made Procedures to Make A Grant § 75.231 Additional information. After selecting an application for funding, the Secretary may require the applicant to submit additional information. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3 and 3474)...

  19. 7 CFR 1735.18 - Additional equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional equity. 1735.18 Section 1735.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Basic Policies § 1735.18 Additional equity. If determined by the Administrator to be necessary for...

  20. 7 CFR 1735.18 - Additional equity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional equity. 1735.18 Section 1735.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Basic Policies § 1735.18 Additional equity. If determined by the Administrator to be necessary for...

  1. 28 CFR 80.7 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional information. 80.7 Section 80.7... § 80.7 Additional information. If an issuer's or domestic concern's submission does not contain all of the information required by § 80.6, the Department of Justice may request whatever...

  2. 76 FR 82279 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    .../2011(76 FR 66913-66914), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  3. 76 FR 29210 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List... furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities....

  4. 78 FR 14999 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... 2378); and 1/18/2013 (78 FR 4133-4134), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  5. 77 FR 77038 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and a service to the Procurement List that will...

  6. 76 FR 34064 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List... nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other severe disabilities. Comments Must...

  7. 77 FR 29596 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the... that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other...

  8. 42 CFR 52e.9 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 52e.9 Section 52e.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.9 Additional conditions. The...

  9. Working Memory and Children's Mental Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, John W.; Hitch, Graham J.

    1997-01-01

    Two experiments investigated extent to which English- and German-speaking childrens' mental arithmetic was constrained by working memory. Found higher mental addition spans when numbers were visible throughout calculation than when not. Variation in addition span with age and arithmetical operation difficulty approximated to a linear function of…

  10. 15 CFR 292.6 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional requirements. 292.6 Section 292.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... PARTNERSHIP; INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 292.6 Additional requirements. Federal policies...

  11. 15 CFR 292.6 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional requirements. 292.6 Section 292.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... PARTNERSHIP; INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 292.6 Additional requirements. Federal policies...

  12. 15 CFR 292.6 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional requirements. 292.6 Section 292.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... PARTNERSHIP; INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 292.6 Additional requirements. Federal policies...

  13. 15 CFR 292.6 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional requirements. 292.6 Section 292.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE... PARTNERSHIP; INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS § 292.6 Additional requirements. Federal policies...

  14. 75 FR 36362 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 1/22/2010 (75 FR 3714); 3/19/2010 (75 FR 13263-13264); 4/9/2010 (75 FR 18164-18165); and 4/30/2010 (75 FR 22744-22745), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published notices of proposed additions to the Procurement List. Glove, Mechanic's...

  15. 77 FR 27737 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be provided...

  16. 78 FR 67129 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... 8/23/2013 (78 FR 52512-52513), 8/30/2013 (78 FR 53734), and 9/6/ 2013 (78 FR 54871), the Committee... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  17. 75 FR 4783 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add to the Procurement List products and services to be...

  18. 77 FR 70737 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement List that will be furnished...

  19. 75 FR 3714 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the procurement list. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add to the Procurement List a product and a service to be...

  20. 76 FR 38641 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will...

  1. 76 FR 41767 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a product and services to the Procurement List that will...

  2. 76 FR 59117 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will...

  3. 78 FR 40727 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and a service to the Procurement List that will...

  4. 75 FR 69639 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by...

  5. 78 FR 52512 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and a service to the Procurement List that will...

  6. 76 FR 75536 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by...

  7. 75 FR 34701 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will...

  8. 77 FR 37658 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Revision On 5/25/2012 (77 FR 31335-31336), the Committee for Purchase From People Who... addition must be received on or before June 25, 2012. Additions On 4/13/2012 (77 FR 22289-22290) and 4/20/2012 (77 FR 23665-23666), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely...

  9. 78 FR 53734 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement List that will be furnished by...

  10. 76 FR 26279 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be provided...

  11. 77 FR 69598 - Procurement List Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed addition to the procurement list. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by...

  12. 76 FR 72908 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and a service to the Procurement List that will...

  13. 78 FR 34351 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... (78 FR 21916), the Committee for Purchase from People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled published... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  14. 75 FR 2510 - Procurement List: Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List: Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add to the Procurement List services to be provided by...

  15. 77 FR 27736 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 9/23/2011 (76 FR 59117-59118); 3/9/2012 (77 FR 14352-14353); and 3/16/2012 (77 FR 15736), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase...

  16. 78 FR 40727 - Procurement List Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... (78 FR 25970-25971), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  17. 75 FR 60739 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the procurement list. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be provided...

  18. 76 FR 14943 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement List that will be furnished by...

  19. 75 FR 62370 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... PEOPLE WHO AREBLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products and services to the Procurement List that will...

  20. 78 FR 50040 - Procurement List, Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be provided...