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Sample records for rhodopsin kinase gene

  1. Characterization and chromosomal localization of the gene for human rhodopsin kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Yamamoto, S.; Dryja, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    G-protein-dependent receptor kinases (GRKs) play a key role in the adapatation of receptors to persistent stimuli. In rod photoreceptors rhodopsin kinase (RK) mediates rapid densensitization of rod photoreceptors to light by catalyzing phosphorylation of the visual pigment rhodopsin. To study the structure and mechanism of FRKs in human photoreceptors, we have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones derived from the human RK locus using a bovine rhodopsin kinase cDNA fragment as a probe. The RK locus, assigned to chromosome 13 band q34, is composed of seven exons that encode a protein 92% identical in amino acid sequence to bovine rhodopsin kinase. The marked difference between the structure of this gene and that of another recently clone human GRK gene suggests the existence of a wide evolutionary gap between members of the GRK gene family. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Binding of rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues to transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Nelson A; Sanz-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Bubis, José

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction of reconstituted rhodopsin, 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin and 13-cis-retinal-rhodopsin with transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1. METHODS: Rod outer segments (ROS) were isolated from bovine retinas. Following bleaching of ROS membranes with hydroxylamine, rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues were generated with the different retinal isomers and the concentration of the reconstituted pigments was calculated from their UV/visible absorption spectra. Transducin and arrestin-1 were purified to homogeneity by column chromatography, and an enriched-fraction of rhodopsin kinase was obtained by extracting freshly prepared ROS in the dark. The guanine nucleotide binding activity of transducin was determined by Millipore filtration using β,γ-imido-(3H)-guanosine 5’-triphosphate. Recognition of the reconstituted pigments by rhodopsin kinase was determined by autoradiography following incubation of ROS membranes containing the various regenerated pigments with partially purified rhodopsin kinase in the presence of (γ-32P) ATP. Binding of arrestin-1 to the various pigments in ROS membranes was determined by a sedimentation assay analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: Reconstituted rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal rendered an absorption spectrum showing a maximum peak at 498 nm, 486 nm and about 467 nm, respectively, in the dark; which was shifted to 380 nm, 404 nm and about 425 nm, respectively, after illumination. The percentage of reconstitution of rhodopsin and the rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal was estimated to be 88%, 81% and 24%, respectively. Although only residual activation of transducin was observed in the dark when reconstituted rhodopsin and 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin was used, the rhodopsin analogue containing the 13-cis isomer of retinal was capable of activating transducin independently of light. Moreover

  3. Characterization and mapping of the human rhodopsin kinase gene and screening of the gene for mutations in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Lin, D.; Magovcevic, I.

    1994-09-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a cytosolic enzyme in rod photoreceptors that initiates the deactivation of the phototransductions cascade by phosphorylating photoactivated rhodopsin. Although the cDNA sequence of bovine RK has been determined previously, no human cDNA or genomic sequence has thus far been available for genetic studies. In order to investigate the possible role of this candidate gene in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and allied diseases, we have isolated and characterized human cDNA and genomic clones derived from the RK locus. The coding sequence of the human gene is 1692 nucleotides in length and is split into seven exons. The human and the bovine sequence show 84% identity at the nucleotide level and 92% identity at the amino acid level. Thus far, the intronic sequences flanking each exon except for one have been determined. We have also mapped the human RK gene to chromosome 13q34 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. To our knowledge, no RP gene has as yet been linked to this region. However, since the substrate for RK (rhodopsin) and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RP, it is conceivable that defects in RK can also cause some forms of this disease. We are evaluating this possibility by screening DNA from 173 patients with autosomal recessive RP and 190 patients with autosomal dominant RP. So far, we have found 11 patients with variant bands. In one patient with autosomal dominant RP we discovered the missense change Ser536Leu. Cosegregation studies and further sequencing of the variant bands are currently underway.

  4. The receptor kinase family: primary structure of rhodopsin kinase reveals similarities to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W; Inglese, J; Palczewski, K; Onorato, J J; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1991-01-01

    Light-dependent deactivation of rhodopsin as well as homologous desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptors involves receptor phosphorylation that is mediated by the highly specific protein kinases rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK), respectively. We report here the cloning of a complementary DNA for RK. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology to beta ARK. In a phylogenetic tree constructed by comparing the catalytic domains of several protein kinases, RK and beta ARK are located on a branch close to, but separate from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C subfamilies. From the common structural features we conclude that both RK and beta ARK are members of a newly delineated gene family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor kinases that may function in diverse pathways to regulate the function of such receptors. Images PMID:1656454

  5. Monomeric Rhodopsin Is Sufficient for Normal Rhodopsin Kinase (GRK1) Phosphorylation and Arrestin-1 Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Bayburt, Timothy H.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; McLean, Mark A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Huang, Chih-chin; Tesmer, John J. G.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization has been observed in a wide variety of experimental contexts, but the functional significance of this phenomenon at different stages of the life cycle of class A GPCRs remains to be elucidated. Rhodopsin (Rh), a prototypical class A GPCR of visual transduction, is also capable of forming dimers and higher order oligomers. The recent demonstration that Rh monomer is sufficient to activate its cognate G protein, transducin, prompted us to test whether the same monomeric state is sufficient for rhodopsin phosphorylation and arrestin-1 binding. Here we show that monomeric active rhodopsin is phosphorylated by rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) as efficiently as rhodopsin in the native disc membrane. Monomeric phosphorylated light-activated Rh (P-Rh*) in nanodiscs binds arrestin-1 essentially as well as P-Rh* in native disc membranes. We also measured the affinity of arrestin-1 for P-Rh* in nanodiscs using a fluorescence-based assay and found that arrestin-1 interacts with monomeric P-Rh* with low nanomolar affinity and 1:1 stoichiometry, as previously determined in native disc membranes. Thus, similar to transducin activation, rhodopsin phosphorylation by GRK1 and high affinity arrestin-1 binding only requires a rhodopsin monomer. PMID:20966068

  6. Mitogen-associated protein kinase- and protein kinase A-dependent regulation of rhodopsin promoter expression in zebrafish rod photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Jiang; Gao, Yan; Willis, Callie L; Li, Ping; Tiano, Joseph P; Nakamura, Paul A; Hyde, David R; Li, Lei

    2007-02-15

    Mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent signal transductions play important roles in the regulation of gene expression. Both MAPK and PKA pathways can be activated by light exposure. In this study, we investigated the effect of light on MAPK and PKA signal transduction and their roles in the regulation of rhodopsin promoter expression by using transgenic zebrafish [Tg(rhod::GFP)]. The Tg(rhod::GFP) fish express short half-life GFP that is under the transcriptional control of the zebrafish rhodopsin promoter and can therefore be used for in vivo studies of rhodopsin gene transcription in live cells. Blue light plays a role in the regulation of rhodopsin promoter expression via an MAPK-mediated signal transduction cascade. Blue light excites cryptochromes (CRY), which activate the downstream PKC-dependent MAPK signal pathway. White light, on the other hand, regulates rhodopsin promoter expression via a G-protein-coupled cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. White light promotes dopamine release in the retina, which activates dopamine receptors and the downstream PKA pathway. Blocking MAPK signaling diminishes the blue light-induced increases in rhodopsin promoter expression, but this treatment has no effect on white light-mediated rhodopsin promoter expression. Conversely, blocking the PKA pathway diminishes the white light-induced rhodopsin promoter expression but does not affect rhodopsin promoter expression regulated by blue light. Together, the data suggest that MAPK and PKA regulate rhodopsin transcription through parallel signal transduction pathways.

  7. Rhodopsin Kinase Activity in the Mammalian Pineal Gland and Other Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Robert L.; Klein, David C.

    1984-10-01

    Rhodopsin kinase, an enzyme involved in photochemical transduction in the retina, has been found in the mammalian pineal gland in amounts equal to those in the retina; other tissues had 7 percent of this amount, or less. This finding suggests that, in mammals, rhodopsin kinase functions in the pineal gland and other tissues to phosphorylate rhodopsin-like integral membrane receptors and is thereby involved in signal transduction.

  8. Interaction of rhodopsin, G-protein and kinase in octopus photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Hirata, H; Tsuda, T

    1992-12-01

    Light induced phosphorylation of octopus rhodopsin was greatly enhanced by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S), suggesting that the kinases are involved in regulating interaction between rhodopsin and G-protein. We determined phosphorylated peptides of octopus rhodopsin in the presence or absence of GTP gamma S. Possible phosphorylation sites for octopus rhodopsin enhanced by GTP gamma S were Thr329, Thr330 and/or Thr336, which suggest that the G-protein associates with cytoplasmic loops including C-terminal peptide in the seventh helix of octopus rhodopsin.

  9. cDNA cloning and characterization of a novel squid rhodopsin kinase encoding multiple modular domains.

    PubMed

    Mayeenuddin, L H; Mitchell, J

    2001-01-01

    Rhodopsin phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms of inactivation in vertebrate and invertebrate visual signal transduction. Here we report the cDNA cloning and protein characterization of a 70-kDa squid rhodopsin kinase, SQRK. The cDNA encoding the 70-kDa protein demonstrates high sequence identity with octopus rhodopsin kinase (92%) and mammalian beta-adrenergic receptor kinases (63-65%), but only 33% similarity with bovine rhodopsin kinase, suggesting that invertebrate rhodopsin kinases may be structurally similar to beta-adrenergic receptor kinases. This cDNA encodes three distinct modular domains: RGS, S/TKc, and PH domains. The native SQRK is an eye-specific protein that is only expressed in photoreceptor cells and the optic ganglion as determined by immunoblotting. Purified SQRK is able to phosphorylate both squid and bovine rhodopsin. Squid rhodopsin phosphorylation by purified SQRK was sensitive to both Mg2+ and GTPgammaS but was insensitive to Ca2+/CaM regulation. The ability of SQRK to phosphorylate rhodopsin was totally lost in the presence of SQRK-specific antibodies. Our results suggest that SQRK plays an important role in squid visual signal termination.

  10. Purification of visual arrestin from squid photoreceptors and characterization of arrestin interaction with rhodopsin and rhodopsin kinase.

    PubMed

    Swardfager, Walter; Mitchell, Jane

    2007-04-01

    Invertebrate visual signal transduction involves photoisomerization of rhodopsin, activating a guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) of the G(q) class, iG(q), which stimulates a phospholipase C, increasing intracellular Ca2+. Arrestin binding to photoactivated rhodopsin is a key mechanism of desensitization. We have previously reported the cloning of a retina-specific arrestin cDNA from Loligo pealei displaying 56-64% sequence similarity to other reported arrestin sequences. Here, we report the purification of the 55-kDa squid visual arrestin. Purified squid visual arrestin is able to inhibit light-activated GTPase activity dose-dependently in arrestin-depleted rhabdomeric membranes and associate with the membrane in a light-dependent manner. Membrane association can be partially inhibited by inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate (IP6), a soluble analog of the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. In reconstitution assays, we demonstrate arrestin phosphorylation by squid rhodopsin kinase, a novel function among the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family. Phosphorylation of purified arrestin requires squid rhodopsin kinase, membranes, light-activation, and the presence of Ca2+. This is the first large-scale purification of an invertebrate arrestin and biochemical demonstration of arrestin function in the invertebrate visual system.

  11. Photochemical chromophore isomerization in histidine kinase rhodopsin HKR1.

    PubMed

    Luck, Meike; Bruun, Sara; Keidel, Anke; Hegemann, Peter; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-04-28

    Histidine kinase rhodopsin 1 is a photoreceptor in green algae functioning as a UV-light sensor. It switches between a UV-absorbing state (Rh-UV) and a blue-absorbing state (Rh-Bl) with a protonated retinal Schiff base (RSB) cofactor in a mixture of 13-trans,15-anti and 13-cis,15-syn isomers. The present spectroscopic study now shows that cofactor-protein assembly stabilizes the protonated 13-trans,15-anti RSB isomer. Formation of the active photoswitch requires the photoinduced conversion to Rh-UV. The transitions between the Rh-Bl isomers and the deprotonated 13-cis,15-anti and 13-trans,15-syn isomers of Rh-UV proceed via multiple photoisomerizations of one or simultaneously two double bonds. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cyclic AMP-dependent activation of rhodopsin gene transcription in cultured retinal precursor cells of chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Pierre; Bernard, Marianne

    2009-07-01

    The present study describes a robust 50-fold increase in rhodopsin gene transcription by cAMP in cultured retinal precursor cells of chicken embryo. Retinal cells isolated at embryonic day 8 (E8) and cultured for 3 days in serum-supplemented medium differentiated mostly into red-sensitive cones and to a lesser degree into green-sensitive cones, as indicated by real-time RT-PCR quantification of each specific opsin mRNA. In contrast, both rhodopsin mRNA concentration and rhodopsin gene promoter activity required the presence of cAMP-increasing agents [forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)] to reach significant levels. This response was rod-specific and was sufficient to activate rhodopsin gene transcription in serum-free medium. The increase in rhodopsin mRNA levels evoked by a series of cAMP analogs suggested the response was mediated by protein kinase A, not by EPAC. Membrane depolarization by high KCl concentration also increased rhodopsin mRNA levels and this response was strongly potentiated by IBMX. The rhodopsin gene response to cAMP-increasing agents was developmentally gated between E6 and E7. Rod-specific transducin alpha subunit mRNA levels also increased up to 50-fold in response to forskolin and IBMX, while rod-specific phosphodiesterase-VI and rod arrestin transcripts increased 3- to 10-fold. These results suggest a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway may play a role in rod differentiation.

  13. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods

    PubMed Central

    Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Berry, Justin D.; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Cornwall, M. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1−/−), Arr1-deficient (Arr1−/−), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1ox) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1−/− rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1ox rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1−/− rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. PMID:27353443

  14. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. © 2016 Frederiksen et al.

  15. Squid visual arrestin: cDNA cloning and calcium-dependent phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase (SQRK).

    PubMed

    Mayeenuddin, Linnia H; Mitchell, Jane

    2003-05-01

    Arrestin binding to rhodopsin is one of the major mechanisms of termination of photoresponses in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here we report the cDNA cloning and characterization of a 48-kDa visual arrestin from squid (Loligo pealei). The cDNA encoded a protein that had 56-64% amino acid sequence similarity to reported arrestin sequences. This protein does not encode any distinct modular domains but contains five fingerprint regions that have been identified within arrestins. Antibodies raised to the recombinant arrestin protein detected arrestin expression only in the eye and recognized a doublet in photoreceptor membranes, representing unphosphorylated and phosphorylated arrestin. In squid eye membranes, arrestin was phosphorylated in a Ca2+-dependent manner and this phosphorylation was inhibited by antibodies raised against squid rhodopsin kinase, but not by inhibitors of protein kinase C or calmodulin kinase. Addition of purified squid rhodopsin kinase to washed rhabdomeric membranes resulted in phosphorylation of rhodopsin, and arrestin was also phosphorylated when calcium was present. This is the first report of a rhodopsin kinase phosphorylating an arrestin substrate, and suggests a dual role for this kinase in the inactivation of the squid visual system.

  16. A photochromic histidine kinase rhodopsin (HKR1) that is bimodally switched by ultraviolet and blue light.

    PubMed

    Luck, Meike; Mathes, Tilo; Bruun, Sara; Fudim, Roman; Hagedorn, Rolf; Tran Nguyen, Tra My; Kateriya, Suneel; Kennis, John T M; Hildebrandt, Peter; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-11-16

    Rhodopsins are light-activated chromoproteins that mediate signaling processes via transducer proteins or promote active or passive ion transport as ion pumps or directly light-activated channels. Here, we provide spectroscopic characterization of a rhodopsin from the Chlamydomonas eyespot. It belongs to a recently discovered but so far uncharacterized family of histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs). These are modular proteins consisting of rhodopsin, a histidine kinase, a response regulator, and in some cases an effector domain such as an adenylyl or guanylyl cyclase, all encoded in a single protein as a two-component system. The recombinant rhodopsin fragment, Rh, of HKR1 is a UVA receptor (λ(max) = 380 nm) that is photoconverted by UV light into a stable blue light-absorbing meta state Rh-Bl (λ(max) = 490 nm). Rh-Bl is converted back to Rh-UV by blue light. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the Rh-UV chromophore is in an unusual 13-cis,15-anti configuration, which explains why the chromophore is deprotonated. The excited state lifetime of Rh-UV is exceptionally stable, probably caused by a relatively unpolar retinal binding pocket, converting into the photoproduct within about 100 ps, whereas the blue form reacts 100 times faster. We propose that the photochromic HKR1 plays a role in the adaptation of behavioral responses in the presence of UVA light.

  17. A Photochromic Histidine Kinase Rhodopsin (HKR1) That Is Bimodally Switched by Ultraviolet and Blue Light*

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Meike; Mathes, Tilo; Bruun, Sara; Fudim, Roman; Hagedorn, Rolf; Tran Nguyen, Tra My; Kateriya, Suneel; Kennis, John T. M.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsins are light-activated chromoproteins that mediate signaling processes via transducer proteins or promote active or passive ion transport as ion pumps or directly light-activated channels. Here, we provide spectroscopic characterization of a rhodopsin from the Chlamydomonas eyespot. It belongs to a recently discovered but so far uncharacterized family of histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs). These are modular proteins consisting of rhodopsin, a histidine kinase, a response regulator, and in some cases an effector domain such as an adenylyl or guanylyl cyclase, all encoded in a single protein as a two-component system. The recombinant rhodopsin fragment, Rh, of HKR1 is a UVA receptor (λmax = 380 nm) that is photoconverted by UV light into a stable blue light-absorbing meta state Rh-Bl (λmax = 490 nm). Rh-Bl is converted back to Rh-UV by blue light. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the Rh-UV chromophore is in an unusual 13-cis,15-anti configuration, which explains why the chromophore is deprotonated. The excited state lifetime of Rh-UV is exceptionally stable, probably caused by a relatively unpolar retinal binding pocket, converting into the photoproduct within about 100 ps, whereas the blue form reacts 100 times faster. We propose that the photochromic HKR1 plays a role in the adaptation of behavioral responses in the presence of UVA light. PMID:23027869

  18. Constitutive activation of opsin: interaction of mutants with rhodopsin kinase and arrestin.

    PubMed

    Rim, J; Oprian, D D

    1995-09-19

    Mutation of Gly90, Glu113, Ala292, and Lys296 in the visual pigment rhodopsin constitutively activates the protein for activation of the G protein transducin. Three of these mutations have been shown to cause two different human diseases. Mutation of Gly90 and Ala292 results in complete night blindness, and mutation of Lys296 results in the degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa. We show here that the mutants not only constitutively activate transducin but are also constitutively activated for phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. In addition, the phosphorylated mutants are shown to bind tightly to the inhibitory protein arrestin in a reaction that quenches the activity toward transducin. Thus the same mutations that result in constitutive activation of transducin also result in constitutive phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase and binding of arrestin to inhibit the activity. This implies that the same conformational change may be responsible for activation of transducin and rhodopsin kinase. It also suggests that degeneration of photoreceptor cells in retinitis pigmentosa results indirectly from the activated state of the receptor, perhaps as a consequence of phosphorylation and persistent binding of arrestin.

  19. The two parallel photocycles of the Chlamydomonas sensory photoreceptor histidine kinase rhodopsin 1.

    PubMed

    Luck, Meike; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs) belong to a class of unexplored sensory photoreceptors that share a similar modular architecture. The light sensing rhodopsin domain is covalently linked to signal-transducing modules and in some cases to a C-terminal guanylyl-cyclase effector. In spite of their wide distribution in unicellular organisms, very little is known about their physiological role and mechanistic functioning. We investigated the photochemical properties of the recombinant rhodopsin-fragment of Cr-HKR1 originating from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our spectroscopic studies revealed an unusual thermal stability of the photoproducts with the deprotonated retinal Schiff base (RSB). Upon UV-irradiation these Rh-UV states with maximal absorbance in the UVA-region (Rh-UV) photochemically convert to stable blue light absorbing rhodopsin (Rh-Bl) with protonated chromophore. The heterogeneity of the sample is based on two parallel photocycles with the chromophore in C15=N-syn- or -anti-configuration. This report represents an attempt to decipher the underlying reaction schemes and interconversions of the two coexisting photocycles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. The rhodopsin gene of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: sequence and spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, J; Morris, A G; Hunt, D M

    1998-08-01

    The cephalopod molluscs are a group of invertebrates that occupy a wide range of oceanic photic environments. They are an ideal group of animals, therefore, in which to study the evolution of rhodopsin. The cDNA sequence of the rhodopsin gene of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis (L.) (Sub-class Coleoidea, Order Sepiida) is presented, together with an analysis of the structure of the gene. A proline-rich C terminus is present; this structure is characteristic of cephalopod rhodopsins. In common with all invertebrate opsins studied so far, the equivalent site to the counterion in vertebrate opsins is occupied by an aromatic amino acid. An intron is present that splits codon 107, in contrast to the intronless rhodopsin gene in two species of myopsid squid. A spectral tuning model involving substitutions at only three amino acid sites is proposed for the spectral shifts between the rhodopsins of Sepia officinalis, three species of squid and Paroctopus defleini.

  1. Computer Molecular Dynamics Studies on Protein Structures (Visual Pigment Rhodopsin and Cyclin-Dependent Kinases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T.

    2007-05-01

    Based on the computer molecular dynamics (MD) calculations we have simulated for the visual pigment rhodopsin and cyclin-dependent kinase proteins the dynamical and structural properties at reliable physiological temperatures and conditions. MD simulations are carried out on the rhodopsin protein to investigate the conformational changes of the protein in relation to the inclusion of the 11-cis chromophore retinal into consideration. It was demonstrated that the adaptation of the chromophore retinal in the opsin site causes a considerable influence on its protein binding pocket, as well as on conformations of the cytoplasmic part, but the extracelluar part of the protein shows a comparably small changes. On the basis of the simulaton results we discuss some molecular mechanisms for the rhodopsin protein function as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the dark state, i.e. for the chromophore retinal as a ligand-agonist stabilizaing the inactive conformation. The central role that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) play in the timing of cell division and repair and the high incidence of genetic alteration of CDKs or deregulation of CDK inhibitors in a number of cancers make CDC28 of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae very attractive model for studies of mechanisms of CDK regulation. The crystal structure of the human CDK2 has served as a model for the catalytic core of other CDKs, including CDC28. Nanoseconds long molecular dynamics trajectories of the CDK2/ATP complex were analyzed. The MD simulations of substitution CDK2-G16S in conserved G-loop shows an important of this amino acid and a conformational change of CDK2 structure resulting in the moving of the G-loop away from ATP and a new rearrangement of amino acids in the T-loop.

  2. Characterization of two dominant alleles of the major rhodopsin-encoding gene ninaE in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Amitavo; Kinser, Ronald; Dolph, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In this study we investigated the biochemical and cell biologic characteristics of flies expressing two novel dominant alleles of the major rhodopsin encoding gene neither inactivation nor afterpotential E (ninaE) in a heterozygous background. Methods Presence of the deep pseudopupil in flies was assayed 5 days post eclosion. For structural analysis, 1-μm-retinal cross sections were obtained from fixed and resin-embedded Drosophila heads. Confocal microscopy was performed on dissected retinas stained with antibodies specific for rhodopsin, NinaA, and F-actin. Rhodopsin levels were determined by western and slot blot analysis. Results Dominant rhodopsin mutants showed progressive age-dependent and light-independent loss of the deep pseudopupil, without any apparent retinal degeneration at the morphological level. Expression of mutant rhodopsin caused rhodopsin to mislocalize to the cell body and the endoplasmic reticulum compartment. Mutant rhodopsin also caused loss of solubility of wild-type rhodopsin and its accumulation presumably as a high molecular mass complex in the photoreceptor cell body. Conclusions In heterozygous mutant flies, there is loss of wild-type rhodopsin immunoreactivity on a western assay but less reduction using slot blot analysis. This suggests that mutant rhodopsin is likely inducing the misfolding and insolubility of wild-type rhodopsin. Localization of rhodopsin revealed that in mutant flies, wild-type rhodopsin is mislocalized to the cell body and the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22194648

  3. Bistable retinal schiff base photodynamics of histidine kinase rhodopsin HKR1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Penzkofer, Alfons; Luck, Meike; Mathes, Tilo; Hegemann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The photodynamics of the recombinant rhodopsin fragment of the histidine kinase rhodopsin HKR1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The retinal cofactor of HKR1 exists in two Schiff base forms RetA and RetB. RetA is the deprotonated 13-cis-retinal Schiff base (RSB) absorbing in the UVA spectral region. RetB is the protonated all-trans RSB absorbing in the blue spectral region. Blue light exposure converts RetB fully to RetA. UVA light exposure converts RetA to RetB and RetB to RetA giving a mixture determined by their absorption cross sections and their conversion efficiencies. The quantum efficiencies of conversion of RetA to RetB and RetB to RetA were determined to be 0.096 ± 0.005 and 0.405 ± 0.01 respectively. In the dark thermal equilibration between RetA and RetB with dominant RetA content occurred with a time constant of about 3 days at room temperature. The fluorescence emission behavior of RetA and RetB was studied, and fluorescence quantum yields of ϕ(F) (RetA) = 0.00117 and ϕ(F) (RetB) = 9.4 × 10(-5) were determined. Reaction coordinate schemes of the photodynamics are developed. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. Total synthesis of a gene for octopus rhodopsin and its preliminary expression.

    PubMed

    Harada, Y; Sakamoto, T; Shinomura, T; Takamoto, K; Senda, T; Tsuda, M

    1991-10-01

    To carry out systematic structure-function studies of octopus rhodopsin, photoreceptor protein of octopus visual cells, by means of specific amino-acid replacements, we have totally synthesized a DNA duplex of 1,365 base pairs that encodes the entire octopus rhodopsin of 455 amino acids [Ovchinnikov et al. (1988) FEBS Lett. 232, 69-72] by introducing codons preferred in Escherichia coli. Total synthesis simplifies site-specific mutagenesis in all parts of the gene by replacement of short restriction fragments by their newly synthesized counterparts containing the required nucleotide alterations. Thirty unique restriction sites were introduced in the octopus rhodopsin gene, which was assembled on a plasmid in two steps. Five cartridge genes of 344, 296, 320, 212, and 317 base pairs capable of being expressed independently were first constructed by using 48 synthetic oligonucleotides ranging in size from 54 to 73 nucleotides. The entire gene was constructed by consecutive linkage of cartridge genes. These cartridge genes were designed to correspond to the transmembrane helical unit of octopus rhodopsin, resulting in easy construction of various chimeric rhodopsins. The nucleotide sequences were confirmed by sequencing the cartridges as well as the entire gene. These synthetic genes were cloned into an expression vector carrying the trp promoter of E. coli, and were preliminarily expressed in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Blocking transcription of the human rhodopsin gene by triplex-mediated DNA photocrosslinking.

    PubMed

    Intody, Z; Perkins, B D; Wilson, J H; Wensel, T G

    2000-11-01

    To explore the ability of triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) to inhibit genes responsible for dominant genetic disorders, we used two TFOs to block expression of the human rhodopsin gene, which encodes a G protein-coupled receptor involved in the blinding disorder autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Psoralen-modified TFOs and UVA irradiation were used to form photoadducts at two target sites in a plasmid expressing a rhodopsin-EGFP fusion, which was then transfected into HT1080 cells. Each TFO reduced rhodopsin-GFP expression by 70-80%, whereas treatment with both reduced expression by 90%. Expression levels of control genes on either the same plasmid or one co-transfected were not affected by the treatment. Mutations at one TFO target eliminated its effect on transcription, without diminishing inhibition by the other TFO. Northern blots indicated that TFO-directed psoralen photoadducts blocked progression of RNA polymerase, resulting in truncated transcripts. Inhibition of gene expression was not relieved over a 72 h period, suggesting that TFO-induced psoralen lesions are not repaired on this time scale. Irradiation of cells after transfection with plasmid and psoralen-TFOs produced photoadducts inside the cells and also inhibited expression of rhodopsin-EGFP. We conclude that directing DNA damage with psoralen-TFOs is an efficient and specific means for blocking transcription from the human rhodopsin gene.

  6. Engineered Zinc Finger Nuclease–Mediated Homologous Recombination of the Human Rhodopsin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, David L.; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Methods. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Results. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. Conclusions. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. PMID:20671268

  7. Engineered zinc finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination of the human rhodopsin gene.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, David L; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-12-01

    Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination.

  8. Structure and function in rhodopsin: high level expression of a synthetic bovine opsin gene and its mutants in stable mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Reeves, P J; Thurmond, R L; Khorana, H G

    1996-10-15

    Stable mammalian cell lines harboring a synthetic bovine opsin gene have been derived from the suspension-adapted HEK293 cell line. The opsin gene is under the control of the immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter/enhancer in an expression vector that also contains a selectable marker (Neo) governed by a relatively weak promoter. The cell lines expressing the opsin gene at high levels are selected by growth in the presence of high concentrations of the antibiotic geneticin. Under the conditions used for cell growth in suspension, opsin is produced at saturated culture levels of more than 2 mg/liter. After reconstitution with 11-cis-retinal, rhodopsin is purified to homogeneity in a single step by immunoaffinity column chromatography. Rhodopsin thus prepared (> 90% recovery at concentrations of up to 15 microM) is indistinguishable from rhodopsin purified from bovine rod outer segments by the following criteria: (i) UV/Vis absorption spectra in the dark and after photobleaching and the rate of metarhodopsin II decay, (ii) initial rates of transducin activation, and (iii) the rate of phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Although mammalian cell opsin migrates slower than rod outer segment opsin on SDS/polyacrylamide gels, presumably due to a different N-glycosylation pattern, their mobilities after deglycosylation are identical. This method has enabled the preparation of several site-specific mutants of bovine opsin in comparable amounts.

  9. Photo-induced Regulation of the Chromatic Adaptive Gene Expression by Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Irieda, Hiroki; Morita, Teppei; Maki, Kimika; Homma, Michio; Aiba, Hiroji; Sudo, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin molecules are photochemically reactive membrane-embedded proteins, with seven transmembrane α-helices, which bind the chromophore retinal (vitamin A aldehyde). They are roughly divided into two groups according to their basic functions: (i) ion transporters such as proton pumps, chloride pumps, and cation channels; and (ii) photo-sensors such as sensory rhodopsin from microbes and visual pigments from animals. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), found in 2003 in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, is categorized as a microbial sensory rhodopsin. To investigate the function of ASR in vivo, ASR and the promoter sequence of the pigment protein phycocyanin were co-introduced into Escherichia coli cells with the reporter gene crp. The result clearly showed that ASR functions as a repressor of the CRP protein expression and that this is fully inhibited by the light activation of ASR, suggesting that ASR would directly regulate the transcription of crp. The repression is also clearly inhibited by the truncation of the C-terminal region of ASR, or mutations on the C-terminal Arg residues, indicating the functional importance of the C-terminal region. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel function of rhodopsin molecules and raise the possibility that the membrane-spanning protein ASR could work as a transcriptional factor. In the future, the ASR activity could be utilized as a tool for arbitrary protein expression in vivo regulated by visible light. PMID:22872645

  10. Rhodopsin Gene Expression Determines Rod Outer Segment Size and Rod Cell Resistance to a Dominant-Negative Neurodegeneration Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Price, Brandee A.; Sandoval, Ivette M.; Chan, Fung; Nichols, Ralph; Roman-Sanchez, Ramon; Wensel, Theodore G.; Wilson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Two outstanding unknowns in the biology of photoreceptors are the molecular determinants of cell size, which is remarkably uniform among mammalian species, and the mechanisms of rod cell death associated with inherited neurodegenerative blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. We have addressed both questions by performing an in vivo titration with rhodopsin gene copies in genetically engineered mice that express only normal rhodopsin or an autosomal dominant allele, encoding rhodopsin with a disease-causing P23H substitution. The results reveal that the volume of the rod outer segment is proportional to rhodopsin gene expression; that P23H-rhodopsin, the most common rhodopsin gene disease allele, causes cell death via a dominant-negative mechanism; and that long term survival of rod cells carrying P23H-rhodopsin can be achieved by increasing the levels of wild type rhodopsin. These results point to promising directions in gene therapy for autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by dominant-negative mutations. PMID:23185477

  11. A rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein immunolocalization.

    PubMed

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Here, we report the DNA sequence of the rhodopsin gene in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta). The primers were designed according to the conserved regions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic rhodopsin-like proteins deposited in the GenBank. The sequence consists of 1,272 bp comprised of 5 introns. The correspondent protein, named Cyanophopsin, showed high identity to rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi, and Algae. At the N-terminal, the protein is characterized by a region with no transmembrane alpha-helices (80 aa), followed by a region with 7alpha-helices (219 aa) and a shorter 35-aa C-terminal region. The DNA sequence of the N-terminal region was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant purified peptide was used as antigen in hens to obtain polyclonal antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence in C. paradoxa cells showed a marked labeling of the muroplast (aka cyanelle) membrane.

  12. A Rhodopsin-Guanylyl Cyclase Gene Fusion Functions in Visual Perception in a Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Avelar, Gabriela M.; Schumacher, Robert I.; Zaini, Paulo A.; Leonard, Guy; Richards, Thomas A.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sensing light is the fundamental property of visual systems, with vision in animals being based almost exclusively on opsin photopigments [1]. Rhodopsin also acts as a photoreceptor linked to phototaxis in green algae [2, 3] and has been implicated by chemical means as a light sensor in the flagellated swimming zoospores of the fungus Allomyces reticulatus [4]; however, the signaling mechanism in these fungi remains unknown. Here we use a combination of genome sequencing and molecular inhibition experiments with light-sensing phenotype studies to examine the signaling pathway involved in visual perception in the closely related fungus Blastocladiella emersonii. Our data show that in these fungi, light perception is accomplished by the function of a novel gene fusion (BeGC1) of a type I (microbial) rhodopsin domain and guanylyl cyclase catalytic domain. Photobleaching of rhodopsin function prevents accumulation of cGMP levels and phototaxis of fungal zoospores exposed to green light, whereas inhibition of guanylyl cyclase activity negatively affects fungal phototaxis. Immunofluorescence microscopy localizes the BeGC1 protein to the external surface of the zoospore eyespot positioned close to the base of the swimming flagellum [4, 5], demonstrating this is a photoreceptive organelle composed of lipid droplets. Taken together, these data indicate that Blastocladiomycota fungi have a cGMP signaling pathway involved in phototaxis similar to the vertebrate vision-signaling cascade but composed of protein domain components arranged as a novel gene fusion architecture and of distant evolutionary ancestry to type II rhodopsins of animals. PMID:24835457

  13. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6) with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7). Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins. PMID:27651995

  14. [Retinitis pigmentosa: results of rhodopsin gene analysis in the Galician population].

    PubMed

    Blanco, M J; Capeans, C; Lareu, M V; Carracedo, A; Piñero, A; Santos, L; Copena, M J; Sánchez-Salorio, M

    2000-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most prevalent inherited degeneration in the retina. The clinical manifestations are variable in terms of severity, age of onset and progression. The clinical variation is paralleled by genetic heterogeneity (more than 20 different loci have been described to date). The aim of this work was to identify mutations in rhodopsin gene and to determine the frequencies of the different genetic forms of RP in the Galician population. 47 previously diagnosed RP patients and their relatives were studied. Genetic forms of RP were identified by recording full family history and clinical examination. DNA samples from patients with RP and control individuals were screened for point mutations in the rhodopsin gene by using PCR SSCPs (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphisms) and direct sequencing in 36 unrelated nonsyndromic RP patients. We report the frequency distribution of the different genetic RP forms. In the SSCPs analysis of rhodopsin gene we found different mobility shifts: one variant in the 5'-untranslated region of the gen and one variant in the third intron. Direct sequencing revealed an A269-->G and an C3982-->T transitions, respectively. Additionally, we observed a single base change in codon 160 (C-->A) of this gene. Polymorphisms are commom findings in the exon 1 and 3 of rhodopsin gene. They are neutral variations and do not represent a change in the protein. No significant differences in the frecuencies of A269-->G and C3982-->T polymorphisms among the three groups of RP patients (ADRP, ARRP, Esporadic RP) and normal individuals were found. There was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium in each genotype in any group.

  15. Mutation spectrum of the rhodopsin gene among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Han, L.B.; Cowley, G.S.; McGee, T.L.; Berson, E.L. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150 patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.

  16. Blocking transcription of the human rhodopsin gene by triplex-mediated DNA photocrosslinking

    PubMed Central

    Intody, Zsofia; Perkins, Brian D.; Wilson, John H.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    To explore the ability of triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) to inhibit genes responsible for dominant genetic disorders, we used two TFOs to block expression of the human rhodopsin gene, which encodes a G protein-coupled receptor involved in the blinding disorder autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Psoralen-modified TFOs and UVA irradiation were used to form photoadducts at two target sites in a plasmid expressing a rhodopsin–EGFP fusion, which was then transfected into HT1080 cells. Each TFO reduced rhodopsin–GFP expression by 70–80%, whereas treatment with both reduced expression by 90%. Expression levels of control genes on either the same plasmid or one co-transfected were not affected by the treatment. Mutations at one TFO target eliminated its effect on transcription, without diminishing inhibition by the other TFO. Northern blots indicated that TFO-directed psoralen photoadducts blocked progression of RNA polymerase, resulting in truncated transcripts. Inhibition of gene expression was not relieved over a 72 h period, suggesting that TFO-induced psoralen lesions are not repaired on this time scale. Irradiation of cells after transfection with plasmid and psoralen–TFOs produced photoadducts inside the cells and also inhibited expression of rhodopsin–EGFP. We conclude that directing DNA damage with psoralen–TFOs is an efficient and specific means for blocking transcription from the human rhodopsin gene. PMID:11058128

  17. Molecular study of the rhodopsin gene in retinitis pigmentosa patients in the Basque Country.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, A I; Arostegui, E; Martin, R; Duran, M; Onaindia, M L; Molina, M; Tejada, M I

    1998-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disorder affecting the outer segment of the retina and leading to night blindness and progressive visual field loss. The rhodopsin gene encodes a photolabile pigment located in the rod outer segments constituting around 80-90% of its protein content and is the initiation point for the visual cascade upon absorption of a single photon. Seventy-five unrelated, isolated RP families in the Basque Country, with at least one affected member, were diagnosed at our hospital after ophthalmic examination and electroretinogram analysis. The patients received genetic counselling according to their individual case based on their clinical diagnosis. The modes of inheritance found from pedigree studies were the following: 20% (15/75) were classified as autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP), 17.33% (13/75) were autosomal recessive (ARRP), 2.66% (2/75) were unclassified (NC), and 60% (45/75) were sporadic cases (SCRP). From these families, 75 unrelated and affected index cases together with 22 affected relatives and 42 unaffected relatives were screened for mutations in the rhodopsin gene by GC clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that five ADRP, three ARRP, 15 SCRP, and one NC families had alterations in this gene. Only three of these alterations, that is 4% (3/75) (95% CL 0-8), appeared to be responsible for the disease. This represents a lower percentage than the 10% previously reported. PMID:9610801

  18. Molecular study of the rhodopsin gene in retinitis pigmentosa patients in the Basque Country.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A I; Arostegui, E; Martin, R; Duran, M; Onaindia, M L; Molina, M; Tejada, M I

    1998-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disorder affecting the outer segment of the retina and leading to night blindness and progressive visual field loss. The rhodopsin gene encodes a photolabile pigment located in the rod outer segments constituting around 80-90% of its protein content and is the initiation point for the visual cascade upon absorption of a single photon. Seventy-five unrelated, isolated RP families in the Basque Country, with at least one affected member, were diagnosed at our hospital after ophthalmic examination and electroretinogram analysis. The patients received genetic counselling according to their individual case based on their clinical diagnosis. The modes of inheritance found from pedigree studies were the following: 20% (15/75) were classified as autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP), 17.33% (13/75) were autosomal recessive (ARRP), 2.66% (2/75) were unclassified (NC), and 60% (45/75) were sporadic cases (SCRP). From these families, 75 unrelated and affected index cases together with 22 affected relatives and 42 unaffected relatives were screened for mutations in the rhodopsin gene by GC clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that five ADRP, three ARRP, 15 SCRP, and one NC families had alterations in this gene. Only three of these alterations, that is 4% (3/75) (95% CL 0-8), appeared to be responsible for the disease. This represents a lower percentage than the 10% previously reported.

  19. Restoration of visual function in P23H rhodopsin transgenic rats by gene delivery of BiP/Grp78.

    PubMed

    Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Knox, Tessa; LaVail, Matthew M; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Noorwez, Syed M; Hauswirth, William W; Lin, Jonathan H; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Lewin, Alfred S

    2010-03-30

    The P23H mutation within the rhodopsin gene (RHO) causes rhodopsin misfolding, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), leading to rod photoreceptor degeneration and autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Grp78/BiP is an ER-localized chaperone that is induced by UPR signaling in response to ER stress. We have previously demonstrated that BiP mRNA levels are selectively reduced in animal models of ADRP arising from P23H rhodopsin expression at ages that precede photoreceptor degeneration. We have now overexpressed BiP to test the hypothesis that this chaperone promotes the trafficking of P23H rhodopsin to the cell membrane, reprograms the UPR favoring the survival of photoreceptors, blocks apoptosis, and, ultimately, preserves vision in ADRP rats. In cell culture, increasing levels of BiP had no impact on the localization of P23H rhodopsin. However, BiP overexpression alleviated ER stress by reducing levels of cleaved pATF6 protein, phosphorylated eIF2alpha and the proapoptotic protein CHOP. In P23H rats, photoreceptor levels of cleaved ATF6, pEIF2alpha, CHOP, and caspase-7 were much higher than those of wild-type rats. Subretinal delivery of AAV5 expressing BiP to transgenic rats led to reduction in CHOP and photoreceptor apoptosis and to a sustained increase in electroretinogram amplitudes. We detected complexes between BiP, caspase-12, and the BH3-only protein BiK that may contribute to the antiapoptotic activity of BiP. Thus, the preservation of photoreceptor function resulting from elevated levels of BiP is due to suppression of apoptosis rather than to a promotion of rhodopsin folding.

  20. Mechanism and specificity of rhodopsin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Frank, R N; Buzney, S M

    1975-11-18

    Partial separation of protein kinase activity from rhodopsin in isolated bovine retinal photoreceptor outer segments was accomplished by mild ultrasonic treatment followed by ultracentrifugation. Residual kinase activity in the rhodopsin-rich sediment was destroyed by chemical denaturation which did not affect the spectral properties of the rhodopsin. The retinal outer segment kinase was found to be specific for rhodopsin, since in these preparations it alone of several bovine protein kinases was capable of phosphorylating rhodopsin in the light. The phosphorylation reaction apparently requires a specific conformation of the rhodopsin molecule since it is abolished by heat denaturation of rhodopsin, and it is greatly reduced or abolished by treatment of the visual pigment protein with potassium alum after the rhodopsin has been "bleached" by light. When kinase and rhodopsin or opsin fractions were prepared from dark-adapted and bleached outer segments and the resultant fractions were mixed in various combinations of bleached and unbleached preparations, the observed pattern of light-activated phosphorylation was consistent only with the interpretation that a conformational change in the rhodopsin molecule in the light exposes a site on the visual pigment protein to the kinase and ATP. These results rule out the possibility of a direct or indirect (rhodopsin-mediated) light activation of the kinase. Finally, phosphorylation of retinal outer segment protein in monochromatic lights of various wavelengths followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that both rhodopsin and the higher molecular weight visual pigment protein reported by several laboratories have the same action spectrum for phosphorylation. This result is consistent with the suggestion that the higher molecular weight species is a rhodopsin dimer.

  1. Isolation of Drosophila genes encoding G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Cassill, J A; Whitney, M; Joazeiro, C A; Becker, A; Zuker, C S

    1991-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are regulated via phosphorylation by a variety of protein kinases. Recently, termination of the active state of two such receptors, the beta-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin, has been shown to be mediated by agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of the receptor by members of a family of protein-serine/threonine kinases (here referred to as G protein-coupled receptor kinases). We now report the isolation of a family of genes encoding a set of Drosophila protein kinases that appear to code for G protein-coupled receptor kinases. These proteins share a high degree of sequence homology with the bovine beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. The presence of a conserved family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases in vertebrates and invertebrates points to the central role of these kinases in signal transduction cascades. Images PMID:1662381

  2. Further screening of the rhodopsin gene in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Vaithinathan, R.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1994-05-15

    Here the authors report 8 novel mutations and 8 previously reported mutations found from further analysis of the rhodopsin gene in a large set of additional patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Leukocyte DNA was purified from 122 unrelated patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa who were not included in previous analyses. The coding region and splice donor and acceptor sites of the rhodopsin gene were screened for mutations using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct genomic sequencing. They found 29 patients with varient bands that were due to mutations. Sequence analysis showed that 20 cases each had 1 of 9 previously published mutations: Pro23His, Thr58Arg, Gly89Asp, Pro171Leu, Glu181Lys, Pro347Leu, Phe45Leu, Arg135Trp, and Lys296Glu. In 9 other cases, they found 8 novel mutations. One was a 3-bp deletion (Cys264-del), and the rest were point mutations resulting in an altered amino acid: Gly51Arg (GGC [yields] CGC), Cys110Tyr (TCG [yields] TAC), Gly114Asp (GGC [yields] GAC), Ala164Glu (GCG [yields] GAG), Pro171Ser (CCA [yields] TCA), Val345Leu (GTG [yields] CTG), and Pro347Gln (CCG [yields] CAG). Each of these novel mutations was found in only one family except for Gly51Arg, which was found in two. In every family tested, the mutation cosegregated with the disease. However, in pedigree D865 only one affected member was available for analysis. About two-thirds of the mutations affect amino acids in transmembrane domains, yet only one-half of opsin's residues are in these regions. One-third of the mutations alter residues in the extracellular/intradiscal space, which includes only 25% of the protein.

  3. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    The proton pump rhodopsin is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing conserved domains and critical amino acid residues of PPR. This gene is phylogenetically affiliated to the xanthorhodopsin clade, but seems to have a distinct evolutionary origin. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR showed that in regular cultures, the transcript abundance of the gene exhibited a clear diel pattern, high abundance in the light period and low in the dark. The same diel pattern was observed for protein abundance with a Western blot using specific antiserum. The rhythm was dampened when the cultures were shifted to continuous dark or light condition, suggesting that this gene is not under circadian clock control. Rhodopsin transcript and protein abundances varied with light intensity, both being highest at a moderate illumination level. Furthermore, the expression of this gene responded to different light spectra, with slightly higher transcript abundance under green than blue light, and lowest abundance under red light. Transformed Escherichia coli over-expressing this rhodopsin gene also exhibited an absorption maximum in the blue-green region with slightly higher absorption in the green. These rhodopsin-promoting light conditions are similar to the relatively turbid marine habitat where the species forms blooms, suggesting that this gene may function to compensate for the light-limited photosynthesis in the dim environment.

  4. The Human Rhodopsin Kinase Promoter in an AAV5 Vector Confers Rod- and Cone-Specific Expression in the Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, John J.; Boye, Sanford L.; Witherspoon, Clark D.; Sandefer, Kristen J.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Erger, Kirsten; Sun, Jingfen; Ryals, Renee; Chiodo, Vince A.; Clark, Mark E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Hauswirth, William W.; Gamlin, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has proven an effective gene delivery vehicle for the treatment of retinal disease. Ongoing clinical trials using a serotype 2 AAV vector to express RPE65 in the retinal pigment epithelium have proven safe and effective. While many proof-of-concept studies in animal models of retinal disease have suggested that gene transfer to the neural retina will also be effective, a photoreceptor-targeting AAV vector has yet to be used in the clinic, principally because a vector that efficiently but exclusively targets all primate photoreceptors has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we evaluate a serotype 5 AAV vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter for its ability to target transgene expression to rod and cone photoreceptors when delivered subretinally in a nonhuman primate (NHP). In vivo fluorescent fundus imaging confirmed that AAV5-hGRK1-mediated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was restricted to the injection blebs of treated eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a lack of gross pathology after injection. Neutralizing antibodies against AAV5 were undetectable in post-injection serum samples from subjects receiving uncomplicated subretinal injections (i.e., no hemorrhage). Immunohistochemistry of retinal sections confirmed hGRK1 was active in, and specific for, both rods and cones of NHP retina. Biodistribution studies revealed minimal spread of vector genomes to peripheral tissues. These results suggest that AAV5-hGRK1 is a safe and effective AAV serotype/promoter combination for targeting therapeutic transgene expression protein to rods and cones in a clinical setting. PMID:22845794

  5. The human rhodopsin kinase promoter in an AAV5 vector confers rod- and cone-specific expression in the primate retina.

    PubMed

    Boye, Shannon E; Alexander, John J; Boye, Sanford L; Witherspoon, Clark D; Sandefer, Kristen J; Conlon, Thomas J; Erger, Kirsten; Sun, Jingfen; Ryals, Renee; Chiodo, Vince A; Clark, Mark E; Girkin, Christopher A; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has proven an effective gene delivery vehicle for the treatment of retinal disease. Ongoing clinical trials using a serotype 2 AAV vector to express RPE65 in the retinal pigment epithelium have proven safe and effective. While many proof-of-concept studies in animal models of retinal disease have suggested that gene transfer to the neural retina will also be effective, a photoreceptor-targeting AAV vector has yet to be used in the clinic, principally because a vector that efficiently but exclusively targets all primate photoreceptors has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we evaluate a serotype 5 AAV vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter for its ability to target transgene expression to rod and cone photoreceptors when delivered subretinally in a nonhuman primate (NHP). In vivo fluorescent fundus imaging confirmed that AAV5-hGRK1-mediated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was restricted to the injection blebs of treated eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a lack of gross pathology after injection. Neutralizing antibodies against AAV5 were undetectable in post-injection serum samples from subjects receiving uncomplicated subretinal injections (i.e., no hemorrhage). Immunohistochemistry of retinal sections confirmed hGRK1 was active in, and specific for, both rods and cones of NHP retina. Biodistribution studies revealed minimal spread of vector genomes to peripheral tissues. These results suggest that AAV5-hGRK1 is a safe and effective AAV serotype/promoter combination for targeting therapeutic transgene expression protein to rods and cones in a clinical setting.

  6. A novel nonsense mutation in rhodopsin gene in two Indonesian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kartasasmita, Arief; Fujiki, Keiko; Iskandar, Erwin; Sovani, Iwan; Fujimaki, Takuro; Murakami, Akira

    2011-03-01

    To report a novel, identical nonsense mutation in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene in two Indonesian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Mutation screening for the RHO gene was performed in 38 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) by direct sequencing. Clinical features were also characterized, through complete ophthalmologic examination. Family members of RP patients testing positive for the RHO gene were subjected to genetic and clinical examination. To assess the founder effect in the two families, haplotype analysis also was performed. A novel homozygous nonsense mutation was detected in two patients by a G to A transition at nucleotide position 482 in exon 2 of the RHO gene, resulting in substitution of a tryptophan-to-stop at codon 161 (c.482G>A, p.W161X). Examination of family members of these 2 patients showed that the affected members were homozygous and unaffected carriers were heterozygous for the p.W161X mutation. Haplotype analysis revealed that members of the two families carried the same disease-associated variants in markers (IVS1 RHO and D3S2322). No p.W161X mutations were detected in 45 normal Indonesian subjects, nor were any mutations detected in exons 1-5 of the RHO gene in the remaining 36 RP patients. We detected a novel, recessive nonsense mutation (p.W161X) in the RHO gene of two families through mutation screening of RHO in 38 Indonesian RP patients. Haplotype analysis suggested that p.W161X was the founder mutation.

  7. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-22

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses.

  8. Rhodopsin gene polymorphism associated with divergent light environments in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Pampoulie, Christophe; Skirnisdottir, Sigurlaug; Star, Bastiaan; Jentoft, Sissel; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg G; Hjörleifsson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Vilhjálmur; Pálsson, Ólafur K; Berg, Paul R; Andersen, Øivind; Magnusdottir, Steinunn; Helyar, Sarah J; Daníelsdóttir, Anna K

    2015-03-01

    The spectral sensitivity of visual pigments in vertebrate eyes is optimized for specific light conditions. One of such pigments, rhodopsin (RH1), mediates dim-light vision. Amino acid replacements at tuning sites may alter spectral sensitivity, providing a mechanism to adapt to ambient light conditions and depth of habitat in fish. Here we present a first investigation of RH1 gene polymorphism among two ecotypes of Atlantic cod in Icelandic waters, which experience divergent light environments throughout the year due to alternative foraging behaviour. We identified one synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the RH1 protein coding region and one in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) that are strongly divergent between these two ecotypes. Moreover, these polymorphisms coincided with the well-known panthophysin (Pan I) polymorphism that differentiates coastal and frontal (migratory) populations of Atlantic cod. While the RH1 SNPs do not provide direct inference for a specific molecular mechanism, their association with this dim-sensitive pigment indicates the involvement of the visual system in local adaptation of Atlantic cod.

  9. A second rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein expression in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2013-08-05

    Here we report the identification and expression of a second rhodopsin-like protein in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta), named Cyanophopsin_2. This new protein was identified due to a serendipity event, since the RACE reaction performed to complete the sequence of Cyanophopsin_1, (the first rhodopsin-like protein of C. paradoxa identified in 2009 by our group), amplified a 619 bp sequence corresponding to a portion of a new gene of the same protein family. The full sequence consists of 1175 bp consisting of 849 bp coding DNA sequence and 4 introns of 326 bp. The protein is characterized by an N-terminal region of 47 amino acids, followed by a region with 7 α-helices of 213 amino acids and a C-terminal region of 22 amino acids. This protein showed high identity with Cyanophopsin_1 and other rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi and Algae. Cyanophosin_2 (CpR2) was expressed in a cell-free expression system, and characterized by means of absorption spectroscopy.

  10. A novel rhodopsin kinase in octopus photoreceptor possesses a pleckstrin homology domain and is activated by G protein betagamma-subunits.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, S; Yoshida, N; Nakagawa, M; Iwasa, T; Tsuda, M

    1998-03-27

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) play an important role in stimulus-dependent receptor phosphorylation and desensitization of the receptors. Mammalian rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (betaARK) are the most studied members among known GRKs. In this work, we purified RK from octopus photoreceptors for the first time from invertebrate tissues. The molecular mass of the purified enzyme was 80 kDa as estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and this was 17 kDa larger than that of the vertebrate enzymes. Unlike vertebrate RK, octopus RK (ORK) was directly activated by betagamma-subunits of a photoreceptor G protein. We examined the effects of various known activators and inhibitors of GRKs on the activity of the purified ORK and found that their effects were different from those on either bovine RK or betaARK. To analyze the primary structure of the enzyme, we cloned the cDNA encoding ORK from an octopus retinal cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA was highly homologous to betaARK over the entire molecule, including a pleckstrin homology domain located in the C-terminal region, and homology to RK was significantly lower. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of various octopus tissues with an antibody against the purified ORK showed that ORK is expressed solely in the retina, which confirmed the identity of the enzyme as rhodopsin kinase. Thus, ORK appears to represent a unique subgroup in the GRK family, which is distinguished from vertebrate RK.

  11. A second visual rhodopsin gene, rh1-2, is expressed in zebrafish photoreceptors and found in other ray-finned fishes.

    PubMed

    Morrow, James M; Lazic, Savo; Dixon Fox, Monica; Kuo, Claire; Schott, Ryan K; de A Gutierrez, Eduardo; Santini, Francesco; Tropepe, Vincent; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-01-15

    Rhodopsin (rh1) is the visual pigment expressed in rod photoreceptors of vertebrates that is responsible for initiating the critical first step of dim-light vision. Rhodopsin is usually a single copy gene; however, we previously discovered a novel rhodopsin-like gene expressed in the zebrafish retina, rh1-2, which we identified as a functional photosensitive pigment that binds 11-cis retinal and activates in response to light. Here, we localized expression of rh1-2 in the zebrafish retina to a subset of peripheral photoreceptor cells, which indicates a partially overlapping expression pattern with rh1 We also expressed, purified and characterized Rh1-2, including investigation of the stability of the biologically active intermediate. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, we found the half-life of the rate of retinal release of Rh1-2 following photoactivation to be more similar to that of the visual pigment rhodopsin than to the non-visual pigment exo-rhodopsin (exorh), which releases retinal around 5 times faster. Phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses show that rh1-2 has ancient origins within teleost fishes, is under similar selective pressure to rh1, and likely experienced a burst of positive selection following its duplication and divergence from rh1 These findings indicate that rh1-2 is another functional visual rhodopsin gene, which contradicts the prevailing notion that visual rhodopsin is primarily found as a single copy gene within ray-finned fishes. The reasons for retention of this duplicate gene, as well as possible functional consequences for the visual system, are discussed.

  12. Molecular analysis and genetic mapping of the rhodopsin gene in families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, S.; Wedemann, H.; Samanns, C.; Horn, M.; Schwinger, E.; Gal, A. ); David, D. ); Terwilliger, D.J.; Ott, J. ); Born, L.I. van den )

    1993-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients/families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened for rhodopsin mutations. Direct sequencing revealed 13 different mutations in a total of 14 (i.e., 16%) unrelated patients. Five of these mutations (T4K, Q28H, R135G, F220C, and C222R) have not been reported so far. In addition, multipoint linkage analysis was performed on two large families with autosomal dominant RP due to rhodopsin mutations by using five DNA probes from 3q21-q24. No tight linkage was found between the rhodopsin locus (RHO) and D3S47 ([theta][sub max] = 0.08). By six-point analysis, RHO was localized in the region between D3S21 and D3S47, with a maximum lod score of 13.447 directly at D3S20. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Dead Sea rhodopsins revisited.

    PubMed

    Bodaker, Idan; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique hypersaline ecosystem with near toxic magnesium levels (∼2 M), dominance of divalent cations and a slightly acidic pH. Previously, we reported a haloarchaeon related to Halobacterium salinarum to dominate in a microbial bloom that developed in 1992 in the upper water layers of the lake following massive freshwater runoff. Whether this clade also dominated an earlier bloom in 1980-1982 cannot be ascertained as no samples for cultivation-independent analysis were preserved. The presence of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin was reported in the 1980-1982 bloom of prokaryotes that had developed in the Dead Sea. To test the hypothesis that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping may play a major role in determining what type of haloarchaea may dominate in specific bloom conditions, we compared rhodopsin genes recovered from Dead Sea biomass collected in different periods with genes coding for retinal proteins in isolated haloarchaea. Novel bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin genes were found in samples collected in 2007 and 2010. The fact that no rhodopsin genes were recovered from samples collected during the 1992 bloom, which was dominated by a single species, suggests that different clades were present in the 1980-1982 and 1992 blooms, and that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping did not necessarily play a determinative role in the dominance of specific halophiles in the blooms.

  14. Feedback from rhodopsin controls rhodopsin exclusion in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Vasiliauskas, Daniel; Mazzoni, Esteban O; Sprecher, Simon G; Brodetskiy, Konstantin; Johnston, Robert J; Lidder, Preetmoninder; Vogt, Nina; Celik, Arzu; Desplan, Claude

    2011-10-09

    Sensory systems with high discriminatory power use neurons that express only one of several alternative sensory receptor proteins. This exclusive receptor gene expression restricts the sensitivity spectrum of neurons and is coordinated with the choice of their synaptic targets. However, little is known about how it is maintained throughout the life of a neuron. Here we show that the green-light sensing receptor rhodopsin 6 (Rh6) acts to exclude an alternative blue-sensitive rhodopsin 5 (Rh5) from a subset of Drosophila R8 photoreceptor neurons. Loss of Rh6 leads to a gradual expansion of Rh5 expression into all R8 photoreceptors of the ageing adult retina. The Rh6 feedback signal results in repression of the rh5 promoter and can be mimicked by other Drosophila rhodopsins; it is partly dependent on activation of rhodopsin by light, and relies on G(αq) activity, but not on the subsequent steps of the phototransduction cascade. Our observations reveal a thus far unappreciated spectral plasticity of R8 photoreceptors, and identify rhodopsin feedback as an exclusion mechanism.

  15. The nop-1 gene of Neurospora crassa encodes a seven transmembrane helix retinal-binding protein homologous to archaeal rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Bieszke, Jennifer A.; Braun, Edward L.; Bean, Laura E.; Kang, Seogchan; Natvig, Donald O.; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    1999-01-01

    Opsins are a class of retinal-binding, seven transmembrane helix proteins that function as light-responsive ion pumps or sensory receptors. Previously, genes encoding opsins had been identified in animals and the Archaea but not in fungi or other eukaryotic microorganisms. Here, we report the identification and mutational analysis of an opsin gene, nop-1, from the eukaryotic filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. The nop-1 amino acid sequence predicts a protein that shares up to 81.8% amino acid identity with archaeal opsins in the 22 retinal binding pocket residues, including the conserved lysine residue that forms a Schiff base linkage with retinal. Evolutionary analysis revealed relatedness not only between NOP-1 and archaeal opsins but also between NOP-1 and several fungal opsin-related proteins that lack the Schiff base lysine residue. The results provide evidence for a eukaryotic opsin family homologous to the archaeal opsins, providing a plausible link between archaeal and visual opsins. Extensive analysis of Δnop-1 strains did not reveal obvious defects in light-regulated processes under normal laboratory conditions. However, results from Northern analysis support light and conidiation-based regulation of nop-1 gene expression, and NOP-1 protein heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris is labeled by using all-trans [3H]retinal, suggesting that NOP-1 functions as a rhodopsin in N. crassa photobiology. PMID:10393943

  16. Modeling Dominant and Recessive Forms of Retinitis Pigmentosa by Editing Three Rhodopsin-Encoding Genes in Xenopus Laevis Using Crispr/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Joanna M; Chiu, Colette N; Stanar, Paloma; Tam, Beatrice M; Ahmed, Sheikh N; Moritz, Orson L

    2017-07-31

    The utility of Xenopus laevis, a common research subject for developmental biology, retinal physiology, cell biology, and other investigations, has been limited by lack of a robust gene knockout or knock-down technology. Here we describe manipulation of the X. laevis genome using CRISPR/Cas9 to model the human disorder retinitis pigmentosa, and to introduce point mutations or exogenous DNA sequences. We introduced and characterized in-frame and out-of-frame insertions and deletions in three genes encoding rhodopsin by co-injection of Cas9 mRNA, eGFP mRNA, and single guide RNAs into fertilized eggs. Deletions were characterized by direct sequencing and cloning; phenotypes were assessed by assays of rod opsin in retinal extracts, and confocal microscopy of cryosectioned and immunolabeled contralateral eyes. We obtained germline transmission of editing to F1 offspring. In-frame deletions frequently caused dominant retinal degeneration associated with rhodopsin biosynthesis defects, while frameshift phenotypes were consistent with knockout. We inserted eGFP or point mutations into rhodopsin genes by co-injection of repair fragments with homology to the Cas9 target sites. Our techniques can produce high frequency gene editing in X. laevis, permitting analysis in the F0 generation, and advancing the utility of X. laevis as a subject for biological research and disease modeling.

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Rhodopsin Gene Identifies a Mosaic Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutation in a Healthy Individual

    PubMed Central

    Beryozkin, Avigail; Levy, Gal; Blumenfeld, Anat; Meyer, Segev; Namburi, Prasanthi; Morad, Yair; Gradstein, Libe; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous hereditary retinal diseases that result in blindness due to photoreceptor degeneration. Mutations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) and are responsible for 16% to 35% of adRP cases in the Western population. Our purpose was to investigate the contribution of RHO to adRP in the Israeli and Palestinian populations. Methods Thirty-two adRP families participated in the study. Mutation detection was performed by whole exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing of RHO exons. Fluorescence PCR reactions of serially diluted samples were used to predict the percentage of mosaic cells in blood samples. Results Eight RHO disease-causing mutations were identified in nine families, with only one novel mutation, c.548-638dup91bp, identified in a family where WES failed to detect any causal variant. Segregation analysis revealed that the origin of the mutation is in a mosaic healthy individual carrying the mutation in approximately 13% of blood cells. Conclusions This is the first report of the mutation spectrum of a known adRP gene in the Israeli and Palestinian populations, leading to the identification of seven previously reported mutations and one novel mutation. Our study shows that RHO mutations are a major cause of adRP in this cohort and are responsible for 28% of adRP families. The novel mutation exhibits a unique phenomenon in which an unaffected individual is mosaic for an adRP-causing mutation. PMID:26962691

  18. Label-free quantification of calcium-sensor targeting to photoreceptor guanylate cyclase and rhodopsin kinase by backscattering interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Sulmann, Stefan; Kussrow, Amanda; Bornhop, Darryl J.; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of protein binding to membrane proteins is challenging and a limited set of methods is available to study such systems. Here we employed backscattering interferometry (BSI), a free-solution label-free method with high sensitivity, to quantify the interaction of neuronal Ca2+-Sensor proteins with their targets operating in phototransduction. We tested direct binding of guanylate cyclase–activating proteins (GCAP1 and GCAP2) to their membrane target guanylate cyclase 1. The regulatory mechanism of GCAPs including their binding interface in the target is unresolved. Here we used a label-free, free-solution assay method based on BSI to determine binding constants of GCAP1 and GCAP2 to the full-length membrane-bound guanylate cyclase type 1. GCAP1 and GCAP2 bound to different regions on the target guanylate cyclase with submicromolar affinity (apparent KD-values of 663 ± 121 nM and 231 ± 63 nM for Ca2+-free GCAP1 and GCAP2, respectively). A guanylate cyclase construct containing the juxta-membrane and kinase homology domain harbored an exclusive binding site for GCAP1 with similar affinities as the full-length protein, whereas GCAP2 did not bind to this region. We provide a model in which GCAP1 and GCAP2 do not share a single binding site to the target, thus cannot exchange upon fluctuating Ca2+ levels. PMID:28361875

  19. Regulation of Arrestin Binding by Rhodopsin Phosphorylation Level

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Raman, Dayanidhi; Wei, Junhua; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Hurley, James B.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2008-01-01

    Arrestins ensure the timely termination of receptor signaling. The role of rhodopsin phosphorylation in visual arrestin binding was established more than 20 years ago, but the effects of the number of receptor-attached phosphates on this interaction remain controversial. Here we use purified rhodopsin fractions with carefully quantified content of individual phosphorylated rhodopsin species to elucidate the impact of phosphorylation level on arrestin interaction with three biologically relevant functional forms of rhodopsin: light-activated and dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. We found that a single receptor-attached phosphate does not facilitate arrestin binding, two are necessary to induce high affinity interaction, and three phosphates fully activate arrestin. Higher phosphorylation levels do not increase the stability of arrestin complex with light-activated rhodopsin but enhance its binding to the dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. The complex of arrestin with hyperphosphorylated light-activated rhodopsin is less sensitive to high salt and appears to release retinal faster. These data suggest that arrestin likely quenches rhodopsin signaling after the third phosphate is added by rhodopsin kinase. The complex of arrestin with heavily phosphorylated rhodopsin, which appears to form in certain disease states, has distinct characteristics that may contribute to the phenotype of these visual disorders. PMID:17848565

  20. Schiff-base deprotonation is mandatory for light-dependent rhodopsin phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Seckler, B; Rando, R R

    1989-01-01

    The absorption of light by rhodopsin leads to the formation of an activated intermediate (R*) capable of catalysing the exchange of GTP for GDP in a retinal guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (transducin). The ability of R* to function as a catalyst is terminated by the rhodopsin kinase. The 10 nonactive-site lysine residues of rhodopsin can be reductively dimethylated to form permethylated rhodopsin (PMRh). This derivative is phosphorylated to the same extent as rhodopsin after photolysis. The monomethylation of the active-site lysine residue of PMRh yields active-site-methylated rhodopsin (AMRh). It had previously been shown, by using AMRh, that the formation of R* and its spectroscopic signature metarhodopsin II requires the photochemically induced deprotonation of the active-site Schiff base [Longstaff, Calhoon & Rando (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 4209-4213]. Here it is demonstrated that active-site Schiff-base deprotonation is also mandatory in the formation of the form of photolyzed rhodopsin that is susceptible to phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. In terms of the spectroscopically defined rhodopsin intermediates, this means that only metarhodopsin II and possibly metarhodopsin III are the actual substrates for rhodopsin kinase. PMID:2604728

  1. Electrophysiological study of Drosophila rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Electrophysiological investigations were carried out on several independently isolated mutants of the ninaE gene, which encodes opsin in R1-6 photoreceptors, and a mutant of the ninaD gene, which is probably important in the formation of the rhodopsin chromophore. In these mutants, the rhodopsin content in R1-6 photoreceptors is reduced by 10(2)-10(6)-fold. Light-induced bumps recorded from even the most severely affected mutants are physiologically normal. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis shows that photoreceptor responses of both a ninaE mutant and a ninaD mutant follow the adapting bump model. Since any extensive rhodopsin-rhodopsin interactions are not likely in these mutants, the above results suggest that such interactions are not needed for the generation and adaptation of light-induced bumps. Mutant bumps are strikingly larger in amplitude than wild-type bumps. This difference is observed both in ninaD and ninaE mutants, which suggests that it is due to severe depletion of rhodopsin content, rather than to any specific alterations in the opsin protein. Lowering or buffering the intracellular calcium concentration by EGTA injection mimics the effects of the mutations on the bump amplitude, but, unlike the mutations, it also affects the latency and kinetics of light responses. PMID:3097245

  2. Receptor-like kinases from Arabidopsis form a monophyletic gene family related to animal receptor kinases

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Shin-Han; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    Plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are proteins with a predicted signal sequence, single transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic kinase domain. Receptor-like kinases belong to a large gene family with at least 610 members that represent nearly 2.5% of Arabidopsis protein coding genes. We have categorized members of this family into subfamilies based on both the identity of the extracellular domains and the phylogenetic relationships between the kinase domains of subfamily members. Surprisingly, this structurally defined group of genes is monophyletic with respect to kinase domains when compared with the other eukaryotic kinase families. In an extended analysis, animal receptor kinases, Raf kinases, plant RLKs, and animal receptor tyrosine kinases form a well supported group sharing a common origin within the superfamily of serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases. Among animal kinase sequences, Drosophila Pelle and related cytoplasmic kinases fall within the plant RLK clade, which we now define as the RLK/Pelle family. A survey of expressed sequence tag records for land plants reveals that mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants have similar percentages of expressed sequence tags representing RLK/Pelle homologs, suggesting that the size of this gene family may have been close to the present-day level before the diversification of land plant lineages. The distribution pattern of four RLK subfamilies on Arabidopsis chromosomes indicates that the expansion of this gene family is partly a consequence of duplication and reshuffling of the Arabidopsis genome and of the generation of tandem repeats. PMID:11526204

  3. Effect of Rhodopsin Phosphorylation on Dark Adaptation in Mouse Rods.

    PubMed

    Berry, Justin; Frederiksen, Rikard; Yao, Yun; Nymark, Soile; Chen, Jeannie; Cornwall, Carter

    2016-06-29

    GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes, including taste, smell, hearing, vision, and cardiovascular, endocrine, and reproductive homeostasis. An important feature of GPCR signaling is its timely termination. This normally occurs when, after their activation, GPCRs are rapidly phosphorylated by specific receptor kinases and subsequently bound by cognate arrestins. Recovery of receptor sensitivity to the ground state then requires dephosphorylation of the receptor and unbinding of arrestin, processes that are poorly understood. Here we investigate in mouse rod photoreceptors the relationship between rhodopsin dephosphorylation and recovery of visual sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/366973-15$15.00/0.

  4. Effect of Rhodopsin Phosphorylation on Dark Adaptation in Mouse Rods

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Justin; Frederiksen, Rikard; Yao, Yun; Nymark, Soile

    2016-01-01

    topology. Signaling by GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes, including taste, smell, hearing, vision, and cardiovascular, endocrine, and reproductive homeostasis. An important feature of GPCR signaling is its timely termination. This normally occurs when, after their activation, GPCRs are rapidly phosphorylated by specific receptor kinases and subsequently bound by cognate arrestins. Recovery of receptor sensitivity to the ground state then requires dephosphorylation of the receptor and unbinding of arrestin, processes that are poorly understood. Here we investigate in mouse rod photoreceptors the relationship between rhodopsin dephosphorylation and recovery of visual sensitivity. PMID:27358455

  5. New insights into the evolutionary history of type 1 rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Mario X; Marín, Ignacio

    2004-03-01

    Type 1 (archaeal) rhodopsins and related rhodopsin-like proteins had been described in a few halophile archaea, gamma-proteobacteria, a single cyanobacteria, some fungi, and a green alga. In exhaustive database searches, we detected rhodopsin-related sequences derived not only from additional fungal species but also from organisms belonging to three groups in which opsins had hitherto not been described: the alpha-proteobacterium Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, the cryptomonad alga Guillardia theta, and the dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula. Putative plant and human type 1 rhodopsin sequences found in the databases are demonstrated to be contaminants of fungal origin. However, a highly diverged sequence supposedly from the plant Oryza sativa was found that is, together with the Pyrocystis sequence, quite similar to gamma-proteobacterial rhodopsins. These close relationships suggest that at least one horizontal gene transfer event involving rhodopsin genes occurred between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Alternative hypotheses to explain the current phylogenetic range of type 1 rhodopsins are suggested. The broader phylogenetic range found is compatible with an ancient origin of type 1 rhodopsins, their patchy distribution being caused by losses in multiple lineages. However, the possibility of ancient horizontal transfer events between distant relatives cannot be dismissed.

  6. Putative modifier genes in mevalonate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Vozzi, Diego; Girardelli, Martina; Tricarico, Paola Maura; Knowles, Alessandra; Crovella, Sergio; Vuch, Josef; Tommasini, Alberto; Piscianz, Elisa; Bianco, Anna Monica

    2016-04-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is an autosomal recessive auto‑inflammatory disease, caused by impairment of the mevalonate pathway. Although the molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated, there is clinical evidence suggesting that other regulatory genes may be involved in determining the phenotype. The identification of novel target genes may explain non‑homogeneous genotype‑phenotype correlations, and provide evidence in support of the hypothesis that novel regulatory genes predispose or amplify deregulation of the mevalonate pathway in this orphan disease. In the present study, DNA samples were obtained from five patients with MKD, which were then analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A missense variation in the PEX11γ gene was observed in homozygosis in P2, possibly correlating with visual blurring. The UNG rare gene variant was detected in homozygosis in P5, without correlating with a specific clinical phenotype. A number of other variants were found in the five analyzed DNA samples from the MKD patients, however no correlation with the phenotype was established. The results of the presents study suggested that further analysis, using next generation sequencing approaches, is required on a larger sample size of patients with MKD, who share the same MVK mutations and exhibit 'extreme' clinical phenotypes. As MVK mutations may be associated with MKD, the identification of specific modifier genes may assist in providing an earlier diagnosis.

  7. Rhodopsin management during the light-dark cycle of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Min; Metoxen, Alexander J; Leming, Matthew T; Whaley, Michelle A; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2014-11-01

    The tropical disease vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae possesses 11 rhodopsin genes. Three of these, GPROP1, GPROP3, and GPROP4, encode rhodopsins with >99% sequence identity. We created antisera against these rhodopsins and used immunohistology to show that one or more of these rhodopsins are expressed in the major R1-6 photoreceptor class of the adult A.gambiae eye. Under dark conditions, rhodopsin accumulates within the light-sensitive rhabdomere of the photoreceptor. Light treatment, however, causes extensive movement of rhodopsin to the cytoplasmic compartment. Protein electrophoresis showed that the rhodopsin is present in two different forms. The larger form is an immature species that is deglycosylated during the posttranslational maturation process to generate the smaller, mature form. The immature form is maintained at a constant level regardless of lighting conditions. These results indicate that rhodopsin biosynthesis and movement into the rhabdomere occurs at a constant rate. In contrast, the mature form increases in abundance when animals are placed in dark conditions. Light-triggered internalization and protein degradation counteracts this rhodopsin increase and keeps rhabdomeric rhodopsin levels low in light conditions. The interplay of the constant maturation rate with light-triggered degradation causes rhodopsin to accumulate within the rhabdomere only in dark conditions. Thus, Anopheles photoreceptors possess a mechanism for adjusting light sensitivity through light-dependent control of rhodopsin levels and cellular location. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rhodopsin management during the light-dark cycle of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Min; Metoxen, Alexander J.; Leming, Matthew T.; Whaley, Michelle A.; O’Tousa, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The tropical disease vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae possesses 11 rhodopsin genes. Three of these, GPROP1, GPROP3, and GPROP4, encode rhodopsins with >99% sequence identity. We created antisera against these rhodopsins and used immunohistology to show that one or more of these rhodopsins are expressed in the major R1-6 photoreceptor class of the adult Anopheles gambiae eye. Under dark conditions, rhodopsin accumulates within the light-sensitive rhabdomere of the photoreceptor. Light treatment, however, causes extensive movement of rhodopsin to the cytoplasmic compartment. Protein electrophoresis showed that the rhodopsin is present in two different forms. The larger form is an immature species that is deglycosylated during the posttranslational maturation process to generate the smaller, mature form. The immature form is maintained at a constant level regardless of lighting conditions. These results indicate that rhodopsin biosynthesis and movement into the rhabdomere occurs at a constant rate. In contrast, the mature form increases in abundance when animals are placed in dark conditions. Light-triggered internalization and protein degradation counteracts this rhodopsin increase and keeps rhabdomeric rhodopsin levels low in light conditions. The interplay of the constant maturation rate with light-triggered degradation causes rhodopsin to accumulate within the rhabdomere only in dark conditions. Thus, Anopheles photoreceptors possess a mechanism for adjusting light sensitivity through light-dependent control of rhodopsin levels and cellular location. PMID:25260623

  9. Vision Science: Can Rhodopsin Cure Blindness?

    PubMed

    Van Gelder, Russell N; Kaur, Kuldeep

    2015-08-17

    Outer retinal degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. A new study now demonstrates that ectopic expression of human rhodopsin in the inner retina, mediated by viral gene therapy, can restore light sensitivity and some vision to mice blind from outer retinal degeneration.

  10. In vivo Editing of the Human Mutant Rhodopsin Gene by Electroporation of Plasmid-based CRISPR/Cas9 in the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Latella, Maria Carmela; Di Salvo, Maria Teresa; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Benati, Daniela; Grisendi, Giulia; Comitato, Antonella; Marigo, Valeria; Recchia, Alessandra

    2016-11-22

    The bacterial CRISPR/Cas system has proven to be an efficient tool for genetic manipulation in various organisms. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the human Rhodopsin (RHO) gene in a mouse model for autosomal dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa. We designed single or double sgRNAs to knock-down mutant RHO expression by targeting exon 1 of the RHO gene carrying the P23H dominant mutation. By delivering Cas9 and sgRNAs in a single plasmid we induced an efficient gene editing in vitro, in HeLa cells engineered to constitutively express the P23H mutant RHO allele. Similarly, after subretinal electroporation of the CRISPR/Cas9 plasmid expressing two sgRNAs into P23H RHO transgenic mice, we scored specific gene editing as well as significant reduction of the mutant RHO protein. Successful in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system confirms its efficacy as a genetic engineering tool in photoreceptor cells.

  11. In vivo Editing of the Human Mutant Rhodopsin Gene by Electroporation of Plasmid-based CRISPR/Cas9 in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Latella, Maria Carmela; Di Salvo, Maria Teresa; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Benati, Daniela; Grisendi, Giulia; Comitato, Antonella; Marigo, Valeria; Recchia, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR/Cas system has proven to be an efficient tool for genetic manipulation in various organisms. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the human Rhodopsin (RHO) gene in a mouse model for autosomal dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa. We designed single or double sgRNAs to knock-down mutant RHO expression by targeting exon 1 of the RHO gene carrying the P23H dominant mutation. By delivering Cas9 and sgRNAs in a single plasmid we induced an efficient gene editing in vitro, in HeLa cells engineered to constitutively express the P23H mutant RHO allele. Similarly, after subretinal electroporation of the CRISPR/Cas9 plasmid expressing two sgRNAs into P23H RHO transgenic mice, we scored specific gene editing as well as significant reduction of the mutant RHO protein. Successful in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system confirms its efficacy as a genetic engineering tool in photoreceptor cells. PMID:27874856

  12. Gene looping facilitates TFIIH kinase-mediated termination of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Scott; Ansari, Athar

    2015-01-01

    TFIIH is a general transcription factor with kinase and helicase activities. The kinase activity resides in the Kin28 subunit of TFIIH. The role of Kin28 kinase in the early steps of transcription is well established. Here we report a novel role of Kin28 in the termination of transcription. We show that RNAPII reads through a termination signal upon kinase inhibition. Furthermore, the recruitment of termination factors towards the 3′ end of a gene was compromised in the kinase mutant, thus confirming the termination defect. A concomitant decrease in crosslinking of termination factors near the 5′ end of genes was also observed in the kinase-defective mutant. Simultaneous presence of termination factors towards both the ends of a gene is indicative of gene looping; while the loss of termination factor occupancy from the distal ends suggest the abolition of a looped gene conformation. Accordingly, CCC analysis revealed that the looped architecture of genes was severely compromised in the Kin28 kinase mutant. In a looping defective sua7-1 mutant, even the enzymatically active Kin28 kinase could not rescue the termination defect. These results strongly suggest a crucial role of Kin28 kinase-dependent gene looping in the termination of transcription in budding yeast. PMID:26286112

  13. Thermal Stability of Rhodopsin and Progression of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Monica Yun; Liu, Jian; Mehrotra, Devi; Liu, Yuting; Guo, Ying; Baldera-Aguayo, Pedro A.; Mooney, Victoria L.; Nour, Adel M.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Over 100 point mutations in the rhodopsin gene have been associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of inherited visual disorders. Among these, we focused on characterizing the S186W mutation. We compared the thermal properties of the S186W mutant with another RP-causing mutant, D190N, and with WT rhodopsin. To assess thermal stability, we measured the rate of two thermal reactions contributing to the thermal decay of rhodopsin as follows: thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal and hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base linkage between the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and opsin protein. We used UV-visible spectroscopy and HPLC to examine the kinetics of these reactions at 37 and 55 °C for WT and mutant rhodopsin purified from HEK293 cells. Compared with WT rhodopsin and the D190N mutant, the S186W mutation dramatically increases the rates of both thermal isomerization and dark state hydrolysis of the Schiff base by 1–2 orders of magnitude. The results suggest that the S186W mutant thermally destabilizes rhodopsin by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the receptor's active site. The decrease in the thermal stability of dark state rhodopsin is likely to be associated with higher levels of dark noise that undermine the sensitivity of rhodopsin, potentially accounting for night blindness in the early stages of RP. Further studies of the thermal stability of additional pathogenic rhodopsin mutations in conjunction with clinical studies are expected to provide insight into the molecular mechanism of RP and test the correlation between rhodopsin's thermal stability and RP progression in patients. PMID:23625926

  14. Repression of Six3 by a corepressor regulates rhodopsin expression

    PubMed Central

    Manavathi, Bramanandam; Peng, Shaohua; Rayala, Suresh K.; Talukder, Amjad H.; Wang, Minhua H.; Wang, Rui-An; Balasenthil, Seetharaman; Agarwal, Neeraj; Frishman, Laura J.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    Here, we provide gain-of-function, loss-of function, and molecular evidence supporting genetic interactions between metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) and Six3 and between Six3 and rhodopsin. We discovered that MTA1 physically interacts with the Six3 chromatin in a histone deacetylase-dependent manner, leading to transcriptional suppression of the Six3 gene. MTA1 is also a Six3-interacting corepressor that contributes to a self-negative regulation of Six3 transcription by Six3. In contrast, deletion of the MTA1 alleles in murine embryonic fibroblasts or its knockdown in rat retinal ganglion cells stimulates Six3 expression. MTA1 inactivation in the MTA1-null mice results in an elevated Six3 level and proliferation of the retina cells with no obvious abnormities in eye formation. However, unexpectedly, we discovered an enhanced recruitment of Six3 to the rhodopsin chromatin in retina from the MTA1-null mice; Six3's homeodomain interacts with specific DNA elements in the rhodopsin promoter to stimulate its transcription, resulting in increased rhodopsin expression. Further, in holoprosencephaly patients, Six3 protein with a naturally occurring deletion mutation in the helix 3 of the homeodomain does not bind to rhodopsin DNA or stimulate rhodopsin transcription, implying a potential defective rhodopsin pathway in the affected holoprosencephaly patients. Further Six3 cooperates with Crx or NRL in stimulating transcription from the rhodopsin-luc. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for the MTA1 as an upstream modifier of Six3 and indicate that Six3 is a direct stimulator of rhodopsin expression, thus revealing a putative role for the MTA1/Six3/rhodopsin pathway in vertebrate eye. PMID:17666527

  15. Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Ion-Pumping Rhodopsins: Genetic Diversity, Physiology, and Ecology.

    PubMed

    Pinhassi, Jarone; DeLong, Edward F; Béjà, Oded; González, José M; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The recognition of a new family of rhodopsins in marine planktonic bacteria, proton-pumping proteorhodopsin, expanded the known phylogenetic range, environmental distribution, and sequence diversity of retinylidene photoproteins. At the time of this discovery, microbial ion-pumping rhodopsins were known solely in haloarchaea inhabiting extreme hypersaline environments. Shortly thereafter, proteorhodopsins and other light-activated energy-generating rhodopsins were recognized to be widespread among marine bacteria. The ubiquity of marine rhodopsin photosystems now challenges prior understanding of the nature and contributions of "heterotrophic" bacteria to biogeochemical carbon cycling and energy fluxes. Subsequent investigations have focused on the biophysics and biochemistry of these novel microbial rhodopsins, their distribution across the tree of life, evolutionary trajectories, and functional expression in nature. Later discoveries included the identification of proteorhodopsin genes in all three domains of life, the spectral tuning of rhodopsin variants to wavelengths prevailing in the sea, variable light-activated ion-pumping specificities among bacterial rhodopsin variants, and the widespread lateral gene transfer of biosynthetic genes for bacterial rhodopsins and their associated photopigments. Heterologous expression experiments with marine rhodopsin genes (and associated retinal chromophore genes) provided early evidence that light energy harvested by rhodopsins could be harnessed to provide biochemical energy. Importantly, some studies with native marine bacteria show that rhodopsin-containing bacteria use light to enhance growth or promote survival during starvation. We infer from the distribution of rhodopsin genes in diverse genomic contexts that different marine bacteria probably use rhodopsins to support light-dependent fitness strategies somewhere between these two extremes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Ion-Pumping Rhodopsins: Genetic Diversity, Physiology, and Ecology

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Edward F.; Béjà, Oded; González, José M.; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The recognition of a new family of rhodopsins in marine planktonic bacteria, proton-pumping proteorhodopsin, expanded the known phylogenetic range, environmental distribution, and sequence diversity of retinylidene photoproteins. At the time of this discovery, microbial ion-pumping rhodopsins were known solely in haloarchaea inhabiting extreme hypersaline environments. Shortly thereafter, proteorhodopsins and other light-activated energy-generating rhodopsins were recognized to be widespread among marine bacteria. The ubiquity of marine rhodopsin photosystems now challenges prior understanding of the nature and contributions of “heterotrophic” bacteria to biogeochemical carbon cycling and energy fluxes. Subsequent investigations have focused on the biophysics and biochemistry of these novel microbial rhodopsins, their distribution across the tree of life, evolutionary trajectories, and functional expression in nature. Later discoveries included the identification of proteorhodopsin genes in all three domains of life, the spectral tuning of rhodopsin variants to wavelengths prevailing in the sea, variable light-activated ion-pumping specificities among bacterial rhodopsin variants, and the widespread lateral gene transfer of biosynthetic genes for bacterial rhodopsins and their associated photopigments. Heterologous expression experiments with marine rhodopsin genes (and associated retinal chromophore genes) provided early evidence that light energy harvested by rhodopsins could be harnessed to provide biochemical energy. Importantly, some studies with native marine bacteria show that rhodopsin-containing bacteria use light to enhance growth or promote survival during starvation. We infer from the distribution of rhodopsin genes in diverse genomic contexts that different marine bacteria probably use rhodopsins to support light-dependent fitness strategies somewhere between these two extremes. PMID:27630250

  17. Rhodopsin coexpression in UV photoreceptors of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaobang; Leming, Matthew T; Whaley, Michelle A; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2014-03-15

    Differential rhodopsin gene expression within specialized R7 photoreceptor cells divides the retinas of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes into distinct domains. The two species express the rhodopsin orthologs Aaop8 and Agop8, respectively, in a large subset of these R7 photoreceptors that function as ultraviolet receptors. We show here that a divergent subfamily of mosquito rhodopsins, Aaop10 and Agop10, is coexpressed in these R7 photoreceptors. The properties of the A. aegypti Aaop8 and Aaop10 rhodopsins were analyzed by creating transgenic Drosophila expressing these rhodopsins. Electroretinogram recordings, and spectral analysis of head extracts, obtained from the Aaop8 strain confirmed that Aaop8 is an ultraviolet-sensitive rhodopsin. Aaop10 was poorly expressed and capable of eliciting only small and slow light responses in Drosophila photoreceptors, and electroretinogram analysis suggested that it is a long-wavelength rhodopsin with a maximal sensitivity near 500 nm. Thus, coexpression of Aaop10 rhodopsin with Aaop8 rhodopsin has the potential to modify the spectral properties of mosquito ultraviolet receptors. Retention of Op10 rhodopsin family members in the genomes of Drosophila species suggests that this rhodopsin family may play a conserved role in insect vision.

  18. Rhodopsin/Lipid Hydrophobic Matching—Rhodopsin Oligomerization and Function

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, Olivier; Teague, Walter E.; Hines, Kirk G.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition of the membrane and rhodopsin packing density strongly modulate the early steps of the visual response of photoreceptor membranes. In this study, lipid-order and bovine rhodopsin function in proteoliposomes composed of the sn-1 chain perdeuterated lipids 14:0d27-14:1-PC, 16:0d31-16:1-PC, 18:0d35-18:1-PC, or 20:0d39-20:1-PC at rhodopsin/lipid molar ratios from 1:70 to 1:1000 (mol/mol) were investigated. Clear evidence for matching of hydrophobic regions on rhodopsin transmembrane helices and hydrophobic thickness of lipid bilayers was observed from 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter measurements at low rhodopsin concentrations. Thin bilayers stretched to match the length of transmembrane helices observed as increase of sn-1 chain order, while thicker bilayers were compressed near the protein. A quantitative analysis of lipid-order parameter changes suggested that the protein adjusts its conformation to bilayer hydrophobic thickness as well, which confirmed our earlier circular-dichroism measurements. Changes in lipid order parameters upon rhodopsin incorporation vanished for bilayers with a hydrophobic thickness of 27 ± 1 Å, suggesting that this is the bilayer thickness at which rhodopsin packs in bilayers at the lowest membrane perturbation. The lipid-order parameter studies also indicated that a hydrophobic mismatch between rhodopsin and lipids triggers rhodopsin oligomerization with increasing rhodopsin concentrations. Both hydrophobic mismatch and rhodopsin oligomerization result in substantial shifts of the equilibrium between the photointermediates metarhodopsin I and metarhodopsin II; increasing bilayer thickness favors formation of metarhodopsin II while oligomerization favors metarhodopsin I. The results highlight the importance of hydrophobic matching for rhodopsin structure, oligomerization, and function. PMID:25762324

  19. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zongchao; Banworth, Marcellus J.; Makkia, Rasha; Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause retinal degeneration and clinical phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital stationary night blindness. Effective gene therapies have been difficult to develop, however, because generating precise levels of rhodopsin expression is critical; overexpression causes toxicity, and underexpression would result in incomplete rescue. Current gene delivery strategies routinely use cDNA-based vectors for gene targeting; however, inclusion of noncoding components of genomic DNA (gDNA) such as introns may help promote more endogenous regulation of gene expression. Here we test the hypothesis that inclusion of genomic sequences from the rhodopsin gene can improve the efficacy of rhodopsin gene therapy in the rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of RP. We utilize our compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), which have the ability to transfer larger and more complex genetic constructs, to deliver murine rhodopsin cDNA or gDNA. We show functional and structural improvements in RKO eyes for up to 8 months after NP-mediated gDNA but not cDNA delivery. Importantly, in addition to improvements in rod function, we observe significant preservation of cone function at time points when cones in the RKO model are degenerated. These results suggest that inclusion of native expression elements, such as introns, can significantly enhance gene expression and therapeutic efficacy and may become an essential option in the array of available gene delivery tools.— Han, Z., Banworth, M. J., Makkia, R., Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Cooper, M. J., Naash, M. I. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype. PMID:25713057

  20. Activity switches of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Eglof; Elgeti, Matthias; Bartl, Franz J

    2008-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the visual pigment of the rod photoreceptor cell contains as its light-sensitive cofactor 11-cis retinal, which is bound by a protonated Schiff base between its aldehyde group and the Lys296 side chain of the apoprotein. Light activation is achieved by 11-cis to all-trans isomerization and subsequent thermal relaxation into the active, G protein-binding metarhodopsin II state. Metarhodopsin II decays via two parallel pathways, which both involve hydrolysis of the Schiff base eventually to opsin and released all-trans retinal. Subsequently, rhodopsin's dark state is regenerated by a complicated retinal metabolism, termed the retinoid cycle. Unlike other retinal proteins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, this regeneration cycle cannot be short cut by light, because blue illumination of active metarhodopsin II does not lead back to the ground state but to the formation of largely inactive metarhodopsin III. In this review, mechanistic details of activating and deactivating pathways of rhodopsin, particularly concerning the roles of the retinal, are compared. Based on static and time-resolved UV/Vis and FTIR spectroscopic data, we discuss a model of the light-induced deactivation. We describe properties and photoreactions of metarhodopsin III and suggest potential roles of this intermediate for vision.

  1. Lipid-Rhodopsin Hydrophobic Mismatch Alters Rhodopsin Helical Content

    SciTech Connect

    Soubias,O.; Niu, S.; Mitchell, D.; Gawrisch, K.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of photoactivated rhodopsin to achieve the enzymatically active metarhodopsin II conformation is exquisitely sensitive to bilayer hydrophobic thickness. The sensitivity of rhodopsin to the lipid matrix has been explained by the hydrophobic matching theory, which predicts that lipid bilayers adjust elastically to the hydrophobic length of transmembrane helices. Here, we examined if bilayer thickness adjusts to the length of the protein or if the protein alters its conformation to adapt to the bilayer. Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into a series of mono-unsaturated phosphatidylcholines with 14-20 carbons per hydrocarbon chain. Changes of hydrocarbon chain length were measured by 2H NMR, and protein helical content was quantified by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and conventional circular dichroism. Experiments were conducted on dark-adapted rhodopsin, the photo-intermediates metarhodopsin I/II/III, and opsin. Changes of bilayer thickness upon rhodopsin incorporation and photoactivation were mostly absent. In contrast, the helical content of rhodopsin increased with membrane hydrophobic thickness. Helical content did not change measurably upon photoactivation. The increases of bilayer thickness and helicity of rhodopsin are accompanied by higher metarhodopsin II/metarhodopsin I ratios, faster rates of metarhodopsin II formation, an increase of tryptophan fluorescence, and higher temperatures of rhodopsin denaturation. The data suggest a surprising adaptability of this G protein-coupled membrane receptor to properties of the lipid matrix.

  2. THE MOLAR EXTINCTION OF RHODOPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George; Brown, Paul K.

    1953-01-01

    The molar extinction of rhodopsin is 40,600 cm.2 per mole equivalent of retinene; i.e., this is the extinction of a solution of rhodopsin which is produced by, or yields on bleaching, a molar solution of retinene. The molar extinctions of all-trans retinene and all-trans retinene oxime have also been determined in ethyl alcohol and aqueous digitonin solutions. On the assumption that each chromophoric group of rhodopsin is made from a single molecule of retinene, it is concluded that the primary photochemical conversion of rhodopsin to lumi-rhodopsin has a quantum efficiency of 1; though the over-all bleaching of rhodopsin in solution to retinene and opsin may have a quantum efficiency as low as one-half. On bleaching cattle rhodopsin, about two sulfhydryl groups appear for each molecule of retinene liberated. In frog rhodopsin the —SH:retinene ratio appears to be higher, 5:2 or perhaps even 3:1. Some of this sulfhydryl appears to have been engaged in binding retinene to opsin; some may have been exposed as the result of changes in opsin which accompany bleaching, comparable with protein denaturation. PMID:13109155

  3. The Cytoplasmic Rhodopsin-Protein Interface: Potential for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Gardner, Eric; Riciutti, Alec; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin is a prototypic G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), interacting with the G protein, transducin, rhodopsin kinase, and arrestin. All of these proteins interact with rhodopsin at its cytoplasmic surface. Structural and modeling studies have provided in-depth descriptions of the respective interfaces. Overlap and thus competition for binding surfaces is a major regulatory mechanism for signal processing. Recently, it was found that the same surface is also targeted by small molecules. These ligands can directly interfere with the binding and activation of the proteins of the signal transduction cascade, but they can also allosterically modulate the retinal ligand binding pocket. Because the pocket that is targeted contains residues that are highly conserved across Class A GPCRs, these findings imply that it may be possible to target multiple GPCRs with the same ligand(s). This is desirable for example in complex diseases such as cancer where multiple GPCRs participate in the disease networks. PMID:21777183

  4. Kinase impact assessment in the landscape of fusion genes that retain kinase domains: a pan-cancer study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pora; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-12-24

    Assessing the impact of kinase in gene fusion is essential for both identifying driver fusion genes (FGs) and developing molecular targeted therapies. Kinase domain retention is a crucial factor in kinase fusion genes (KFGs), but such a systematic investigation has not been done yet. To this end, we analyzed kinase domain retention (KDR) status in chimeric protein sequences of 914 KFGs covering 312 kinases across 13 major cancer types. Based on 171 kinase domain-retained KFGs including 101 kinases, we studied their recurrence, kinase groups, fusion partners, exon-based expression depth, short DNA motifs around the break points and networks. Our results, such as more KDR than 5'-kinase fusion genes, combinatorial effects between 3'-KDR kinases and their 5'-partners and a signal transduction-specific DNA sequence motif in the break point intronic sequences, supported positive selection on 3'-kinase fusion genes in cancer. We introduced a degree-of-frequency (DoF) score to measure the possible number of KFGs of a kinase. Interestingly, kinases with high DoF scores tended to undergo strong gene expression alteration at the break points. Furthermore, our KDR gene fusion network analysis revealed six of the seven kinases with the highest DoF scores (ALK, BRAF, MET, NTRK1, NTRK3 and RET) were all observed in thyroid carcinoma. Finally, we summarized common features of 'effective' (highly recurrent) kinases in gene fusions such as expression alteration at break point, redundant usage in multiple cancer types and 3'-location tendency. Collectively, our findings are useful for prioritizing driver kinases and FGs and provided insights into KFGs' clinical implications. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Chromosome mapping of the human arrestin (SAG), {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase 2 (ADRBK2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, G.; Sallese, M.; Stornaiuolo, A.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of proteins play a major role in determining homologous desensitization of G-coupled receptors: {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase ({beta}ARK), which phosphorylates the agonist-occupied receptor and its functional cofactor, {beta}-arrestin. Both {beta}ARK and {beta}-arrestin are members of multigene families. The family of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases includes rhodopsin kinase, {beta}ARK1, {beta}ARK2, IT11-A (GRK4), GRK5, and GRK6. The arrestin/{beta}-arrestin gene family includes arrestin (also known as S-antigen), {beta}-arrestin 1, and {beta}-arrestin 2. Here we report the chromosome mapping of the human genes for arrestin (SAG), {beta}arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results confirmed the assignment of the gene coding for arrestin (SAG) to chromosome 2 and allowed us to refine its localization to band q37. The gene coding for {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2) was mapped to chromosome 17p13 and that coding for {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) to chromosome 22q11. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  6. The Wall-associated Kinase gene family in rice genomes.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; Christoff, Ana Paula; de Lima, Júlio Cesar; de Ross, Bruno Comparsi Feijó; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Margis, Rogerio

    2014-12-01

    The environment is a dynamic system in which life forms adapt. Wall-Associated Kinases (WAK) are a subfamily of receptor-like kinases associated with the cell wall. These genes have been suggested as sensors of the extracellular environment and triggers of intracellular signals. They belong to the ePK superfamily with or without a conserved arginine before the catalytic subdomain VIB, which characterizes RD and non-RD WAKs. WAK is a large subfamily in rice. We performed an extensive comparison of WAK genes from A. thaliana (AtWAK), O. sativa japonica and indica subspecies (OsWAK). Phylogenetic studies and WAK domain characterization allowed for the identification of two distinct groups of WAK genes in Arabidopsis and rice. One group corresponds to a cluster containing only OsWAKs that most likely expanded after the monocot-dicot separation, which evolved into a non-RD kinase class. The other group comprises classical RD-kinases with both AtWAK and OsWAK representatives. Clusterization analysis using extracellular and kinase domains demonstrated putative functional redundancy for some genes, but also highlighted genes that could recognize similar extracellular stimuli and activate different cascades. The gene expression pattern of WAKs in response to cold suggests differences in the regulation of the OsWAK genes in the indica and japonica subspecies. Our results also confirm the hypothesis of functional diversification between A. thaliana and O. sativa WAK genes. Furthermore, we propose that plant WAKs constitute two evolutionarily related but independent subfamilies: WAK-RD and WAK-nonRD. Recognition of this structural division will further provide insights to understanding WAK functions and regulations.

  7. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  8. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  9. Allele-Specific Inhibition of Rhodopsin With an Antisense Oligonucleotide Slows Photoreceptor Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Susan F.; Jazayeri, Ali; Matthes, Michael T.; Yasumura, Douglas; Yang, Haidong; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andy; Freier, Sue; Hung, Gene; Adamson, Peter S.; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P.; LaVail, Matthew M.; McCaleb, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To preserve photoreceptor cell structure and function in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa with P23H rhodopsin by selective inhibition of the mutant rhodopsin allele using a second generation antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Methods Wild-type mice and rats were treated with ASO by intravitreal (IVT) injection and rhodopsin mRNA and protein expression were measured. Transgenic rats expressing the murine P23H rhodopsin gene (P23H transgenic rat Line 1) were administered either a mouse-specific P23H ASO or a control ASO. The contralateral eye was injected with PBS and used as a comparator control. Electroretinography (ERG) measurements and analyses of the retinal outer nuclear layer were conducted and correlated with rhodopsin mRNA levels. Results Rhodopsin mRNA and protein expression was reduced after a single ASO injection in wild-type mice with a rhodopsin-specific ASO. Transgenic rat eyes that express a murine P23H rhodopsin gene injected with a murine P23H ASO had a 181 ± 39% better maximum amplitude response (scotopic a-wave) as compared with contralateral PBS-injected eyes; the response in control ASO eyes was not significantly different from comparator contralateral eyes. Morphometric analysis of the outer nuclear layer showed a significantly thicker nuclear layer in eyes injected with murine P23H ASO (18%) versus contralateral PBS-injected eyes. Conclusions Allele-specific ASO-mediated knockdown of mutant P23H rhodopsin expression slowed the rate of photoreceptor degeneration and preserved the function of photoreceptor cells in eyes of the P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat. Our data indicate that ASO treatment is a potentially effective therapy for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26436889

  10. Retinal Flip in Rhodopsin Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Brown, Michael F.; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a well-characterized structural model of a G protein-coupled receptor. Photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal triggers activation. Surprisingly, the x-ray crystal structure of the active Meta-II state has a 180° rotation about the long-axis of the retinal polyene chain. Unbiased microsecond-timescale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the retinal cofactor can flip back to the orientation observed in the inactive state of rhodopsin under conditions favoring the Meta-I state. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence from molecular dynamics simulations showing how rotation of the retinal ligand within its binding pocket can occur in the activation mechanism of rhodopsin. PMID:26083914

  11. Cyanobacterial Light-Driven Proton Pump, Gloeobacter Rhodopsin: Complementarity between Rhodopsin-Based Energy Production and Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah Reum; Shi, Lichi; Brown, Leonid S.; Jung, Kwang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A homologue of type I rhodopsin was found in the unicellular Gloeobacter violaceus PCC7421, which is believed to be primitive because of the lack of thylakoids and peculiar morphology of phycobilisomes. The Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR) gene encodes a polypeptide of 298 amino acids. This gene is localized alone in the genome unlike cyanobacterium Anabaena opsin, which is clustered together with 14 kDa transducer gene. Amino acid sequence comparison of GR with other type I rhodopsin shows several conserved residues important for retinal binding and H+ pumping. In this study, the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and bound all-trans retinal to form a pigment (λmax  = 544 nm at pH 7). The pKa of proton acceptor (Asp121) for the Schiff base, is approximately 5.9, so GR can translocate H+ under physiological conditions (pH 7.4). In order to prove the functional activity in the cell, pumping activity was measured in the sphaeroplast membranes of E. coli and one of Gloeobacter whole cell. The efficient proton pumping and rapid photocycle of GR strongly suggests that Gloeobacter rhodopsin functions as a proton pumping in its natural environment, probably compensating the shortage of energy generated by chlorophyll-based photosynthesis without thylakoids. PMID:25347537

  12. Rescue of Photoreceptor Degeneration by Curcumin in Transgenic Rats with P23H Rhodopsin Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Chavali, Venkata R. M.; Joseph, Victory T.; Kadam, Rajendra; Lin, Jonathan H.; Jamison, Jeffrey A.; Kompella, Uday B.; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-01-01

    The P23H mutation in the rhodopsin gene causes rhodopsin misfolding, altered trafficking and formation of insoluble aggregates leading to photoreceptor degeneration and autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). There are no effective therapies to treat this condition. Compounds that enhance dissociation of protein aggregates may be of value in developing new treatments for such diseases. Anti-protein aggregating activity of curcumin has been reported earlier. In this study we present that treatment of COS-7 cells expressing mutant rhodopsin with curcumin results in dissociation of mutant protein aggregates and decreases endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore we demonstrate that administration of curcumin to P23H-rhodopsin transgenic rats improves retinal morphology, physiology, gene expression and localization of rhodopsin. Our findings indicate that supplementation of curcumin improves retinal structure and function in P23H-rhodopsin transgenic rats. This data also suggest that curcumin may serve as a potential therapeutic agent in treating RP due to the P23H rhodopsin mutation and perhaps other degenerative diseases caused by protein trafficking defects. PMID:21738619

  13. Light-Promoted Rhodopsin Expression and Starvation Survival in the Marine Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of microbial rhodopsins in marine proteobacteria changed the dogma that photosynthesis is the only pathway to use the solar energy for biological utilization in the marine environment. Although homologs of these rhodopsins have been identified in dinoflagellates, the diversity of the encoding genes and their physiological roles remain unexplored. As an initial step toward addressing the gap, we conducted high-throughput transcriptome sequencing on Oxyrrhis marina to retrieve rhodopsin transcripts, rapid amplification of cDNA ends to isolate full-length cDNAs of dominant representatives, and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR to investigate their expression under varying conditions. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that O. marina contained both the proton-pumping type (PR) and sensory type (SR) rhodopsins, and the transcriptome data showed that the PR type dominated over the SR type. We compared rhodopsin gene expression for cultures kept under light: dark cycle and continuous darkness in a time course of 24 days without feeding. Although both types of rhodopsin were expressed under the two conditions, the expression levels of PR were much higher than SR, consistent with the transcriptomic data. Furthermore, relative to cultures kept in the dark, rhodopsin expression levels and cell survival rate were both higher in cultures grown in the light. This is the first report of light-dependent promotion of starvation survival and concomitant promotion of PR expression in a eukaryote. While direct evidence needs to come from functional test on rhodopsins in vitro or gene knockout/knockdown experiments, our results suggest that the proton-pumping rhodopsin might be responsible for the light-enhanced survival of O. marina, as previously demonstrated in bacteria. PMID:25506945

  14. Updated rice kinase database RKD 2.0: enabling transcriptome and functional analysis of rice kinase genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of a phosphate moiety from a phosphate donor to the substrate molecule, thus, playing critical roles in cell signaling and metabolism. Although plant genomes contain more than 1,000 genes that encode kinases, knowledge is limited about the precise roles for the...

  15. Identification of a single phosphorylation site within octopus rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ohguro, H; Yoshida, N; Shindou, H; Crabb, J W; Palczewski, K; Tsuda, M

    1998-12-01

    Light-dependent phosphorylation of rhodopsin (Rho) is a first step in the desensitization of the signaling state of the receptor during vertebrate and invertebrate visual transduction. We found that only 358Ser of the photoactivated octopus Rho (oRho*) was phosphorylated by octopus rhodopsin kinase (oRK). Tryptic truncation of the C-terminal PPQGY repeats of oRho that follow the phosphorylation region did not influence spectral or G-protein activation properties of oRho but abolished phosphorylation. Despite significant structural differences between oRK and mammalian RK, these results provide further evidence of the importance of singly phosphorylated species of Rho* in the generation of arrestin binding sites.

  16. A Causal Gene for Seed Dormancy on Wheat Chromosome 4A Encodes a MAP Kinase Kinase.

    PubMed

    Torada, Atsushi; Koike, Michiya; Ogawa, Taiichi; Takenouchi, Yu; Tadamura, Kazuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kawaura, Kanako; Ogihara, Yasunari

    2016-03-21

    Seed germination under the appropriate environmental conditions is important both for plant species survival and for successful agriculture. Seed dormancy, which controls germination time, is one of the adaptation mechanisms and domestication traits [1]. Seed dormancy is generally defined as the absence of germination of a viable seed under conditions that are favorable for germination [2]. The seed dormancy of cultivated plants has generally been reduced during domestication [3]. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely grown crops in the world. Weak dormancy may be an advantage for the productivity due to uniform emergence and a disadvantage for the risks of pre-harvest sprouting (PHS), which decreases grain quality and yield [4]. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling natural variation of seed dormancy have been identified on various chromosomes [5]. A major QTL for seed dormancy has been consistently detected on chromosome 4A [6-13]. The QTL was designated as a major gene, Phs1, which could be precisely mapped within a 2.6 cM region [14]. Here, we identified a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) gene (designated TaMKK3-A) by a map-based approach as a candidate gene for the seed dormancy locus Phs1 on chromosome 4A in bread wheat. Complementation analysis showed that transformation of a dormant wheat cultivar with the TaMKK3-A allele from a nondormant cultivar clearly reduced seed dormancy. Cultivars differing in dormancy had a single nonsynonymous amino acid substitution in the kinase domain of the predicted MKK3 protein sequence, which may be associated with the length of seed dormancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacteriophage T4 deoxynucleotide kinase: gene cloning and enzyme purification.

    PubMed Central

    Brush, G S; Bhatnagar, S K; Bessman, M J

    1990-01-01

    Gene 1 of bacteriophage T4 has been cloned into a lambda pL expression vector, resulting in the overproduction of deoxynucleotide kinase. A procedure that includes affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue F3GA-agarose has been used to purify milligram quantities of enzymes from a 2-liter culture. The enzyme has been partially characterized in vitro and in vivo, and it appears to be identical to the deoxynucleotide kinase isolated from T4-infected Escherichia coli. These results prove the earlier contention that the phosphorylation of three dissimilar deoxynucleotides (5-hydroxymethyldeoxycytidylate, dTMP, and dGMP), to the exclusion of most others, is catalyzed by a single protein. Images PMID:2160930

  18. A G protein-coupled receptor phosphatase required for rhodopsin function.

    PubMed

    Vinós, J; Jalink, K; Hardy, R W; Britt, S G; Zuker, C S

    1997-08-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors are phosphorylated by kinases that mediate agonist-dependent receptor deactivation. Although many receptor kinases have been isolated, the corresponding phosphatases, necessary for restoring the ground state of the receptor, have not been identified. Drosophila RDGC (retinal degeneration C) is a phosphatase required for rhodopsin dephosphorylation in vivo. Loss of RDGC caused severe defects in the termination of the light response as well as extensive light-dependent retinal degeneration. These phenotypes resulted from the hyperphosphorylation of rhodopsin because expression of a truncated rhodopsin lacking the phosphorylation sites restored normal photoreceptor function. These results suggest the existence of a family of receptor phosphatases involved in the regulation of G protein-coupled signaling cascades.

  19. MicRhoDE: a curated database for the analysis of microbial rhodopsin diversity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Boeuf, Dominique; Audic, Stéphane; Brillet-Guéguen, Loraine; Caron, Christophe; Jeanthon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photoactive transmembrane proteins found in all three domains of life and in viruses. Today, microbial rhodopsin research is a flourishing research field in which new understandings of rhodopsin diversity, function and evolution are contributing to broader microbiological and molecular knowledge. Here, we describe MicRhoDE, a comprehensive, high-quality and freely accessible database that facilitates analysis of the diversity and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Rhodopsin sequences isolated from a vast array of marine and terrestrial environments were manually collected and curated. To each rhodopsin sequence are associated related metadata, including predicted spectral tuning of the protein, putative activity and function, taxonomy for sequences that can be linked to a 16S rRNA gene, sampling date and location, and supporting literature. The database currently covers 7857 aligned sequences from more than 450 environmental samples or organisms. Based on a robust phylogenetic analysis, we introduce an operational classification system with multiple phylogenetic levels ranging from superclusters to species-level operational taxonomic units. An integrated pipeline for online sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction is also provided. With a user-friendly interface and integrated online bioinformatics tools, this unique resource should be highly valuable for upcoming studies of the biogeography, diversity, distribution and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Database URL: http://micrhode.sb-roscoff.fr. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Rhodopsin Molecular Evolution in Mammals Inhabiting Low Light Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabin; Ru, Binghua; Teeling, Emma C.; Faulkes, Christopher G.; Zhang, Shuyi; Rossiter, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The ecological radiation of mammals to inhabit a variety of light environments is largely attributed to adaptive changes in their visual systems. Visual capabilities are conferred by anatomical features of the eyes as well as the combination and properties of their constituent light sensitive pigments. To test whether evolutionary switches to different niches characterized by dim-light conditions coincided with molecular adaptation of the rod pigment rhodopsin, we sequenced the rhodopsin gene in twenty-two mammals including several bats and subterranean mole-rats. We compared these to thirty-seven published mammal rhodopsin sequences, from species with divergent visual ecologies, including nocturnal, diurnal and aquatic groups. All taxa possessed an intact functional rhodopsin; however, phylogenetic tree reconstruction recovered a gene tree in which rodents were not monophyletic, and also in which echolocating bats formed a monophyletic group. These conflicts with the species tree appear to stem from accelerated evolution in these groups, both of which inhabit low light environments. Selection tests confirmed divergent selection pressures in the clades of subterranean rodents and bats, as well as in marine mammals that live in turbid conditions. We also found evidence of divergent selection pressures among groups of bats with different sensory modalities based on vision and echolocation. Sliding window analyses suggest most changes occur in transmembrane domains, particularly obvious within the pinnipeds; however, we found no obvious pattern between photopic niche and predicted spectral sensitivity based on known critical amino acids. This study indicates that the independent evolution of rhodopsin vision in ecologically specialised groups of mammals has involved molecular evolution at the sequence level, though such changes might not mediate spectral sensitivity directly. PMID:20016835

  1. Constitutively Active Rhodopsin and Retinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul Shin-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor in rod photoreceptor cells of the retina that initiates scotopic vision. In the dark, rhodopsin is bound to the chromophore 11-cis retinal, which locks the receptor in an inactive state. The maintenance of an inactive rhodopsin in the dark is critical for rod photoreceptor cells to remain highly sensitive. Perturbations by mutation or absence of 11-cis retinal can cause rhodopsin to become constitutively active, which leads to the desensitization of photoreceptor cells and, in some instances, retinal degeneration. Constitutive activity can arise in rhodopsin by various mechanisms and can cause a variety of inherited retinal diseases including Leber congenital amaurosis, congenital night blindness, and retinitis pigmentosa. In this review, the molecular and structural properties of different constitutively active forms of rhodopsin are overviewed and the possibility that constitutive activity can arise from different active-state conformations is discussed. PMID:24931191

  2. The Activation Pathway of Human Rhodopsin in Comparison to Bovine Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Szczepek, Michal; Elgeti, Matthias; Ritter, Eglof; Piechnick, Ronny; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Bartl, Franz J.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor of rod cells, absorbs light to mediate the first step of vision by activating the G protein transducin (Gt). Several human diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa or congenital night blindness, are linked to rhodopsin malfunctions. Most of the corresponding in vivo studies and structure-function analyses (e.g. based on protein x-ray crystallography or spectroscopy) have been carried out on murine or bovine rhodopsin. Because these rhodopsins differ at several amino acid positions from human rhodopsin, we conducted a comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of human rhodopsin in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. We show by FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy that the light-induced transformations of the early photointermediates are very similar. Significant differences between the pigments appear with formation of the still inactive Meta I state and the transition to active Meta II. However, the conformation of Meta II and its activity toward the G protein are essentially the same, presumably reflecting the evolutionary pressure under which the active state has developed. Altogether, our results show that although the basic activation pathways of human and bovine rhodopsin are similar, structural deviations exist in the inactive conformation and during receptor activation, even between closely related rhodopsins. These differences between the well studied bovine or murine rhodopsins and human rhodopsin have to be taken into account when the influence of point mutations on the activation pathway of human rhodopsin are investigated using the bovine or murine rhodopsin template sequences. PMID:26105054

  3. Rhodopsin of the larval mosquito.

    PubMed

    Brown, P K; White, R H

    1972-04-01

    Larvae of the mosquito Aedes aegypti have a cluster of four ocelli on each side of the head. The visual pigment of each ocellus of mosquitoes reared in darkness was characterized by microspectrophotometry, and found to be the same. Larval mosquito rhodopsin (lambda(max) = 515 nm) upon short irradiation bleaches to a stable photoequilibrium with metarhodopsin (lambda(max) = 480 nm). On long irradiation of glutaraldehyde-fixed tissues or in the presence of potassium borohydride, bleaching goes further, and potassium borohydride reduces the product, retinal, to retinol (vitamin A(1)). In the presence of hydroxylamine, the rhodopsin bleaches rapidly, with conversion of the chromophore to retinaldehyde oxime (lambda(max) about 365 nm).

  4. The ANKK1 kinase gene and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Guillermo; Pérez-González, Rocío; Aragüés, María; Palomo, Tomás; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Hoenicka, Janet

    2009-07-01

    The TaqIA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs1800497), which is located in the gene that codes for the putative kinase ANKK1 (ANKK1) near the termination codon of the D2 dopamine receptor gene (DRD2; chromosome 11q22-q23), is the most studied genetic variation in a broad range of psychiatric disorders and personality traits. A large number of individual genetic association studies have found that the TaqIA SNP is linked to alcoholism and antisocial traits. In addition, it has also been related to other conditions such as schizophrenia, eating disorders, and some behavioral childhood disorders. The TaqIA A1 allele is mainly associated with addictions, antisocial disorders, eating disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders, while the A2 allele occurs more frequently in schizophrenic and obsessive-compulsive patients. Current data show that the TaqIA polymorphism may be a marker of both DRD2 and ANKK1 genetic variants. ANKK1 would belong to a family of kinases involved in signal transduction. This raises the question of whether signaling players intervene in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Basic research on the ANKK1 protein and its putative interaction with the D2 dopamine receptor could shed light on this issue.

  5. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  6. Constitutively active rhodopsin mutants causing night blindness are effectively phosphorylated by GRKs but differ in arrestin-1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey. A.; Ostermaier, Martin K.; Singhal, Ankita; Panneels, Valerie; Homan, Kristoff T.; Glukhova, Alisa; Sligar, Stephen G.; Tesmer, John J. G.; Schertler, Gebhard F.X.; Standfuss, Joerg; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of activating mutations associated with night blindness on the stoichiometry of rhodopsin interactions with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) and arrestin-1 have not been reported. Here we show that the monomeric form of WT rhodopsin and its constitutively active mutants M257Y, G90D, and T94I, reconstituted into HDL particles are effectively phosphorylated by GRK1, as well as two more ubiquitously expressed subtypes, GRK2 and GRK5. All versions of arrestin-1 tested (WT, pre-activated, and constitutively monomeric mutants) bind to monomeric rhodopsin and show the same selectivity for different functional forms of rhodopsin as in native disc membranes. Rhodopsin phosphorylation by GRK1 and GRK2 promotes arrestin-1 binding to a comparable extent, whereas similar phosphorylation by GRK5 is less effective, suggesting that not all phosphorylation sites on rhodopsin are equivalent in promoting arrestin-1 binding. The binding of WT arrestin-1 to phospho-opsin is comparable to the binding to its preferred target, P-Rh*, suggesting that in photoreceptors arrestin-1 only dissociates after opsin regeneration with 11-cis-retinal, which converts phospho-opsin into inactive phospho-rhodopsin that has lower affinity for arrestin-1. Reduced binding of arrestin-1 to the phospho-opsin form of G90D mutant likely contributes to night blindness caused by this mutation in humans. PMID:23872075

  7. Safe and Efficient Gene Therapy for Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Maria; Calabria, Andrea; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Kosinski, Penelope; López-Manzaneda, Sergio; Hill, Collin; del Mar Mañu-Pereira, María; Martín, Miguel A; Orman, Israel; Vives-Corrons, Joan-LLuis; Kung, Charles; Schambach, Axel; Jin, Shengfang; Bueren, Juan A; Montini, Eugenio; Navarro, Susana; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) is a monogenic metabolic disease caused by mutations in the PKLR gene that leads to hemolytic anemia of variable symptomatology and that can be fatal during the neonatal period. PKD recessive inheritance trait and its curative treatment by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation provide an ideal scenario for developing gene therapy approaches. Here, we provide a preclinical gene therapy for PKD based on a lentiviral vector harboring the hPGK eukaryotic promoter that drives the expression of the PKLR cDNA. This therapeutic vector was used to transduce mouse PKD hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that were subsequently transplanted into myeloablated PKD mice. Ectopic RPK expression normalized the erythroid compartment correcting the hematological phenotype and reverting organ pathology. Metabolomic studies demonstrated functional correction of the glycolytic pathway in RBCs derived from genetically corrected PKD HSCs, with no metabolic disturbances in leukocytes. The analysis of the lentiviral insertion sites in the genome of transplanted hematopoietic cells demonstrated no evidence of genotoxicity in any of the transplanted animals. Overall, our results underscore the therapeutic potential of the hPGK-coRPK lentiviral vector and provide high expectations toward the gene therapy of PKD and other erythroid metabolic genetic disorders. PMID:27138040

  8. Safe and Efficient Gene Therapy for Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gomez, Maria; Calabria, Andrea; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Kosinski, Penelope; López-Manzaneda, Sergio; Hill, Collin; Del Mar Mañu-Pereira, María; Martín, Miguel A; Orman, Israel; Vives-Corrons, Joan-LLuis; Kung, Charles; Schambach, Axel; Jin, Shengfang; Bueren, Juan A; Montini, Eugenio; Navarro, Susana; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-08-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) is a monogenic metabolic disease caused by mutations in the PKLR gene that leads to hemolytic anemia of variable symptomatology and that can be fatal during the neonatal period. PKD recessive inheritance trait and its curative treatment by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation provide an ideal scenario for developing gene therapy approaches. Here, we provide a preclinical gene therapy for PKD based on a lentiviral vector harboring the hPGK eukaryotic promoter that drives the expression of the PKLR cDNA. This therapeutic vector was used to transduce mouse PKD hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that were subsequently transplanted into myeloablated PKD mice. Ectopic RPK expression normalized the erythroid compartment correcting the hematological phenotype and reverting organ pathology. Metabolomic studies demonstrated functional correction of the glycolytic pathway in RBCs derived from genetically corrected PKD HSCs, with no metabolic disturbances in leukocytes. The analysis of the lentiviral insertion sites in the genome of transplanted hematopoietic cells demonstrated no evidence of genotoxicity in any of the transplanted animals. Overall, our results underscore the therapeutic potential of the hPGK-coRPK lentiviral vector and provide high expectations toward the gene therapy of PKD and other erythroid metabolic genetic disorders.

  9. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling.

  10. Microbial and viral-like rhodopsins present in coastal marine sediments from four polar and subpolar regions

    SciTech Connect

    López, José L.; Golemba, Marcelo; Hernández, Edgardo; Lozada, Mariana; Dionisi, Hebe; Jansson, Janet K.; Carroll, Jolynn; Lundgren, Leif; Sjöling, Sara; Mac Cormack, Walter P.; Sobecky, Patricia

    2016-11-03

    Rhodopsins are broadly distributed. In this work, we analyzed 23 metagenomes corresponding to marine sediment samples from four regions that share cold climate conditions (Norway; Sweden; Argentina and Antarctica). In order to investigate the genes evolution of viral rhodopsins, an initial set of 6224 bacterial rhodopsin sequences according to COG5524 were retrieved from the 23 metagenomes. After selection by the presence of transmembrane domains and alignment, 123 viral (51) and non-viral (72) sequences (>50 amino acids) were finally included in further analysis. Viral rhodopsin genes were homologs of Phaeocystis globosa virus and Organic lake Phycodnavirus. Non-viral microbial rhodopsin genes were ascribed to Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus and Cryptophyta and Fungi. A rescreening using Blastp, using as queries the viral sequences previously described, retrieved 30 sequences (>100 amino acids). Phylogeographic analysis revealed a geographical clustering of the sequences affiliated to the viral group. This clustering was not observed for the microbial non-viral sequences. The phylogenetic reconstruction allowed us to propose the existence of a putative ancestor of viral rhodopsin genes related to Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi. This is the first report about the existence of a phylogeographic association of the viral rhodopsin sequences from marine sediments.

  11. [Therapeutic effect of focal adhesion kinase gene silence on leukemia].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lü-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Xu, Hong-Gui; Zhang, Ya-Ting

    2011-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) gene silence on leukemia cell growth, leukemogenesis and efficacy of chemotherapy drug. Vector containing lentiviral-FAK-shRNA was constructed and transfected into BCR/ABL-BaF3 leukemic cells, the cell growth and apoptosis were detected in vitro. The effect of FAK shRNA on leukemogenesis was studied in a murine model with leukemia. The apoptosis of leukemia cells and survival of leukemic mice treated by FAK shRNA combined with drug STI571 were monitored. The results showed that FAK gene expression was knocked down by lentiviral-FAK-shRNA. FAK gene silencing inhibited leukemia cell growth in vitro. The apoptosis test results showed that the percentages of Annexin V(+) cells in vector control group and FAK shRNA group were (3.46 ± 0.56)% and (7.3 ± 0.79)%, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mice in vector control group died at day 21 to 27, while the mice in FAK shRNA group died between day 52 and 60, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Moreover, FAK gene silence combined with drug STI571 could enhance the apoptosis of leukemia cells and prolong survival time of leukemic mice. It is concluded that FAK gene silence inhibits leukemogenesis and promotes efficacy of chemotherapy drug on leukemia cells, indicating FAK gene silence may be considered as a new therapeutic strategy for leukemia.

  12. Ultraviolet Chromophore Transitions in the Rhodopsin Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Ebrey, Thomas G.; Honig, Barry

    1972-01-01

    Difference spectra measured at -105° show two decreases in the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of rhodopsin upon bleaching that cannot be attributed to changes in protein conformation. These absorbancy decreases in rhodopsin are consistent with a cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore. PMID:4505668

  13. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  14. Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutations in the Pantothenate Kinase 2 Gene in a Korean Patient with Atypical Pantothenate Kinase Associated Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Hyouk; Sung, Young-Hee; Park, Kee-Hyung; Lee, Yeung-Bae; Park, Hyeon-Mi; Shin, Dong Jin; Kim, Gu-Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2) and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. We report a case of atypical PKAN presenting with generalized dystonia. Our patient had compound heterozygous mutations in the PANK2 gene, including mutation in exon 3 (p.D268G) and exon 4 (p.R330P). To our knowledge, this patient is the first to have the p.R330P mutation and the second to have the p.D268G mutation. PMID:24868354

  15. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene in a korean patient with atypical pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyouk; Sung, Young-Hee; Park, Kee-Hyung; Lee, Yeung-Bae; Park, Hyeon-Mi; Shin, Dong Jin; Kim, Gu-Hwan

    2009-05-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2) and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. We report a case of atypical PKAN presenting with generalized dystonia. Our patient had compound heterozygous mutations in the PANK2 gene, including mutation in exon 3 (p.D268G) and exon 4 (p.R330P). To our knowledge, this patient is the first to have the p.R330P mutation and the second to have the p.D268G mutation.

  16. Rhodopsin-Regulated Insulin Receptor Signaling Pathway in Rod Photoreceptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Raju V.S.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The retina is an integral part of the central nervous system and retinal cells are known to express insulin receptors (IR), although their function is not known. This article describes recent studies that link the photoactivation of rhodopsin to tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR and subsequent activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), a neuron survival factor. Our studies suggest that the physiological role of this process is to provide neuroprotection of the retina against light-damage by activating proteins that protect against stress-induced apoptosis. We focus mainly on our recently identified regulation of the IR pathway through the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. Various mutant and knockout proteins of phototransduction cascade have been used to study the light-induced activation of the retinal IR. Our studies suggest that rhodopsin may have additional previously uncharacterized signaling functions in photoreceptors. PMID:20407846

  17. Microbial Rhodopsins: Diversity, Mechanisms, and Optogenetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L

    2017-06-20

    Microbial rhodopsins are a family of photoactive retinylidene proteins widespread throughout the microbial world. They are notable for their diversity of function, using variations of a shared seven-transmembrane helix design and similar photochemical reactions to carry out distinctly different light-driven energy and sensory transduction processes. Their study has contributed to our understanding of how evolution modifies protein scaffolds to create new protein chemistry, and their use as tools to control membrane potential with light is fundamental to optogenetics for research and clinical applications. We review the currently known functions and present more in-depth assessment of three functionally and structurally distinct types discovered over the past two years: (a) anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) from cryptophyte algae, which enable efficient optogenetic neural suppression; (b) cryptophyte cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs), structurally distinct from the green algae CCRs used extensively for neural activation and from cryptophyte ACRs; and (c) enzymerhodopsins, with light-gated guanylyl cyclase or kinase activity promising for optogenetic control of signal transduction.

  18. Study of the orientation of retinal in bovine rhodopsin: the use of a photoactivatable retinal analog

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.

    1987-05-01

    Rhodopsin is the major transmembrane protein in the photoreceptor cells of vertebrate and invertebrate retina. Bovine rhodopsin consists of a polypeptide chain of 348 amino acids of known sequence in which the chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, is linked to Lys-296 as a Schiff base. To investigate the orientation of retinal in the protein and to study the interactions between retinal and the protein, the authors have developed a crosslinking approach using a /sup 3/H-labeled photoactivatable analog of retinal. Bleached rhodopsin in rod outer segments was reconstituted with the analog to give a pigment with lambda/sub max/ at 460nm. Reduction of the Schiff base with borane dimenthylamine, followed by degradation with CNBr and sequencing of the radioactive fragment showed that the analog is attached to Lys-296, as in the native rhodopsin. Further, the reconstitute protein after photolysis was phosphorylated by rhodopsin kinase. Photolysis of the reconstituted pigment at -15/sup 0/C resulted in crosslinking of the analog to the opsin to the extent of 30% as analyzed by SDS electrophoresis. The site(s) of crosslinking in the protein are under investigation.

  19. Relevance of rhodopsin studies for GPCR activation.

    PubMed

    Deupi, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Rhodopsin, the dim-light photoreceptor present in the rod cells of the retina, is both a retinal-binding protein and a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Due to this conjunction, it benefits from an arsenal of spectroscopy techniques that can be used for its characterization, while being a model system for the important family of Class A (also referred to as "rhodopsin-like") GPCRs. For instance, rhodopsin has been a crucial player in the field of GPCR structural biology. Until 2007, it was the only GPCR for which a high-resolution crystal structure was available, so all structure-activity analyses on GPCRs, from structure-based drug discovery to studies of structural changes upon activation, were based on rhodopsin. At present, about a third of currently available GPCR structures are still from rhodopsin. In this review, I show some examples of how these structures can still be used to gain insight into general aspects of GPCR activation. First, the analysis of the third intracellular loop in rhodopsin structures allows us to gain an understanding of the structural and dynamic properties of this region, which is absent (due to protein engineering or poor electron density) in most of the currently available GPCR structures. Second, a detailed analysis of the structure of the transmembrane domains in inactive, intermediate and active rhodopsin structures allows us to detect early conformational changes in the process of ligand-induced GPCR activation. Finally, the analysis of a conserved ligand-activated transmission switch in the transmembrane bundle of GPCRs in the context of the rhodopsin activation cycle, allows us to suggest that the structures of many of the currently available agonist-bound GPCRs may correspond to intermediate active states. While the focus in GPCR structural biology is inevitably moving away from rhodopsin, in other aspects rhodopsin is still at the forefront. For instance, the first studies of the structural basis of disease mutants in

  20. Yeast Pho85 kinase is required for proper gene expression during the diauxic shift.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Masafumi; Katou, Yuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Toh-e, Akio

    2004-08-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae changes its gene expression profile when environmental nutritional conditions are changed. Protein kinases including cyclic AMP-dependent kinase, Snf1 and Tor kinases play important roles in this process. Pho85 kinase, a member of the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase family, is involved in the regulation of phosphate metabolism and reserve carbohydrates, and thus is implicated to function as a nutrient-sensing kinase. Upon depletion of glucose in the medium, yeast cells undergo a diauxic shift, accompanied by a carbon metabolic pathway shift, stimulation of mitochondrial function and downregulation of ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis. We analysed the effect of a pho85Delta mutation on the expression profiles of the genes in this process to investigate whether Pho85 kinase participates in the yeast diauxy. We found that, in the absence of PHO85, a majority of mitochondrial genes were not properly induced, that proteasome-related and chaperonin genes were more repressed, and that, when glucose was still present in the medium, a certain class of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis (ribosomal protein and rRNA processing genes) was repressed, whereas those involved in gluconeogenesis and the glyoxylate cycle were induced. We also found that PHO85 is required for proper expression of several metal sensor genes and their regulatory genes. These results suggest that Pho85 is required for proper onset of changes in expression profiles of genes responsible for the diauxic shift.

  1. Separate nuclear genes encode cytosolic and mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Troll, H; Winckler, T; Lascu, I; Müller, N; Saurin, W; Véron, M; Mutzel, R

    1993-12-05

    We have previously isolated cDNA clones for the gip17 gene encoding the cytosolic nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, and partial cDNAs for guk, a second member of the NDP kinase gene family (Wallet, V., Mutzel, R., Troll, H., Barzu, O., Wurster, B., Véron, M., and Lacombe, M. L. (1990) J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 80, 1199-1202). We now characterize genomic DNA clones for both NDP kinase genes, and we show that guk defines a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial NDP kinase. Isolated D. discoideum mitochondria contain 3% of the total cellular NDP kinase activity. Antibodies which specifically recognize and inhibit the activity of either cytosolic or mitochondrial NDP kinase unambiguously distinguish between these activities. The nascent mitochondrial NDP kinase contains a presequence of 57 amino acids that is removed during import into the organelle as shown by determination of the NH2 terminus of the mature protein from mitochondria. The genes for mitochondrial and cytosolic NDP kinases contain four and two introns, respectively. The positions of the of the introns in the gene for the cytosolic enzyme match exactly the positions of the second and fourth introns in the coding region of its mitochondrial homologue. From these results we conclude that the isozymes diverged from a common ancestor, and we discuss possible phylogenetic pathways for the evolution of cytosolic and organelle NDP kinases.

  2. Genomic makeup of the marine flavobacterium Nonlabens (Donghaeana) dokdonensis and identification of a novel class of rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Byung Kwon; Song, Ju Yeon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin-containing marine microbes such as those in the class Flavobacteriia play a pivotal role in the biogeochemical cycle of the euphotic zone (Fuhrman JA, Schwalbach MS, Stingl U. 2008. Proteorhodopsins: an array of physiological roles? Nat Rev Microbiol. 6:488-494). Deciphering the genome information of flavobacteria and accessing the diversity and ecological impact of microbial rhodopsins are important in understanding and preserving the global ecosystems. The genome sequence of the orange-pigmented marine flavobacterium Nonlabens dokdonensis (basonym: Donghaeana dokdonensis) DSW-6 was determined. As a marine photoheterotroph, DSW-6 has written in its genome physiological features that allow survival in the oligotrophic environments. The sequence analysis also uncovered a gene encoding an unexpected type of microbial rhodopsin containing a unique motif in addition to a proteorhodopsin gene and a number of photolyase or cryptochrome genes. Homologs of the novel rhodopsin gene were found in other flavobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, a species of Cytophagia, a deinococcus, and even a eukaryote diatom. They all contain the characteristic NQ motif and form a phylogenetically distinct group. Expression analysis of this rhodopsin gene in DSW-6 indicated that it is induced at high NaCl concentrations, as well as in the presence of light and the absence of nutrients. Genomic and metagenomic surveys demonstrate the diversity of the NQ rhodopsins in nature and the prevalent occurrence of the encoding genes among microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline niches, suggesting its involvement in sodium metabolism and the sodium-adapted lifestyle.

  3. Genomic Makeup of the Marine Flavobacterium Nonlabens (Donghaeana) dokdonensis and Identification of a Novel Class of Rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Byung Kwon; Song, Ju Yeon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin-containing marine microbes such as those in the class Flavobacteriia play a pivotal role in the biogeochemical cycle of the euphotic zone (Fuhrman JA, Schwalbach MS, Stingl U. 2008. Proteorhodopsins: an array of physiological roles? Nat Rev Microbiol. 6:488–494). Deciphering the genome information of flavobacteria and accessing the diversity and ecological impact of microbial rhodopsins are important in understanding and preserving the global ecosystems. The genome sequence of the orange-pigmented marine flavobacterium Nonlabens dokdonensis (basonym: Donghaeana dokdonensis) DSW-6 was determined. As a marine photoheterotroph, DSW-6 has written in its genome physiological features that allow survival in the oligotrophic environments. The sequence analysis also uncovered a gene encoding an unexpected type of microbial rhodopsin containing a unique motif in addition to a proteorhodopsin gene and a number of photolyase or cryptochrome genes. Homologs of the novel rhodopsin gene were found in other flavobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, a species of Cytophagia, a deinococcus, and even a eukaryote diatom. They all contain the characteristic NQ motif and form a phylogenetically distinct group. Expression analysis of this rhodopsin gene in DSW-6 indicated that it is induced at high NaCl concentrations, as well as in the presence of light and the absence of nutrients. Genomic and metagenomic surveys demonstrate the diversity of the NQ rhodopsins in nature and the prevalent occurrence of the encoding genes among microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline niches, suggesting its involvement in sodium metabolism and the sodium-adapted lifestyle. PMID:23292138

  4. The Activation Pathway of Human Rhodopsin in Comparison to Bovine Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Szczepek, Michal; Elgeti, Matthias; Ritter, Eglof; Piechnick, Ronny; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W; Bartl, Franz J

    2015-08-14

    Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor of rod cells, absorbs light to mediate the first step of vision by activating the G protein transducin (Gt). Several human diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa or congenital night blindness, are linked to rhodopsin malfunctions. Most of the corresponding in vivo studies and structure-function analyses (e.g. based on protein x-ray crystallography or spectroscopy) have been carried out on murine or bovine rhodopsin. Because these rhodopsins differ at several amino acid positions from human rhodopsin, we conducted a comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of human rhodopsin in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. We show by FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy that the light-induced transformations of the early photointermediates are very similar. Significant differences between the pigments appear with formation of the still inactive Meta I state and the transition to active Meta II. However, the conformation of Meta II and its activity toward the G protein are essentially the same, presumably reflecting the evolutionary pressure under which the active state has developed. Altogether, our results show that although the basic activation pathways of human and bovine rhodopsin are similar, structural deviations exist in the inactive conformation and during receptor activation, even between closely related rhodopsins. These differences between the well studied bovine or murine rhodopsins and human rhodopsin have to be taken into account when the influence of point mutations on the activation pathway of human rhodopsin are investigated using the bovine or murine rhodopsin template sequences. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Cadmium activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene and MBP kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Hsiao, Lin-June; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are modules involved in the transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular targets in all eukaryotes. In plants, it has been evidenced that MAPKs play a role in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stresses, plant hormones, and cell cycle cues. However, the effect of heavy metals on plant MAPKs has not been well examined. The Northern blot analysis of OsMAPK mRNA levels has shown that only OsMAPK2, but not OsMAPK3 and OsMAPK4, expressed in suspension-cultured cells in response to 100-400 microM Cd treatments. The OsMAPK2 transcripts increased within 12 h upon 400 microM Cd treatment. In addition, we found that 42- and 50-kDa MBP kinases were significantly activated by Cd treatment in rice suspension-cultured cells. And 40-, 42-, 50- and 64-kDa MBP kinases were activated in rice roots. Furthermore, GSH inhibits Cd-induced 40-kDa MBP kinase activation. By immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by in-gel kinase assay, we confirmed that Cd-activated 42-kDa MBP kinase is a MAP kinase. Our results suggest that a MAP kinase cascade may function in the Cd-signalling pathway in rice.

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodopsins: Insights and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Farrens, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has become an established tool at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics because of its exquisite sensitivity and recent technical advancements. However, rhodopsin proteins present the fluorescence spectroscopist with a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to the presence of the light-sensitive retinal chromophore. This review briefly summarizes some approaches that have successfully met these challenges and the novel insights they have yielded about rhodopsin structure and function. We start with a brief overview of fluorescence fundamentals and experimental methodologies, followed by more specific discussions of technical challenges rhodopsin proteins present to fluorescence studies. Finally, we end by discussing some of the unique insights that have been gained specifically about visual rhodopsin and its interactions with affiliate proteins through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24183695

  7. Infrared studies of octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Satoshi; Morita, Eugene H.; Tasumi, Mitsuo; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Tsuda, Motoyuki

    1993-08-01

    The infrared difference spectra between octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin have been observed at 210 K under irradiation of blue and orange light under neutral conditions. The CN stretching frequencies of the protonated Schiff-base linkage shift upon H/D exchange. The H/D shifts observed in this study for octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin are 25 and 23 cm -1, respectively, whereas those for bovine rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin have been reported to be about 30 and 4cm -1, respectively. These results indicate that environments around the Schiff-base linkage differ between octopus and bovine lumirhodopsin, whereas those of octopus rhodopsin and lumirhodopsin are similar. The relationship between the H/D shift of the CN stretching band and the hydrogen bond involving the protonated Schiff base is discussed.

  8. Intermediate Excited States in Rhodopsin Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, L. J.; Yan, M.; Jedju, T. M.; Callender, R. H.; Chao, H.; Alfano, R. R.

    1996-03-01

    Recent work by Wang et.al. footnote Q. Wang et.al., Science 266, 422 (1994) reports rapid coherent photoisomerization in rhodopsin. The bathorhodopsin photoproduct appears in 200 fs and exhibits torsional oscillations which remain synchronized with the initial photoexcitation. We report transient absorption experiments which suggest that the fraction of excited rhodopsin molecules which does not isomerize in this fashion (approximately 1/3) remains in an electronically excited state, probably the twisted state described by Birge and Hubbard,footnote R. R. Birge and L. M. Hubbard, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 102, 2195 (1980) for ~ 3 ps and then reforms rhodopsin. This picture explains the long bleaching recovery time for rhodopsin and the controversial spectral dynamics which are observed in the red.

  9. Microbial and viral-like rhodopsins present in coastal marine sediments from four polar and subpolar regions.

    PubMed

    López, J L; Golemba, M; Hernández, E; Lozada, M; Dionisi, H M; Jansson, J; Carroll, J; Lundgren, L; Sjöling, S; Cormack, W P Mac

    2016-11-03

    Rhodopsins are broadly distributed. In this work we analyzed 23 metagenomes corresponding to marine sediment samples from four regions which share cold climate conditions (Norway; Sweden; Argentina and Antarctica). In order to investigate the genes evolution of viral-rodopsins, an initial set of 6224 bacterial rhodopsins sequences according COG5524 were retrieved from the 23 metagenomes. After selection by the presence of transmembrane domains and alignment 123 viral (51) and non-viral (72) sequences (>50 aminoacids) were finally included in further analysis. Viral rhodopsin genes were homologues of Phaeocystis globosa virus and Organic lake Phycodnavirus Non-viral microbial rhodopsin genes were ascribed to Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus as well as Cryptophyta and Fungi. A re-screening using Blastp, using as queries the viral sequences previously described, retrieved 30 sequences (>100 aminoacids). Phylogeographic analysis revealed a geographycal clustering of the sequences affiliated to the viral group. This clustering was not observed for the microbial non-viral sequences. The phylogenetic reconstruction allowed us to propose the existence of a putative ancestor of viral rhodopsins (PAVR) genes related to Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi This is the first report about the existence of a phylogeographic association of the viral rhodopsins sequences from marine sediments.

  10. Global Analysis of Serine-Threonine Protein Kinase Genes in Neurospora crassa ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gyungsoon; Servin, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Gloria E.; Altamirano, Lorena; Colot, Hildur V.; Collopy, Patrick; Litvinkova, Liubov; Li, Liande; Jones, Carol A.; Diala, Fitz-Gerald; Dunlap, Jay C.; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Serine/threonine (S/T) protein kinases are crucial components of diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes, including the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. In order to assess the importance of S/T kinases to Neurospora biology, we embarked on a global analysis of 86 S/T kinase genes in Neurospora. We were able to isolate viable mutants for 77 of the 86 kinase genes. Of these, 57% exhibited at least one growth or developmental phenotype, with a relatively large fraction (40%) possessing a defect in more than one trait. S/T kinase knockouts were subjected to chemical screening using a panel of eight chemical treatments, with 25 mutants exhibiting sensitivity or resistance to at least one chemical. This brought the total percentage of S/T mutants with phenotypes in our study to 71%. Mutants lacking apg-1, an S/T kinase required for autophagy in other organisms, possessed the greatest number of phenotypes, with defects in asexual and sexual growth and development and in altered sensitivity to five chemical treatments. We showed that NCU02245/stk-19 is required for chemotropic interactions between female and male cells during mating. Finally, we demonstrated allelism between the S/T kinase gene NCU00406 and velvet (vel), encoding a p21-activated protein kinase (PAK) gene important for asexual and sexual growth and development in Neurospora. PMID:21965514

  11. Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy To Visualize Rhodopsin-Containing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keffer, J. L.; Sabanayagam, C. R.; Lee, M. E.; DeLong, E. F.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sunlight is captured and converted to chemical energy in illuminated environments. Although (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosystems have been characterized in detail, retinal-based photosystems, rhodopsins, have only recently been identified as important mediators of light energy capture and conversion. Recent estimates suggest that up to 70% of cells in some environments harbor rhodopsins. However, because rhodopsin autofluorescence is low—comparable to that of carotenoids and significantly less than that of (bacterio)chlorophylls—these estimates are based on metagenomic sequence data, not direct observation. We report here the use of ultrasensitive total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to distinguish between unpigmented, carotenoid-producing, and rhodopsin-expressing bacteria. Escherichia coli cells were engineered to produce lycopene, β-carotene, or retinal. A gene encoding an uncharacterized rhodopsin, actinorhodopsin, was cloned into retinal-producing E. coli. The production of correctly folded and membrane-incorporated actinorhodopsin was confirmed via development of pink color in E. coli and SDS-PAGE. Cells expressing carotenoids or actinorhodopsin were imaged by TIRF microscopy. The 561-nm excitation laser specifically illuminated rhodopsin-containing cells, allowing them to be differentiated from unpigmented and carotenoid-containing cells. Furthermore, water samples collected from the Delaware River were shown by PCR to have rhodopsin-containing organisms and were examined by TIRF microscopy. Individual microorganisms that fluoresced under illumination from the 561-nm laser were identified. These results verify the sensitivity of the TIRF microscopy method for visualizing and distinguishing between different molecules with low autofluorescence, making it useful for analyzing natural samples. PMID:25769822

  12. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to visualize rhodopsin-containing cells.

    PubMed

    Keffer, J L; Sabanayagam, C R; Lee, M E; DeLong, E F; Hahn, M W; Maresca, J A

    2015-05-15

    Sunlight is captured and converted to chemical energy in illuminated environments. Although (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosystems have been characterized in detail, retinal-based photosystems, rhodopsins, have only recently been identified as important mediators of light energy capture and conversion. Recent estimates suggest that up to 70% of cells in some environments harbor rhodopsins. However, because rhodopsin autofluorescence is low-comparable to that of carotenoids and significantly less than that of (bacterio)chlorophylls-these estimates are based on metagenomic sequence data, not direct observation. We report here the use of ultrasensitive total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to distinguish between unpigmented, carotenoid-producing, and rhodopsin-expressing bacteria. Escherichia coli cells were engineered to produce lycopene, β-carotene, or retinal. A gene encoding an uncharacterized rhodopsin, actinorhodopsin, was cloned into retinal-producing E. coli. The production of correctly folded and membrane-incorporated actinorhodopsin was confirmed via development of pink color in E. coli and SDS-PAGE. Cells expressing carotenoids or actinorhodopsin were imaged by TIRF microscopy. The 561-nm excitation laser specifically illuminated rhodopsin-containing cells, allowing them to be differentiated from unpigmented and carotenoid-containing cells. Furthermore, water samples collected from the Delaware River were shown by PCR to have rhodopsin-containing organisms and were examined by TIRF microscopy. Individual microorganisms that fluoresced under illumination from the 561-nm laser were identified. These results verify the sensitivity of the TIRF microscopy method for visualizing and distinguishing between different molecules with low autofluorescence, making it useful for analyzing natural samples. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  14. Structural elements of the signal propagation pathway in squid rhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Minoru; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Suwa, Makiko

    2011-05-19

    Squid and bovine rhodopsins are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate Gq- and Gt-type G-proteins, respectively. To understand the structural elements of the signal propagation pathway, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of squid and bovine rhodopsins plus a detailed sequence analysis of class A GPCRs. The computations indicate that although the geometry of the retinal is similar in bovine and squid rhodopsins, the important interhelical hydrogen bond networks are different. In squid rhodopsin, an extended hydrogen bond network that spans ∼13 Å to Tyr315 on the cytoplasmic site is present regardless of the protonation state of Asp80. In contrast, the extended hydrogen bond network is interrupted at Tyr306 in bovine rhodopsin. Those differences in the hydrogen bond network may play significant functional roles in the signal propagation from the retinal binding site to the cytoplasmic site, including transmembrane helix (TM) 6 to which the G-protein binds. The MD calculations demonstrate that the elongated conformation of TM6 in squid rhodopsin is stabilized by salt bridges formed with helix (H) 9. Together with the interhelical hydrogen bonds, the salt bridges between TM6 and H9 stabilize the protein conformation of squid rhodopsin and may hinder the occurrence of large conformational changes that are observed upon activation of bovine rhodopsin.

  15. THE RHODOPSIN-TRANSDUCIN COMPLEX HOUSES TWO DISTINCT RHODOPSIN MOLECULES

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Ringler, Philipe; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Upon illumination the visual receptor rhodopsin (Rho) transitions to the activated form Rho*, which binds the heterotrimeric G protein, transducin (Gt) causing GDP to GTP exchange and Gt dissociation. Using succinylated concanavalin A (sConA) as a probe, we visualized native Rho dimers solubilized in 1 mM n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM) and Rho monomers 5 mM in DDM. By nucleotide depletion and affinity chromatography together with crosslinking and size exclusion chromatography, we trapped and purified nucleotide-free Rho*•Gt and sConA-Rho*•Gt complexes kept in solution by either DDM or lauryl-maltose-neopentyl-glycol (LMNG). The 3-D envelope calculated from projections of negatively stained Rho*•Gt-LMNG complexes accommodated two Rho molecules, one Gt heterotrimer and a detergent belt. Visualization of triple sConA-Rho*•Gt complexes unequivocally demonstrated a pentameric assembly of the Rho*•Gt complex in which the photoactivated Rho* dimer serves as a platform for binding the Gt heterotrimer. Importantly, individual monomers of the Rho* dimer in the heteropentameric complex exhibited different capabilities to be regenerated with either 11-cis or 9-cis-retinal. PMID:23458690

  16. Genome-wide identification, phylogeny and expressional profiles of mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene family in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yue, Hong; Feng, Kewei; Deng, Pingchuan; Song, Weining; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-08-22

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) are the important components of MAPK cascades, which play the crucial role in plant growth and development as well as in response to diverse stresses. Although this family has been systematically studied in many plant species, little is known about MAPKKK genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), especially those involved in the regulatory network of stress processes. In this study, we identified 155 wheat MAPKKK genes through a genome-wide search method based on the latest available wheat genome information, of which 29 belonged to MEKK, 11 to ZIK and 115 to Raf subfamily, respectively. Then, chromosome localization, gene structure and conserved protein motifs and phylogenetic relationship as well as regulatory network of these TaMAPKKKs were systematically investigated and results supported the prediction. Furthermore, a total of 11 homologous groups between A, B and D sub-genome and 24 duplication pairs among them were detected, which contributed to the expansion of wheat MAPKKK gene family. Finally, the expression profiles of these MAPKKKs during development and under different abiotic stresses were investigated using the RNA-seq data. Additionally, 10 tissue-specific and 4 salt-responsive TaMAPKKK genes were selected to validate their expression level through qRT-PCR analysis. This study for the first time reported the genome organization, evolutionary features and expression profiles of the wheat MAPKKK gene family, which laid the foundation for further functional analysis of wheat MAPKKK genes, and contributed to better understanding the roles and regulatory mechanism of MAPKKKs in wheat.

  17. Characterization of an Unconventional Rhodopsin from the Freshwater Actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola

    PubMed Central

    Keffer, J. L.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopsin-encoding microorganisms are common in many environments. However, knowing that rhodopsin genes are present provides little insight into how the host cells utilize light. The genome of the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola encodes a rhodopsin of the uncharacterized actinorhodopsin family. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by heterologously expressing R. lacicola actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. However, cultures of R. lacicola did not pump protons, even though actinorhodopsin mRNA and protein were both detected. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced by providing exogenous retinal, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. We used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and oxidation of accessory pigments to confirm that R. lacicola does not synthesize retinal. These results suggest that in some organisms, the actinorhodopsin gene is constitutively expressed, but rhodopsin-based light capture may require cofactors obtained from the environment. IMPORTANCE Up to 70% of microbial genomes in some environments are predicted to encode rhodopsins. Because most microbial rhodopsins are light-activated proton pumps, the prevalence of this gene suggests that in some environments, most microorganisms respond to or utilize light energy. Actinorhodopsins were discovered in an analysis of freshwater metagenomic data and subsequently identified in freshwater actinobacterial cultures. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin from the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by expressing actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced only after both light and retinal were provided, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. These results indicate that photoheterotrophy in this organism and others may require cofactors obtained from the

  18. [Phototaxis of the green algae: the new class of rhodopsin receptors].

    PubMed

    Govorunova, E G; Jung, K H; Sineshchekov, O A

    2004-01-01

    Photomotility behavior in green flagellate algae is mediated by rhodopsin-like receptors, which was initially suggested on the basis of physiological evidence. The cascade of rapid Ca(2+)-dependent electrical responses in the plasma membrane plays a key role in the signal transduction chain during both phototaxis and the photophobic response. The photoreceptor current through the plasma membrane is the earliest detectable event upon photoexcitation of the photoreceptors. Analysis of this current revealed that it consists of at least two components with different characteristics. Genes encoding two archaeal-type rhodopsins (type I rhodopsins) were recently identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and named (Chlamydomonas Sensory Rhodopsins A and B CSRA and CSRB). The measurements of photoelectric and motor responses in genetic transformants of C. reinhardtii enriched in each of these receptor proteins showed that the two components of the photoreceptor current are mediated by the two rhodopsins, and that both CSRA and CSRB are involved in phototaxis and the photophobic response. The CSRA-mediated current dominates at high light intensities and contributes primarily to the photophobic response. The CSRB-initiated transduction involves an efficient amplification cascade and mediates the highly sensitive phototaxis at low light intensities. CSRA and CSRB expressed heterologously in oocytes of Xenopus laevis act as light-gated proton channels, although it is unclear whether this channel activity plays a functional role in the initiation of motor responses and/or occurs in the native system.

  19. Nanoparticle-mediated rhodopsin cDNA but not intron-containing DNA delivery causes transgene silencing in a rhodopsin knockout model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Mitra, Rajendra N; Filonov, Nazar A; Han, Zongchao

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we compared the efficacy of nanoparticle (NP)-mediated intron-containing rhodopsin (sgRho) vs. intronless cDNA in ameliorating retinal disease phenotypes in a rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. We showed that NP-mediated sgRho delivery achieved long-term expression and phenotypic improvement in RKO mice, but not NP housing cDNA. However, the protein level of the NP-sgRho construct was only 5-10% of wild-type at 8 mo postinjection. To have a better understanding of the reduced levels of long-term expression of the vectors, in the present study, we evaluated the epigenetic changes of subretinal delivering NP-cDNA vs. NP-sgRho in the RKO mouse eyes. Following the administration, DNA methylation and histone status of specific regions (bacteria plasmid backbone, promoter, rhodopsin gene, and scaffold/matrix attachment region) of the vectors were evaluated at various time points. We documented that epigenetic transgene silencing occurred in vector-mediated gene transfer, which were caused by the plasmid backbone and the cDNA of the transgene, but not the intron-containing transgene. No toxicity or inflammation was found in the treated eyes. Our results suggest that cDNA of the rhodopsin transgene and bacteria backbone interfered with the host defense mechanism of DNA methylation-mediated transgene silencing through heterochromatin-associated modifications. © FASEB.

  20. The effect of phosphorylation on arrestin-rhodopsin interaction in the squid visual system.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelly A; Ou, Wei-Lin; Guan, Xinyu; Sugamori, Kim S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhishek; Ernst, Oliver P; Mitchell, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Invertebrate visual opsins are G protein-coupled receptors coupled to retinoid chromophores that isomerize reversibly between inactive rhodopsin and active metarhodopsin upon absorption of photons of light. The squid visual system has an arrestin protein that binds to metarhodopsin to block signaling to Gq and activation of phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin kinase (SQRK) can phosphorylate both metarhodopsin and arrestin, a dual role that is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor kinases. The sites and role of arrestin phosphorylation by SQRK were investigated here using recombinant proteins. Arrestin was phosphorylated on serine 392 and serine 397 in the C-terminus. Unphosphorylated arrestin bound to metarhodopsin and phosphorylated metarhodopsin with similar high affinities (Kd 33 and 21 nM respectively), while phosphorylation of arrestin reduced the affinity 3- to 5-fold (Kd 104 nM). Phosphorylation of metarhodopsin slightly increased the dissociation of arrestin observed during a 1 hour incubation. Together these studies suggest a unique role for SQRK in phosphorylating both receptor and arrestin and inhibiting the binding of these two proteins in the squid visual system. Invertebrate visual systems are inactivated by arrestin binding to metarhodopsin that does not require receptor phosphorylation. Here we show that squid rhodopsin kinase phosphorylates arrestin on two serines (S392,S397) in the C-terminus and phosphorylation decreases the affinity of arrestin for squid metarhodopsin. Metarhodopsin phosphorylation has very little effect on arrestin binding but does increase arrestin dissociation. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. Functional role of positively selected amino acid substitutions in mammalian rhodopsin evolution.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A; Invergo, Brandon M; Ramon, Eva; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Garriga, Pere

    2016-02-11

    Visual rhodopsins are membrane proteins that function as light photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina. Specific amino acids have been positively selected in visual pigments during mammal evolution, which, as products of adaptive selection, would be at the base of important functional innovations. We have analyzed the top candidates for positive selection at the specific amino acids and the corresponding reverse changes (F13M, Q225R and A346S) in order to unravel the structural and functional consequences of these important sites in rhodopsin evolution. We have constructed, expressed and immunopurified the corresponding mutated pigments and analyzed their molecular phenotypes. We find that position 13 is very important for the folding of the receptor and also for proper protein glycosylation. Position 225 appears to be important for the function of the protein affecting the G-protein activation process, and position 346 would also regulate functionality of the receptor by enhancing G-protein activation and presumably affecting protein phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Our results represent a link between the evolutionary analysis, which pinpoints the specific amino acid positions in the adaptive process, and the structural and functional analysis, closer to the phenotype, making biochemical sense of specific selected genetic sequences in rhodopsin evolution.

  2. Functional role of positively selected amino acid substitutions in mammalian rhodopsin evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A.; Invergo, Brandon M.; Ramon, Eva; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Garriga, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Visual rhodopsins are membrane proteins that function as light photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina. Specific amino acids have been positively selected in visual pigments during mammal evolution, which, as products of adaptive selection, would be at the base of important functional innovations. We have analyzed the top candidates for positive selection at the specific amino acids and the corresponding reverse changes (F13M, Q225R and A346S) in order to unravel the structural and functional consequences of these important sites in rhodopsin evolution. We have constructed, expressed and immunopurified the corresponding mutated pigments and analyzed their molecular phenotypes. We find that position 13 is very important for the folding of the receptor and also for proper protein glycosylation. Position 225 appears to be important for the function of the protein affecting the G-protein activation process, and position 346 would also regulate functionality of the receptor by enhancing G-protein activation and presumably affecting protein phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Our results represent a link between the evolutionary analysis, which pinpoints the specific amino acid positions in the adaptive process, and the structural and functional analysis, closer to the phenotype, making biochemical sense of specific selected genetic sequences in rhodopsin evolution. PMID:26865329

  3. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis.

  4. The S-locus receptor kinase gene in a self-incompatible Brassica napus line encodes a functional serine/threonine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Goring, D R; Rothstein, S J

    1992-01-01

    An S-receptor kinase (SRK) cDNA, SRK-910, from the active S-locus in a self-incompatible Brassica napus W1 line has been isolated and characterized. The SRK-910 gene is predominantly expressed in pistils and segregates with the W1 self-incompatibility phenotype in an F2 population derived from a cross between the self-incompatible W1 line and a self-compatible Westar line. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence demonstrated that the extracellular receptor domain is highly homologous to S-locus glycoproteins, whereas the cytoplasmic kinase domain contains conserved amino acids present in serine/threonine kinases. An SRK-910 kinase protein fusion was produced in Escherichia coli and found to contain kinase activity. Phosphoamino acid analysis confirmed that only serine and threonine residues were phosphorylated. Thus, the SRK-910 gene encodes a functional serine/threonine receptor kinase. PMID:1332796

  5. The equine herpes virus 4 thymidine kinase is a better suicide gene than the human herpes virus 1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Loubière, L; Tiraby, M; Cazaux, C; Brisson, E; Grisoni, M; Zhao-Emonet, J; Tiraby, G; Klatzmann, D

    1999-09-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase suicide gene (HSV1tk) together with ganciclovir (GCV) have been successfully used for in vivo treatment of various experimental tumors, and many clinical trials using this system have been launched. With the aim to improve this therapeutic system, we compared the potential efficacy of different herpes virus derived thymidine kinases (HSV1, varicella-zoster virus, equine herpes virus type-4 and Epstein-Barr virus) as suicide genes in association with the nucleoside analogs acyclovir, ganciclovir and bromovinyldeoxyur- idine. Using various murine and human cell lines expressing these viral tk, we show that HSV1- and EHV4tk are the more efficient suicide genes for the different nucleoside analogs tested. Moreover, EHV4tk expressing murine and human cells were three- to 12-fold more sensitive to GCV than HSV1tk expressing cells. This was correlated with the presence of five-fold higher amounts of the toxic triphosphated-GCV in EHV4- versus HSV1tk expressing cells. Altogether, these experiments underline the potential advantages of the EHV4tk as a suicide gene.

  6. Possible peptide chain termination mutants in thymide kinase gene of a mammalian virus, herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Summers, W P; Wagner, M; Summers, W C

    1975-10-01

    Mutations in the viral gene coding for the thymidine kinase (ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.75) induced by herpes simplex virus have been obtained by selection of virus resistant to bromodeoxyuridine when grown in thymidine-kinase-deficient LMTK- mouse cells. Proteins labeled after infection of Vero (monkey) cells with herpes simplex virus were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and one protein of about 40,000 daltons was consistently altered in a number of thymidine-kinase-deficient mutants. Many viral mutants lacked this peptide and one class of these mutants induced the synthesis of new shorter peptides. Revertant virus could be selected which simultaneously regained the ability to induce thymidine kinase activity, regained the intact thymidine kinase peptide, and lost the ability to synthesize the shorter peptide fragment. These mutants comprise a class of animal virus mutants which have the properties expected of peptide chain termination mutants.

  7. Possible peptide chain termination mutants in thymide kinase gene of a mammalian virus, herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, W P; Wagner, M; Summers, W C

    1975-01-01

    Mutations in the viral gene coding for the thymidine kinase (ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.75) induced by herpes simplex virus have been obtained by selection of virus resistant to bromodeoxyuridine when grown in thymidine-kinase-deficient LMTK- mouse cells. Proteins labeled after infection of Vero (monkey) cells with herpes simplex virus were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and one protein of about 40,000 daltons was consistently altered in a number of thymidine-kinase-deficient mutants. Many viral mutants lacked this peptide and one class of these mutants induced the synthesis of new shorter peptides. Revertant virus could be selected which simultaneously regained the ability to induce thymidine kinase activity, regained the intact thymidine kinase peptide, and lost the ability to synthesize the shorter peptide fragment. These mutants comprise a class of animal virus mutants which have the properties expected of peptide chain termination mutants. Images PMID:172894

  8. Molecular physiology of rhodopsin: Computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'Dman, T. B.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Computer simulation is used for comparative investigation of the molecular dynamics of rhodopsin containing the chromophore group (11- cis-retinal) and free opsin. Molecular dynamics is traced within a time interval of 3000 ps; 3 × 106 discrete conformational states of rhodopsin and opsin are obtained and analyzed. It is demonstrated that the presence of the chromophore group in the chromophore center of opsin influences considerably the nearest protein environment of 11- cis-retinal both in the region of the β-ionone ring and in the region of the protonated Schiff base bond. Based on simulation results, a possible intramolecular mechanism of keeping rhodopsin as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the inactive state, i.e., the chromophore function as an efficient ligand antagonist, is discussed.

  9. The Severe Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Rhodopsin Mutant Ter349Glu Mislocalizes and Induces Rapid Rod Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, T. J.; Gross, Alecia K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause approximately one-tenth of retinitis pigmentosa cases worldwide, and most result in endoplasmic reticulum retention and apoptosis. Other rhodopsin mutations cause receptor mislocalization, diminished/constitutive activity, or faulty protein-protein interactions. The purpose of this study was to test for mechanisms by which the autosomal dominant rhodopsin mutation Ter349Glu causes an early, rapid retinal degeneration in patients. The mutation adds an additional 51 amino acids to the C terminus of the protein. Folding and ligand interaction of Ter349Glu rhodopsin were tested by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectrophotometry. The ability of the mutant to initiate phototransduction was tested using a radioactive filter binding assay. Photoreceptor localization was assessed both in vitro and in vivo utilizing fluorescent immunochemistry on transfected cells, transgenic Xenopus laevis, and knock-in mice. Photoreceptor ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Spectrally, Ter349Glu rhodopsin behaves similarly to wild-type rhodopsin, absorbing maximally at 500 nm. The mutant protein also displays in vitro G protein activation similar to that of WT. In cultured cells, mislocalization was observed at high expression levels whereas ciliary localization occurred at low expression levels. Similarly, transgenic X. laevis expressing Ter349Glu rhodopsin exhibited partial mislocalization. Analysis of the Ter349Glu rhodopsin knock-in mouse showed a rapid, early onset degeneration in homozygotes with a loss of proper rod outer segment development and improper disc formation. Together, the data show that both mislocalization and rod outer segment morphogenesis are likely associated with the human phenotype. PMID:23940033

  10. A first principles study of rhodopsin photoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Carla; Frank, Irmgard; Parrinello, Michele

    1998-03-01

    Rhodopsin is the protein responsible for converting light during the process of vision. It consists of the apoprotein opsin and the protonated Schiff base of the chromophore 11-cis retinal. In the first step of vision the chromophore undergoes a photoinduced 11-cis→all-trans isomerisation. We have studied the mechanism of rhodopsin photoactivation with a recently-developed method (Frank, Hutter, Marx and Parrinello 1997), that allows us to investigate the potential surface of excited states efficiently within a density functional based formalism. In particular, we have explored the influence of relevant aminoacids in the retinal binding pocket on the photoreaction.

  11. The Road to Optogenetics: Microbial Rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, E G; Koppel, L A

    2016-09-01

    Optogenetics technology (using light-sensitive microbial proteins to control animal cell physiology) is becoming increasingly popular in laboratories around the world. Among these proteins, particularly important are rhodopsins that transport ions across the membrane and are used in optogenetics to regulate membrane potential by light, mostly in neurons. Although rhodopsin ion pumps transport only one charge per captured photon, channelrhodopsins are capable of more efficient passive transport. In this review, we follow the history of channelrhodopsin discovery in flagellate algae and discuss the latest addition to the channelrhodopsin family, channels with anion, rather than cation, selectivity.

  12. 3pK, a new mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase located in the small cell lung cancer tumor suppressor gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Latif, F; Duh, F M; Bernal, R; Smola, U; Li, H; Kuzmin, I; Wixler, V; Geil, L; Shrestha, S

    1996-01-01

    NotI linking clones, localized to the human chromosome 3p21.3 region and homozygously deleted in small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H740 and NCI-H1450, were used to search for a putative tumor suppressor gene(s). One of these clones, NL1G210, detected a 2.5-kb mRNA in all examined human tissues, expression being especially high in the heart and skeletal muscle. Two overlapping cDNA clones containing the entire open reading frame were isolated from a human heart cDNA library and fully characterized. Computer analysis and a search of the GenBank database to reveal high sequence identity of the product of this gene to serine-threonine kinases, especially to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a recently described substrate of mitogen-activated kinases. Sequence identitiy was 72% at the nucleotide level and 75% at the amino acid level, strongly suggesting that this protein is a serine-threonine kinase. Here we demonstrate that the new gene, referred to as 3pK (for chromosome 3p kinase), in fact encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated protein serine-threonine kinase with a novel substrate specificity. PMID:8622688

  13. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  14. Conservation of MAP kinase activity and MSP genes in parthenogenetic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase activation is a prerequisite for oocyte maturation, ovulation and fertilisation in many animals. In the hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, an MSP (major sperm protein) dependent pathway is utilised for MAP kinase activation and successive oocyte maturation with extracellular MSP released from sperm acting as activator. How oocyte-to-embryo transition is triggered in parthenogenetic nematode species that lack sperm, is not known. Results We investigated two key elements of oocyte-to-embryo transition, MSP expression and MAP kinase signaling, in two parthenogenetic nematodes and their close hermaphroditic relatives. While activated MAP kinase is present in all analysed nematodes irrespective of the reproductive mode, MSP expression differs. In contrast to hermaphroditic or bisexual species, we do not find MSP expression at the protein level in parthenogenetic nematodes. However, genomic sequence analysis indicates that functional MSP genes are present in several parthenogenetic species. Conclusions We present three alternative interpretations to explain our findings. (1) MSP has lost its function as a trigger of MAP kinase activation and is not expressed in parthenogenetic nematodes. Activation of the MAP kinase pathway is achieved by another, unknown mechanism. Functional MSP genes are required for occasionally emerging males found in some parthenogenetic species. (2) Because of long-term disadvantages, parthenogenesis is of recent origin. MSP genes remained intact during this short intervall although they are useless. As in the first scenario, an unknown mechanism is responsible for MAP kinase activation. (3) The molecular machinery regulating oocyte-to-embryo transition in parthenogenetic nematodes is conserved with respect to C. elegans, thus requiring intact MSP genes. However, MSP expression has been shifted to non-sperm cells and is reduced below the detection limits, but is still sufficient to

  15. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Stähli, Alexandra; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI) kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB431542. Emdogain caused 39 coding genes to be differentially expressed in palatal fibroblasts by microarray analysis (p<0.05; >10-fold). Importantly, in the presence of the TGF-βRI kinase inhibitor SB431542, Emdogain failed to cause any significant changes in gene expression. Consistent with this mechanism, three independent TGF-βRI kinase inhibitors and a TGF-β neutralizing antibody abrogated the increased expression of IL-11, a selected Emdogain target gene. The MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and U0126 lowered the impact of Emdogain on IL-11 expression. The data support that TGF-βRI kinase activity is necessary to mediate the effects of Emdogain on gene expression in vitro.

  16. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of WNK kinase gene family in rice.

    PubMed

    Manuka, Rakesh; Saddhe, Ankush Ashok; Kumar, Kundan

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases represent one of the largest gene families involved in diverse regulatory functions. WNK (With No Lysine) kinases are members of ser/thr protein kinase family, which lack conserved catalytic lysine (K) residue at protein kinase subdomain II and is replaced by either asparagine, serine or glycine residues. They are involved in regulation of flowering time, circadian rhythms and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we have identified 9 members of WNK in rice, showed resemblance to Arabidopsis and human WNK and clustered into five main clades phylogenetically. The predicted genes structure, bonafide conserved signature motif and domains strongly support their identity, as members of WNK kinase family. We have analyzed their chromosomal distribution, physio-chemical properties, subcellular localizations and cis-elements in the promoter regions in silico. Further, transcript analysis of OsWNK by qRT-PCR revealed their differential regulation in tissue specific and abiotic stresses libraries. In conclusion, the identification of nine OsWNK and transcript level expression pattern under abiotic stress using qRT-PCR in rice will significantly contribute towards the understanding of WNK genes in monocots and thus provide a set up for functional genomics studies of WNK protein kinases.

  17. Mutational analysis of the kinase domain of MYLK2 gene in common human cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Nam, Suk Woo; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2006-01-01

    Genetic alterations of the genes encoding protein kinases have been implicated in the development of human cancers. Myosin light chain kinase 2, skeletal muscle (MYLK2) encodes a calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine kinase. In a recent study, MYLK2 gene was somatically mutated in colorectal carcinomas. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that other common human carcinomas besides colorectal carcinomas harbored MYLK2 mutations in the kinase domain. We analyzed exons 6 and 7 eccoding the kinase domain of MYLK2 for somatic mutations in 60 gastric, 104 colorectal, 79 non-small cell lung, and 54 breast cancers using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). We found one MYLK2 mutation in lung adenocarcinomas, but not in other cancers. The MYLK2 mutation detected was a missense mutation that would substitute an amino acid (E374D) However, there was no somatic mutation of the MYLK2 gene. These data suggest that the kinase domain of MYLK2 is rarely mutated in common human carcinomas and that it does not play a dominant role in cancer pathogenesis.

  18. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae LSB6 gene encodes phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Gil-Soo; Audhya, Anjon; Markley, Daniel J; Emr, Scott D; Carman, George M

    2002-12-06

    The LSB6 gene product was identified from the Saccharomyces Genome Data Base (locus YJL100W) as a putative member of a novel type II phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4-kinase family. Cell extracts lacking the LSB6 gene had a reduced level of PI 4-kinase activity. In addition, multicopy plasmids containing the LSB6 gene directed the overexpression of PI 4-kinase activity in cell extracts of wild-type cells, in an lsb6Delta mutant, in a pik1(ts) stt4(ts) double mutant, and in an pik1(ts) stt4(ts) lsb6Delta triple mutant. The heterologous expression of the S. cerevisiae LSB6 gene in Escherichia coli resulted in the expression of a protein that possessed PI 4-kinase activity. Although the lsb6Delta mutant did not exhibit a growth phenotype and failed to exhibit a defect in phosphoinositide synthesis in vivo, the overexpression of the LSB6 gene could partially suppress the lethal phenotype of an stt4Delta mutant defective in the type III STT4-encoded PI 4-kinase indicating that Lsb6p functions as a PI 4-kinase in vivo. Lsb6p was localized to the membrane fraction of the cell, and when overexpressed, GFP-tagged Lsb6p was observed on both the plasma membrane and the vacuole membrane. The enzymological properties (pH optimum, dependence on magnesium or manganese as a cofactor, the dependence of activity on Triton X-100, the dependence on the PI surface concentration, and temperature sensitivity) of the LSB6-encoded enzyme were very similar to the membrane-associated 55-kDa PI 4-kinase previously purified from S. cerevisiae.

  19. Sequence of the canine herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene: taxon-preferred amino acid residues in the alphaherpesviral thymidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M; Sheldrick, P; Lebreton, F; Foulon, T

    1995-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignments of evolutionarily related proteins are finding increasing use as indicators of critical amino acid residues necessary for structural stability or involved in functional domains responsible for catalytic activities. In the past, a number of alignments have provided such information for the herpesviral thymidine kinases, for which three-dimensional structures are not yet available. We have sequenced the thymidine kinase gene of a canine herpesvirus, and with a multiple alignment have identified amino acids preferentially conserved in either of two taxons, the genera Varicellovirus and Simplexvirus, of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. Since some regions of the thymidine kinases show otherwise elevated levels of substitutional tolerance, these conserved amino acids are candidates for critical residues which have become fixed through selection during the evolutionary divergence of these enzymes. Several pairs with distinctive patterns of distribution among the various viruses occur in or near highly conserved sequence motifs previously proposed to form the catalytic site, and we speculate that they may represent interacting, co-ordinately variable residues.

  20. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Genes in Corn Roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Patil, S.; Bhatia, A.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding Ca-2(+) - Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs), Corn Root Protein Kinase 1 and 2 (CRPK 1, CRPK 2) were isolated from the root tip library of corn (Zea mays L., cv. Merit) and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of both the clones have features characteristic of plant CDPKS, including all 11 conserved serine/threonine kinase subdomains, a junction domain and a calmodulin-like domain with four Ca-2(+), -binding sites. Northern analysis revealed that CRPKI mRNA is preferentially expressed in roots, especially in the root tip; whereas, the expression of CRPK2 mRNA was very low in all the tissues tested. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that CRPKI mRNA is highly expressed in the root apex, as compared to other parts of the root. Partially purified CDPK from the root tip phosphorylates syntide-2, a common peptide substrate for plant CDPKs, and the phosphorylation was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of Ca-2(+). Our results show that two CDPK isoforms are expressed in corn roots and they may be involved in the Ca-2(+)-dependent signal transduction process.

  1. The Medicago truncatula lysin [corrected] motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-09-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysin [corrected] motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known.

  2. Modulation of molecular interactions and function by rhodopsin palmitylation†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul S.-H.; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Jastrzebska, Beata; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Pulawski, Wojciech; Kono, Masahiro; Lem, Janis; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Filipek, Slawomir; Müller, Daniel J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Rhodopsin is palmitylated at two cysteine residues in its carboxyl terminal region. We have looked at the effects of palmitylation on the molecular interactions formed by rhodopsin using single-molecule force spectroscopy and the function of rhodopsin using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. A knockin mouse model expressing palmitate-deficient rhodopsin was used for live animal in vivo studies and to obtain native tissue samples for in vitro assays. We specifically looked at the effects palmitylation has on the chromophore-binding pocket, interactions of rhodopsin with transducin, and molecular interactions stabilizing the receptor structure. The structure of rhodopsin is largely unperturbed by the absence of palmitate linkage. The binding pocket for the chromophore 11-cis-retinal is minimally altered as palmitate-deficient rhodopsin exhibited the same absorbance spectrum as wild-type rhodopsin. Similarly, the rate of release of all-trans-retinal after light activation was the same both in the presence and absence of palmitylation. Significant differences were observed in the rate of transducin activation by rhodopsin and in the force required to unfold the last stable structural segment in rhodopsin at its carboxyl terminal region. A 1.3-fold reduction in the rate of transducin activation by rhodopsin was observed in the absence of palmitylation. Single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed a 2.1-fold reduction in normalized force required to unfold the carboxyl terminal end of rhodopsin. The absence of palmitylation in rhodopsin therefore destabilizes the molecular interactions formed in the carboxyl terminal end of the receptor, which appears to hinder the activation of transducin by light-activated rhodopsin. PMID:19348429

  3. Sixteen-kinase gene expression identifies luminal breast cancers with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Chabannon, Christian; Charpin, Colette; Chaffanet, Max; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease made of various molecular subtypes with different prognosis. However, evolution remains difficult to predict within some subtypes, such as luminal A, and treatment is not as adapted as it should be. Refinement of prognostic classification and identification of new therapeutic targets are needed. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we profiled 227 breast cancers. We focused our analysis on two major breast cancer subtypes with opposite prognosis, luminal A (n = 80) and basal (n = 58), and on genes encoding protein kinases. Whole-kinome expression separated luminal A and basal tumors. The expression (measured by a kinase score) of 16 genes encoding serine/threonine kinases involved in mitosis distinguished two subgroups of luminal A tumors: Aa, of good prognosis and Ab, of poor prognosis. This classification and its prognostic effect were validated in 276 luminal A cases from three independent series profiled across different microarray platforms. The classification outperformed the current prognostic factors in univariate and multivariate analyses in both training and validation sets. The luminal Ab subgroup, characterized by high mitotic activity compared with luminal Aa tumors, displayed clinical characteristics and a kinase score intermediate between the luminal Aa subgroup and the luminal B subtype, suggesting a continuum in luminal tumors. Some of the mitotic kinases of the signature represent therapeutic targets under investigation. The identification of luminal A cases of poor prognosis should help select appropriate treatment, whereas the identification of a relevant kinase set provides potential targets.

  4. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  5. [Effects of overexpression of NADH kinase gene on ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2014-09-01

    Glycerol is the main byproduct in ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to improve ethanol yield and the substrate conversion, a cassette about 4.5 kb for gene homologous recombination, gpd2Δ::PGK1(PT)-POS5-HyBR, was constructed and transformed into the haploid strain S. cerevisiae S1 (MATa) to replace the GPD2 gene by POS5 gene. The NADH kinase gene POS5 was successfully over expressed in the recombinant strain S. cerevisiae S3. Comparing with the parent strain, the recombinant strain S. cerevisiae S3 exhibited an 8% increase in ethanol production and a 33.64% decrease in glycerol production in the conical flask fermentation with an initiatory glucose concentration of 150 g/L. Overexpression of NADH kinase gene seems effective in reducing glycerol production and increasing ethanol yield.

  6. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the thymidine kinase gene from herpesvirus of turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S L; Aparisio, D I; Bandyopadhyay, P K

    1989-01-01

    The thymidine kinase gene encoded by herpesvirus of turkeys has been identified and characterized. A viral mutant (ATR0) resistant to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylthymine was isolated. This mutant was also resistant to 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuronosyl)-5-methyluracil and was unable to incorporate [125I]deoxycytidine into DNA. The mutant phenotype was rescued by a cloned region of the turkey herpesvirus genome whose DNA sequence was found to contain an open reading frame similar to that for known thymidine kinases from other viruses. When expressed in Escherichia coli, this open reading frame complemented a thymidine kinase-deficient strain and resulted in thymidine kinase activity in extracts assayed in vitro. Images PMID:2724415

  7. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the thymidine kinase gene from herpesvirus of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Martin, S L; Aparisio, D I; Bandyopadhyay, P K

    1989-06-01

    The thymidine kinase gene encoded by herpesvirus of turkeys has been identified and characterized. A viral mutant (ATR0) resistant to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylthymine was isolated. This mutant was also resistant to 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuronosyl)-5-methyluracil and was unable to incorporate [125I]deoxycytidine into DNA. The mutant phenotype was rescued by a cloned region of the turkey herpesvirus genome whose DNA sequence was found to contain an open reading frame similar to that for known thymidine kinases from other viruses. When expressed in Escherichia coli, this open reading frame complemented a thymidine kinase-deficient strain and resulted in thymidine kinase activity in extracts assayed in vitro.

  8. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  9. Identification of Novel Gene Targets and Functions of p21-Activated Kinase 1 during DNA Damage by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Mona; Li, Da-Qiang; Horvath, Anelia; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    P21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), a serine/threonine protein kinase, modulates many cellular processes by phosphorylating its downstream substrates. In addition to its role in the cytoplasm, PAK1 also affects gene transcription due to its nuclear localization and association with chromatin. It is now recognized that PAK1 kinase activity and its nuclear translocation are rapidly stimulated by ionizing radiation (IR), and that PAK1 activation is a component of the DNA damage response. Owing to the role of PAK1 in the cell survival, its association with the chromatin, and now, stimulation by ionizing radiation, we hypothesize that PAK1 may be contributing to modulation of genes with roles in cellular processes that might be important in the DNA damage response. The purpose of this study was to identify new PAK1 targets in response to ionizing radiation with putative role in the DNA damage response. We examined the effect of IR on the gene expression patterns in the murine embryonic fibroblasts with or without Pak1 using microarray technology. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified using Gene Spring GX 10.0.2. Pathway, network, functional analyses and gene family classification were carried out using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Ingenuity Pathway, Gene Ontology and PANTHER respectively. Selective targets of PAK1 were validated by RT-qPCR. For the first time, we provide a genome-wide analysis of PAK1 and identify its targets with potential roles in the DNA damage response. Gene Ontology analysis identified genes in the IR-stimulated cells that were involved in cell cycle arrest and cell death. Pathway analysis revealed p53 pathway being most influenced by IR responsive, PAK1 targets. Gene family of transcription factors was over represented and gene networks involved in DNA replication, repair and cellular signaling were identified. In brief, this study identifies novel PAK1 dependent IR responsive genes which reveal new aspects of PAK1

  10. Disruption of the mouse inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase gene, associated lethality, and tissue distribution of 2-kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Verbsky, John; Lavine, Kory; Majerus, Philip W

    2005-06-14

    Many functions have been suggested for inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate (InsP6), including mRNA export, nonhomologous end-joining, endocytosis, and ion channel regulation. However, it remains to be demonstrated that InsP6 is necessary for in vivo survival. We previously isolated a cDNA encoding the mammalian inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate (InsP5) 2-kinase (2-kinase), the enzyme that converts InsP5 to InsP6. We used the sequence to search the BayGenomics databases and identify an ES cell line (XA232) that has a gene trap construct embedded in the 2-kinase gene. We obtained a mouse from this line, produced heterozygotes, and confirmed that the heterozygotes contain the trapping construct and have diminished 2-kinase activity. Breeding the XA232 heterozygotes produced no homozygous offspring; thus, loss of 2-kinase is lethal in mice. Dissections of embryonic day-8.5 uteri yielded no homozygous embryos; thus, the mice die before day 8.5 postcoitum. The gene trap construct contains a beta-galactosidase/neomycin reporter gene, allowing us to stain heterozygotes for beta-galactosidase to determine tissue-specific expression of 2-kinase protein. 2-kinase is expressed in the hippocampus, the cortex, the Purkinje layer of the cerebellum in the brain, in cardiomyocytes, and in the testes of adult mice. At day 9.5 postcoitum, 2-kinase was expressed in the notochord, the ventricular layer of the neural tube, and the myotome of the somites. Intense staining was also seen in the yolk sac, suggesting that InsP6 is necessary for yolk sac development or function. Furthermore, failure of yolk sac development or function is consistent with the early lethality of 2-kinase embryos.

  11. Unusual thermal and conformational properties of the rhodopsin congenital night blindness mutant Thr-94 --> Ile.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Eva; del Valle, Luis J; Garriga, Pere

    2003-02-21

    Naturally occurring point mutations in the opsin gene cause the retinal diseases retinitis pigmentosa and congenital night blindness. Although these diseases involve similar mutations in very close locations in rhodopsin, their progression is very different, with retinitis pigmentosa being severe and causing retinal degeneration. We report on the expression and characterization of the recently found T94I mutation associated with congenital night blindness, in the second transmembrane helix or rhodopsin, and mutations at the same site. T94I mutant rhodopsin folded properly and was able to bind 11-cis-retinal to form chromophore, but it showed a blue-shifted visible band at 478 nm and reduced molar extinction coefficient. Furthermore, T94I showed dramatically reduced thermal stability, extremely long lived metarhodopsin II intermediate, and highly increased reactivity toward hydroxylamine in the dark, when compared with wild type rhodopsin. The results are consistent with the location of Thr-94 in close proximity to Glu-113 counterion in the vicinity of the Schiff base linkage and suggest a role for this residue in maintaining the correct dark inactive conformation of the receptor. The reported results, together with previously published data on the other two known congenital night blindness mutants, suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying this disease may not be structural misfolding, as proposed for retinitis pigmentosa mutants, but abnormal functioning of the receptor by decreased thermal stability and/or constitutive activity.

  12. Identification and characterization of a protein kinase gene in the Lymantria dispar nultinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus

    Treesearch

    David S. Bischoff; James M. Slavicek

    1994-01-01

    The Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) gene encoding vPK has been cloned and sequenced. LdMNPV vPK shows a 24% amino acid identity to the catalytic domains of the eucaryotic protein kinases nPKC from rabbits, HSPKCE from humans, APLPKCB from Aplysia californica, and dPKC98F from ...

  13. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes in Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqin; Shi, Lanping; Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Qian; Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Cai, Jinsen; Yu, Huanxin; Wang, Rongzhang; Wen, Jiayu; Lin, Youquan; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been implicated in plant growth, development, and environment adaptation, but a comprehensive understanding of MAPK signaling at genome-wide level is limited in Capsicum annuum. Herein, genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of MAPK and MAPK kinase (MAPKK) were performed in pepper. A total of 19 pepper MAPK (CaMAPKs) genes and five MAPKK (CaMAPKKs) genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CaMAPKs and CaMAPKKs could be classified into four groups and each group contains similar exon-intron structures. However, significant divergences were also found. Notably, five members of the pepper MAPKK family were much less conserved than those found in Arabidopsis, and 9 Arabidopsis MAPKs did not have orthologs in pepper. Additionally, 7 MAPKs in Arabidopsis had either two or three orthologs in the pepper genome, and six pepper MAPKs and one MAPKK differing in sequence were found in three pepper varieties. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPK and MAPKK genes were ubiquitously expressed and transcriptionally modified in pepper leaves after treatments with heat, salt, and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation as well as exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon, and abscisic acid. The MAPKK-MAPK interactome was tested by yeast two-hybrid assay, the results showed that one MAPKK might interact with multiple MAPKs, one MAPK might also interact with more than one MAPKKs, constituting MAPK signaling networks which may collaborate in transmitting upstream signals into appropriate downstream cellular responses and processes. These results will facilitate future functional characterization of MAPK cascades in pepper. PMID:26442088

  14. Analysis of kinase gene expression patterns across 5681 human tissue samples reveals functional genomic taxonomy of the kinome.

    PubMed

    Kilpinen, Sami; Ojala, Kalle; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2010-12-03

    Kinases play key roles in cell signaling and represent major targets for drug development, but the regulation of their activation and their associations with health and disease have not been systematically analyzed. Here, we carried out a bioinformatic analysis of the expression levels of 459 human kinase genes in 5681 samples consisting of 44 healthy and 55 malignant human tissues. Defining the tissues where the kinase genes were transcriptionally active led to a functional genomic taxonomy of the kinome and a classification of human tissues and disease types based on the similarity of their kinome gene expression. The co-expression network around each of the kinase genes was defined in order to determine the functional context, i.e. the biological processes that were active in the cells and tissues where the kinase gene was expressed. Strong associations for individual kinases were found for mitosis (69 genes, including AURKA and BUB1), cell cycle control (73 genes, including PLK1 and AURKB), DNA repair (49 genes, including CHEK1 and ATR), immune response (72 genes, including MATK), neuronal (131 genes, including PRKCE) and muscular (72 genes, including MYLK2) functions. We then analyzed which kinase genes gain or lose transcriptional activity in the development of prostate and lung cancers and elucidated the functional associations of individual cancer associated kinase genes. In summary, we report here a systematic classification of kinases based on the bioinformatic analysis of their expression in human tissues and diseases, as well as grouping of tissues and tumor types according to the similarity of their kinome transcription.

  15. Analysis of Kinase Gene Expression Patterns across 5681 Human Tissue Samples Reveals Functional Genomic Taxonomy of the Kinome

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Sami; Ojala, Kalle; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Kinases play key roles in cell signaling and represent major targets for drug development, but the regulation of their activation and their associations with health and disease have not been systematically analyzed. Here, we carried out a bioinformatic analysis of the expression levels of 459 human kinase genes in 5681 samples consisting of 44 healthy and 55 malignant human tissues. Defining the tissues where the kinase genes were transcriptionally active led to a functional genomic taxonomy of the kinome and a classification of human tissues and disease types based on the similarity of their kinome gene expression. The co-expression network around each of the kinase genes was defined in order to determine the functional context, i.e. the biological processes that were active in the cells and tissues where the kinase gene was expressed. Strong associations for individual kinases were found for mitosis (69 genes, including AURKA and BUB1), cell cycle control (73 genes, including PLK1 and AURKB), DNA repair (49 genes, including CHEK1 and ATR), immune response (72 genes, including MATK), neuronal (131 genes, including PRKCE) and muscular (72 genes, including MYLK2) functions. We then analyzed which kinase genes gain or lose transcriptional activity in the development of prostate and lung cancers and elucidated the functional associations of individual cancer associated kinase genes. In summary, we report here a systematic classification of kinases based on the bioinformatic analysis of their expression in human tissues and diseases, as well as grouping of tissues and tumor types according to the similarity of their kinome transcription. PMID:21151926

  16. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  17. The transcription-splicing protein NonO/p54nrb and three NonO-interacting proteins bind to distal enhancer region and augment rhodopsin expression.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sharda P; Hao, Hong; Yang, Hyun-Jin; Kautzmann, Marie-Audrey I; Brooks, Matthew; Nellissery, Jacob; Klocke, Bernward; Seifert, Martin; Swaroop, Anand

    2014-04-15

    Phototransduction machinery in vertebrate photoreceptors is contained within the membrane discs of outer segments. Daily renewal of 10% of photoreceptor outer segments requires stringent control of gene expression. Rhodopsin constitutes over 90% of the protein in rod discs, and its altered expression or transport is associated with photoreceptor dysfunction and/or death. Two cis-regulatory sequences have been identified upstream of the rhodopsin transcription start site. While the proximal promoter binds to specific transcription factors, including NRL and CRX, the rhodopsin enhancer region (RER) reportedly contributes to precise and high-level expression of rhodopsin in vivo. Here, we report the identification of RER-bound proteins by mass spectrometry. We validate the binding of NonO (p54(nrb)), a protein implicated in coupling transcription to splicing, and three NonO-interacting proteins-hnRNP M, Ywhaz and Ppp1ca. NonO and its interactors can activate rhodopsin promoter in HEK293 cells and function synergistically with NRL and CRX. DNA-binding domain of NonO is critical for rhodopsin promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis demonstrates high occupancy of NonO at rhodopsin and a subset of phototransduction genes. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of NonO in mouse retina leads to loss of rhodopsin expression and rod cell death, which can be partially rescued by a C-terminal NonO construct. RNA-seq analysis of the NonO shRNA-treated retina revealed splicing defects and altered expression of genes, specifically those associated with phototransduction. Our studies identify an important contribution of NonO and its interacting modulator proteins in enhancing rod-specific gene expression and controlling rod homeostasis.

  18. Conservation of molecular interactions stabilizing bovine and mouse rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Müller, Daniel J.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor that initiates phototransduction in rod photoreceptor cells. The structure and function of rhodopsin is tightly linked to molecular interactions that stabilize and determine the receptor's functional state. Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to localize and quantify molecular interactions that structurally stabilize bovine and mouse rhodopsin from native disc membranes of rod photoreceptor cells. The mechanical unfolding of bovine and mouse rhodopsin revealed nine major unfolding intermediates, each intermediate defining a structurally stable segment in the receptor. These stable structural segments had similar localization and occurrence in both bovine and mouse samples. For each structural segment, parameters describing their unfolding energy barrier were determined by dynamic SMFS. No major differences were observed between bovine and mouse rhodopsin thereby implying that the structures of both rhodopsins are largely stabilized by similar molecular interactions. PMID:21038881

  19. Programmed cell death genes are linked to elevated creatine kinase levels in unhealthy male nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangkyu; Simon, Eric; Myers, Leann; Hamm, L. Lee; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    Declining health in the oldest-old takes an energy toll for simple maintenance of body functions. The underlying mechanisms, however, differ in males and females. In females, the declines are explained by loss of muscle mass, but this is not the case in males in whom they are associated with increased levels of circulating creatine kinase. This relationship raises the possibility that muscle damage rather than muscle loss is the cause of the increased energy demands of unhealthy aging in males. We have now examined factors that contribute to the increase in creatine kinase. Much of it (60%) can be explained by a history of cardiac problems and lower kidney function, while being mitigated by moderate physical activity, reinforcing the notion that tissue damage is a likely source. In a search for genetic risk factors associated with elevated creatine kinase, the Ku70 gene XRCC6 and the ceramide synthase gene LASS1 were investigated because of their roles in telomere length and longevity and healthy aging, respectively. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these two genes were independently associated with creatine kinase levels. The XRCC6 variant was epistatic to one of the LASS1 variants but not to the other. These gene variants have potential regulatory activity. Ku70 is an inhibitor of the pro-apoptotic Bax, while the product of Lass1, ceramide, operates in both caspase-dependent and independent pathways of programmed cell death, providing a potential cellular mechanism for the effects of these genes on tissue damage and circulating creatine kinase. PMID:26913518

  20. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  1. Targeting the Proteostasis Network in Rhodopsin Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin are one of the most common causes of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Misfolding of rhodopsin can result in disruptions in cellular protein homeostasis, or proteostasis. There is currently no available treatment for RP. In this review, we discuss the different approaches currently being investigated for treatment of rhodopsin RP, focusing on the potential of manipulation of the proteostasis network as a therapeutic approach to combat retinal degeneration.

  2. Identification of genes from pattern formation, tyrosine kinase, and potassium channel families by DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Kamb, A.; Weir, M.; Rudy, B.; Varmus, H.; Kenyon, C. )

    1989-06-01

    The study of gene family members has been aided by the isolation of related genes on the basis of DNA homology. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction to screen animal genomes very rapidly and reliably for likely gene family members. Using conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers, they have shown that the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains sequences homologous to many Drosophila genes involved in pattern formation, including the segment polarity gene wingless (vertebrate int-1), and homeobox sequences characteristic of the Antennapedia, engrailed, and paired families. In addition, they have used this method to show that C. elegans contains at least five different sequences homologous to genes in the tyrosine kinase family. Lastly, they have isolated six potassium channel sequences from humans, a result that validates the utility of the method with large genomes and suggests that human potassium channel gene diversity may be extensive.

  3. Mutations in the pantothenate kinase gene PANK2 are not associated with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Klopstock, Thomas; Elstner, Matthias; Lücking, Christoph B; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Gasser, Thomas; Botz, Evelyn; Lichtner, Peter; Hörtnagel, Konstanze

    2005-05-13

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) may serve as a model for Parkinson disease (PD) since many PKAN patients suffer from parkinsonism and both conditions lead to iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. We screened the gene coding for pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) for sequence variants in PD. We found no mutations in 67 PD patients with affected sibs or early-onset disease. Moreover, PANK2 polymorphisms were not associated with late-onset idiopathic PD in 339 patients. We conclude that PANK2 variants exert, if any, only a very small effect in the genetic risk of PD.

  4. Dark regeneration of rhodopsin in crayfish photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The eyes of crayfish were exposed to lights of known spectral composition, and the course of regeneration was followed in the dark by measuring the content of rhodopsin and metarhodopsin in single rhabdoms isolated at various times after the adaptation, using an assay that is based on the fluorescence of metarhodopsin. Complete recovery requires several days in the dark after intense adaptation to orange light, but requires less than 2 d after blue light exposure. Following an orange light exposure with blue produces recovery kinetics characteristic of the blue light exposure alone. This quickening of recovery occurs whether the receptors are exposed to blue light either immediately or many hours after the original exposure to orange. Conversely, following blue light adaptation with orange leads to slow recovery, which is characteristic of orange alone. Recovery from long-wavelength adaptation is slower principally because many rhabdoms seem to delay the onset of regeneration. We suggest that the regeneration system is itself photosensitive, and after orange light adaptation the supply of active chromophore (presumably 11-cis retinal) limits the rate of recovery. Once started, recovery proceeds slowly and continuously, and the total pigment concentration (rhodopsin plus metarhodopsin) in the rhabdomeric membrane remains approximately constant. Within hours after intense adapting exposures, the rhabdoms become altered in appearance, the surfaces become coated with accessory pigment, and the bands of microvilli are less distinct. These changes persist until recovery of rhodopsin proceeds, which suggests that visual pigment regeneration results from addition of newly synthesized rhodopsin associated with membrane turn-over. PMID:6747600

  5. Rhodopsin bleaching signals in essential night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M.; Holland, M. G.; Ohba, N.

    1972-01-01

    1. The dark-adaptation curves of two subjects with essential night blindness revealed no evidence for functioning rod vision. Cone vision was normal. 2. The photopupillomotor dark adaptation, and flash intensity response amplitude curves on one of these subjects confirmed the absence of rod function. 3. However, there is the normal amount of rhodopsin in their rods with normal kinetics. 4. Cone pigment kinetics are also nearly normal. After a full bleach, log threshold elevation of the foveal cones is linearly related to pigment regeneration. The constant of proportionality is about 3·0 as it is in the normal retina. 5. After a full rhodopsin bleach, the contralateral pupil size recovered its full dark value along a curve which followed the regeneration of rhodopsin. 6. The results in (5) are identical to those previously found on normal subjects. 7. With the exception of a very small response attributed to the contribution of cones, no significant changes in pupil size were evoked by uniform ganzfeld steady backgrounds until the intensity of retinal illuminance was so high that appreciable rhodopsin was bleached. This contrast to the changes evoked by weak steady backgrounds in the normal eye. 8. Therefore, rod bleaching signals are normal in such retinas but rod signals evoked by real lights are not functional. This supports Rushton's concept as to how bleaching signals influence retinal sensitivity as opposed to the view of Barlow. 9. The defect in essential night blindness very probably involves the rod automatic gain control, but because of (4) the cone gain control must be normal. 10. Therefore, rod and cone gain control mechanisms must be independent in these night blind retinas and, by analogy, in the normal retina as well. PMID:4538549

  6. Dictyostelium discoideum has a single diacylglycerol kinase gene with similarity to mammalian theta isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    De La Roche, Marc A; Smith, Janet L; Rico, Maribel; Carrasco, Silvia; Merida, Isabel; Licate, Lucila; Côté, Graham P; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2002-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the neutral lipid diacylglycerol (DG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). In mammalian systems DGKs are a complex family of at least nine isoforms that are thought to participate in down-regulation of DG-based signalling pathways and perhaps activation of PA-stimulated signalling events. We report here that the simple protozoan amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum appears to contain a single gene encoding a DGK enzyme. This gene, dgkA, encodes a deduced protein that contains three C1-type cysteine-rich repeats, a DGK catalytic domain most closely related to the theta subtype of mammalian DGKs and a C-terminal segment containing a proline/glutamine-rich region and a large aspargine-repeat region. This gene corresponds to a previously reported myosin II heavy chain kinase designated myosin heavy chain-protein kinase C (MHC-PKC), but our analysis clearly demonstrates that this protein does not, as suggested by earlier data, contain a protein kinase catalytic domain. A FLAG-tagged version of DgkA expressed in Dictyostelium displayed robust DGK activity. Earlier studies indicating that disruption of this locus alters myosin II assembly levels in Dictyostelium raise the intriguing possibility that DG and/or PA metabolism may play a role in controlling myosin II assembly in this system. PMID:12296770

  7. The rhodopsins: structure and function. Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    Nature makes use of the propensity of retinal for light-dependent double-bond isomerization in a number of systems and in a variety of ways. The common theme for light receptors based on this kind of chemistry is that (1) the retinal is bound in most cases to a small membrane protein via a protonated lysine-retinal Schiff base, (2) the absorption maximum in the visible is tuned to a suitable wavelength largely by electrostatic interaction with polar protein residues, and (3) the light-induced bond rotations and strains in the retinal set off reaction chains during which at least part of the excess free energy acquired is transferred to the protein and causes pK shifts of acidic residues and/or backbone conformational changes. The physiological consequence of the process initiated by absorption of light is either the activation of an information transfer chain (sensory and visual rhodopsins) or energy transduction which drives the electrogenic movement of ions across the membrane (ion-motive rhodopsins). Rhodopsins with these functions occur in bacteria and in higher organisms; from an evolutionary standpoint they are not related to one another. Nevertheless, all of these proteins are remarkably similar and form a distinct family.

  8. The rhodopsins: structure and function. Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    Nature makes use of the propensity of retinal for light-dependent double-bond isomerization in a number of systems and in a variety of ways. The common theme for light receptors based on this kind of chemistry is that (1) the retinal is bound in most cases to a small membrane protein via a protonated lysine-retinal Schiff base, (2) the absorption maximum in the visible is tuned to a suitable wavelength largely by electrostatic interaction with polar protein residues, and (3) the light-induced bond rotations and strains in the retinal set off reaction chains during which at least part of the excess free energy acquired is transferred to the protein and causes pK shifts of acidic residues and/or backbone conformational changes. The physiological consequence of the process initiated by absorption of light is either the activation of an information transfer chain (sensory and visual rhodopsins) or energy transduction which drives the electrogenic movement of ions across the membrane (ion-motive rhodopsins). Rhodopsins with these functions occur in bacteria and in higher organisms; from an evolutionary standpoint they are not related to one another. Nevertheless, all of these proteins are remarkably similar and form a distinct family.

  9. Cloning and characterization of two genes encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe IFO 0354.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Takahashi, M; Yoshihara, K; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, K; Imai, K; Karita, S; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    1998-11-08

    We report the cloning and characterization of two genes encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase (EC 2.7.1.29), SpDAK1 and SpDAK2, from Schizosaccharomyces pombe IFO 0354. The open reading frames of both genes encode 591 amino acids and have Mrs of 62158 and 62170, respectively. Both predicted amino acid sequences exhibited a high identity to each other (99.8%) and relatively high identities (30% to 76%) to other putative dihydroxyacetone kinase gene products. A Western blot analysis showed that these enzymes are induced by glycerol and repressed by glucose. A genomic Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of SpDAK1 and the absence of SpDAK2 in a standard laboratory strain, S. pombe 972h-.

  10. Identification of new protein kinase-related genes in three herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, and Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R F; Smith, T F

    1989-01-01

    By using amino acid sequence patterns (motifs) diagnostic of conserved regions within the catalytic domains of protein kinases, homologous open reading frames of three herpesviruses were identified as protein kinase-related genes. The three sequences, herpes simplex virus gene UL13, varicella-zoster virus gene 47, and Epstein-Barr virus gene BGLF4, resemble serine/threonine kinases rather than tyrosine kinases. PMID:2535748

  11. Evidence against a second autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.; Bhattacharya, S. ); Farrar, J.; Humphries, P. ); Denton, M. ); Gal, A. )

    1993-08-01

    In 1989 McWilliam et al. reported close linkage of the autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) locus to chromosome 3q marker D3S47 in a large Irish pedigree (McWilliam et al 1989). Subsequent studies confirmed linkage in two other adRP families (Lester et al 1990; Olsson et al. 1990). Shortly afterward, utations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, mapping to 3q21-24, were implicated in disease causation, and it is now known that around one-third of adRP results from such mutations (Dryja et al. 1991; Sung et al. 1991; Inglchearn et al. 1992a). At that time, sequencing studies had failed to find rhodopsin mutations in the three families first linked to 3q. Several adRP families in which rhodopsin mutations had been found gave lod scores that, when pooled, had a peak of 4.47 at a theta of .12 (Inglehearn et al. 1992b). The apparent lack of mutations in families TCDM1, adRP3, and 20 together with the linkage data in these and the proved RHO-RP families, led to speculation that two adRP loci existed on chromosome 3q (Olsson et al. 1990; Inglehearn et al. 1992b). However this situation has been reversed by more recent analysis, since rhodopsin mutations have now been found in all three families. There is therefore no longer any evidence to support the hypothesis that a second adRP locus exists close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q.

  12. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  13. High throughput screening of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistant genes in CML

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Leyuan; Roderick, Justine; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Green, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening in mammalian cells has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying new genes and molecular pathways relevant to many cellular processes and diseases. For example, screening for genes that, when inactivated, lead to resistance to cancer therapeutic drugs can reveal new mechanisms for how resistance develops, and identify potential targetable strategies to overcome drug resistance. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for performing a high throughput RNAi screen using a genome-wide human short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library for identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistance genes in a human CML cell line model. PMID:27581147

  14. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration in two Chinese children: identification of a novel PANK2 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Chan, K Y; Lam, C W; Lee, L P; Tong, S F; Yuen, Y P

    2008-02-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (formerly Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome), the most prevalent form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, is a rare degenerative brain disease characterised by predominantly extrapyramidal dysfunction resulting from mutations in the PANK2 (pantothenate kinase 2) gene. Using DNA mutation analysis, the authors identified a novel missense mutation (P354L) in exon 4 of the PANK2 gene in an adolescent with classic pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. DNA-based diagnosis of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration plays a key role in determination, and can make the diagnosis more simply, directly, and economically because it obviates the need for unnecessary biochemical tests. Once pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration-like symptoms are identified, mutation analysis and target screening for the family of the proband can provide efficient and accurate evidence of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration inheritance.

  15. Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection modulates expression of megakaryocyte cell cycle genes through phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Supreet; Sultana, Hameeda; Catravas, John D; Carlyon, Jason A; Neelakanta, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis infects neutrophils and other cells from hematopoietic origin. Using human megakaryocytic cell line, MEG-01, we show that expression of cell cycle genes in these cells are altered upon A. phagocytophilum infection. Expression of several cell cycle genes in MEG-01 cells was significantly up regulated at early and then down regulated at later stages of A. phagocytophilum infection. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays revealed reduced cellular cytotoxicity in MEG-01 cells upon A. phagocytophilum infection. The levels of both PI3KCA (p110 alpha, catalytic subunit) and PI3KR1 (p85, regulatory subunit) of Class I PI3 kinases and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) and inhibitory kappa B (IκB) were elevated at both early and late stages of A. phagocytophilum infection. Inhibition of PI3 kinases with LY294002 treatment resulted in significant reduction in the expression of tested cell cycle genes, A. phagocytophilum burden and phosphorylated Akt levels in these MEG-01 cells. Collectively, these results suggest a role for PI3K-Akt-NF-κB signaling pathway in the modulation of megakaryocyte cell cycle genes upon A. phagocytophilum infection.

  16. Cloning and characterization of a protein kinase C gene from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-Xing; Doucet, Daniel; Ladd, Tim; Krell, Peter J; Arif, Basil M

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated protein kinase C (PKC) in the control of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)-dependent gene expression during molting and metamorphosis in insects. To further understand the role of this kinase in 20E signal transduction, we cloned a homolog of mammalian PKC by RT-PCR and 5'/3'-RACE from adult of the moth Choristoneura fumiferana. The full-length cDNA of the C. fumiferana PKC (CfPKC1) is 2.3 kb with an open reading frame encoding a protein of 669 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains all the characteristic features of the classical protein kinase C subfamily. Northern and Western blot analysis showed that CfPKC1 was distributed ubiquitously in various tissues and at different developmental stages. Activation of CfPKC1 with the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) resulted in a rapid redistribution of the protein from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Knock-down of the CfPKC1 gene by double-stranded RNA interference or treatment of the CF-203 cells with PKC-specific inhibitors reduces the expression of the 20E-responsive genes CHR3 and E75. This data suggests that CfPKC1 is involved in the 20E-response gene expression in C. fumiferana.

  17. K-sam gene encodes secreted as well as transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, M; Hattori, Y; Sasaki, H; Tanaka, M; Sugano, K; Yazaki, Y; Sugimura, T; Terada, M

    1992-01-01

    K-sam was first identified as a gene amplified in the stomach cancer cell line KATO-III. The size of the major transcript of the K-sam gene was 3.5 kilobases in KATO-III cells, and we have previously shown that K-sam encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the heparin-binding growth factor receptor, or fibroblast growth factor receptor, gene family. The K-sam gene expresses multiple sizes of mRNAs in brain tissue, the immature teratoma cell line NCC-IT, and KATO-III. RNA blot analyses with a variety of K-sam probes indicate that there are at least four classes of K-sam mRNAs. Three types of K-sam cDNAs in addition to the previously reported type of K-sam cDNA were isolated, and their nucleotide sequences encode a full-length transmembrane receptor, a secreted receptor with a tyrosine kinase domain, and a secreted receptor without a tyrosine kinase domain. Images PMID:1313574

  18. Transcriptional analysis of three major putative phosphatidylinositol kinase genes in a parasitic protozoan, Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Yunuen; Zamora, Gus; Ray, Suparna; Chapoy, Jaime; Chavez, Edna; Valvarde, Robert; Williams, Ebonye; Aley, Stephen B; Das, Siddhartha

    2007-01-01

    The current investigation evaluates the expression of phosphatidylinositol kinase (PIK) genes in the parasitic protozoan, Giardia lamblia. The G. lamblia Genome Database revealed the presence of two putative phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (gPI3K) and one phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (gPI4K) genes resembling the catalytic subunit of eukaryotic PIKs. Primers, designed to amplify mRNA of these three genes, were used to measure transcription by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reactions. Results suggest that all three PIK genes are expressed in non-encysting and encysting trophozoites. The relative levels of the mRNA were highest in parasites cultured in pre-encysting medium that contained no bile. Two inhibitors of PI3K, LY 294002 and wortmannin were found to inhibit the growth of the trophozoite in culture. However, wortmannin was more effective than LY294002. Altogether, the present study indicates that Giardia is capable of expressing PIKs that are necessary for the growth and differentiation of this pathogen.

  19. Physcomitrella patens Has Kinase-LRR R Gene Homologs and Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanigaki, Yusuke; Ito, Kenji; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Kosaka, Akiko; Yamato, Katsuyuki T.; Okanami, Masahiro; Lehtonen, Mikko T.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Akita, Motomu

    2014-01-01

    Plant disease resistance gene (R gene)-like sequences were screened from the Physcomitrella patens genome. We found 603 kinase-like, 475 Nucleotide Binding Site (NBS)-like and 8594 Leucine Rich Repeat (LRR)-like sequences by homology searching using the respective domains of PpC24 (Accession No. BAD38895), which is a candidate kinase-NBS-LRR (kinase-NL) type R-like gene, as a reference. The positions of these domains in the genome were compared and 17 kinase-NLs were predicted. We also found four TIR-NBS-LRR (TIR-NL) sequences with homology to Arabidopsis TIR-NL (NM_001125847), but three out of the four TIR-NLs had tetratricopeptide repeats or a zinc finger domain in their predicted C-terminus. We also searched for kinase-LRR (KLR) type sequences by homology with rice OsXa21 and Arabidopsis thaliana FLS2. As a result, 16 KLRs with similarity to OsXa21 were found. In phylogenetic analysis of these 16 KLRs, PpKLR36, PpKLR39, PpKLR40, and PpKLR43 formed a cluster with OsXa21. These four PpKLRs had deduced transmembrane domain sequences and expression of all four was confirmed. We also found 14 homologs of rice OsXB3, which is known to interact with OsXa21 and is involved in signal transduction. Protein–protein interaction was observed between the four PpKLRs and at least two of the XB3 homologs in Y2H analysis. PMID:24748046

  20. Transcriptional upregulation of the human MRP2 gene expression by serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pułaski, L; Szemraj, J; Uchiumi, T; Kuwano, M; Bartosz, G

    2005-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation by cellular signalling pathways of multidrug resistance proteins that pump anticancer drugs out of cells is one of key issues in the development of the multidrug resistance phenotype. In our study, we have used the reporter gene approach as well as determination of mRNA levels in two cancer cell lines of human origin, MCF-7 and A549, to study the regulation of multidrug resistance proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 AND MRP3) by serine/threonine protein kinases. Since a prototypic PKC inducer, PMA, caused a marked upregulation of transcription from both human MRP2 and MRP3 promoters, a role for PKC isoforms in positive control of expression of these proteins could be postulated. Interestingly, broad-spectrum serine-threonine protein kinase inhibitors which also inhibit PKC, staurosporine and H-7, stimulated expression from the MRP2 promoter instead of inhibiting it. This effect was not seen for MRP3. MRP2 induction by staurosporine and H-7 was shown to have phenotypic consequences in whole cells, rendering them more resistant to etoposide and increasing their ability to export calcein through the plasma membrane. These results point to the involvement of serine/threonine protein kinases in negative regulation of the human MRP2 gene and to the necessity of testing novel anti-cancer drugs acting as protein kinase inhibitors with regard to their potential ability to induce multidrug resistance.

  1. Analysis of kinase gene expression in the frontal cortex of suicide victims: implications of fear and stress.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang; Le, Thien; Xing, Guoqiang; Johnson, Luke R; Ursano, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health issue that results from an interaction between multiple risk factors including individual vulnerabilities to complex feelings of hopelessness, fear, and stress. Although kinase genes have been implicated in fear and stress, including the consolidation and extinction of fearful memories, expression profiles of those genes in the brain of suicide victims are less clear. Using gene expression microarray data from the Online Stanley Genomics Database and a quantitative PCR, we investigated the expression profiles of multiple kinase genes including the calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase (CAMK), the cyclin-dependent kinase, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and the protein kinase C (PKC) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of mood disorder patients died with suicide (N = 45) and without suicide (N = 38). We also investigated the expression pattern of the same genes in the PFC of developing humans ranging in age from birth to 49 year (N = 46). The expression levels of CAMK2B, CDK5, MAPK9, and PRKCI were increased in the PFC of suicide victims as compared to non-suicide controls (false discovery rate, FDR-adjusted p < 0.05, fold change >1.1). Those genes also showed changes in expression pattern during the postnatal development (FDR-adjusted p < 0.05). These results suggest that multiple kinase genes undergo age-dependent changes in normal brains as well as pathological changes in suicide brains. These findings may provide an important link to protein kinases known to be important for the development of fear memory, stress associated neural plasticity, and up-regulation in the PFC of suicide victims. More research is needed to better understand the functional role of these kinase genes that may be associated with the pathophysiology of suicide.

  2. Characterizing rhodopsin signaling by EPR spectroscopy: from structure to dynamics.

    PubMed

    Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N; Morizumi, Takefumi; Ernst, Oliver P

    2015-09-26

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, together with spin labeling techniques, has played a major role in the characterization of rhodopsin, the photoreceptor protein and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in rod cells. Two decades ago, these biophysical tools were the first to identify transmembrane helical movements in rhodopsin upon photo-activation, a critical step in the study of GPCR signaling. EPR methods were employed to identify functional loop dynamics within rhodopsin, to measure light-induced millisecond timescale changes in rhodopsin conformation, to characterize the effects of partial agonists on the apoprotein opsin, and to study lipid interactions with rhodopsin. With the emergence of advanced pulsed EPR techniques, the stage was set to determine the amplitude of structural changes in rhodopsin and the dynamics in the rhodopsin signaling complexes. Work in this area has yielded invaluable information about mechanistic properties of GPCRs. Using EPR techniques, receptors are studied in native-like membrane environments and the effects of lipids on conformational equilibria can be explored. This perspective addresses the impact of EPR methods on rhodopsin and GPCR structural biology, highlighting historical discoveries made with spin labeling techniques, and outlining exciting new directions in the field.

  3. Crystallographic Study of the LUMI Intermediate of Squid Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Midori; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Upon absorption of light, the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin isomerizes from the 11-cis to the trans configuration, initiating a photoreaction cycle. The primary photoreaction state, bathorhodopsin (BATHO), relaxes thermally through lumirhodopsin (LUMI) into a photoactive state, metarhodopsin (META), which stimulates the conjugated G-protein. Previous crystallographic studies of squid and bovine rhodopsins have shown that the structural change in the primary photoreaction of squid rhodopsin is considerably different from that observed in bovine rhodopsin. It would be expected that there is a fundamental difference in the subsequent thermal relaxation process between vertebrate and invertebrate rhodopsins. In this work, we performed crystallographic analyses of the LUMI state of squid rhodopsin using the P62 crystal. When the crystal was illuminated at 100 K with blue light, a half fraction of the protein was converted into BATHO. This reaction state relaxed into LUMI when the illuminated crystal was warmed in the dark to 170 K. It was found that, whereas trans retinal is largely twisted in BATHO, it takes on a more planar configuration in LUMI. This relaxation of retinal is accompanied by reorientation of the Schiff base NH bond, the hydrogen-bonding partner of which is switched to Asn185 in LUMI. Unlike bovine rhodopsin, the BATHO-to-LUMI transition in squid rhodopsin was accompanied by no significant change in the position/orientation of the beta-ionone ring of retinal.

  4. Evidence of microbial rhodopsins in Antarctic Dry Valley edaphic systems.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Leandro D; Vikram, Surendra; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Cowan, Don A

    2017-07-28

    Microorganisms able to synthesize rhodopsins have the capacity to translocate ions through their membranes, using solar energy to generate a proton motive force. Rhodopsins are the most abundant phototrophic proteins in oceanic surface waters and are key constituents in marine bacterial ecology. However, it remains unclear how rhodopsins are used in most microorganisms. Despite their abundance in marine and fresh-water systems, the presence of functional rhodopsin systems in edaphic habitats has never been reported. Here, we show the presence of several new putative H(+) , Na(+) and Cl(+) pumping rhodopsins identified by metagenomic analysis of Antarctic desert hypolithic communities. Reconstruction of two Proteobacteria genomes harboring xanthorhodopsin-like proteins and one Bacteroidetes genome with a Na-pumping-like rhodopsin indicated that these bacteria were aerobic heterotrophs possessing the apparent capacity for the functional expression of rhodopsins. The existence of these protein systems in hypolithic bacteria expands the known role of rhodopsins to include terrestrial environments and suggests a possible predominant function as heterotrophic energy supply proteins, a feasible microbial adaptation to the harsh conditions prevalent in Antarctic edaphic systems. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Expression and characterization of the thymidine kinase gene of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Martin Hernandez, A M; Tabares, E

    1991-01-01

    The thymidine kinase (TK) gene of African swine fever virus (ASFV) was located within the viral genome by using two degenerate oligonucleotide probes derived from sequences of the vaccinia virus and cellular TK genes. The TK gene was mapped within a 0.72-kbp BglII-XhoI fragment (0.242 to 0.246 map units) derived from a 23.9-kbp SalI-B fragment of the ASFV genome. Identification of this region as the ASFV TK gene was confirmed by expression of TK in Escherichia coli and by the synthesis of active TK in a cell-free system programmed with RNA synthesized in vitro. The sequenced gene for TK includes an open reading frame of 588 nucleotides encoding a protein of 196 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 32.4% identity with the TK of vaccinia virus. Images PMID:1987368

  6. Myxococcus xanthus sasS encodes a sensor histidine kinase required for early developmental gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C; Kaplan, H B

    1997-01-01

    Initiation of Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development requires integration of information concerning the cells' nutrient status and density. A gain-of-function mutation, sasB7, that bypasses both the starvation and high cell density requirements for developmental expression of the 4521 reporter gene, maps to the sasS gene. The wild-type sasS gene was cloned and sequenced. This gene is predicted to encode a sensor histidine protein kinase that appears to be a key element in the transduction of starvation and cell density inputs. The sasS null mutants express 4521 at a basal level, form defective fruiting bodies, and exhibit reduced sporulation efficiencies. These data indicate that the wild-type sasS gene product functions as a positive regulator of 4521 expression and participates in M. xanthus development. The N terminus of SasS is predicted to contain two transmembrane domains that would locate the protein to the cytoplasmic membrane. The sasB7 mutation, an E139K missense mutation, maps to the predicted N-terminal periplasmic region. The C terminus of SasS contains all of the conserved residues typical of the sensor histidine protein kinases. SasS is predicted to be the sensor protein in a two-component system that integrates information required for M. xanthus developmental gene expression. PMID:9401035

  7. A Kinase-Independent Activity of Cdk9 Modulates Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Gene Induction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A gene induction competition assay has recently uncovered new inhibitory activities of two transcriptional cofactors, NELF-A and NELF-B, in glucocorticoid-regulated transactivation. NELF-A and -B are also components of the NELF complex, which participates in RNA polymerase II pausing shortly after the initiation of gene transcription. We therefore asked if cofactors (Cdk9 and ELL) best known to affect paused polymerase could reverse the effects of NELF-A and -B. Unexpectedly, Cdk9 and ELL augmented, rather than prevented, the effects of NELF-A and -B. Furthermore, Cdk9 actions are not blocked either by Ckd9 inhibitors (DRB or flavopiridol) or by two Cdk9 mutants defective in kinase activity. The mode and site of action of NELF-A and -B mutants with an altered NELF domain are similarly affected by wild-type and kinase-dead Cdk9. We conclude that Cdk9 is a new modulator of GR action, that Ckd9 and ELL have novel activities in GR-regulated gene expression, that NELF-A and -B can act separately from the NELF complex, and that Cdk9 possesses activities that are independent of Cdk9 kinase activity. Finally, the competition assay has succeeded in ordering the site of action of several cofactors of GR transactivation. Extension of this methodology should be helpful in determining the site and mode of action of numerous additional cofactors and in reducing unwanted side effects. PMID:24559102

  8. Not all butterfly eyes are created equal: rhodopsin absorption spectra, molecular identification, and localization of ultraviolet-, blue-, and green-sensitive rhodopsin-encoding mRNAs in the retina of Vanessa cardui.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Adriana D; Bernard, Gary D; Szeto, Allan S; Nagy, Lisa M; White, Richard H

    2003-04-14

    Surveys of spectral sensitivities, visual pigment spectra, and opsin gene sequences have indicated that all butterfly eyes contain ultraviolet-, blue-, and green-sensitive rhodopsins. Some species also contain a fourth or fifth type, related in amino acid sequence to green-sensitive insect rhodopsins, but red shifted in absorbance. By combining electron microscopy, epi-microspectrophotometry, and polymerase chain reaction cloning, we found that the compound eye of Vanessa cardui has the typical ultrastructural features of the butterfly retina but contains only the three common insect rhodopsins. We estimated lambda-max values and relative densities of the rhodopsins in the Vanessa retina (0.72, P530; 0.12, P470; and 0.15, P360) from microspectrophotometric measurements and calculations based on a computational model of reflectance spectra. We isolated three opsin-encoding cDNA fragments that were identified with P530, P470, and P360 by homology to the well-characterized insect rhodopsin families. The retinal mosaic was mapped by opsin mRNA in situ hybridization and found to contain three kinds of ommatidia with respect to their patterns of short wavelength rhodopsin expression. In some ommatidia, P360 or P470 was expressed in R1 and R2 opposed receptor cells; in others, one cell expressed P360, whereas its complement expressed P470. P530 was expressed in the other seven cells of all ommatidia. P470-expressing cells were abundant in the ventral retina but nearly absent dorsally. Our results indicated that there are major differences between the color vision systems of nymphalid and papilionid butterflies: the nymphalid Vanessa has a simpler, trichromatic, system than do the tetrachromatic papilionids that have been studied. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Mouse Models of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Lamin A/C Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Muchir, Antoine; Worman, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently occurring mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A and nuclear lamin C cause striated muscle diseases virtually always involving the heart. In this review, we describe the approaches and methods used to discover that cardiomyopathy-causing lamin A/C gene mutations increase MAP kinase signaling in the heart and that this plays a role in disease pathogenesis. We review different mouse models of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations and how transcriptomic analysis of one model identified increased cardiac activity of the ERK1/2, JNK, and p38α MAP kinases. We describe methods used to measure the activity of these MAP kinases in mouse hearts and then discuss preclinical treatment protocols using pharmacological inhibitors to demonstrate their role in pathogenesis. Several of these kinase inhibitors are in clinical development and could potentially be used to treat human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations. PMID:26795484

  10. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 (PDK4) gene expression by glucocorticoids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Sara; Chowdhury, Farhana; Attia, Ramy R; Song, Shulan; Zhang, Yi; Elam, Marshall B; Cook, George A; Park, Edwards A

    2010-02-05

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) inhibits its activity. The expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene is increased in fasting and other conditions associated with the switch from the utilization of glucose to fatty acids as an energy source. Transcription of the PDK4 gene is elevated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. In this study, we have investigated the factors involved in the regulation of the PDK4 gene by these hormones. Glucocorticoids stimulate PDK4 through two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites located more than 6000 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Insulin inhibits the glucocorticoid induction in part by causing dissociation of the GR from the promoter. Previously, we found that the estrogen related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here, we determined that one of the ERRalpha binding sites contributes to the insulin inhibition of PDK4. A binding site for the forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) is adjacent to the ERRalpha binding sites. FoxO1 participates in the glucocorticoid induction of PDK4 and the regulation of this gene by insulin. Our data demonstrate that glucocorticoids and insulin each modulate PDK4 gene expression through complex hormone response units that contain multiple factors.

  11. Retinoblastoma cancer suppressor gene product is a substrate of the cell cycle regulator cdc2 kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, B T; Gruenwald, S; Morla, A O; Lee, W H; Wang, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (RB) is a nuclear protein which has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor. It is phosphorylated from S to M phase of the cell cycle and dephosphorylated in G1. This suggests that the function of RB is regulated by its phosphorylation in the cell cycle. Ten phosphotryptic peptides are found in human RB proteins. The pattern of RB phosphorylation does not change from S to M phases of the cell cycle. Hypophosphorylated RB prepared from insect cells infected with an RB-recombinant baculovirus is used as a substrate for in vitro phosphorylation reactions. Of several protein kinases tested, only cdc2 kinase phosphorylates RB efficiently and all 10 peptides can be phosphorylated by cdc2 in vitro. Removal of cdc2 from mitotic cell extracts by immunoprecipitation causes a concomitant depletion of RB kinase activity. These results indicate that cdc2 or a kinase with similar substrate specificity is involved in the cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of the RB protein. Images PMID:2009861

  12. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Nasar; Li, Dayong; Tian, Limei; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yafen; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV) while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26222830

  13. Discovery of rice essential genes by characterizing a CRISPR-edited mutation of closely related rice MAP kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Minkenberg, Bastian; Xie, Kabin; Yang, Yinong

    2017-02-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system depends on a guide RNA (gRNA) to specify its target. By efficiently co-expressing multiple gRNAs that target different genomic sites, the polycistronic tRNA-gRNA gene (PTG) strategy enables multiplex gene editing in the family of closely related mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) genes in Oryza sativa (rice). In this study, we identified MPK1 and MPK6 (Arabidopsis AtMPK6 and AtMPK4 orthologs, respectively) as essential genes for rice development by finding the preservation of MPK functional alleles and normal phenotypes in CRISPR-edited mutants. The true knock-out mutants of MPK1 were severely dwarfed and sterile, and homozygous mpk1 seeds from heterozygous parents were defective in embryo development. By contrast, heterozygous mpk6 mutant plants completely failed to produce homozygous mpk6 seeds. In addition, the functional importance of specific MPK features could be evaluated by characterizing CRISPR-induced allelic variation in the conserved kinase domain of MPK6. By simultaneously targeting between two and eight genomic sites in the closely related MPK genes, we demonstrated 45-86% frequency of biallelic mutations and the successful creation of single, double and quadruple gene mutants. Indels and fragment deletion were both stably inherited to the next generations, and transgene-free mutants of rice MPK genes were readily obtained via genetic segregation, thereby eliminating any positional effects of transgene insertions. Taken together, our study reveals the essentiality of MPK1 and MPK6 in rice development, and enables the functional discovery of previously inaccessible genes or domains with phenotypes masked by lethality or redundancy.

  14. A comparative study of rhodopsin function in the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis): Spectral tuning and light-activated kinetics.

    PubMed

    van Hazel, Ilke; Dungan, Sarah Z; Hauser, Frances E; Morrow, James M; Endler, John A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-07-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating the phototransduction cascade in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Although well-characterized in a few model systems, comparative studies of rhodopsin function, particularly for nonmammalian vertebrates are comparatively lacking. Bowerbirds are rare among passerines in possessing a key substitution, D83N, at a site that is otherwise highly conserved among G protein-coupled receptors. While this substitution is present in some dim-light adapted vertebrates, often accompanying another unusual substitution, A292S, its functional relevance in birds is uncertain. To investigate functional effects associated with these two substitutions, we use the rhodopsin gene from the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis) as a background for site-directed mutagenesis, in vitro expression and functional characterization. We also mutated these sites in two additional rhodopsins that do not naturally possess N83, chicken and bovine, for comparison. Both sites were found to contribute to spectral blue-shifts, but had opposing effects on kinetic rates. Substitutions at site 83 were found to primarily affect the kinetics of light-activated rhodopsin, while substitutions at site 292 had a larger impact on spectral tuning. The contribution of substitutions at site 83 to spectral tuning in particular depended on genetic background, but overall, the effects of substitutions were otherwise surprisingly additive, and the magnitudes of functional shifts were roughly similar across all three genetic backgrounds. By employing a comparative approach with multiple species, our study provides new insight into the joint impact of sites 83 and 292 on rhodopsin structure-function as well as their evolutionary significance for dim-light vision across vertebrates. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  15. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The doublecortin and doublecortin-like kinase 1 genes cooperate in murine hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Teruyuki; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2006-07-01

    The doublecortin (Dcx) and doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk) genes are developmentally expressed neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. Humans with DCX mutations show a severe defect in hippocampal development, but targeted deletion in mouse shows only a defect in pyramidal neuron lamination. There is significant sequence overlap between Dcx and Dclk, suggesting functional redundancy. Here we show that the two genes display overlapping expression patterns in developing mouse hippocampus. Targeted deletion of Dclk shows no appreciable developmental defect in the hippocampus, but removal of both genes shows severe hippocampal lamination defects involving the entire cornu ammonis and dentate gyrus fields that mimic the human phenotype. These results suggest these genes are partially functionally redundant in the formation of the murine hippocampus.

  17. Transcriptional Activity of Neural Retina Leucine Zipper (Nrl) Is Regulated by c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase and Tip60 during Retina Development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Woong; Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Chul-Hong; An, Joo-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl), a key basic motif leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, modulates rod photoreceptor differentiation by activating rod-specific target genes. In searching for factors that might couple with Nrl to modulate its transcriptional activity through posttranslational modification, we observed the novel interactions of Nrl with c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and HIV Tat-interacting protein 60 (Tip60). JNK1 directly interacted with and phosphorylated Nrl at serine 50, which enhanced Nrl transcriptional activity on the rhodopsin and Ppp2r5c promoters. Use of an inactive JNK1 mutant or treatment with a JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly reduced JNK1-mediated phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of Nrl in cultured retinal explants. We also found that Nrl activated rhodopsin and Ppp2r5c transcription by recruiting Tip60 to promote histone H3/H4 acetylation. The binding affinity of phospho-Nrl for Tip60 was significantly greater than that of the unphosphorylated Nrl. Thus, the histone acetyltransferase-containing Tip60 behaved as a coactivator in the Nrl-dependent transcriptional regulation of the rhodopsin and Ppp2r5c genes in the developing mouse retina. A transcriptional network of interactive proteins, including Nrl, JNK1, and Tip60, may be required to precisely control spatiotemporal photoreceptor-specific gene expression during retinal development. PMID:22354990

  18. Transcriptional activity of neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl) is regulated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase and Tip60 during retina development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Woong; Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Chul-Hong; An, Joo-Hee; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2012-05-01

    Neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl), a key basic motif leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, modulates rod photoreceptor differentiation by activating rod-specific target genes. In searching for factors that might couple with Nrl to modulate its transcriptional activity through posttranslational modification, we observed the novel interactions of Nrl with c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and HIV Tat-interacting protein 60 (Tip60). JNK1 directly interacted with and phosphorylated Nrl at serine 50, which enhanced Nrl transcriptional activity on the rhodopsin and Ppp2r5c promoters. Use of an inactive JNK1 mutant or treatment with a JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly reduced JNK1-mediated phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of Nrl in cultured retinal explants. We also found that Nrl activated rhodopsin and Ppp2r5c transcription by recruiting Tip60 to promote histone H3/H4 acetylation. The binding affinity of phospho-Nrl for Tip60 was significantly greater than that of the unphosphorylated Nrl. Thus, the histone acetyltransferase-containing Tip60 behaved as a coactivator in the Nrl-dependent transcriptional regulation of the rhodopsin and Ppp2r5c genes in the developing mouse retina. A transcriptional network of interactive proteins, including Nrl, JNK1, and Tip60, may be required to precisely control spatiotemporal photoreceptor-specific gene expression during retinal development.

  19. Rapid induction by wounding and bacterial infection of an S gene family receptor-like kinase gene in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Pastuglia, M; Roby, D; Dumas, C; Cock, J M

    1997-01-01

    A receptor-like kinase, SRK, has been implicated in the autoincompatible response that leads to the rejection of self-pollen in Brassica plants. SRK is encoded by one member of a multigene family, which includes several receptor-like kinase genes with patterns of expression very different from that of SRK but of unknown function. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the Brassica S gene family, SFR2. RNA gel blot analysis demonstrated that SFR2 mRNA accumulated rapidly in response both to wounding and to infiltration with either of two bacteria: Xanthomonas campestris, a pathogen, and Escherichia coli, a saprophyte. SFR2 mRNA also accumulated rapidly after treatment with salicylic acid, a molecule that has been implicated in plant defense response signaling pathways. A SFR2 promoter and reporter gene fusion was introduced into tobacco and was shown to be induced by bacteria of another genus, Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum. The accumulation of SFR2 mRNA in response to wounding and pathogen invasion is typical of a gene involved in the defense responses of the plant. The rapidity of SFR2 mRNA accumulation is consistent with SFR2 playing a role in the signal transduction pathway that leads to induction of plant defense proteins, such as pathogenesis-related proteins or enzymes of phenylpropanoid metabolism.

  20. Rapid induction by wounding and bacterial infection of an S gene family receptor-like kinase gene in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed Central

    Pastuglia, M; Roby, D; Dumas, C; Cock, J M

    1997-01-01

    A receptor-like kinase, SRK, has been implicated in the autoincompatible response that leads to the rejection of self-pollen in Brassica plants. SRK is encoded by one member of a multigene family, which includes several receptor-like kinase genes with patterns of expression very different from that of SRK but of unknown function. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the Brassica S gene family, SFR2. RNA gel blot analysis demonstrated that SFR2 mRNA accumulated rapidly in response both to wounding and to infiltration with either of two bacteria: Xanthomonas campestris, a pathogen, and Escherichia coli, a saprophyte. SFR2 mRNA also accumulated rapidly after treatment with salicylic acid, a molecule that has been implicated in plant defense response signaling pathways. A SFR2 promoter and reporter gene fusion was introduced into tobacco and was shown to be induced by bacteria of another genus, Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum. The accumulation of SFR2 mRNA in response to wounding and pathogen invasion is typical of a gene involved in the defense responses of the plant. The rapidity of SFR2 mRNA accumulation is consistent with SFR2 playing a role in the signal transduction pathway that leads to induction of plant defense proteins, such as pathogenesis-related proteins or enzymes of phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:9014364

  1. Insulin-induced reactivation of an inactive herpes simplex thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Clough, D W; Morse, B S; Kucherlapati, R S; Davidson, R L

    1984-01-01

    A line of mouse cells transformed with ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus type 1 and containing a methylated and inactive viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene was treated with insulin in an attempt to induce expression of the inactive gene. Insulin was found to be capable of inducing the inactive TK gene in these cells. The induction of the TK+ phenotype was dose dependent (from 1-100 micrograms of insulin per ml), and the TK activity induced was shown to be of viral origin. Analysis of the methylation pattern of the viral TK gene by using the methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases Sma I, Hpa II, and Hha I revealed that the active viral TK gene in the parental transformed cells was hypomethylated, whereas the inactive TK gene in the uninduced TK- cells was methylated. The active TK gene in three insulin-induced TK+ lines also was methylated, but the methylation patterns in the insulin-induced lines all were different from the uninduced TK- line. These data suggest that extensive hypomethylation of the inactive TK gene is not required for insulin induction. Four other transformed lines containing an inactive viral TK gene were tested for insulin inducibility, but insulin was unable to induce expression of the TK gene in any of the other lines. Thus, insulin inducibility does not seem to be a function of the viral TK gene itself. These results suggest that insulin inducibility of the viral TK gene may be a reflection of the region of the host genome into which the TK gene was integrated. Images PMID:6322172

  2. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B.; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A.; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2016-01-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilize receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily, using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 are found to stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released facilitating H5 and H7 repacking onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles prolines play in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  3. Cone-like rhodopsin expressed in the all-cone retina of the colubrid pine snake as a potential adaptation to diurnality.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Darren, Benedict; Schott, Ryan K; Tropepe, Vincent; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-07-01

    Colubridae is the largest and most diverse family of snakes, with visual systems that reflect this diversity, encompassing a variety of retinal photoreceptor organizations. The transmutation theory proposed by Walls postulates that photoreceptors could evolutionarily transition between cell types in squamates, but few studies have tested this theory. Recently, evidence for transmutation and rod-like machinery in an all-cone retina has been identified in a diurnal garter snake (Thamnophis), and it appears that the rhodopsin gene at least may be widespread among colubrid snakes. However, functional evidence supporting transmutation beyond the existence of the rhodopsin gene remains rare. We examined the all-cone retina of another colubrid, Pituophis melanoleucus, thought to be more secretive/burrowing than Thamnophis We found that P. melanoleucus expresses two cone opsins (SWS1, LWS) and rhodopsin (RH1) within the eye. Immunohistochemistry localized rhodopsin to the outer segment of photoreceptors in the all-cone retina of the snake and all opsin genes produced functional visual pigments when expressed in vitro Consistent with other studies, we found that P. melanoleucus rhodopsin is extremely blue-shifted. Surprisingly, P. melanoleucus rhodopsin reacted with hydroxylamine, a typical cone opsin characteristic. These results support the idea that the rhodopsin-containing photoreceptors of P. melanoleucus are the products of evolutionary transmutation from rod ancestors, and suggest that this phenomenon may be widespread in colubrid snakes. We hypothesize that transmutation may be an adaptation for diurnal, brighter-light vision, which could result in increased spectral sensitivity and chromatic discrimination with the potential for colour vision. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Construction and Expression of Sugar Kinase Transcriptional Gene Fusions by Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti ORFeome▿

    PubMed Central

    Humann, Jodi L.; Schroeder, Brenda K.; Mortimer, Michael W.; House, Brent L.; Yurgel, Svetlana N.; Maloney, Scott C.; Ward, Kristel L.; Fallquist, Heather M.; Ziemkiewicz, Hope T.; Kahn, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti ORFeome project cloned 6,314 open reading frames (ORFs) into a modified Gateway entry vector system from which the ORFs could be transferred to destination vectors in vivo via bacterial conjugation. In this work, a reporter gene destination vector, pMK2030, was constructed and used to generate ORF-specific transcriptional fusions to β-glucuronidase (gusA) and green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporter genes. A total of 6,290 ORFs were successfully transferred from the entry vector library into pMK2030. To demonstrate the utility of this system, reporter plasmids corresponding to 30 annotated sugar kinase genes were integrated into the S. meliloti SM1021 and/or SM8530 genome. Expression of these genes was measured using a high-throughput β-glucuronidase assay to track expression on nine different carbon sources. Six ORFs integrated into SM1021 and SM8530 had different basal levels of expression in the two strains. The annotated activities of three other sugar kinases were also confirmed. PMID:18791020

  5. The Rhodopsin-Arrestin-1 Interaction in Bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuyan; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Cho, Min-Kyu; Thaker, Tarjani M.; Sanders, Charles R.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Iverson, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are essential mediators of information transfer in eukaryotic cells. Interactions between GPCRs and their binding partners modulate the signaling process. For example, the interaction between GPCR and cognate G protein initiates the signal, while the interaction with cognate arrestin terminates G-protein-mediated signaling. In visual signal transduction, arrestin-1 selectively binds to the phosphorylated light-activated GPCR rhodopsin to terminate rhodopsin signaling. Under physiological conditions, the rhodopsin-arrestin-1 interaction occurs in highly specialized disk membrane in which rhodopsin resides. This membrane is replaced with mimetics when working with purified proteins. While detergents are commonly used as membrane mimetics, most detergents denature arrestin-1, preventing biochemical studies of this interaction. In contrast, bicelles provide a suitable alternative medium. An advantage of bicelles is that they contain lipids, which have been shown to be necessary for normal rhodopsin-arrestin-1 interaction. Here we describe how to reconstitute rhodopsin into bicelles, and how bicelle properties affect the rhodopsin-arrestin-1 interaction. PMID:25697518

  6. Functional Expression of Gloeobacter Rhodopsin in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Chen, Que; Arents, Jos; Ganapathy, Srividya; de Grip, Willem J; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2017-05-01

    Proteorhodopsins are light-driven proton pumps that occur widespread in Nature, where they function predominantly in environments with high incident irradiance. Their maximal absorbance is usually in the blue range, but can be extended into the (far)red range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Because they can be expressed heterologously, they may be exploited in studies aimed at increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Here we report further studies toward this goal, by comparing the expression of two different bacterial rhodopsins (Proteorhodopsin and Gloeobacter rhodopsin) in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In particular, we investigated the pigments bound by the respective apo-opsins, and the oligomeric state of the corresponding holo-rhodopsins, both in Escherichia coli and in the cyanobacterial membranes. We conclude that the two proton-pumping rhodopsins are predominantly present in an oligomeric state (hexamers for Proteorhodopsin and trimers for Gloeobacter rhodopsin). Furthermore, Gloeobacter rhodopsin is able to bind an antenna carotenoid (in addition to retinal) and has the highest pumping rate at given light intensity. However, its lower expression level will decrease its physiological effectiveness. It remains to be established which of these two bacterial rhodopsins is best in stimulating the growth rate of its cyanobacterial host. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Characterization of a protein kinase gene in allelic association with the spinal muscular atrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Carter, T.A.; Kleyn, P.W.

    1994-09-01

    A protein kinase gene has been identified from a 400 Kb minimal genetic region which defines the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. A highly polymorphic microsatellite marker (D5S1414) isolated from a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clone within this interval detects linkage disequilibrium with the SMA locus in 32 Polish families (Yule`s coefficient: 0.92) and maps to an intron of the protein kinase gene. Exon amplification was used to isolate coding sequences from a YAC-derived phage subclone containing D5S1414. Five exons were identified and a GenBank search using the BLAST program showed complete homology of these exons with a protein kinase gene. The gene is expressed in all tissues checked to far. Full-length cDNAs have been identified from both normal and SMA brain libraries and by reverse-transcriptase (RT) PCR from RNA of various tissues. The cDNA sequences will be reported. The genomic sequences flanking each exon were determined by direct sequencing of the homologous phage. The marker D5S1414 was located within the intronic sequence between exons 6 and 7. To screen for disease mutations, PCR was performed across each exon including the flanking splice sites in normal controls and SMA samples shown to be homozygous across the region by haplotyping. Comparative sequence analysis of the products together with the RT-PCR from normal and SMA brain RNA has identified several candidate polymorphisms. To date, the most interesting lead is an intronic polymorphism possibly affecting exon splicing in a homozygous SMA patient. An updated mutation search will be reported.

  8. Repair of Rhodopsin mRNA by Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-Splicing: A New Approach for Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  9. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission.

  10. Opposite displacement of helix F in attractant and repellent signaling by sensory rhodopsin-Htr complexes.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Jun; Tsai, Ah-lim; Spudich, John L

    2011-05-27

    Two forms of the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I distinguished by differences in its photoactive site have been shown to be directly correlated with attractant and repellent signaling by the dual-signaling protein. In prior studies, differences in the photoactive site defined the two forms, namely the direction of light-induced proton transfer from the chromophore and the pK(a) of an Asp counterion to the protonated chromophore. Here, we show by both in vivo and in vitro measurements that the two forms are distinct protein conformers with structural similarities to two conformers seen in the light-driven proton transport cycle of the related protein bacteriorhodopsin. Measurements of spontaneous cell motility reversal frequencies, an in vivo measure of histidine kinase activity in the phototaxis system, indicate that the two forms are a photointerconvertible pair, with one conformer activating and the other inhibiting the kinase. Protein conformational changes in these photoconversions monitored by site-directed spin labeling show that opposite structural changes in helix F, distant from the photoactive site, correspond to the opposite phototaxis signals. The results provide the first direct evidence that displacements of helix F are directly correlated with signaling and impact our understanding of the sensory rhodopsin I signaling mechanism and the evolution of diverse functionality in this protein family.

  11. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2002-10-15

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  12. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2003-03-04

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  13. Optogenetic Vision Restoration Using Rhodopsin for Enhanced Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gaub, Benjamin M; Berry, Michael H; Holt, Amy E; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Flannery, John G

    2015-01-01

    Retinal disease is one of the most active areas of gene therapy, with clinical trials ongoing in the United States for five diseases. There are currently no treatments for patients with late-stage disease in which photoreceptors have been lost. Optogenetic gene therapies are in development, but, to date, have suffered from the low light sensitivity of microbial opsins, such as channelrhodopsin and halorhodopsin, and azobenzene-based photoswitches. Several groups have shown that photoreceptive G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be expressed heterologously, and photoactivate endogenous Gi/o signaling. We hypothesized such a GPCR could increase sensitivity due to endogenous signal amplification. We targeted vertebrate rhodopsin to retinal ON-bipolar cells of blind rd1 mice and observed restoration of: (i) light responses in retinal explants, (ii) visually-evoked potentials in visual cortex in vivo, and (iii) two forms of visually-guided behavior: innate light avoidance and discrimination of temporal light patterns in the context of fear conditioning. Importantly, both the light responses of the retinal explants and the visually-guided behavior occurred reliably at light levels that were two to three orders of magnitude dimmer than required for channelrhodopsin. Thus, gene therapy with native light-gated GPCRs presents a novel approach to impart light sensitivity for visual restoration in a useful range of illumination. PMID:26137852

  14. Lateral diffusion of rhodopsin in photoreceptor membrane: a reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Korenyak, Darya A.; Shukolyukov, Sergei A.; Zueva, Lidia V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In a series of works between 1972 and 1984, it was established that rhodopsin undergoes rotational and lateral Brownian motion in the plane of photoreceptor membrane. The concept of free movement of proteins of phototransduction cascade is an essential principle of the present scheme of vertebrate phototransduction. This has recently been challenged by findings that show that in certain conditions rhodopsin in the membrane may be dimeric and form extended areas of paracrystalline organization. Such organization seems incompatible with earlier data on free rhodopsin diffusion. Thus we decided to reinvestigate lateral diffusion of rhodopsin and products of its photolysis in photoreceptor membrane specifically looking for indications of possible oligomeric organization. Methods Diffusion exchange by rhodopsin and its photoproducts between bleached and unbleached halves of rod outer segment was traced using high-speed dichroic microspectrophotometer. Measurements were conducted on amphibian (frog, toad, and salamander) and gecko rods. Results We found that the curves that are supposed to reflect the process of diffusion equilibration of rhodopsin in nonuniformly bleached outer segment largely show production of long-lived bleaching intermediate, metarhodopsin III (Meta III). After experimental elimination of Meta III contribution, we observed rhodopsin equilibration time constant was threefold to tenfold longer than estimated previously. However, after proper correction for the geometry of rod discs, it translates into generally accepted value of diffusion constant of approximately 5×10−9 cm2 s−1. Yet, we found that there exists an immobile rhodopsin fraction whose size can vary from virtually zero to 100%, depending on poorly defined factors. Controls suggest that the formation of the immobile fraction is not due to fragmentation of rod outer segment discs but supposedly reflects oligomerization of rhodopsin. Conclusions Implications of the new findings

  15. Identification of Phosphoglycerate Kinase 1 (PGK1) as a reference gene for quantitative gene expression measurements in human blood RNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood is a convenient sample and increasingly used for quantitative gene expression measurements with a variety of diseases including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Quantitative gene expression measurements require normalization of target genes to reference genes that are stable and independent from variables being tested in the experiment. Because there are no genes that are useful for all situations, reference gene selection is an essential step to any quantitative reverse transcription-PCR protocol. Many publications have described appropriate genes for a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions, however, reference genes that may be suitable for the analysis of CFS, or human blood RNA derived from whole blood as well as isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), have not been described. Findings Literature review and analyses of our unpublished microarray data were used to narrow down the pool of candidate reference genes to six. We assayed whole blood RNA from Tempus tubes and cell preparation tube (CPT)-collected PBMC RNA from 46 subjects, and used the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms to select the most stable reference genes. Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) was one of the optimal normalization genes for both whole blood and PBMC RNA, however, additional genes differed for the two sample types; Ribosomal protein large, P0 (RPLP0) for PBMC RNA and Peptidylprolyl isomerase B (PPIB) for whole blood RNA. We also show that the use of a single reference gene is sufficient for normalization when the most stable candidates are used. Conclusions We have identified PGK1 as a stable reference gene for use with whole blood RNA and RNA derived from PBMC. When stable genes are selected it is possible to use a single gene for normalization rather than two or three. Optimal normalization will improve the ability of results from PBMC RNA to be compared with those from whole blood RNA and potentially allows comparison of gene expression results

  16. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  17. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation.

  18. Microbial rhodopsins: wide distribution, rich diversity and great potential

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Marie; Sudo, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    One of the major topics in biophysics and physicobiology is to understand and utilize biological functions using various advanced techniques. Taking advantage of the photoreactivity of the seven-transmembrane rhodopsin protein family has been actively investigated by a variety of methods. Rhodopsins serve as models for membrane-embedded proteins, for photoactive proteins and as a fundamental tool for optogenetics, a new technology to control biological activity with light. In this review, we summarize progress of microbial rhodopsin research from the viewpoint of distribution, diversity and potential. PMID:27493861

  19. Gene structure of the two-domain taurocyamine kinase from Paragonimus westermani: evidence for a distinct lineage of trematode phosphagen kinases.

    PubMed

    Jarilla, Blanca R; Tokuhiro, Shinji; Nagataki, Mitsuru; Uda, Kouji; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Acosta, Luz P; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2013-07-11

    Taurocyamine kinase (TK) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphate between ATP and taurocyamine. Annelid TKs were suggested to have evolved from a CK ancestor. However, TKs from the lung fluke Paragonimus westermani comprised another lineage. Construction of phylogenetic tree and comparison of exon/intron organization showed that P. westermani TK and other trematode TKs evolved from a molluscan arginine kinase (AK) gene. Exon shuffling probably caused the changes in amino acid sequence thereby changing the affinity from AK to TK. The present study provides new insights on the evolution of phosphagen kinases found in trematodes. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A kinase-START gene confers temperature-dependent resistance to wheat stripe rust.

    PubMed

    Fu, Daolin; Uauy, Cristobal; Distelfeld, Assaf; Blechl, Ann; Epstein, Lynn; Chen, Xianming; Sela, Hanan; Fahima, Tzion; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2009-03-06

    Stripe rust is a devastating fungal disease that afflicts wheat in many regions of the world. New races of Puccinia striiformis, the pathogen responsible for this disease, have overcome most of the known race-specific resistance genes. We report the map-based cloning of the gene Yr36 (WKS1), which confers resistance to a broad spectrum of stripe rust races at relatively high temperatures (25 degrees to 35 degrees C). This gene includes a kinase and a putative START lipid-binding domain. Five independent mutations and transgenic complementation confirmed that both domains are necessary to confer resistance. Yr36 is present in wild wheat but is absent in modern pasta and bread wheat varieties, and therefore it can now be used to improve resistance to stripe rust in a broad set of varieties.

  1. Novel PANK2 gene mutations in two Chinese siblings with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jingli; Wen, Bing; Zhu, Jun; Lin, Pengfei; Zheng, Jinfan; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2013-04-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and iron accumulation in the brain. Classic and atypical PKAN are distinguished on the basis of age at onset and disease progression. PANK2, localized on chromosome20p13, is confirmed as the responsible gene. We report two Chinese siblings with atypical PKAN, who had a 26- and 24-year disease course, respectively. Brain MRI scans of the two siblings showed the specific "eye of the tiger" sign. Genetic analysis identified novel compound heterozygous mutations (IVS1-2 A>T, c.T1130C) in PANK2 gene, which were confirmed to be deleterious. We verify the clinical heterogeneity even in siblings with identical genotype and expand the gene mutation pool for PKAN.

  2. Fission yeast Cdk7 controls gene expression through both its CAK and C-terminal domain kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm; Hermand, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity.

  3. Fission Yeast Cdk7 Controls Gene Expression through both Its CAK and C-Terminal Domain Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity. PMID:25691663

  4. Identification by targeted differential display of an immediate early gene encoding a putative serine/threonine kinase.

    PubMed

    Donohue, P J; Alberts, G F; Guo, Y; Winkles, J A

    1995-04-28

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 mitogenic signal transduction is mediated in part by gene products that are specifically expressed in response to cell surface receptor binding and activation. We have used a targeted differential display method to identify FGF-1-inducible genes in murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Here we report that one of these genes is predicted to encode a novel serine/threonine-specific protein kinase. This putative kinase has been named Fnk, for FGF-inducible kinase. The deduced Fnk amino acid sequence has 49, 36, 33, 32, and 22% overall identity to mouse serum-inducible kinase (Snk), mouse polo-like kinase (Plk), Drosophila polo, Saccharomyces Cdc5, and mouse Snk/Plk-akin kinase (Sak), respectively. These proteins are all members of the polo subfamily of structurally related serine/threonine kinases. The Plk, polo, Cdc5, and Sak kinases are required for cell division. FGF-1 induction of Fnk mRNA expression is first detected at 30 min after mitogen addition, reflects transcriptional activation, and does not require de novo protein synthesis. FGF-2, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, calf serum, or phorbol myristate acetate treatment of quiescent cells also induces fnk gene expression. Fnk mRNA is expressed in vivo in a tissue-specific manner, with relatively high levels detected in newborn and adult mouse skin. These results indicate that Fnk may be a transiently expressed protein kinase involved in the early signaling events required for growth factor-stimulated cell cycle progression.

  5. Global Regulation of Differential Gene Expression by c-Abl/Arg Oncogenic Kinases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qincai; Li, Chenggong; Qu, Xiuhua; Cao, Cheng; Liu, Xuan

    2017-05-30

    BACKGROUND Studies have found that c-Abl oncogenic kinases may regulate gene transcription by RNA polymerase II phosphorylation or by direct regulation of specific transcription factors or coactivators. However, the global regulation of differential gene expression by c-Abl/Arg is largely unknown. In this study, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) regulated by c-Abl/Arg were identified, and related cellular functions and associated pathways were investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS RNA obtained from wild-type and c-Abl/Arg gene-silenced MCF-7 cells was analyzed by RNA-Seq. DEGs were identified using edgeR software and partially validated by qRT-PCR. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses were used to explore the potential functions of these DEGs. RESULTS A total of 1,034 DEGs were significantly regulated by c-Abl/Arg (399 were up-regulated and 635 were down-regulated after c-Abl/Arg double knockdown). GO and KEGG analyses showed that the DEGs were primarily involved in cellular metabolic processes, neurodegenerative disease, the metabolic process and signaling pathway of cAMP, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS Our data collectively support the hypothesis that c-Abl/Arg regulate differential gene expression, providing new insights into the biological functions of c-Abl and Arg.

  6. Pyruvate Kinase and Fcγ Receptor Gene Copy Numbers Associated With Malaria Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Faik, Imad; van Tong, Hoang; Lell, Bertrand; Meyer, Christian G; Kremsner, Peter G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2017-07-15

    Genetic factors are associated with susceptibility to many infectious diseases and may be determinants of clinical progression. Gene copy number variation (CNV) has been shown to be associated with phenotypes of numerous diseases, including malaria. We quantified gene copy numbers of the pyruvate kinase, liver, and red blood cell (PKLR) gene as well as of the Fcγ receptor 2A and Fcγ receptor 2C (FCGR2A, FCGR2C) and Fcγ receptor 3 (FCGR3) genes using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays in Gabonese children with severe (n = 184) or and mild (n = 189) malaria and in healthy Gabonese and white individuals (n = 76 each). The means of PKLR, FCGR2A, FCGR2C, and FCGR3 copy numbers were significantly higher among children with severe malaria compared to those with mild malaria (P < .002), indicating that a surplus of copies of those genes is significantly associated with malaria severity. Copy numbers of the FCGR2A and FCGR2C genes were significantly lower (P = .005) in Gabonese individuals compared with white individuals. In conclusion, CNV of the PKLR, FCGR2A, FCGR2C, and FCGR3 genes is associated with malaria severity, and our results provide evidence for a role of CNV in host responses to malaria. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. AAV Delivery of Wild-Type Rhodopsin Preserves Retinal Function in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E.; Hauswirth, William W.; Gorbatyuk, Marina S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /– backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO. PMID:21126223

  8. MAP Kinase Phosphatase 3 (MKP3) Preserves Norepinephrine Transporter Activity by Modulating ERK1/2 Kinase-Mediated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Ole V.; Larsen, Mads B.; Amara, Susan G.

    2017-01-01

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) mediates the clearance of norepinephrine (NE) from the extracellular space and is a target of therapeutic antidepressants and psychostimulants. Previously we identified a MAP kinase phosphatase 3 (MKP3), as an important modulator of protein kinase C (PKC) mediated internalization of the related dopamine transporter (DAT). Here we show that MKP3 decreases PKC-mediated down regulation of NET expressed in PC12 cells. We demonstrate that this process involves a PKC-stimulated decrease of NET surface expression that is dependent on dynamin. Surprisingly, MAP kinase inhibitors have no effect on the PKC-mediated regulation of NET activity, suggesting that, like PKC-mediated regulation of the DAT, the acute activation of MAP kinases is not likely to be involved. To elucidate potential mechanisms we used a substrate trap-based assay to identify extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as the predominant substrate of MKP3. Furthermore we also established that brief chemical stabilization of a modified destabilized MKP3 does not alter PKC-mediated down regulation of NET. Finally, the expression of a dominant negative version of H-Ras, an upstream activator of ERK1/2, abolishes phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-mediated down regulation of NET in a manner similar to MKP3. Taken together we propose that chronic MKP3 expression regulates surface NET through the sustained inhibition of ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling that alters gene expression in PC12 cells. This is supported by gene expression data from naïve and MKP3-expressing PC12 cells that reveal robust decreases in gene expression of several genes in the MKP3-tranfected cells. Interestingly, caveolin-1, a protein with a critical role in membrane protein trafficking is down regulated by MKP3 expression. We further show that selective silencing of the caveolin-1 gene in naïve PC12 cells attenuates PKC-mediated downregulation of NET activity, consistent with a potential role for

  9. An S receptor kinase gene in self-compatible Brassica napus has a 1-bp deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Goring, D R; Glavin, T L; Schafer, U; Rothstein, S J

    1993-01-01

    S locus glycoprotein (SLG) and S locus receptor kinase (SRK) cDNAs were isolated from an S allele present in a number of self-compatible Brassica napus lines. This A10 allele did not segregate with self-incompatibility in crosses involving other self-incompatible B. napus lines. The SLG-A10 cDNA was found to contain an intact open reading frame and was predicted to encode an SLG protein with sequence similarities to those previously associated with phenotypically strong self-incompatibility reactions. SLG-A10 transcripts were detected in the developing stigma at steady state levels even higher than those detected for SLG alleles linked with self-incompatibility. Analysis of the corresponding SRK-A10 cDNA showed that it was very similar to other S locus receptor kinase genes and was expressed predominantly in the stigma. However, a 1-bp deletion was detected in the SRK gene toward the 3' end of the SLG homology domain. This deletion would lead to premature termination of translation and the production of a truncated SRK protein. The A10 allele was determined to represent a B. oleracea S allele based on its segregation pattern with the B. oleracea S24 allele when both these alleles were present in the same B. napus background. These results suggest that a functional SRK gene is required for Brassica self-incompatibility. PMID:8518554

  10. The human protein kinase C gamma gene (PRKCG) as a susceptibility locus for behavioral disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, Isabel R; Clegg, Hilary V; Corley, Robin P; Crowley, Thomas J; Hewitt, John K; Hopfer, Christian J; Krauter, Kenneth; Lessem, Jeffrey; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Stallings, Michael C; Wehner, Jeanne M; Young, Susan E; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2007-06-01

    This study explores the association between a highly heritable behavioral disinhibition phenotype and the protein kinase C gamma (PRKCG) gene in an ethnically diverse youth sample from Colorado, USA. The rationale for this study was based on the impulsive behavior and increased ethanol consumption observed in the protein kinase C gamma (PKC-gamma)-deficient mouse model. Two composite behavioral disinhibition phenotypes and their component behavioral scores [conduct disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), substance experimentation (SUB) and novelty-seeking] were examined for association with five independent PRKCG single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Association analysis for the five individual SNPs revealed modest genetic association of Exon 14 (rs2242244) and Upstream (rs307941) markers with the behavioral disinhibition composite variables in the combined, Hispanic and African-American samples. Additionally, haplotype-based association analysis for two SNPs located in Intron 3 (rs402691) and Exon 6 (rs3745406) indicated a significant overall association of the PRKCG locus with the ADHD-hyperactive subscale scores in the combined and Caucasian samples, supporting the relation between impulsive behaviors and the PRKCG gene. A significant haplotype association was also observed with SUB scores but only in the Hispanic ethnic group, highlighting the marker variability for each ethnic group. In conclusion, our results support the role of the PKC-gamma enzyme in behavioral impulsivity previously observed in mice. This study provides the first exploration of the PRKCG gene and its association with behavioral disinhibition and warrants further study in other larger population samples.

  11. Radiation induction of the receptor tyrosine kinase gene Ptk-3 in normal rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, S.; Hideyuki, S.; Akihiro, I.

    1995-07-01

    Radiation-induced gene expression was examined in rat astrocyte cultures using differential display of mRNA via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. A 0.3-kb cDNA that was consistently observed in irradiated cultures but not in unirradiated cultures was cloned and sequenced. It was found to be identical to Ptk-3, a receptor tyrosine kinase gene identified recently. The protein encoded by Ptk-3 is a member of a novel class of receptor tyrosine kinases whose extracellular domain contains regions of homology with coagulation factors V and VIII and complement component C1. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression of Ptk-3 was increased in rat astrocytes by 0.5 h after exposure to 10 Gy and remained at the same elevated level for at least 24 h. The maximum increase occurred after 5 Gy cloning studies indicated the presence of at least two Ptk-3 mRNA transcripts, which are probable the result of an alternative splicing mechanism. The short isoform lacks a 37 amino acid sequence in the glycine/proline-rich juxtamembrane region. The splicing pattern of the Ptk-3 gene was not altered by radiation. However, the ratios of the longer to the shorter mRNA transcripts differed between adult cortex, neonatal cortex and in vitro astrocyte cultures. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Characterization of an S-locus receptor protein kinase-like gene from peach.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Carole L; Nickerson, Michael L; Farrell, Robert E; Artlip, Timothy S; El Ghaouth, Ahmed; Wilson, Charles L; Wisniewski, Michael E

    2005-04-01

    A receptor-like protein kinase gene (Ppsrkl1) was isolated from a peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.) bark cDNA library prepared with RNAs isolated from bark collected in December (cold acclimated). Sequence analysis indicated that this gene is related to the S-locus family of receptor protein kinases (SRKs) and that it shares greatest homology with ZMPK1 from maize and At4g32300 from Arabidopsis, both of which are intron-less genes. In bark tissues, Ppsrkl1 is induced by water deficit treatment, repressed by short-day photoperiods and showed no response to cold treatment. The Ppsrkl1 mRNA also increased in roots in response to water deficit. In fruit, Ppsrkl1 shows no response up to 6 h after wounding, but at 12 and 24 h after wounding, Ppsrkl1 mRNA shows an abrupt decline. This decline was prevented by the addition of salicylic acid to the wound site. The Ppsrkl1 mRNA rapidly decreased in fruit after 10-min exposure to UV-C radiation, followed by a return to normal levels within 1.5 h. Taken together, these experiments indicate that Ppsrkl1 is negatively regulated by light and positively influenced by salicylic acid treatment in fruit and water stress in bark and roots.

  13. Tyrosine kinase activation in breast carcinoma with correlation to HER-2/neu gene amplification and receptor overexpression.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, R; Naeem, R; Marconi, S; Luszcz, J; Garb, J; Gasparini, R; Otis, C N

    2001-12-01

    The HER-2/neu oncogene encodes a transmembrane receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. A pilot study was performed to investigate downstream effects of HER-2/neu (or related growth factor receptor) activation by identifying phosphorylated tyrosine. Fifty-four breast carcinomas were evaluated for HER-2/neu overexpression by the HercepTest (Dako, Carpinteria, CA) and the monoclonal CB11 antibody (Ventana, Tucson, AZ). Phosphotyrosine (an indication of tyrosine kinase activity) was detected by an antiphosphotyrosine mouse monoclonal antibody (Upstate Biotechnology, Lake Placid, NY). The gene amplification status was evaluated in 50 of the 54 cases by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Ventana gene probe. The HER-2/neu oncogene amplification was detected in 28% (14 of 50) of cases. Of the 14 cases showing oncogene amplification, tyrosine kinase activity was detected in 9 (64.2%) cases. There was moderate agreement between HER-2/neu gene amplification and tyrosine kinase activity (kappa = 0.43). Immunohistochemical staining of 3+ (with both HercepTest and CB11) showed better agreement with HER-2/neu oncogene amplification and increased tyrosine kinase activity than 2+ immunohistochemical staining. Overall, oncogene amplification and overexpression correlated with increased tyrosine kinase activity, supporting the mechanism of tyrosine kinase activation by HER-2/neu amplification and overexpression. However, 7 cases showing increased tyrosine kinase activity did not show gene amplification or 3+ receptor expression (by either HercepTest or CB11), raising the possibility of other growth factor receptors operating via the tyrosine kinase pathway. There was no apparent correlation between tyrosine kinase activity and hormone receptor status (estrogen or progesterone). Increased tyrosine kinase activity is more commonly associated with higher-grade tumors and thus may correlate with aggressive biologic behavior in breast carcinoma. The results of

  14. Disruption of the acetate kinase (ack) gene of Clostridium acetobutylicum results in delayed acetate production.

    PubMed

    Kuit, Wouter; Minton, Nigel P; López-Contreras, Ana M; Eggink, Gerrit

    2012-05-01

    In microorganisms, the enzyme acetate kinase (AK) catalyses the formation of ATP from ADP by de-phosphorylation of acetyl phosphate into acetic acid. A mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum lacking acetate kinase activity is expected to have reduced acetate and acetone production compared to the wild type. In this work, a C. acetobutylicum mutant strain with a selectively disrupted ack gene, encoding AK, was constructed and genetically and physiologically characterized. The ack (-) strain showed a reduction in acetate kinase activity of more than 97% compared to the wild type. The fermentation profiles of the ack (-) and wild-type strain were compared using two different fermentation media, CGM and CM1. The latter contains acetate and has a higher iron and magnesium content than CGM. In general, fermentations by the mutant strain showed a clear shift in the timing of peak acetate production relative to butyrate and had increased acid uptake after the onset of solvent formation. Specifically, in acetate containing CM1 medium, acetate production was reduced by more than 80% compared to the wild type under the same conditions, but both strains produced similar final amounts of solvents. Fermentations in CGM showed similar peak acetate and butyrate levels, but increased acetoin (60%), ethanol (63%) and butanol (16%) production and reduced lactate (-50%) formation by the mutant compared to the wild type. These findings are in agreement with the proposed regulatory function of butyryl phosphate as opposed to acetyl phosphate in the metabolic switch of solventogenic clostridia.

  15. Stimulation of sky receptor tyrosine kinase by the product of growth arrest-specific gene 6.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Nagata, K; Toshima, J; Nakano, T; Arita, H; Tsuda, H; Suzuki, K; Mizuno, K

    1995-09-29

    Sky (also called Rse, Brt, and Tyro3) is a member of a subfamily of related receptor tyrosine kinases, including Axl/Ufo/Ark and c-Eyk/Mer. We obtained evidence that Gas6 (the product of growth arrest-specific gene 6) is a ligand of the Sky receptor tyrosine kinase. Gas6, but not protein S (an anticoagulant protein structurally similar to Gas6), specifically bound to the soluble form of Sky (Sky-Fc), composed of the extracellular domain of Sky fused to the Fc domain of human immunoglobulin G1. The native and recombinant Gas6, but not protein S, stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Sky ectopically expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Stimulation of Sky in response to Gas6 was inhibited by Sky-Fc. The half-maximal concentration of Gas6 that stimulated Sky was about 1 nM. Thus, Gas6 as a ligand for Sky specifically binds to and stimulates Sky receptor tyrosine kinase.

  16. Gene transfer of arginine kinase to skeletal muscle using adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Forbes, S C; Bish, L T; Ye, F; Spinazzola, J; Baligand, C; Plant, D; Vandenborne, K; Barton, E R; Sweeney, H L; Walter, G A

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we tested the feasibility of non-invasively measuring phosphoarginine (PArg) after gene delivery of arginine kinase (AK) using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to murine hindlimbs. This was achieved by evaluating the time course, regional distribution and metabolic flux of PArg using (31)phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). AK gene was injected into the gastrocnemius of the left hindlimb of C57Bl10 mice (age 5 weeks, male) using self-complementary AAV, type 2/8 with desmin promoter. Non-localized (31)P-MRS data were acquired over 9 months after injection using 11.1-T and 17.6-T Bruker Avance spectrometers. In addition, (31)P two-dimensional chemical shift imaging and saturation transfer experiments were performed to examine the spatial distribution and metabolic flux of PArg, respectively. PArg was evident in each injected mouse hindlimb after gene delivery, increased until 28 weeks, and remained elevated for at least 9 months (P<0.05). Furthermore, PArg was primarily localized to the injected posterior hindimb region and the metabolite was in exchange with ATP. Overall, the results show the viability of AAV gene transfer of AK gene to skeletal muscle, and provide support of PArg as a reporter that can be used to non-invasively monitor the transduction of genes for therapeutic interventions.

  17. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding.

    PubMed

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-03-14

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations.

  18. Investigation of evolution-related aspects of bacterial rhodopsins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated evolution-related aspects of bacterial rhodopsins, the unique retinal-based energy transducing systems of halophilic archae. The approach was to describe both structural and functional aspects: the structure by sequencing genes to explore which regions are conserved, and the function by comparing proton and chloride transport in the closely related systems, bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin, respectively. In the latter, we have made a good start toward the ultimate goal of separating the attributes of the general principles of retinal-based ionic pumps from those of the specific ion specificities, by determining the thermodynamics of the internal steps of the protein-mediated active transport process, as well as some of the intraprotein ion-transfer steps. Our present emphasis is on continuing to acquire the tools for studying what distinguishes proton transport from chloride transport. We consider it important, therefore, that we have been able to provide firm mathematical grounds for the kinetics analyses which underlies these studies. Our molecular biological studies have received a great boost from the expression vector for the bop gene based on a halobacterial plasmid, that we recently developed.

  19. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  20. Cloning, sequencing and characterization of a gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii NRRL2547.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Xiang; Kayingo, Gerald; Blomberg, Anders; Prior, Bernard A

    2002-12-01

    The dihydroxyacetone pathway, an alternative pathway for the dissimilation of glycerol via reduction by glycerol dehydrogenase and subsequent phosphorylation by dihydroxyacetone (DHA) kinase, is activated in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii during osmotic stress. In experiments aimed at investigating the physiological function of the DHA pathway in Z. rouxii, a typical osmotolerant yeast, we cloned and characterized a DAK gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Z. rouxii NRRL 2547. Sequence analysis revealed a 1761 bp open reading frame, encoding a peptide composed of 587 deduced amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of 61 664 Da. As the amino acid sequence was most closely homologous (68% identity) to the S. cerevisiae Dak1p, we named the gene and protein ZrDAK1 and ZrDak1p, respectively. A putative ATP binding site was also found but no consensus element associated with osmoregulation was found in the upstream region of the ZrDAK1 gene. The ZrDAK1 gene complemented a S. cerevisiae W303-1A dak1delta dak2 delta strain by improving the growth of the mutant on 50 mmol/l dihydroxyacetone and by increasing the tolerance to dihydroxyacetone in a medium containing 5% sodium chloride, suggesting that it is a functional homologue of the S. cerevisiae DAK1. However, expression of the ZrDAK1 gene in the S. cerevisiae dak1delta dak2 delta strain had no significant effect on glycerol levels during osmotic stress. The ZrDAK1 sequence has been deposited in the public data bases under Accession No. AJ294719; regions upstream and downstream of ZrDAK1are deposited as Accession Nos AJ294739 and AJ294720, respectively.

  1. Two Different Transcripts of a LAMMER Kinase Gene Play Opposite Roles in Disease Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenfei; Xia, Fan; Liu, Hongbo; Xiao, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of genes can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Genome-wide transcriptome sequencing has demonstrated that alternative splicing occurs in a large number of intron-containing genes of different species. However, despite the phenomenon having been known for decades, it is largely unknown how the alternatively spliced transcripts function differently. Here, we report that two alternatively spliced transcripts of the rice (Oryza sativa) LAMMER kinase gene OsDR11, long OsDR11L and short OsDR11S, play opposite roles in rice resistance against Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae (Xoo), which causes the most damaging bacterial disease in rice worldwide. Overexpressing OsDR11S or suppressing OsDR11L in rice enhanced resistance to Xoo, which was accompanied by an accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and induced expression of JA signaling genes. In contrast, suppressing OsDR11S was associated with increased susceptibility to Xoo, along with decreased levels of JA and expression of JA signaling genes. The OsDR11S and OsDR11L proteins colocalized in the nucleus. OsDR11L showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro, while OsDR11S did not. In the presence of OsDR11S, autophosphorylation of OsDR11L was inhibited, and overexpression of OsDR11S suppressed OsDR11L expression. OsDR11 appeared to contribute to a minor quantitative trait locus against Xoo. These results suggest that OsDR11L is a negative regulator in rice disease resistance, which may be associated with suppression of JA signaling. The results also suggest that OsDR11S may inhibit the function of OsDR11L at both the transcription and protein kinase activity levels, leading to resistance against Xoo. PMID:27621422

  2. Assignment of the human diacylglycerol kinase 4 (DAGK4) gene to chromosome 4p16.3

    SciTech Connect

    Endele, S.; Zabel, B.; Winterpacht, A.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the localization of the human gene for diacylglycerol kinase 4 (DAGK4) to human chromosome 4p16.3 using an exon amplification scheme. It also discusses the possible implications of the chromosomal location of this gene in certain hereditary malignancies. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  3. The G Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Lukas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a key light-sensitive protein expressed exclusively in rod photoreceptor cells of the retina. Failure to express this transmembrane protein causes a lack of rod outer segment formation and progressive retinal degeneration, including the loss of cone photoreceptor cells. Molecular studies of rhodopsin have paved the way to understanding a large family of cell-surface membrane proteins called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Work started on rhodopsin over 100 years ago still continues today with substantial progress made every year. These activities underscore the importance of rhodopsin as a prototypical GPCR and receptor required for visual perception—the fundamental process of translating light energy into a biochemical cascade of events culminating in vision. PMID:25697513

  4. [Peculiarities of rhodopsin photoconversion at the early stages of photolysis].

    PubMed

    Fel'dman, T B; Fedorovich, I B; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2003-02-01

    The primary stages of rhodopsin photolysis were studied with the low temperature absorption spectroscopy technique. Digitonin extract of bovine rhodopsin was irradiated at -155 degrees C with blue light (436 nm). The following changes of the dark spectrum were recorded in the course of slow rise of the temperature in 1-3 degrees C steps. Simultaneous appearance of more than one spectral product was revealed throughout the batho- to lumirhodopsin transition. An intermediate product transformed along with bathorhodopsin to a next product known as a "blue-shifted intermediate", was observed. The data suggest that appearance of more than one intermediate at each stage of the rhodopsin photolysis reflects existence of multiple conformation states of the rhodopsin molecule in the course of its photoconversion.

  5. Calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and CDPK-related kinase (CRK) gene families in tomato: genome-wide identification and functional analyses in disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Tian-Yu; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and CDPK-related kinases (CRKs) play multiple roles in plant. Nevertheless, genome-wide identification of these two families is limited to several plant species, and role of CRKs in disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we identified the CDPK and CRK gene families in genome of the economically important crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and analyzed their function in resistance to various pathogens. Twenty-nine CDPK and six CRK genes were identified in tomato genome. Both SlCDPK and SlCRK proteins harbored an STKc_CAMK type protein kinase domain, while only SlCDPKs contained EF-hand type Ca(2+) binding domain(s). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that plant CRK family diverged early from CDPKs, and shared a common ancestor gene with subgroup IV CDPKs. Subgroup IV SlCDPK proteins were basic and their genes contained 11 introns, which were distinguished from other subgroups but similar to CRKs. Subgroup I SlCDPKs generally did not carry an N-terminal myristoylation motif while those of the remaining subgroups and SlCRKs universally did. SlCDPK and SlCRK genes were differently responsive to pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, silencing analyses demonstrated that SlCDPK18 and SlCDPK10 positively regulated nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and host resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000, respectively, while SlCRK6 positively regulated resistance to both Pst DC3000 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in tomato. In conclusion, CRKs apparently evolved from CDPK lineage, SlCDPK and SlCRK genes regulate a wide range of resistance and SlCRK6 is the first CRK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance.

  6. Primary Processes in Photolysis of Octopus Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    1988-01-01

    The photolysis of octopus rhodopsin was studied by picosecond time-resolved spectroscopy at physiological temperature (8°C) and by steady-state spectroscopy at very low temperature (10 K). Both hypsorhodopsin and bathorhodopsin were formed from a bathorhodopsin-like red-shifted intermediate “primerhodopsin,” which was the primary photoproduct with our time resolution (36 ps). Though it was proposed that hypsorhodopsin is formed solely by a multiphoton process, the present results obtained by using blue light pulses (461 nm) of low intensity showed that hypsorhodopsin is formed by a single photon mechanism via thermal decay from primerhodopsin. When the excitation intensity is increased, a channel for the photochemical formation of hypsorhodopsin from primerhodopsin is opened. There are two thermal pathways leading from primerhodopsin. One process is the formation of hypsorhodopsin, which is later thermally converted to bathorhodopsin, and the other is the direct formation of bathorhodopsin from primerhodopsin. The formation efficiencies at room temperature of hypsorhodopsin and bathorhodopsin at very low excitation intensity were estimated to be larger than 0.6 and smaller than 0.4, respectively. The formation of hypsorhodopsin was also found in the early stages of the irradiation of octopus rhodopsin with weak continuous light at 10 K. However bathorhodopsin is formed three times more efficiently than hypsorhodopsin at 10 K. At physiological temperatures the formation of hypsorhodopsin in D2O takes place more slowly than in H2O. This indicates that the lifetime of primerhodopsin is decreased by H2O/D2O exchange. The rate constant for the primerhodopsin → bathorhodopsin conversion is more sensitive than that for the primerhodopsin → hypsorhodopsin conversion. The transformation of hypsorhodopsin to bathorhodopsin shows no deuterium effect at low temperature. PMID:19431715

  7. Evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in Lotus, Medicago, and Phaseolus.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Benson, Benjamin V; Macarthur, Kenton J; Piya, Sarbottam

    2013-11-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) genes encode proteins that mediate various signaling pathways associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses in eukaryotes. The MAPK genes form a 3-tier signal transduction cascade between cellular stimuli and physiological responses. Recent identification of soybean MAPKs and availability of genome sequences from other legume species allowed us to identify their MAPK genes. The main objectives of this study were to identify MAPKs in 3 legume species, Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, and to assess their phylogenetic relationships. We used approaches in comparative genomics for MAPK gene identification and named the newly identified genes following Arabidopsis MAPK nomenclature model. We identified 19, 18, and 15 MAPKs and 7, 4, and 9 MAPKKs in the genome of Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, respectively. Within clade placement of MAPKs and MAPKKs in the 3 legume species were consistent with those in soybean and Arabidopsis. Among 5 clades of MAPKs, 4 founder clades were consistent to MAPKs of other plant species and orthologs of MAPK genes in the fifth clade-"Clade E" were consistent with those in soybean. Our results also indicated that some gene duplication events might have occurred prior to eudicot-monocot divergence. Highly diversified MAPKs in soybean relative to those in 3 other legume species are attributable to the polyploidization events in soybean. The identification of the MAPK genes in the legume species is important for the legume crop improvement; and evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of these gene members provide insights into plant genome evolution.

  8. Recent Advances in Engineering Microbial Rhodopsins for Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2015-01-01

    Protein engineering of microbial rhodopsins has been successful in generating variants with improved properties for applications in optogenetics. Members of this membrane protein family can act as both actuators and sensors of neuronal activity. Chimeragenesis, structure-guided mutagenesis, and directed evolution have proven effective strategies for tuning absorption wavelength, altering ion specificity and increasing fluorescence. These approaches facilitate the development of useful optogenetic tools and, in some cases, have yielded insights into rhodopsin structure-function relationships. PMID:26038227

  9. Vitamin A activates rhodopsin and sensitizes it to ultraviolet light

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Sadaharu; Isayama, Tomoki; Delori, François C.; Makino, Clint L.

    2013-01-01

    The visual pigment, rhodopsin, consists of opsin protein with 11-cis retinal chromophore, covalently bound. Light activates rhodopsin by isomerizing the chromophore to the all-trans conformation. The activated rhodopsin sets in motion a biochemical cascade that evokes an electrical response by the photoreceptor. All-trans retinal is eventually released from the opsin and reduced to vitamin A. Rod and cone photoreceptors contain vast amounts of rhodopsin, so after exposure to bright light, the concentration of vitamin A can reach relatively high levels within their outer segments. Since a retinal analog, β-ionone, is capable of activating some types of visual pigments, we tested whether vitamin A might produce a similar effect. In single-cell recordings from isolated dark-adapted salamander green-sensitive rods, exogenously applied vitamin A decreased circulating current and flash sensitivity and accelerated flash response kinetics. These changes resembled those produced by exposure of rods to steady light. Microspectrophotometric measurements showed that vitamin A accumulated in the outer segments and binding of vitamin A to rhodopsin was confirmed in in vitro assays. In addition, vitamin A improved the sensitivity of photoreceptors to ultraviolet (UV) light. Apparently, the energy of a UV photon absorbed by vitamin A transferred by a radiationless process to the 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin, which subsequently isomerized. Therefore, our results suggest that vitamin A binds to rhodopsin at an allosteric binding site distinct from the chromophore binding pocket for 11-cis retinal to activate the rhodopsin, and that it serves as a sensitizing chromophore for UV light. PMID:22192505

  10. Vitamin A activates rhodopsin and sensitizes it to ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Miyazono, Sadaharu; Isayama, Tomoki; Delori, François C; Makino, Clint L

    2011-11-01

    The visual pigment, rhodopsin, consists of opsin protein with 11-cis retinal chromophore, covalently bound. Light activates rhodopsin by isomerizing the chromophore to the all-trans conformation. The activated rhodopsin sets in motion a biochemical cascade that evokes an electrical response by the photoreceptor. All-trans retinal is eventually released from the opsin and reduced to vitamin A. Rod and cone photoreceptors contain vast amounts of rhodopsin, so after exposure to bright light, the concentration of vitamin A can reach relatively high levels within their outer segments. Since a retinal analog, β-ionone, is capable of activating some types of visual pigments, we tested whether vitamin A might produce a similar effect. In single-cell recordings from isolated dark-adapted salamander green-sensitive rods, exogenously applied vitamin A decreased circulating current and flash sensitivity and accelerated flash response kinetics. These changes resembled those produced by exposure of rods to steady light. Microspectrophotometric measurements showed that vitamin A accumulated in the outer segments and binding of vitamin A to rhodopsin was confirmed in in vitro assays. In addition, vitamin A improved the sensitivity of photoreceptors to ultraviolet (UV) light. Apparently, the energy of a UV photon absorbed by vitamin A transferred by a radiationless process to the 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin, which subsequently isomerized. Therefore, our results suggest that vitamin A binds to rhodopsin at an allosteric binding site distinct from the chromophore binding pocket for 11-cis retinal to activate the rhodopsin, and that it serves as a sensitizing chromophore for UV light.

  11. Methyl-accepting protein associated with bacterial sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, E N; Hasselbacher, C A; Spudich, J L

    1988-01-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of Halobacterium halobium phototaxis mutants and revertants with L-[methyl-3H] methionine implicated seven methyl-accepting protein bands with apparent molecular masses from 65 to 150 kilodaltons (kDa) in adaptation of the organism to chemo and photo stimuli, and one of these (94 kDa) was specifically implicated in phototaxis. The lability of the radiolabeled bands to mild base treatment indicated that the methyl linkages are carboxylmethylesters, as is the case in the eubacterial chemotaxis receptor-transducers. The 94-kDa protein was present in increased amounts in an overproducer of the apoprotein of sensory rhodopsin I, one of two retinal-containing phototaxis receptors in H. halobium. It was absent in a strain that contained sensory rhodopsin II and that lacked sensory rhodopsin I and was also absent in a mutant that lacked both photoreceptors. Based on the role of methyl-accepting proteins in chemotaxis in other bacteria, we suggest that the 94-kDa protein is the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. By [3H]retinal labeling studies, we previously identified a 25-kDa retinal-binding polypeptide that was derived from photochemically reactive sensory rhodopsin I. When H. halobium membranes containing sensory rhodopsin I were treated by a procedure that stably reduced [3H]retinal onto the 25-kDa apoprotein, a 94-kDa protein was also found to be radiolabeled. Protease digestion confirmed that the 94-kDa retinal-labeled protein was the same as the methyl-accepting protein that was suggested above to be the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. Possible models are that the 25- and 94-kDa proteins are tightly interacting components of the photosensory signaling machinery or that both are forms of sensory rhodopsin I. Images PMID:3410829

  12. Systematic analysis of human kinase genes: a large number of genes and alternative splicing events result in functional and structural diversity

    PubMed Central

    Milanesi, Luciano; Petrillo, Mauro; Sepe, Leandra; Boccia, Angelo; D'Agostino, Nunzio; Passamano, Myriam; Di Nardo, Salvatore; Tasco, Gianluca; Casadio, Rita; Paolella, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein kinases are a well defined family of proteins, characterized by the presence of a common kinase catalytic domain and playing a significant role in many important cellular processes, such as proliferation, maintenance of cell shape, apoptosys. In many members of the family, additional non-kinase domains contribute further specialization, resulting in subcellular localization, protein binding and regulation of activity, among others. About 500 genes encode members of the kinase family in the human genome, and although many of them represent well known genes, a larger number of genes code for proteins of more recent identification, or for unknown proteins identified as kinase only after computational studies. Results A systematic in silico study performed on the human genome, led to the identification of 5 genes, on chromosome 1, 11, 13, 15 and 16 respectively, and 1 pseudogene on chromosome X; some of these genes are reported as kinases from NCBI but are absent in other databases, such as KinBase. Comparative analysis of 483 gene regions and subsequent computational analysis, aimed at identifying unannotated exons, indicates that a large number of kinase may code for alternately spliced forms or be incorrectly annotated. An InterProScan automated analysis was perfomed to study domain distribution and combination in the various families. At the same time, other structural features were also added to the annotation process, including the putative presence of transmembrane alpha helices, and the cystein propensity to participate into a disulfide bridge. Conclusion The predicted human kinome was extended by identifiying both additional genes and potential splice variants, resulting in a varied panorama where functionality may be searched at the gene and protein level. Structural analysis of kinase proteins domains as defined in multiple sources together with transmembrane alpha helices and signal peptide prediction provides hints to function assignment

  13. DNA-dependent kinase (p350) as a candidate gene for the murine SCID defect.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, C U; Patil, C K; Evans, J W; Cuomo, C A; Fried, L M; Carter, T; Oettinger, M A; Brown, J M

    1995-02-24

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice are deficient in a recombination process utilized in both DNA double-strand break repair and in V(D)J recombination. The phenotype of these mice involves both cellular hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and a lack of B and T cell immunity. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase, p350, was identified as a strong candidate for the murine gene SCID. Both p350 and a gene complementing the SCID defect colocalize to human chromosome 8q11. Chromosomal fragments expressing p350 complement the SCID phenotype, and p350 protein levels are greatly reduced in cells derived from SCID mice compared to cells from wild-type mice.

  14. IRE1 directs proteasomal and lysosomal degradation of misfolded rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Messah, Carissa; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is responsible for folding of secreted and membrane proteins in eukaryotic cells. Disruption of ER protein folding leads to ER stress. Chronic ER stress can cause cell death and is proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) directs a key unfolded protein response signaling pathway that controls the fidelity of ER protein folding. IRE1 signaling may be particularly helpful in preventing chronic ER stress and cell injury by alleviating protein misfolding in the ER. To examine this, we used a chemical-genetic approach to selectively activate IRE1 in mammalian cells and tested how artificial IRE1 signaling affected the fate of misfolded P23H rhodopsin linked to photoreceptor cell death. We found that IRE1 signaling robustly promoted the degradation of misfolded P23H rhodopsin without affecting its wild-type counterpart. We also found that IRE1 used both proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways to remove P23H rhodopsin. Surprisingly, when one degradation pathway was compromised, IRE1 signaling could still promote misfolded rhodopsin degradation using the remaining pathway. Last, we showed that IRE1 signaling also reduced levels of several other misfolded rhodopsins with lesser effects on misfolded cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Our findings reveal the diversity of proteolytic mechanisms used by IRE1 to eliminate misfolded rhodopsin. PMID:22219383

  15. The molecular basis for the high photosensitivity of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Robert S H; Colmenares, Leticia U

    2003-12-09

    Based on structural information derived from the F NMR data of labeled rhodopsins, rhodopsin crystal structure, and excited-state properties of model polyenes, we propose a molecular mechanism that accounts specifically for the causes of the well-known enhanced photoreactivity of rhodopsin (increased rates and quantum yield of isomerization). It involves the key features of close proximity of C-187 to H-12 and chromophore bond lengthening upon light absorption. The resultant "sudden punch" to H-12 triggers dual processes of decay of the Franck-Condon-excited rhodopsin, a productive directed photoisomerization and a nonproductive decay returning to the ground state as two separate molecular pathways [based on real-time fluorescence results of Chosrowjan, H., Mataga, N., Shibata, Y., Tachibanaki, S., Kandori, H., Shichida, Y., Okada, T. & Kouyama, T. (1998) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 9706-9707]. The two processes are controlled by the local protein structure: an empty space provided by the intradiscal loop connecting transmembrane helices 4 and 5 and a protein wall composed of amino acid units in transmembrane 3. Suggestions, involving retinal analogs and rhodopsin mutants, to improve the unusually high photosensitivity of rhodopsin are proposed.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  17. Cloning and Characterization of a Receptor-Like Protein Kinase Gene Associated with Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Hajouj, Taleb; Michelis, Regina; Gepstein, Shimon

    2000-01-01

    Senescence-associated genes are up-regulated during plant senescence and many have been implicated in encoding enzymes involved in the metabolism of senescing tissues. Using the differential display technique, we identified a SAG in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) leaf that was exclusively expressed during senescence and was designated senescence-associated receptor-like kinase (SARK). The deduced SARK polypeptide consists of a signal peptide, a leucine-rich repeat in the extracellular region, a single membrane-spanning domain, and the characteristic serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The mRNA level for SARK increased prior to the loss of chlorophyll and the decrease of chlorophyll a/b-binding protein mRNA. Detached mature bean leaves, which senesce at an accelerated rate compared with leaves on intact plants, showed a similar temporal pattern of SARK message accumulation. Light and cytokinin, which delayed the initiation of leaf senescence, also delayed SARK gene expression; in contrast, darkness and ethylene, which accelerated senescence, advanced the initial appearance of the SARK transcript. SARK protein accumulation exhibited a temporal pattern similar to that of its mRNA. A possible role for SARK in the regulation of leaf senescence was considered. PMID:11080306

  18. The protein kinase TOUSLED is required for maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Jun; Xia, Ran; Wang, Junguo; Shen, Jie; Cao, Rui; Hong, Xuhui; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2007-01-01

    TOUSLED-like kinases (TLKs) are highly conserved in plants and animals, but direct evidence linking TLKs and transcriptional gene silencing is lacking. We isolated two new alleles of TOUSLED (TSL). Mutations of TSL in ros1 reactivate the transcriptionally silent 35S-NPTII transgene and the transcriptionally silent endogenous loci TSI (TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis shows that histone H3Lys9 dimethylation is decreased in the reactivated transgene and endogenous TSI loci in the tsl ros1 mutant. However, there is no change in DNA methylation in the affected loci. Western blot and ChIP assay suggest that TSL might not be responsible for histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation. The tsl seedlings were more sensitive to DNA damage reagent methyl methanesulphonate and UV-B light. Our results provide direct evidence for a crucial role of the TOUSLED protein kinase in the maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in some genomic regions in a DNA-methylation-independent manner in Arabidopsis. PMID:17110953

  19. The protein kinase TOUSLED is required for maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Jun; Xia, Ran; Wang, Junguo; Shen, Jie; Cao, Rui; Hong, Xuhui; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2007-01-01

    TOUSLED-like kinases (TLKs) are highly conserved in plants and animals, but direct evidence linking TLKs and transcriptional gene silencing is lacking. We isolated two new alleles of TOUSLED (TSL). Mutations of TSL in ros1 reactivate the transcriptionally silent 35S-NPTII transgene and the transcriptionally silent endogenous loci TSI (TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis shows that histone H3Lys9 dimethylation is decreased in the reactivated transgene and endogenous TSI loci in the tsl ros1 mutant. However, there is no change in DNA methylation in the affected loci. Western blot and ChIP assay suggest that TSL might not be responsible for histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation. The tsl seedlings were more sensitive to DNA damage reagent methyl methanesulphonate and UV-B light. Our results provide direct evidence for a crucial role of the TOUSLED protein kinase in the maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing in some genomic regions in a DNA-methylation-independent manner in Arabidopsis.

  20. High fat diet induced obesity alters ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nteeba, J; Ross, J W; Perfield, J W; Keating, A F

    2013-12-01

    Insulin regulates ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K) signaling, important for primordial follicle viability and growth activation. This study investigated diet-induced obesity impacts on: (1) insulin receptor (Insr) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1); (2) PI3K components (Kit ligand (Kitlg), kit (c-Kit), protein kinase B alpha (Akt1) and forkhead transcription factor subfamily 3 (Foxo3a)); (3) xenobiotic biotransformation (microsomal epoxide hydrolase (Ephx1), Cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1 (Cyp2e1), Glutathione S-transferase (Gst) isoforms mu (Gstm) and pi (Gstp)) and (4) microRNA's 184, 205, 103 and 21 gene expression. INSR, GSTM and GSTP protein levels were also measured. Obese mouse ovaries had decreased Irs1, Foxo3a, Cyp2e1, MiR-103, and MiR-21 but increased Kitlg, Akt1, and miR-184 levels relative to lean littermates. These results support that diet-induced obesity potentially impairs ovarian function through aberrant gene expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High fat diet induced obesity alters ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nteeba, J.; Ross, J.W.; Perfield, J.W.; Keating, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin regulates ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, important for primordial follicle viability and growth activation. This study investigated diet-induced obesity impacts on: 1) insulin receptor (Insr) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1); 2) PI3K components (Kit ligand (Kitlg), kit (c-Kit), protein kinase B alpha (Akt1) and forkhead transcription factor subfamily 3 (Foxo3a)); 3) xenobiotic biotransformation (microsomal epoxide hydrolase (Ephx1), Cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1 (Cyp2e1), Glutathione S-transferase (Gst) isoforms mu (Gstm) and pi (Gstp)) and 4) microRNA’s 184, 205, 103 and 21 gene expression. INSR, GSTM and GSTP protein levels were also measured. Obese mouse ovaries had decreased Irs1, Foxo3a, Cyp2e1, MiR-103, and MiR-21 but increased Kitlg, Akt1, and miR-184 levels relative to lean littermates. These results support that diet-induced obesity potentially impairs ovarian function through aberrant gene expression. PMID:23954404

  2. Genomic structure and chromosomal localization of the human deoxycytidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Walker, S.; Gribbin, T. ); Chen, E. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill ); Johnson, E.E.; Spychala, J.; Mitchell, B.S. )

    1993-01-15

    Deoxycytidine kinase (NTP:deoxycytidine 5[prime]-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.74) is an enzyme that catalyzes phosphorylation of deoxyribonucleosides and a number of nucleoside analogs that are important in antiviral and cancer chemotherapy. Deficiency of this enzyme activity is associated with resistance to these agents, whereas increased enzyme activity is associated with increased activation of such compounds to cytotoxic nucleoside triphosphate derivatives. To characterize the regulation of expression of this gene, we have isolated genomic clones encompassing its entire coding and 5[prime] flanking regions and delinated all the exon/intron boundaries. The gene extends over more than 34 kilobases on chromosome 4 and the coding region is composed of 7 exons ranging in size from 90 to 1544 base pairs (bp). The 5[prime] flanking region is highly G+C-rich and contains four regions that are potential Sp1 binding sites. A 697-bp fragment encompassing 386 bp of 5[prime] upstream region, the 250-bp first exon, and 61 bp of the first intron was demonstrated to promote chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in a T-lymphoblast cell line and to have >6-fold greater activity in a Jurkat T-lymphoblast than in a Raji B-lymphoblast cell line. Our data suggest that these 5[prime] sequences may contain elements that are important for the tissue-specific differences in deoxycytidine kinase expression. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel serine-threonine kinase gene from the Xp22 region.

    PubMed

    Montini, E; Andolfi, G; Caruso, A; Buchner, G; Walpole, S M; Mariani, M; Consalez, G; Trump, D; Ballabio, A; Franco, B

    1998-08-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases are part of a large and expanding family of proteins. Through our transcriptional mapping effort in the Xp22 region, we have isolated and sequenced the full-length transcript of STK9, a novel cDNA highly homologous to serine-threonine kinases. A number of human genetic disorders have been mapped to the region where STK9 has been localized including Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome, oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1), and a novel locus for nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness (DFN6). To evaluate the possible involvement of STK9 in any of the above-mentioned disorders, a 2416-bp full-length cDNA was assembled. The entire genomic structure of the gene, which is composed of 20 coding exons, was determined. Northern analysis revealed a transcript larger than 9.5 kb in several tissues including brain, lung, and kidney. The mouse homologue (Stk9) was identified and mapped in the mouse in the region syntenic to human Xp. This location is compatible with the location of the Xcat mutant, which shows congenital cataracts very similar to those observed in NH patients. Sequence homologies, expression pattern, and mapping information in both human and mouse make STK9 a candidate gene for the above-mentioned disorders.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of pig GYS1 gene by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Tao; Guo, Jiazhong; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Wang, Linjie

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase and has important roles in glycogen metabolism biosynthesis. Studies have revealed that GSK3β can directly regulate the glycogen synthase activity, yet little is known about the regulation of GSK3β on GYS1 gene transcription. Here, we show that overexpression of GSK3β decreased the mRNA expression level of GYS1. Then we cloned approximately 1.5 kb of pig GYS1 gene promoter region, generated sequential deletion constructs, and evaluated their activity. A gradual increase of the promoter activity was seen with increasing length of the promoter sequence, reaching its highest activity to the sequence corresponding to nt -350 to +224, and then decreased. However, the activities of constructed promoter fragments show different responses to GSK3β co-transfection. By analyzing a series of GYS1 promoter reporter constructs, we have defined two crucial regions (-1488 to -539, -350 to -147) that are responsible for GSK3β-induced transcriptional repression. Furthermore, the ChIP results revealed that only the first and second NF-κB sites of GYS1 promoter could bind to p65, and overexpression of GSK3β induced a significant decrease in p65 binding to the second NF-κB binding site, suggesting that GSK3β may regulate expression of GYS1 gene through binding to the second rather than the first NF-κB site. These data suggest that the NF-κB plays important roles in the transcriptional activity of pig GYS1 gene regulated by GSK3β.

  5. Mutation of CERKL, a Novel Human Ceramide Kinase Gene, Causes Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP26)

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Miquel; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the main cause of adult blindness, is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors through apoptosis. Up to now, 39 genes and loci have been implicated in nonsyndromic RP, yet the genetic bases of >50% of the cases, particularly of the recessive forms, remain unknown. Previous linkage analysis in a Spanish consanguineous family allowed us to define a novel autosomal recessive RP (arRP) locus, RP26, within an 11-cM interval (17.4 Mb) on 2q31.2-q32.3. In the present study, we further refine the RP26 locus down to 2.5 Mb, by microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping. After unsuccessful mutational analysis of the nine genes initially reported in this region, a detailed gene search based on expressed-sequence-tag data was undertaken. We finally identified a novel gene encoding a ceramide kinase (CERKL), which encompassed 13 exons. All of the patients from the RP26 family bear a homozygous mutation in exon 5, which generates a premature termination codon. The same mutation was also characterized in another, unrelated, Spanish pedigree with arRP. Human CERKL is expressed in the retina, among other adult and fetal tissues. A more detailed analysis by in situ hybridization on adult murine retina sections shows expression of Cerkl in the ganglion cell layer. Ceramide kinases convert the sphingolipid metabolite ceramide into ceramide-1-phosphate, both key mediators of cellular apoptosis and survival. Ceramide metabolism plays an essential role in the viability of neuronal cells, the membranes of which are particularly rich in sphingolipids. Therefore, CERKL deficiency could shift the relative levels of the signaling sphingolipid metabolites and increase sensitivity of photoreceptor and other retinal cells to apoptotic stimuli. This is the first genetic report suggesting a direct link between retinal neurodegeneration in RP and sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis. PMID

  6. Synthetic genes for human muscle-type adenylate kinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Nishikawa, S; Tanaka, T; Uesugi, S; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gene coding for the human muscle-type cytosolic adenylate kinase (hAK1) was chemically synthesized and directly expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of trp promoter. The DNA duplex of 596 bp was designed and constructed from 40 oligonucleotide fragments of typically 30 nucleotides in length. Twelve unique restriction sites were fairly evenly spaced in the synthetic gene to facilitate site-specific mutagenesis at any part of this recombinant protein. The genes for mutant hAK1 (Tyr 95----Phe 95, Y95F hAK1; Arg 97----Ala 97, R97A hAK1) were constructed by cassette mutagenesis and utilized restriction sites incorporated in the hAK1 gene. The recombinant hAK1 was purified to homogeneity by a two-step chromatographic procedure with a good yield, and showed the same adenylate kinase activity as that of authentic hAK1. Preliminary kinetic studies show that the enzymatic activity (Vmax app,cor/Et) of Y95F hAK1 was slightly greater than that of recombinant hAK1, whereas R97A hAK1 still possessed approximately 4% of recombinant hAK1 activity. These results suggest that the Arg-97 residue is important but not essential for catalytic activity, and that Tyr-95 can be replaced by phenylalanine without substantial effects on the enzymatic activity. Moreover, preliminary estimates of the apparent kinetic parameters suggest that these residues are not required for MgATP binding, and therefore they do not appear to be part of the MgATP binding site.

  7. Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene therapy for rat malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A J; Vogels, R; Someren, G V; Esandi, M C; Noteboom, J L; Avezaat, C J; Vecht, C; Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Bout, A; Hoogerbrugge, P M

    1996-01-20

    Transfer of a herpes simplex virus-derived thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene into brain tumor cells and subsequent ganciclovir (GCV) treatment has been shown by others to be an effective treatment in rats with intracerebrally inoculated 9L gliosarcomas. Mechanism of action and reproducibility are, however, still a matter of debate. We have used the same model to test the therapeutic effects of both retrovirus- and adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HSV-tk gene followed by GCV treatment. Survival time of rats with intracerebral 9L tumors was significantly prolonged after a single administration of adenovirus carrying a HSV-tk gene as compared to controls. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer also resulted in significantly prolonged survival time when recombinant retrovirus-producing cells were transplanted. Direct injection of the recombinant retrovirus, HSV-tk-expressing cells, virus-producing cells without GCV administration and recombinant retrovirus-lacZ or interleukin-2 (IL-2)-producing cells did not result in tumor cell kill. In the present study, no significant difference in survival of 9L brain tumor carrying rats was found after treatment with adenovirus as compared to retrovirus-mediated HSV-tk-mediated gene transfer and subsequent GCV treatment.

  8. Expression of protein kinase C genes during ontogenic development of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Sposi, N.M.; Bottero, L.; Testa, U.; Peschle, C.; Russo, G.

    1989-05-01

    The authors have analyzed the RNA expression of three protein kinase C (PKC) genes in (/alpha/, /beta/, and /gamma/) in human and murine central nervous systems during embryonic-fetal, perinatal, and adult life. Analysis of human brain poly(A)/sup +/ RNA indicates that expression of PKC /alpha/ and /beta/ genes can be detected as early as 6 weeks postconception, undergoes a gradual increase until 9 weeks postconception, and reaches its highest level in the adult stage,and that the PKC /gamma/ gene, although not expressed during embryonic and early fetal development, is abundantly expressed in the adult period. Similar developmental patterns were observed in human spinal cord and medulla oblongata. A detailed analysis of PKC gene expression during mammalian ontogeny was performed on poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from the brain cells of murine embryos at different stages of development and the brain cells of neonatal and adult mice. The ontogenic patterns were similar to those observed for human brain. Furthermore, they observed that the expression of PKC /gamma/ is induced in the peri- and postnatal phases. These results suggest that expression of PKC /alpha/, /beta/, and /gamma/ genes possibly mediates the development of central neuronal functions, and expression of PKC /gamma/ in particular may be involved in the development of peri- and postnatal functions.

  9. The pkI gene encoding pyruvate kinase I links to the luxZ gene which enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Lu, H C; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1997-10-09

    Partial 3'-end nucleotide sequence of the pkI gene (GenBank accession No. AF019143) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 has been determined, and the encoded pyruvate kinase I is deduced. Pyruvate kinase I is the key enzyme of glycolysis, which converts phosphoenol pyruvate to pyruvate. Alignment and comparison of pyruvate kinase Is from P. leiognathi, E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium show that they are homologous. Nucleotide sequence reveals that the pkI gene is linked to the luxZ gene that enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi. The gene order of the pkI and luxZ genes is-pk1-ter-->-R&R"-luxZ-ter"-->, whereas ter is transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes, and R&R" is the regulatory region and ter" is transcriptional terminator for the luxZ gene. It clearly elicits that the pkI gene and luxZ gene are divided to two operons. Functional analysis confirms that the potential hairpin loop omega T is the transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes. It infers that the pkI and related genes are simply linked to the luxZ gene in P. leiognathi genome.

  10. Organization and evolution of multifunctional Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Tombes, Robert M; Faison, M Omar; Turbeville, J M

    2003-12-11

    The "multi-functional" Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, type II (CaMK-II) is an evolutionarily conserved protein. It has been found as a single gene in the horseshoe crab, marine sponge, sea urchin, nematode, and fruit fly, whereas most vertebrates possess four genes (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta). Species from fruit flies to humans encode alternative splice variants which are differentially targeted to phosphorylate diverse downstream targets of Ca(2+) signaling. By comparing known CaMK-II protein and nucleotide sequences, we have now provided evidence for the evolutionary relatedness of CaMK-IIs. Parsimony analyses unambiguously indicate that the four vertebrate CaMK-II genes arose via repeated duplications. Nucleotide phylogenies show consistent but moderate support for the placement of the vertebrate delta CaMK-II as the earliest diverging vertebrate gene. delta CaMK-II is the only gene with both central and C-terminal variable domains and has three to four times more intronic sequence than the other three genes. beta and gamma CaMK-II genes show strong sequence similarity and have comparable exon and intron organization and utilization. alpha CaMK-II is absent from amphibians (Xenopus laevis) and has the most restricted tissue specificity in mammals, whereas beta, gamma, and delta CaMK-IIs are expressed in most tissues. All 38 known mammalian CaMK-II splice variants were compiled with their tissue specificity and exon usage. Some of these variants use alternative 5' and 3' donors within a single exon as well as alternative promoters. These findings serve as an important benchmark for future phylogenetic, developmental, or biochemical studies on this important, conserved, and highly regulated gene family.

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hubert, A; Husson, A; Chédeville, A; Lavoinne, A

    2000-09-22

    The effect of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene expression was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. Activation of AMPK by AICAR counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the PEPCK gene expression, both at the mRNA and the transcriptional levels. It is proposed that a target for AMPK is involved in the inhibitory effect of glucose on PEPCK gene transcription.

  12. The primary structure of sensory rhodopsin II: a member of an additional retinal protein subgroup is coexpressed with its transducer, the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin II.

    PubMed

    Seidel, R; Scharf, B; Gautel, M; Kleine, K; Oesterhelt, D; Engelhard, M

    1995-03-28

    The blue-light receptor genes (sopII) of sensory rhodopsin (SR) II were cloned from two species, the halophilic bacteria Haloarcula vallismortis (vSR-II) and Natronobacterium pharaonis (pSR-II). Upstream of both sopII gene loci, sequences corresponding to the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin (Htr) II were recognized. In N. pharaonis, psopII and phtrII are transcribed as a single transcript. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of vHtr-II and pHtr-II with Htr-I and the chemotactic methyl-accepting proteins from Escherichia coli revealed considerable identities in the signal domain and methyl-accepting sites. Similarities with Htr-I in Halobacterium salinarium suggest a common principle in the phototaxis of extreme halophiles. Alignment of all known retinal protein sequences from Archaea identifies both SR-IIs as an additional subgroup of the family. Positions defining the retinal binding site are usually identical with the exception of Met-118 (numbering is according to the bacteriorhodopsin sequence), which might explain the typical blue color shift of SR-II to approximately 490 nm. In archaeal retinal proteins, the function can be deduced from amino acids in positions 85 and 96. Proton pumps are characterized by Asp-85 and Asp-96; chloride pumps by Thr-85 and Ala-96; and sensors by Asp-85 and Tyr-96 or Phe-96.

  13. Molecular genetics of rhodopsin and phototrans duction in the visual system of Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zuker, C.; Cowman, A.; Montell, C.; Rubin, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated the genes encoding four Drosophila visual pigments. Each of these opsins is expressed in a set of functionally and anatomically distinct photoreceptor cells of the eye. One is expressed in the six outer photoreceptor cells (R1-R6), the second in the central R8 photoreceptor cell, and the other two in the UV sensitive R7 photoreceptor cells. They have determined the structure and nucleotide sequence of each of these genes. They have used P element-mediated gene transfer to introduce the cloned structural gene for the R1-R6 opsin in the Drosophila germline and restored the ninaE mutant phenotype to wild-type. In an attempt to study the contribution of the various opsins to the specific functional properties of the different photoreceptor cell types, they have genetically engineered Drosophila lines that express R8 opsin in the R1-R6 photoreceptor cells. In collaboration with Drs. Ozaki and Pak at Purdue University, they have used oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to mutate selected amino acids and regions of the rhodopsin molecule and reintroduced the mutated genes into Drosophila to analyze structure-function relationships in the rhodopsin molecule.

  14. Light-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, B E; Khorana, H G; Nasi, E

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the functioning of bovine rod opsin, which is efficiently synthesized from RNA made by in vitro transcription, following injection into Xenopus oocytes. We found that oocytes expressing the gene for opsin exhibit light-dependent ionic currents only after pigment generation by incubation with 11-cis-retinal. These currents are similar to the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) response of oocytes, but their amplitude is substantially smaller. 2. In order to optimize the conditions for obtaining light-induced currents in RNA-injected oocytes, the native ACh response was examined under several conditions. It was found that elevated external calcium markedly enhances the muscarinic response and that these currents have a non-linear dependence on membrane voltage, increasing substantially with depolarization. 3. Using the optimal conditions for evoking the largest ACh responses, (28 mM [Ca2+]o, 0 mV, omission of serum and Hepes from the media), the light-evoked currents obtained in RNA-injected oocytes were remarkably enhanced, and responses to multiple light stimuli could be obtained. 4. The light response appeared to desensitize, even after long periods of recovery and pigment regeneration. By contrast, the ACh responses continued to appear normal. These results suggest that desensitization of photoresponses expressed in Xenopus oocytes involve changes at early stages of the pathway, resulting in a reduced ability of rhodopsin to couple to the endogenous signalling system. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7692039

  15. Switch of rhodopsin expression in terminally differentiated Drosophila sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Simon G; Desplan, Claude

    2008-07-24

    Specificity of sensory neurons requires restricted expression of one sensory receptor gene and the exclusion of all others within a given cell. In the Drosophila retina, functional identity of photoreceptors depends on light-sensitive Rhodopsins (Rhs). The much simpler larval eye (Bolwig organ) is composed of about 12 photoreceptors, eight of which are green-sensitive (Rh6) and four blue-sensitive (Rh5). The larval eye becomes the adult extraretinal 'eyelet' composed of four green-sensitive (Rh6) photoreceptors. Here we show that, during metamorphosis, all Rh6 photoreceptors die, whereas the Rh5 photoreceptors switch fate by turning off Rh5 and then turning on Rh6 expression. This switch occurs without apparent changes in the programme of transcription factors that specify larval photoreceptor subtypes. We also show that the transcription factor Senseless (Sens) mediates the very different cellular behaviours of Rh5 and Rh6 photoreceptors. Sens is restricted to Rh5 photoreceptors and must be excluded from Rh6 photoreceptors to allow them to die at metamorphosis. Finally, we show that Ecdysone receptor (EcR) functions autonomously both for the death of larval Rh6 photoreceptors and for the sensory switch of Rh5 photoreceptors to express Rh6. This fate switch of functioning, terminally differentiated neurons provides a novel, unexpected example of hard-wired sensory plasticity.

  16. Liver kinase B1 inhibits the expression of inflammation-related genes postcontraction in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Moore, Timothy M.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; McVey, Natalie L.; Madsen, Steven R.; Hallowell, David M.; Harris, Alexander M.; Char, Robin E.; Mackay, Ryan P.; Hancock, Chad R.; Hansen, Jason M.; Kauwe, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle-specific liver kinase B1 (LKB1) knockout mice (skmLKB1-KO) exhibit elevated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling after treadmill running. MAPK activation is also associated with inflammation-related signaling in skeletal muscle. Since exercise can induce muscle damage, and inflammation is a response triggered by damaged tissue, we therefore hypothesized that LKB1 plays an important role in dampening the inflammatory response to muscle contraction, and that this may be due in part to increased susceptibility to muscle damage with contractions in LKB1-deficient muscle. Here we studied the inflammatory response and muscle damage with in situ muscle contraction or downhill running. After in situ muscle contractions, the phosphorylation of both NF-κB and STAT3 was increased more in skmLKB1-KO vs. wild-type (WT) muscles. Analysis of gene expression via microarray and RT-PCR shows that expression of many inflammation-related genes increased after contraction only in skmLKB1-KO muscles. This was associated with mild skeletal muscle fiber membrane damage in skmLKB1-KO muscles. Gene markers of oxidative stress were also elevated in skmLKB1-KO muscles after contraction. Using the downhill running model, we observed significantly more muscle damage after running in skmLKB1-KO mice, and this was associated with greater phosphorylation of both Jnk and STAT3 and increased expression of SOCS3 and Fos. In conclusion, we have shown that the lack of LKB1 in skeletal muscle leads to an increased inflammatory state in skeletal muscle that is exacerbated by muscle contraction. Increased susceptibility of the muscle to damage may underlie part of this response. PMID:26796753

  17. SOS4, a pyridoxal kinase gene, is required for root hair development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huazhong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-06-01

    Root hair development in plants is controlled by many genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors. A number of genes have been shown to be important for root hair formation. Arabidopsis salt overly sensitive 4 mutants were originally identified by screening for NaCl-hypersensitive growth. The SOS4 (Salt Overly Sensitive 4) gene was recently isolated by map-based cloning and shown to encode a pyridoxal (PL) kinase involved in the production of PL-5-phosphate, which is an important cofactor for various enzymes and a ligand for certain ion transporters. The root growth of sos4 mutants is slower than that of the wild type. Microscopic observations revealed that sos4 mutants do not have root hairs in the maturation zone. The sos4 mutations block the initiation of most root hairs, and impair the tip growth of those that are initiated. The root hairless phenotype of sos4 mutants was complemented by the wild-type SOS4 gene. SOS4 promoter-beta-glucuronidase analysis showed that SOS4 is expressed in the root hair and other hair-like structures. Consistent with SOS4 function as a PL kinase, in vitro application of pyridoxine and pyridoxamine, but not PL, partially rescued the root hair defect in sos4 mutants. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treatments promoted root hair formation in both wild-type and sos4 plants, indicating that genetically SOS4 functions upstream of ethylene and auxin in root hair development. The possible role of SOS4 in ethylene and auxin biosynthesis is discussed.

  18. Novel Polymorphisms in the Myosin Light Chain Kinase Gene Confer Risk for Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Grant, Audrey; Halder, Indrani; Brower, Roy; Sevransky, Jonathan; Maloney, James P.; Moss, Marc; Shanholtz, Carl; Yates, Charles R.; Meduri, Gianfranco Umberto; Shriver, Mark D.; Ingersoll, Roxann; Scott, Alan F.; Beaty, Terri H.; Moitra, Jaideep; Ma, Shwu Fan; Ye, Shui Q.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic basis of acute lung injury (ALI) is poorly understood. The myosin light chain kinase (MYLK) gene encodes the nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase isoform, a multifunctional protein involved in the inflammatory response (apoptosis, vascular permeability, leukocyte diapedesis). To examine MYLK as a novel candidate gene in sepsis-associated ALI, we sequenced exons, exon–intron boundaries, and 2 kb of 5′ UTR of the MYLK, which revealed 51 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Potential association of 28 MYLK SNPs with sepsis-associated ALI were evaluated in a case-control sample of 288 European American subjects (EAs) with sepsis alone, subjects with sepsis-associated ALI, or healthy control subjects, and a sample population of 158 African American subjects (AAs) with sepsis and ALI. Significant single locus associations in EAs were observed between four MYLK SNPs and the sepsis phenotype (P < 0.001), with an additional SNP associated with the ALI phenotype (P = 0.03). A significant association of a single SNP (identical to the SNP identified in EAs) was observed in AAs with sepsis (P = 0.002) and with ALI (P = 0.01). Three sepsis risk-conferring haplotypes in EAs were defined downstream of start codon of smooth muscle MYLK isoform, a region containing putative regulatory elements (P < 0.001). In contrast, multiple haplotypic analyses revealed an ALI-specific, risk-conferring haplotype at 5′ of the MYLK gene in both European and African Americans and an additional 3′ region haplotype only in African Americans. These data strongly implicate MYLK genetic variants to confer increased risk of sepsis and sepsis-associated ALI. PMID:16399953

  19. Characterization and expression analysis of somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase genes from Phalaenopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y W; Tsai, Y J; Chen, F C

    2014-12-18

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (SERK) genes have been found to be involved in the somatic embryogenesis of several plant species. We identified and characterized 5 PhSERK genes in the Phalaenopsis orchid. The amino acid sequences of PhSERKs and other SERK proteins are highly conserved, with the highest homology observed in the leucine-rich repeat-receptor-like kinase domain. All 5 PhSERKs were expressed in all Phalaenopsis organs examined (root, leaf, shoot apical meristem, and flower), with the strongest expression, particularly for PhSERK1 and 3, in the shoot apical meristem of mature plants. Expression of all PhSERKs was downregulated during early floral bud development and was upregulated gradually until the semi-open flower stage was reached. All 5 PhSERKs were expressed during both seed germination and protocorm-like-body (PLB) development. In germinated seeds, quantitative real-time PCR revealed upregulation of all PhSERKs except PhSERK4 at 1 week and downregulation after 4 weeks. The 5 PhSERKs were differentially expressed in the early stage of PLB development and maintained substantial levels during PLB formation, with PhSERK1 and 5 upregulated 1 week after culture and PhSERK2, 3, and 4 downregulated over this period. Because physical wounding of PLB stimulates secondary PLB formation, the PhSERK5 expression peak at week 3 coincided with visible and fully developed secondary PLBs. PhSERK5 may be important in PLB induction and subsequent development. Our PhSERK expression analysis revealed that these genes have a broad role during orchid plant development.

  20. Liver kinase B1 inhibits the expression of inflammation-related genes postcontraction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Moore, Timothy M; Ebbert, Mark T W; McVey, Natalie L; Madsen, Steven R; Hallowell, David M; Harris, Alexander M; Char, Robin E; Mackay, Ryan P; Hancock, Chad R; Hansen, Jason M; Kauwe, John S; Thomson, David M

    2016-04-15

    Skeletal muscle-specific liver kinase B1 (LKB1) knockout mice (skmLKB1-KO) exhibit elevated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling after treadmill running. MAPK activation is also associated with inflammation-related signaling in skeletal muscle. Since exercise can induce muscle damage, and inflammation is a response triggered by damaged tissue, we therefore hypothesized that LKB1 plays an important role in dampening the inflammatory response to muscle contraction, and that this may be due in part to increased susceptibility to muscle damage with contractions in LKB1-deficient muscle. Here we studied the inflammatory response and muscle damage with in situ muscle contraction or downhill running. After in situ muscle contractions, the phosphorylation of both NF-κB and STAT3 was increased more in skmLKB1-KO vs. wild-type (WT) muscles. Analysis of gene expression via microarray and RT-PCR shows that expression of many inflammation-related genes increased after contraction only in skmLKB1-KO muscles. This was associated with mild skeletal muscle fiber membrane damage in skmLKB1-KO muscles. Gene markers of oxidative stress were also elevated in skmLKB1-KO muscles after contraction. Using the downhill running model, we observed significantly more muscle damage after running in skmLKB1-KO mice, and this was associated with greater phosphorylation of both Jnk and STAT3 and increased expression of SOCS3 and Fos. In conclusion, we have shown that the lack of LKB1 in skeletal muscle leads to an increased inflammatory state in skeletal muscle that is exacerbated by muscle contraction. Increased susceptibility of the muscle to damage may underlie part of this response.

  1. Structural and functional studies of the intracellular tyrosine kinase MATK gene and its translated product.

    PubMed

    Avraham, S; Jiang, S; Ota, S; Fu, Y; Deng, B; Dowler, L L; White, R A; Avraham, H

    1995-01-27

    We recently cloned the cDNA which encodes a novel megakaryocyte-associated tyrosine kinase termed MATK. In this study, we have cloned and characterized the human MATK gene as well as the murine homolog of human MATK cDNA and performed functional studies of its translated product. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of human and murine MATK cDNAs revealed 85% homology, indicating that MATK is highly conserved in mouse and human. The human gene consists of 13 exons interrupted by 12 introns. The genetic units which encode the SH3 and SH2 domains are located on separate exons. The putative ATP binding site (GXGXXG) is localized on exon 7, and the entire catalytic domain is subdivided into seven exons (7-13). Somatic cell hybrid analysis indicated that human MATK gene is located on chromosome 19 while the murine Matk gene is located on chromosome 10. The immediate 5'-flanking region was highly rich in GC sequences, and potential cis-acting elements were identified including several SP1, GATA-1, APRE, and APRE1. Antisense oligonucleotides directed against MATK mRNA sequences significantly inhibited megakaryocyte progenitor proliferation. Functional studies indicated that MATK can phosphorylate the carboxyl-terminal conserved tyrosine of the Src protein. These results support the notion that MATK acts as a regulator of p60c-src in megakaryocytic cells and participates in the pathways regulating growth of cells of this lineage.

  2. Identification, nomenclature, and evolutionary relationships of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in soybean.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S; Reese, R Neil; Benson, Benjamin V

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution.

  3. Identification, Nomenclature, and Evolutionary Relationships of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P.; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S.; Reese, R. Neil; Benson, Benjamin V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution. PMID:24137047

  4. Phosphatidylinositol phosphate 5-kinase genes respond to phosphate deficiency for root hair elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yukika; Kusano, Hiroaki; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Plants drastically alter their root system architecture to adapt to different underground growth conditions. During phosphate (Pi) deficiency, most plants including Arabidopsis thaliana enhance the development of lateral roots and root hairs, resulting in bushy and hairy roots. To elucidate the signal pathway specific for the root hair elongation response to Pi deficiency, we investigated the expression of type-B phosphatidylinositol phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) genes, as a quantitative factor for root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. At young seedling stages, the PIP5K3 and PIP5K4 genes responded to Pi deficiency in steady-state transcript levels via PHR1-binding sequences (P1BSs) in their upstream regions. Both pip5k3 and pip5k4 single mutants, which exhibit short-root-hair phenotypes, remained responsive to Pi deficiency for root hair elongation; however the pip5k3pip5k4 double mutant exhibited shorter root hairs than the single mutants, and lost responsiveness to Pi deficiency at young seedling stages. In the tactical complementation line in which modified PIP5K3 and PIP5K4 genes with base substitutions in their P1BSs were co-introduced into the double mutant, root hairs of young seedlings had normal lengths under Pi-sufficient conditions, but were not responsive to Pi deficiency. From these results, we conclude that a Pi-deficiency signal is transferred to the pathway for root hair elongation via the PIP5K genes.

  5. The Protein Kinase KIS Impacts Gene Expression during Development and Fear Conditioning in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Valérie; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Maucuer, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The brain-enriched protein kinase KIS (product of the gene UHMK1) has been shown to phosphorylate the human splicing factor SF1 in vitro. This phosphorylation in turn favors the formation of a U2AF65-SF1-RNA complex which occurs at the 3′ end of introns at an early stage of spliceosome assembly. Here, we analyzed the effects of KIS knockout on mouse SF1 phosphorylation, physiology, adult behavior, and gene expression in the neonate brain. We found SF1 isoforms are differently expressed in KIS-ko mouse brains and fibroblasts. Re-expression of KIS in fibroblasts restores a wild type distribution of SF1 isoforms, confirming the link between KIS and SF1. Microarray analysis of transcripts in the neonate brain revealed a subtle down-regulation of brain specific genes including cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels and metabolic enzymes. Q-PCR analyses confirmed these defects and point to an increase of pre-mRNA over mRNA ratios, likely due to changes in splicing efficiency. While performing similarly in prepulse inhibition and most other behavioral tests, KIS-ko mice differ in spontaneous activity and contextual fear conditioning. This difference suggests that disregulation of gene expression due to KIS inactivation affects specific brain functions. PMID:22937132

  6. An ant-plant mutualism through the lens of cGMP-dependent kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Turner, Kyle M; Doha, Manjima; Anreiter, Ina; Allen, Aaron M; Sokolowski, Marla B; Frederickson, Megan E

    2017-09-13

    In plant-animal mutualisms, how an animal forages often determines how much benefit its plant partner receives. In many animals, foraging behaviour changes in response to foraging gene expression or activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) that foraging encodes. Here, we show that this highly conserved molecular mechanism affects the outcome of a plant-animal mutualism. We studied the two PKG genes of Allomerus octoarticulatus, an Amazonian ant that defends the ant-plant Cordia nodosa against herbivores. Some ant colonies are better 'bodyguards' than others. Working in the field in Peru, we found that colonies fed with a PKG activator recruited more workers to attack herbivores than control colonies. This resulted in less herbivore damage. PKG gene expression in ant workers correlated with whether an ant colony discovered an herbivore and how much damage herbivores inflicted on leaves in a complex way; natural variation in expression levels of the two genes had significant interaction effects on ant behaviour and herbivory. Our results suggest a molecular basis for ant protection of plants in this mutualism. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Tyrosine kinase domain mutations of EGFR gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vatte, Chittibabu; Al Amri, Ali M; Cyrus, Cyril; Chathoth, Shahanas; Acharya, Sadananda; Hashim, Tariq Mohammad; Al Ali, Zhara; Alshreadah, Saleh Tawfeeq; Alsayyah, Ahmed; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2017-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a commonly altered gene that is identified in various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Therefore, EGFR is a promising molecular marker targeted by monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the spectrum of mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene in HNSCC patients. Materials and methods This retrospective study included 47 confirmed HNSCC cases. Mutations in the TK domain, exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene, were detected by Scorpion® chemistry and ARMS® technologies on Rotor-Gene Q real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The tumors exhibited EGFR-TK domain mutations in 57% of cases. Four cases of T790M mutations were reported for the first time among HNSCC patients. Out of the total mutations, L861Q (exon 21), exon 20 insertions and deletions of exon 19 accounted for the majority of mutations (21%, 19%, and 17%, respectively). EGFR mutation status was correlated with the higher grade (P=0.026) and advanced stage (P=0.034) of HNSCC tumors. Conclusion Higher frequency of EGFR-TK domain mutations together with the presence of the T790M mutation suggests that identification of these mutations might streamline the therapy and provide a better prognosis in HNSCC cases. PMID:28352186

  8. Sphingosine kinase 1 gene transfer reduces postoperative peritoneal adhesion in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Li, Q-F; Liu, H-J; Li, R; Wu, C-T; Wang, L-S

    2008-02-01

    Recovery of the surgically damaged mesothelial cell layer is a major process in reducing postoperative peritoneal adhesions. Sphingosine kinase (SPK) 1 is a signalling molecule involved in the regulation of proliferation and migration of various cell types. This study determined the effect of SPK-1 gene transfer on the recovery of damaged mesothelial cells and on peritoneal adhesion formation after surgery. Rat mesothelial cells were isolated and characterized by their expression of cytokeratin and vimentin. Their migration was determined by scratch wound motility assay. Cellular SPK-1 activity was measured by [gamma-32P]adenosine 5'-triphosphate incorporation. Wistar rats underwent laparotomy with subsequent caecum or uterine horn abrasion. Rats were randomized to either SPK-1 gene (Ad-SPK-1) transfer or control groups. The animals were killed 14 days after operation and peritoneal adhesions were graded. Adenovirus-mediated SPK-1 gene transfer increased the cellular SPK-1 activity of mesothelial cells, leading to enhanced migration. Median adhesion scores were significantly lower in the Ad-SPK-1 group than in controls in both rat caecum (0.98 versus 2.60; P < 0.001) and rat uterine horn (0.28 versus 1.83; P < 0.001) models. Adenovirus-mediated SPK-1 gene transfer promotes recovery of the surgically damaged mesothelial cell layer and prevents postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation. 2007 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The myotonic dystrophy kinase 3{prime}-untranslated region and its effect on gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, C.W.Y.; Sabourin, L.A.; Narang, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease involving the expansion of an unstable CTG repeat in the 3{prime}-untranslated (3{prime}-UTR) region of the DM kinase (DMK) gene. Increased levels of mRNA in congenital compared to normal tissue have been shown, suggesting elevated DMK levels may be responsible for the disease phenotype. To study the effect of the DMK 3{prime}UTR on gene expression, a reporter gene system was constructed using the constitutive CMV promoter with the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) open reading frame and the DMK 3{prime}UTR containing from 5 repeats up to 90 repeats. Transient transfection into a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line shows a three-fold increase in CAT activity from constructs containing a wildtype 3{prime}UTR (5 and 20 repeats) compared to a control construct containing only a poly(A) signal. Reporter constructs with repeats in the protomutation (50 repeats) and mutation (90 repeats) range show a greater than 10-fold increase over control CAT activity. These results suggest the presence of elements in the DMK 3{prime}UTR capable of conferring increased gene expression. We are currently investigating cell-specific activity of the constructs and conducting deletion mapping to identify regulatory elements in the 3{prime}-UTR.

  10. A system for assaying homologous recombination at the endogenous human thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.B.; Little, J.B. ); Potter, H. ); Yandell, D.W. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-08-01

    A system for assaying human interchromosomal recombination in vitro was developed, using a cell line containing two different mutant thymidine kinase genes (TK) on chromosomes 17. Heteroalleles were generated in the TK{sup +/+} parent B-lymphoblast cell line WIL-2 by repeated exposure to the alkylating nitrogen mustard ICR-191, which preferentially causes +1 or {minus}1 frameshifts. Resulting TK{sup {minus}/{minus}} mutants were selected in medium containing the toxic thymidine analog trifluorothymidine. In two lines, heterozygous frameshifts were located in exons 4 and 7 of the TK gene separated by {approx}8 kilobases. These lines undergo spontaneous reversion to TK{sup +} at a frequency of < 10{sup {minus}7}, and revertants can be selected in cytidine/hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium. The nature and location of these heteroallelic mutations make large deletions, rearrangements, nondisjunction, and reduplication unlikely mechanisms for reversion to TK{sup +}. The mode of reversion to TK{sup +} was specifically assessed by DNA sequencing, use of single-strand conformation polymorphisms, and analysis of various restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the TK gene on chromosome 17. The data suggest that a proportion of revertants has undergone recombination and gene conversion at the TK locus, with concomitant loss of frameshifts and allele loss at linked RFLPs. Models are presented for the origin of two recombinants.

  11. Functional expression of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Kit, M

    1981-12-01

    The recombinant plasmid pAGO contains the Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) gene and consists of a 2-kb PvuII fragment of HSV-1 DNA inserted into the PvuII site of pBR322. A deletion mutant of pAGO, designated pMH110, has been isolated which removes the normal HSV-1 TK gene promoter but places the promoter of the pBR322 tetracycline-resistance (tetr) gene only about 400 bp from the translational start codon of the HSV-1 TK polypeptide. In contrast to pAGO, which transforms mouse LM(TK-) cells to TK+ but is only weakly expressed in TK- bacteria, pMH110 not only efficiently transforms LM(TK-) cells to TK+ but also enables TK- Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form colonies on selective plates containing 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd) plus thymidine (dThd) and to exhibit fully restored ability to incorporate [3H]dThd into DNA. The levels of TK activity expressed by bacteria harboring pMH110 were about as high as those expressed by bacteria harboring plasmid pTK3, which contains the wild-type E. coli TK gene. The TK activity expressed in bacteria harboring pMH110 was partially purified and shown to be HSV-1-specific by serological and disc PAGE analyses and by experiments demonstrating that this enzyme phosphorylated [125I]deoxycytidine.

  12. Flatworms have lost the right open reading frame kinase 3 gene during evolution.

    PubMed

    Breugelmans, Bert; Ansell, Brendan R E; Young, Neil D; Amani, Parisa; Stroehlein, Andreas J; Sternberg, Paul W; Jex, Aaron R; Boag, Peter R; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-05-15

    All multicellular organisms studied to date have three right open reading frame kinase genes (designated riok-1, riok-2 and riok-3). Current evidence indicates that riok-1 and riok-2 have essential roles in ribosome biosynthesis, and that the riok-3 gene assists this process. In the present study, we conducted a detailed bioinformatic analysis of the riok gene family in 25 parasitic flatworms (platyhelminths) for which extensive genomic and transcriptomic data sets are available. We found that none of the flatworms studied have a riok-3 gene, which is unprecedented for multicellular organisms. We propose that, unlike in other eukaryotes, the loss of RIOK-3 from flatworms does not result in an evolutionary disadvantage due to the unique biology and physiology of this phylum. We show that the loss of RIOK-3 coincides with a loss of particular proteins associated with essential cellular pathways linked to cell growth and apoptosis. These findings indicate multiple, key regulatory functions of RIOK-3 in other metazoan species. Taking advantage of a known partial crystal structure of human RIOK-1, molecular modelling revealed variability in nucleotide binding sites between flatworm and human RIOK proteins.

  13. Flatworms have lost the right open reading frame kinase 3 gene during evolution

    PubMed Central

    Breugelmans, Bert; Ansell, Brendan R. E.; Young, Neil D.; Amani, Parisa; Stroehlein, Andreas J.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Jex, Aaron R.; Boag, Peter R.; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    All multicellular organisms studied to date have three right open reading frame kinase genes (designated riok-1, riok-2 and riok-3). Current evidence indicates that riok-1 and riok-2 have essential roles in ribosome biosynthesis, and that the riok-3 gene assists this process. In the present study, we conducted a detailed bioinformatic analysis of the riok gene family in 25 parasitic flatworms (platyhelminths) for which extensive genomic and transcriptomic data sets are available. We found that none of the flatworms studied have a riok-3 gene, which is unprecedented for multicellular organisms. We propose that, unlike in other eukaryotes, the loss of RIOK-3 from flatworms does not result in an evolutionary disadvantage due to the unique biology and physiology of this phylum. We show that the loss of RIOK-3 coincides with a loss of particular proteins associated with essential cellular pathways linked to cell growth and apoptosis. These findings indicate multiple, key regulatory functions of RIOK-3 in other metazoan species. Taking advantage of a known partial crystal structure of human RIOK-1, molecular modelling revealed variability in nucleotide binding sites between flatworm and human RIOK proteins. PMID:25976756

  14. Assignment of the protein kinase C delta polypeptide gene (PRKCD) to human chromosome 3 and mouse chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Huppi, K; Siwarski, D; Goodnight, J; Mischak, H

    1994-01-01

    The protein kinase C (pkc) enzymes are a family of serine-threonine protein kinases, each encoded by a distinct and separate gene. The chromosomal locations of human PRKCA, PRKCB, and PRKCG have previously been established. We now report that PRKCD, a novel member of the pkc gene family, maps to human chromosome 3. The chromosomal location of Pkcd has also been determined in the mouse by analysis of recombination frequency in an interspecific panel of backcross mice. We find that the locus encoding pkcd resides proximal to nucleoside phosphorylase (Np-2) and Tcra on mouse chromosome 14 in a region syntenic with human 3p.

  15. EML4-ALK fusion gene and efficacy of an ALK kinase inhibitor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koivunen, Jussi P.; Mermel, Craig; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; Murphy, Carly; Lifshits, Eugene; Holmes, Alison J.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Kim, Jhingook; Chiang, Derek; Thomas, Roman; Lee, Jinseon; Richards, William G.; Sugarbaker, David J.; Ducko, Christopher; Lindeman, Neal; Marcoux, J. Paul; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Lee, Charles; Meyerson, Matthew; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The EML4-ALK fusion gene has been detected in ~7% of Japanese non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). We determined the frequency of EML4-ALK in Caucasian NSCLCs and in NSCLC cell lines. We also determined whether TAE684, a specific ALK kinase inhibitor, would inhibit the growth of EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We screened 305 primary NSCLCs (both US (n=138) and Korean (n=167) patients) and 83 NSCLC cell lines using RT-PCR and by exon array analyses. We evaluated the efficacy of TAE684 against NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Results We detected 4 different variants, including two novel variants, of EML4-ALK using RT-PCR in 8/305 tumors (3%) and in 3/83 (3.6%) NSCLC cell lines. All EML4-ALK containing tumors and cell lines were adenocarcinomas. EML4-ALK was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients who were never or light (< 10 pack years) cigarette smokers compared to current/former smokers (6% vs. 1%; p=0.049). TAE684 inhibited the growth of 1 of 3 (H3122) EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo, inhibited Akt phosphorylation and caused apoptosis. In another EML4-ALK cell line, DFCI032, TAE684 was ineffective due to co-activation of EGFR and ERBB2. The combination of TAE684 and CL-387,785 (EGFR/ERBB2 kinase inhibitor), inhibited growth and Akt phosphorylation and led to apoptosis in the DFCI032 cell line. Conclusions EML4-ALK is found in the minority of NSCLCs. ALK kinase inhibitors alone or in combination may nevertheless be clinically effective treatments for NSCLC patients whose tumors contain EML4-ALK. PMID:18594010

  16. The CarO rhodopsin of the fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is a light-driven proton pump that retards spore germination

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Jorge; Brunk, Michael; Avalos, Javier; Terpitz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsins are membrane-embedded photoreceptors found in all major taxonomic kingdoms using retinal as their chromophore. They play well-known functions in different biological systems, but their roles in fungi remain unknown. The filamentous fungus Fusarium fujikuroi contains two putative rhodopsins, CarO and OpsA. The gene carO is light-regulated, and the predicted polypeptide contains all conserved residues required for proton pumping. We aimed to elucidate the expression and cellular location of the fungal rhodopsin CarO, its presumed proton-pumping activity and the possible effect of such function on F. fujikuroi growth. In electrophysiology experiments we confirmed that CarO is a green-light driven proton pump. Visualization of fluorescent CarO-YFP expressed in F. fujikuroi under control of its native promoter revealed higher accumulation in spores (conidia) produced by light-exposed mycelia. Germination analyses of conidia from carO− mutant and carO+ control strains showed a faster development of light-exposed carO− germlings. In conclusion, CarO is an active proton pump, abundant in light-formed conidia, whose activity slows down early hyphal development under light. Interestingly, CarO-related rhodopsins are typically found in plant-associated fungi, where green light dominates the phyllosphere. Our data provide the first reliable clue on a possible biological role of a fungal rhodopsin. PMID:25589426

  17. The CarO rhodopsin of the fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is a light-driven proton pump that retards spore germination.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, Jorge; Brunk, Michael; Avalos, Javier; Terpitz, Ulrich

    2015-01-15

    Rhodopsins are membrane-embedded photoreceptors found in all major taxonomic kingdoms using retinal as their chromophore. They play well-known functions in different biological systems, but their roles in fungi remain unknown. The filamentous fungus Fusarium fujikuroi contains two putative rhodopsins, CarO and OpsA. The gene carO is light-regulated, and the predicted polypeptide contains all conserved residues required for proton pumping. We aimed to elucidate the expression and cellular location of the fungal rhodopsin CarO, its presumed proton-pumping activity and the possible effect of such function on F. fujikuroi growth. In electrophysiology experiments we confirmed that CarO is a green-light driven proton pump. Visualization of fluorescent CarO-YFP expressed in F. fujikuroi under control of its native promoter revealed higher accumulation in spores (conidia) produced by light-exposed mycelia. Germination analyses of conidia from carO(-) mutant and carO(+) control strains showed a faster development of light-exposed carO(-) germlings. In conclusion, CarO is an active proton pump, abundant in light-formed conidia, whose activity slows down early hyphal development under light. Interestingly, CarO-related rhodopsins are typically found in plant-associated fungi, where green light dominates the phyllosphere. Our data provide the first reliable clue on a possible biological role of a fungal rhodopsin.

  18. Two Cdc2 Kinase Genes with Distinct Functions in Vegetative and Infectious Hyphae in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiquan; Zhang, Shijie; Ma, Jiwen; Dai, Yafeng; Li, Chaohui; Lyu, Xueliang; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle involves a number of protein kinases important for the onset and progression through mitosis, most of which are well characterized in the budding and fission yeasts and conserved in other fungi. However, unlike the model yeast and filamentous fungi that have a single Cdc2 essential for cell cycle progression, the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum contains two CDC2 orthologs. The cdc2A and cdc2B mutants had no obvious defects in growth rate and conidiation but deletion of both of them is lethal, indicating that these two CDC2 orthologs have redundant functions during vegetative growth and asexual reproduction. However, whereas the cdc2B mutant was normal, the cdc2A mutant was significantly reduced in virulence and rarely produced ascospores. Although deletion of CDC2A had no obvious effect on the formation of penetration branches or hyphopodia, the cdc2A mutant was limited in the differentiation and growth of infectious growth in wheat tissues. Therefore, CDC2A plays stage-specific roles in cell cycle regulation during infectious growth and sexual reproduction. Both CDC2A and CDC2B are constitutively expressed but only CDC2A was up-regulated during plant infection and ascosporogenesis. Localization of Cdc2A- GFP to the nucleus but not Cdc2B-GFP was observed in vegetative hyphae, ascospores, and infectious hyphae. Complementation assays with chimeric fusion constructs showed that both the N- and C-terminal regions of Cdc2A are important for its functions in pathogenesis and ascosporogenesis but only the N-terminal region is important for its subcellular localization. Among the Sordariomycetes, only three Fusarium species closely related to F. graminearum have two CDC2 genes. Furthermore, F. graminearum uniquely has two Aurora kinase genes and one additional putative cyclin gene, and its orthologs of CAK1 and other four essential mitotic kinases in the budding yeast are dispensable for viability. Overall, our data indicate that cell cycle

  19. Two Cdc2 Kinase Genes with Distinct Functions in Vegetative and Infectious Hyphae in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Zhang, Shijie; Ma, Jiwen; Dai, Yafeng; Li, Chaohui; Lyu, Xueliang; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle involves a number of protein kinases important for the onset and progression through mitosis, most of which are well characterized in the budding and fission yeasts and conserved in other fungi. However, unlike the model yeast and filamentous fungi that have a single Cdc2 essential for cell cycle progression, the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum contains two CDC2 orthologs. The cdc2A and cdc2B mutants had no obvious defects in growth rate and conidiation but deletion of both of them is lethal, indicating that these two CDC2 orthologs have redundant functions during vegetative growth and asexual reproduction. However, whereas the cdc2B mutant was normal, the cdc2A mutant was significantly reduced in virulence and rarely produced ascospores. Although deletion of CDC2A had no obvious effect on the formation of penetration branches or hyphopodia, the cdc2A mutant was limited in the differentiation and growth of infectious growth in wheat tissues. Therefore, CDC2A plays stage-specific roles in cell cycle regulation during infectious growth and sexual reproduction. Both CDC2A and CDC2B are constitutively expressed but only CDC2A was up-regulated during plant infection and ascosporogenesis. Localization of Cdc2A- GFP to the nucleus but not Cdc2B-GFP was observed in vegetative hyphae, ascospores, and infectious hyphae. Complementation assays with chimeric fusion constructs showed that both the N- and C-terminal regions of Cdc2A are important for its functions in pathogenesis and ascosporogenesis but only the N-terminal region is important for its subcellular localization. Among the Sordariomycetes, only three Fusarium species closely related to F. graminearum have two CDC2 genes. Furthermore, F. graminearum uniquely has two Aurora kinase genes and one additional putative cyclin gene, and its orthologs of CAK1 and other four essential mitotic kinases in the budding yeast are dispensable for viability. Overall, our data indicate that cell cycle

  20. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Pande, A.; Yue, K.T.; Callender, R.; Ebrey, T.G.; Tsuda, M.

    1987-08-11

    The authors report here the resonance Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin. These studies were undertaken in order to make comparisons with the well-studied bovine pigments, so as to understand the similarities and the differences in pigment structure and photochemical processes between vertebrates and invertebrates. The flow method was used to obtain the Raman spectrum of rhodopsin at 13 /sup 0/C. The bathorhodopsin spectrum was obtained by computer subtraction of the spectra containing different photostationary mixtures of rhodopsin, isorhodopsin, hypsorhodopsin, and bathorhodopsin, obtained at 12 K using the pump-probe technique and from measurements at 80 K. Like their bovine counterparts, the Schiff base vibrational mode appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in octopus rhodopsin and the photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin, suggesting a proteonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. Differences between the Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin indicate that the formation of bathorhodopsin is associated with chromophore isomerization. This inference is substantiated by the chromophore chemical extraction data which show that, like the bovine system, octopus rhodopsin is an 11-cis pigment, while the photoproducts contain an all-trans pigment, in agreement with the previous work. The octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin spectra show marked differences from their bovine counterparts in other respects, however. The differences are most dramatic in the structure-sensitive fingerprint and the HOOP regions. Thus, it appears that although the two species differ in the specific nature of the chromophore-protein interactions, the general process of visual transduction is the same.

  1. Proton movement and photointermediate kinetics in rhodopsin mutants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James W; Szundi, Istvan; Kazmi, Manija A; Sakmar, Thomas P; Kliger, David S

    2006-05-02

    The role of ionizable amino acid side chains in the bovine rhodopsin activation mechanism was studied in mutants E134Q, E134R/R135E, H211F, and E122Q. All mutants exhibited bathorhodopsin stability on the 30 ns to 1 micros time scale similar to that of the wild type. Lumirhodopsin decay was also similar to that of the wild type except for the H211F mutant where early decay (20 micros) to a second form of lumirhodopsin was seen, followed by formation of an extremely long-lived Meta I(480) product (34 ms), an intermediate which forms to a much reduced extent, if at all, in dodecyl maltoside suspensions of wild-type rhodopsin. A smaller amount of a similar long-lived Meta I(480) product was seen after photolysis of E122Q, but E134Q and E134R/R135Q displayed kinetics much more similar to those of the wild type under these conditions (i.e., no Meta I(480) product). These results support the idea that specific interaction of His211 and Glu122 plays a significant role in deprotonation of the retinylidene Schiff base and receptor activation. Proton uptake measurements using bromcresol purple showed that E122Q was qualitatively similar to wild-type rhodopsin, with at least one proton being released during lumirhodopsin decay per Meta I(380) intermediate formed, followed by uptake of at least two protons per rhodopsin bleached on a time scale of tens of milliseconds. Different results were obtained for H211F, E134Q, and E134R/R135E, which all released approximately two protons per rhodopsin bleached. These results show that several ionizable groups besides the Schiff base imine are affected by the structural changes involved in rhodopsin activation. At least two proton uptake groups and probably at least one proton release group in addition to the Schiff base are present in rhodopsin.

  2. Molecular variation and evolution of the tyrosine kinase domains of insulin receptor IRa and IRb genes in Cyprinidae.

    PubMed

    Kong, XiangHui; Wang, XuZhen; He, ShunPing

    2011-07-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) gene plays an important role in regulating cell growth, differentiation and development. In the present study, DNA sequences of insulin receptor genes, IRa and IRb, were amplified and sequenced from 37 representative species of the Cyprinidae and from five outgroup species from non-cyprinid Cypriniformes. Based on coding sequences (CDS) of tyrosine kinase regions of IRa and IRb, molecular evolution and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed to better understand the characteristics of IR gene divergence in the family Cyprinidae. IRa and IRb were clustered into one lineage in the gene tree of the IR gene family, reconstructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). IRa and IRb have evolved into distinct genes after IR gene duplication in Cyprinidae. For each gene, molecular evolution analyses showed that there was no significant difference among different groups in the reconstructed maximum parsimony (MP) tree of Cyprinidae; IRa and IRb have been subjected to similar evolutionary pressure among different lineages. Although the amino acid sequences of IRa and IRb tyrosine kinase regions were highly conserved, our analyses showed that there were clear sequence variations between the tyrosine kinase regions of IRa and IRb proteins. This indicates that IRa and IRb proteins might play different roles in the insulin signaling pathway.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of GBM invasion genes identifies effective inhibitors of the LIM kinase-Cofilin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Golbourn, Brian; Bertrand, Kelsey C.; Luck, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Byron, Sara; Zadeh, Gelareh; Croul, Sidney; Berens, Michael; Rutka, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly proliferative and invasive neoplasms where total surgical resection is often impossible and effective local radiation therapy difficult. Consequently, there is a need to develop a greater understanding of the molecular events driving invasion and to identify novel treatment targets. Using microarray analysis comparing normal brain samples and mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we identified over 140 significant genes involved in cell migration and invasion. The cofilin (CFL) pathway, which disassembles actin filaments, was highly up-regulated compared to normal brain. Up-regulation of LIM domain kinase 1 and 2 (LIMK1/2), that phosphorylates and inactivates cofilin, was confirmed in an additional independent data set comparing normal brain to GBM. We identified and utilized two small molecule inhibitors BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I directed against the cofilin regulating kinases, LIMK1 and LIMK2, to target this pathway. Significant decreases in cell viability were observed in glioma cells treated with BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I, while no cytotoxic effects were seen in normal astrocytes that lack LIMK. BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I promoted increased adhesion in GBM cells, and decreased migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that use of LIMK inhibitors may provide a novel way to target the invasive machinery in GBM. PMID:25237832

  4. [Gene expression and activity regulation of two calmodulin binding protein kinases in tobacco seedling].

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Li, Rong-Jun; Liang, Shu-Ping; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2005-06-01

    Two different calmodulin-binding protein kinase cDNAs (NtCBK1/2) have been isolated from tobacco. To understand the CBK protein activity regulation, we compared the activity regulation of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 by pH, Mg(2+) concentration and Na(+) concentration. We found the autophosphorylation of NtCBK1/2 reached the maximum in pH 7.5 and 8 respectively; Mg(2+) and Na(+) shown different effects on the activity of NtCBKs, high and low Mg(2+) concentrations both inhibited the activity of NtCBKs, but Na+ had little effect on the kinase activity. In addition, to obtain further insight about the physiological roles of individual NtCBKs, we detected the expression profiles of CBKs. The results revealed different patterns of expression of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2. Both are largely expressed in leaf and flower; but in stem and root, NtCBK1 gene had stronger expression than NtCBK2. NtCBK2 expression was induced by GA treatment, while NtCBK1 expression remained unchanged under GA treatment. Expression of both NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 increased in response to salt stress, the former to a greater extent, and both expressions did not change under high/low temperature, drought, NAA and ABA treatments.

  5. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ gene mutation predisposes to respiratory infection and airway damage

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Ivan; Vadas, Oscar; Garçon, Fabien; Banham-Hall, Edward; Plagnol, Vincent; Leahy, Timothy R.; Baxendale, Helen; Coulter, Tanya; Curtis, James; Wu, Changxin; Blake-Palmer, Katherine; Perisic, Olga; Smyth, Deborah; Maes, Mailis; Fiddler, Christine; Juss, Jatinder; Cilliers, Deirdre; Markelj, Gašper; Chandra, Anita; Farmer, George; Kielkowska, Anna; Clark, Jonathan; Kracker, Sven; Debré, Marianne; Picard, Capucine; Pellier, Isabelle; Jabado, Nada; Morris, James A.; Barcenas-Morales, Gabriela; Fischer, Alain; Stephens, Len; Hawkins, Phillip; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Abinun, Mario; Clatworthy, Menna; Durandy, Anne; Doffinger, Rainer; Chilvers, Edwin; Cant, Andrew J.; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Williams, Roger L.; Condliffe, Alison; Nejentsev, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations cause primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), which predispose to infections. Here we describe Activated PI3K-δ Syndrome (APDS), a PID associated with a dominant gain-of-function mutation E1021K in the p110δ protein, the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ (PI3Kδ), encoded by the PIK3CD gene. We found E1021K in 17 patients from seven unrelated families, but not among 3,346 healthy subjects. APDS was characterized by recurrent respiratory infections, progressive airway damage, lymphopenia, increased circulating transitional B cells, increased IgM and reduced IgG2 levels in serum and impaired vaccine responses. The E1021K mutation enhanced membrane association and kinase activity of p110δ. Patient-derived lymphocytes had increased levels of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate and phosphorylated AKT protein and were prone to activation-induced cell death. Selective p110δ inhibitors IC87114 and GS-1101 reduced the activity of the mutant enzyme in vitro, suggesting a therapeutic approach for patients with APDS. PMID:24136356

  6. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2005-04-05

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease.

  7. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease. PMID:15784735

  8. HDA18 Affects Cell Fate in Arabidopsis Root Epidermis via Histone Acetylation at Four Kinase Genes[W

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cui; Li, Lin-Chen; Chen, Wen-Qian; Chen, Xian; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Shu-Nong

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of hair (H) and non-hair (N) cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is dependent on positional relationships with underlying cortical cells. We previously found that histone acetylation relays positional information and that a mutant altered in the histone deacetylase gene family member HISTONE DEACETYLASE 18 (HDA18) exhibits altered H and N epidermal cell patterning. Here, we report that HDA18 has in vitro histone deacetylase activity and that both mutation and overexpression of HDA18 led to cells at the N position having H fate. The HDA18 protein physically interacted with histones related to a specific group of kinase genes, which are demonstrated in this study to be components of a positional information relay system. Both down- and upregulation of HDA18 increased transcription of the targeted kinase genes. Interestingly, the acetylation levels of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9), histone 3 lysine 14 (H3K14) and histone 3 lysine 18 (H3K18) at the kinase genes were differentially affected by down- or upregulation of HDA18, which explains why the transcription levels of the four HDA18-target kinase genes increased in all lines with altered HDA18 expression. Our results reveal the surprisingly complex mechanism by which HDA18 affects cellular patterning in Arabidopsis root epidermis. PMID:23362208

  9. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2α phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2α phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2α phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes. PMID:23076791

  10. GCN-2 dependent inhibition of protein synthesis activates osmosensitive gene transcription via WNK and Ste20 kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Strange, Kevin

    2012-12-15

    Increased gpdh-1 transcription is required for accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol and survival of Caenorhabditis elegans during hypertonic stress. Our previous work has shown that regulators of gpdh-1 (rgpd) gene knockdown constitutively activates gpdh-1 expression. Fifty-five rgpd genes play essential roles in translation suggesting that inhibition of protein synthesis is an important signal for regulating osmoprotective gene transcription. We demonstrate here that translation is reduced dramatically by hypertonic stress or knockdown of rgpd genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs). Toxin-induced inhibition of translation also activates gpdh-1 expression. Hypertonicity-induced translation inhibition is mediated by general control nonderepressible (GCN)-2 kinase signaling and eIF-2α phosphoryation. Loss of gcn-1 or gcn-2 function prevents eIF-2α phosphorylation, completely blocks reductions in translation, and inhibits gpdh-1 transcription. gpdh-1 expression is regulated by the highly conserved with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) and Ste20 kinases WNK-1 and GCK-3, which function in the GCN-2 signaling pathway downstream from eIF-2α phosphorylation. Our previous work has shown that hypertonic stress causes rapid and dramatic protein damage in C. elegans and that inhibition of translation reduces this damage. The current studies demonstrate that reduced translation also serves as an essential signal for activation of WNK-1/GCK-3 kinase signaling and subsequent transcription of gpdh-1 and possibly other osmoprotective genes.

  11. The Medicago truncatula Lysine Motif-Receptor-Like Kinase Gene Family Includes NFP and New Nodule-Expressed Genes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysine motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known. PMID:16844829

  12. Modulation of human c-mpl gene expression by thrombopoietin through protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, M; Morikawa, S; Sato, T; Sato, I; Sato, T; Fuse, A

    2003-01-01

    The c-Mpl, thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor specificially controls megakaryocytic growth and differentiation. TPO increased the c-mpl promoter activity determined by a transient expression system using a vector containing the luciferase gene as a reporter in the human megakaryoblastic cell line CMK. The maximal promoter activity of c-mpl was obtained 24 hr after pretreatment with TPO for 3 hr and then declined with time. This increase was completely abolished by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (GF109203, calphostin C and H7). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment led to an increase in c-mpl promoter activity. These results demonstrate that the promoter activity of c-mpl is modulated by transcription through a PKC-dependent pathway.

  13. Overexpression of polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk) increases bioinsecticide production by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Doruk, Tugrul; Avican, Ummehan; Camci, Irem Yalim; Gedik, Sedef Tunca

    2013-05-06

    Polyphosphate (polyP), synthesized by polyP kinase (PPK) using the terminal phosphate of ATP as substrate, performs important functions in every living cell. The present work reports on the relationship between polyP metabolism and bioinsecticide production in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti). The ppk gene of Bti was cloned into vector pHT315 and the effect of its overexpression on endotoxin production was determined. Endotoxin production by the recombinant strain was found to be consistently higher than that by the wild type strain and the strain that carried the empty plasmid. The toxicity of the recombinant mutant strain (LC50 5.8±0.6ngml(-1)) against late 2nd instar Culex quinquefasciatus was about 7.7 times higher than that of Bti (LC50 44.9±7ngml(-1)). To our knowledge this is the first reported study which relates polyP metabolism with bioinsecticide biosynthesis.

  14. Genetic analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans MAP kinase gene mpk-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, M R; Kim, S K

    1998-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans mpk-1 gene encodes a MAP kinase protein that plays an important role in Ras-mediated induction of vulval cell fates. We show that mutations that eliminate mpk-1 activity result in a highly penetrant, vulvaless phenotype. A double mutant containing a gain-of-function mpk-1 mutation and a gain-of-function mek mutation (MEK phosphorylates and activates MPK-1) exhibits a multivulva phenotype. These results suggest that mpk-1 may transduce most or all of the anchor cell signal. Epistasis analysis suggests that mpk-1 acts downstream of mek-2 (encodes a MEK homolog) and upstream of lin-1 (encodes an Ets transcription factor) in the anchor cell signaling pathway. Finally, mpk-1 may act together with let-60 ras in multiple developmental processes, as mpk-1 mutants exhibit nearly the same range of developmental phenotypes as let-60 ras mutants. PMID:9725833

  15. Genetic analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans MAP kinase gene mpk-1.

    PubMed

    Lackner, M R; Kim, S K

    1998-09-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans mpk-1 gene encodes a MAP kinase protein that plays an important role in Ras-mediated induction of vulval cell fates. We show that mutations that eliminate mpk-1 activity result in a highly penetrant, vulvaless phenotype. A double mutant containing a gain-of-function mpk-1 mutation and a gain-of-function mek mutation (MEK phosphorylates and activates MPK-1) exhibits a multivulva phenotype. These results suggest that mpk-1 may transduce most or all of the anchor cell signal. Epistasis analysis suggests that mpk-1 acts downstream of mek-2 (encodes a MEK homolog) and upstream of lin-1 (encodes an Ets transcription factor) in the anchor cell signaling pathway. Finally, mpk-1 may act together with let-60 ras in multiple developmental processes, as mpk-1 mutants exhibit nearly the same range of developmental phenotypes as let-60 ras mutants.

  16. A novel pantothenate kinase gene (PANK2) is defective in Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, B; Westaway, S K; Levinson, B; Johnson, M A; Gitschier, J; Hayflick, S J

    2001-08-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome (HSS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder associated with iron accumulation in the brain. Clinical features include extrapyramidal dysfunction, onset in childhood, and a relentlessly progressive course. Histologic study reveals iron deposits in the basal ganglia. In this respect, HSS may serve as a model for complex neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy, in which pathologic accumulation of iron in the brain is also observed. Thus, understanding the biochemical defect in HSS may provide key insights into the regulation of iron metabolism and its perturbation in this and other neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show that HSS is caused by a defect in a novel pantothenate kinase gene and propose a mechanism for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  17. The Role of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Keratinocyte Fibrogenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Januszyk, Michael; Kwon, Sun Hyung; Wong, Victor W.; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Whittam, Alexander J.; Major, Melanie R.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal skin scarring causes functional impairment, psychological stress, and high socioeconomic cost. Evidence shows that altered mechanotransduction pathways have been linked to both inflammation and fibrosis, and that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a key mediator of these processes. We investigated the importance of keratinocyte FAK at the single cell level in key fibrogenic pathways critical for scar formation. Keratinocytes were isolated from wildtype and keratinocyte-specific FAK-deleted mice, cultured, and sorted into single cells. Keratinocytes were evaluated using a microfluidic-based platform for high-resolution transcriptional analysis. Partitive clustering, gene enrichment analysis, and network modeling were applied to characterize the significance of FAK on regulating keratinocyte subpopulations and fibrogenic pathways important for scar formation. Considerable transcriptional heterogeneity was observed within the keratinocyte populations. FAK-deleted keratinocytes demonstrated increased expression of genes integral to mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix production, including Igtbl, Mmpla, and Col4a1. Transcriptional activities upon FAK deletion were not identical across all single keratinocytes, resulting in higher frequency of a minor subpopulation characterized by a matrix-remodeling profile compared to wildtype keratinocyte population. The importance of keratinocyte FAK signaling gene expression was revealed. A minor subpopulation of keratinocytes characterized by a matrix-modulating profile may be a keratinocyte subset important for mechanotransduction and scar formation. PMID:28880199

  18. Dynamic Regulation of the Adenosine Kinase Gene during Early Postnatal Brain Development and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kiese, Katharina; Jablonski, Janos; Boison, Detlev; Kobow, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous metabolic intermediary and nucleoside adenosine is a “master regulator” in all living systems. Under baseline conditions adenosine kinase (ADK) is the primary enzyme for the metabolic clearance of adenosine. By regulating the availability of adenosine, ADK is a critical upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. ADK protein exists in the two isoforms nuclear ADK-L, and cytoplasmic ADK-S, which are subject to dynamic expression changes during brain development and in response to brain injury; however, gene expression changes of the Adk gene as well as regulatory mechanisms that direct the cell-type and isoform specific expression of ADK have never been investigated. Here we analyzed potential gene regulatory mechanisms that may influence Adk expression including DNA promoter methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor binding. Our data suggest binding of transcription factor SP1 to the Adk promoter influences the regulation of Adk expression. PMID:27812320

  19. The primary structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene for 3-phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Hitzeman, R A; Hagie, F E; Hayflick, J S; Chen, C Y; Seeburg, P H; Derynck, R

    1982-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene for the yeast glycolytic enzyme, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), has been obtained by sequencing part of a 3.1 kbp HindIII fragment obtained from the yeast genome. The structural gene sequence corresponds to a reading frame of 1251 bp coding for 416 amino acids with no intervening DNA sequences. The amino acid sequence is approximately 65 percent homologous with human and horse PGK protein sequences and is in general agreement with the published protein sequence for yeast PGK. As for other highly expressed structural genes in yeast, the coding sequence is highly codon biased with 95 percent of the amino acids coded for by a select 25 codons (out of 61 possible). Besides structural DNA sequence, 291 bp of 5'-flanking sequence and 286 bp of 3'-flanking sequence were determined. Transcription starts 36 nucleotides upstream from the translational start and stops 86-93 nucleotides downstream from the translational stop. These results suggest a non-polyadenylated mRNA length of 1373 to 1380 nucleotides, which is consistent with the observed length of 1500 nucleotides for polyadenylated PGK mRNA. A sequence TATATATAAA is found at 145 nucleotides upstream from the translational start. This sequence resembles the TATAAA box that is possibly associated with RNA polymerase II binding. Images PMID:6296791

  20. T Cell Receptor-Independent Basal Signaling via Erk and Abl Kinases Suppresses RAG Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roose, Jeroen P; Diehn, Maximilian; Tomlinson, Michael G; Lin, Joseph; Alizadeh, Ash A; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O

    2003-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways guided by cellular receptors commonly exhibit low-level constitutive signaling in a continuous, ligand-independent manner. The dynamic equilibrium of positive and negative regulators establishes such a tonic signal. Ligand-independent signaling by the precursors of mature antigen receptors regulates development of B and T lymphocytes. Here we describe a basal signal that controls gene expression profiles in the Jurkat T cell line and mouse thymocytes. Using DNA microarrays and Northern blots to analyze unstimulated cells, we demonstrate that expression of a cluster of genes, including RAG-1 and RAG-2, is repressed by constitutive signals requiring the adapter molecules LAT and SLP-76. This TCR-like pathway results in constitutive low-level activity of Erk and Abl kinases. Inhibition of Abl by the drug STI-571 or inhibition of signaling events upstream of Erk increases RAG-1 expression. Our data suggest that physiologic gene expression programs depend upon tonic activity of signaling pathways independent of receptor ligation. PMID:14624253

  1. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  2. Role of the promoter in the regulation of the thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Travali, S.; Lipson, K.E.; Jaskulski, D.; Lauret, E.; Baserga, R.

    1988-04-01

    To identify the regulatory elements of the human thymidine kinase (TK) gene, the authors established stable cell lines carrying different chimeric constructs of the TK gene. Their results can be summarized as follows. (i) When the TK coding sequence is under the control of the calcyclin promoter (a promoter that is activated when G/sub o/ cells are stimulated by growth factors), TK mRNA levels are higher in G/sub 1/-arrested cells than in proliferating cells: (ii) when the TK coding sequence is under the control of the promoter of heat shock protein HSP70, steady-state levels of TK mRNA are highest after heat shock, regardless of the position of the cells in the cell cycle; (iii) the bacterial CAT gene under the control of the human TK promoter is maximally expressed in the S phase; (iv) the TK cDNA driven by the simian virus 40 promoter is also maximally expressed in the S phase; and (v) TK enzyme activity is always at a maximum in the S phase, even when the levels of TK mRNA are highest in nonproliferating cells. The authors conclude that although the TK coding sequence may also play some role, the TK promoter has an important role in the cell cycle regulation of TK mRNA levels.

  3. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  4. The mouse muscle creatine kinase promoter faithfully drives reporter gene expression in transgenic Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wayland; Neff, Eric S; Furlow, J David

    2004-06-17

    Developing Xenopus laevis experience two periods of muscle differentiation, once during embryogenesis and again at metamorphosis. During metamorphosis, thyroid hormone induces both muscle growth in the limbs and muscle death in the tail. In mammals, the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene is activated during the differentiation from myoblasts to myocytes and has served as both a marker for muscle development and to drive transgene expression in transgenic mice. Transcriptional control elements are generally highly conserved throughout evolution, potentially allowing mouse promoter use in transgenic X. laevis. This paper compares endogenous X. laevis MCK gene expression and the mouse MCK (mMCK) promoter driving a green fluorescent protein reporter in transgenic X. laevis. The mMCK promoter demonstrated strong skeletal muscle-specific transgene expression in both the juvenile tadpole and adult frog. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrate the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in vertebrate muscle gene promoters and illustrate the utility of using X. laevis transgenesis for detailed comparative study of mammalian promoter activity in vivo.

  5. Inhibition by interferon of biochemical transformation induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Kit, S

    1982-10-01

    To learn whether interferon could prevent the biochemical transformations induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase (TK) genes, LM(TK-) mouse fibroblast cultures were pretreated for 24 h with 2.4-40 international units (I.U.)/ml mouse alpha + beta interferon, and subsequently transformed to the TK+ phenotype with recombinant plasmids containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) TK gene (pAGO and pMH110) and the marmoset herpesvirus (MarHV) TK gene (pMAR035). Mouse alpha + beta interferon inhibited transformation and the inhibition was interferon dose-dependent. Transformation was also inhibited when LM(TK-) cells were pretreated for 2-5 h with 40 I.U./ml interferon. Maximal inhibitions of TK+ colony formation were observed following a 9-20 h pretreatment period with interferon. In contrast, 40 I.U./ml interferon treatment for 20 h did not reduce the rate or extent of LM(TK-) cell growth. Experiments in which cultures were first treated with plasmid pAGO and only afterwards treated with interferon also showed that, as the interferon concentration used, interferon did not inhibit the outgrowth of transformated colonies. Enzyme assays showed that pretreatment with interferon inhibited the induction of TK activity in cells that had been transfected with pAGO DNA.

  6. Chromatin structure is required to block transcription of the methylated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Buschhausen, G.; Wittig, B.; Graessmann, M.; Graessmann, A.

    1987-03-01

    Inhibition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene transcription (pHSV-106, pML-BPV-TK4) by DNA methylation is an indirect effect, which occurs with a latency period of approx. 8 hr microinjection of the DNA into TK/sup -/ rat 2 and mouse LTK/sup -/ cells. The authors have strong evidence that chromatin formation is critical for the transition of the injected DNA from methylation insensitivity to methylation sensitivity. Chromatin was reconstituted in vitro by using methylated and mock-methylated HSV TK DNA and purified chicken histone octamers. After microinjection, the methylated chromatin was always biologically inactive, as tested by autoradiography of the cells after incubation with (/sup 3/H)thymidine and by RNA dot blot analysis. However, in transformed cell lines, reactivation of the methylated chromatic occurred after treatment with 5-azacytidine. Furthermore, integration of the TK chromatin into the host genome is not required to block expression of the methylated TK gene. Mouse cells that contained the pML-BPV-TK4 chromatin permanently in an episomal state also did not support TK gene expression as long as the TK DNA remained methylated.

  7. Regulation of floral patterning and organ identity by Arabidopsis ERECTA-family receptor kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Shannon M; Lee, Jin Suk; Shpak, Elena D; Torii, Keiko U

    2013-12-01

    Due to the lack of cell migration, plant organogenesis relies on coordinated cell proliferation, cell growth, and differentiation. A flower possesses a complex structure, with sepals and petals constituting the perianth, and stamens and pistils where male and female gametophytes differentiate. While advances have been made in our understanding of gene regulatory networks controlling flower development, relatively little is known of how cell-cell coordination influences floral organ specification. The Arabidopsis ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases, ER, ER-LIKE1 (ERL1), and ERL2, regulate inflorescence architecture, organ shape, and epidermal stomatal patterning. Here it is reported that ER-family genes together regulate floral meristem organization and floral organ identity. The stem cell marker CLAVATA3 exhibits misplaced expression in the floral meristems of the er erl1 erl2 mutant. Strikingly, homeotic conversion of sepals to carpels was observed in er erl1 erl2 flowers. Consistently, ectopic expression of AGAMOUS, which determines carpel identity, was detected in er erl1 erl2 flower primordia. Among the known downstream components of ER-family receptor kinases in stomatal patterning, YODA (YDA) is also required for proper floral patterning. YDA and the ER-family show complex, synergistic genetic interactions: er erl1 erl2 yda quadruple mutant plants become extremely small, callus-like masses. While a constitutively active YDA fully rescues stomatal clustering in er erl1 erl2, it only partially rescues er erl1 erl2 flower defects. The study suggests that ER-family signalling is crucial for ensuring proper expression domains of floral meristem and floral organ identity determinants, and further implies the existence of a non-canonical downstream pathway.

  8. Atomistic insights into rhodopsin activation from a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Irina G; Best, Robert B; Engel, Stanislav; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Hummer, Gerhard; Costanzi, Stefano

    2008-08-06

    Rhodopsin, the light sensitive receptor responsible for blue-green vision, serves as a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Upon light absorption, it undergoes a series of conformational changes that lead to the active form, metarhodopsin II (META II), initiating a signaling cascade through binding to the G protein transducin (G(t)). Here, we first develop a structural model of META II by applying experimental distance restraints to the structure of lumi-rhodopsin (LUMI), an earlier intermediate. The restraints are imposed by using a combination of biased molecular dynamics simulations and perturbations to an elastic network model. We characterize the motions of the transmembrane helices in the LUMI-to-META II transition and the rearrangement of interhelical hydrogen bonds. We then simulate rhodopsin activation in a dynamic model to study the path leading from LUMI to our META II model for wild-type rhodopsin and a series of mutants. The simulations show a strong correlation between the transition dynamics and the pharmacological phenotypes of the mutants. These results help identify the molecular mechanisms of activation in both wild type and mutant rhodopsin. While static models can provide insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and predict ligand affinity, a dynamic model of activation could be applicable to study the pharmacology of other GPCRs and their ligands, offering a key to predictions of basal activity and ligand efficacy.

  9. Distribution of rhodopsin and retinochrome in the squid retina

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The cephalopod retina contains two kinds of photopigments, rhodopsin and retinochrome. For many years retinochrome has been thought to be localized in the inner segments of the visual cells, whereas rhodopsin is in the outer segments. However, it is now clear that retinochrome can be extracted also from fragments of outer segments. In the dark- adapted retina of Loligo pealei retinochrome is distributed half-and- half in the inner and outer segments. Todarodes pacificus contains much more retinochrome than Loligo, and it is more abundant in the outer than in the inner segments. The outer segments of Loligo contain retinochrome and metarhodopsin in addition to rhodopsin, whether squids are kept in the dark or in the light. But there is extremely little metarhodopsin (about 3% of rhodopsin) even in light-adapted eyes. The inner segments contain only retinochrome, and much less in the light than in the dark. On the other hand, retinochrome in the outer segments increases markedly during light adaptation. These facts suggest the possibility that some retinochrome moves forward from the inner to the outer segments during light adaptation and there reacts with metarhodopsin to promote regeneration of rhodopsin. PMID:6620

  10. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations—F45L, V209M and F220C—yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5. PMID:27694816

  11. Dynamics of the internal water molecules in squid rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Tobias, Douglas J

    2009-04-08

    Understanding the mechanism of G-protein coupled receptors action is of major interest for drug design. The visual rhodopsin is the prototype structure for the family A of G-protein coupled receptors. Upon photoisomerization of the covalently bound retinal chromophore, visual rhodopsins undergo a large-scale conformational change that prepares the receptor for a productive interaction with the G-protein. The mechanism by which the local perturbation of the retinal cis-trans isomerization is transmitted throughout the protein is not well understood. The crystal structure of the visual rhodopsin from squid solved recently suggests that a chain of water molecules extending from the retinal toward the cytoplasmic side of the protein may play a role in the signal transduction from the all-trans retinal geometry to the activated receptor. As a first step toward understanding the role of water in rhodopsin function, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation of squid rhodopsin embedded in a hydrated bilayer of polyunsaturated lipid molecules. The simulation indicates that the water molecules present in the crystal structure participate in favorable interactions with side chains in the interhelical region and form a persistent hydrogen-bond network in connecting Y315 to W274 via D80.

  12. Quantitation of the Effect of Hydroxylamine on Rhodopsin Palmitylation†

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Wesley; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodopsin (the photosensitive rod visual pigment) has been a model for photobiologic studies of the opsins as well as a structural model for G-protein-coupled receptors. The two palmitate groups attached to cysteines 322 and 323 are thought to serve as membrane anchors for the rhodopsin C-terminus, but the absence of the palmitates does not alter membrane localization. However, removal of the palmitates affects rhodopsin function. Therefore, it is important to quantitate the stability of rhodopsin palmitates to hydroxylamine, which is a widely utilized reagent in biochemical preparations of the apoprotein. We have developed a mass spectrometric method to quantitate the resulting opsin palmitylation. Our data show that both of the bovine rhodopsin palmitates are labile to hydroxylamine, with significant depalmitylation occurring at concentrations of ≥100 mM, with an EC50 of 220 mM L−1. The palmitate at position 322 is the more stable to hydroxylamine. Samples prepared in the presence of >50 mM should therefore be considered to be at least partially depalmitylated and the results interpreted accordingly. PMID:18399918

  13. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations--F45L, V209M and F220C--yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5.

  14. Phosphagen kinase in Schistosoma japonicum: characterization of its enzymatic properties and determination of its gene structure.

    PubMed

    Tokuhiro, Shinji; Uda, Kouji; Yano, Hiroko; Nagataki, Mitsuru; Jarilla, Blanca R; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    Phosphagen kinases (PKs) play a major role in the regulation of energy metabolism in animals. Creatine kinase (CK) is the sole PK in vertebrates, whereas several PKs are present in invertebrates. Here, we report the enzymatic properties and gene structure of PK in the trematode Schistosoma japonicum (Sj). SjPK has a unique contiguous dimeric structure comprising domain 1 (D1) and domain 2 (D2). The three states of the recombinant SjPK (D1, D2, and D1D2) show a specific activity for the substrate taurocyamine. The comparison of the two domains of SjPK revealed that D1 had a high turnover rate (kcat=52.91) and D2 exhibited a high affinity for taurocyamine (Km(Tauro) =0.53±0.06). The full-length protein exhibited higher affinity for taurocyamine (Km(Tauro) =0.47±0.03) than the truncated domains (D1=1.30±0.10, D2=0.53±0.06). D1D2 also exhibited higher catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km(Tauro) =82.98) than D1 (40.70) and D2 (29.04). These results demonstrated that both domains of SjTKD1D2 interacted efficiently and remained functional. The three-dimensional structure of SjPKD1 was constructed by the homology modeling based on the transition state analog complex state of Limulus AK. This protein model of SjPKD1 suggests that the overall structure is almost conserve between SjPKD1 and Limulus AK except for the flexible loops, that is, particularly guanidino-specificity (GS) region, which is associated with the recognition of the corresponding guanidino substrate. The constructed NJ tree and the comparison of exon/intron organization suggest that SjTK has evolved from an arginine kinase (AK) gene. SjTK has potential as a novel antihelminthic drug target as it is absent in mammals and its strong activity may imply a significant role for this protein in the energy metabolism of the parasite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-10-03

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process.

  16. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process. PMID:27694882

  17. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  18. Overexpression of the MAP kinase gene OsMAPK33 enhances sensitivity to salt stress in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling cascades are activated by extracellular stimuli such as environmental stresses and pathogens in higher eukaryotic plants. To know more about MAPK signaling in plants, a MAPK cDNA clone, OsMAPK33 was isolated from rice. The gene is mainly induced by ...

  19. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  20. Spectrum of rhodopsin mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Joong; Kim, Cinoo; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Hum; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kimm, Kuchan; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations in patients with mutations. Methods The RHO mutations were screened by direct sequencing, and mutation prevalence was measured in patients and controls. The impact of missense mutations to RP was predicted by segregation analysis, peptide sequence alignment, and in silico analysis. The severity of disease in patients with the missense mutations was compared by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic visual field testing. Results Five heterozygous mutations were identified in six of 302 probands with RP, including a novel mutation (c.893C>A, p.A298D) and four known mutations (c.50C>T, p.T17M; c.533A>G, p.Y178C; c.888G>T, p.K296N; and c.1040C>T, p.P347L). The allele frequency of missense mutations was measured in 114 ethnically matched controls. p.A298D, newly identified in a sporadic patient, had never been found in controls and was predicted to be pathogenic. Among the patients with the missense mutations, we observed the most severe phenotype in patients with p.P347L, less severe phenotypes in patients with p.Y178C or p.A298D, and a relatively moderate phenotype in a patient with p.T17M. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum of RHO mutations in Korean RP patients and clinical features that vary according to mutations. Our findings will be useful for understanding these genetic spectra and the genotype–phenotype correlations and will therefore help with predicting disease prognosis and facilitating the development of gene therapy. PMID:21677794

  1. Diversification of Lrk/Tak kinase gene clusters is associated with subfunctionalization and cultivar-specific transcript accumulation in barley.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pingsha; Wise, Roger P

    2008-08-01

    Lrk (Lr10 receptor-like kinase) and Tak (Triticum aestivum kinase) belong to the receptor-like kinase (RLK) supergene family in higher plants. Three Lrk/Tak gene regions spanning greater than 600 kb were identified via a genome-wide survey of barley gene-rich BAC clones. Two Lrk/Tak gene clusters are positioned on barley chromosome 3 (3H) and another is localized on chromosome 5 (1H), with each Lrk and Tak open reading frame physically positioned in a back-to-back orientation. Thirteen new Lrk/Tak-like fragments were cloned from the two clusters on 3H and the single cluster on 1H, respectively, and compared phylogenetically with other grass Lrk/Tak-like genes, including a 280-kb Lrk/Tak cluster on rice chromosome 1S. Physically clustered Lrk/Tak-like genes always form monophyletic groups; this suggests that the primary mechanism of expansion of the Lrk/Tak RLK super family was by tandem duplication, of which most members were duplicated after speciation of the Poaceae. Cultivar-dependent transcript accumulation of some Lrk/Tak family members on 3H, as revealed via Barley1 GeneChip microarray analysis, is consistent with the hypothesis of subfunctionalization of Lrk/Tak members following tandem duplication.

  2. Interleukin-1 Receptor–Associated Kinase 3 Gene Associates with Susceptibility to Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, María; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Sun, Xiaoguang; Tejera, Paula; Corrales, Almudena; Blanco, Jesús; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Espinosa, Elena; Muriel, Arturo; Blanch, Lluis; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Villar, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is the most common cause of acute lung injury (ALI), leading to organ dysfunction and death in critically ill patients. Previous studies associated variants of interleukin-1 receptor–associated kinase genes (IRAKs) with differential immune responses to pathogens and with outcomes during sepsis, and revealed that increased expression levels of the IRAK3 gene were correlated with poor outcomes during sepsis. Here we explored whether common variants of the IRAK3 gene were associated with susceptibility to, and outcomes of, severe sepsis. After our discovery of polymorphism, we genotyped a subset of seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 336 population-based control subjects and 214 patients with severe sepsis, collected as part of a prospective study of adults from a Spanish network of intensive care units. Whereas IRAK3 SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to severe sepsis, rs10506481 showed a significant association with the development of ALI among patients with sepsis (P = 0.007). The association remained significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons, population stratification, and clinical variables (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.15–5.47; P = 0.021). By imputation, we revealed three additional SNPs independently associated with ALI (P < 0.01). One of these (rs1732887) predicted the disruption of a putative human–mouse conserved transcription factor binding site, and demonstrated functional effects in vitro (P = 0.017). Despite the need for replication in independent studies, our data suggest that common SNPs in the IRAK3 gene may be determinants of sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:21297081

  3. Microbial rhodopsins on leaf surfaces of terrestrial plants

    PubMed Central

    Atamna-Ismaeel, Nof; Finkel, Omri M.; Glaser, Fabian; Sharon, Itai; Schneider, Ron; Post, Anton F.; Spudich, John L.; von Mering, Christian; Vorholt, Julia A.; Iluz, David; Béjà, Oded; Belkin, Shimshon

    2013-01-01

    Summary The above-ground surfaces of terrestrial plants, the phyllosphere, comprise the main interface between the terrestrial biosphere and solar radiation. It is estimated to host up to 1026 microbial cells that may intercept part of the photon flux impinging on the leaves. Based on 454-pyrosequencing-generated metagenome data, we report on the existence of diverse microbial rhodopsins in five distinct phyllospheres from tamarisk (Tamarix nilotica), soybean (Glycine max), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), clover (Trifolium repens) and rice (Oryza sativa). Our findings, for the first time describing microbial rhodopsins from non-aquatic habitats, point towards the potential coexistence of microbial rhodopsin-based phototrophy and plant chlorophyll-based photosynthesis, with the different pigments absorbing non-overlapping fractions of the light spectrum. PMID:21883799

  4. Transmembrane signaling by GPCRs: insight from rhodopsin and opsin structures.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hui-Woog; Park, Jung Hee; Kim, Yong Ju; Ernst, Oliver P

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), also known as seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, are the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. As versatile signaling molecules, they mediate cellular responses to extracellular signals. Diffusible ligands like hormones and neurotransmitters bind to GPCRs to modulate GPCR activity. An extraordinary and highly specialized GPCR is the photoreceptor rhodopsin which contains the chromophore retinal as its covalently bound ligand. For receptor activation the configuration of retinal is altered by photon absorption. To date, rhodopsin is the only GPCR for which crystal structures of inactive, active and ligand-free conformations are known. Although the photochemical activation is unique to rhodopsin, many mechanistic insights from this receptor can be generalized for GPCRs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prospects for herpes-simplex-virus thymidine-kinase and cytokine gene transduction as immunomodulatory gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hassan, W; Sanford, M A; Woo, S L; Chen, S H; Hall, S J

    2000-04-01

    In completed and ongoing clinical trials, adenovirus-mediated (Ad.) expression of herpes-simplex-virus thymidine-kinase (HSV-tk) gene transduction followed by ganciclovir (GCV) therapy has produced limited toxicity and evidence of antitumor activity following injection of the prostate. Furthermore, this system has been shown to direct systemic antitumor activity in several experimental cancer models, including that of prostate cancer, which may serve as the basis for in-situ immunomodulatory gene therapy. In a mouse model of prostate cancer, natural killer (NK) cells have been identified as the mediator of antimetastatic activity following Ad.HSV-tk + GCV, resulting in the combination of Ad.HSV-tk and adenovirus-mediated expression of interleukin 12 (Ad.IL-12) to exploit this cytokine's ability to enhance NK proliferation and cytotoxicity. Combination therapy demonstrated superior local and systemic growth suppression over that obtained with either therapy alone. Importantly, when the metastatic tumor burden was increased to an extent that negated the growth-suppressive activity directed by Ad.HSV-tk + GCV or Ad.IL-12 alone, combination therapy continued to demonstrate significant growth suppression. Examination of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes documented enhanced NK lytic activity following combination therapy. Therefore, it appears that the combination of Ad.HSV-tk and Ad.IL-12 should be validated in a clinical trial for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. The Maize Low-Phytic Acid Mutant lpa2 Is Caused by Mutation in an Inositol Phosphate Kinase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Wu, Yunsheng; Hazebroek, Jan; Meeley, Robert B.; Ertl, David S.

    2003-01-01

    Reduced phytic acid content in seeds is a desired goal for genetic improvement in several crops. Low-phytic acid mutants have been used in genetic breeding, but it is not known what genes are responsible for the low-phytic acid phenotype. Using a reverse genetics approach, we found that the maize (Zea mays) low-phytic acid lpa2 mutant is caused by mutation in an inositol phosphate kinase gene. The maize inositol phosphate kinase (ZmIpk) gene was identified through sequence comparison with human and Arabidopsis Ins(1,3,4)P3 5/6-kinase genes. The purified recombinant ZmIpk protein has kinase activity on several inositol polyphosphates, including Ins(1,3,4)P3, Ins(3,5,6)P3, Ins(3,4,5,6)P4, and Ins(1,2,5,6)P4. The ZmIpk mRNA is expressed in the embryo, the organ where phytic acid accumulates in maize seeds. The ZmIpk Mutator insertion mutants were identified from a Mutator F2 family. In the ZmIpk Mu insertion mutants, seed phytic acid content is reduced approximately 30%, and inorganic phosphate is increased about 3-fold. The mutants also accumulate myo-inositol and inositol phosphates as in the lpa2 mutant. Allelic tests showed that the ZmIpk Mu insertion mutants are allelic to the lpa2. Southern-blot analysis, cloning, and sequencing of the ZmIpk gene from lpa2 revealed that the lpa2-1 allele is caused by the genomic sequence rearrangement in the ZmIpk locus and the lpa2-2 allele has a nucleotide mutation that generated a stop codon in the N-terminal region of the ZmIpk open reading frame. These results provide evidence that ZmIpk is one of the kinases responsible for phytic acid biosynthesis in developing maize seeds. PMID:12586875

  7. Rhodopsin photoactivation dynamics revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchithranga M.d.c.; ...

    2015-01-27

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision under dim light conditions. During rhodopsin photoactivation, the chromophore retinal undergoes cis-trans isomerization, and subsequently dissociates from the protein yielding the opsin apoprotein [1]. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the rhodopsin photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks the individual hydrogen atom motions in the protein molecules, because the neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen is much higher than other atoms [2-4]. We used protein (rhodopsin/opsin) samples with CHAPSmore » detergent hydrated with heavy water. The solvent signal is suppressed due to the heavy water, so that only the signals from proteins and detergents are detected. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by the mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. Our QENS experiments conducted at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate that the protein dynamic behavior increases with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin was longer compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which forms a band around the protein molecule in the micelle. Unlike the protein, the CHAPS detergent manifests localized motions that are the same as in the bulk empty micelles. Furthermore QENS provides unique understanding of the key dynamics involved in the activation of the GPCR involved in the visual process.« less

  8. Rhodopsin photoactivation dynamics revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchithranga M.d.c.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang -Qiang

    2015-01-27

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision under dim light conditions. During rhodopsin photoactivation, the chromophore retinal undergoes cis-trans isomerization, and subsequently dissociates from the protein yielding the opsin apoprotein [1]. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the rhodopsin photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks the individual hydrogen atom motions in the protein molecules, because the neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen is much higher than other atoms [2-4]. We used protein (rhodopsin/opsin) samples with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The solvent signal is suppressed due to the heavy water, so that only the signals from proteins and detergents are detected. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by the mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. Our QENS experiments conducted at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate that the protein dynamic behavior increases with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin was longer compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which forms a band around the protein molecule in the micelle. Unlike the protein, the CHAPS detergent manifests localized motions that are the same as in the bulk empty micelles. Furthermore QENS provides unique understanding of the key dynamics involved in the activation of the GPCR involved in the visual process.

  9. Photoenergetics of octopus rhodopsin. Convergent evolution of biological photon counters?

    PubMed

    Cooper, A; Dixon, S F; Tsuda, M

    1986-01-01

    The enthalpy changes associated with each of the major steps in the photoconversion of octopus rhodopsin have been measured by direct photocalorimetry. Formation of the primary photoproduct (bathorhodopsin) involves energy uptake of about 130 kJ/mol, corresponding to storage of over 50% of the exciting photon energy, and is comparable to the energy storage previously observed in bovine rhodopsin. Subsequent intermediates involve the step-wise dissipation of this energy to give the physiological end-product (acid metarhodopsin) at a level only slightly above the parent rhodopsin. No significant differences in energetics are observed between rhodopsin in microvilli membrane suspensions or detergent dispersions. Use of different buffer systems in the calorimetric experiments shows that conversion of rhodopsin to acid metarhodopsin involves no light-induced protonation change, whereas alkali metarhodopsin photoproduction occurs with the release of one proton per molecule and an additional enthalpy increase of about 50 kJ/mol. Van't Hoff analysis of the effect of temperature on the reversible metarhodopsin equilibrium gives an enthalpy for the acid----alkali transition consistent with this calorimetric result, and the proton release is confirmed by direct observation of light-induced pH changes. Acid-base titration of metarhodopsin yields an apparent pK of 9.5 for this transition, though the pH profile deviates slightly from ideal titration behaviour. We suggest that a high energy primary photoproduct is an obligatory feature of efficient biological photo-detectors, as opposed to photon energy transducers, and that the similarity at this stage between cephalopod and vertebrate rhodopsins represents either convergent evolution at the molecular level or strong conservation of a crucial functional characteristic.

  10. Glycerol Hypersensitivity in a Drosophila Model for Glycerol Kinase Deficiency Is Affected by Mutations in Eye Pigmentation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Patrick J.; Jackson, George R.; Dipple, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol kinase plays a critical role in metabolism by converting glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate in an ATP dependent reaction. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency results in a wide range of phenotypic variability; patients can have severe metabolic and CNS abnormalities, while others possess hyperglycerolemia and glyceroluria with no other apparent phenotype. In an effort to help understand the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic variation, we have created a Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency by RNAi targeting of dGyk (CG18374) and dGK (CG7995). As expected, RNAi flies have reduced glycerol kinase RNA expression, reduced phosphorylation activity and elevated glycerol levels. Further investigation revealed these flies to be hypersensitive to fly food supplemented with glycerol. Due to the hygroscopic nature of glycerol, we predict glycerol hypersensitivity is a result of greater susceptibility to desiccation, suggesting glycerol kinase to play an important role in desiccation resistance in insects. To evaluate a role for genetic modifier loci in determining severity of the glycerol hypersensitivity observed in knockdown flies, we performed a preliminary screen of lethal transposon insertion mutant flies using a glycerol hypersensitive survivorship assay. We demonstrate that this type of screen can identify both enhancer and suppressor genetic loci of glycerol hypersensitivity. Furthermore, we found that the glycerol hypersensitivity phenotype can be enhanced or suppressed by null mutations in eye pigmentation genes. Taken together, our data suggest proteins encoded by eye pigmentation genes play an important role in desiccation resistance and that eye pigmentation genes are strong modifiers of the glycerol hypersensitive phenotype identified in our Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency. PMID:22427807

  11. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Regulates Genes during Proliferation and Differentiation in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jeffery D.; Fulton, Debra L.; Richard, Stephane; Almazan, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is important for oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. However, the precise cellular mechanisms by which p38 regulates OLG differentiation remain largely unknown. To determine whether p38 functions in part through transcriptional events in regulating OLG identity, we performed microarray analysis on differentiating oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) treated with a p38 inhibitor. Consistent with a role in OLG differentiation, pharmacological inhibition of p38 down-regulated the transcription of genes that are involved in myelin biogenesis, transcriptional control and cell cycle. Proliferation assays showed that OLPs treated with the p38 inhibitor retained a proliferative capacity which could be induced upon application of mitogens demonstrating that after two days of p38-inhibition OLGs remained poised to continue mitosis. Together, our results suggest that the p38 pathway regulates gene transcription which can coordinate OLG differentiation. Our microarray dataset will provide a useful resource for future studies investigating the molecular mechanisms by which p38 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. PMID:26714323

  12. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Genome of Acanthamoeba castellanii highlights extensive lateral gene transfer and early evolution of tyrosine kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Amoebozoa constitute one of the primary divisions of eukaryotes, encompassing taxa of both biomedical and evolutionary importance, yet its genomic diversity remains largely unsampled. Here we present an analysis of a whole genome assembly of Acanthamoeba castellanii (Ac) the first representative from a solitary free-living amoebozoan. Results Ac encodes 15,455 compact intron-rich genes, a significant number of which are predicted to have arisen through inter-kingdom lateral gene transfer (LGT). A majority of the LGT candidates have undergone a substantial degree of intronization and Ac appears to have incorporated them into established transcriptional programs. Ac manifests a complex signaling and cell communication repertoire, including a complete tyrosine kinase signaling toolkit and a comparable diversity of predicted extracellular receptors to that found in the facultatively multicellular dictyostelids. An important environmental host of a diverse range of bacteria and viruses, Ac utilizes a diverse repertoire of predicted pattern recognition receptors, many with predicted orthologous functions in the innate immune systems of higher organisms. Conclusions Our analysis highlights the important role of LGT in the biology of Ac and in the diversification of microbial eukaryotes. The early evolution of a key signaling facility implicated in the evolution of metazoan multicellularity strongly argues for its emergence early in the Unikont lineage. Overall, the availability of an Ac genome should aid in deciphering the biology of the Amoebozoa and facilitate functional genomic studies in this important model organism and environmental host. PMID:23375108

  14. Structure and chromosomal localization of the genomic locus encoding the Kiz1 LIM-kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, O.; Burkitt, V.; Webb, G.C.

    1996-08-01

    We have cloned and characterized the mouse gene encoding Kiz1/Limk1, a new member of the zinc-finger LIM family that also has a kinase domain. The gene encompasses 25 kb of the mouse genome, and the organization of its 16 exons does not correlate with its functional domains. The promoter region of Kiz1/Limk1 was identified by cloning a 1.06-kb genomic fragment upstream from the first ATG in a promotorless CAT vector. This construct was demonstrated to drive CAT expression in Jurkat cells. The promoter sequence lacks conventional TATA and CAAT motifs but contains consensus binding sequences for several transcriptional regulators implicated in control of transcription in many different cell types, including Sp1, Ets, and E2A. Analysis of the chromosomal localization of KIZ1/LIMK1 indicates that it lies on human chromosome 17 in the region 17q25 and on mouse Chromosome 5, band G2. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Measuring herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase reporter gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2006-01-01

    The herpes simplex 1 virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene (PRG) or its mutant HSV1-sr39tk are used to investigate intracellular molecular events in cultured cells and for imaging intracellular molecular events and cell trafficking in living subjects. Two in vitro methods are available to assay gene expression of HSV1-tk or HSV1-sr39tk in cells or tissues. One method determines the level of HSV1-TK or HSV1-sr39TK enzyme activity in cell or tissue lysates by measuring the amount of the radiolabeled substrates that have been phosphorylated by these enzymes in a fixed amount of cell lysate protein after a fixed incubation time. The other method, called the 'cell-uptake assay', takes into account the natural uptake and efflux characteristics of the radiolabeled substrate by specific cells, in addition to the level of HSV1-TK or HSV1-sr39TK activity. Both of these assays can be used to validate molecular models in cultured cells, prior to studying them in living research subjects. Each of these assays can be completed in one day.

  16. Adenosine kinase, glutamine synthetase and EAAT2 as gene therapy targets for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Young, D; Fong, D M; Lawlor, P A; Wu, A; Mouravlev, A; McRae, M; Glass, M; Dragunow, M; During, M J

    2014-12-01

    Astrocytes are an attractive cell target for gene therapy, but the validation of new therapeutic candidates is needed. We determined whether adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated overexpression of glutamine synthetase (GS) or excitatory amino-acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), or expression of microRNA targeting adenosine kinase (miR-ADK) in hippocampal astrocytes in the rat brain could modulate susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures and neuronal cell loss. Transgene expression was found predominantly in astrocytes following direct injection of glial-targeting AAV9 vectors by 3 weeks postinjection. ADK expression in miR-ADK vector-injected rats was reduced by 94-96% and was associated with an ~50% reduction in the duration of kainate-induced seizures and greater protection of dentate hilar neurons but not CA3 neurons compared with miR-control vector-injected rats. In contrast, infusion of AAV-GS and EAAT2 vectors did not afford any protection against seizures or neuronal damage as the level of transcriptional activity of the glial fibrillary acidic promoter was too low to drive any significant increase in transgenic GS or EAAT2 relative to the high endogenous levels of these proteins. Our findings support ADK as a prime therapeutic target for gene therapy of temporal lobe epilepsy and suggest that alternative approaches including the use of stronger glial promoters are needed to increase transgenic GS and EAAT2 expression to levels that may be required to affect seizure induction and propagation.

  17. Five histidine kinases perceive osmotic stress and regulate distinct sets of genes in Synechocystis.

    PubMed

    Paithoonrangsarid, Kalyanee; Shoumskaya, Maria A; Kanesaki, Yu; Satoh, Syusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Los, Dmitry A; Zinchenko, Vladislav V; Hayashi, Hidenori; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Suzuki, Iwane; Murata, Norio

    2004-12-17

    Microorganisms respond to hyperosmotic stress via changes in the levels of expression of large numbers of genes. Such responses are essential for acclimation to a new osmotic environment. To identify factors involved in the perception and transduction of signals caused by hyperosmotic stress, we examined the response of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which has proven to be a particularly useful microorganism in similar analyses. We screened knockout libraries of histidine kinases (Hiks) and response regulators (Rres) in Synechocystis by DNA microarray and slot-blot hybridization analyses, and we identified several two-component systems, which we designated Hik-Rre systems, namely, Hik33-Rre31, Hik34-Rre1, and Hik10-Rre3, as well as Hik16-Hik41-Rre17, as the transducers of hyperosmotic stress. We also identified Hik2-Rre1 as a putative additional two-component system. Each individual two-component system regulated the transcription of a specific group of genes that were responsive to hyperosmotic stress.

  18. Adaptation of a retrovirus as a eucaryotic vector transmitting the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tabin, C.J.; Hoffman, J.W.; Goff, S.P.; Weinberg, R.A.

    1982-04-01

    The authors investigated the feasibility of using retroviruses as vectors for transferring DNA sequences into animal cells. The thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus was chosen as a convenient model. The internal BamHI fragments of a DNA clone of Moloney leukemia virus (MLV) were replaced with a purified BamHI DNA segment containing the tk gene. Chimeric genomes were created carrying the tk insert on both orientations relative to the MLV sequence. Each was transfected into TK/sup -/ cells along with MLV helper virus, and TK/sup +/ colonies were obtained by selection in the presence of hypoxanthine, aminopterin, and thymidine (HAT). Virus collected from TK/sup +/-transformed, MLV producer cells passed the TK/sup +/ phenotype to TK/sup -/ cells. Nonproducer cells were isolated, and TK/sup +/ transducing virus was subsequently rescued from them. The chimeric virus showed single-hit kinetics in infections. Virion and cellular RNA and cellular DNA from infected cells were all shown to contain sequences which hybridized to both MLV- and tk-specific probes. The sizes of these sequences were consistent with those predicted for the chimeric virus. In all respects studied, the chimeric MLV-tk virus behaved like known replication-defective retroviruses. These experiments suggest great general applicability of retroviruses as eucaryotic vectors.

  19. Photoreverse Reaction Dynamics of Octopus Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Keiichi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Terazima, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    Photoreverse reactions of octopus rhodopsin (Rh) from acid-metarhodopsin (Acid-Meta), which is the final product of the photoreaction of Rh, to Rh were studied by the time-resolved transient absorption and transient grating methods. The time course of the absorption signal showed a rapid change within 500 ns followed by one phase with a time constant of ∼470 μs, whereas the transient grating signal indicates three phases with time constants of <500 ns, ∼490 μs, and 2.6 ms. The faster two phases indicate the conformational change in the vicinity of the chromophore, and the slowest one represents conformational change far from the chromophore. The absorption spectrum of the first intermediate created just after the laser excitation (<500 ns) is already very similar to the final product, Rh. This behavior is quite different from that of the forward reaction from Rh to Acid-Meta, in which several intermediates with different absorption spectra are involved within 50 ns–500 μs. This result indicates that the conformation around the chromophore is easily adjusted from all-trans to 11-cis forms compared with that from 11-cis to all-trans forms. Furthermore, it was found that the protein energy is quickly relaxed after the excitation. One of the significantly different properties between Rh and Acid-Meta is the diffusion coefficient (D). D is reduced by about half the transformation from Rh to Acid-Meta. This large reduction was interpreted in terms of the helix opening of the Rh structure. PMID:17325000

  20. Photoactivation-induced instability of rhodopsin mutants T4K and T17M in rod outer segments underlies retinal degeneration in X. laevis transgenic models of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Tam, Beatrice M; Noorwez, Syed M; Kaushal, Shalesh; Kono, Masahiro; Moritz, Orson L

    2014-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease involving progressive vision loss, and is often linked to mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Mutations that abolish N-terminal glycosylation of rhodopsin (T4K and T17M) cause sector RP in which the inferior retina preferentially degenerates, possibly due to greater light exposure of this region. Transgenic animal models expressing rhodopsin glycosylation mutants also exhibit light exacerbated retinal degeneration (RD). In this study, we used transgenic Xenopus laevis to investigate the pathogenic mechanism connecting light exposure and RD in photoreceptors expressing T4K or T17M rhodopsin. We demonstrate that increasing the thermal stability of these rhodopsins via a novel disulfide bond resulted in significantly less RD. Furthermore, T4K or T17M rhodopsins that were constitutively inactive (due to lack of the chromophore-binding site or dietary deprivation of the chromophore precursor vitamin A) induced less toxicity. In contrast, variants in the active conformation accumulated in the ER and caused RD even in the absence of light. In vitro, T4K and T17M rhodopsins showed reduced ability to regenerate pigment after light exposure. Finally, although multiple amino acid substitutions of T4 abolished glycosylation at N2 but were not toxic, similar substitutions of T17 were not tolerated, suggesting that the carbohydrate moiety at N15 is critical for cell viability. Our results identify a novel pathogenic mechanism in which the glycosylation-deficient rhodopsins are destabilized by light activation. These results have important implications for proposed RP therapies, such as vitamin A supplementation, which may be ineffective or even detrimental for certain RP genotypes. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413336-13$15.00/0.

  1. Photoactivation-Induced Instability of Rhodopsin Mutants T4K and T17M in Rod Outer Segments Underlies Retinal Degeneration in X. laevis Transgenic Models of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Beatrice M.; Noorwez, Syed M.; Kaushal, Shalesh; Kono, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease involving progressive vision loss, and is often linked to mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Mutations that abolish N-terminal glycosylation of rhodopsin (T4K and T17M) cause sector RP in which the inferior retina preferentially degenerates, possibly due to greater light exposure of this region. Transgenic animal models expressing rhodopsin glycosylation mutants also exhibit light exacerbated retinal degeneration (RD). In this study, we used transgenic Xenopus laevis to investigate the pathogenic mechanism connecting light exposure and RD in photoreceptors expressing T4K or T17M rhodopsin. We demonstrate that increasing the thermal stability of these rhodopsins via a novel disulfide bond resulted in significantly less RD. Furthermore, T4K or T17M rhodopsins that were constitutively inactive (due to lack of the chromophore-binding site or dietary deprivation of the chromophore precursor vitamin A) induced less toxicity. In contrast, variants in the active conformation accumulated in the ER and caused RD even in the absence of light. In vitro, T4K and T17M rhodopsins showed reduced ability to regenerate pigment after light exposure. Finally, although multiple amino acid substitutions of T4 abolished glycosylation at N2 but were not toxic, similar substitutions of T17 were not tolerated, suggesting that the carbohydrate moiety at N15 is critical for cell viability. Our results identify a novel pathogenic mechanism in which the glycosylation-deficient rhodopsins are destabilized by light activation. These results have important implications for proposed RP therapies, such as vitamin A supplementation, which may be ineffective or even detrimental for certain RP genotypes. PMID:25274813

  2. Recent advances in engineering microbial rhodopsins for optogenetics.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, R Scott; Bedbrook, Claire N; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-08-01

    Protein engineering of microbial rhodopsins has been successful in generating variants with improved properties for applications in optogenetics. Members of this membrane protein family can act as both actuators and sensors of neuronal activity. Chimeragenesis, structure-guided mutagenesis, and directed evolution have proven effective strategies for tuning absorption wavelength, altering ion specificity and increasing fluorescence. These approaches facilitate the development of useful optogenetic tools and, in some cases, have yielded insights into rhodopsin structure-function relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  4. Gene control of tyrosine kinase TIE2 and vascular manifestations of infections

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chandra C.; David, Sascha; Zhang, Ruyang; Berghelli, Anthony; Milam, Katelyn; Higgins, Sarah J.; Hunter, Jon; Mukherjee, Aditi; Wei, Yongyue; Tran, Mei; Suber, Freeman; Kobzik, Lester; Kain, Kevin C.; Lu, Shulin; Santel, Ansgar; Yano, Kiichiro; Guha, Prajna; Dumont, Daniel J.; Christiani, David C.; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    Ligands of the endothelial-enriched tunica interna endothelial cell kinase 2 (Tie2) are markedly imbalanced in severe infections associated with vascular leakage, yet regulation of the receptor itself has been understudied in this context. Here, we show that TIE2 gene expression may constitute a novel vascular barrier control mechanism in diverse infections. Tie2 expression declined rapidly in wide-ranging models of leak-associated infections, including anthrax, influenza, malaria, and sepsis. Forced Tie2 suppression sufficed to attenuate barrier function and sensitize endothelium to permeability mediators. Rapid reduction of pulmonary Tie2 in otherwise healthy animals attenuated downstream kinase signaling to the barrier effector vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and induced vascular leakage. Compared with wild-type littermates, mice possessing one allele of Tie2 suffered more severe vascular leakage and higher mortality in two different sepsis models. Common genetic variants that influence TIE2 expression were then sought in the HapMap3 cohort. Remarkably, each of the three strongest predicted cis-acting SNPs in HapMap3 was also associated with the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in an intensive care unit cohort of 1,614 subjects. The haplotype associated with the highest TIE2 expression conferred a 28% reduction in the risk of ARDS independent of other major clinical variables, including disease severity. In contrast, the most common haplotype was associated with both the lowest TIE2 expression and 31% higher ARDS risk. Together, the results implicate common genetic variation at the TIE2 locus as a determinant of vascular leak-related clinical outcomes from common infections, suggesting new tools to identify individuals at unusual risk for deleterious complications of infection. PMID:26884170

  5. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  6. Novel mutation in the PANK2 gene leads to pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Saleheen, Danish; Ali, Tuba; Aly, Zarmeneh; Khealani, Bhojo; Frossard, Philippe M

    2007-10-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration is an autosomal-recessive disorder associated with the accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia. The disease presents with dystonia, rigidity, and gait impairment, leading to restriction of activities and loss of ambulation. The disorder is caused by defective iron metabolism associated with mutations in the PANK2 gene, which codes for the pantothenate kinase enzyme. We report on a mutation screen conducted in two siblings to establish a molecular diagnosis of the disease and a genetic test for the family.

  7. 5' flanking sequence and structure of a gene encoding rat 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Darville, M I; Crepin, K M; Hue, L; Rousseau, G G

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis and degradation of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, a ubiquitous stimulator of glycolysis, are catalyzed by 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (EC 2.7.1.105) and fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.46), respectively. In liver, these two activities belong to separate domains of the same 470-residue polypeptide. Various mRNAs have been described for this bifunctional enzyme, which is controlled by hormonal and metabolic signals. To understand the origin and regulation of these mRNAs, we have characterized rat genomic clones encoding the liver isozyme, which is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and the muscle isozyme, which is not. We describe here a 55-kilobase gene that encodes these isozymes by alternative splicing from two promoters. Each of the putative promoters was sequenced over about 3 kilobases and found to include nucleotide motifs for binding regulatory factors. The two isozymes share the same 13 exons and differ only by the first exon that, in the liver but not in the muscle isozyme, contains the serine phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The gene was assigned to the X chromosome. An analysis of the exon limits of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase in relation to its functional domains and to its similarity with other proteins plus its G + C content at the third codon position suggests that this gene originates from several fusion events. Images PMID:2549541

  8. Sequences contained within the promoter of the human thymidine kinase gene can direct cell-cycle regulation of heterologous fusion genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y K; Wells, S; Lau, Y F; Lee, A S

    1988-01-01

    Recent evidence on the transcriptional regulation of the human thymidine kinase (TK) gene raises the possibility that cell-cycle regulatory sequences may be localized within its promoter. A hybrid gene that combines the TK 5' flanking sequence and the coding region of the bacterial neomycin-resistance gene (neo) has been constructed. Upon transfection into a hamster fibroblast cell line K12, the hybrid gene exhibits cell-cycle-dependent expression. Deletion analysis reveals that the region important for cell-cycle regulation is within -441 to -63 nucleotides from the transcriptional initiation site. This region (-441 to -63) also confers cell-cycle regulation to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) promoter, which is not expressed in a cell-cycle manner. We conclude that the -441 to -63 sequence within the human TK promoter is important for cell-cycle-dependent expression. Images PMID:3413063

  9. Sequences contained within the promoter of the human thymidine kinase gene can direct cell-cycle regulation of heterologous fusion genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongkyu; Wells, S.; Lau, Yunfai Chris; Lee, A.S. )

    1988-08-01

    Recent evidence on the transcriptional regulation of the human thymidine kinase (TK) gene raises the possibility that cell-cycle regulatory sequences may be localized within its promoter. A hybrid gene that combines the TK 5{prime} flanking sequence and the coding region of the bacterial neomycin-resistance gene (neo) has been constructed. Upon transfection into a hamster fibroblast cell line K12, the hybrid gene exhibits cell-cycle-dependent expression. Deletion analysis reveals that the region important for cell-cycle regulation is within {minus}441 to {minus}63 nucleotides from the transcriptional initiation site. This region ({minus}441 to {minus}63) also confers cell-cycle regulation to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) promoter, which is not expressed in a cell-cycle manner. The authors conclude that the {minus}441 to {minus}63 sequence within the human TK promoter is important for cell-cycle-dependent expression.

  10. Genome sequence of the marine flavobacterium Croceitalea dokdonensis DOKDO 023 that contains proton- and sodium-pumping rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Lee, Hyun Gwon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Kim, Jihyun F

    2016-04-01

    Bacteroidetes are considered as efficient degraders of the high-molecular-weight particulate organic matter that is present in the marine environment. Here, we report the first genome sequence of the genus Croceitalea that belongs to Flavobacteriia. Gratifying the reputation, the genome of Croceitalea dokdonensis DOKDO 023 encodes many hydrolytic enzymes for utilizing biopolymers, mainly polysaccharides and proteins. The genome also harbors two genes for microbial rhodopsins, proteorhodopsin and a recently discovered sodium pump. This research provides a genetic basis for better understanding of Croceitalea, as well as insights into the strategies adapted by a rhodopsin-containing photoheterotroph to thrive in the marine environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Photochemistry of Acetabularia rhodopsin II from a marine plant, Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Kikukawa, Takashi; Shimono, Kazumi; Tamogami, Jun; Miyauchi, Seiji; Kim, So Young; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kamo, Naoki

    2011-10-18

    Acetabularia rhodopsins are the first microbial rhodopsins discovered in a marine plant organism, Acetabularia acetabulum. Previously, we expressed Acetabularia rhodopsin II (ARII) by a cell-free system from one of two opsin genes in A. acetabulum cDNA and showed that ARII is a light-driven proton pump [Wada, T., et al. (2011) J. Mol. Biol. 411, 986-998]. In this study, the photochemistry of ARII was examined using the flash-photolysis technique, and data were analyzed using a sequential irreversible model. Five photochemically defined intermediates (P(i)) were sufficient to simulate the data. Noticeably, both P(3) and P(4) contain an equilibrium mixture of M, N, and O. Using a transparent indium tin oxide electrode, the photoinduced proton transfer was measured over a wide pH range. Analysis of the pH-dependent proton transfer allowed estimation of the pK(a) values of some amino acid residues. The estimated values were 2.6, 5.9 (or 6.3), 8.4, 9.3, 10.5, and 11.3. These values were assigned as the pK(a) of Asp81 (Asp85(BR)) in the dark, Asp92 (Asp96(BR)) at N, Glu199 (Glu204(BR)) at M, Glu199 in the dark, an undetermined proton-releasing residue at the release, and the pH to start denaturation, respectively. Following this analysis, the proton transfer of ARII is discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Siderophore production of a periplasmic transport binding protein kinase gene defective mutant of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Calugay, Ronie J; Okamura, Yoshiko; Wahyudi, Aris Tri; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2004-10-22

    A non-magnetic mutant, NMA61, of the magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 was generated by transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in magnetosome synthesis. The genomic region of NMA61 interrupted by a Mini-Tn5 transposon was analyzed. The transposon was inserted in an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a periplasmic transport binding protein kinase gene homologue. Three adjacent ORFs and a promoter were identified upstream, indicating that the sequences comprised an operon. Phenotype characterizations showed that the growth inhibition imposed by the exogenous non-assimilable iron chelator nitrilotriacetate was relieved in wild type but not in NMA61, by the addition of the isolated wild type siderophore. Higher concentration of siderophores accumulated in the culture medium of NMA61 than in wild type. These data suggest that the interrupted periplasmic transport binding protein kinase gene homologue is required for siderophore transport into M. magneticum AMB-1.

  13. Mutations in the Kinase Domain of the HER2/ERBB2 Gene Identified in a Wide Variety of Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wenhsiang; Chen, Wangjuh Sting; Xiao, Nick; Bender, Ryan; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Tan, Zheng; Swensen, Jeffrey; Millis, Sherri Z; Basu, Gargi; Gatalica, Zoran; Press, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    The HER2 (official name ERBB2) gene encodes a membrane receptor in the epidermal growth factor receptor family amplified and overexpressed in adenocarcinoma. Activating mutations also occur in several cancers. We report mutation analyses of the HER2 kinase domain in 7497 histologically diverse cancers. Forty-five genes, including the kinase domain of HER2 with HER2 IHC and dual in situ hybridization, were analyzed in tumors from 7497 patients with cancer, including 850 breast, 770 colorectal, 910 non-small cell lung, 823 uterine or cervical, 1372 ovarian, and 297 pancreatic cancers, as well as 323 melanomas and 2152 other solid tumors. Sixty-nine HER2 kinase domain mutations were identified in tumors from 68 patients (approximately 1% of all cases, ranging from absent in sarcomas to 4% in urothelial cancers), which included previously published activating mutations and 13 novel mutations. Fourteen cases with coexisting HER2 mutation and amplification and/or overexpression were identified. Fifty-two of 68 patients had additional mutations in other analyzed genes, whereas 16 patients (23%) had HER2 mutations identified as the sole driver mutation. HER2 mutations coexisted with HER2 gene amplification and overexpression and with mutations in other functionally important genes. HER2 mutations were identified as the only driver mutation in a significant proportion of solid cancers. Evaluation of anti-HER2 therapies in nonamplified, HER2-mutated cancers is warranted.

  14. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  15. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  16. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene alteration in signet ring cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Alese, Olatunji B; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Sica, Gabriel; Zhang, Guojing; Alexis, Dianne; La Rosa, Francisco G; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Chen, Zhengjia; Rossi, Michael R; Adsay, Nazim V; Khuri, Fadlo R; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2015-03-01

    ALK-EML4 translocation is an established driver aberration in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with reported predilection for cases with signet ring histology. We assessed the presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in signet ring cancers arising in the stomach and colon. Histologically confirmed cases of signet ring adenocarcinoma of the stomach or the colon were identified. The presence of the classic ALK and EML4 fusion gene was initially determined by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed using two previously validated antibodies, ALK1 clone (1:100; DAKO) and 5A4 (Novocastra, Leica Biosystems) along with positive controls of ALK-translocated lung cancer. We employed 42 cases of signet ring carcinoma diagnosed between 2001 and 2011; 25 gastric and 17 colon cancer. Median age 63.3 years; male/female 17/25; race, black 47.5%, white 47.5%, others, 5%; stage I, 21.4%; stage II, 31%; stage III, 26.2%; stage IV, 21.4%. One of 42 cases (2.3%) was positive for ALK translocation by FISH using the standard criteria of at least 15% positive cells for the break-apart signal (50-70 cells enumerated per case). Using a less restrictive cut-off of 10% positive cells, 7 cases (16%) were considered possibly positive. None of the 'possibly positive' cases was found to harbor ALK translocation by another molecular testing approach (IHC). IHC with two previously validated monoclonal antibodies showed 0 of 42 (0%) cases positive. ALK gene rearrangement is very rare in gastrointestinal cancers and enrichment strategy focusing on signet ring cell histology did not significantly improve the detection rate.

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  18. The Bilayer Enhances Rhodopsin Kinetic Stability in Bovine Rod Outer Segment Disk Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Scott C.; Sprangers, Peter; Albert, Arlene D.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a kinetically stable protein constituting >90% of rod outer segment disk membrane protein. To investigate the bilayer contribution to rhodopsin kinetic stability, disk membranes were systematically disrupted by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. Rhodopsin kinetic stability was examined under subsolubilizing (rhodopsin in a bilayer environment perturbed by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside) and under fully solubilizing conditions (rhodopsin in a micelle with cosolubilized phospholipids). As determined by DSC, rhodopsin exhibited a scan-rate-dependent irreversible endothermic transition at all stages of solubilization. The transition temperature (Tm) decreased in the subsolubilizing stage. However, once the rhodopsin was in a micelle environment there was little change of the Tm as the phospholipid/rhodopsin ratio in the mixed micelles decreased during the fully solubilized stage. Rhodopsin thermal denaturation is consistent with the two-state irreversible model at all stages of solubilization. The activation energy of denaturation (Eact) was calculated from the scan rate dependence of the Tm and from the rate of rhodopsin thermal bleaching at all stages of solubilization. The Eact as determined by both techniques decreased in the subsolubilizing stage, but remained constant once fully solubilized. These results indicate the bilayer structure increases the Eact to rhodopsin denaturation. PMID:21689528

  19. Robust Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Rhodopsin Precedes Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Kroeger, Heike; Sakami, Sanae; Messah, Carissa; Yasumura, Douglas; Matthes, Michael T.; Coppinger, Judith A.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; LaVail, Matthew M.; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor essential for vision and rod photoreceptor viability. Disease-associated rhodopsin mutations, such as P23H rhodopsin, cause rhodopsin protein misfolding and trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, activating the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The pathophysiologic effects of ER stress and UPR activation on photoreceptors are unclear. Here, by examining a P23H rhodopsin knock-in mouse, we found that the UPR IRE1 signaling pathway is strongly activated in misfolded rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors. IRE1 significantly upregulated ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD), triggering pronounced P23H rhodopsin degradation. Rhodopsin protein loss occurred as soon as photoreceptors developed, preceding photoreceptor cell death. By contrast, IRE1 activation did not affect JNK signaling or rhodopsin mRNA levels. Interestingly, pro-apoptotic signaling from the PERK UPR pathway was also not induced. Our findings reveal that an early and significant pathophysiologic effect of ER stress in photoreceptors is the highly efficient elimination of misfolded rhodopsin protein. We propose that early disruption of rhodopsin protein homeostasis in photoreceptors could contribute to retinal degeneration. PMID:25270370

  20. Identification, purification, and characterization of GRK5, a member of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    PubMed

    Premont, R T; Koch, W J; Inglese, J; Lefkowitz, R J

    1994-03-04

    A novel member of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), named GRK5, has been cloned from bovine taste epithelium. The cDNA sequence predicts a 590-amino acid protein with high overall similarity to rhodopsin kinase. GRK5 mRNA is found most abundantly in lung, heart, retina, and lingual epithelium, but is expressed very little in brain, liver, kidney, or testis. GRK5 expressed in Sf9 cells was purified to apparent homogeneity. GRK5 major autophosphorylation sites were mapped to Ser484 and Thr485. Purified GRK5 phosphorylates rhodopsin in a light-dependent manner and beta 2-adrenergic receptor in an agonist-dependent manner and phosphorylates the C-terminal tail regions of both receptor proteins. GRK5 possesses neither a CAAX motif specifying protein prenylation like rhodopsin kinase nor similarity to the G protein beta gamma-subunit binding domain of beta-adrenergic receptor kinases. GRK5 phosphorylation of rhodopsin or beta 2-adrenergic receptor is not stimulated by G protein beta gamma-subunits. The GRK5 protein does not undergo agonist-dependent translocation from cytosol to membranes as do beta-adrenergic receptor kinase and rhodopsin kinase, but rather appears to associate with membranes constitutively. GRK5 thus appears functionally similar to other characterized GRKs, but has distinct regulatory properties which may be important for its cellular function.

  1. Nuclear Gene 33/Mig6 regulates the DNA damage response through an ATM serine/threonine kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Cen; Park, Soyoung; Zhang, Xiaowen; Eisenberg, Leonard M; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Xu, Dazhong

    2017-10-06

    Gene 33 (Mig6, ERRFI1) is an adaptor protein with multiple cellular functions. We recently linked Gene 33 to the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that ectopic expression of Gene 33 triggers DDR in an ATM serine/threonine kinase (ATM)-dependent fashion and through pathways dependent or not dependent on ABL proto-oncogene 1 non-receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Abl). We observed the clear presence of Gene 33 in the nucleus and chromatin fractions of the cell. We also found that the nuclear localization of Gene 33 is regulated by its 14-3-3-binding domain and that the chromatin localization of Gene 33 is partially dependent on its ErbB-binding domain. Our data further indicated that Gene 33 may regulate the targeting of c-Abl to chromatin. Moreover, we observed a clear association of Gene 33 with histone H2AX and that ectopic expression of Gene 33 promotes the interaction between ATM and histone H2AX without triggering DNA damage. In summary, our results reveal nuclear functions of Gene 33 that regulate DDR. The nuclear localization of Gene 33 also provides a spatial explanation of the previously reported regulation of apoptosis by Gene 33 via the c-Abl/p73 pathway. On the basis of these findings and our previous studies, we propose that Gene 33 is a proximal regulator of DDR that promotes DNA repair. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Nitric oxide regulation of gene transcription via soluble guanylate cyclase and type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Idriss, S D; Gudi, T; Casteel, D E; Kharitonov, V G; Pilz, R B; Boss, G R

    1999-04-02

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates the expression of multiple genes but in most cases its precise mechanism of action is unclear. We used baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which have very low soluble guanylate cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase) activity, and CS-54 arterial smooth muscle cells, which express these two enzymes, to study NO regulation of the human fos promoter. The NO-releasing agent Deta-NONOate (ethanamine-2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazone)bis-) had no effect on a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene under control of the fos promoter in BHK cells transfected with an empty vector or in cells transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector. In BHK cells transfected with expression vectors for guanylate cyclase, Deta-NONOate markedly increased the intracellular cGMP concentration and caused a small (2-fold) increase in CAT activity; the increased CAT activity appeared to be from cGMP activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In BHK cells co-transfected with guanylate cyclase and G-kinase expression vectors, CAT activity was increased 5-fold in the absence of Deta-NONOate and 7-fold in the presence of Deta-NONOate. Stimulation of CAT activity in the absence of Deta-NONOate appeared to be largely from endogenous NO since we found that: (i) BHK cells produced high amounts of NO; (ii) CAT activity was partially inhibited by a NO synthase inhibitor; and (iii) the inhibition by the NO synthase inhibitor was reversed by exogenous NO. In CS-54 cells, we found that NO increased fos promoter activity and that the increase was prevented by a guanylate cyclase inhibitor. In summary, we found that NO activates the fos promoter by a guanylate cyclase- and G-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  3. Direct and indirect effects of RNA interference against pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase genes in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Yao, LiLi; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B6 comprises six interconvertible pyridine compounds (vitamers), among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a coenzyme involved in a high diversity of biochemical reactions. Humans and animals obtain B6 vitamers from diet, and synthesize pyridoxal 5'-phosphate by pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase. Currently, little is known on how pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is supplied to meet their requirement in terms of cofactor. Bombyx mori is a large silk-secreting insect, in which protein metabolism is most active, and the vitamin B6 demand is high. In this study, we successfully down-regulated the gene expression of pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase by body cavity injection of synthesized double-stranded small interfering RNA to 5th instar larvae of Bombyx mori, and analyzed the gene transcription levels of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymes, phosphoserine aminotransferase and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase. Results show that the gene expression of pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase has a greater impact on the gene transcription of enzymes using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor in Bombyx mori. Our study suggests that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis and dynamic balance may be regulated by genetic networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-wide identification, characterisation and expression profiles of calcium-dependent protein kinase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Fedorowicz-Strońska, Olga; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Krajewski, Paweł; Sadowski, Jan

    2017-02-01

    In plant cells, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are important sensors of Ca(2+) flux resulting from various environmental stresses like cold, drought or salt stress. Previous genome sequence analysis and comparative studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) defined a multi-gene family of CDPKs. Here, we identified and characterised the CDPK gene complement of the model plant, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Comparative analysis encompassed phylogeny reconstruction based on newly available barley genome sequence, as well as established model genomes (e.g. O. sativa, A. thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon). Functional gene copies possessed characteristic CDPK domain architecture, including a serine/threonine kinase domain and four regulatory EF-hand motifs. In silico verification was followed by measurements of transcript abundance via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The relative expression of CDPK genes was determined in the vegetative growth stage under intensifying drought stress conditions. The majority of barley CDPK genes showed distinct changes in patterns of expression during exposure to stress. Our study constitutes evidence for involvement of the barley CDPK gene complement in signal transduction pathways relating to adaptation to drought. Our bioinformatics and transcriptomic analyses will provide an important foundation for further functional dissection of the barley CDPK gene family.

  5. Transmembrane channel formation in rhodopsin-containing bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Montal, M; Darszon, A; Trissl, H W

    1977-05-19

    Rhodopsin has been incorporated into planar lipid bilayer membranes. The effect of light is to increase the bilayer permeability in a pattern consistent with the formation of a transmembrane channel of about 10 A diameter. A model of visual excitation based on a light-activated and voltage-sensitive channel is presented.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Thermally Stable Rhodopsin Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Standfuss, Jörg; Xie, Guifu; Edwards, Patricia C.; Burghammer, Manfred; Oprian, Daniel D.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.

    2007-01-01

    We determined the structure of the rhodopsin mutant N2C/D282C expressed in mammalian cells; the first structure of a recombinantly produced G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The mutant was designed to form a disulfide bond between the N-terminus and loop E3 which allows handling of opsin in detergent solution and increases thermal stability of rhodopsin by 10°C. It furthermore allowed us to crystallize a fully deglycosylated rhodopsin (N2C/N15D/D282C). N15 mutations are normally misfolding and cause retinitis pigmentosa in humans. Microcrystallographic techniques and a 5μm x-ray beam were used to collect data along a single needle measuring 5x5x90μm3. The disulfide introduces only minor changes but fixes the N-terminal cap over the β-sheet lid covering the ligand binding site, a likely explanation for the increased stability. This work allows structural investigation of rhodopsin mutants and shows the problems encountered during structure determination of GPCRs and other mammalian membrane proteins. PMID:17825322

  7. H+ -pumping rhodopsin from the marine alga Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Satoshi P; Ewers, David; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Moroni, Anna; Gradmann, Dietrich; Hegemann, Peter

    2006-08-15

    An opsin-encoding cDNA was cloned from the marine alga Acetabularia acetabulum. The cDNA was expressed in Xenopus oocytes into functional Acetabularia rhodopsin (AR) mediating H+ carried outward photocurrents of up to 1.2 microA with an action spectrum maximum at 518 nm (AR518). AR is the first ion-pumping rhodopsin found in a plant organism. Steady-state photocurrents of AR are always positive and rise sigmoidally from negative to positive transmembrane voltages. Numerous kinetic details (amplitudes and time constants), including voltage-dependent recovery of the dark state after light-off, are documented with respect to their sensitivities to light, internal and external pH, and the transmembrane voltage. The results are analyzed by enzyme kinetic formalisms using a simplified version of the known photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Blue-light causes a shunt of the photocycle under H+ reuptake from the extracellular side. Similarities and differences of AR with BR are pointed out. This detailed electrophysiological characterization highlights voltage dependencies in catalytic membrane processes of this eukaryotic, H+ -pumping rhodopsin and of microbial-type rhodopsins in general.

  8. Rhodopsin mutants that bind but fail to activate transducin

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, R.R.; Sakmar, T.P.; Khorana, H.G. ); Koenig, B.; Hofmann, K.P. )

    1990-10-05

    Rhodopsin is a member of a family of receptors that contain seven transmembrane helices and are coupled to G proteins. The nature of the interactions between rhodopsin mutants and the G protein, transducin (G{sub t}), was investigated by flash photolysis in order to monitor directly G{sub t} binding and dissociation. Three mutant opsins with alterations in their cytoplasmic loops bound 11-cis-retinal to yield pigments with native rhodopsin absorption spectra, but they failed to stimulate the guanosine triphosphatase activity of G{sub t}. The opsin mutations included reversal of a charged pair conserved in all G protein-coupled receptors at the cytoplasmic border to the third transmembrane helix (mutant CD1), replacement of 13 amino acids in the second cytoplasmic loop (mutant CD2), and deletion of 13 amino acids from the third cytoplasmic loop (mutant EF1). Whereas mutant CD1 failed to bind G{sub t}, mutants CD2 and EF1 showed normal G{sub t} binding but failed to release G{sub t} in the presence of guanosine triphosphate. Therefore, it appears that at least the second and third cytoplasmic loops of rhodopsin are required for activation of bound G{sub t}.

  9. The HPr(Ser) Kinase of Streptococcus salivarius: Purification, Properties, and Cloning of the hprK Gene

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    1999-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, HPr, a protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system, is phosphorylated on a serine residue at position 46 by an ATP-dependent protein kinase. The HPr(Ser) kinase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 was purified, and the encoding gene (hprK) was cloned by using a nucleotide probe designed from the N-terminal amino acid sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence of the S. salivarius enzyme showed 45% identity with the Bacillus subtilis enzyme, the conserved residues being located mainly in the C-terminal half of the protein. The predicted hprK gene product has a molecular mass of 34,440 Da and a pI of 5.6. These values agree well with those found experimentally by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, molecular sieve chromatography in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride, and chromatofocusing using the purified protein. The native protein migrates on a Superdex 200 HR column as a 330,000-Da protein, suggesting that the HPr(Ser) kinase is a decamer. The enzyme requires Mg2+ for activity and functions optimally at pH 7.5. Unlike the enzyme from other gram-positive bacteria, the HPr(Ser) kinase from S. salivarius is not stimulated by FDP or other glycolytic intermediates. The enzyme is inhibited by inorganic phosphate, and its Kms for HPr and ATP are 31 μM and 1 mM, respectively. PMID:9922231

  10. Gammaherpesvirus gene expression and DNA synthesis are facilitated by viral protein kinase and histone variant H2AX.

    PubMed

    Mounce, Bryan C; Tsan, Fei Chin; Droit, Lindsay; Kohler, Sarah; Reitsma, Justin M; Cirillo, Lisa A; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2011-11-25

    Gammaherpesvirus protein kinases are an attractive therapeutic target as they support lytic replication and latency. Via an unknown mechanism these kinases enhance expression of select viral genes and DNA synthesis. Importantly, the kinase phenotypes have not been examined in primary cell types. Mouse gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV68) protein kinase orf36 activates the DNA damage response (DDR) and facilitates lytic replication in primary macrophages. Significantly, H2AX, a DDR component and putative orf36 substrate, enhances MHV68 replication. Here we report that orf36 facilitated expression of RTA, an immediate early MHV68 gene, and DNA synthesis during de novo infection of primary macrophages. H2AX expression supported efficient RTA transcription and phosphorylated H2AX associated with RTA promoter. Furthermore, viral DNA synthesis was attenuated in H2AX-deficient macrophages, suggesting that the DDR system was exploited throughout the replication cycle. The interactions between a cancer-associated gammaherpesvirus and host tumor suppressor system have important implications for the pathogenesis of gammaherpesvirus infection.

  11. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis.

  12. Zonal induction of mixed lineage kinase ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression in regenerating mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Douziech, M; Grondin, G; Loranger, A; Marceau, N; Blouin, R

    1998-08-28

    ZPK/DLK/MUK is a serine/theronine kinase believed to be involved in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. To further explore the suggested participation of ZPK/DLK/MUK in this process, we examined the expression and cellular localization of ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNA in regenerating mouse liver following partial hepatectomy by ribonuclease protection assay and in situ hybridization. The steady-state level of APK/DLKMUK mRNA was very low in normal and sham-operated mouse livers, whereas a marked and transient increase was observed in the regenerating liver. While ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNAs were rarely detected in hepatocytes from all zones of the normal liver, hepatocytes of regenerating liver exhibit a gradient of expression ranging from low in the periportal zone, to intermediate in the mid-zone, to high in the pericentral zone. These findings demonstrate a transient stimulation of ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression that correlates with the growth response of hepatocyte subpopulations in regenerating liver.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling controls basal and oncostatin M-mediated JUNB gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Mellissa J; Hu, Qiuping; Macrae, Erin; DeWille, James

    2015-05-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is aberrantly activated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Activation of MAPK signaling is associated with the increased expression of a wide range of genes that promote cell survival, proliferation, and migration. This report investigated the influence of MAPK signaling on the regulation and expression of JUNB in human breast cancer cell lines. JUNB has been associated with tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions, with most reports describing JUNB as an oncogene in breast cancer. Our results indicated that JUNB expression is elevated in MCF10A(met), SKBR3, and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines compared to nontransformed MCF10A mammary epithelial cells. Increased RAS/MAPK signaling in MCF10A(met) cells correlates with the increased association of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) phosphorylated on serine 5 (Pol IIser5p) with the JUNB proximal promoter. Pol IIser5p is the "transcription initiating" form of Pol II. Treatment with U0126, a MAPK pathway inhibitor, reduces Pol IIser5p association with the JUNB proximal promoter and reduces JUNB expression. Oncostatin M (OSM) enhances MAPK and STAT3 signaling and significantly induces JUNB expression. U0126 treatment reduces OSM-induced Pol IIser5p binding to the JUNB proximal promoter and JUNB expression, but does not reduce pSTAT3 levels or the association of pSTAT3 with the JUNB proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway plays a primary role in the control of JUNB gene expression by promoting the association of Pol IIser5p with the JUNB proximal promoter.

  14. Salt-inducible kinase 3, SIK3, is a new gene associated with hearing

    PubMed Central

    Wolber, Lisa E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Buniello, Annalisa; Vuckovic, Dragana; Pirastu, Nicola; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Ciullo, Marina; Mangino, Massimo; Steves, Claire; Concas, Maria Pina; Cocca, Massilimiliano; Spector, Tim D.; Gasparini, Paolo; Steel, Karen P.; Williams, Frances M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing function is known to be heritable, but few significant and reproducible associations of genetic variants have been identified to date in the adult population. In this study, genome-wide association results of hearing function from the G-EAR consortium and TwinsUK were used for meta-analysis. Hearing ability in eight population samples of Northern and Southern European ancestry (n = 4591) and the Silk Road (n = 348) was measured using pure-tone audiometry and summarized using principal component (PC) analysis. Genome-wide association analyses for PC1–3 were conducted separately in each sample assuming an additive model adjusted for age, sex and relatedness of subjects. Meta-analysis was performed using 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tested against each of the three PCs of hearing ability in 4939 individuals. A single SNP lying in intron 6 of the salt-inducible kinase 3 (SIK3) gene was found to be associated with hearing PC2 (P = 3.7×10−8) and further supported by whole-genome sequence in a subset. To determine the relevance of this gene in the ear, expression of the Sik3 protein was studied in mouse cochlea of different ages. Sik3 was expressed in murine hair cells during early development and in cells of the spiral ganglion during early development and adulthood. Our results suggest a developmental role of Sik3 in hearing and may be required for the maintenance of adult auditory function. PMID:25060954

  15. Cell-cycle-specific interaction of nuclear DNA-binding proteins with a CCAAT sequence from the human thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, G B; Gudas, J M; Pardee, A B

    1987-01-01

    Induction of thymidine kinase parallels the onset of DNA synthesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the thymidine kinase gene, we have examined whether specific nuclear factors interact in a cell-cycle-dependent manner with sequences upstream of this gene. Two inverted CCAAT boxes near the transcriptional initiation sites were observed to form complexes with nuclear DNA-binding proteins. The nature of the complexes changes dramatically as the cells approach DNA synthesis and correlates well with the previously reported transcriptional increase of the thymidine kinase gene. Images PMID:3479796

  16. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase (Erk1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) and tristetraprolin (TTP) comprehensively regulate injury-induced immediate early gene (IEG) response in in vitro liver organ culture.

    PubMed

    Tran, Doan Duy Hai; Koch, Alexandra; Saran, Shashank; Armbrecht, Marcel; Ewald, Florian; Koch, Martina; Wahlicht, Tom; Wirth, Dagmar; Braun, Armin; Nashan, Björn; Gaestel, Matthias; Tamura, Teruko

    2016-05-01

    Differentiated hepatocytes are long-lived and normally do not undergo cell division, however they have the unique capacity to autonomously decide their replication fate after liver injury. In this context, the key players of liver regeneration immediately after injury have not been adequately studied. Using an in vitro liver culture system, we show that after liver injury, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 were activated within 15 min and continued to be phosphorylated for more than 2h. Both p38MAPK and Erk1/2 were activated at the edge of the cut as well as on the liver surface where the mesothelial cell sheet expresses several cytokines. Notably, in human liver Erk1/2 was also activated under the mesothelial cell sheet shortly after liver resections. Furthermore, in in vitro liver slice culture immediate early genes (IEGs) were upregulated within 1-2 h and the S phase marker proliferation-cell-nuclear-antigen (PCNA) appeared 24 h after injury. Although Erk1/2 was activated after injury, in MK2 depleted liver a set of IEGs, such as Dusp1, Cox2, or c-Myc and proliferation marker gene Ki67 were not induced. In addition, in immortalized hepatocyte cells, THLE-2, the same subset of genes was upregulated upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. The protein level of tristetraprolin (TTP), a substrate for MK2 that plays a role in mRNA degradation, was increased in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. In this context, the depletion of TTP gene rescued Dusp1, Cox2, or c-Myc upregulation in the presence of MK2 inhibitor. These data imply that MK2 pathway is positively involved in Erk1/2 induced IEG response after liver injury. These data also suggest that in vitro liver culture may be a useful tool for measuring the proliferation potential of hepatocytes in individual liver.

  17. Accelerated Evolution of PAK3- and PIM1-like Kinase Gene Families in the Zebra Finch, Taeniopygia guttata

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lesheng; Lovell, Peter V.; Heger, Andreas; Mello, Claudio V.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoding protein kinases tend to evolve slowly over evolutionary time, and only rarely do they appear as recent duplications in sequenced vertebrate genomes. Consequently, it was a surprise to find two families of kinase genes that have greatly and recently expanded in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) lineage. In contrast to other amniotic genomes (including chicken) that harbor only single copies of p21-activated serine/threonine kinase 3 (PAK3) and proviral integration site 1 (PIM1) genes, the zebra finch genome appeared at first to additionally contain 67 PAK3-like (PAK3L) and 51 PIM1-like (PIM1L) protein kinase genes. An exhaustive analysis of these gene models, however, revealed most to be incomplete, owing to the absence of terminal exons. After reprediction, 31 PAK3L genes and 10 PIM1L genes remain, and all but three are predicted, from the retention of functional sites and open reading frames, to be enzymatically active. PAK3L, but not PIM1L, gene sequences show evidence of recurrent episodes of positive selection, concentrated within structures spatially adjacent to N- and C-terminal protein regions that have been discarded from zebra finch PAK3L genes. At least seven zebra finch PAK3L genes were observed to be expressed in testis, whereas two sequences were found transcribed in the brain, one broadly including the song nuclei and the other in the ventricular zone and in cells resembling Bergmann's glia in the cerebellar Purkinje cell layer. Two PIM1L sequences were also observed to be expressed with broad distributions in the zebra finch brain, one in both the ventricular zone and the cerebellum and apparently associated with glial cells and the other showing neuronal cell expression and marked enrichment in midbrain/thalamic nuclei. These expression patterns do not correlate with zebra finch-specific features such as vocal learning. Nevertheless, our results show how ancient and conserved intracellular signaling molecules can be co

  18. Functional analysis of duplicated Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SymRK) genes during nodulation and mycorrhizal infection in soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Indrasumunar, Arief; Wilde, Julia; Hayashi, Satomi; Li, Dongxue; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2015-03-15

    Association between legumes and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurs. The early stages of this association involve a complex of signalling events between the host and microsymbiont. Several genes dealing with early signal transduction have been cloned, and one of them encodes the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase (SymRK; also termed NORK). The Symbiosis Receptor Kinase gene is required by legumes to establish a root endosymbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria as well as mycorrhizal fungi. Using degenerate primer and BAC sequencing, we cloned duplicated SymRK homeologues in soybean called GmSymRKα and GmSymRKβ. These duplicated genes have high similarity of nucleotide (96%) and amino acid sequence (95%). Sequence analysis predicted a malectin-like domain within the extracellular domain of both genes. Several putative cis-acting elements were found in promoter regions of GmSymRKα and GmSymRKβ, suggesting a participation in lateral root development, cell division and peribacteroid membrane formation. The mutant of SymRK genes is not available in soybean; therefore, to know the functions of these genes, RNA interference (RNAi) of these duplicated genes was performed. For this purpose, RNAi construct of each gene was generated and introduced into the soybean genome by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy root transformation. RNAi of GmSymRKβ gene resulted in an increased reduction of nodulation and mycorrhizal infection than RNAi of GmSymRKα, suggesting it has the major activity of the duplicated gene pair. The results from the important crop legume soybean confirm the joint phenotypic action of GmSymRK genes in both mycorrhizal and rhizobial infection seen in model legumes.

  19. Cdk12 Is A Gene-Selective RNA Polymerase II Kinase That Regulates a Subset of the Transcriptome, Including Nrf2 Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Bohmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The Nrf2 transcription factor is well conserved throughout metazoan evolution and serves as a central regulator of adaptive cellular responses to oxidative stress. We carried out an RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells to better understand the regulatory mechanisms governing Nrf2 target gene expression. This paper describes the identification and characterization of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) kinase Cdk12 as a factor that is required for Nrf2 target gene expression in cell culture and in vivo. Cdk12 is, however, not essential for bulk mRNA transcription and cells lacking CDK12 function are viable and able to proliferate. Consistent with previous findings on the DNA damage and heat shock responses, it emerges that Cdk12 may be specifically required for stress activated gene expression. Transcriptome analysis revealed that antioxidant gene expression is compromised in flies with reduced Cdk12 function, which makes them oxidative stress sensitive. In addition to supporting Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induced gene activation, Cdk12 suppresses genes that support metabolic functions in stressed conditions. We suggest that Cdk12 acts as a gene-selective Pol II kinase that engages a global shift in gene expression to switch cells from a metabolically active state to “stress-defence mode” when challenged by external stress. PMID:26911346

  20. Cdk12 Is A Gene-Selective RNA Polymerase II Kinase That Regulates a Subset of the Transcriptome, Including Nrf2 Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Bohmann, Dirk

    2016-02-25

    The Nrf2 transcription factor is well conserved throughout metazoan evolution and serves as a central regulator of adaptive cellular responses to oxidative stress. We carried out an RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells to better understand the regulatory mechanisms governing Nrf2 target gene expression. This paper describes the identification and characterization of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) kinase Cdk12 as a factor that is required for Nrf2 target gene expression in cell culture and in vivo. Cdk12 is, however, not essential for bulk mRNA transcription and cells lacking CDK12 function are viable and able to proliferate. Consistent with previous findings on the DNA damage and heat shock responses, it emerges that Cdk12 may be specifically required for stress activated gene expression. Transcriptome analysis revealed that antioxidant gene expression is compromised in flies with reduced Cdk12 function, which makes them oxidative stress sensitive. In addition to supporting Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induced gene activation, Cdk12 suppresses genes that support metabolic functions in stressed conditions. We suggest that Cdk12 acts as a gene-selective Pol II kinase that engages a global shift in gene expression to switch cells from a metabolically active state to "stress-defence mode" when challenged by external stress.

  1. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H.; Schwemer, J.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to the octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.

  2. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  3. Novel neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene mutation associated with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Su, Yi-Ning; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Wang-Tso

    2010-12-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor and nerve growth factor, as reported in previous studies. This report is of a 6-month-old male infant with typical symptoms and signs of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis. He had a homozygous insertion mutation with c.2086_2087 ins C of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1) gene with both parents as heterozygous carriers. This mutation may have a strong relation to hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV Taiwanese patients. This is the youngest reported patient in Taiwan and first reported with congenital insensitivity to pain with mutation of NTRK1 gene inherited from the parents. Early diagnosis may provide appropriate medical care and education for these children and their families for better prognosis.

  4. Probing the remarkable thermal kinetics of visual rhodopsin with E181Q and S186A mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Hendrickson, Heidi P.; Videla, Pablo E.; Chen, Ya-Na; Ho, Junming; Sekharan, Sivakumar; Batista, Victor S.; Tully, John C.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2017-06-01

    We recently reported a very unusual temperature dependence of the rate of thermal reaction of wild type bovine rhodopsin: the Arrhenius plot exhibits a sharp "elbow" at 47 °C and, in the upper temperature range, an unexpectedly large activation energy (114 ± 8 kcal/mol) and an enormous prefactor (1072±5 s-1). In this report, we present new measurements and a theoretical model that establish convincingly that this behavior results from a collective, entropy-driven breakup of the rigid hydrogen bonding networks (HBNs) that hinder the reaction at lower temperatures. For E181Q and S186A, two rhodopsin mutants that disrupt the HBNs near the binding pocket of the 11-cis retinyl chromophore, we observe significant decreases in the activation energy (˜90 kcal/mol) and prefactor (˜1060 s-1), consistent with the conclusion that the reaction rate is enhanced by breakup of the HBN. The results provide insights into the molecular mechanism of dim-light vision and eye diseases caused by inherited mutations in the rhodopsin gene that perturb the HBNs.

  5. Rhodopsin 5- and Rhodopsin 6-mediated clock synchronization in Drosophila melanogaster is independent of retinal phospholipase C-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Szular, Joanna; Sehadova, Hana; Gentile, Carla; Szabo, Gisela; Chou, Wen-Hai; Britt, Steven G; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2012-02-01

    Circadian clocks of most organisms are synchronized with the 24-hour solar day by the changes of light and dark. In Drosophila, both the visual photoreceptors in the compound eyes as well as the blue-light photoreceptor Cryptochrome expressed within the brain clock neurons contribute to this clock synchronization. A specialized photoreceptive structure located between the retina and the optic lobes, the Hofbauer-Buchner (H-B) eyelet, projects to the clock neurons in the brain and also participates in light synchronization. The compound eye photoreceptors and the H-B eyelet contain Rhodopsin photopigments, which activate the canonical invertebrate phototransduction cascade after being excited by light. We show here that 2 of the photopigments present in these photoreceptors, Rhodopsin 5 (Rh5) and Rhodopsin 6 (Rh6), contribute to light synchronization in a mutant (norpA(P41) ) that disrupts canonical phototransduction due to the absence of Phospholipase C-β (PLC-β). We reveal that norpA(P41) is a true loss-of-function allele, resulting in a truncated PLC-β protein that lacks the catalytic domain. Light reception mediated by Rh5 and Rh6 must therefore utilize either a different (nonretinal) PLC-β enzyme or alternative signaling mechanisms, at least in terms of clock-relevant photoreception. This novel signaling mode may distinguish Rhodopsin-mediated irradiance detection from image-forming vision in Drosophila.

  6. A New Rhodopsin Influences Light-dependent Daily Activity Patterns of Fruit Flies.

    PubMed

    Kistenpfennig, Christa; Grebler, Rudi; Ogueta, Maite; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Schlichting, Matthias; Stanewsky, Ralf; Senthilan, Pingkalai R; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2017-08-01

    Rhodopsin 7 ( Rh7), a new invertebrate Rhodopsin gene, was discovered in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster in 2000, but its function has remained elusive. We generated an Rh7 null mutant ( Rh7(0)) by P element-mediated mutagenesis and found that an absence of Rh7 had significant effects on fly activity patterns during light-dark (LD) cycles: Rh7(0) mutants exhibited less morning activity and a longer siesta than wild-type controls. Consistent with these results, we found that Rh7 appears to be expressed in a few dorsal clock neurons that have been previously implicated in the control of the siesta. We also found putative Rh7 expression in R8 photoreceptor cells of the compound eyes and in the Hofbauer-Buchner eyelets, which have been shown to control the precise timing of locomotor activity. The absence of Rh7 alone impaired neither the flies' responses to constant white light nor the ability to follow phase shifts of white LD cycles. However, in blue light (470 nm), Rh7(0) mutants needed significantly longer to synchronize than wild-type controls, suggesting that Rh7 is a blue light-sensitive photopigment with a minor contribution to circadian clock synchronization. In combination with mutants that lacked additionally cryptochrome-based and/or eye-based light input to the circadian clock, the absence of Rh7 provoked slightly stronger effects.

  7. Efficient femtosecond energy transfer from carotenoid to retinal in gloeobacter rhodopsin-salinixanthin complex.

    PubMed

    Iyer, E Siva Subramaniam; Gdor, Itay; Eliash, Tamar; Sheves, Mordechai; Ruhman, Sanford

    2015-02-12

    The retinal proton pump xanthorhodopsin (XR) was recently found to function with an attached carotenoid light harvesting antenna, salinixanthin (SX). It is intriguing to discover if this departure from single chromophore architecture is singular or if it has been adopted by other microbial rhodopsins. In search of other cases, retinal protein encoding genes in numerous bacteria have been identified containing sequences corresponding to carotenoid binding sites like that in XR. Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR), exhibiting particularly close homology to XR, has been shown to attach SX, and fluorescence measurements suggest SX can function as a light harvesting (LH) antenna in GR as well. In this study, we test this suggestion in real time using ultrafast transient absorption. Results show that energy transfer indeed occurs from S2 of SX to retinal in the GR-SX composite with an efficiency of ∼40%, even higher than that in XR. This validates the earlier fluorescence study, and supports the notion that many microbial retinal proteins use carotenoid antennae to harvest light.

  8. Regulation of maltose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by genes of the RAS/protein kinase A pathway.

    PubMed

    Wanke, V; Vavassori, M; Thevelein, J M; Tortora, P; Vanoni, M

    1997-02-03

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae maltose utilization requires a functional MAL locus, each composed of three genes: MALR (gene 3) encoding a regulatory protein, MALT (gene 1) encoding maltose permease and MALS (gene 2) encoding maltase. We show that constitutive activation of the RAS/protein kinase A pathway severely reduces growth of MAL1 strains on maltose. This may be a consequence of reduction in MALT mRNA, reduced Vmax and increased catabolite inactivation of the MALT-encoded maltose transporter in the MAL1 strain. Mutations in the GGS1/TPS1 gene, which restricts glucose influx and possibly affects signalling, relieve carbon catabolite repression on both maltase and maltose permease and reduce maltose permease inactivation.

  9. [Cytotoxicity of cytosine deaminase and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes in melanoma cells is independent on promoter strength].

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, I V; Kuz'min, D V; Pleshkan, V V; Zinov'eva, M V; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-01-01

    In preparation of the therapeutic genetic constructs aimed to the gene-programmed enzymatic transformation of the non-toxic prodrug into toxin within cancer cells the right choice of regulatory elements (promoters and enhancers) is essential. This is widely accepted that the efficiency of the gene therapy constructions is dependent, in particular, on the strength of promoters driving the expression of the therapeutic genes. In this work we demonstrated, using the melanoma-specific promoters and enhancers of human melanoma inhibitory activity and mouse tyrosinase gene, that for the development of cytotoxic effect the promoter strength is not of primary importance. In the case of HSVtk, coding for the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, and FCU1, coding for cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase hybrid protein genes, their cytotoxic activity was determined by the quantity of the added prodrug.

  10. Somatic mutations and germline sequence variants in the expressed tyrosine kinase genes of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhifu; Walgren, Richard; Zhao, Yu; Kasai, Yumi; Miner, Tracie; Ries, Rhonda E.; Lubman, Olga; Fremont, Daved H.; McLellan, Michael D.; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Watson, Mark; Baty, Jack; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinase (TK) genes (eg, FLT3 and KIT) are found in more than 30% of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML); many groups have speculated that mutations in other TK genes may be present in the remaining 70%. We performed high-throughput resequencing of the kinase domains of 26 TK genes (11 receptor TK; 15 cytoplasmic TK) expressed in most AML patients using genomic DNA from the bone marrow (tumor) and matched skin biopsy samples (“germline”) from 94 patients with de novo AML; sequence variants were validated in an additional 94 AML tumor samples (14.3 million base pairs of sequence were obtained and analyzed). We identified known somatic mutations in FLT3, KIT, and JAK2 TK genes at the expected frequencies and found 4 novel somatic mutations, JAK1V623A, JAK1T478S, DDR1A803V, and NTRK1S677N, once each in 4 respective patients of 188 tested. We also identified novel germline sequence changes encoding amino acid substitutions (ie, nonsynonymous changes) in 14 TK genes, including TYK2, which had the largest number of nonsynonymous sequence variants (11 total detected). Additional studies will be required to define the roles that these somatic and germline TK gene variants play in AML pathogenesis. PMID:18270328

  11. Comparison of the expression patterns of two small gene families of S gene family receptor kinase genes during the defence response in Brassica oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pastuglia, Martine; Swarup, Ranjan; Rocher, Anne; Saindrenan, Patrick; Roby, Dominique; Dumas, Christian; Cock, J Mark

    2002-01-09

    SFR2, a member of the S gene family of receptor kinases, has been shown to be rapidly induced by wounding and bacterial infection suggesting that this gene may play a role in the defence response in Brassica. In this study we have compared the response of SFR2 to that of two other members of the SFR gene family in Brassica (SFR1 and SFR3) and to the closely-related ARK genes of Arabidopsis. Different patterns of mRNA accumulation were observed for different members of these families. SFR1 transcripts only accumulated in response to bacterial infection and their abundance was not significantly affected by wounding. Neither treatment induced accumulation of SFR3 transcripts. ARK1 and ARK3 resembled SFR2 in that their mRNAs accumulated in response to both wounding and bacterial infection. Both SFR1 and SFR2 mRNAs accumulated in response to exogenously applied salicylic acid (SA) and SA was shown to be required for induction of expression from the SFR2 promoter in Arabidopsis. However, the timing of the increase in endogenous SA levels following bacterial infiltration in Brassica indicates that the accumulation of SFR mRNA in the first few hours after infiltration does not occur in response to an increase in SA levels. We discuss the possibility that induction of SFR gene expression by SA may contribute to potentialization of the defence response. Taken together with previous studies that indicate a possible role during development, the data presented here suggest that the SFR and ARK gene families may have overlapping roles in both defence and during development.

  12. Chromatinized Protein Kinase C-θ Directly Regulates Inducible Genes in Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Anjum; Wu, Fan; Hardy, Kristine; Li, Jasmine; Tu, Wen Juan; McCuaig, Robert; Harris, Janelle; Khanna, Kum Kum; Attema, Joanne; Gregory, Philip A.; Goodall, Gregory J.; Harrington, Kirsti; Dahlstrom, Jane E.; Boulding, Tara; Madden, Rebecca; Tan, Abel; Milburn, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is activated during cancer invasion and metastasis, enriches for cancer stem cells (CSCs), and contributes to therapeutic resistance and disease recurrence. Signal transduction kinases play a pivotal role as chromatin-anchored proteins in eukaryotes. Here we report for the first time that protein kinase C-theta (PKC-θ) promotes EMT by acting as a critical chromatin-anchored switch for inducible genes via transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the key inflammatory regulatory protein NF-κB. Chromatinized PKC-θ exists as an active transcription complex and is required to establish a permissive chromatin state at signature EMT genes. Genome-wide analysis identifies a unique cohort of inducible PKC-θ-sensitive genes that are directly tethered to PKC-θ in the mesenchymal state. Collectively, we show that cross talk between signaling kinases and chromatin is critical for eliciting inducible transcriptional programs that drive mesenchymal differentiation and CSC formation, providing novel mechanisms to target using epigenetic therapy in breast cancer. PMID:24891615

  13. Structural, Energetic, and Mechanical Perturbations in Rhodopsin Mutant That Causes Congenital Stationary Night Blindness*

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Ge, Lin; Müller, Daniel J.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Several point mutations in rhodopsin cause retinal diseases including congenital stationary night blindness and retinitis pigmentosa. The mechanism by which a single amino acid residue substitution leads to dysfunction is poorly understood at the molecular level. A G90D point mutation in rhodopsin causes constitutive activity and leads to congenital stationary night blindness. It is unclear which perturbations the mutation introduces and how they can cause the receptor to be constitutively active. To reveal insight into these mechanisms, we characterized the perturbations introduced into dark state G90D rhodopsin from a transgenic mouse model expressing exclusively the mutant rhodopsin in rod photoreceptor cells. UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy revealed hydroxylamine accessibility to the chromophore-binding pocket of dark state G90D rhodopsin, which is not detected in dark state wild-type rhodopsin but is detected in light-activated wild-type rhodopsin. Single-molecule force spectroscopy suggested that the structural changes introduced by the mutation are small. Dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed that, compared with dark state wild-type rhodopsin, the G90D mutation decreased energetic stability and increased mechanical rigidity of most structural regions in the dark state mutant receptor. The observed structural, energetic, and mechanical changes in dark state G90D rhodopsin provide insights into the nature of perturbations caused by a pathological point mutation. Moreover, these changed properties observed for dark state G90D rhodopsin are consistent with properties expected for an active state. PMID:22549882

  14. Signals governing the trafficking and mistrafficking of a ciliary GPCR, rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, Kerrie H; Lee, Richard; Ropelewski, Philip; Nemet, Ina; Tian, Guilian; Imanishi, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-21

    Rhodopsin is a cilia-specific GPCR essential for vision. Rhodopsin mislocalization is associated with blinding diseases called retinal ciliopathies. The mechanism by which rhodopsin mislocalizes in rod photoreceptor neurons is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin mislocalization. Rhodopsin and its truncation mutants were fused to a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, Dendra2, and expressed in Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors. Photoconversion of Dendra2 causes a color change from green to red, enabling visualization of the dynamic events associated with rhodopsin trafficking and renewal. We found that rhodopsin mislocalization is a facilitated process for which a signal located within 322-326 aa (CCGKN) is essential. An additional signal within 327-336 aa further facilitated the mislocalization. This collective mistrafficking signal confers toxicity to rhodopsin and causes mislocalization when the VXPX cilia-targeting motif is absent. We also determined that the VXPX motif neutralizes this mistrafficking signal, enhances ciliary targeting at least 10-fold, and accelerates trafficking of post-Golgi vesicular structures. In the absence of the VXPX motif, mislocalized rhodopsin is actively cleared through secretion of vesicles into the extracellular milieu. Therefore, this study unveiled the multiple roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin localization and renewal.

  15. Signals Governing the Trafficking and Mistrafficking of a Ciliary GPCR, Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Lodowski, Kerrie H.; Lee, Richard; Ropelewski, Philip; Nemet, Ina; Tian, Guilian

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a cilia-specific GPCR essential for vision. Rhodopsin mislocalization is associated with blinding diseases called retinal ciliopathies. The mechanism by which rhodopsin mislocalizes in rod photoreceptor neurons is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin mislocalization. Rhodopsin and its truncation mutants were fused to a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, Dendra2, and expressed in Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors. Photoconversion of Dendra2 causes a color change from green to red, enabling visualization of the dynamic events associated with rhodopsin trafficking and renewal. We found that rhodopsin mislocalization is a facilitated process for which a signal located within 322–326 aa (CCGKN) is essential. An additional signal within 327–336 aa further facilitated the mislocalization. This collective mistrafficking signal confers toxicity to rhodopsin and causes mislocalization when the VXPX cilia-targeting motif is absent. We also determined that the VXPX motif neutralizes this mistrafficking signal, enhances ciliary targeting at least 10-fold, and accelerates trafficking of post-Golgi vesicular structures. In the absence of the VXPX motif, mislocalized rhodopsin is actively cleared through secretion of vesicles into the extracellular milieu. Therefore, this study unveiled the multiple roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin localization and renewal. PMID:23966685

  16. Rhodopsin molecular contrast imaging by optical coherence tomography for functional assessment of photoreceptors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafra, Zahra; Liu, Tan; Jiao, Shuliang

    2016-03-01

    Rhodopsin, the light-sensing molecule in the outer segments of rod photoreceptors, is responsible for converting light into neuronal signals in a process known as phototransduction. Rhodopsin is thus a functional biomarker for rod photoreceptors. We developed a novel technology based on visible-light optical coherence tomography (VIS-OCT) for in vivo molecular imaging of rhodopsin. The depth resolution of OCT allows the visualization of the location where the change of optical absorption occurs and provides a potentially accurate assessment of rhodopsin content by segmentation of the image at the location. A broadband supercontinuum laser, whose filtered output was centered at 520 nm, was used as the illuminating light source. To test the capabilities of the system on rhodopsin mapping we imaged the retina of albino rats. The rats were dark adapted before imaging. An integrated near infrared OCT was used to guide the alignment in dark. VIS-OCT three-dimensional images were then acquired under dark- and light- adapted states sequentially. Rhodopsin distribution was calculated from the differential image. The rhodopsin distributions can be displayed in both en face view and depth-resolved cross-sectional image. Rhodopsin OCT can be used to quantitatively image rhodopsin distribution and thus assess the distribution of functional rod photoreceptors in the retina. Rhodopsin OCT can bring significant impact into ophthalmic clinics by providing a tool for the diagnosis and severity assessment of a variety of retinal conditions.

  17. Transcriptional response of a novel HpCDPK1 kinase gene from Hippeastrum x hybr. to wounding and fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Pawełek, Agnieszka; Duszyn, Maria; Świeżawska, Brygida; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana; Jaworski, Krzysztof

    2017-09-01

    Calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPK) are well established plant sensor and effectors for calcium ions and participate in regulation of multiple abiotic and biotic stress responses in plant cells. Here we present the identification and characterization of a new CDPK kinase gene from bulbous plant Hippeastrum x hybr. and examine the role of this kinase in stress responses leading to phytoalexin (PA) production in plant tissues. In the previous research, it was shown that Hippeastrum bulbs mechanically wounded or infected with Peyronellaea curtisii (=Phoma narcissi) are inducted to an antifungal red substance synthesis. In this research, we demonstrated Ca(2+) dependence of the phytoalexin production by wounded bulbs. Furthermore, the isolated HpCDPK1 cDNA for ORF was found to be 1596bp long and encoded 531 amino acid protein with CDPK kinase activity, as was shown by recombinant GST-HpCDPK1 enzyme production and analysis. HpCDPK1 transcript was present in all vegetative and chosen generative organs of Hippeastrum plant. The dynamics of the observed HpCDPK1 mRNA changes in bulbs depended on stressor type. The mechanical injury caused one wave of transcript increase while more complex transcript changes were observed within 48h after Peyronellaea inoculation. In plant bulbs already accumulating red phytoalexin, increases in HpCDPK1 mRNA level were observed at certain intervals within 48h whereas, in the case of fungal infection, only one big increment in the transcript amount at the 10th minute after inoculation was detected. The observed transcriptional response of HpCDPK1 gene to wounding and pathogen infection stress suggests a positive correlation with phytoalexin synthesis and maintenance in bulb tissues and puts more light on CDPK kinase role in the plant stress response regulation. This also bears some potential for understanding the mechanism of a phytoalexin formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Expansion of the Receptor-Like Kinase/Pelle Gene Family and Receptor-Like Proteins in Arabidopsis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Shin-Han, Shiu; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2003-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are a family of transmembrane proteins with versatile N-terminal extracellular domains and C-terminal intracellular kinases. They control a wide range of physiological responses in plants and belong to one of the largest gene families in the Arabidopsis genome with more than 600 members. Interestingly, this gene family constitutes 60% of all kinases in Arabidopsis and accounts for nearly all transmembrane kinases in Arabidopsis. Analysis of four fungal, six metazoan, and two Plasmodium sp. genomes indicates that the family was represented in all but fungal genomes, indicating an ancient origin for the family with a more recent expansion only in the plant lineages. The RLK/Pelle family can be divided into several subfamilies based on three independent criteria: the phylogeny based on kinase domain sequences, the extracellular domain identities, and intron locations and phases. A large number of receptor-like proteins (RLPs) resembling the extracellular domains of RLKs are also found in the Arabidopsis genome. However, not all RLK subfamilies have corresponding RLPs. Several RLK/Pelle subfamilies have undergone differential expansions. More than 33% of the RLK/Pelle members are found in tandem clusters, substantially higher than the genome average. In addition, 470 of the RLK/Pelle family members are located within the segmentally duplicated regions in the Arabidopsis genome and 268 of them have a close relative in the corresponding regions. Therefore, tandem duplications and segmental/whole-genome duplications represent two of the major mechanisms for the expansion of the RLK/Pelle family in Arabidopsis. PMID:12805585

  19. Characterization of Ribozymes Targeting a Congenital Night Blindness Mutation in Rhodopsin Mutation.

    PubMed

    Conley, Shannon M; Whalen, Patrick; Lewin, Alfred S; Naash, Muna I

    2016-01-01

    The G90D mutation in the rhodopsin gene leads to autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in patients. This occurs because the G90D mutant protein cannot efficiently bind chromophore and is constitutively active. To combat this mutation, we designed and characterized two different hammerhead ribozymes to cleave G90D transcript. In vitro testing showed that the G90D1 ribozyme efficiently and specifically cleaved the mutant transcript while G90D2 cleaved both WT and mutant transcript. AAV-mediated delivery of G90D1 under the control of the mouse opsin promoter (MOP500) to G90D transgenic eyes showed that the ribozyme partially retarded the functional degeneration (as measured by electroretinography [ERG]) associated with this mutation. These results suggest that with additional optimization, ribozymes may be a useful part of the gene therapy knockdown strategy for dominant retinal disease.

  20. Analysis of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MAP2K4 is a putative tumor and metastasis suppressor gene frequently found to be deleted in various cancer types. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of this gene to assess its involvement in ovarian cancer. Methods We screened for mutations in MAP2K4 using High Resolution Melt analysis of 149 primary ovarian tumors and methylation at the promoter using Methylation-Specific Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism analysis of 39 tumors. We also considered the clinical impact of changes in MAP2K4 using publicly available expression and copy number array data. Finally, we used siRNA to measure the effect of reducing MAP2K4 expression in cell lines. Results In addition to 4 previously detected homozygous deletions, we identified a homozygous 16 bp truncating deletion and a heterozygous 4 bp deletion, each in one ovarian tumor. No promoter methylation was detected. The frequency of MAP2K4 homozygous inactivation was 5.6% overall, and 9.8% in high-grade serous cases. Hemizygous deletion of MAP2K4 was observed in 38% of samples. There were significant correlations of copy number and expression in three microarray data sets. There was a significant correlation between MAP2K4 expression and overall survival in one expression array data set, but this was not confirmed in an independent set. Treatment of JAM and HOSE6.3 cell lines with MAP2K4 siRNA showed some reduction in proliferation. Conclusions MAP2K4 is targeted by genetic inactivation in ovarian cancer and restricted to high grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas in our cohort. PMID:21575258

  1. Attractant and repellent signaling conformers of sensory rhodopsin-transducer complexes.

    PubMed

    Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Sasaki, Jun; Wang, Jihong; Spudich, John L

    2010-08-10

    Attractant and repellent signaling conformers of the dual-signaling phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I and its transducer subunit (SRI-HtrI) have recently been distinguished experimentally by the opposite connection of their retinylidene protonated Schiff bases to the outwardly located periplasmic side and inwardly located cytoplasmic side. Here we show that the pK(a) of the outwardly located Asp76 counterion in the outwardly connected conformer is lowered by approximately 1.5 units from that of the inwardly connected conformer. The pK(a) difference enables quantitative determination of the relative amounts of the two conformers in wild-type cells and behavioral mutants prior to photoexcitation, comparison of their absorption spectra, and determination of their relative signaling efficiency. We have shown that the one-photon excitation of the SRI-HtrI attractant conformer causes a Schiff base connectivity switch from inwardly connected to outwardly connected states in the attractant signaling photoreaction. Conversely, a second near-UV photon drives the complex back to the inwardly connected conformer in the repellent signaling photoreaction. The results suggest a model of the color-discriminating dual-signaling mechanism in which phototaxis responses (his-kinase modulation) result from the photointerconversion of the two oppositely connected SRI-HtrI conformers by one-photon and two-photon activation. Furthermore, we find that the related repellent phototaxis SRII-HtrII receptor complex has an outwardly connected retinylidene Schiff base like the repellent signaling forms of the SRI-HtrI complex, indicating the general applicability of macro conformational changes, which can be detected by the connectivity switch, to phototaxis signaling by sensory rhodopsin-transducer complexes.

  2. The gene for creatine kinase, mitochondrial 2 (sarcomeric; CKMT2), maps to chromosome 5q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, I.; Devaud, C. ); Cherif, D.; Cohen, D.; Beckmann, J.S. )

    1993-10-01

    YAC clones for the creatine kinase, mitochrondial 2 (sarcomeric; CKMT2), gene were isolated. One of these YACs was localized on chromosome 5q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. A polymorphic dinucleotide repeat (heterozygosity 0.77) was identified within the seventh intron of the CKMT2 gene. Genotyping of CEPH families allowed positioning of CKMT2 on the multipoint map of chromosome 5 between D5S424 and D5S428, distal to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) (5q12-q14). 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in retinal rod outer segment membranes studied by spin-labeling and pulsed electron double resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Hara, Hideyuki; Tokunaga, Fumio; Arata, Toshiaki

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of spin labeling and PELDOR to measure inter-rhodopsin distance in ROS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong decay of PELDOR signal indicated a high density (mM range) of rhodopsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decay was modeled by rhodopsin monomers dispersed in a planar membrane. -- Abstract: We have determined the spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in the retinal rod outer segment (ROS) membrane by measuring the distances between rhodopsin molecules in which native cysteines were spin-labeled at {approx}1.0 mol/mol rhodopsin. The echo modulation decay of pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) from spin-labeled ROS curved slightly with strong background decay. This indicated that the rhodopsin was densely packed in the retina and that the rhodopsin molecules were not aligned well. The curve was simulated by a model in which rhodopsin is distributed randomly as monomers in a planar membrane.

  4. Origin and diversification of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase (LRR-RLK) genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping-Li; Du, Liang; Huang, Yuan; Gao, Shu-Min; Yu, Meng

    2017-02-07

    Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases (LRR-RLKs) are the largest group of receptor-like kinases in plants and play crucial roles in development and stress responses. The evolutionary relationships among LRR-RLK genes have been investigated in flowering plants; however, no comprehensive studies have been performed for these genes in more ancestral groups. The subfamily classification of LRR-RLK genes in plants, the evolutionary history and driving force for the evolution of each LRR-RLK subfamily remain to be understood. We identified 119 LRR-RLK genes in the Physcomitrella patens moss genome, 67 LRR-RLK genes in the Selaginella moellendorffii lycophyte genome, and no LRR-RLK genes in five green algae genomes. Furthermore, these LRR-RLK sequences, along with previously reported LRR-RLK sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, were subjected to evolutionary analyses. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant LRR-RLKs belong to 19 subfamilies, eighteen of which were established in early land plants, and one of which evolved in flowering plants. More importantly, we found that the basic structures of LRR-RLK genes for most subfamilies are established in early land plants and conserved within subfamilies and across different plant lineages, but divergent among subfamilies. In addition, most members of the same subfamily had common protein motif compositions, whereas members of different subfamilies showed variations in protein motif compositions. The unique gene structure and protein motif compositions of each subfamily differentiate the subfamily classifications and, more importantly, provide evidence for functional divergence among LRR-RLK subfamilies. Maximum likelihood analyses showed that some sites within four subfamilies were under positive selection. Much of the diversity of plant LRR-RLK genes was established in early land plants. Positive selection contributed to the evolution of a few LRR-RLK subfamilies.

  5. QM/MM Study of Dehydro and Dihydro β-Ionone Retinal Analogues in Squid and Bovine Rhodopsins: Implications for Vision in Salamander Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Altun, Ahmet; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Visual pigment rhodopsin provides a decisive crossing point for interaction between organisms and environment. Naturally occurring visual pigments contain only PSB11 and 3,4-dehydro-PSB11 as chromophores. Therefore, the ability of visual opsin to discriminate between the retinal geometries is investigated by means of QM/MM incorporation of PSB11, 6-s-cis and 6-s-trans forms of 3,4-dehydro-PSB11, 3,4-dehydro-5,6-dihydro-PSB11, 5,6-dihydro-PSB11 analogues into squid and bovine