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Sample records for ribonucleotide reductase mediate

  1. Peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of the stable free radical tyrosine residue of the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit.

    PubMed

    Guittet, O; Decottignies, P; Serani, L; Henry, Y; Le Maréchal, P; Laprévote, O; Lepoivre, M

    2000-04-25

    Ribonucleotide reductase activity is rate-limiting for DNA synthesis, and inhibition of this enzyme supports cytostatic antitumor effects of inducible NO synthase. The small R2 subunit of class I ribonucleotide reductases contains a stable free radical tyrosine residue required for activity. This radical is destroyed by peroxynitrite, which also inactivates the protein and induces nitration of tyrosine residues. In this report, nitrated residues in the E. coli R2 protein were identified by UV-visible spectroscopy, mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and tryptic peptide sequencing. Mass analysis allowed the detection of protein R2 as a native dimer with two iron clusters per subunit. The measured mass was 87 032 Da, compared to a calculated value of 87 028 Da. Peroxynitrite treatment preserved the non-heme iron center and the dimeric form of the protein. A mean of two nitrotyrosines per E. coli protein R2 dimer were obtained at 400 microM peroxynitrite. Only 3 out of the 16 tyrosines were nitrated, including the free radical Tyr122. Despite its radical state, that should favor nitration, the buried Tyr122 was not nitrated with a high yield, probably owing to its restricted accessibility. Dose-response curves for Tyr122 nitration and loss of the free radical were superimposed. However, protein R2 inactivation was higher than nitration of Tyr122, suggesting that nitration of the nonconserved Tyr62 and Tyr289 might be also of importance for peroxynitrite-mediated inhibition of E. coli protein R2.

  2. The tyrosyl free radical in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Gräslund, A; Sahlin, M; Sjöberg, B M

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase, catalyses the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, a reaction essential for DNA synthesis in all living cells. The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase, which is the prototype of all known eukaryotic and virus-coded enzymes, consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins B1 and B2. The B2 subunit contains an antiferromagnetically coupled pair of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of an electron, has its unpaired spin density delocalized in the aromatic ring of tyrosine. Effects of iron-radical interaction indicate a relatively close proximity between the iron center and the radical. The EPR signal of the radical can be studied directly in frozen packed cells of E. coli or mammalian origin, if the cells are made to overproduce ribonucleotide reductase. The hypothetic role of the tyrosyl free radical in the enzymatic reaction is not yet elucidated, except in the reaction with the inhibiting substrate analogue 2'-azido-CDP. In this case, the normal tyrosyl radical is destroyed with concomitant appearance of a 2'-azido-CDP-localized radical intermediate. Attempts at spin trapping of radical reaction intermediates have turned out negative. In E. coli the activity of ribonucleotide reductase may be regulated by enzymatic activities that interconvert a nonradical containing form and the fully active protein B2. In synchronized mammalian cells, however, the cell cycle variation of ribonucleotide reductase, studied by EPR, was shown to be due to de novo protein synthesis. Inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase are of medical interest because of their ability to control DNA synthesis. One example is hydroxyurea, used in cancer therapy, which selectively destroys the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:3007085

  3. Studies on Marek's Disease Virus Encoded Ribonucleotide Reductase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is an essential enzyme for the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The enzyme consists of two subunits namely RR1 and RR2, both of which associate to form an active holoenzyme. Herpesviruses express a functional R...

  4. E2F4 and ribonucleotide reductase mediate S-phase arrest in colon cancer cells treated with chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Chimploy, Korakod; Díaz, G Dario; Li, Qingjie; Carter, Orianna; Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza; Mathews, Christopher K; Williams, David E; Bailey, George S; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2009-11-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL) is a water-soluble derivative of chlorophyll that exhibits cancer chemopreventive properties, but which also has been studied for its possible cancer therapeutic effects. We report here that human colon cancer cells treated with CHL accumulate in S-phase of the cell cycle, and this is associated with reduced expression levels of p53, p21, and other G(1)/S checkpoint controls. At the same time, E2F1 and E2F4 transcription factors become elevated and exhibit increased DNA binding activity. In CHL-treated colon cancer cells, bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments provided evidence for the inhibition of DNA synthesis. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), a pivotal enzyme for DNA synthesis and repair, was reduced at the mRNA and protein level after CHL treatment, and the enzymatic activity was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner both in vitro and in vivo. Immunoblotting revealed that expression levels of RR subunits R1, R2, and p53R2 were reduced by CHL treatment in HCT116 (p53(+/+)) and HCT116 (p53(-/-)) cells, supporting a p53-independent mechanism. Prior studies have shown that reduced levels of RR small subunits can increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to clinically used DNA-damaging agents and RR inhibitors. We conclude that by inhibiting R1, R2, and p53R2, CHL has the potential to be effective in the clinical setting, when used alone or in combination with currently available cancer therapeutic agents.

  5. Mediation by indole analogues of electron transfer during oxygen activation in variants of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase R2 lacking the electron-shuttling tryptophan 48.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Lana; Kelch, Brian A; Pathickal, Betsy A; Baldwin, Jeffrey; Ley, Brenda A; Bollinger, J Martin

    2004-05-25

    Activation of dioxygen by the carboxylate-bridged diiron(II) cluster in the R2 subunit of class I ribonucleotide reductase from Escherichia coli results in the one-electron oxidation of tyrosine 122 (Y122) to a stable radical (Y122*). A key step in this reaction is the rapid transfer of a single electron from a near-surface residue, tryptophan 48 (W48), to an adduct between O(2) and diiron(II) cluster to generate a readily reducible cation radical (W48(+)(*)) and the formally Fe(IV)Fe(III) intermediate known as cluster X. Previous work showed that this electron injection step is blocked in the R2 variant with W48 replaced by phenylalanine [Krebs, C., Chen, S., Baldwin, J., Ley, B. A., Patel, U., Edmondson, D. E., Huynh, B. H., and Bollinger, J. M., Jr. (2000) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 12207-12219]. In this study, we show that substitution of W48 with alanine similarly disables the electron transfer (ET) but also permits its chemical mediation by indole compounds. In the presence of an indole mediator, O(2) activation in the R2-W48A variant produces approximately 1 equiv of stable Y122* and more than 1 equiv of the normal (micro-oxo)diiron(III) product. In the absence of a mediator, the variant protein generates primarily altered Fe(III) products and only one-fourth as much stable Y122* because, as previously reported for R2-W48F, most of the Y122* that is produced decays as a consequence of the inability of the protein to mediate reductive quenching of one of the two oxidizing equivalents of the initial diiron(II)-O(2) complex. Mediation of ET is effective in W48A variants containing additional substitutions that also impact the reaction mechanism or outcome. In the reaction of R2-W48A/F208Y, the presence of mediator suppresses formation of the Y208-derived diiron(III)-catecholate product (which is predominant in R2-F208Y in the absence of reductants) in favor of Y122*. In the reaction of R2-W48A/D84E, the presence of mediator affects the outcome of decay of the

  6. Leukemia L1210 cell lines resistant to ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cory, J G; Carter, G L

    1988-02-15

    Leukemia L1210 cell lines, ED1 and ED2, were generated which were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of deoxyadenosine/erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)adenine and deoxyadenosine/erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)adenine plus 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazole[2,3a]imidazole/Desferal, respectively. The ED1 and ED2 were characterized to show that these cell lines had increased levels of ribonucleotide reductase as measured by CDP reduction. The reductase activity in crude cell-free extracts from the ED1 and ED2 cells was not inhibited by dATP. For CDP reductase, the activation by adenylylimido diphosphate and inhibition by dGTP and dTTP in these extracts from the ED1 and ED2 cells were the same as for the wild-type L1210 cells. The ED1 and ED2 cells were highly cross-resistant, as measured by growth inhibition, to deoxyguanosine/8-aminoguanosine, 2-fluorodeoxyadenosine, and 2-fluoroadenine arabinoside. While the ED2 cells showed resistance to 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-[2,3a]-imidazole/Desferal (6-fold), the ED1 and ED2 cell lines showed less resistance to hydroxyurea, 4-methyl-5-amino-1-formylisoquinoline thiosemicarbazone, and the dialdehyde of inosine. These data indicate that the mechanisms of resistance to the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors are related to the increased level of ribonucleotide reductase activity and to the decreased sensitivity of the effector-binding subunit to dATP.

  7. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26536144

  8. Bcl2 induces DNA replication stress by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Maohua; Yen, Yun; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Khuri, Fadlo R; Curran, Walter J; Doetsch, Paul W; Deng, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication stress is an inefficient DNA synthesis process that leads replication forks to progress slowly or stall. Two main factors that cause replication stress are alterations in pools of deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) precursors required for DNA synthesis and changes in the activity of proteins required for synthesis of dNTPs. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), containing regulatory hRRM1 and catalytic hRRM2 subunits, is the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleoside diphosphates (NDP) to deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates (dNDP) and thereby provides dNTP precursors needed for the synthesis of DNA. Here, we demonstrate that either endogenous or exogenous expression of Bcl2 results in decreases in RNR activity and intracellular dNTP, retardation of DNA replication fork progression, and increased rate of fork asymmetry leading to DNA replication stress. Bcl2 colocalizes with hRRM1 and hRRM2 in the cytoplasm and directly interacts via its BH4 domain with hRRM2 but not hRRM1. Removal of the BH4 domain of Bcl2 abrogates its inhibitory effects on RNR activity, dNTP pool level, and DNA replication. Intriguingly, Bcl2 directly inhibits RNR activity by disrupting the functional hRRM1/hRRM2 complex via its BH4 domain. Our findings argue that Bcl2 reduces intracellular dNTPs by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase activity, thereby providing insight into how Bcl2 triggers DNA replication stress.

  9. Synthesis and metabolism of inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to prepare more effective inhibitors of ribo-nucleotide reductase a series of 2-substituted-4,6-dihydroxypyrimidines was prepared via the appropriately substituted benzamidine. None of the compounds exhibited in vivo activity against L1210 leukemia. No further testing was performed. In order to investigate the metabolism of 3,4-dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid, a known inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, radiolabeled 3,4-dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid was synthesized by a modification of the procedure of Pichat and Tostain. /sup 14/C-3,4-Dihydroxybenzoic acid was converted to the methyl ester and subsequently reacted with hydroxylamine to give the hydroxamic acid. /sup 14/C-3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid was given i.p. to Sprague-Dawley rats. Excretion occurred mainly (72%) via the urine. HPLC coupled with GC/MS analyses showed that the compound was excreted mainly unchanged. The compound was metabolized to 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide, 4-methoxy-3-hydroxybenzohydroxamic acid, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzohydroxamic acid. HPLC analysis also showed the lack of formation of any glucuronide or sulfate conjugates through either the hydroxamic acid or catechol functionalities.

  10. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-07

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone.

  11. Mechanism of inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with motexafin gadolinium (MGd)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahedi Avval, Farnaz; Berndt, Carsten; Pramanik, Aladdin; Holmgren, Arne

    2009-02-13

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is an expanded porphyrin anticancer agent which selectively targets tumor cells and works as a radiation enhancer, with promising results in clinical trials. Its mechanism of action is oxidation of intracellular reducing molecules and acting as a direct inhibitor of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This paper focuses on the mechanism of inhibition of RNR by MGd. Our experimental data present at least two pathways for inhibition of RNR; one precluding subunits oligomerization and the other direct inhibition of the large catalytic subunit of the enzyme. Co-localization of MGd and RNR in the cytoplasm particularly in the S-phase may account for its inhibitory properties. These data can elucidate an important effect of MGd on the cancer cells with overproduction of RNR and its efficacy as an anticancer agent and not only as a general radiosensitizer.

  12. Identification of Non-nucleoside Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Modulators

    DOE PAGES

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Huff, Sarah E.; Pink, John; ...

    2015-10-21

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of dNTP synthesis and is an established cancer target. Drugs targeting RR are mainly nucleoside in nature. In this study, we sought to identify non-nucleoside small-molecule inhibitors of RR. Using virtual screening, binding affinity, inhibition, and cell toxicity, we have discovered a class of small molecules that alter the equilibrium of inactive hexamers of RR, leading to its inhibition. Several unique chemical categories, including a phthalimide derivative, show micromolar IC50s and KDs while demonstrating cytotoxicity. A crystal structure of an active phthalimide binding at the targeted interface supports the noncompetitive mode of inhibitionmore » determined by kinetic studies. Furthermore, the phthalimide shifts the equilibrium from dimer to hexamer. Finally, together, these data identify several novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of human RR which act by stabilizing the inactive form of the enzyme.« less

  13. Identification of Non-nucleoside Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Huff, Sarah E.; Pink, John; Alam, Intekhab; Zhang, Andrew; Perry, Kay; Harris, Michael E.; Misko, Tessianna; Porwal, Suheel K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Miyagi, Masaru; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2015-10-21

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of dNTP synthesis and is an established cancer target. Drugs targeting RR are mainly nucleoside in nature. In this study, we sought to identify non-nucleoside small-molecule inhibitors of RR. Using virtual screening, binding affinity, inhibition, and cell toxicity, we have discovered a class of small molecules that alter the equilibrium of inactive hexamers of RR, leading to its inhibition. Several unique chemical categories, including a phthalimide derivative, show micromolar IC50s and KDs while demonstrating cytotoxicity. A crystal structure of an active phthalimide binding at the targeted interface supports the noncompetitive mode of inhibition determined by kinetic studies. Furthermore, the phthalimide shifts the equilibrium from dimer to hexamer. Finally, together, these data identify several novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of human RR which act by stabilizing the inactive form of the enzyme.

  14. Gene expression signature based screening identifies ribonucleotide reductase as a candidate therapeutic target in Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Kelli L.; Gordon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a critical need in cancer therapeutics to identify targeted therapies that will improve outcomes and decrease toxicities compared to conventional, cytotoxic chemotherapy. Ewing sarcoma is a highly aggressive bone and soft tissue cancer that is caused by the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. Although EWS-FLI1 is specific for cancer cells, and required for tumorigenesis, directly targeting this transcription factor has proven challenging. Consequently, targeting unique dependencies or key downstream mediators of EWS-FLI1 represent important alternative strategies. We used gene expression data derived from a genetically defined model of Ewing sarcoma to interrogate the Connectivity Map and identify a class of drugs, iron chelators, that downregulate a significant number of EWS-FLI1 target genes. We then identified ribonucleotide reductase M2 (RRM2), the iron-dependent subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), as one mediator of iron chelator toxicity in Ewing sarcoma cells. Inhibition of RNR in Ewing sarcoma cells caused apoptosis in vitro and attenuated tumor growth in an in vivo, xenograft model. Additionally, we discovered that the sensitivity of Ewing sarcoma cells to inhibition or suppression of RNR is mediated, in part, by high levels of SLFN11, a protein that sensitizes cells to DNA damage. This work demonstrates a unique dependency of Ewing sarcoma cells on RNR and supports further investigation of RNR inhibitors, which are currently used in clinical practice, as a novel approach for treating Ewing sarcoma. PMID:27557498

  15. Hydroxyurea-resistant vaccinia virus: overproduction of ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Slabaugh, M.B.; Mathews, C.K.

    1986-11-01

    Repeated passage of vaccinia virus in increasing concentrations of hydroxyurea followed by plaque purification resulted in the isolation of variants capable of growth in 5 mM hydroxyurea, a drug concentration which inhibited the reproduction of wild-type vaccinia virus 1000-fold. Analyses of viral protein synthesis by using (/sup 35/S)methionine pulse-labeling at intervals throughout the infection cycle revealed that all isolates overproduced a 34,000-molecular-weight (MW) early polypeptide. Measurement of ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase activity after infection indicated that 4- to 10-fold more activity was induced by hydroxyurea-resistant viruses than by the wild-type virus. A two-step partial purification resulted in a substantial enrichment for the 34,000-MW protein from extracts of wild-type and hydroxyurea-resistant-virus-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. In the presence of the drug, the isolates incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA earlier and a rate substantially greater than that of the wild type, although the onset of DNA synthesis was delayed in both cases. The drug resistance trait was markedly unstable in all isolates. In the absence of selective pressure, plaque-purified isolated readily segregated progeny that displayed a wide range of resistance phenotypes. The results of this study indicate that vaccinia virus encodes a subunit of ribonucleotide reductase which is 34,000-MW early protein whose overproduction confers hydroxyurea resistance on reproducing viruses.

  16. Structural Basis for Activation of Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-12-03

    The class Ib ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli can initiate reduction of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides with either a Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-tyrosyl radical (Y{sm_bullet}) or a Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor in the NrdF subunit. Whereas Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} can self-assemble from Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and O{sub 2}, activation of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF requires a reduced flavoprotein, NrdI, proposed to form the oxidant for cofactor assembly by reduction of O{sub 2}. The crystal structures reported here of E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF reveal different coordination environments, suggesting distinct initial binding sites for the oxidants during cofactor activation. In the structures of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF in complex with reduced and oxidized NrdI, a continuous channel connects the NrdI flavin cofactor to the NrdF Mn{sub 2}{sup II} active site. Crystallographic detection of a putative peroxide in this channel supports the proposed mechanism of Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly.

  17. Transgenic overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase improves cardiac performance

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Sarah G.; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Korte, Frederick Steven; Luo, Zhaoxiong; Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N.; Page, Jennifer L.; Brozovich, Frank; Weiss, Robert S.; Tian, Rong; Murry, Charles E.; Regnier, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cardiac myosin can use 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) as an energy substrate, that it enhances contraction and relaxation with minimal effect on calcium-handling properties in vitro, and that contractile enhancement occurs with only minor elevation of cellular [dATP]. Here, we report the effect of chronically enhanced dATP concentration on cardiac function using a transgenic mouse that overexpresses the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (TgRR), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in de novo deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Hearts from TgRR mice had elevated left ventricular systolic function compared with wild-type (WT) mice, both in vivo and in vitro, without signs of hypertrophy or altered diastolic function. Isolated cardiomyocytes from TgRR mice had enhanced contraction and relaxation, with no change in Ca2+ transients, suggesting targeted improvement of myofilament function. TgRR hearts had normal ATP and only slightly decreased phosphocreatine levels by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and they maintained rate responsiveness to dobutamine challenge. These data demonstrate long-term (at least 5-mo) elevation of cardiac [dATP] results in sustained elevation of basal left ventricular performance, with maintained β-adrenergic responsiveness and energetic reserves. Combined with results from previous studies, we conclude that this occurs primarily via enhanced myofilament activation and contraction, with similar or faster ability to relax. The data are sufficiently compelling to consider elevated cardiac [dATP] as a therapeutic option to treat systolic dysfunction. PMID:23530224

  18. Ribonucleotide reductases: influence of environment on synthesis and activity.

    PubMed

    Gon, Stéphanie; Beckwith, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are enzymes that provide deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs), the building blocks required for de novo DNA synthesis and repair. They are found in all organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Interestingly, in the microbial world, several organisms possess the genes encoding two, or even three different RNRs that present different structures and allosteric regulation. The finding of an increasing number of bacterial species that possess more than one RNR might suggest particular functions for these enzymes in different growth conditions. Recent support for this proposal comes from studies indicating that expression and activity of the different RNRs depends on the environment. The oxygen content as well as the redox and oxidative stresses regulate RNR activity and synthesis in various organisms. This regulation has a direct consequence on dNTP pools. An excess of dNTP pools that leads to misincorporation of dNTPs results in genetic abnormalities in eukaryotes as in prokaryotes. In contrast, increased dNTP concentrations help cells to survive under conditions where DNA has been damaged. Hence the use of different RNRs in response to various environmental conditions allows the cell to regulate the amount precisely of dNTP in both a positive and negative manner so that enough, yet not excessive, dNTPs are synthesized.

  19. Rnr4p, a novel ribonucleotide reductase small-subunit protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P J; Chabes, A; Casagrande, R; Tian, X C; Thelander, L; Huffaker, T C

    1997-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases catalyze the formation of deoxyribonucleotides by the reduction of the corresponding ribonucleotides. Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductases are alpha2beta2 tetramers; each of the larger, alpha subunits possesses binding sites for substrate and allosteric effectors, and each of the smaller, beta subunits contains a binuclear iron complex. The iron complex interacts with a specific tyrosine residue to form a tyrosyl free radical which is essential for activity. Previous work has identified two genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RNR1 and RNR3, that encode alpha subunits and one gene, RNR2, that encodes a beta subunit. Here we report the identification of a second gene from this yeast, RNR4, that encodes a protein with significant similarity to the beta-subunit proteins. The phenotype of rnr4 mutants is consistent with that expected for a defect in ribonucleotide reductase; rnr4 mutants are supersensitive to the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea and display an S-phase arrest at their restrictive temperature. rnr4 mutant extracts are deficient in ribonucleotide reductase activity, and this deficiency can be remedied by the addition of exogenous Rnr4p. As is the case for the other RNR genes, RNR4 is induced by agents that damage DNA. However, Rnr4p lacks a number of sequence elements thought to be essential for iron binding, and mutation of the critical tyrosine residue does not affect Rnr4p function. These results suggest that Rnr4p is catalytically inactive but, nonetheless, does play a role in the ribonucleotide reductase complex. PMID:9315671

  20. A phase II trial of sequential ribonucleotide reductase inhibition in aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Zeidner, Joshua F.; Karp, Judith E.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Smith, B. Douglas; Gojo, Ivana; Gore, Steven D.; Levis, Mark J.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Ivy, S. Percy; Pratz, Keith W.; McDevitt, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a varied group of disorders that can have prolonged chronic phases, but eventually accelerate and can transform into a secondary acute myeloid leukemia that is ultimately fatal. Triapine is a novel inhibitor of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase. Sequential inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with triapine and an M1 ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor (fludarabine) was noted to be safe, and led to a 29% complete plus partial response rate in myeloproliferative neoplasms. This article reports the findings of a phase II trial of triapine (105 mg/m2/day) followed by fludarabine (30 mg/m2/day) daily for 5 consecutive days in 37 patients with accelerated myeloproliferative neoplasms and secondary acute myeloid leukemia. The overall response rate was 49% (18/37), with a complete remission rate of 24% (9/37). Overall response rates and complete remissions were seen in all disease subsets, including secondary acute myeloid leukemia, in which the overall response rate and complete remission rate were 48% and 33%, respectively. All patients with known JAK2 V617F mutations (6/6) responded. The median overall survival of the entire cohort was 6.9 months, with a median overall survival of both overall responders and complete responders of 10.6 months. These data further demonstrate the promise of sequential inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase in patients with accelerated myeloproliferative neoplasms and secondary acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00381550). PMID:24362550

  1. The Dimanganese(II) Site of Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-10-02

    Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) use a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor, Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet}, in their homodimeric NrdF ({beta}2) subunit to initiate reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The structure of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} form of NrdF is an important component in understanding O{sub 2}-mediated formation of the active metallocofactor, a subject of much interest because a unique flavodoxin, NrdI, is required for cofactor assembly. Biochemical studies and sequence alignments suggest that NrdF and NrdI proteins diverge into three phylogenetically distinct groups. The only crystal structure to date of a NrdF with a fully ordered and occupied dimanganese site is that of Escherichia coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, prototypical of the enzymes from actinobacteria and proteobacteria. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, representative of the enzymes from a second group, from Bacillus and Staphylococcus. The structures of the metal clusters in the {beta}2 dimer are distinct from those observed in E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF. These differences illustrate the key role that solvent molecules and protein residues in the second coordination sphere of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} cluster play in determining conformations of carboxylate residues at the metal sites and demonstrate that diverse coordination geometries are capable of serving as starting points for Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly in class Ib RNRs.

  2. Identification of structural domains within the large subunit of herpes simplex virus ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Conner, J; Cross, A; Murray, J; Marsden, H

    1994-12-01

    The large subunit (R1) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) ribonucleotide reductase is a bifunctional protein consisting of a unique N-terminal protein kinase domain and a ribonucleotide reductase domain. Previous studies showed that the two functional domains are linked by a protease sensitive site. Here we provide evidence for two subdomains, of 30K and 53K, within the reductase domain. The two fragments, which were produced by limited proteolysis and were resistant to further degradation, remained tightly associated in a complex containing two molecules of each. They were capable of binding the R2 subunit of HSV ribonucleotide reductase with approximately the same affinity as the intact protein but the complex did not complement the small subunit (R2) to give an active enzyme. At low concentrations (0.4 micrograms/ml) of trypsin or V8 protease, cleavage between the subdomains was prevented by the presence of the N-terminal protein kinase domain. At higher protease concentrations (1 micrograms/ml) the N-terminal domain is extensively proteolysed and the 30K and 53K domains were generated. Identical results were obtained using purified R1 isolated from infected cell extracts or following expression in Escherichia coli. The origin of the two domains was investigated by N-terminal sequencing of the 53K fragment and by examining their reactivity with a panel of R1-specific monoclonal antibodies which we isolated and epitope mapped for that purpose. The trypsin cleavage site was found to lie between arginine 575 and asparagine 576, and proteolysis in this region was not prevented by the presence of R2 or the nonapeptide YAGAVVNDL. We propose that the ribonucleotide reductase region of HSV R1 exists in a two domain structure, and that the interdomain linking region is protected by the unique N terminus.

  3. The class III ribonucleotide reductase from Neisseria bacilliformis can utilize thioredoxin as a reductant

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yifeng; Funk, Michael A.; Rosado, Leonardo A.; Baek, Jiyeon; Drennan, Catherine L.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    The class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied to date couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxynucleotides with the oxidation of formate to CO2. Here we report the cloning and heterologous expression of the Neisseria bacilliformis class III RNR and show that it can catalyze nucleotide reduction using the ubiquitous thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase/NADPH system. We present a structural model based on a crystal structure of the homologous Thermotoga maritima class III RNR, showing its architecture and the position of conserved residues in the active site. Phylogenetic studies suggest that this form of class III RNR is present in bacteria and archaea that carry out diverse types of anaerobic metabolism. PMID:25157154

  4. dNTP deficiency induced by HU via inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase affects neural tube development.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhen; Wang, Xiuwei; Dong, Yanting; Xu, Lin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-02-03

    Exposure to environmental toxic chemicals in utero during the neural tube development period can cause developmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neural tube development programming, the murine neural tube defects (NTDs) model was induced by interrupting folate metabolism using methotrexate in our previous study. The present study aimed to examine the effects of dNTP deficiency induced by hydroxyurea (HU), a specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor, during murine neural tube development. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with various doses of HU on gestation day (GD) 7.5, and the embryos were checked on GD 11.5. RNR activity and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels were measured in the optimal dose. Additionally, DNA damage was examined by comet analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Cellular behaviors in NTDs embryos were evaluated with phosphorylation of histone H3 (PH-3) and caspase-3 using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results showed that NTDs were observed mostly with HU treatment at an optimal dose of 225 mg/kg b/w. RNR activity was inhibited and dNTP levels were decreased in HU-treated embryos with NTDs. Additionally, increased DNA damage, decreased proliferation, and increased caspase-3 were significant in NTDs embryos compared to the controls. Results indicated that HU induced murine NTDs model by disturbing dNTP metabolism and further led to the abnormal cell balance between proliferation and apoptosis.

  5. Photo-ribonucleotide reductase β2 by selective cysteine labeling with a radical phototrigger

    PubMed Central

    Pizano, Arturo A.; Lutterman, Daniel A.; Holder, Patrick G.; Teets, Thomas S.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical radical initiation is a powerful tool for studying radical initiation and transport in biology. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), which catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms, are an exemplar of radical mediated transformations in biology. Class Ia RNRs are composed of two subunits: α2 and β2. As a method to initiate radical formation photochemically within β2, a single surface-exposed cysteine of the β2 subunit of Escherichia coli Class Ia RNR has been labeled (98%) with a photooxidant ([Re ] = tricarbonyl(1,10-phenanthroline)(methylpyridyl)rhenium(I)). The labeling was achieved by incubation of S355C-β2 with the 4-(bromomethyl)pyridyl derivative of [Re] to yield the labeled species, [Re]-S355C-β2. Steady-state and time-resolved emission experiments reveal that the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited-state 3[Re ]∗ is not significantly perturbed after bioconjugation and is available as a phototrigger of tyrosine radical at position 356 in the β2 subunit; transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the radical lives for microseconds. The work described herein provides a platform for photochemical radical initiation and study of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in the β2 subunit of RNR, from which radical initiation and transport for this enzyme originates. PMID:22171005

  6. Mechanism of ribonucleotide reductase from Herpes simplex virus type 1. Evidence for 3' carbon-hydrogen bond cleavage and inactivation by nucleotide analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Ator, M.A.; Stubbe, J.; Spector, T.

    1986-03-15

    Isotope effects of 2.5, 2.1, and 1.0 were measured on the conversion of (3'-3H)ADP, (3'-H)UDP, and (5-3H) UDP to the corresponding 2'-deoxynucleotides by herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase. These results indicate that the reduction of either purine or pyrimidine nucleotides requires cleavage of the 3' carbon-hydrogen bond of the substrate. The substrate analogs 2'-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-diphosphate (ClUDP), 2'-deoxy-2'-fluorouridine 5'-diphosphate, and 2'-azido-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-diphosphate were time-dependent inactivators of the herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase. Incubation of (3'-3H)ClUDP with the enzyme was accompanied by time-dependent release of 3H to the solvent. Reaction of (beta-32P)ClUDP with the reductase resulted in the production of inorganic pyrophosphate. These results are consistent with the enzyme-mediated cleavage of the 3' carbon-hydrogen bond of ClUDP and the subsequent conversion of the nucleotide to 2-methylene-3(2H)furanone, as previously reported with the Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase.

  7. Cloning and sequencing of the genes from Salmonella typhimurium encoding a new bacterial ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, A; Gibert, I; Barbé, J

    1994-01-01

    A plasmid library of Salmonella typhimurium was used to complement a temperature-sensitive nrdA mutant of Escherichia coli. Complementation was obtained with two different classes of plasmids, one carrying the E. coli nrdAB-like genes and the second containing an operon encoding a new bacterial ribonucleotide reductase. Plasmids harboring these new reductase genes also enable obligately anaerobic nrdB::Mud1 E. coli mutants to grow in the presence of oxygen. This operon consists of two open reading frames, which have been designated nrdE (2,145 bp) and nrdF (969 bp). The deduced amino acid sequences of the nrdE and nrdF products include the catalytically important residues conserved in ribonucleotide reductase enzymes of class I and show 25 and 28% overall identity with the R1 and R2 protein, respectively, of the aerobic ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase of E. coli. The 3' end of the sequenced 4.9-kb fragment corresponds to the upstream region of the previously published proU operon of both S. typhimurium and E. coli, indicating that the nrdEF genes are at 57 min on the chromosomal maps of these two bacterial species. Analysis of the nrdEF and proU sequences demonstrates that transcription of the nrdEF genes is in the clockwise direction on the S. typhimurium and E. coli maps. Images PMID:8195103

  8. Inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase by 2'-substituted deoxycytidine analogs: possible application in AIDS treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, V; Borella, S; Calderazzo, F; Ferraro, P; Chieco Bianchi, L; Reichard, P

    1994-01-01

    After phosphorylation to the corresponding diphosphates, 2'-azido-2'-deoxycytidine and 2'-difluorocytidine act as powerful inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase. Phosphorylation requires deoxycytidine kinase, an enzyme with particularly high activity in lymphoid cells. Therefore, the deoxycytidine analogs can be expected to inhibit the reductase with some specificity for the lymphoid system. Pretreatment of human CEM lymphoblasts with the analogs considerably increased the phosphorylation of 3'-deoxy-3'-azidothymidine (AzT). The increased phosphorylation of AzT is caused by a prolongation of the S phase of the cell cycle. Our results suggest the possibility of a combination of 2'-substituted deoxycytidine analogs with AzT in the treatment of AIDS. Gao et al. [Gao, W.-Y., Cara, A., Gallo, R. C. & Lori, F. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90, 8925-8928] have suggested the use of the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea for this purpose, since the resulting decrease in the size of deoxyribonucleotide pools decreases the processivity of the HIV reverse transcriptase. From our results it would appear that the 2'-substituted deoxycytidine analogs might be preferable to hydroxyurea. PMID:8078894

  9. Cloning, sequence determination, and regulation of the ribonucleotide reductase subunits from Plasmodium falciparum: a target for antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, H; Salem, J S; Li, L S; Yang, F D; Mama, S; Wang, Z M; Fisher, A; Hamann, C S; Cooperman, B S

    1993-01-01

    Malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, accounting for more than one million deaths annually. We have focused on the reduction of ribonucleotides to 2'-deoxyribonucleotides, catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductase, which represents the rate-determining step in DNA replication as a target for antimalarial agents. We report the full-length DNA sequence corresponding to the large (PfR1) and small (PfR2) subunits of Plasmodium falciparum ribonucleotide reductase. The small subunit (PfR2) contains the major catalytic motif consisting of a tyrosyl radical and a dinuclear Fe site. Whereas PfR2 shares 59% amino acid identity with human R2, a striking sequence divergence between human R2 and PfR2 at the C terminus may provide a selective target for inhibition of the malarial enzyme. A synthetic oligopeptide corresponding to the C-terminal 7 residues of PfR2 inhibits mammalian ribonucleotide reductase at concentrations approximately 10-fold higher than that predicted to inhibit malarial R2. The gene encoding the large subunit (PfR1) contains a single intron. The cysteines thought to be involved in the reduction mechanism are conserved. In contrast to mammalian ribonucleotide reductase, the genes for PfR1 and PfR2 are located on the same chromosome and the accumulation of mRNAs for the two subunits follow different temporal patterns during the cell cycle. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8415692

  10. Biochemical Characterization of the Split Class II Ribonucleotide Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Crona, Mikael; Hofer, Anders; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Tholander, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Its flexibility with respect to oxygen load is reflected by the fact that its genome encodes all three existing classes of ribonucleotides reductase (RNR): the oxygen-dependent class I RNR, the oxygen-indifferent class II RNR, and the oxygen-sensitive class III RNR. The P. aeruginosa class II RNR is expressed as two separate polypeptides (NrdJa and NrdJb), a unique example of a split RNR enzyme in a free-living organism. A split class II RNR is also found in a few closely related γ-Proteobacteria. We have characterized the P. aeruginosa class II RNR and show that both subunits are required for formation of a biologically functional enzyme that can sustain vitamin B12-dependent growth. Binding of the B12 coenzyme as well as substrate and allosteric effectors resides in the NrdJa subunit, whereas the NrdJb subunit mediates efficient reductive dithiol exchange during catalysis. A combination of activity assays and activity-independent methods like surface plasmon resonance and gas phase electrophoretic macromolecule analysis suggests that the enzymatically active form of the enzyme is a (NrdJa-NrdJb)2 homodimer of heterodimers, and a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments and molecular modeling suggests a plausible region in NrdJa that interacts with NrdJb. Our detailed characterization of the split NrdJ from P. aeruginosa provides insight into the biochemical function of a unique enzyme known to have central roles in biofilm formation and anaerobic growth. PMID:26225432

  11. Functional Analysis of Ribonucleotide Reductase from Cordyceps militaris Expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Ahmad, Suparmin; Park, Enoch Y

    2017-01-10

    Cordyceps militaris produces cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine), which has various activities, including anti-oxidant, anti-tumoral, anti-viral, and anti-inflammatory. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) seems to be a candidate to produce cordycepin in C. militaris because RNR catalyzes the reduction of nucleotides to 2'-deoxynucleotides, whose structures are similar to that of cordycepin. However, the role of RNR has not been confirmed yet. In this study, complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of C. militaris RNR (CmRNR) large and small subunits (CmR1 and CmR2) were cloned from C. militaris NBRC9787 to investigate the function of CmRNR for its cordycepin production. C. militaris NBRC9787 began to produce cordycepin when grown in a liquid surface culture in medium composed of glucose and yeast extract for 15 days. CmR1 cDNA and CmR2 cDNA were obtained from its genomic DNA and from total RNA extracted from its mycelia after cultivation for 21 days, respectively. Recombinant CmR1 and CmR2 were expressed individually in Escherichia coli and purified. Purified recombinant CmR1 and CmR2 showed RNR activity toward adenosine diphosphate (ADP) only when two subunits were mixed but only show the reduction of ADP to 2'-deoxyADP. These results indicate that the pathway from ADP to 3'deoxyADP via CmRNR does not exist in C. militaris and cordycepin production in C. militaris may be mediated by other enzymes.

  12. Determination of triapine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in human plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Kunos, Charles A; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Triapine is an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). Studies have shown that triapine significantly decreases the activity of RNR and enhanced the radiation-mediated cytotoxicity in cervical and colon cancer. In this work, we have developed and validated a selective and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the determination of triapine in human plasma. In this method, 2-[(3-fluoro-2-pyridinyl)methylene] hydrazinecarbothioamide (NSC 266749) was used as the internal standard (IS); plasma samples were prepared by deproteinization with acetonitrile; tripaine and the IS were separated on a Waters Xbridge Shield RP18 column (3.5 µm; 2.1 × 50 mm) using a mobile phase containing 25.0% methanol and 75.0% ammonium bicarbonate buffer (10.0 mM, pH 8.50; v/v); column eluate was monitored by positive turbo-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry; and quantitation of triapine was carried out in multiple-reaction-monitoring mode. The method developed had a linear calibration range of 0.250-50.0 ng/mL with correlation coefficient of 0.999 for triapine in human plasma. The IS-normalized recovery and the IS-normalized matrix factor of triapine were 101-104% and 0.89-1.05, respectively. The accuracy expressed as percentage error and precision expressed as coefficient of variation were ≤±6 and ≤8%, respectively. The validated LC-MS/MS method was applied to the measurement of triapine in patient samples from a phase I clinical trial.

  13. Ribonucleotide reductase inhibition restores platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Abdul-Karim, Fadi W; Fanning, James; Abulafia, Ovadia; Bonebrake, Albert J; Usha, Lydia

    2012-04-27

    The potent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxyaldehyde-thiosemicarbazone (3-AP) was tested as a chemosensitizer for restored cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Preclinical in vitro platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell survival, RNR activity, and DNA damage assays were done after cisplatin or cisplatin plus 3-AP treatments. Six women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer underwent four-day 3-AP (96 mg/m(2), day one to four) and cisplatin (25 mg/m(2), day two and three) infusions every 21 days until disease progression or adverse effects prohibited further therapy. Pre-therapy ovarian cancer tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for RNR subunit expression as an indicator of cisplatin plus 3-AP treatment response. 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells was not as effective as sequencing cisplatin plus 3-AP together in cell survival assays. Platinum-mediated DNA damage (i.e., γH2AX foci) resolved quickly after cisplatin-alone or 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure, but persisted after a cisplatin plus 3-AP sequence. On trial, 25 four-day overlapping 3-AP and cisplatin cycles were administered to six women (median 4.2 cycles per patient). 3-AP-related methemoglobinemia (range seven to 10%) occurred in two (33%) of six women, halting trial accrual. When sequenced cisplatin plus 3-AP, RNR inhibition restored platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancers. 3-AP (96 mg/m(2)) infusions produced modest methemoglobinemia, the expected consequence of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors disrupting collateral proteins containing iron. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00081276.

  14. Ribonucleotide reductase inhibition restores platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The potent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxyaldehyde-thiosemicarbazone (3-AP) was tested as a chemosensitizer for restored cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Methods Preclinical in vitro platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell survival, RNR activity, and DNA damage assays were done after cisplatin or cisplatin plus 3-AP treatments. Six women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer underwent four-day 3-AP (96 mg/m2, day one to four) and cisplatin (25 mg/m2, day two and three) infusions every 21 days until disease progression or adverse effects prohibited further therapy. Pre-therapy ovarian cancer tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for RNR subunit expression as an indicator of cisplatin plus 3-AP treatment response. Results 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells was not as effective as sequencing cisplatin plus 3-AP together in cell survival assays. Platinum-mediated DNA damage (i.e., γH2AX foci) resolved quickly after cisplatin-alone or 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure, but persisted after a cisplatin plus 3-AP sequence. On trial, 25 four-day overlapping 3-AP and cisplatin cycles were administered to six women (median 4.2 cycles per patient). 3-AP-related methemoglobinemia (range seven to 10%) occurred in two (33%) of six women, halting trial accrual. Conclusions When sequenced cisplatin plus 3-AP, RNR inhibition restored platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancers. 3-AP (96 mg/m2) infusions produced modest methemoglobinemia, the expected consequence of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors disrupting collateral proteins containing iron. Trial registry ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00081276 PMID:22541066

  15. Ribonucleotide Reduction in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Function and Expression of Genes Encoding Class Ib and Class II Ribonucleotide Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Stephanie S.; Warner, Digby F.; Tsenova, Liana; Timm, Juliano; McKinney, John D.; Kaplan, Gilla; Rubin, Harvey; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, possesses a class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), encoded by the nrdE and nrdF2 genes, in addition to a putative class II RNR, encoded by nrdZ. In this study we probed the relative contributions of these RNRs to the growth and persistence of M. tuberculosis. We found that targeted knockout of the nrdF2 gene could be achieved only in the presence of a complementing allele, confirming that this gene is essential under normal, in vitro growth conditions. This observation also implied that the alternate class Ib small subunit encoded by the nrdF1 gene is unable to substitute for nrdF2 and that the class II RNR, NrdZ, cannot substitute for the class Ib enzyme, NrdEF2. Conversely, a ΔnrdZ null mutant of M. tuberculosis was readily obtained by allelic exchange mutagenesis. Quantification of levels of nrdE, nrdF2, nrdF1, and nrdZ gene expression by real-time, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR with molecular beacons by using mRNA from aerobic and O2-limited cultures showed that nrdZ was significantly induced under microaerophilic conditions, in contrast to the other genes, whose expression was reduced by O2 restriction. However, survival of the ΔnrdZ mutant strain was not impaired under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Moreover, the lungs of B6D2/F1 mice infected with the ΔnrdZ mutant had bacterial loads comparable to those of lungs infected with the parental wild-type strain, which argues against the hypothesis that nrdZ plays a significant role in the virulence of M. tuberculosis in this mouse model. PMID:14573627

  16. Evaluation of combinations of drugs that inhibit Ehrlich tumor cell ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Cory, J G

    1981-05-01

    The nature of the inhibition of Ehrlich tumor cell ribonucleotide reductase by combinations of agents directed at the non-heme iron-containing component and the effector-binding component was studied with the use of isobolograms. From these studies, it was determined that the combinations of pyrazoloimidazole (IMPY) and dialdehyde of inosine, IMPY and deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP), IMPY and deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP), and IMPY and deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) gave synergistic inhibition of cytidine diphosphate reductase. The combination of dATP and dGTP also gave synergistic inhibition. The combinations of hydroxyurea and IMPY, 4-methyl-5-aminoisoquinoline thiosemicarbazone (MAIQ) and IMPY, and dialdehyde of inosine and dialdehyde derivative of 5'-deoxyinosine gave antagonistic inhibition. Other combinations utilizing MAIQ and dATP, MAIQ and dGTP, MAIQ and dTTP, hydroxyurea and dGTP, and hydroxyurea and dTTP gave inhibition which was additive.

  17. Rapid X-ray Photoreduction of Dimetal-Oxygen Cofactors in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sigfridsson, Kajsa G. V.; Chernev, Petko; Leidel, Nils; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Gräslund, Astrid; Haumann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Prototypic dinuclear metal cofactors with varying metallation constitute a class of O2-activating catalysts in numerous enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase. Reliable structures are required to unravel the reaction mechanisms. However, protein crystallography data may be compromised by x-ray photoreduction (XRP). We studied XPR of Fe(III)Fe(III) and Mn(III)Fe(III) sites in the R2 subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Rapid and biphasic x-ray photoreduction kinetics at 20 and 80 K for both cofactor types suggested sequential formation of (III,II) and (II,II) species and similar redox potentials of iron and manganese sites. Comparing with typical x-ray doses in crystallography implies that (II,II) states are reached in <1 s in such studies. First-sphere metal coordination and metal-metal distances differed after chemical reduction at room temperature and after XPR at cryogenic temperatures, as corroborated by model structures from density functional theory calculations. The inter-metal distances in the XPR-induced (II,II) states, however, are similar to R2 crystal structures. Therefore, crystal data of initially oxidized R2-type proteins mostly contain photoreduced (II,II) cofactors, which deviate from the native structures functional in O2 activation, explaining observed variable metal ligation motifs. This situation may be remedied by novel femtosecond free electron-laser protein crystallography techniques. PMID:23400774

  18. Ribonucleotide reductases reveal novel viral diversity and predict biological and ecological features of unknown marine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sakowski, Eric G.; Munsell, Erik V.; Hyatt, Mara; Kress, William; Williamson, Shannon J.; Nasko, Daniel J.; Polson, Shawn W.; Wommack, K. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Virioplankton play a crucial role in aquatic ecosystems as top-down regulators of bacterial populations and agents of horizontal gene transfer and nutrient cycling. However, the biology and ecology of virioplankton populations in the environment remain poorly understood. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are ancient enzymes that reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides and thus prime DNA synthesis. Composed of three classes according to O2 reactivity, RNRs can be predictive of the physiological conditions surrounding DNA synthesis. RNRs are universal among cellular life, common within viral genomes and virioplankton shotgun metagenomes (viromes), and estimated to occur within >90% of the dsDNA virioplankton sampled in this study. RNRs occur across diverse viral groups, including all three morphological families of tailed phages, making these genes attractive for studies of viral diversity. Differing patterns in virioplankton diversity were clear from RNRs sampled across a broad oceanic transect. The most abundant RNRs belonged to novel lineages of podoviruses infecting α-proteobacteria, a bacterial class critical to oceanic carbon cycling. RNR class was predictive of phage morphology among cyanophages and RNR distribution frequencies among cyanophages were largely consistent with the predictions of the “kill the winner–cost of resistance” model. RNRs were also identified for the first time to our knowledge within ssDNA viromes. These data indicate that RNR polymorphism provides a means of connecting the biological and ecological features of virioplankton populations. PMID:25313075

  19. Investigation of an octapeptide inhibitor of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bushweller, J.H.; Bartlett, P.A. )

    1991-08-20

    Several peptides contained within the C-terminal sequence of the B2 subunit of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) were investigated for their ability to inhibit the enzyme, presumably by interfering with association of the B1 and B2 subunits. AcYLVGQIDSE, corresponding by sequence homology to a nonapeptide that inhibits herpes simplex RNR shows no inhibition of the E. cole enzyme, whereas AcDDLSNFQL, the C-terminal octapeptide of the E. coli B2 subunit, is a noncompetitive inhibitor. Neither bradykinin (RPPGFSPER) nor the pentapeptide AcSNFQL inhibits the E. coli enzyme. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy was used to probe the conformation of AcDDLSNFQL when it is bound to the B1 subunit. These experiments suggest that the peptide adopts a turn in the region of Asn{sub 5} and Phe{sub 6} and that a hydrophobic cluster of the phenylalanine and leucine side chains is involved in the interaction surface.

  20. Physical interaction between human ribonucleotide reductase large subunit and thioredoxin increases colorectal cancer malignancy.

    PubMed

    Lou, Meng; Liu, Qian; Ren, Guoping; Zeng, Jiling; Xiang, Xueping; Ding, Yongfeng; Lin, Qinghui; Zhong, Tingting; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Lijun; Qi, Hongyan; Shen, Jing; Li, Haoran; Shao, Jimin

    2017-04-14

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate-limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis by catalyzing the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. During each enzymatic turnover, reduction of the active site disulfide in the catalytic large subunit is performed by a pair of shuttle cysteine residues in its C-terminal tail. Thioredoxin (Trx) and Glutaredoxin (Grx) are ubiquitous redox proteins, catalyzing thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. Here, immunohistochemical examination of clinical colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens revealed that human thioredoxin1 (hTrx1), but not human glutaredoxin1 (hGrx1), was upregulated along with human RR large subunit (RRM1) in cancer tissues, and the expression levels of both proteins were correlated with cancer malignancy stage. Ectopically expressed hTrx1 significantly increased RR activity, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation and migration. Importantly, inhibition of both hTrx1 and RRM1 produced a synergistic anti-cancer effect in CRC cells and xenograft mice. Furthermore, hTrx1 rather than hGrx1 was the efficient reductase for RRM1 regeneration. We also observed a direct protein-protein interaction between RRM1 and hTrx1 in CRC cells. Interestingly, besides the known two conserved cysteines, a third one (Cys779) in the RRM1 C-terminus was essential for RRM1 regeneration and binding to hTrx1, while both Cys32 and Cys35 in hTrx1 played a counterpart role. Our findings suggest that the upregulated RRM1 and hTrx1 in CRC directly interact with each other and promote RR activity, resulting in enhanced DNA synthesis and cancer malignancy. We propose that the RRM1-hTrx1 interaction might be a novel potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  1. Marek’s disease virus encoded ribonucleotide reductase large subunit is essential for in vivo replication and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease virus encodes a ribonucleotide reductase (RR) that consists of two subunits namely RR1 and RR2, both of which associate to form an active holoenzyme and both subunits are necessary for enzyme activity. It is an essential enzyme for the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleo...

  2. Structures of the Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase Rnr2 and Rnr4 Homodimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerhalter, M.; Voegtli, W.C.; Perlstein, D.L.; Ge, J.; Stubbe, J.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Class I ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Eukaryotic RNRs comprise two subunits, the R1 subunit, which contains substrate and allosteric effector binding sites, and the R2 subunit, which houses a catalytically essential diiron-tyrosyl radical cofactor. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there are two variants of the R2 subunit, called Rnr2 and Rnr4. Rnr4 is unique in that it lacks three iron-binding residues conserved in all other R2s. Nevertheless, Rnr4 is required to activate Rnr2, and the functional species in vivo is believed to be a heterodimeric complex between the two proteins. The crystal structures of the Rnr2 and Rnr4 homodimers have been determined and are compared to that of the heterodimer. The homodimers are very similar to the heterodimer and to mouse R2 in overall fold, but there are several key differences. In the Rnr2 homodimer, one of the iron-binding helices, helix {alpha}B, is not well-ordered. In the heterodimer, interactions with a loop region connecting Rnr4 helices {alpha}A and {alpha}3 stabilize this Rnr2 helix, which donates iron ligand Asp 145. Sequence differences between Rnr2 and Rnr4 prevent the same interactions from occurring in the Rnr2 homodimer. These findings provide a structural rationale for why the heterodimer is the preferred complex in vivo. The active-site region in the Rnr4 homodimer reveals interactions not apparent in the heterodimer, supporting previous conclusions that this subunit does not bind iron. When taken together, these results support a model in which Rnr4 stabilizes Rnr2 for cofactor assembly and activity.

  3. Methyl-Hydroxylamine as an Efficacious Antibacterial Agent That Targets the Ribonucleotide Reductase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Julián, Esther; Baelo, Aida; Gavaldà, Joan; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has encouraged vigorous efforts to develop antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of action. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme in DNA replication that acts by converting ribonucleotides into the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA replication and repair. RNR has been extensively studied as an ideal target for DNA inhibition, and several drugs that are already available on the market are used for anticancer and antiviral activity. However, the high toxicity of these current drugs to eukaryotic cells does not permit their use as antibacterial agents. Here, we present a radical scavenger compound that inhibited bacterial RNR, and the compound's activity as an antibacterial agent together with its toxicity in eukaryotic cells were evaluated. First, the efficacy of N-methyl-hydroxylamine (M-HA) in inhibiting the growth of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated, and no effect on eukaryotic cells was observed. M-HA showed remarkable efficacy against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, given the M-HA activity against these two bacteria, our results showed that M-HA has intracellular antimycobacterial activity against BCG-infected macrophages, and it is efficacious in partially disassembling and inhibiting the further formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Furthermore, M-HA and ciprofloxacin showed a synergistic effect that caused a massive reduction in a P. aeruginosa biofilm. Overall, our results suggest the vast potential of M-HA as an antibacterial agent, which acts by specifically targeting a bacterial RNR enzyme. PMID:25782003

  4. Methyl-hydroxylamine as an efficacious antibacterial agent that targets the ribonucleotide reductase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Julián, Esther; Baelo, Aida; Gavaldà, Joan; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has encouraged vigorous efforts to develop antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of action. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme in DNA replication that acts by converting ribonucleotides into the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA replication and repair. RNR has been extensively studied as an ideal target for DNA inhibition, and several drugs that are already available on the market are used for anticancer and antiviral activity. However, the high toxicity of these current drugs to eukaryotic cells does not permit their use as antibacterial agents. Here, we present a radical scavenger compound that inhibited bacterial RNR, and the compound's activity as an antibacterial agent together with its toxicity in eukaryotic cells were evaluated. First, the efficacy of N-methyl-hydroxylamine (M-HA) in inhibiting the growth of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated, and no effect on eukaryotic cells was observed. M-HA showed remarkable efficacy against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, given the M-HA activity against these two bacteria, our results showed that M-HA has intracellular antimycobacterial activity against BCG-infected macrophages, and it is efficacious in partially disassembling and inhibiting the further formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Furthermore, M-HA and ciprofloxacin showed a synergistic effect that caused a massive reduction in a P. aeruginosa biofilm. Overall, our results suggest the vast potential of M-HA as an antibacterial agent, which acts by specifically targeting a bacterial RNR enzyme.

  5. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  6. Genetic characterization and role in virulence of the ribonucleotide reductases of Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, DeLacy V; Crump, Katie E; Makhlynets, Olga; Snyder, Melanie; Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping; Stubbe, JoAnne; Kitten, Todd

    2014-02-28

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a cause of infective endocarditis and has been shown to require a manganese transporter called SsaB for virulence and O2 tolerance. Like certain other pathogens, S. sanguinis possesses aerobic class Ib (NrdEF) and anaerobic class III (NrdDG) ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) that perform the essential function of reducing ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The accompanying paper (Makhlynets, O., Boal, A. K., Rhodes, D. V., Kitten, T., Rosenzweig, A. C., and Stubbe, J. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 6259-6272) indicates that in the presence of O2, the S. sanguinis class Ib RNR self-assembles an essential diferric-tyrosyl radical (Fe(III)2-Y(•)) in vitro, whereas assembly of a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical (Mn(III)2-Y(•)) cofactor requires NrdI, and Mn(III)2-Y(•) is more active than Fe(III)2-Y(•) with the endogenous reducing system of NrdH and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1). In this study, we have shown that deletion of either nrdHEKF or nrdI completely abolishes virulence in an animal model of endocarditis, whereas nrdD mutation has no effect. The nrdHEKF, nrdI, and trxR1 mutants fail to grow aerobically, whereas anaerobic growth requires nrdD. The nrdJ gene encoding an O2-independent adenosylcobalamin-cofactored RNR was introduced into the nrdHEKF, nrdI, and trxR1 mutants. Growth of the nrdHEKF and nrdI mutants in the presence of O2 was partially restored. The combined results suggest that Mn(III)2-Y(•)-cofactored NrdF is required for growth under aerobic conditions and in animals. This could explain in part why manganese is necessary for virulence and O2 tolerance in many bacterial pathogens possessing a class Ib RNR and suggests NrdF and NrdI may serve as promising new antimicrobial targets.

  7. The involvement of Arg265 of mouse ribonucleotide reductase R2 protein in proton transfer and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Narváez, Ana J; Voevodskaya, Nina; Thelander, Lars; Gräslund, Astrid

    2006-09-08

    Ribonucleotide reductase class I enzymes consist of two non-identical subunits, R1 and R2, the latter containing a diiron carboxylate center and a stable tyrosyl radical (Tyr*), both essential for catalysis. Catalysis is known to involve highly conserved amino acid residues covering a range of approximately 35 A and a concerted mechanism involving long range electron transfer, probably coupled to proton transfer. A number of residues involved in electron transfer in both the R1 and R2 proteins have been identified, but no direct model has been presented regarding the proton transfer side of the process. Arg265 is conserved in all known sequences of class Ia R2. In this study we have used site-directed mutagenesis to gain insight into the role of this residue, which lies close to the catalytically essential Asp266 and Trp103. Mutants to Arg265 included replacement by Ala, Glu, Gln, and Tyr. All mutants of Arg265 were found to have no or low catalytic activity with the exception of Arg265 to Glu, which shows approximately 40% of the activity of native R2. We also found that the Arg mutants were capable of stable tyrosyl radical generation, with similar kinetics of radical formation and R1 binding as native R2. Our results, supported by molecular modeling, strongly suggest that Arg265 is involved in the proton-coupled electron transfer pathway and may act as a proton mediator during catalysis.

  8. In vivo requirement for glutaredoxins and thioredoxins in the reduction of the ribonucleotide reductases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gon, Stéphanie; Faulkner, Melinda J; Beckwith, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli expresses three types of ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) that utilize the redox chemistry of cysteine to catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides. Upon reduction, the cysteines form a disulfide bond and must be reduced. The authors present in vivo studies that shed light on the mechanism by which these enzymes are regenerated. The class Ia enzyme, NrdAB, can be reduced by either the thioredoxins 1 and 2 or by glutaredoxin 1. The class Ib enzyme, NrdEF, is reduced in vivo by a dedicated glutaredoxin-like protein, NrdH. Despite its similarities to glutaredoxins, this protein is itself reduced by thioredoxin reductase in vivo. However, in the absence of thioredoxin reductase and NrdH, glutaredoxin 1 can partially replace NrdH. Despite their similar structures, the NrdEF and NrdAB RNRs differ in their abilities to function under low oxygen conditions. With only traces of oxygen present, NrdAB can allow some growth in the absence of the anaerobic enzyme NrdDG. NrdEF cannot. Furthermore, in anaerobiosis, E. coli is dependent for growth on class III RNR, NrdDG, and on having at least one of the two reductive systems, thioredoxin reductase or glutathione reductase. These findings indicate a role for these enzymes either for NrdDG reactivation or some other essential anaerobic process.

  9. Class I Ribonucleotide Reductases: Metallocofactor Assembly and Repair In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of metallocofactors essential for the activity of many enyzmes is a major mechanism of posttranslational modification. The cellular machinery required for these processes in the case of mono- and dinuclear nonheme iron and manganese cofactors has remained largely elusive. In addition, many metallocofactors can be converted to inactive forms, and pathways for their repair have recently come to light. The class I ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides and require dinuclear metal clusters for activity: an FeIIIFeIII-tyrosyl radical (Y•) cofactor (class Ia), a MnIIIMnIII-Y• cofactor (class Ib), and a MnIVFeIII cofactor (class Ic). The class Ia, Ib, and Ic RNRs are structurally homologous and contain almost identical metal coordination sites. Recent progress in our under-standing of the mechanisms by which the cofactor of each of these RNRs is generated in vitro and in vivo and by which the damaged cofactors are repaired is providing insight into how nature prevents mismetallation and orchestrates active cluster formation in high yields. PMID:21456967

  10. STRUCTURAL BASIS FOR ALLOSTERIC REGULATION OF HUMAN RIBONUCLEOTIDE REDUCTASE BY NUCLEOTIDE-INDUCED OLIGOMERIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, James Wesley; Wijerathna, Sanath Ranjan; Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Xu, Hai; Nakano, Ryo; Jha, Shalini; Prendergast, Jay; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Roos, Annette; Nordlund, Pär; Li, Zongli; Walz, Thomas; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2011-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is an αnβn (RR1●RR2) complex that maintains balanced dNTP pools by reducing ribonucleoside diphosphates to deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates. RR1 is the catalytic subunit and RR2 houses the free radical required for catalysis. RR is allosterically regulated by its activator ATP and its inhibitor dATP, which regulate RR activity by inducing oligomerization of RR1. Here, we report the first X-ray structures of human RR1 bound to TTP-only, dATP-only, TTP●GDP, TTP●ATP, and TTP●dATP. These structures provide insights into ATP/dATP regulation of RR. At physiological dATP concentrations, RR1 forms inactive hexamers. We determined the first X-ray structure of the RR1●dATP hexamer and used single-particle electron microscopy to visualize the α6●ββ’ 1●dATP holo complex. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional assays confirm that hexamerization is a prerequisite for inhibition by dATP. Our data provide an elegant mechanism for regulating RR activity by dATP-induced oligomerization. PMID:21336276

  11. Investigation of reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2'-azido-2'-deoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thao P; Sobczak, Adam J; Mebel, Alexander M; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wnuk, Stanislaw F

    2012-07-08

    Model 3'-azido-3'-deoxynucleosides with thiol or vicinal dithiol substituents at C2' or C5' were synthesized to study reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2'-azido-2'-deoxynucleotides. Esterification of 5'-(tert-butyldiphenylsilyl)-3'-azido-3'-deoxyadenosine and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) with 2,3-S-isopropylidene-2,3-dimercaptopropanoic acid or N-Boc-S-trityl-L-cysteine and deprotection gave 3'-azido-3'-deoxy-2'-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)adenosine and the 3'-azido-3'-deoxy-5'-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)thymidine analogs. Density functional calculations predicted that intramolecular reactions between generated thiyl radicals and an azido group on such model compounds would be exothermic by 33.6-41.2 kcal/mol and have low energy barriers of 10.4-13.5 kcal/mol. Reduction of the azido group occurred to give 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine, which was postulated to occur with thiyl radicals generated by treatment of 3'-azido-3'-deoxy-5'-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl)thymidine with 2,2'-azobis-(2-methyl-2-propionamidine) dihydrochloride. Gamma radiolysis of N(2)O-saturated aqueous solutions of AZT and cysteine produced 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine and thymine most likely by both radical and ionic processes.

  12. Mapping the subunit interface of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) using photo cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A Quamrul; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2008-11-15

    Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside 5'-diphosphates to deoxynucleoside 5'-diphosphates and is a 1:1 complex of two homodimeric subunits: alpha2 and beta2. As a first step towards mapping the subunit interface, beta2 (V365C) was labeled with [(14)C]-benzophenone (BP) iodoacetamide. The resulting [(14)C]-BP-beta2 (V365C) was complexed with alpha2 and irradiated at 365nm for 30min at 4 degrees C. The cross-linked mixture was purified by anion exchange chromatography and digested with trypsin. The peptides were purified by reverse phase chromatography, identified by scintillation counting and analyzed by Edman sequencing. Three [(14)C]-labeled peptides were identified: two contained a peptide in beta to which the BP was attached. The third contained the same beta peptide and a peptide in alpha found in its alphaD helix. These results provide direct support for the proposed docking model of alpha2beta2.

  13. The structural basis for peptidomimetic inhibition of eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductase: a conformationally flexible pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai; Fairman, James W; Wijerathna, Sanath R; Kreischer, Nathan R; LaMacchia, John; Helmbrecht, Elizabeth; Cooperman, Barry S; Dealwis, Chris

    2008-08-14

    Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes nucleoside diphosphate conversion to deoxynucleoside diphosphate. Crucial for rapidly dividing cells, RR is a target for cancer therapy. RR activity requires formation of a complex between subunits R1 and R2 in which the R2 C-terminal peptide binds to R1. Here we report crystal structures of heterocomplexes containing mammalian R2 C-terminal heptapeptide, P7 (Ac-1FTLDADF7) and its peptidomimetic P6 (1Fmoc(Me)PhgLDChaDF7) bound to Saccharomyces cerevisiae R1 (ScR1). P7 and P6, both of which inhibit ScRR, each bind at two contiguous sites containing residues that are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Such binding is quite distinct from that reported for prokaryotes. The Fmoc group in P6 peptide makes several hydrophobic interactions that contribute to its enhanced potency in binding to ScR1. Combining all of our results, we observe three distinct conformations for peptide binding to ScR1. These structures provide pharmacophores for designing highly potent nonpeptide class I RR inhibitors.

  14. Tangled Up in Knots: Structures of Inactivated Forms of E. coli Class Ia Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Zimanyi, Christina M.; Ando, Nozomi; Brignole, Edward J.; Asturias, Francisco J.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2012-10-23

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) provide the precursors for DNA biosynthesis and repair and are successful targets for anticancer drugs such as clofarabine and gemcitabine. Recently, we reported that dATP inhibits E. coli class Ia RNR by driving formation of RNR subunits into {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4} rings. Here, we present the first X-ray structure of a gemcitabine-inhibited E. coli RNR and show that the previously described {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4} rings can interlock to form an unprecedented ({alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4}){sub 2} megacomplex. This complex is also seen in a higher-resolution dATP-inhibited RNR structure presented here, which employs a distinct crystal lattice from that observed in the gemcitabine-inhibited case. With few reported examples of protein catenanes, we use data from small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to both understand the solution conditions that contribute to concatenation in RNRs as well as present a mechanism for the formation of these unusual structures.

  15. The bacteriophage T4 gene for the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase contains an intron.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, B M; Hahne, S; Mathews, C Z; Mathews, C K; Rand, K N; Gait, M J

    1986-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 gene nrdB codes for the small subunit of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase. The T4 nrdB gene was localized between 136.1 kb and 137.8 kb in the T4 genetic map according to the deduced structural homology of the protein to the amino acid sequence of its bacterial counterpart, the B2 subunit of Escherichia coli. This positions the C-terminal end of the T4 nrdB gene approximately 2 kb closer to the T4 gene 63 than earlier anticipated from genetic recombinational analyses. The most surprising feature of the T4 nrdB gene is the presence of an approximately 625 bp intron which divides the structural gene into two parts. This is the second example of a prokaryotic structural gene with an intron. The first prokaryotic intron was reported in the nearby td gene, coding for the bacteriophage T4-specific thymidylate synthase enzyme. The nucleotide sequence at the exon-intron junctions of the T4 nrdB gene is similar to that of the junctions of the T4 td gene: the anticipated exon-intron boundary at the donor site ends with a TAA stop codon and there is an ATG start codon at the putative downstream intron-exon boundary of the acceptor site. In the course of this work the denA gene of T4 (endonuclease II) was also located. PMID:3530746

  16. Inactivation of B/sub 12/-dependent ribonucleotide reductase by 2'-azido-2'-deoxyarabinofuranosyladenine 5'-triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1986-05-01

    The Coenzyme B/sub 12/-dependent ribonucleotide triphosphate reductase (RTPR) from Lactobacillus leichmannii is rapidly inactivated by the substrate analog 2-azido-2'-deoxy-arabinofuranosyladenine 5'-triphosphate (N/sub 3/araATP). This reaction has been probed using N/sub 2/ araATP specifically radiolabeled in the sugar and base moieties. Unlike the inactivation of this enzyme by 2'-halo nucleotides, reaction of RTPR with N/sub 3/araATP does not result in formation of PPPi, adenine, or azide ion. Instead, the phosphate, sugar, and base moieties remain bound to the protein after gel filtration of the inactive protein. One equivalent of coenzyme is destroyed during the inactivation, producing 5'-deoxyadenosine and cob(II)alamin. No/sup 3/H/sub 2/O is formed when RTPR is inactivated with (3'-/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/araATP. These results suggest that inactivation occurs either through reaction of an enzyme group with the azido moiety or through formation of a tight-binding product.

  17. The efficacy of the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor Didox in preclinical models of AML.

    PubMed

    Cook, Guerry J; Caudell, David L; Elford, Howard L; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89-52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML.

  18. The Efficacy of the Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Didox in Preclinical Models of AML

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Guerry J.; Caudell, David L.; Elford, Howard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89–52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML. PMID:25402485

  19. Cell death in response to antimetabolites directed at ribonucleotide reductase and thymidylate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Asuncion Valenzuela, Malyn M; Castro, Imilce; Gonda, Amber; Diaz Osterman, Carlos J; Jutzy, Jessica M; Aspe, Jonathan R; Khan, Salma; Neidigh, Jonathan W; Wall, Nathan R

    2015-01-01

    New agent development, mechanistic understanding, and combinatorial partnerships with known and novel modalities continue to be important in the study of pancreatic cancer and its improved treatment. In this study, known antimetabolite drugs such as gemcitabine (ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor) and 5-fluorouracil (thymidylate synthase inhibitor) were compared with novel members of these two drug families in the treatment of a chemoresistant pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1. Cellular survival data, along with protein and messenger ribonucleic acid expression for survivin, XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2, were compared from both the cell cytoplasm and from exosomes after single modality treatment. While all antimetabolite drugs killed PANC-1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, neither family significantly altered the cytosolic protein level of the four inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) investigated. Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2 were found localized to exosomes where no significant difference in expression was recorded. This inability for significant and long-lasting expression may be a reason why pancreatic cancer lacks responsiveness to these and other cancer-killing agents. Continued investigation is required to determine the responsibilities of these IAPs in their role in chemoresistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:25767396

  20. Generation of an attenuated Tiantan vaccinia virus by deletion of the ribonucleotide reductase large subunit.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shifu; Jia, Peng; Sun, Lili; Hu, Ningning; Li, Chang; Lu, Huijun; Tian, Mingyao; Qi, Yanxin; Jin, Ningyi; Li, Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Attenuation of the virulence of vaccinia Tiantan virus (VTT) underlies the strategy adopted for mass vaccination campaigns. This strategy provides advantages of safety and efficacy over traditional vaccines and is aimed at minimization of adverse health effects. In this study, a mutant form of the virus, MVTT was derived from VTT by deletion of the ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1) (TI4L). Compared to wild-type parental (VTT) and revertant (VTT-rev) viruses, virulence of the mutant MVTT was reduced by 100-fold based on body weight reduction and by 3,200-fold based on determination of the intracranial 50% lethal infectious dose. However, the immunogenicity of MVTT was equivalent to that of the parental VTT. We also demonstrated that the TI4L gene is not required for efficient replication. These data support the conclusion that MVTT can be used as a replicating virus vector or as a platform for the development of vaccines against infectious diseases and for cancer therapy.

  1. The Structural Basis for Peptidomimetic Inhibition of Eukaryotic Ribonucleotide Reductase: A Conformationally Flexible Pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hai; Fairman, James W.; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; Kreischer, Nathan R.; LaMacchia, John; Helmbrecht, Elizabeth; Cooperman, Barry S.; Dealwis, Chris

    2008-08-19

    Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes nucleoside diphosphate conversion to deoxynucleoside diphosphate. Crucial for rapidly dividing cells, RR is a target for cancer therapy. RR activity requires formation of a complex between subunits R1 and R2 in which the R2 C-terminal peptide binds to R1. Here we report crystal structures of heterocomplexes containing mammalian R2 C-terminal heptapeptide, P7 (Ac-{sup 1}FTLDADF{sup 7}) and its peptidomimetic P6 ({sup 1}Fmoc(Me)PhgLDChaDF{sup 7}) bound to Saccharomyces cerevisiae R1 (ScR1). P7 and P6, both of which inhibit ScRR, each bind at two contiguous sites containing residues that are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Such binding is quite distinct from that reported for prokaryotes. The Fmoc group in P6 peptide makes several hydrophobic interactions that contribute to its enhanced potency in binding to ScR1. Combining all of our results, we observe three distinct conformations for peptide binding to ScR1. These structures provide pharmacophores for designing highly potent nonpeptide class I RR inhibitors.

  2. A New Type of YumC-Like Ferredoxin (Flavodoxin) Reductase Is Involved in Ribonucleotide Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jing; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The trxB2 gene, which is annotated as a thioredoxin reductase, was found to be essential for growth of Lactococcus lactis in the presence of oxygen. The corresponding protein (TrxB2) showed a high similarity with Bacillus subtilis YumC (E value = 4.0E−88), and YumC was able to fully complement the ΔtrxB2 mutant phenotype. YumC represents a novel type of ferredoxin (flavodoxin) reductase (FdR) with hitherto-unknown biological function. We adaptively evolved the ΔtrxB2 mutant under aerobic conditions to find suppressor mutations that could help elucidate the involvement of TrxB2 in aerobic growth. Genome sequencing of two independent isolates, which were able to grow as well as the wild-type strain under aerated conditions, revealed the importance of mutations in nrdI, encoding a flavodoxin involved in aerobic ribonucleotide reduction. We suggest a role for TrxB2 in nucleotide metabolism, where the flavodoxin (NrdI) serves as its redox partner, and we support this hypothesis by showing the beneficial effect of deoxynucleosides on aerobic growth of the ΔtrxB2 mutant. Finally, we demonstrate, by heterologous expression, that the TrxB2 protein functionally can substitute for YumC in B. subtilis but that the addition of deoxynucleosides cannot compensate for the lethal phenotype displayed by the B. subtilis yumC knockout mutant. PMID:26507228

  3. A bioinformatic analysis of ribonucleotide reductase genes in phage genomes and metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, is found in all domains of life and many viral genomes. RNRs are also amongst the most abundant genes identified in environmental metagenomes. This study focused on understanding the distribution, diversity, and evolution of RNRs in phages (viruses that infect bacteria). Hidden Markov Model profiles were used to analyze the proteins encoded by 685 completely sequenced double-stranded DNA phages and 22 environmental viral metagenomes to identify RNR homologs in cultured phages and uncultured viral communities, respectively. Results RNRs were identified in 128 phage genomes, nearly tripling the number of phages known to encode RNRs. Class I RNR was the most common RNR class observed in phages (70%), followed by class II (29%) and class III (28%). Twenty-eight percent of the phages contained genes belonging to multiple RNR classes. RNR class distribution varied according to phage type, isolation environment, and the host’s ability to utilize oxygen. The majority of the phages containing RNRs are Myoviridae (65%), followed by Siphoviridae (30%) and Podoviridae (3%). The phylogeny and genomic organization of phage and host RNRs reveal several distinct evolutionary scenarios involving horizontal gene transfer, co-evolution, and differential selection pressure. Several putative split RNR genes interrupted by self-splicing introns or inteins were identified, providing further evidence for the role of frequent genetic exchange. Finally, viral metagenomic data indicate that RNRs are prevalent and highly dynamic in uncultured viral communities, necessitating future research to determine the environmental conditions under which RNRs provide a selective advantage. Conclusions This comprehensive study describes the distribution, diversity, and evolution of RNRs in phage genomes and environmental viral metagenomes. The distinct distributions of

  4. Redox-Linked Conformational Control of Proton Coupled Electron Transfer: Y122 in the Ribonucleotide Reductase β2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Adam R.; Burns, Lori A.; Sherrill, C. David; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosyl radicals play essential roles in biological proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides and is vital in DNA replication in all organisms. Class Ia RNRs consist of α2 and β2 homodimeric subunits. In class 1a RNR, such as the E. coli enzyme, an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O•)-diferric cofactor is located in β2. While Y122O• is extremely stable in free β2, Y122O• is highly reactive in the quaternary substrate-α2β2 complex and serves as a radical initiator in catalytic PCET between β2 and α2. In this report, we investigate the structural interactions that control the reactivity of Y122O• in a model system, isolated E. coli β2. Y122O• was reduced with hydroxyurea (HU), a radical scavenger that quenches the radical in a clinically relevant reaction. In the difference FT-IR spectrum, associated with this PCET reaction, amide I (CO) and amide II (CN/NH) bands were observed. Specific 13C-labeling of the tyrosine C1 carbon assigned a component of these bands to the Y122-T123 amide bond. Comparison to density functional calculations on a model dipeptide, tyrosine-threonine, and structural modeling demonstrated that PCET is associated with a Y122 rotation and a 7.2 Å translation of the Y122 phenolic oxygen. To test for the functional consequences of this structural change, a proton inventory defined the origin of the large solvent isotope effect (SIE=16.7±1.0 at 25°C) on this reaction. These data suggest that the one electron, HU-mediated reduction of Y122O• is associated with two, rate-limiting (full or partial) proton transfer reactions. One is attributable to HU oxidation (SIE=11.9, net H atom transfer), and the other is attributable to coupled, hydrogen-bonding changes in the Y122O•-diferric cofactor (SIE=1.4). These results illustrate the importance of redox-linked changes to backbone and ring dihedral angles in high potential PCET and provide evidence for

  5. Differential accumulation of ribonucleotide reductase subunits in clam oocytes: the large subunit is stored as a polypeptide, the small subunit as untranslated mRNA

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Within minutes of fertilization of clam oocytes, translation of a set of maternal mRNAs is activated. One of the most abundant of these stored mRNAs encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (Standart, N. M., S. J. Bray, E. L. George, T. Hunt, and J. V. Ruderman, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:1968-1976). Unfertilized oocytes do not contain any ribonucleotide reductase activity; such activity begins to appear shortly after fertilization. In virtually all organisms, this enzyme is composed of two dissimilar subunits with molecular masses of approximately 44 and 88 kD, both of which are required for activity. This paper reports the identification of the large subunit of clam ribonucleotide reductase isolated by dATP-Sepharose chromatography as a relatively abundant 86-kD polypeptide which is already present in oocytes, and whose level remains constant during early development. The enzyme activity of this large subunit was established in reconstitution assays using the small subunit isolated from embryos by virtue of its binding to the anti-tubulin antibody YL 1/2. Thus the two components of clam ribonucleotide reductase are differentially stored in the oocyte: the small subunit in the form of untranslated mRNA and the large subunit as protein. When fertilization triggers the activation of translation of the maternal mRNA, the newly synthesized small subunit combines with the preformed large subunit to generate active ribonucleotide reductase. PMID:3536960

  6. Potent competitive inhibition of human ribonucleotide reductase by a nonnucleoside small molecule.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Md Faiz; Alam, Intekhab; Huff, Sarah E; Pink, John; Flanagan, Sheryl A; Shewach, Donna; Misko, Tessianna A; Oleinick, Nancy L; Harte, William E; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Harris, Michael E; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2017-08-01

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRR) is crucial for DNA replication and maintenance of a balanced dNTP pool, and is an established cancer target. Nucleoside analogs such as gemcitabine diphosphate and clofarabine nucleotides target the large subunit (hRRM1) of hRR. These drugs have a poor therapeutic index due to toxicity caused by additional effects, including DNA chain termination. The discovery of nonnucleoside, reversible, small-molecule inhibitors with greater specificity against hRRM1 is a key step in the development of more effective treatments for cancer. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a unique nonnucleoside small-molecule hRR inhibitor, naphthyl salicylic acyl hydrazone (NSAH), using virtual screening, binding affinity, inhibition, and cell toxicity assays. NSAH binds to hRRM1 with an apparent dissociation constant of 37 µM, and steady-state kinetics reveal a competitive mode of inhibition. A 2.66-Å resolution crystal structure of NSAH in complex with hRRM1 demonstrates that NSAH functions by binding at the catalytic site (C-site) where it makes both common and unique contacts with the enzyme compared with NDP substrates. Importantly, the IC50 for NSAH is within twofold of gemcitabine for growth inhibition of multiple cancer cell lines, while demonstrating little cytotoxicity against normal mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells. NSAH depresses dGTP and dATP levels in the dNTP pool causing S-phase arrest, providing evidence for RR inhibition in cells. This report of a nonnucleoside reversible inhibitor binding at the catalytic site of hRRM1 provides a starting point for the design of a unique class of hRR inhibitors.

  7. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  8. Evaluating the Therapeutic Potential of a Non-Natural Nucleotide that Inhibits Human Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Faiz; Wan, Qun; Jha, Shalini; Motea, Edward; Berdis, Anthony; Dealwis, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRR) is the key enzyme involved in de novo dNTP synthesis and thus represents an important therapeutic target against hyperproliferative diseases, most notably cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of non-natural indolyl-2’-deoxynucleoside triphosphates to inhibit the activity of hRR. The structural similarities of these analogs with dATP predicted that they would inhibit hRR activity by binding to its allosteric sites. In silico analysis and in vitro characterization identified one particular analog designated as 5-nitro-indolyl-2'-deoxyribose triphosphate (5-NITP) that inhibits hRR. 5-NITP binding to hRR was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. X-ray crystal structure of 5-NITP bound to RR1 was determined. Cell-based studies demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of the corresponding non-natural nucleoside against leukemia cells. 5-NITP binds to hRR with micromolar affinity. Binding does not induce hexamerization of hRR1 like dATP, the native allosteric inhibitor of hRR that binds with high affinity to the A-site. The X-ray crystal structure of S. cerevisiae RR1-5-NITP (ScRR1-5-NITP) complex determined to 2.3 Å resolution shows that 5-NITP does not bind to the A-site but rather at the S-site. Regardless, 5-NIdR produces cytostatic and cytotoxic effects against human leukemia cells by altering cell-cycle progression. Our studies provide useful insights towards developing new inhibitors with improved potency and efficacy against hRR. PMID:22933704

  9. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunit Localization in Response to Iron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M; Zhang, Caiguo; Wu, Xiaorong; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Puig, Sergi

    2016-04-29

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes deoxyribonucleotide synthesis in eukaryotes. Living organisms have developed multiple strategies to tightly modulate RNR function to avoid inadequate or unbalanced deoxyribonucleotide pools that cause DNA damage and genome instability. Yeast cells activate RNR in response to genotoxic stress and iron deficiency by facilitating redistribution of its small heterodimeric subunit Rnr2-Rnr4 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it forms an active holoenzyme with large Rnr1 subunit. Dif1 protein inhibits RNR by promoting nuclear import of Rnr2-Rnr4. Upon DNA damage, Dif1 phosphorylation by the Dun1 checkpoint kinase and its subsequent degradation enhances RNR function. In this report, we demonstrate that Dun1 kinase triggers Rnr2-Rnr4 redistribution to the cytoplasm in response to iron deficiency. We show that Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization by low iron requires Dun1 kinase activity and phosphorylation site Thr-380 in the Dun1 activation loop, but not the Dun1 forkhead-associated domain. By using different Dif1 mutant proteins, we uncover that Dun1 phosphorylates Dif1 Ser-104 and Thr-105 residues upon iron scarcity. We observe that the Dif1 phosphorylation pattern differs depending on the stimuli, which suggests different Dun1 activating pathways. Importantly, the Dif1-S104A/T105A mutant exhibits defects in nucleus-to-cytoplasm redistribution of Rnr2-Rnr4 by iron limitation. Taken together, these results reveal that, in response to iron starvation, Dun1 kinase phosphorylates Dif1 to stimulate Rnr2-Rnr4 relocalization to the cytoplasm and promote RNR function.

  10. Sinorhizobium meliloti requires a cobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase for symbiosis with its plant host

    PubMed Central

    Taga, Michiko E.; Walker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is a critical cofactor for animals and protists, yet its biosynthesis is limited to prokaryotes. We previously showed that the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti requires cobalamin to establish a symbiotic relationship with its plant host, Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Here, the specific requirement for cobalamin in the S. meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis was investigated. Of the three known cobalamin-dependent enzymes in S. meliloti, the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (BhbA) does not affect symbiosis whereas disruption of the metH gene encoding the cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase causes a significant defect in symbiosis. Expression of the cobalamin-independent methionine synthase MetE alleviates this symbiotic defect, indicating that the requirement for methionine synthesis does not reflect a need for the cobalamin-dependent enzyme. To investigate the function of the cobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) encoded by nrdJ, S. meliloti was engineered to express an Escherichia coli cobalamin-independent (Class Ia) RNR instead of nrdJ. This strain is severely defective in symbiosis. Electron micrographs show that these cells can penetrate alfalfa nodules but are unable to differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and instead are lysed in the plant cytoplasm. Flow cytometry analysis indicates that these bacteria are largely unable to undergo endoreduplication. These phenotypes may be due to the inactivation of the Class Ia RNR by reactive oxygen species and/or inadequate oxygen availability in the nodule. These results show that the critical role of the cobalamin-dependent RNR for survival of S. meliloti in its plant host can account for the considerable resources that S. meliloti dedicates to cobalamin biosynthesis. PMID:20698752

  11. Inhibition of tumor cell ribonucleotide reductase by macrophage-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Stuehr, D J; Nathan, C F

    1991-10-01

    Macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO) is cytostatic to tumor cells and microbial pathogens. We tested whether one molecular target for the cytostatic action of NO may be ribonucleotide reductase (RR), a rate-limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. In a concentration-dependent manner, NO gas and lysates of activated macrophages that generated comparable amounts of NO led to the same degree of inhibition of partially purified RR from L1210 mouse lymphoma cells. Lysates from nonactivated macrophages, which do not produce NO, were noninhibitory. With lysates from activated macrophages, RR was protected by omitting L-arginine or by adding the NO synthase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium, N omega-methyl-L-arginine, or N omega-amino-L-arginine. L-Arginine, but not D-arginine, abolished the protective effect of N omega-amino-L-arginine. The prototypic pharmacologic inhibitor of RR is hydroxyurea. Its structural resemblance to N omega-hydroxy-L-arginine, a reaction intermediate of NO synthase, prompted us to test if hydroxyurea can generate NO. In the presence of H2O2 and CuSO4, hydroxyurea produced NO2-/NO3-, aerobic reaction products of NO. Addition of morpholine blocked NO2-/NO3- generation from hydroxyurea and led to formation of nitrosomorpholine, as detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Thus, hydroxyurea can produce an NO-like, nitrosating rectant. L1210 cell DNA synthesis was inhibited completely by activated macrophages or by hydroxyurea, and was partially restored to the same degree in both settings by providing deoxyribonucleosides to bypass the block in RR. Thus, both NO gas and NO generated by activated macrophage lysates inhibit tumor cell RR. The RR inhibitor hydroxyurea can also generate an NO-like species. Similar, partial restoration of tumor cell DNA synthesis by deoxyribonucleosides in the presence of activated macrophages or hydroxyurea suggests that cytostasis by activated macrophages and by hydroxyurea has comparable mechanisms, including, but

  12. Structurally dependent redox property of ribonucleotide reductase subunit p53R2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lijun; Zhou, Bingsen; Liu, Xiyong; Wang, Tieli; Shih, Jennifer; Qi, Christina; Heung, Yvonne; Yen, Yun

    2006-02-15

    p53R2 is a newly identified small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR) and plays a key role in supplying precursors for DNA repair in a p53-dependent manner. Currently, we are studying the redox property, structure, and function of p53R2. In cell-free systems, p53R2 did not oxidize a reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicator carboxy-H2DCFDA, but another class I RR small subunit, hRRM2, did. Further studies showed that purified recombinant p53R2 protein has catalase activity, which breaks down H2O2. Overexpression of p53R2 reduced intracellular ROS and protected the mitochondrial membrane potential against oxidative stress, whereas overexpression of hRRM2 did not and resulted in a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. In a site-directed mutagenesis study, antioxidant activity was abrogated in p53R2 mutants Y331F, Y285F, Y49F, and Y241H, but not Y164F or Y164C. The fluorescence intensity in mutants oxidizing carboxy-H2DCFDA, in order from highest to lowest, was Y331F > Y285F > Y49F > Y241H > wild-type p53R2. This indicates that Y331, Y285, Y49, and Y241 in p53R2 are critical residues involved in scavenging ROS. Of interest, the ability to oxidize carboxy-H2DCFDA indicated by fluorescence intensity was negatively correlated with RR activity from wild-type p53R2, mutants Y331F, Y285F, and Y49F. Our findings suggest that p53R2 may play a key role in defending oxidative stress by scavenging ROS, and this antioxidant property is also important for its fundamental enzymatic activity.

  13. The Novel Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor COH29 Inhibits DNA Repair In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Chuan; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhang, Keqiang; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Un, Frank; Hu, Shuya; Chou, Chih-Ming; Chen, Chun-Han; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yan; Liu, Xiyong; Smith, D. Lynne; Li, Hongzhi; Liu, Zheng; Warden, Charles D.; Su, Leila; Malkas, Linda H.; Chung, Young Min; Hu, Mickey C.-T.

    2015-01-01

    COH29 [N-(4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylthiazol-2-yl)-3,4-dihydroxybenzamide], a novel antimetabolite drug developed at City of Hope Cancer Center, has anticancer activity that stems primarily from the inhibition of human ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This key enzyme in deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis is the target of established clinical agents such as hydroxyurea and gemcitabine because of its critical role in DNA replication and repair. Herein we report that BRCA-1–defective human breast cancer cells are more sensitive than wild-type BRCA-1 counterparts to COH29 in vitro and in vivo. Microarray gene expression profiling showed that COH29 reduces the expression of DNA repair pathway genes, suggesting that COH29 interferes with these pathways. It is well established that BRCA1 plays a role in DNA damage repair, especially homologous recombination (HR) repair, to maintain genome integrity. In BRCA1-defective HCC1937 breast cancer cells, COH29 induced more double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA-damage response than in HCC1937 + BRCA1 cells. By EJ5– and DR–green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter assay, we found that COH29 could inhibit nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) efficiency and that no HR activity was detected in HCC1937 cells, suggesting that repression of the NHEJ repair pathway may be involved in COH29-induced DSBs in BRCA1-deficient HCC1937 cells. Furthermore, we observed an accumulation of nuclear Rad51 foci in COH29-treated HCC1937 + BRCA1 cells, suggesting that BRCA1 plays a crucial role in repairing and recovering drug-induced DNA damage by recruiting Rad51 to damage sites. In summary, we describe here additional biologic effects of the RNR inhibitor COH29 that potentially strengthen its use as an anticancer agent. PMID:25814515

  14. Nucleoside Analogue Triphosphates Allosterically Regulate Human Ribonucleotide Reductase and Identify Chemical Determinants That Drive Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Andrew J; Ahmad, Md Faiz; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Dealwis, Chris G; Harris, Michael E

    2016-10-18

    Class I ribonucleotide reductase (RR) maintains balanced pools of deoxyribonucleotide substrates for DNA replication by converting ribonucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) to 2'-deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates (dNDPs). Binding of deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) effectors (ATP/dATP, dGTP, and dTTP) modulates the specificity of class I RR for CDP, UDP, ADP, and GDP substrates. Crystal structures of bacterial and eukaryotic RRs show that dNTP effectors and NDP substrates bind on either side of a flexible nine-amino acid loop (loop 2). Interactions with the effector nucleobase alter loop 2 geometry, resulting in changes in specificity among the four NDP substrates of RR. However, the functional groups proposed to drive specificity remain untested. Here, we use deoxynucleoside analogue triphosphates to determine the nucleobase functional groups that drive human RR (hRR) specificity. The results demonstrate that the 5-methyl, O4, and N3 groups of dTTP contribute to specificity for GDP. The O6 and protonated N1 of dGTP direct specificity for ADP. In contrast, the unprotonated N1 of adenosine is the primary determinant of ATP/dATP-directed specificity for CDP. Structural models from X-ray crystallography of eukaryotic RR suggest that the side chain of D287 in loop 2 is involved in binding of dGTP and dTTP, but not dATP/ATP. This feature is consistent with experimental results showing that a D287A mutant of hRR is deficient in allosteric regulation by dGTP and dTTP, but not ATP/dATP. Together, these data define the effector functional groups that are the drivers of human RR specificity and provide constraints for evaluating models of allosteric regulation.

  15. NrdR Controls Differential Expression of the Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Torrents, Eduard; Grinberg, Inna; Gorovitz-Harris, Batia; Lundström, Hanna; Borovok, Ilya; Aharonowitz, Yair; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Cohen, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses class Ia, class Ib, and class III ribonucleotide reductases (RNR). Under standard laboratory conditions, the aerobic class Ia nrdAB RNR genes are well expressed, whereas the aerobic class Ib nrdEF RNR genes are poorly expressed. The class III RNR is normally expressed under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions. In this paper, we show that the E. coli YbaD protein differentially regulates the expression of the three sets of genes. YbaD is a homolog of the Streptomyces NrdR protein. It is not essential for growth and has been renamed NrdR. Previously, Streptomyces NrdR was shown to transcriptionally regulate RNR genes by binding to specific 16-bp sequence motifs, NrdR boxes, located in the regulatory regions of its RNR operons. All three E. coli RNR operons contain two such NrdR box motifs positioned in their regulatory regions. The NrdR boxes are located near to or overlap with the promoter elements. DNA binding experiments showed that NrdR binds to each of the upstream regulatory regions. We constructed deletions in nrdR (ybaD) and showed that they caused high-level induction of transcription of the class Ib RNR genes but had a much smaller effect on induction of transcription of the class Ia and class III RNR genes. We propose a model for differential regulation of the RNR genes based on binding of NrdR to the regulatory regions. The model assumes that differences in the positions of the NrdR binding sites, and in the sequences of the motifs themselves, determine the extent to which NrdR represses the transcription of each RNR operon. PMID:17496099

  16. The unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 large subunit is not required for ribonucleotide reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Conner, J; Macfarlane, J; Lankinen, H; Marsden, H

    1992-01-01

    Using purified bacterially expressed herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1) and the proteolytic enzymes chymotrypsin and trypsin, we have generated stable N-terminal truncations. Chymotrypsin removes 246 amino acids from the amino terminus to produce a fragment (dN246R1) which retains full enzymic activity and affinity for the small subunit (R2). Treatment of R1 with trypsin produces a 120K protein and a cleavage at amino acid residue 305 to produce a fragment (dN305R1) which remains associated with a 33K N-terminal polypeptide. Although this 33K-dN305R1 complex retains full binding affinity for R2 its reductase activity is reduced by approximately 50%. Increasing the concentration of trypsin removes the 33K N-terminal polypeptide resulting in dN305R1 which, when bound to R2, has full ribonucleotide reductase activity. Like R1, dN246R1 and dN305R1 each exist as dimers showing that the first 305 amino acids of R1 are not necessary for dimer formation. These results indicate that, in structural studies of subunit interaction, dN246R1 or dN305R1 can be considered as suitable replacements for intact R1.

  17. Ribonucleotide reductase small subunit p53R2 facilitates p21 induction of G1 arrest under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lijun; Zhou, Bingsen; Liu, Xiyong; Heung, Yvonne; Chau, Jennifer; Chu, Emilie; Li, Shan; Jiang, Chunglin; Un, Frank; Yen, Yun

    2007-01-01

    p53R2, which is one of the two known ribonucleotide reductase small subunits (the other being M2), is suggested to play an important role in supplying deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) for DNA repair during the G(1) or G(2) phase of the cell cycle. The ability of p53R2 to supply dNTPs for repairing DNA damages requires the presence of a functional p53 tumor suppressor. Here, we report in vivo physical interaction and colocalization of p53R2 and p21 before DNA damage. Mammalian two-hybrid assay further indicates that the amino acids 1 to 113 of p53R2 are critical for interacting with the NH(2)-terminal region (amino acids 1-93) of p21. The binding between p21 and p53R2 decreases inside the nucleus in response to UV, the time point of which corresponds to the increased binding of p21 with cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2), and the decreased Cdk2 activity in the nucleus at G(1). Interestingly, p53R2 dissociates from p21 but facilitates the accumulation of p21 in the nucleus in response to UV. On the other hand, the ribonucleotide reductase activity increases at the corresponding time in response to UV. These data suggest a new function of p53R2 of cooperating with p21 during DNA repair at G(1) arrest.

  18. Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase Is a Dimanganese(III)-Tyrosyl Radical Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides, providing the building blocks for DNA replication and repair. It is composed of two proteins: α (NrdE) and β (NrdF). β contains the metallo-cofactor, essential for the initiation of the reduction process. The RNR genes are organized within the nrdI-nrdE-nrdF-ymaB operon. Each protein has been cloned, expressed, and purified from E. coli. As isolated, recombinant (r) rNrdF contained a diferric-tyrosyl radical (Fe(III)2-Y•) cofactor. Alternatively, this cluster could be self-assembled from apo-rNrdF, Fe(II), and O2. Apo-rNrdF loaded using 4 Mn(II)/β2, O2 and reduced NrdI (a flavodoxin), can form a dimanganese(III)-Y• (Mn(III)2-Y•) cofactor. In the presence of rNrdE/ATP/CDP, Mn(III)2-Y• and Fe(III)2-Y• rNrdF generate dCDP at 132 and 10 nmol min-1 mg-1 respectively (both normalized for 1 Y•/β2). To determine the endogenous cofactor of NrdF in B. subtilis, the entire operon was placed behind a Pspank(hy) promoter and integrated into the B. subtilis genome at the amyE site. All four genes were induced in cells grown in LB medium, with levels of NrdE and NrdF elevated 35 fold relative to the wild type (wt) strain. NrdE and NrdF co-purified in a 1:1 ratio from this engineered B. subtilis. The visible, EPR, and atomic absorption spectra of the purified NrdENrdF complex (eNrdF) exhibited characteristics of a Mn(III)2-Y• center with 2 Mn and 0.5 Y•/β2 and activity of 318-363 nmol min-1 mg-1 (normalized for 1 Y•/β2). These data strongly suggest that the B. subtilis class Ib RNR is a Mn(III)2-Y• enzyme. PMID:21561096

  19. O2 activation by non-heme diiron proteins: identification of a symmetric mu-1,2-peroxide in a mutant of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Moënne-Loccoz, P; Baldwin, J; Ley, B A; Loehr, T M; Bollinger, J M

    1998-10-20

    Non-heme diiron clusters occur in a number of enzymes (e.g., ribonucleotide reductase, methane monooxygenase, and Delta9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase) that activate O2 for chemically difficult oxidation reactions. In each case, a kinetically labile peroxo intermediate is believed to form when O2 reacts with the diferrous enzyme, followed by O-O bond cleavage and the formation of high-valent iron intermediates [formally Fe(IV)] that are thought to be the reactive oxidants. Greater kinetic stability of a peroxodiiron(III) intermediate in protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase was achieved by the iron-ligand mutation Asp84 --> Glu and the surface mutation Trp48 --> Phe. Here, we present the first definitive evidence for a bridging, symmetrical peroxo adduct from vibrational spectroscopic studies of the freeze-trapped intermediate of this mutant R2. Isotope-sensitive bands are observed at 870, 499, and 458 cm-1 that are assigned to the intraligand peroxo stretching frequency and the asymmetric and symmetric Fe-O2-Fe stretching frequencies, respectively. Similar results have been obtained in the resonance Raman spectroscopic study of a peroxodiferric species of Delta9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase [Broadwater, J. A., Ai, J., Loehr, T. M., Sanders-Loehr, J., and Fox, B. G. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 14664-14671]. Similarities among these adducts and transient species detected during O2 activation by methane monooxygenase hydroxylase, ferritin, and wild-type protein R2 suggest the symmetrical peroxo adduct as a common intermediate in the diverse oxidation reactions mediated by members of this class.

  20. The ribonucleotide reductase induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves minimally a complex of two polypeptides (136K and 38K).

    PubMed

    Frame, M C; Marsden, H S; Dutia, B M

    1985-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encodes a polypeptide of apparent mol. wt. 136 000 (Vmw136) known to be a component of the virus-specified ribonucleotide reductase. Monoclonal antibodies that precipitate this polypeptide also precipitate a polypeptide of mol. wt. 38 000 (Vmw38) from extracts of HSV-1-infected cells. The basis for this co-precipitation has been investigated using a monoclonal antibody directed against Vmw136 and an oligopeptide-induced antiserum directed against the carboxy terminus of Vmw38. We have also made use of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of HSV-1 which maps within the sequences encoding Vmw136 and which induces a thermolabile ribonucleotide reductase. Our experiments show (i) Vmw136 and Vmw38 form a complex in infected cells and (ii) the mutation in the ts mutant results in the two polypeptides being unable to form the complex at the non-permissive temperature. We speculate that association of the two polypeptides is necessary for ribonucleotide reductase activity. No evidence was found for involvement of host proteins in the proposed virus-induced ribonucleotide reductase complex. The terms RR1 and RR2 are suggested for the large and small subunits of the HSV-induced enzyme.

  1. Large subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase gene is a virulent factor and plays a critical role in Marek's disease virus pathogenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a ribonucleotide reductase (RR) gene consisting of two subunits UL39 (RR1) and UL40 (RR2). Both RR1 and RR2 form an active holoenzyme and are necessary for enzyme activity. This gene was indentified by monoclonal antibody T81 in a gt11 MDV expression library and f...

  2. Cloning and characterization of subunit genes of ribonucleotide reductase, a cell-cycle-regulated enzyme, from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, D; Schuster, S M; Chakrabarti, R

    1993-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (EC 1.17.4.1; RNR), a cell-cycle-regulated enzyme, catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides by the reduction of the corresponding ribonucleotides. The important role of the RNR in DNA synthesis and cell division makes this enzyme an excellent target for chemotherapy. However, nothing is known about this enzyme from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have isolated cDNA clones encoding both the large and small RNR subunits. The sequences of full-length clones of the large and small RNR subunits revealed an open reading frame encoding 806 and 349 amino acids, respectively, and showed significant identity with other RNR sequences in the data base. RNA blot analysis showed that the size of the large and small RNR subunit transcripts are 5.4 kb and 2.2 kb, respectively. Both the RNR subunit transcripts fluctuate in level during the cell cycle, reaching a peak preceding maximal DNA synthesis activity. An oligodeoxynucleotide phosphorothioate that is complementary to sequences around the translational initiation codon of the small RNR subunit showed significant inhibition of growth, as measured by the inhibition in DNA synthesis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8265664

  3. Photochemistry of 4'-benzophenone-substituted nucleoside derivatives as models for ribonucleotide reductases: competing generation of 3'-radicals and photoenols.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, T E; Müller, G; Berkessel, A

    2000-04-21

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the 2'-reduction of ribonucleotides, thus providing 2'-deoxyribonucleotides, the monomers for DNA-biosynthesis. The current mechanistic hypothesis for the catalysis effected by this class of enzymes involves a sequence of radical reactions. A 3'-hydrogen abstraction, effected by a radical at the enzyme's active site, is believed to initiate the catalytic cycle. As models for this substrate-enzyme interaction, the photochemically induced intramolecular hydrogen abstraction in a series of 4'-benzophenone-substituted nucleoside analogues was studied. Model compounds with hydroxy-, methoxy-, mesyloxy-groups or a cyclic carbonate in 2'- and 3'-positions were investigated. Depending on the substitution pattern, two different types of photoproducts were observed: Those which result from photoenol formation (gamma-H-abstraction) and those which result from abstraction of the 3'-H-atom (delta-H-abstraction). Photoenol formation was further supported by H/D-exchange experiments. Thus, the 3'-H-abstraction postulated as the initial step in RNR action was successfully modeled by photolysis of 4'-benzophenone-substituted nucleoside analogues. The regioselectivity of the photochemical H-abstraction and thus of the product distribution as a function of the 2'- and 3'-substituents was rationalized on the basis of a conformational analysis of the four model systems, utilizing molecular mechanics simulations.

  4. Bivariate flow cytometric analysis of DNA content versus immunopositivity for ribonucleotide reductase M1 subunit in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, R; Bottone, M G; Danova, M; Pellicciari, C

    1998-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is a cytoplasmatic enzyme catalyzing the reduction of all four ribonucleotides to their corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Its activity strongly correlates to the rate of DNA synthesis. By using a specific monoclonal antibody against the large M1 subunit of RR, we assessed the expression of M1-RR versus DNA content by dual-parameter flow cytometry. The aim of this paper was to compare the variations in the immunopositivity for M1-RR during the cell cycle to the positivity for other cell cycle markers identifying either proliferating cells (Ki-67 and PCNA) or quiescent cells (statin). To do this, normal human embryonic fibroblasts in different growth conditions as well as several other mammalian cell lines (rat C6 glioma cells; mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and B16 melanoma cells; human epithelial EUE cells and mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells) were used. The expression of M1-RR antigen was found to correlate positively with the expression of Ki-67 and PCNA, and negatively with the expression of statin. During early G1 phase, M1-RR becomes detectable by specific antibodies relatively later compared to PCNA and Ki-67; therefore, the lack of immunopositivity for M1-RR cannot be taken as an absolute indication of cell quiescence in G0.

  5. Implications and problems in analysing cytotoxic activity of hydroxyurea in combination with a potential inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, G; Barzi, A; Franchetti, P

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of hydroxyurea in combination with 2.2'-bipyridyl-6-carbothioamide (a potential inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase) on P388 murine leukemia is reported. Synergistic activity was studied using various interpretations of the isobologram method and the combination index method. We evaluated the pros and cons of these methods and their overall usefulness. In our opinion, to obtain all possible information from a compound association, it is important to choose a formally correct method that (a) can quantitatively evaluate synergism or antagonism, (b) may offer the possibility of averaging final results, (c) needs a minimal amount of experimental data, and (d) is rapid. Moreover, we emphasize both the utility of testing at least three molar ratios of compound association and the importance of carefully choosing the fractional inhibition used in calculating the combination effect. Such evaluation of drug combinations gives information essential to the preparation of new anticancer drug regimens and to the early assessment of biochemical interactions.

  6. 5,6-Dihydro-5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine potentiates the anti-HIV-1 activity of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M; Heineman, Richard H; Beach, Lauren B; Martin, Jessica L; Schnettler, Erica K; Dapp, Michael J; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2013-11-15

    The nucleoside analog 5,6-dihydro-5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (KP-1212) has been investigated as a first-in-class lethal mutagen of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Since a prodrug monotherapy did not reduce viral loads in Phase II clinical trials, we tested if ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors (RNRIs) combined with KP-1212 would improve antiviral activity. KP-1212 potentiated the activity of gemcitabine and resveratrol and simultaneously increased the viral mutant frequency. G-to-C mutations predominated with the KP-1212-resveratrol combination. These observations represent the first demonstration of a mild anti-HIV-1 mutagen potentiating the antiretroviral activity of RNRIs and encourage the clinical translation of enhanced viral mutagenesis in treating HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein kinase activity associated with the large subunit of herpes simplex virus type 2 ribonucleotide reductase (ICP10).

    PubMed Central

    Chung, T D; Wymer, J P; Smith, C C; Kulka, M; Aurelian, L

    1989-01-01

    The large subunit of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) ribonucleotide reductase (RR1) is demonstrated to possess serine/threonine-specific kinase activity. Computer-assisted sequence analysis identified regions within the amino terminus of ICP10 that are homologous to the catalytic domain of known protein kinases (PKs). An in vitro kinase assay confirmed the ability of ICP10, immunoprecipitated from either HSV-2-infected cells or from cells transfected with an ICP10 expression vector, to autophosphorylate and transphosphorylate exogenous substrates in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. The HSV-1 RR1 was shown to be negative for PK activity under these conditions. PK activity was localized to a 57-kDa amino-terminal region within ICP10 that lacked RR activity. Images PMID:2545912

  8. Avemar, a nontoxic fermented wheat germ extract, induces apoptosis and inhibits ribonucleotide reductase in human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Saiko, Philipp; Ozsvar-Kozma, Maria; Madlener, Sibylle; Bernhaus, Astrid; Lackner, Andreas; Grusch, Michael; Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Krupitza, Georg; Jaeger, Walter; Ammer, Kirsten; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Szekeres, Thomas

    2007-06-08

    Avemar (MSC) is a nontoxic fermented wheat germ extract demonstrated to significantly improve the survival rate in patients suffering from various malignancies. We investigated its effects in human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. After 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation, Avemar inhibited the growth of HL-60 cells with IC50 values of 400, 190, and 160 microg/ml, respectively. Incubation with MSC caused dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in up to 85% of tumor cells. In addition, Avemar attenuated the progression from G2-M to G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle and was also found to significantly reduce the in situ activity of ribonucleotide reductase, the key enzyme of de novo DNA synthesis. We conclude that Avemar exerts a number of beneficial effects which could support conventional chemotherapy of human malignancies.

  9. Targeting Ribonucleotide Reductase M2 and NF-κB Activation with Didox to Circumvent Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Khyati N; Wilson, Elizabeth A; Malla, Ritu; Elford, Howard L; Faridi, Jesika S

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen is widely used as an adjuvant therapy for patients with estrogen receptor (ERα)-positive tumors. However, the clinical benefit is often limited because of the emergence of drug resistance. In this study, overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 (RRM2) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells resulted in a reduction in the effectiveness of tamoxifen, through downregulation of ERα66 and upregulation of the 36-kDa variant of ER (ERα36). We identified that NF-κB, HIF1α, and MAPK/JNK are the major pathways that are affected by RRM2 overexpression and result in increased NF-κB activity and increased protein levels of EGFR, HER2, IKKs, Bcl-2, RelB, and p50. RRM2-overexpressing cells also exhibited higher migratory and invasive properties. Through time-lapse microscopy and protein profiling studies of tamoxifen-treated MCF-7 and T-47D cells, we have identified that RRM2, along with other key proteins, is altered during the emergence of acquired tamoxifen resistance. Inhibition of RRM2 using siRRM2 or the ribonucleotide reductase (RR) inhibitor didox not only eradicated and effectively prevented the emergence of tamoxifen-resistant populations but also led to the reversal of many of the proteins altered during the process of acquired tamoxifen resistance. Because didox also appears to be a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation, combining didox with tamoxifen treatment cooperatively reverses ER-α alterations and inhibits NF-κB activation. Finally, inhibition of RRM2 by didox reversed tamoxifen-resistant in vivo tumor growth and decreased in vitro migratory and invasive properties, revealing a beneficial effect of combination therapy that includes RRM2 inhibition to delay or abrogate tamoxifen resistance.

  10. Conserved electron donor complex Dre2-Tah18 is required for ribonucleotide reductase metallocofactor assembly and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Haoran; Zhang, Caiguo; An, Xiuxiang; Liu, Lili; Stubbe, JoAnne; Huang, Mingxia

    2014-04-29

    Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) require a diferric-tyrosyl radical (Fe(III)2-Y•) cofactor to produce deoxynucleotides essential for DNA replication and repair. This metallocofactor is an important target of RNR-based therapeutics, although mechanisms of in vivo cofactor assembly, inactivation, and reactivation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the conserved Fe-S protein-diflavin reductase complex, Dre2-Tah18, plays a critical role in RNR cofactor biosynthesis. Depletion of Dre2 affects both RNR gene transcription and mRNA turnover through the activation of the DNA-damage checkpoint and the Aft1/Aft2-controlled iron regulon. Under conditions of comparable RNR protein levels, cells with diminishing Dre2 have significantly reduced ability to make deoxynucleotides. Furthermore, the kinetics and levels of in vivo reconstitution of the RNR cofactor are severely impaired in two conditional tah18 mutants. Together, these findings provide insight into RNR cofactor formation and reveal a shared mechanism underlying assembly of the Fe(III)2-Y• cofactor in RNR and the Fe-S clusters in cytosolic and nuclear proteins.

  11. Spectroscopic Studies of the Iron and Manganese Reconstituted Tyrosyl Radical in Bacillus Cereus Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tomter, Ane B.; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Bell, Caleb B.; Barra, Anne-Laure; Andersen, Niels H.; Solomon, Edward I.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν7a = 1500 cm−1) was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the 18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm−1) of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011) J Biol Chem 286: 33053–33060) indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8 times higher

  12. A tyrosine-tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; McCaslin, Tyler G.; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2015-12-01

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O.) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ~10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine-tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO. to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer.

  13. A stable Fe{sup III}-Fe{sup IV} replacement of tyrosyl radical in a class I ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Voevodskaya, N.; Lendzian, F.; Graeslund, A. . E-mail: astrid@dbb.su.se

    2005-05-20

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) of Chlamydia trachomatis is a class I RNR enzyme composed of two homodimeric components, proteins R1 and R2. In class I RNR, R1 has the substrate binding site, whereas R2 has a diferric site and normally in its active form a stable tyrosyl free radical. C. trachomatis RNR is unusual, because its R2 component has a phenylalanine in the place of the radical carrier tyrosine. Replacing the tyrosyl radical, a paramagnetic Fe{sup III}-Fe{sup IV} species (species X, normally a transient intermediate in the process leading to radical formation) may provide the oxidation equivalent needed to start the catalytic process via long range electron transfer from the active site in R1. Here EPR spectroscopy shows that in C. trachomatis RNR, species X can become essentially stable when formed in a complete RNR (R1/R2/substrate) complex, adding further weight to the possible role of this species X in the catalytic reaction.

  14. An S-phase specific release from a transcriptional block regulates the expression of mouse ribonucleotide reductase R2 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, S; Skogman, E; Thelander, L

    1992-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) activity in mammalian cells is closely linked to DNA synthesis. The RR enzyme is composed of two non-identical subunits, proteins R1 and R2. Both proteins are required for holoenzyme activity, which is regulated by S-phase specific de novo synthesis and breakdown of the R2 subunit. In quiescent cells stimulated to proliferate and in elutriated cell populations enriched in the various cell cycle phases the R2 protein levels are correlated to R2 mRNA levels that are low in G0/G1-phase cells but increase dramatically at the G1/S border. Using an R2 promoter-luciferase reporter gene construct we demonstrate an unexpected early activation of the R2 promoter as cells pass from quiescence to proliferation. However, due to a transcriptional block, this promoter activation only results in very short R2 transcripts until cells enter the S-phase, when full-length R2 transcripts start to appear. The position for the transcriptional block was localized to a nucleotide sequence approximately 87 bp downstream from the first exon/intron boundary by S1 nuclease mapping of R2 transcripts from modified in vitro nuclear run-on experiments. These results identify blocking of transcription as a mechanism to control cell cycle regulated gene expression. Images PMID:1464320

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of 57Fe-reconstituted rubrerythrin, a non-heme iron protein with structural analogies to ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Ravi, N; Prickril, B C; Kurtz, D M; Huynh, B H

    1993-08-24

    Rubrerythrin, a contraction of rubredoxin and hemerythrin, is the trivial name given to a non-heme iron protein isolated from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough). This protein, whose physiological function is unknown, was first characterized by J. LeGall et al. [(1988) Biochemistry 28, 1636] as being a homodimer of subunit M(r) = 21,900 with four Fe per homodimer distributed as two rubredoxin-type FeS4 centers and one hemerythrin-type diiron cluster. Subsequent analysis of the amino acid sequence of the rubrerythrin gene [Kurtz, D. M., Jr., & Prickril, B.C. (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 181, 137] revealed an internal homology which suggested that each subunit can accommodate one diiron cluster. Here, we report a procedure for reconstitution of the as-isolated D. vulgaris rubrerythrin with 57Fe. The reconstituted protein was characterized by optical, electron paramagnetic resonance, and Mössbauer spectroscopies. The results indicate successful incorporation of 57Fe into the two types of sites and strongly suggest that each subunit of rubrerythrin can indeed accommodate one diiron cluster as well as one rubredoxin-type center. Combined with amino acid sequence analysis, the spectroscopic characterization further suggests that the rubrerythrin subunit contains a diiron site whose structure is more closely related to that in ribonucleotide reductase than to that in hemerythrin.

  16. A tyrosine–tryptophan dyad and radical-based charge transfer in a ribonucleotide reductase-inspired maquette

    PubMed Central

    Pagba, Cynthia V.; McCaslin, Tyler G.; Veglia, Gianluigi; Porcelli, Fernando; Yohannan, Jiby; Guo, Zhanjun; McDaniel, Miranda; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2015-01-01

    In class 1a ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a substrate-based radical is generated in the α2 subunit by long-distance electron transfer involving an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O·) in the β2 subunit. The conserved W48 β2 is ∼10 Å from Y122OH; mutations at W48 inactivate RNR. Here, we design a beta hairpin peptide, which contains such an interacting tyrosine–tryptophan dyad. The NMR structure of the peptide establishes that there is no direct hydrogen bond between the phenol and the indole rings. However, electronic coupling between the tyrosine and tryptophan occurs in the peptide. In addition, downshifted ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) frequencies are observed for the radical state, reproducing spectral downshifts observed for β2. The frequency downshifts of the ring and CO bands are consistent with charge transfer from YO· to W or another residue. Such a charge transfer mechanism implies a role for the β2 Y-W dyad in electron transfer. PMID:26627888

  17. Sen1p Contributes to Genomic Integrity by Regulating Expression of Ribonucleotide Reductase 1 (RNR1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhat; Verma, Naveen; Mandal, Papita; Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a multi-step process which requires recruitment of several factors to promoters. One of the factors, Sen1p is an RNA/DNA helicase implicated in transcriptional termination and RNA processing in yeast. In the present study, we have identified a novel function of Sen1p that regulates the expression of ribonucleotide reductase RNR1 gene, which is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. Cells with mutation in the helicase domain or lacking N-terminal domain of Sen1p displayed a drastic decrease in the basal level transcription of RNR1 gene and showed enhanced sensitivity to various DNA damaging agents. Moreover, SEN1 mutants [Sen1-1 (G1747D), Sen1-2 (Δ1-975)] exhibited defects in DNA damage checkpoint activation. Surprisingly, CRT1 deletion in Sen1p mutants (Sen1-1, Sen1-2) was partly able to rescue the slow growth phenotype upon genotoxic stress. Altogether, our observations suggest that Sen1p is required for cell protection against DNA damage by regulating the expression of DNA repair gene RNR1. Thus, the misregulation of Sen1p regulated genes can cause genomic instability that may lead to neurological disorders and premature aging. PMID:23741394

  18. Radiosensitization of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Ribonucleotide Reductase: Enhanced Radiation Response at Low-Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Pink, John; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To test whether pharmacologic inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC no. 663249) enhances radiation sensitivity during low-dose-rate ionizing radiation provided by a novel purpose-built iridium-192 cell irradiator. Methods and Materials: The cells were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (11, 23, 37, 67 cGy/h) using a custom-fabricated cell irradiator or to high-dose-rate radiation (330 cGy/min) using a conventional cell irradiator. The radiation sensitivity of human cervical (CaSki, C33-a) cancer cells with or without RNR inhibition by 3-AP was evaluated using a clonogenic survival and an RNR activity assay. Alteration in the cell cycle distribution was monitored using flow cytometry. Results: Increasing radiation sensitivity of both CaSki and C33-a cells was observed with the incremental increase in radiation dose rates. 3-AP treatment led to enhanced radiation sensitivity in both cell lines, eliminating differences in cell cytotoxicity from the radiation dose rate. RNR blockade by 3-AP during low-dose-rate irradiation was associated with low RNR activity and extended G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: We conclude that RNR inhibition by 3-AP impedes DNA damage repair mechanisms that rely on deoxyribonucleotide production and thereby increases radiation sensitivity of human cervical cancers to low-dose-rate radiation.

  19. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Carmona, Mercè; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Bañó, M Carmen; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2017-06-01

    The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  20. Insight into the mechanism of inactivation of ribonucleotide reductase by gemcitabine 5'-diphosphate in the presence or absence of reductant.

    PubMed

    Artin, Erin; Wang, Jun; Lohman, Gregory J S; Yokoyama, Kenichi; Yu, Guixue; Griffin, Robert G; Bar, Galit; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2009-12-15

    Gemcitabine 5'-diphosphate (F(2)CDP) is a potent inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), enzymes that convert nucleotides (NDPs) to deoxynucleotides and are essential for DNA replication and repair. The Escherichia coli RNR, an alpha2beta2 complex, when incubated with 1 equiv of F(2)CDP catalyzes the release of two fluorides and cytosine concomitant with enzyme inactivation. In the presence of reductant (thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase/NADPH or DTT), the enzyme inactivation results from its covalent labeling of alpha with the sugar of F(2)CDP (one label/alpha2beta2). SDS-PAGE analysis of the inactivated RNR without boiling of the sample reveals that alpha migrates as an 87 and 110 kDa protein in a ratio of 0.6:0.4. When the reductant is omitted, RNR is inactivated by loss of the essential tyrosyl radical and formation of a new radical. Inactivation studies with C225S-alpha in the presence or absence of reductants, reveal it behaves like wt-RNR in the absence of reductant. Inactivated C225S-alpha migrates as an 87 kDa protein and is not covalently modified. C225 is one of the cysteines in RNR's active site that supplies reducing equivalents to make dNDPs. To identify the new radical formed, [1'-(2)H]-F(2)CDP was studied with wt- and C225S-RNR by 9 and 140 GHz EPR spectroscopy. These studies revealed that the new radical is a nucleotide derived with g values of g(x) 2.00738, g(y) 2.00592, and g(z) 2.00230 and with altered hyperfine interactions (apparent triplet collapsed to a doublet) relative to [1'-(1)H]-F(2)CDP. The EPR features are very similar to those we recently reported for the nucleotide radical generated with CDP and E441Q-RNR.

  1. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Mercè; Bañó, M. Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth. PMID:28640807

  2. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the adenosylcobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase from Lactobacillus leichmannii.

    PubMed Central

    Booker, S; Stubbe, J

    1993-01-01

    Ribonucleoside-triphosphate reductase (RTPR, EC 1.17.4.2) from Lactobacillus leichmannii, a monomeric adenosylcobalamin-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside triphosphates to deoxynucleoside triphosphates. The gene for this enzyme has been cloned and sequenced. In contrast to expectations based on mechanistic considerations, there is no statistically significant sequence homology with the Escherichia coli reductase that requires a dinuclear-iron center and tyrosyl radical cofactor. The RTPR has been overexpressed and purified to homogeneity, yielding 90 mg of protein from 2.5 g of bacteria. Initial characterization of the recombinant RTPR indicates that its properties are identical to those of the RTPR isolated from L. leichmannii. PMID:8397403

  3. Investigation of reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2′-azido-2′-deoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Thao P.; Sobczak, Adam J.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.

    2012-01-01

    Model 3′-azido-3′-deoxynucleosides with thiol or vicinal dithiol substituents at C2′ or C5′ were synthesized to study reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2′-azido-2′-deoxynucleotides. Esterification of 5′-(tert-butyldiphenylsilyl)-3′-azido-3′-deoxyadenosine and 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine (AZT) with 2,3-S-isopropylidene-2,3-dimercaptopropanoic acid or N-Boc-S-trityl-L-cysteine and deprotection gave 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-2′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)adenosine and the 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-5′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)thymidine analogs. Density functional calculations predicted that intramolecular reactions between generated thiyl radicals and an azido group on such model compounds would be exothermic by 33.6-41.2 kcal/mol and have low energy barriers of 10.4-13.5 kcal/mol. Reduction of the azido group occurred to give 3′-amino-3′-deoxythymidine, which was postulated to occur with thiyl radicals generated by treatment of 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-5′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl)thymidine with 2,2′-azobis-(2-methyl-2-propionamidine) dihydrochloride. Gamma radiolysis of N2O-saturated aqueous solutions of AZT and cysteine produced 3′-amino-3′-deoxythymidine and thymine most likely by both radical and ionic processes. PMID:22711937

  4. Resistance of herpes simplex virus type 1 to peptidomimetic ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors: selection and characterization of mutant isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, A M; Kibler, P; White, P; Bousquet, C; Dansereau, N; Cordingley, M G

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encodes its own ribonucleotide reductase (RR), which provides the high levels of deoxynucleoside triphosphates required for viral DNA replication in infected cells. HSV RR is composed of two distinct subunits, R1 and R2, whose association is required for enzymatic activity. Peptidomimetic inhibitors that mimic the C-terminal amino acids of R2 inhibit HSV RR by preventing the association of R1 and R2. These compounds are candidate antiviral therapeutic agents. Here we describe the in vitro selection of HSV type 1 KOS variants with three- to ninefold-decreased sensitivity to the RR inhibitor BILD 733. The resistant isolates have growth properties in vitro similar to those of wild-type KOS but are more sensitive to acyclovir, possibly as a consequence of functional impairment of their RRs. A single amino acid substitution in R1 (Ala-1091 to Ser) was associated with threefold resistance to BILD 733, whereas an additional substitution (Pro-1090 to Leu) was required for higher levels of resistance. These mutations were reintroduced into HSV type 1 KOS and shown to be sufficient to confer the resistance phenotype. Studies in vitro with RRs isolated from cells infected with these mutant viruses demonstrated that these RRs bind BILD 733 more weakly than the wild-type enzyme and are also functionally impaired, exhibiting an elevated dissociation constant (Kd) for R1-R2 subunit association and/or reduced activity (kcat). This work provides evidence that the C-terminal end of HSV R1 (residues 1090 and 1091) is involved in R2 binding interactions and demonstrates that resistance to subunit association inhibitors may be associated with compromised activity of the target enzyme. PMID:8551616

  5. Is the mu-oxo-mu-peroxodiiron intermediate of a ribonucleotide reductase biomimetic a possible oxidant of epoxidation reactions?

    PubMed

    de Visser, Sam P

    2008-01-01

    Density functional calculations on a mu-oxo-mu-peroxodiiron complex (1) with a tetrapodal ligand BPP (BPP=N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-3-aminopropionate) are presented that is a biomimetic of the active site region of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). We have studied all low-lying electronic states and show that it has close-lying broken-shell singlet and undecaplet (S=0, 5) ground states with essentially two sextet spin iron atoms. In strongly distorted electronic systems in which the two iron atoms have different spin states, the peroxo group moves considerably out of the plane of the mu-oxodiiron group due to orbital rearrangements. The calculated absorption spectra of (1,11)1 are in good agreement with experimental studies on biomimetics and RNR enzyme systems. Moreover, vibrational shifts in the spectrum due to (18)O(2) substitution of the oxygen atoms in the peroxo group follow similar trends as experimental observations. To identify whether the mu-oxo-mu-1,2-peroxodiiron or the mu-oxo-mu-1,1-peroxodiiron complexes are able to epoxidize substrates, we studied the reactivity patterns versus propene. Generally, the reactions are stepwise via radical intermediates and proceed by two-state reactivity patterns on competing singlet and undecaplet spin state surfaces. However, both the mu-oxo-mu-1,2-peroxodiiron and mu-oxo-mu-1,1-peroxodiiron complex are sluggish oxidants with high epoxidation barriers. The epoxidation barriers for the mu-oxo-mu-1,1-peroxodiiron complex are significantly lower than the ones for the mu-oxo-mu-1,2-peroxodiiron complex but still are too high to be considered for catalytic properties. Thus, theory has ruled out two possible peroxodiiron catalysts as oxidants in RNR enzymes and biomimetics and the quest to find the actual oxidant in the enzyme mechanism continues.

  6. Ribonucleotide Reductase as One Important Target of [Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)lanthanum(III)] Trithiocyanate (KP772)

    PubMed Central

    Heffeter, P.; Popovic-Bijelic, A.; Saiko, P.; Dornetshuber, R.; Jungwirth, U.; Voevodskaya, N.; Biglino, D.; Jakupec, M.A.; Elbling, L.; Micksche, M.; Szekeres, T.; Keppler, B.K.; Gräslund, A.; Berger, W.

    2012-01-01

    KP772 is a new lanthanum complex containing three 1,10-phenathroline molecules. Recently, we have demonstrated that the promising in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties of KP772 are based on p53-independent G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis induction. A National Cancer Institute (NCI) screen revealed significant correlation of KP772 activity with that of the ribonucleotide reductase (RR) inhibitor hydroxyurea (HU). Consequently, this study aimed to investigate whether KP772 targets DNA synthesis in tumor cells by RR inhibition. Indeed, KP772 treatment led to significant reduction of cytidine incorporation paralleled by a decrease of deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools. This strongly indicates disruption of RR activity. Moreover, KP772 protected against oxidative stress, suggesting that this drug might interfere with RR by interaction with the tyrosyl radical in subunit R2. Additionally, several observations (e.g. increase of transferrin receptor expression and protective effect of iron preloading) indicate that KP772 interferes with cellular iron homeostasis. Accordingly, co-incubation of Fe(II) with KP772 led to generation of a coloured iron complex (Fe-KP772) in cell free systems. In electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of mouse R2 subunits, KP772 disrupted the tyrosyl radical while Fe-KP772 had no significant effects. Moreover, coincubation of KP772 with iron-loaded R2 led to formation of Fe-KP772 suggesting chelation of RR-bound Fe(II). Summarizing, our data prove that KP772 inhibits RR by targeting the iron centre of the R2 subunit. As also Fe-KP772 as well as free lanthanum exert significant -though less pronounced- cytotoxic/static activities, additional mechanisms are likely to synergise with RR inhibition in the promising anticancer activity of KP772. PMID:19508176

  7. Corynebacterium ammoniagenes class Ib ribonucleotide reductase: transcriptional regulation of an atypical genomic organization in the nrd cluster.

    PubMed

    Torrents, E; Roca, I; Gibert, I

    2003-04-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of complex enzymes that play an essential role in all organisms because they catalyse de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides required for DNA replication and repair. Three different classes of RNR have been described according to their metal cofactors and organic radicals. Class Ib RNR is encoded in four different genes (nrdH, nrdI, nrdE and nrdF) organized in an operon. The authors previously cloned and sequenced the genes encoding the active class Ib RNR of Corynebacterium ammoniagenes and showed that these genes are clustered in an atypical nrdEF region, which differs from that of other known class Ib enzymes because of an intergenic sequence (1171 bp) present between nrdE and nrdF. This study investigated the transcriptional organization and regulation of this nrd region by RT-PCR. Three different and independent mRNA were found (nrdHIE, nrdF and an ORF present in the intergenic region), each one being transcribed from its own promoter and being essential for normal growth. The ratio of nrdF to nrdHIE mRNA was 9.1, as determined by competitive RT-PCR; the expression of both nrdHIE and nrdF was found to be dependent on the culture growth phase, and was induced in the presence of hydroxyurea, manganese and hydrogen peroxide. This is believed to be the first direct evidence for a manganese-dependent transcriptional regulation of nrd genes. These results suggest a common and coordinated regulation of the different nrd genes, despite their being transcribed from independent promoters.

  8. Caspase-dependent Proteolysis of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunits R2 and p53R2 during Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Tebbi, Ali; Guittet, Olivier; Tuphile, Karine; Cabrié, Aimeric; Lepoivre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RnR) is a key enzyme synthesizing deoxyribonucleotides for DNA replication and repair. In mammals, the R1 catalytic subunit forms an active complex with either one of the two small subunits R2 and p53R2. Expression of R2 is S phase-specific and required for DNA replication. The p53R2 protein is expressed throughout the cell cycle and in quiescent cells where it provides dNTPs for mitochondrial DNA synthesis. Participation of R2 and p53R2 in DNA repair has also been suggested. In this study, we investigated the fate of the RnR subunits during apoptosis. The p53R2 protein was cleaved in a caspase-dependent manner in K-562 cells treated with inhibitors of the Bcr-Abl oncogenic kinase and in HeLa 229 cells incubated with TNF-α and cycloheximide. The cleavage site was mapped between Asp342 and Asn343. Caspase attack released a C-terminal p53R2 peptide of nine residues containing the conserved heptapeptide essential for R1 binding. As a consequence, the cleaved p53R2 protein was inactive. In vitro, purified caspase-3 and -8 could release the C-terminal tail of p53R2. Knocking down these caspases, but not caspase-2, -7, and -10, also inhibited p53R2 cleavage in cells committed to die via the extrinsic death receptor pathway. The R2 subunit was subjected to caspase- and proteasome-dependent proteolysis, which was prevented by siRNA targeting caspase-8. Knocking down caspase-3 was ineffective. Protein R1 was not subjected to degradation. Adding deoxyribonucleosides to restore dNTP pools transiently protected cells from apoptosis. These data identify RnR activity as a prosurvival function inactivated by proteolysis during apoptosis. PMID:25878246

  9. Progesterone and DNA Damage Encourage Uterine Cell Proliferation and Decidualization through Up-regulating Ribonucleotide Reductase 2 Expression during Early Pregnancy in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei; Feng, Xu-Hui; Deng, Wen-Bo; Ni, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Jia, Bo; Yang, Xin-Ling; Wang, Tong-Song; Liu, Ji-Long; Su, Ren-Wei; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Qi, Qian-Rong; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Embryo implantation into the maternal uterus is a crucial step for the successful establishment of mammalian pregnancy. Following the attachment of embryo to the uterine luminal epithelium, uterine stromal cells undergo steroid hormone-dependent decidualization, which is characterized by stromal cell proliferation and differentiation. The mechanisms underlying steroid hormone-induced stromal cell proliferation and differentiation during decidualization are still poorly understood. Ribonucleotide reductase, consisting of two subunits (RRM1 and RRM2), is a rate-limiting enzyme in deoxynucleotide production for DNA synthesis and plays an important role in cell proliferation and tumorgenicity. Based on our microarray analysis, Rrm2 expression was significantly higher at implantation sites compared with interimplantation sites in mouse uterus. However, the expression, regulation, and function of RRM2 in mouse uterus during embryo implantation and decidualization are still unknown. Here we show that although both RRM1 and RRM2 expression are markedly induced in mouse uterine stromal cells undergoing decidualization, only RRM2 is regulated by progesterone, a key regulator of decidualization. Further studies showed that the induction of progesterone on RRM2 expression in stromal cells is mediated by the AKT/c-MYC pathway. RRM2 can also be induced by replication stress and DNA damage during decidualization through the ATR/ATM-CHK1-E2F1 pathway. The weight of implantation sites and deciduoma was effectively reduced by specific inhibitors for RRM2. The expression of decidual/trophoblast prolactin-related protein (Dtprp), a reliable marker for decidualization in mice, was significantly reduced in deciduoma and steroid-induced decidual cells after HU treatment. Therefore, RRM2 may be an important effector of progesterone signaling to induce cell proliferation and decidualization in mouse uterus. PMID:22403396

  10. Phosphorylation of ribonucleotide reductase R2 protein: in vivo and in vitro evidence of a role for p34cdc2 and CDK2 protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Chan, A K; Litchfield, D W; Wright, J A

    1993-11-30

    Ribonucleotide reductase is responsible for supplying the deoxyribonucleotides required for DNA synthesis and repair. The active enzyme consists of two dissimilar protein components called R1 and R2. Immunoprecipitation of R1 and R2 proteins from [32P]orthophosphate-labeled exponentially growing mouse L cells showed that the R2 protein but not the R1 protein of ribonucleotide reductase could be phosphorylated in vivo. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping experiments of trypsin-digested R2 protein showed a major spot containing more than 90% of the total radioactivity and a minor spot with the remaining radioactivity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of R2 phosphorylated protein indicated that phosphorylation occurred exclusively on serine. Protein kinase C, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, p34cdc2, and CDK2 were capable of phosphorylating the R2 protein in vitro, whereas casein kinase II was not. To determine whether any of these enzymes could phosphorylate peptides observed to be phosphorylated in actively growing cells, tryptic phosphopeptide maps of R2 that had been phosphorylated in vitro were compared with maps of R2 that had been isolated from [32P]-labeled cells. Only the phosphopeptide maps obtained with p34cdc2 and CDK2 matched the pattern found in [32P]-labeled cells. Experiments in which tryptic digests from different samples were mixed prior to two-dimensional separation demonstrated comigration of phosphopeptides obtained by in vivo phosphorylation with phosphopeptides derived from p34cdc2 or CDK2 obtained by in vitro phosphorylations. These studies indicate that protein R2 phosphorylation may play an important role in the regulation of ribonucleotide reduction, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle progression, and suggest a potentially important p34cdc2 and/or CDK2 regulation point in DNA replication.

  11. Role of Arginine 293 and Glutamine 288 in Communication between Catalytic and Allosteric Sites in Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2012-11-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 ({alpha}) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 ({beta}) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  12. Ixr1 Is Required for the Expression of the Ribonucleotide Reductase Rnr1 and Maintenance of dNTP Pools

    PubMed Central

    Tsaponina, Olga; Barsoum, Emad; Åström, Stefan U.; Chabes, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dun1 protein kinase is a downstream target of the conserved Mec1-Rad53 checkpoint pathway. Dun1 regulates dNTP pools during an unperturbed cell cycle and after DNA damage by modulating the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by multiple mechanisms, including phosphorylation of RNR inhibitors Sml1 and Dif1. Dun1 also activates DNA-damage-inducible genes by inhibiting the Crt1 transcriptional repressor. Among the genes repressed by Crt1 are three out of four RNR genes: RNR2, RNR3, and RNR4. The fourth RNR gene, RNR1, is also DNA damage-inducible, but is not controlled by Crt1. It has been shown that the deletion of DUN1 is synthetic lethal with the deletion of IXR1, encoding an HMG-box-containing DNA binding protein, but the reason for this lethality is not known. Here we demonstrate that the dun1 ixr1 synthetic lethality is caused by an inadequate RNR activity. The deletion of IXR1 results in decreased dNTP levels due to a reduced RNR1 expression. The ixr1 single mutants compensate for the reduced Rnr1 levels by the Mec1-Rad53-Dun1-Crt1–dependent elevation of Rnr3 and Rnr4 levels and downregulation of Sml1 levels, explaining why DUN1 is indispensible in ixr1 mutants. The dun1 ixr1 synthetic lethality is rescued by an artificial elevation of the dNTP pools. We show that Ixr1 is phosphorylated at several residues and that Ser366, a residue important for the interaction of HMG boxes with DNA, is required for Ixr1 phosphorylation. Ixr1 interacts with DNA at multiple loci, including the RNR1 promoter. Ixr1 levels are decreased in Rad53-deficient cells, which are known to have excessive histone levels. A reduction of the histone gene dosage in the rad53 mutant restores Ixr1 levels. Our results demonstrate that Ixr1, but not Dun1, is required for the proper RNR1 expression both during an unperturbed cell cycle and after DNA damage. PMID:21573136

  13. Biophysical characterization of fluorotyrosine probes site-specifically incorporated into enzymes: E. coli ribonucleotide reductase as an example

    DOE PAGES

    Oyala, Paul H.; Ravichandran, Kanchana R.; Funk, Michael A.; ...

    2016-06-08

    Here, fluorinated tyrosines (FnY’s, n = 2 and 3) have been site-specifically incorporated into E. coli class Ia ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) using the recently evolved M. jannaschii Y-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pair. Class Ia RNRs require four redox active Y’s, a stable Y radical (Y·) in the β subunit (position 122 in E. coli), and three transiently oxidized Y’s (356 in β and 731 and 730 in α) to initiate the radicaldependent nucleotide reduction process. FnY (3,5; 2,3; 2,3,5; and 2,3,6) incorporation in place of Y122-β and the X-ray structures of each resulting β with a diferric cluster are reported and comparedmore » with wt-β2 crystallized under the same conditions. The essential diferric-FnY· cofactor is self-assembled from apo FnY-β2, Fe2+, and O2 to produce ~1 Y·/β2 and ~3 Fe3+/β2. The FnY· are stable and active in nucleotide reduction with activities that vary from 5% to 85% that of wt-β2. Each FnY·-β2 has been characterized by 9 and 130 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance and high-field electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopies. The hyperfine interactions associated with the 19F nucleus provide unique signatures of each FnY· that are readily distinguishable from unlabeled Y·’s. The variability of the abiotic FnY pKa’s (6.4 to 7.8) and reduction potentials (-30 to +130 mV relative to Y at pH 7.5) provide probes of enzymatic reactions proposed to involve Y·’s in catalysis and to investigate the importance and identity of hopping Y·’s within redox active proteins proposed to protect them from uncoupled radical chemistry.« less

  14. Biophysical Characterization of Fluorotyrosine Probes Site-Specifically Incorporated into Enzymes: E. coli Ribonucleotide Reductase As an Example

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fluorinated tyrosines (FnY’s, n = 2 and 3) have been site-specifically incorporated into E. coli class Ia ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) using the recently evolved M. jannaschii Y-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pair. Class Ia RNRs require four redox active Y’s, a stable Y radical (Y·) in the β subunit (position 122 in E. coli), and three transiently oxidized Y’s (356 in β and 731 and 730 in α) to initiate the radical-dependent nucleotide reduction process. FnY (3,5; 2,3; 2,3,5; and 2,3,6) incorporation in place of Y122-β and the X-ray structures of each resulting β with a diferric cluster are reported and compared with wt-β2 crystallized under the same conditions. The essential diferric-FnY· cofactor is self-assembled from apo FnY-β2, Fe2+, and O2 to produce ∼1 Y·/β2 and ∼3 Fe3+/β2. The FnY· are stable and active in nucleotide reduction with activities that vary from 5% to 85% that of wt-β2. Each FnY·-β2 has been characterized by 9 and 130 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance and high-field electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopies. The hyperfine interactions associated with the 19F nucleus provide unique signatures of each FnY· that are readily distinguishable from unlabeled Y·’s. The variability of the abiotic FnY pKa’s (6.4 to 7.8) and reduction potentials (−30 to +130 mV relative to Y at pH 7.5) provide probes of enzymatic reactions proposed to involve Y·’s in catalysis and to investigate the importance and identity of hopping Y·’s within redox active proteins proposed to protect them from uncoupled radical chemistry. PMID:27276098

  15. Rational Reprogramming of the R2 Subunit of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase into a Self-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.; Voegtli, W.C.; Khidekel, N.; Moënne-Loccoz, P.; Krebs, C.; Ley, B.A.; Huynh, B.H.; Loehr, T.M.; Rosenzweig, A.C.; Bollinger, Jr., J.M.

    2010-03-05

    The outcome of O{sub 2} activation at the diiron(II) cluster in the R2 subunit of Escherichia coli (class I) ribonucleotide reductase has been rationally altered from the normal tyrosyl radical (Y122) production to self-hydroxylation of a phenylalanine side-chain by two amino acid substitutions that leave intact the (histidine){sub 2}-(carboxylate){sub 4} ligand set characteristic of the diiron-carboxylate family. Iron ligand Asp (D) 84 was replaced with Glu (E), the amino acid found in the cognate position of the structurally similar diiron-carboxylate protein, methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH). We previously showed that this substitution allows accumulation of a {mu}-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) intermediate, which does not accumulate in the wild-type (wt) protein and is probably a structural homologue of intermediate P (H{sub peroxo}) in O{sub 2} activation by MMOH. In addition, the near-surface residue Trp (W) 48 was replaced with Phe (F), blocking transfer of the 'extra' electron that occurs in wt R2 during formation of the formally Fe(III)Fe(IV) cluster X. Decay of the {mu}-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex in R2-W48F/D84E gives an initial brown product, which contains very little Y122 and which converts very slowly (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7 h) upon incubation at 0 C to an intensely purple final product. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the purple product indicates that F208 has undergone {epsilon}-hydroxylation and the resulting phenol has shifted significantly to become a ligand to Fe2 of the diiron cluster. Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the purple product generated with {sup 16}O{sub 2} or {sub 18}O{sub 2} show appropriate isotopic sensitivity in bands assigned to O-phenyl and Fe-O-phenyl vibrational modes, confirming that the oxygen of the Fe(III)-phenolate species is derived from O{sub 2}. Chemical analysis, experiments involving interception of the hydroxylating intermediate with exogenous reductant, and Moessbauer and EXAFS characterization of the brown

  16. Ribonucleotide reductase large subunit M1 plays a different role in the invasion and metastasis of papillary thyroid carcinoma and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zejun; Song, Rui; Gong, Chaoju; Zhang, Xiaomin; Ren, Guoping; Li, Jinfan; Chen, Yuexia; Qiu, Lanlan; Mei, Lingming; Zhang, Ronghui; Xiang, Xueping; Chen, Xiang; Shao, Jimin

    2016-03-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) has been reported to be associated with several types of cancer while the expression and role of RR in thyroid carcinoma (TC) has not been investigated. Here, we first examined the expression level of three RR subunit proteins (RRM1, RRM2, and RRM2B) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC) patient samples by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that RRM1 was higher expressed in 95.2 % cancer tissues compared with their adjacent normal tissues in 146 PTC samples. The expression level of RRM1 was positively correlated with T stage, lymph node metastasis (LNM), extrathyroidal invasion (ETI), and TNM stage in PTC patients. However, in 12 UTC samples, RRM1 expression was negatively expressed in six cases. To further determine the biological role of RRM1 in TC, ectopic expression or siRNA-mediated knockdown of RRM1 were carried out in the high-differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell line TPC-1 and the poor-differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell line SW579, respectively. In TPC-1 and SW579 cells, overexpression and siRNA knockdown of RRM1 demonstrated that RRM1 promoted DNA synthesis and proliferation in both cell lines as shown by EdU incorporation and cell viability assays. However, RRM1 enhanced cell migration and invasion in TPC-1 cells but inhibited that in SW579 cells as shown by wound healing and transwell assays. Moreover, we also found that RRM1 promoted PTEN expression and reduced Akt phosphorylation in a RR-activity-independent manner in the low-differentiated TC cells but not in the high-differentiated TC cells. In contrast, RRM2 expression was higher expressed in both PTC and UTC patient samples, consisting with its oncogenic role in other cancers. Therefore, we suggest that RRM1 promotes thyroid carcinoma proliferation as a component of RR but may play a different role in the invasion and metastasis of differently differentiated thyroid carcinomas through a non-RR pathway, which could

  17. Reduction of the tyrosyl radical and the iron center in protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse, herpes simplex virus and E. coli by p-alkoxyphenols.

    PubMed

    Pötsch, S; Sahlin, M; Langelier, Y; Gräslund, A; Lassmann, G

    1995-10-23

    The rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical in the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (protein R2) from E. coli, mouse, and herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) by a series of p-alkoxyphenols with different alkyl chains, have been studied by stopped-flow UV-vis and stopped-flow EPR spectroscopy. The reduction and release of iron in R2 by the inhibitors was followed using bathophenanthroline as chelator of Fe2+. p-Alkoxyphenols reduce the mouse R2 tyrosyl radical 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than the HSV-2 and E. coli radical. In contrast to E. coli, the iron center in R2 from mouse and HSV-2 is reduced by the inhibitors. For mouse R2, the rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical increases in parallel with increasing alkyl chain length of the inhibitor, an observation which may be important for the design of new antiproliferative drugs.

  18. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of 2'-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine and the 5'-Diphosphate Derivative as Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, D.; Xu, H.; Wijerathna, S.R.; Dealwis, C.; Lee, R.E.

    2010-08-27

    Analysis of the recently solved X-ray crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonucleotide reductase I (ScRnr1) in complex with effectors and substrates led to the discovery of a conserved water molecule located at the active site that interacted with the 2'-hydroxy group of the nucleoside ribose. In this study 2'-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2'-deoxyadenosine 1 and the 5'-diphosphate derivative 2 were designed and synthesized to see if the conserved water molecule could be displaced by a hydroxymethylene group, to generate novel RNR inhibitors as potential antitumor agents. Herein we report the synthesis of analogues 1 and 2, and the co-crystal structure of adenosine diphosphate analogue 2 bound to ScRnr1, which shows the conserved water molecule is displaced as hypothesized.

  19. Structure-based Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of 2′-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-2′-Deoxyadenosine and Its 5′-Diphosphate as Novel Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dianqing; Xu, Hai; Wijerathna, Sanath, R.; Dealwis, Chris; Lee, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the recently solved X-ray crystal structures of yeast ribonucleotide reductase I (RnrI) in complex with effectors and substrates led to the discovery of a conserved water molecule located at the active site that interacted with the 2′ hydroxy of the nucleoside ribose. In this study 2′-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2′-deoxy-adenosine 1 and its 5′-diphosphate 2 were designed and synthesized to see if the conserved water molecule could be displaced by a hydroxylmethylene group, to generate a novel of inhibitors of this enzyme towards the development of potential anti-neoplastic agents. In this paper, we report the synthesis of these two adenosine analogs 1 and 2, and the co-crystal structure of adenosine diphosphate analog 2 bound with RnrI enzyme which displaces the conserved water as hypothesized. PMID:19681093

  20. Isolation and characterization of expressible cDNA clones encoding the M1 and M2 subunits of mouse ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Thelander, L; Berg, P

    1986-01-01

    Mammalian ribonucleotide reductase consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins M1 and M2, which are differentially regulated during the cell cycle. We have isolated expressible cDNA clones of both subunits from an Okayama-Berg cDNA library made with mRNA from hydroxyurea-resistant, M2 protein-overproducing mouse TA3 cells. Expression of M2 protein could be demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy after transfection of COS-7 monkey cells with the plasmid. Electrophoresis and blot analyses of the parent and hydroxyurea-resistant TA3 mRNA revealed two M2 transcripts, a major one of 2.1 kilobases and a minor one of about 1.6 kilobases. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the corresponding cDNAs indicated that the two mRNAs differed only in the length of the 3' untranslated ends. By contrast, there was only one mRNA corresponding to the M1 protein, and its mobility corresponded to about 3.1 kilobases. The hydroxyurea-resistant TA3 cells contained a 50- to 100-fold excess of the M2 mRNAs over that of the parent cells and a 10-fold excess of the M1 mRNA. However, a Southern blot analysis of the corresponding genomic DNA sequences showed that the M2 gene was amplified fivefold but the M1 gene was still single copy. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 2,111-base-pair-long M2 cDNA revealed an open reading frame coding for 390 amino acids, which corresponds to a molecular weight of 45,100. The mouse M2 protein sequence was quite homologous to the equivalent protein in the clam Spisula solidissima, while the homology to the smaller subunits of Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus type 2, and Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductases were less pronounced. Images PMID:3025593

  1. Characterization of heterosubunit complexes formed by the R1 and R2 subunits of herpes simplex virus 1 and equine herpes virus 4 ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Conner, J

    2000-04-01

    We report on the separate PCR cloning and subsequent expression and purification of the large (R1) and small (R2) subunits from equine herpes virus type 4 (EHV-4) ribonucleotide reductase. The EHV-4 R1 and R2 subunits reconstituted an active enzyme and their abilities to complement the R1 and R2 subunits from the closely related herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ribonucleotide reductase, with the use of subunit interaction and enzyme activity assays, were analysed. Both EHV-4 R1/HSV-1 R2 and HSV-1 R1/EHV-4 R2 were able to assemble heterosubunit complexes but, surprisingly, neither of these complexes was fully active in enzyme activity assays; the EHV-4 R1/HSV-1 R2 and HSV-1 R1/EHV-4 R2 enzymes had 50% and 5% of their respective wild-type activities. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to alter two non-conserved residues located within the highly conserved and functionally important C-termini of the EHV-4 and HSV-1 R1 proteins. Mutation of Pro-737 to Lys and Lys-1084 to Pro in EHV-4 and HSV-1 R1 respectively had no effects on subunit assembly. Mutation of Pro-737 to Lys in EHV-4 R1 decreased enzyme activity by 50%; replacement of Lys-1084 by Pro in HSV-1 R1 had no effect on enzyme activity. Both alterations failed to restore full enzyme activities to the heterosubunit enzymes. Therefore probably neither of these amino acids has a direct role in catalysis. However, mutation of the highly conserved Tyr-1111 to Phe in HSV-1 R1 inactivated enzyme activity without affecting subunit interaction.

  2. Use of a chemical trigger for electron transfer to characterize a precursor to cluster X in assembly of the iron-radical cofactor of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Lana; Krebs, Carsten; Ley, Brenda A; Naik, Sunail; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Bollinger, J Martin

    2004-05-25

    A key step in generation of the catalytically essential tyrosyl radical (Y122(*)) in protein R2 of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase is electron transfer (ET) from the near-surface residue, tryptophan 48 (W48), to a (Fe(2)O(2))(4+) complex formed by addition of O(2) to the carboxylate-bridged diiron(II) cluster. Because this step is rapid, the (Fe(2)O(2))(4+) complex does not accumulate and, therefore, has not been characterized. The product of the ET step is a "diradical" intermediate state containing the well-characterized Fe(IV)Fe(III) cluster, X, and a W48 cation radical (W48(+)(*)). The latter may be reduced from solution to complete the two-step transfer of an electron to the buried diiron site. In this study, a (Fe(2)O(2))(4+) state that is probably the precursor to the X-W48(+)(*) diradical state in the reaction of the wild-type protein (R2-wt) has been characterized by exploitation of the observation that in R2 variants with W48 replaced with alanine (A), the otherwise disabled ET step can be mediated by indole compounds. Mixing of the Fe(II) complex of R2-W48A/Y122F with O(2) results in accumulation of an intermediate state that rapidly converts to X upon mixing with 3-methylindole (3-MI). The state comprises at least two species, of which each exhibits an apparent Mössbauer quadrupole doublet with parameters characteristic of high-spin Fe(III) ions. The isomer shifts of these complexes and absence of magnetic hyperfine coupling in their Mössbauer spectra suggest that both are antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(III) clusters. The fact that both rapidly convert to X upon treatment with a molecule (3-MI) shown in the preceding paper to mediate ET in W48A R2 variants indicates that they are more oxidized than X by one electron, which suggests that they have a bound peroxide equivalent. Their failure to exhibit either the long-wavelength absorption (at 650-750 nm) or Mössbauer doublet with high isomer shift (>0.6 mm/s) that are characteristic of

  3. The Crystal Structure of Thermotoga maritima Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase Lacks a Radical Cysteine Pre-Positioned in the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Aurelius, Oskar; Johansson, Renzo; Bågenholm, Viktoria; Lundin, Daniel; Tholander, Fredrik; Balhuizen, Alexander; Beck, Tobias; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Mulliez, Etienne; Logan, Derek T.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA synthesis, and are found in all but a few organisms. RNRs use radical chemistry to catalyze the reduction reaction. Despite RNR having evolved several mechanisms for generation of different kinds of essential radicals across a large evolutionary time frame, this initial radical is normally always channelled to a strictly conserved cysteine residue directly adjacent to the substrate for initiation of substrate reduction, and this cysteine has been found in the structures of all RNRs solved to date. We present the crystal structure of an anaerobic RNR from the extreme thermophile Thermotoga maritima (tmNrdD), alone and in several complexes, including with the allosteric effector dATP and its cognate substrate CTP. In the crystal structure of the enzyme as purified, tmNrdD lacks a cysteine for radical transfer to the substrate pre-positioned in the active site. Nevertheless activity assays using anaerobic cell extracts from T. maritima demonstrate that the class III RNR is enzymatically active. Other genetic and microbiological evidence is summarized indicating that the enzyme is important for T. maritima. Mutation of either of two cysteine residues in a disordered loop far from the active site results in inactive enzyme. We discuss the possible mechanisms for radical initiation of substrate reduction given the collected evidence from the crystal structure, our activity assays and other published work. Taken together, the results suggest either that initiation of substrate reduction may involve unprecedented conformational changes in the enzyme to bring one of these cysteine residues to the expected position, or that alternative routes for initiation of the RNR reduction reaction may exist. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis showing that the structure of tmNrdD is representative of a new RNR subclass IIIh, present in all Thermotoga

  4. New Iminodiacetate-Thiosemicarbazone Hybrids and Their Copper(II) Complexes Are Potential Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Inhibitors with High Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Zaltariov, Mirela F; Hammerstad, Marta; Arabshahi, Homayon J; Jovanović, Katarina; Richter, Klaus W; Cazacu, Maria; Shova, Sergiu; Balan, Mihaela; Andersen, Niels H; Radulović, Siniša; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Arion, Vladimir B

    2017-03-20

    As ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) plays a crucial role in nucleic acid metabolism, it is an important target for anticancer therapy. The thiosemicarbazone Triapine is an efficient R2 inhibitor, which has entered ∼20 clinical trials. Thiosemicarbazones are supposed to exert their biological effects through effectively binding transition-metal ions. In this study, six iminodiacetate-thiosemicarbazones able to form transition-metal complexes, as well as six dicopper(II) complexes, were synthesized and fully characterized by analytical, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-vis; (1)H and (13)C NMR), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. The antiproliferative effects were examined in several human cancer and one noncancerous cell lines. Several of the compounds showed high cytotoxicity and marked selectivity for cancer cells. On the basis of this, and on molecular docking calculations one lead dicopper(II) complex and one thiosemicarbazone were chosen for in vitro analysis as potential R2 inhibitors. Their interaction with R2 and effect on the Fe(III)2-Y· cofactor were characterized by microscale thermophoresis, and two spectroscopic techniques, namely, electron paramagnetic resonance and UV-vis spectroscopy. Our findings suggest that several of the synthesized proligands and copper(II) complexes are effective antiproliferative agents in several cancer cell lines, targeting RNR, which deserve further investigation as potential anticancer drugs.

  5. 2.6 Å X-ray Crystal Structure of Human p53R2, a p53 Inducible Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter; Zhou, Bingsen; Ho, Nam; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Su, Leila; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Yen, Yun

    2009-01-01

    Human p53R2 (hp53R2) is a 351 residue p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) small subunit. It shares >80% sequence identity with hRRM2, the small RNR subunit responsible for normal maintenance of the deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pool used for DNA replication, which is active during the S-phase in a cell-cycle dependent fashion. But rather than cyclic dNTP synthesis, hp53R2 has been shown to supply dNTPs for DNA repair to cells in G0-G1 in a p53-dependent fashion. The first x-ray crystal structure of hp53R2 is solved to 2.6 Å, in which monomers A and B exhibit mono- and bi-nuclear iron occupancy, respectively. The pronounced structural differences at three regions between hp53R2 and hRRM2 highlight the possible regulatory role in iron assimilation, and help explain previously observed physical and biochemical differences in the mobility and accessibility of the radical-iron center, as well as radical transfer pathways between the two enzymes. The sequence-structure-function correlations that differentiate hp53R2 and hRRM2 are revealed for the first time. Insight gained from this structural work will be used toward the identification of biological function, regulation mechanism and inhibitors selection in RNR small subunits. PMID:19728742

  6. CREB1 directly activates the transcription of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 and promotes the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zejun; Lin, Aifen; Chen, Jiaoe; Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Hong; Li, Hongzhang; Hu, Yanyan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Jiangang; Qiu, Lanlan; Mei, Lingming; Shao, Jimin; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    As the small subunit of Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), RRM2 displays a very important role in various critical cellular processes such as cell proliferation, DNA repair, and senescence, etc. Importantly, RRM2 functions like a tumor driver in most types of cancer but little is known about the regulatory mechanism of RRM2 in cancer development. In this study, we found that the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) acted as a transcription factor of RRM2 gene in human colorectal cancer (CRC). CREB1 directly bound to the promoter of RRM2 gene and induced its transcriptional activation. Knockdown of CREB1 decreased the expression of RRM2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, knockdown of RRM2 attenuated CREB1-induced aggressive phenotypes of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the data from TCGA database and clinical CRC specimens with immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated a strong correlation between the co-expression of CREB1 and RRM2. Decreased disease survivals were observed in CRC patients with high expression levels of CREB1 or RRM2. Our results indicate CREB1 as a critical transcription factor of RRM2 which promotes tumor aggressiveness, and imply a significant correlation between CREB1 and RRM2 in CRC specimens. These may provide the possibility that CREB1 and RRM2 could be used as biomarkers or targets for CRC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27801665

  7. Pulsed ELDOR spectroscopy measures the distance between the two tyrosyl dadicals in the R2 subunit of the E. coli ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Bennati, Marina; Weber, Axel; Antonic, Jelena; Perlstein, Deborah L; Robblee, John; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2003-12-10

    Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) to deoxynucleoside diphosphates (dNDPs). This RNR is composed of two homodimeric subunits: R1 and R2. R1 binds the NDPs in the active site, and R2 harbors the essential di-iron tyrosyl radical (Y*) cofactor. In this paper, we used PELDOR, a method that detects weak electron-electron dipolar coupling, to make the first direct measurement of the distance between the two Y*'s on each monomer of R2. In the crystal structure of R2, the Y*'s are reduced to tyrosines, and consequently R2 is inactive. In R2, where the Y*'s assume a well-defined geometry with respect to the protein backbone, the PELDOR method allows measurement of a distance of 33.1 +/- 0.2 A that compares favorably to the distance (32.4 A) between the center of mass of the spin density distribution of each Y* on each R2 monomer from the structure. The experiments provide the first direct experimental evidence for two Y*'s in a single R2 in solution.

  8. The expression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 in the carcinogenesis of uterine cervix and its relationship with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying-Fang; Wu, Tzu-Fan; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Tee, Yi-Torng; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Chou, Chi-Hung; Lin, Wea-Lung; Low, Hui-Ying; Chou, Ming-Yung; Yang, Shun-Fa; Wang, Po-Hui

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the implication of ribonucleotide reductase M2 (RRM2) in the carcinogenesis of uterine cervix and its relationship with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of cancer patients. The impact of RRM2 on cell viability was investigated in SiHa cervical cancer cells after RRM2 knockdown and the addition of cisplatin, which induces inter- and intra-strand DNA crosslinks. RRM2 immunoreactivity was evaluated by semi-quantitative H score among 29 normal, 30 low-grade dysplasia, 30 high-grade dysplasia and 103 invasive cancer tissue specimens of the uterine cervix, using tissue microarrays. RRM2 was then correlated with the clinicopathological variables of cervical cancer and patient survival. A greater toxic effect on cell viability using cisplatin was reflected by the greater reduction in RRM2 protein expression in SiHa cells. The RRM2 expression in cancer tissues was higher than that in high-grade dysplasia, low-grade dysplasia or normal cervical tissues. RRM2 upregulation was correlated with deep stromal invasion, large tumors and parametrial invasion and predicted poor survival. RRM2 is a new molecular marker for the diagnosis and clinical outcomes of cervical cancer. It is involved in cervical carcinogenesis and predicts poor survival, and may be a potential therapeutic target including in cisplatin treatment.

  9. DFT Calculations for Intermediate and Active States of the Diiron Center with Tryptophan or Tyrosine Radical in Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Class Ia ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) subunit R2 contains a diiron active site. In this paper, active site models for the intermediate X-Trp48+· and X-Tyr122·, the active Fe(III)Fe(III)-Tyr122·, and the met Fe(III)Fe(III) states of E. coli R2 are studied, using broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) incorporated with the conductor like screening (COSMO) solvation model. Different structural isomers and different protonation states have been explored. Calculated geometric, energetic, Mössbauer, hyperfine, and redox properties are compared with available experimental data. Feasible detailed structures of these intermediate and active states are proposed. Asp84 and Trp48 are most likely the main contributing residues to the result that the transient Fe(IV)Fe(IV) state is not observed in wild-type class Ia E. coli R2. Asp84 is proposed to serve as a proton transfer conduit between the diiron cluster and Tyr122 in both the tyrosine radical activation pathway and in the first steps of the catalytic proton coupled electron transfer pathway. Proton coupled and simple redox potential calculations show that the kinetic control of proton transfer to Tyr122· plays a critical role in preventing reduction from the active Fe(III)Fe(III)-Tyr122· state to the met state, which is potentially the reason that the Tyr122· in the active state can be stable over very long period. PMID:21322584

  10. Insight into the mechanism of inactivation of ribonucleotide reductase by gemcitabine 5′-diphosphate in the presence or absence of reductant†

    PubMed Central

    Artin, Erin; Wang, Jun; Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Yokoyama, Kenichi; Yu, Guixue; Griffin, Robert G.; Bar, Galit; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine 5′-diphosphate (F2CDP) is a potent inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), enzymes that convert nucleotides (NDPs) to deoxynucleotides and are essential for DNA replication and repair. The E. coli RNR, an α2β2 complex, when incubated with one equivalent of F2CDP catalyzes the release of two fluorides and cytosine concomitant with enzyme inactivation. In the presence of reductant (thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase/NADPH or DTT), the enzyme inactivation results from its covalent labeling of α with the sugar of F2CDP (one-label/α2β2). SDS PAGE analysis of the inactivated RNR without boiling of the sample reveals that α migrates as an 87 kDa and 110 kDa protein in a ratio of 0.6:0.4. When the reductant is omitted, RNR is inactivated by loss of the essential tyrosyl radical and formation of a new radical. Inactivation studies with C225S-α in the presence or absence of reductants, reveal it behaves like wt-RNR in the absence of reductant. Inactivated C225S-α migrates as an 87 kDa protein and is not covalently modified. C225 is one of the cysteines in RNR’s active site that supplies reducing equivalents to make dNDPs. To identify the new radical formed, [1′-2H] F2CDP was studied with wt- and C225S-RNR by 9 and 140 GHz EPR spectroscopy. These studies revealed that the new radical is nucleotide derived with g values of gx 2.00738, gy 2.00592, gz 2.00230 and with altered hyperfine interactions (apparent triplet collapsed to a doublet) relative to [1′-1H] F2CDP. The EPR features are very similar to those we recently reported for the nucleotide radical generated with CDP and E441Q-RNR. PMID:19899770

  11. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, A.N.I.; Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1987-11-03

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with (1-/sup 14/C)iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of /sup 14/C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of /sup 14/C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of /sup 14/C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of /sup 14/C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of /sup 14/C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  13. Characterization of cell proliferation in the adult dentate under normal conditions and after kainate induced seizures using ribonucleotide reductase and BrdU.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Dahlström, Annica; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2005-03-02

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), an enzyme for DNA synthesis, was recently used as a marker of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone in normal adult mammalian brains. However, the duration of RNR expression in normal adult brain and the expression pattern of RNR in the adult dentate gyrus following brain injury have not been explored. In this study, we examined the duration of the RNR expression in newborn cells in the normal adult rat brain by analysis of RNR and BrdU double-labeled specimens at different time intervals after BrdU application. Secondly, we induced, in adult rats, seizures by kainic acid and investigated the changes in expression of RNR following seizures, and characterized the phenotype of RNR-positive cells using a variety of other markers. Our results revealed that RNR was detectable in proliferating cells from 2 h to at least 1 day. At 7 and 28 days after seizures, there was a fivefold increase in number of clusters of RNR-positive cells in the dentate gyrus, and a doubling of the number of BrdU-labeled cells in each cluster. Proliferating astrocytes and neuronal precursors were recognized in each RNR-positive cell cluster, and both types increased in number after seizures. Colocalization of RNR and activated caspase-3 was observed at 7 days, indicating that proliferating cells were susceptible to status epilepticus induced damage. RNR immunohistochemistry provides a useful approach in experiments investigating a change in cell proliferation, revealing the location, number, morphology and fate of newly formed cells after, e.g., brain injury.

  14. Inactivation of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleotide reductase by 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate: adenosylcobalamin destruction and formation of a nucleotide-based radical.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Gerfen, Gary J; Stubbe, Joanne

    2010-02-23

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR, 76 kDa) from Lactobacillus leichmannii is a class II RNR that requires adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) as a cofactor. It catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside triphosphates to deoxynucleotides and is 100% inactivated by 1 equiv of 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate (F(2)CTP) in <2 min. Sephadex G-50 chromatography of the inactivation reaction mixture for 2 min revealed that 0.47 equiv of a sugar moiety is covalently bound to RNR and 0.25 equiv of a cobalt(III) corrin is tightly associated, likely through a covalent interaction with C(419) (Co-S) in the active site of RNR [Lohman, G. J. S., and Stubbe, J. (2010) Biochemistry 49, DOI: 10.1021/bi902132u ]. After 1 h, a similar experiment revealed 0.45 equiv of the Co-S adduct associated with the protein. Thus, at least two pathways are associated with RNR inactivation: one associated with alkylation by the sugar of F(2)CTP and the second with AdoCbl destruction. To determine the fate of [1'-(3)H]F(2)CTP in the latter pathway, the reaction mixture at 2 min was reduced with NaBH(4) (NaB(2)H(4)) and the protein separated from the small molecules using a centrifugation device. The small molecules were dephosphorylated and analyzed by HPLC to reveal 0.25 equiv of a stereoisomer of cytidine, characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, indicating the trapped nucleotide had lost both of its fluorides and gained an oxygen. High-field ENDOR studies with [1'-(2)H]F(2)CTP from the reaction quenched at 30 s revealed a radical that is nucleotide-based. The relationship between this radical and the trapped cytidine analogue provides insight into the nonalkylative pathway for RNR inactivation relative to the alkylative pathway.

  15. HF-EPR, Raman, UV/VIS Light Spectroscopic, and DFT Studies of the Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Tyrosyl Radical from Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tomter, Ane B.; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Schmitzberger, Florian; Andersen, Niels H.; Barra, Anne-Laure; Engman, Henrik; Nordlund, Pär; Andersson, K. Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) belongs to the gamma subfamily of herpes viruses, among the most common pathogenic viruses in humans worldwide. The viral ribonucleotide reductase small subunit (RNR R2) is involved in the biosynthesis of nucleotides, the DNA precursors necessary for viral replication, and is an important drug target for EBV. RNR R2 generates a stable tyrosyl radical required for enzymatic turnover. Here, the electronic and magnetic properties of the tyrosyl radical in EBV R2 have been determined by X-band and high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy recorded at cryogenic temperatures. The radical exhibits an unusually low g1-tensor component at 2.0080, indicative of a positive charge in the vicinity of the radical. Consistent with these EPR results a relatively high C-O stretching frequency associated with the phenoxyl radical (at 1508 cm−1) is observed with resonance Raman spectroscopy. In contrast to mouse R2, EBV R2 does not show a deuterium shift in the resonance Raman spectra. Thus, the presence of a water molecule as a hydrogen bond donor moiety could not be identified unequivocally. Theoretical simulations showed that a water molecule placed at a distance of 2.6 Å from the tyrosyl-oxygen does not result in a detectable deuterium shift in the calculated Raman spectra. UV/VIS light spectroscopic studies with metal chelators and tyrosyl radical scavengers are consistent with a more accessible dimetal binding/radical site and a lower affinity for Fe2+ in EBV R2 than in Escherichia coli R2. Comparison with previous studies of RNR R2s from mouse, bacteria, and herpes viruses, demonstrates that finely tuned electronic properties of the radical exist within the same RNR R2 Ia class. PMID:21980375

  16. The forkhead-like transcription factor (Fhl1p) maintains yeast replicative lifespan by regulating ribonucleotide reductase 1 (RNR1) gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Tai, Akiko; Kamei, Yuka; Mukai, Yukio

    2017-06-17

    In eukaryotes, numerous genetic factors contribute to the lifespan including metabolic enzymes, signal transducers, and transcription factors. As previously reported, the forkhead-like transcription factor (FHL1) gene was required for yeast replicative lifespan and cell proliferation. To determine how Fhl1p regulates the lifespan, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of a heterozygous diploid strain deleted for FHL1. We discovered numerous Fhl1p-target genes, which were then screened for lifespan-regulating activity. We identified the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) 1 gene (RNR1) as a regulator of replicative lifespan. RNR1 encodes a large subunit of the RNR complex, which consists of two large (Rnr1p/Rnr3p) and two small (Rnr2p/Rnr4p) subunits. Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 reduced transcription of RNR1 and RNR3, but not RNR2 and RNR4. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Fhl1p binds to the promoter regions of RNR1 and RNR3. Cells harboring an RNR1 deletion or an rnr1-C428A mutation, which abolishes RNR catalytic activity, exhibited a short lifespan. In contrast, cells with a deletion of the other RNR genes had a normal lifespan. Overexpression of RNR1, but not RNR3, restored the lifespan of the heterozygous FHL1 mutant to the wild-type (WT) level. The Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant conferred a decrease in dNTP levels and an increase in hydroxyurea (HU) sensitivity. These findings reveal that Fhl1p regulates RNR1 gene transcription to maintain dNTP levels, thus modulating longevity by protection against replication stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cobalt substitution of mouse R2 ribonucleotide reductase as a model for the reactive diferrous state: spectroscopic and structural evidence for a ferromagnetically coupled dinuclear cobalt cluster.

    PubMed

    Strand, Kari R; Karlsen, Solveig; Andersson, K Kristoffer

    2002-09-13

    The R2 dimer of mouse ribonucleotide reductase contains a dinuclear iron-oxygen cluster and tyrosyl radical/subunit. The dinuclear diferrous form reacts with dioxygen to generate the tyrosyl radical essential for the catalytic reaction that occurs at the R1 dimer. It is important to understand how the reactivity toward oxygen is related to the crystal structure of the dinuclear cluster. For the mouse R2 protein, no structure has been available with a fully occupied dinuclear metal ion site. A cobalt substitution of mouse R2 was performed to produce a good model for the very air-sensitive diferrous form of the enzyme. X-band EPR and light absorption studies (epsilon(550 nm) = 100 mm(-1) cm(-1)/Co(II)) revealed a strong cooperative binding of cobalt to the dinuclear site. In perpendicular mode EPR, the axial signal from mouse R2 incubated with Co(II) showed a typical S = 3/2 Co(II) signal, and its low intensity indicated that the majority of the Co(II) bound to R2 is magnetically coupled. In parallel mode EPR, a typical integer spin signal (M(s) = +/-3) with g approximately 12 is observed at 3.6 K and 10 K, showing that the two Co(II) ions (S = 3/2) in the dinuclear site are ferromagnetically coupled. We have solved the 2.4 A crystal structure of the Co(II)-substituted R2 with a fully occupied dinuclear cluster. The bridging Co(II) carboxylate ligand Glu-267 adopts an altered orientation compared with its counterpart Glu-238 in Escherichia coli R2. This might be important for proper O(2) activation of the more exposed native diferrous site in mouse R2 compared with E. coli R2.

  18. Enzymatic activity of coenzyme B(12) derivatives with altered axial nucleotides: probing the mechanochemical triggering hypothesis in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Brown, K L; Zou, X; Li, J; Chen, G

    2001-11-05

    Theoretical studies (J. Inorg. Biochem. 2001, 83, 121) of the involvement of the bulky 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (Dmbz) ligand of coenzyme B(12) (5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl) in the mechanism of activation of the carbon-cobalt bond of the coenzyme for homolytic cleavage by AdoCbl-dependent enzymes (the "mechanochemical triggering" mechanisms) have shown that a purely steric, ground-state mechanism can supply only a few kilocalories per mole (of the observed 13-16 kcal mol(-1)) of activation, but that an electronic mechanism, operating to stabilize the transition state, can explain all of the observed catalytic effect. To address these mechanisms experimentally, analogues of AdoCbl in which the Dmbz ligand is replaced by benzimidazole (Ado(Bzim)Cbl) or by imidazole (Ado(Im)Cbl) have been prepared and characterized. Both of these analogues support turnover in the AdoCbl-dependent ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase (RTPR) from Lactobacillus leichmannii at 100% of the activity of AdoCbl itself, but the Ado(Im)Cbl analogue has a significantly higher K(m). 5'-Deoxyadenosylcobinamide, the analogue in which the axial nucleotide has been chemically removed, in contrast, is inactive in the spectrophotometric assay, which indicates that it has at most 1% of the activity of AdoCbl. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric measurements of the formation of cob(II)alamin at the enzyme active site show that RTPR binds Ado(Bzim)Cbl slightly more weakly than it does AdoCbl, but binds Ado(Im)Cbl 8-fold more weakly. While the equilibrium constant for cob(II)alamin formation is nearly the same for Ado(Bzim)Cbl and AdoCbl, it is 5-fold smaller for Ado(Im)Cbl. Finally, the forward rate constant for enzyme-induced Co-C bond homolysis was about the same for Ado(Bzim)Cbl and for AdoCbl but was 17-fold smaller for Ado(Im)Cbl. These results are consistent with a small contribution from ground-state mechanochemical triggering, but they do not in themselves rule out transition-state mechanical

  19. Metallation and mismetallation of iron and manganese proteins in vitro and in vivo: the class I ribonucleotide reductases as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2012-01-01

    How cells ensure correct metallation of a given protein and whether a degree of promiscuity in metal binding has evolved are largely unanswered questions. In a classic case, iron- and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutases (SODs) catalyze the disproportionation of superoxide using highly similar protein scaffolds and nearly identical active sites. However, most of these enzymes are active with only one metal, although both metals can bind in vitro and in vivo. Iron(II) and manganese(II) bind weakly to most proteins and possess similar coordination preferences. Their distinct redox properties suggest that they are unlikely to be interchangeable in biological systems except when they function in Lewis acid catalytic roles, yet recent work suggests this is not always the case. This review summarizes the diversity of ways in which iron and manganese are substituted in similar or identical protein frameworks. As models, we discuss (1) enzymes, such as epimerases, thought to use FeII as a Lewis acid under normal growth conditions but which switch to MnII under oxidative stress; (2) extradiol dioxygenases, which have been found to use both FeII and MnII, the redox role of which in catalysis remains to be elucidated; (3) SODs, which use redox chemistry and are generally metal-specific; and (4) the class I ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), which have evolved unique biosynthetic pathways to control metallation. The primary focus is the class Ib RNRs, which can catalyze formation of a stable radical on a tyrosine residue in their β2 subunits using either a di-iron or a recently characterized dimanganese cofactor. The physiological roles of enzymes that can switch between iron and manganese cofactors are discussed, as are insights obtained from the studies of many groups regarding iron and manganese homeostasis and the divergent and convergent strategies organisms use for control of protein metallation. We propose that, in many of the systems discussed,

  20. The Composition and Structure of the Inorganic Core of Relaxed Intermediate X(Y122F) of E. coli Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the diferrous center of the β2 (R2) subunit of the class 1a Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductases (RNR) by reaction with O2 followed by one-electron reduction yields a spin-coupled, paramagnetic Fe(III)/Fe(IV) intermediate, denoted X, whose identity has been sought by multiple investigators for over a quarter century. To determine the composition and structure of X, the present study has applied 57Fe, 14,15N, 17O and 1H ENDOR measurements combined with quantitative measurements of 17O and 1H EPR line broadening studies to WT X, which is very short-lived, and to X prepared with the Y122F mutant, which has a lifetime of many seconds. Previous studies have established that over several seconds X(Y122F) relaxes to an equilibrium structure. The present report focuses on the relaxed structure. It establishes the following conclusions. (i) The 57Fe and 14N ENDOR spectra of X(WT) quenched at 42 ms, and X(Y122F) quenched at 8 ms and 4 s all are identical, indicating that the properties of the [Fe2, His2] coordination center of X is unchanged by the Y122F mutation, and is invariant during relaxation as the quench delay increases. (ii) 17O ENDOR and quantitative EPR from X enriched separately with H217O and 17O2(g), along with 1,2H ENDOR shows that relaxed X contains an Fe(III)-bound hydroxide oxygen derived from solvent and an oxo-bridge derived from O2 gas. (iii) The loss of hyperfine coupling to the second 17O from the 17O2 molecule during the relaxation process, and the absence of a bridging 17O from solvent, together indicate that the inorganic core of relaxed X has the composition, [(OH−)Fe(III)-O-Fe(IV)]: there is no second inorganic oxygenic bridge, neither oxo nor hydroxo. (iv) The geometric analysis of the 14N ENDOR data, together with recent EXAFS measurements (Dassama, L. M. et al.; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 16758) of the Fe-Fe distance, support the view that X contains a ‘diamond-core’ Fe(III)/Fe(IV) center, with the irons bridged by

  1. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  2. Kinetic evidence that a radical transfer pathway in protein R2 of mouse ribonucleotide reductase is involved in generation of the tyrosyl free radical.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P P; Rova, U; Katterle, B; Thelander, L; Gräslund, A

    1998-08-21

    Class I ribonucleotide reductases consist of two subunits, R1 and R2. The active site is located in R1; active R2 contains a diferric center and a tyrosyl free radical (Tyr.), both essential for enzymatic activity. The proposed mechanism for the enzymatic reaction includes the transport of a reducing equivalent, i.e. electron or hydrogen radical, across a 35-A distance between Tyr. in R2 and the active site in R1, which are connected by a hydrogen-bonded chain of conserved, catalytically essential amino acid residues. Asp266 and Trp103 in mouse R2 are part of this radical transfer pathway. The diferric/Tyr. site in R2 is reconstituted spontaneously by mixing iron-free apoR2 with Fe(II) and O2. The reconstitution reaction requires the delivery of an external reducing equivalent to form the diferric/Tyr. site. Reconstitution kinetics were investigated in mouse apo-wild type R2 and the three mutants D266A, W103Y, and W103F by rapid freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance with >/=4 Fe(II)/R2 at various reaction temperatures. The kinetics of Tyr. formation in D266A and W103Y is on average 20 times slower than in wild type R2. More strikingly, Tyr. formation is completely suppressed in W103F. No change in the reconstitution kinetics was found starting from Fe(II)-preloaded proteins, which shows that the mutations do not affect the rate of iron binding. Our results are consistent with a reaction mechanism using Asp266 and Trp103 for delivery of the external reducing equivalent. Further, the results with W103F suggest that an intact hydrogen-bonded chain is crucial for the reaction, indicating that the external reducing equivalent is a H. Finally, the formation of Tyr. is not the slowest step of the reaction as it is in Escherichia coli R2, consistent with a stronger interaction between Tyr. and the iron center in mouse R2. A new electron paramagnetic resonance visible intermediate named mouse X, strikingly similar to species X found in E. coli R2, was detected only

  3. Equilibration of tyrosyl radicals (Y356•, Y731•, Y730•) in the radical propagation pathway of the E. coli class Ia ribonucleotide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase is an α2β2 complex that catalyzes the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides using a diferric-tyrosyl radical (Y122•) cofactor in β2 to initiate catalysis in α2. Each turnover requires reversible long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over 35 Å between the two subunits by a specific pathway (Y122• ⇆ [W48?] ⇆ Y356 within β to Y731 ⇆ Y730 ⇆ C439 within α). Previously, we reported that a β2 mutant with 3-nitrotyrosyl radical (NO2Y•, 1.2 radicals/β2) in place of Y122• in the presence of α2, CDP and ATP catalyzes formation of 0.6 equiv dCDP and accumulates 0.6 equiv of a new Y• proposed to be located on Y356 in β2. We now report three independent methods that establish that Y356 is the predominant location (85 – 90%) of the radical with the remaining 10 – 15% delocalized onto Y731 and Y730 in α2. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance spectroscopy on samples prepared by rapid freeze quench (RFQ) methods identified three distances: 30 ± 0.4 Å (88 ± 3%), 33 ± 0.4 Å and 38 ± 0.5 Å (12 ± 3%) indicative of NO2Y122•-Y356•, NO2Y122•- NO2Y122•, and NO2Y122•-Y731(730)•, respectively. Radical distribution in α2 was supported by RFQ EPR studies using Y731(3,5-F2Y) or Y730(3,5-F2Y)-α2 which revealed F2Y•, and by studies using globally incorporated [β-2H2]Y-α2 and analysis using parameters obtained from 140 GHz EPR spectroscopy. The amount of Y• delocalized in α2 from these two studies varied from 6 to 15%. The studies together give the first insight into the relative redox potentials of the three transient Y•s in the PCET pathway and their conformations. PMID:21967342

  4. Biochemical modulation of aracytidine (Ara-C) effects by GTI-2040, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in K562 human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Aimiuwu, Josephine; Xie, Zhiliang; Wei, Xiaohui; Liu, Shujun; Klisovic, Rebecca; Marcucci, Guido; Chan, Kenneth K

    2011-03-01

    GTI-2040 is a potent antisense to the M2 subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), an enzyme involved in the de novo synthesis of nucleoside triphosphates. We hypothesized that combination of GTI-2040 with the cytarabine (Ara-C) could result in an enhanced cytotoxic effect with perturbed intracellular deoxynucleotide/nucleotide (dNTP/NTP) pools including Ara-C triphosphate (Ara-CTP). This study aims to provide a direct experimental support of this hypothesis by monitoring the biochemical modulation effects, intracellular levels of Ara-CTP, dNTPs/NTPs following the combination treatment of Ara-C, and GTI-2040 in K562 human leukemia cells. GTI-2040 was introduced into cells via electroporation. A hybridization-ligation ELISA was used to quantify intracellular GTI-2040 concentrations. Real-time PCR and Western blot methods were used to measure the RNR M2 mRNA and protein levels, respectively. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt assay was used to measure the cytotoxicity following various drug treatments. A non-radioactive HPLC-UV method was used for measuring the intracellular Ara-CTP, while a LC-MS/MS method was used to quantify intracellular dNTP/NTP pools. GTI-2040 was found to downregulate M2 mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner and showed significant decrease in dNTP but not NTP pool. When combining GTI-2040 with Ara-C, a synergistic cytotoxicity was observed with no further change in dNTP/NTP pools. Importantly, pretreatment of K562 cells with GTI-2040 was found to increase Ara-CTP level for the first time, and this effect may be due to inhibition of RNR by GTI-2040. This finding provides a laboratory justification for the current phase I/II evaluation of GTI-2040 in combination with Ara-C in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

  5. Site-specific incorporation of 3-nitrotyrosine as a probe of pKa perturbation of redox-active tyrosines in ribonucleotide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Uhlin, Ulla; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2010-01-01

    E. coli ribonucleotide reductase catalyzes the reduction of nucleoside 5′-diphosphates into 2′-deoxynucleotides and is composed of two subunits: α2 and β2. During turnover, a stable tyrosyl radical (Y·) at Y122-β2 reversibly oxidizes C439 in the active site of α2. This radical propagation step is proposed to occur over 35 Å, to use specific redox-active tyrosines (Y122 and Y356 in β2, Y731 and Y730 in α2), and to involve proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). 3-Nitrotyrosine (NO2Y, pKa 7.1) has been incorporated in place of Y122, Y731 and Y730 to probe how the protein environment perturbs each pKa in the presence of the second subunit, substrate (S), and allosteric effector (E). The activity of each mutant is < 4 × 10−3 that of the wt subunit. The [NO2Y730]-α2 and [NO2Y731]-α2 each exhibits a pKa of 7.8 – 8.0 with E and E/β2. The pKa of [NO2Y730]-α2 is elevated to 8.2 - 8.3 in the S/E/β2 complex, while no further perturbation is observed for [NO2Y731]-α2. Mutations in pathway residues adjacent to the NO2Y that disrut H bonding minimally perturb its Ka. The pKa of NO2Y122-β2 alone or with α2/S/E is > 9.6. X-ray crystal structures have been obtained for all NO2Y-α2 mutants (2.1 – 3.1 Å resolution), which show minimal structural perturbation compared to wt-α2. Together with the pKa of the previously reported NO2Y356-β2 (7.5 in the α2/S/E complex, Yee, C. et al, Biochemistry 2003, 42, 14541-14552.), these studies provide a picture of the protein environment of the ground state at each Y in the PCET pathway and are the starting point for understanding differences in PCET mechanisms at each residue in the pathway. PMID:20518462

  6. A DinB Ortholog Enables Mycobacterial Growth under dTTP-Limiting Conditions Induced by the Expression of a Mycobacteriophage-Derived Ribonucleotide Reductase Gene.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shreya; Samaddar, Sourabh; Kirtania, Prithwiraj; Das Gupta, Sujoy K

    2015-11-02

    Mycobacterium species such as M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis encode at least two translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases, DinB1 and DinB2, respectively. Although predicted to be linked to DNA repair, their role in vivo remains enigmatic. M. smegmatis mc(2)155, a strain commonly used to investigate mycobacterial genetics, has two copies of dinB2, the gene that codes for DinB2, by virtue of a 56-kb chromosomal duplication. Expression of a mycobacteriophage D29 gene (gene 50) encoding a class II ribonucleotide reductase in M. smegmatis ΔDRKIN, a strain derived from mc(2)155 in which one copy of the duplication is lost, resulted in DNA replication defects and growth inhibition. The inhibitory effect could be linked to the deficiency of dTTP that resulted under these circumstances. The selective inhibition observed in the ΔDRKIN strain was found to be due solely to a reduced dosage of dinB2 in this strain. Mycobacterium bovis, which is closely related to M. tuberculosis, the tuberculosis pathogen, was found to be highly susceptible to gene 50 overexpression. Incidentally, these slow-growing pathogens harbor one copy of dinB2. The results indicate that the induction of a dTTP-limiting state can lead to growth inhibition in mycobacteria, with the effect being maximum in cells deficient in DinB2. Mycobacterium species, such as M. tuberculosis, the tuberculosis pathogen, are known to encode several Y family DNA polymerases, one of which is DinB2, an ortholog of the DNA repair-related protein DinP of Escherichia coli. Although this protein has been biochemically characterized previously and found to be capable of translesion synthesis in vitro, its in vivo function remains unknown. Using a novel method to induce dTTP deficiency in mycobacteria, we demonstrate that DinB2 can aid mycobacterial survival under such conditions. Apart from unraveling a specific role for the mycobacterial Y family DNA polymerase DinB2 for the first time, this study also paves the way for the

  7. Use of 2,3,5-F3Y-β2 and 3-NH2Y-α2 to study PCET in E. coli Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Yee, Cyril S.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    E. coli ribonucleotide reductase is an α2β2 complex that catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside 5′-diphosphates (NDPs) to deoxynucleotides (dNDPs). The active site for NDP reduction resides in α2, and the essential diferric-tyrosyl radical (Y122•) cofactor that initiates radical transfer to the active site cysteine in α2 (C439), 35 Å removed, is in β2. The oxidation is proposed to involve a hopping mechanism through aromatic amino acids (Y122→W48→Y356 in β2 to Y731→Y730→C439 in α2) and reversible proton coupled electron transfer (PCET). Recently 2,3,5-F3Y (F3Y) was site-specifically incorporated in place of Y356 in β2, and 3-NH2Y (NH2Y) in place of Y731 and Y730 in α2. A pH rate profile with F3Y356-β2 suggested that as the pH is elevated, the rate-determining step of RNR can be altered from a conformational change to PCET and that the altered driving force for F3Y oxidation, by residues adjacent to it in the pathway, is responsible for this change. Studies with NH2Y731(730)-α2/β2/CDP/ATP resulted in detection of NH2Y radical (NH2Y•) intermediates capable of dNDP formation. In this study, the reaction of F3Y356-β2/α2/CDP/ATP has been examined by stopped flow (SF) absorption and rapid freeze quench EPR spectroscopy and has failed to reveal any radical intermediates. F3Y356-β2/CDP/ATP has also been examined with NH2Y731-α2 (or NH2Y730-α2) by stopped-flow kinetics from pH 6.5–9.2 and revealed rate constants for NH2Y• formation that support a change in rate limiting step at elevated pH. The results together with kinetic simulations provide a guide for future studies to detect radical intermediates in the pathway. PMID:21182280

  8. Replacement of Y730 and Y731 in the α2 Subunit of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase with 3-Aminotyrosine using an Evolved Suppressor tRNA/tRNA-Synthetase Pair

    PubMed Central

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the essential tyrosyl radical (Y•) in E. coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), a number of enzymes involved in primary metabolism have been found that use transient or stable tyrosyl (Y) or tryptophanyl (W) radicals in catalysis. These enzymes engage in a myriad of charge transfer reactions that occur with exquisite control and specificity. The unavailability of natural amino acids that can perturb the reduction potential and/or protonation states of redox-active Y or W residues has limited the usefulness of site-directed mutagenesis methods to probe the attendant mechanism of charge transport at these residues. However, recent technologies designed to site-specifically incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins have now made viable the study of these mechanisms. The class Ia RNR from E. coli serves as a paradigm for enzymes that use amino acid radicals in catalysis. It catalyzes the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides and utilizes both stable and transient protein radicals. This reaction requires radical transfer from a stable tyrosyl radical (Y122•) in the β subunit to an active-site cysteine (C439) in the α subunit, where nucleotide reduction occurs. The distance between the sites is proposed to be >35 Å. A pathway between these sites has been proposed in which transient aromatic amino acid radicals mediate radical transport. To examine the pathway for radical propagation as well as requirements for coupled electron and proton transfers, a suppressor tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (RS) pair has been evolved that allows for site-specific incorporation of 3-aminotyrosine (NH2Y). NH2Y was chosen because it is structurally similar to Y with a similar phenolic pKa. However, at pH 7, it is more easily oxidized than Y by 190 mV (≈4.4 kcal/mol), thus allowing it to act as a radical trap. Here we present the detailed procedures involved in evolving an NH2Y-specific RS, assessing its efficiency in NH2Y insertion, generating

  9. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  10. Mediated electrochemistry of nitrate reductase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Schwarz, Günter; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2013-06-27

    Herein we report the mediated electrocatalytic voltammetry of the plant molybdoenzyme nitrate reductase (NR) from Arabidopsis thaliana using the established truncated molybdenum-heme fragment at a glassy carbon (GC) electrode. Methyl viologen (MV), benzyl viologen (BV), and anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQ) are employed as effective artificial electron transfer partners for NR, differing in redox potential over a range of about 220 mV and delivering different reductive driving forces to the enzyme. Nitrate is reduced at the Mo active site of NR, yielding the oxidized form of the enzyme, which is reactivated by the electro-reduced form of the mediator. Digital simulation was performed using a single set of enzyme dependent parameters for all catalytic voltammetry obtained under different sweep rates and various substrate or mediator concentrations. The kinetic constants from digital simulation provide new insight into the kinetics of the NR catalytic mechanism.

  11. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

    2009-05-28

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

  12. Production of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase from herpes simplex virus with prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems: higher activity of R2 produced by eukaryotic cells related to higher iron-binding capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Lamarche, N; Matton, G; Massie, B; Fontecave, M; Atta, M; Dumas, F; Gaudreau, P; Langelier, Y

    1996-01-01

    The R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase from herpes simplex virus type 2 was overproduced with prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant R2 purified by a two-step procedure exhibited a 3-fold higher activity when produced in eukaryotic cells. Precise quantification of the R2 concentration at each step of the purification indicated that the activity was not altered during the purification procedure. Moreover, we have observed that the level of R2 expression, in eukaryotic cells as well as in prokaryotic cells, did not influence R2 activity. Extensive characterization of the recombinant R2 purified from eukaryotic and prokaryotic expression systems has shown that both types of pure R2 preparations were similar in their 76 kDa dimer contents (more than 95%) and in their ability to bind the R1 subunit. However, we have found that the higher activity of R2 produced in eukaryotic cells is more probably related to a higher capability of binding the iron cofactor as well as a 3-fold greater ability to generate the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:8947477

  13. Roles of DNA helicases and Exo1 in the avoidance of mutations induced by Top1-mediated cleavage at ribonucleotides in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Hengyao; Potenski, Catherine J.; Epshtein, Anastasiya; Sung, Patrick; Klein, Hannah L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The replicative DNA polymerases insert ribonucleotides into DNA at a frequency of approximately 1/6500 nucleotides replicated. The rNMP residues make the DNA backbone more susceptible to hydrolysis and can also distort the helix, impeding the transcription and replication machineries. rNMPs in DNA are efficiently removed by RNaseH2 by a process called ribonucleotides excision repair (RER). In the absence of functional RNaseH2, rNMPs are subject to cleavage by Topoisomerase I, followed by further processing to result in deletion mutations due to slippage in simple DNA repeats. The topoisomerase I-mediated cleavage at rNMPs results in DNA ends that cannot be ligated by DNA ligase I, a 5′OH end and a 2′–3′ cyclic phosphate end. In the budding yeast, the mutation level in RNaseH2 deficient cells is kept low via the action of the Srs2 helicase and the Exo1 nuclease, which collaborate to process the Top1-induced nick with subsequent non-mutagenic gap filling. We have surveyed other helicases and nucleases for a possible role in reducing mutagenesis at Top1 nicks at rNMPs and have uncovered a novel role for the RecQ family helicase Sgs1 in this process. PMID:26716562

  14. Roles of DNA helicases and Exo1 in the avoidance of mutations induced by Top1-mediated cleavage at ribonucleotides in DNA.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hengyao; Potenski, Catherine J; Epshtein, Anastasiya; Sung, Patrick; Klein, Hannah L

    2016-01-01

    The replicative DNA polymerases insert ribonucleotides into DNA at a frequency of approximately 1/6500 nucleotides replicated. The rNMP residues make the DNA backbone more susceptible to hydrolysis and can also distort the helix, impeding the transcription and replication machineries. rNMPs in DNA are efficiently removed by RNaseH2 by a process called ribonucleotides excision repair (RER). In the absence of functional RNaseH2, rNMPs are subject to cleavage by Topoisomerase I, followed by further processing to result in deletion mutations due to slippage in simple DNA repeats. The topoisomerase I-mediated cleavage at rNMPs results in DNA ends that cannot be ligated by DNA ligase I, a 5'OH end and a 2'-3' cyclic phosphate end. In the budding yeast, the mutation level in RNaseH2 deficient cells is kept low via the action of the Srs2 helicase and the Exo1 nuclease, which collaborate to process the Top1-induced nick with subsequent non-mutagenic gap filling. We have surveyed other helicases and nucleases for a possible role in reducing mutagenesis at Top1 nicks at rNMPs and have uncovered a novel role for the RecQ family helicase Sgs1 in this process.

  15. Mechanism of assembly of the dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of class Ib ribonucleotide reductase: Enzymatic generation of superoxide is required for tyrosine oxidation via a Mn(III)Mn(IV) intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Stich, Troy A.; Britt, R. David; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2013-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) utilize radical chemistry to reduce nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. In the class Ia and Ib RNRs, this reaction requires a stable tyrosyl radical (Y•) generated by oxidation of a reduced dinuclear metal cluster. The FeIII2-Y• cofactor in the NrdB subunit of the class Ia RNRs can be generated by self-assembly from FeII2-NrdB, O2, and a reducing equivalent. By contrast, the structurally homologous class Ib enzymes require a MnIII2-Y• cofactor in their NrdF subunit. MnII2-NrdF does not react with O2, but it binds the reduced form of a conserved flavodoxin-like protein, NrdIhq, which, in the presence of O2, reacts to form the MnIII2-Y• cofactor. Here we investigate the mechanism of assembly of the MnIII2-Y• cofactor in Bacillus subtilis NrdF. Cluster assembly from MnII2-NrdF, NrdIhq, and O2 has been studied by stopped flow absorption and rapid freeze quench EPR spectroscopies. The results support a mechanism in which NrdIhq reduces O2 to O2•− (40-48 s−1, 0.6 mM O2), the O2•− channels to and reacts with MnII2-NrdF to form a MnIIIMnIV intermediate (2.2 ± 0.4 s−1), and the MnIIIMnIV species oxidizes tyrosine to Y• (0.08-0.15 s−1). Controlled production of O2•− by NrdIhq during class Ib RNR cofactor assembly both circumvents the unreactivity of the MnII2 cluster with O2 and satisfies the requirement for an “extra” reducing equivalent in Y• generation. PMID:23402532

  16. Electron injection through a specific pathway determines the outcome of oxygen activation at the diiron cluster in the F208Y mutant of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase protein R2.

    PubMed

    Parkin, S E; Chen, S; Ley, B A; Mangravite, L; Edmondson, D E; Huynh, B H; Bollinger, J M

    1998-01-27

    Protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase from Escherichia coli contains a dinuclear iron cluster, which reductively activates O2 to produce the enzyme's functionally essential tyrosyl radical by one-electron oxidation of residue Y122. A key step in this reaction is the rapid injection of a single electron from an exogenous reductant (Fe2+ or ascorbate) during formation of the radical-generating intermediate, cluster X, from the diiron(II) cluster and O2. As this step leaves only one of the two oxidizing equivalents of the initial diiron(II)-O2 adduct, it commits the reaction to a one-electron oxidation outcome and precludes possible two-electron alternatives (as occur in the related diiron bacterial alkane hydroxylases and fatty acyl desaturases). In the F208Y site-directed mutant of R2, Y208 is hydroxylated (a two-electron oxidation) in preference to the normal reaction [Aberg, A., Ormö, M., Nordlund, P., & Sjöberg, B. M. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 9845-9850], implying that this substitution blocks electron injection or (more likely) introduces an endogenous reductant (Y208) that effectively competes. Here we demonstrate that O2 activation in the F208Y mutant of R2 partitions between these two-electron (Y208 hydroxylation) and one-electron (Y122 radical production) outcomes and that the latter becomes predominant under conditions which favor electron injection (namely, high concentration of the reductant ascorbate). Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of the partition ratio to ascorbate concentration is strictly dependent on the integrity of a hydrogen-bond network involving the near surface residue W48: when this residue is substituted with F, Y208 hydroxylation predominates irrespective of ascorbate concentration. These data suggest that the hydrogen-bond network involving W48 is a specific electron-transfer pathway between the cofactor site and the protein surface.

  17. Quantum cluster size and solvent polarity effects on the geometries and Mössbauer properties of the active site model for ribonucleotide reductase intermediate X: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Han, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis

    2010-03-01

    In studying the properties of metalloproteins using ab initio quantum mechanical methods, one has to focus on the calculations on the active site. The bulk protein and solvent environment is often neglected, or is treated as a continuum dielectric medium with a certain dielectric constant. The size of the quantum cluster of the active site chosen for calculations can vary by including only the first-shell ligands which are directly bound to the metal centers, or including also the second-shell residues which are adjacent to and normally have H-bonding interactions with the first-shell ligands, or by including also further hydrogen bonding residues. It is not well understood how the size of the quantum cluster and the value of the dielectric constant chosen for the calculations will influence the calculated properties. In this paper, we have studied three models (A, B, and C) of different sizes for the active site of the ribonucleotide reductase intermediate X, using density functional theory (DFT) OPBE functional with broken-symmetry methodology. Each model is studied in gas-phase and in the conductor-like screening (COSMO) solvation model with different dielectric constants ε = 4, 10, 20, and 80, respectively. All the calculated Fe-ligand geometries, Heisenberg J coupling constants, and the Mössbauer isomer shifts, quadrupole splittings, and the (57)Fe, (1)H, and (17)O hyperfine tensors are compared. We find that the calculated isomer shifts are very stable. They are virtually unchanged with respect to the size of the cluster and the dielectric constant of the environment. On the other hand, certain Fe-ligand distances are sensitive to both the size of the cluster and the value of ε. ε = 4, which is normally used for the protein environment, appears too small when studying the diiron active site geometry with only the first-shell ligands as seen by comparisons with larger models.

  18. [Synthese of 1-(5-deoxy-beta-D-ribo-hexofuranosyl)cytosine and 1-(2,5-dideoxy-beta-D-erythro-hexofuranosyl)cytosine, and their phosphates. Specificity of an mammalian (rat) ribonucleotide-reductase].

    PubMed

    David, S; de Sennyey, G

    1979-12-01

    Mild, acidic hydrolysis of 3-O-benzoyl-1,2,:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-allofuranose gave a diol that was selectively benzoylated at O-6 in high yield by intermediate conversion to the stannylene derivative. The 3,6-dibenzoate was converted to the 5-O-tosyl derivative and thence to a mixture of iodides, which were reduced with tributylstannane to 3,6-di-O-benzoyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-ribo-hexofuranose (6). Acetolysis gave an anomeric mixture of diacetates, which, when treated with N-acetylbis(trimethylsilyl)cytosine gave the protected nucleoside, which was deprotected to free "homocytidine", 1-(5-deoxy-beta-D-ribo-hexofuranosyl)cytosine (11), by alklaine methanolysis. This was N-acetylated and then treated with acetone to give a protected nucleoside, which was labelled by oxidation to the aldehyde, reduction with sodium borotritide, and deprotection. Acidic methanolysis of 6 gave a mixture of methyl 2,6- and 3,6-di-O-benzoylfuranosides, the hydroxyl groups of which were treated by the tetrachloromethane-triphenylphosphine reagent to give the 2-chloro-2-deoxy (21) and 3-chloro-3-deoxy derivatives. Reduction of 21 gave methyl 3,6-di-O-benzoyl-2,5-dideoxy-D-erythro-furanoside, further transformed in 1-(2,5-dideoxy-beta-D-erythro-hexofuranosyl)cytosine mixed with the alpha anomer. Phosphates and diphosphates of the nucleosides were prepared by extensions of known methods. The phosphate and the diphosphate of 11 act neither as substrates nor as inhibitors of a ribonucleotide-reductase from rat asicites tumor.

  19. Spectroscopic and Electronic Structure Studies of Intermediate X in Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 and Two Variants: A Description of the FeIV-Oxo Bond in the FeIII-O-FeIV Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Mití, Nataša; Clay, Michael D.; Saleh, Lana; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Spectroscopic and electronic structure studies of the class I Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) intermediate X and three computationally-derived model complexes are presented, compared and evaluated to determine the electronic and geometric structure of the FeIII-FeIV active site of intermediate X. Rapid freeze-quench (RFQ) EPR, absorption and MCD were used to trap intermediate X in R2 wild-type (WT) and two variants, W48A and Y122F/Y356F. RFQ-EPR spin quantitation was used to determine the relative contributions of intermediate X and radicals present, while RFQ-MCD was used to specifically probe the FeIII/FeIV active site, which displayed three FeIV d-d transitions between 16 700 – 22 600 cm-1, two FeIV d-d spin-flip transitions between 23 500 – 24 300 cm-1 and five oxo to FeIV and FeIII charge transfer (CT) transitions between 25 000 – 32 000 cm-1. The FeIV d-d transitions were perturbed in the two variants, confirming that all three d-d transitions derive from the d-π manifold. Furthermore, the FeIV d-π splittings in the WT are too large to correlate with a bis-μ-oxo structure. The assignment of the FeIV d-d transitions in WT intermediate X best correlates with a bridged μ-oxo/μ-hydroxo [FeIII(μ-O)(μ-OH)FeIV] structure. The μ-oxo/μ-hydroxo core structure provides an important σ/π superexchange pathway, which is not present in the bis-μ-oxo structure, to promote facile electron transfer from Y122 to the remote FeIV through the bent oxo bridge, thereby generating the tyrosyl radical for catalysis. PMID:17602477

  20. EPR studies on a stable sulfinyl radical observed in the iron-oxygen-reconstituted Y177F/I263C protein R2 double mutant of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse.

    PubMed

    Adrait, Annie; Ohrström, Maria; Barra, Anne-Laure; Thelander, Lars; Gräslund, Astrid

    2002-05-21

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the biosynthesis of deoxyribonucleotides. The active enzyme contains a diiron center and a tyrosyl free radical required for enzyme activity. The radical is located at Y177 in the R2 protein of mouse RNR. The radical is formed concomitantly with the mu-oxo-bridged diferric center in a reconstitution reaction between ferrous iron and molecular oxygen in the protein. EPR at 9.6 and 285 GHz was used to investigate the reconstitution reaction in the double-mutant Y177F/I263C of mouse protein R2. The aim was to produce a protein-linked radical derived from the Cys residue in the mutant protein to investigate its formation and characteristics. The mutation Y177F hinders normal radical formation at Y177, and the I263C mutation places a Cys residue at the same distance from the iron center as Y177 in the native protein. In the reconstitution reaction, we observed small amounts of a transient radical with a probable assignment to a peroxy radical, followed by a stable sulfinyl radical, most likely located on C263. The unusual radical stability may be explained by the hydrophobic surroundings of C263, which resemble the hydrophobic pocket surrounding Y177 in native protein R2. The observation of a sulfinyl radical in RNR strengthens the relationship between RNR and another free radical enzyme, pyruvate formate-lyase, where a similar relatively stable sulfinyl radical has been observed in a mutant. Sulfinyl radicals may possibly be considered as stabilized forms of very short-lived thiyl radicals, proposed to be important intermediates in the radical chemistry of RNR.

  1. The Origin and Evolution of Ribonucleotide Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Daniel; Berggren, Gustav; Logan, Derek T.; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reduction is the only pathway for de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides in extant organisms. This chemically demanding reaction, which proceeds via a carbon-centered free radical, is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). The mechanism has been deemed unlikely to be catalyzed by a ribozyme, creating an enigma regarding how the building blocks for DNA were synthesized at the transition from RNA- to DNA-encoded genomes. While it is entirely possible that a different pathway was later replaced with the modern mechanism, here we explore the evolutionary and biochemical limits for an origin of the mechanism in the RNA + protein world and suggest a model for a prototypical ribonucleotide reductase (protoRNR). From the protoRNR evolved the ancestor to modern RNRs, the urRNR, which diversified into the modern three classes. Since the initial radical generation differs between the three modern classes, it is difficult to establish how it was generated in the urRNR. Here we suggest a model that is similar to the B12-dependent mechanism in modern class II RNRs. PMID:25734234

  2. Stimulation of Chromosomal Rearrangements by Ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Conover, Hailey N; Lujan, Scott A; Chapman, Mary J; Cornelio, Deborah A; Sharif, Rabab; Williams, Jessica S; Clark, Alan B; Camilo, Francheska; Kunkel, Thomas A; Argueso, Juan Lucas

    2015-11-01

    We show by whole genome sequence analysis that loss of RNase H2 activity increases loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains harboring the pol2-M644G allele encoding a mutant version of DNA polymerase ε that increases ribonucleotide incorporation. This led us to analyze the effects of loss of RNase H2 on LOH and on nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) in mutant diploid strains with deletions of genes encoding RNase H2 subunits (rnh201Δ, rnh202Δ, and rnh203Δ), topoisomerase 1 (TOP1Δ), and/or carrying mutant alleles of DNA polymerases ε, α, and δ. We observed an ∼7-fold elevation of the LOH rate in RNase H2 mutants encoding wild-type DNA polymerases. Strains carrying the pol2-M644G allele displayed a 7-fold elevation in the LOH rate, and synergistic 23-fold elevation in combination with rnh201Δ. In comparison, strains carrying the pol2-M644L mutation that decreases ribonucleotide incorporation displayed lower LOH rates. The LOH rate was not elevated in strains carrying the pol1-L868M or pol3-L612M alleles that result in increased incorporation of ribonucleotides during DNA synthesis by polymerases α and δ, respectively. A similar trend was observed in an NAHR assay, albeit with smaller phenotypic differentials. The ribonucleotide-mediated increases in the LOH and NAHR rates were strongly dependent on TOP1. These data add to recent reports on the asymmetric mutagenicity of ribonucleotides caused by topoisomerase 1 processing of ribonucleotides incorporated during DNA replication.

  3. [Expression of Gemcitabine-resistance-related gene and polymorphism of ribonucleotide reductase M1 gene promoter in Gemcitabine-resistant A549/Gem and NCI-H460/Gem cell lines].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-qing; Wang, Wei-xia; Lin, Li; Song, San-tai

    2010-01-01

    To assay the expression of cytidine deaminase (CDA), ribonucleotide reductase subunit 1 (RRM1), phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN), excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and RRM1(-)37A/C polymorphism, which have been shown relevant to gemcitabine resistance in two human gemcitabine-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549/Gem and NCI-H460/Gem, so as to make clear how do they vary during the course of acquiring resistance to gemcitabine. The human gemcitabine-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549/Gem and NCI-H460/Gem were established in our Department by repeated clinical serum peak concentration and gradually increasing doses. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to examine the expression of CDA, RRM1, PTEN, ERCC1, dCK and RRM1(-)37A/C polymorphism in those cell lines at different time points during their induction process. The resistance indexes of A549/Gem and NCI-H460/Gem cells reached 163.228 and 181.684, and then remained stable at 115.297 and 129.783, respectively. The expression of CDA, RRM1, PTEN and ERCC1 varied along with the changing gemcitabine resistance indexes, but expression of dCK did not change apparently. The wild type promoter was able to amplify the genomic DNA in different induction stages of A549/Gem and NCI-H460/Gem cells, but allelotype did not, indicating that the gene type of A549/Gem, NCI-H460/Gem and their parental cells remaining still wild type. Compared with their parental cells, the expressions of CDA, RRM1, PTEN and ERCC1 in human gemcitabine-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549/Gem and NCI-H460/Gem rise, the expression of dCK changes inapparently, therefore, their gene type are remaining wild type.

  4. Biliverdin Reductase Mediates Hypoxia-Induced EMT via PI3-Kinase and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rui; Yao, Ying; Han, Min; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Wei, Juncheng; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding; Xu, Gang

    2008-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia in the renal parenchyma is thought to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), leading to fibrogenesis and ultimately end-stage renal failure. Biliverdin reductase, recently identified as a serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase that may activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, is upregulated in response to reactive oxygen species that may accompany hypoxia. We investigated this potential role of biliverdin reductase in hypoxia-induced renal tubular EMT. Expression of biliverdin reductase was upregulated in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK-2) cultured in hypoxic conditions (1% O2), and this was accompanied by reduced expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin. Inhibiting PI3K reversed these changes, consistent with EMT. In normoxic conditions, overexpression of biliverdin reductase promoted similar characteristics of EMT, which were also reversed by inhibiting PI3K. Furthermore, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knockdown biliverdin reductase, we demonstrated that the enzyme associates with phosphorylated Akt and mediates the hypoxia-induced EMT phenotype. In vivo, expression of biliverdin reductase increased in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and immunohistochemistry of serial sections demonstrated similar localization of phosphorylated Akt and biliverdin reductase. In conclusion, biliverdin reductase mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through a PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway. PMID:18184861

  5. Biotransformation of arsenic by bacterial strains mediated by oxido-reductase enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, N; Singh, D P

    2014-12-24

    The present study deals with the enzyme mediated biotransformation of arsenic in five arsenic tolerant strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus, Paenibacillus macerans and Escherichia coli). Biotransformation ability of these isolates was evaluated by monitoring arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. Results showed that arsenic oxidase activity was exclusively present in P. macerans and B. pumilus while B. subtilis, B. megaterium and E. coli strains showed presence of Arsenic oxido-reductase enzyme. The reversible nature of arsenic oxido- reductase suggested that same enzyme can carry out oxidation and reduction of arsenic depending upon the relative concentration of arsenic species. Lineweaver-Burk plot of the arsenite oxidase activity in P. macerans showed highest Km value (Km- 200 μM) and lower Vmax (0.012 μmol mg-1 protein min-1) indicating lowest affinity of the enzyme for arsenite. On the contrary, E. coli showed the lower Km value ( Km- 38.46 μM) and higher Vmax (0.044 μmol mg-1 protein min-1) suggesting for higher affinity for the arsenite. Lineweaver-Burk plot of arsenate reductase activity showed the presence of this enzyme in B. subtilis, B. megaterium and E. coli which were in the range of 200-360 μM Km and Vmax value between 0.256- 0.129 mmol mg-1 protein min-1. These results suggested that affinity of the as reductase enzyme is lowest for arsenate than that for the arsenite. Thus, arsenite oxidase system appears to be a predominant mechanism of cellular defense in these bacterial strains.

  6. Ribonucleotides and RNA Promote Peptide Chain Growth.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Helmut; Tremmel, Peter; Kervio, Eric; Pfeffer, Camilla; Steiner, Ulrich E; Richert, Clemens

    2017-01-24

    All known forms of life use RNA-mediated polypeptide synthesis to produce the proteins encoded in their genes. Because the principal parts of the translational machinery consist of RNA, it is likely that peptide synthesis was achieved early in the prebiotic evolution of an RNA-dominated molecular world. How RNA attracted amino acids and then induced peptide formation in the absence of enzymes has been unclear. Herein, we show that covalent capture of an amino acid as a phosphoramidate favors peptide formation. Peptide coupling is a robust process that occurs with different condensation agents. Kinetics show that covalent capture can accelerate chain growth over oligomerization of the free amino acid by at least one order of magnitude, so that there is no need for enzymatic catalysis for peptide synthesis to begin. Peptide chain growth was also observed on phosphate-terminated RNA strands. Peptide coupling promoted by ribonucleotides or ribonucleotide residues may have been an important transitional form of peptide synthesis that set in when amino acids were first captured by RNA. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Calmodulin-mediated suppression of 2-ketoisovalerate reductase in Beauveria bassiana beauvericin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Deok-Hyo; Oh, Junsang; Hyun, Min-Woo; Han, Jae-Gu; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Ketoisovalerate reductase (KIVR, E.C. 1.2.7.7) mediates the specific reduction of 2-ketoisovalerate (2-Kiv) to d-hydroxyisovalerate (d-Hiv), a precursor for beauvericin biosynthesis. Beauvericin, a famous mycotoxin produced by many fungi, is a cyclooligomer depsipeptide, which has insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, and cytotoxic activities. In this report, we demonstrated that Beauveria bassiana 2-ketoisovalerate reductase (BbKIVR) acts as a typical KIVR enzyme in the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana. In addition, we found that BbKIVR interacts with calmodulin (CaM) in vitro and in vivo. The functional role of CaM-binding to BbKIVR was to negatively regulate the BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress suppressed BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Interestingly, this negative effect of BbKIVR activity by light and salt stress was recovered by CaM inhibitors, suggesting that the inhibitory mechanism is mediated through stimulation of CaM activity. Therefore, this work suggests that BbKIVR plays an important role in the beauvericin biosynthetic pathway mediated by environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress via the CaM signaling pathway.

  8. Diacetyl/l-Xylulose Reductase Mediates Chemical Redox Cycling in Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2017-07-17

    Reactive carbonyls such as diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) and 2,3-pentanedione in tobacco and many food and consumer products are known to cause severe respiratory diseases. Many of these chemicals are detoxified by carbonyl reductases in the lung, in particular, dicarbonyl/l-xylulose reductase (DCXR), a multifunctional enzyme important in glucose metabolism. DCXR is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Using recombinant human enzyme, we discovered that DCXR mediates redox cycling of a variety of quinones generating superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and, in the presence of transition metals, hydroxyl radicals. Redox cycling activity preferentially utilized NADH as a cosubstrate and was greatest for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and 1,2-naphthoquinone, followed by 1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (menadione). Using 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as the substrate, quinone redox cycling was found to inhibit DCXR reduction of l-xylulose and diacetyl. Competitive inhibition of enzyme activity by the quinone was observed with respect to diacetyl (Ki = 190 μM) and l-xylulose (Ki = 940 μM). Abundant DCXR activity was identified in A549 lung epithelial cells when diacetyl was used as a substrate. Quinones inhibited reduction of this dicarbonyl, causing an accumulation of diacetyl in the cells and culture medium and a decrease in acetoin, the reduced product of diacetyl. The identification of DCXR as an enzyme activity mediating chemical redox cycling suggests that it may be important in generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in the lung. These activities, together with the inhibition of dicarbonyl/l-xylulose metabolism by redox-active chemicals, as well as consequent deficiencies in pentose metabolism, are likely to contribute to lung injury following exposure to dicarbonyls and quinones.

  9. The enzymatic activity of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase is enhanced by NPM-ALK: new insights in ALK-mediated pathogenesis and the treatment of ALCL.

    PubMed

    Boccalatte, Francesco E; Voena, Claudia; Riganti, Chiara; Bosia, Amalia; D'Amico, Lucia; Riera, Ludovica; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Jensen, Ole N; Goss, Valerie L; Lee, Kimberly; Nardone, Julie; Rush, John; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Comb, Michael J; Chiarle, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2009-03-19

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma represents a subset of neoplasms caused by translocations that juxtapose the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) to dimerization partners. The constitutive activation of ALK fusion proteins leads to cellular transformation through a complex signaling network. To elucidate the ALK pathways sustaining lymphomagenesis and tumor maintenance, we analyzed the tyrosine-kinase protein profiles of ALK-positive cell lines using 2 complementary proteomic-based approaches, taking advantage of a specific ALK RNA interference (RNAi) or cell-permeable inhibitors. A well-defined set of ALK-associated tyrosine phosphopeptides, including metabolic enzymes, kinases, ribosomal and cytoskeletal proteins, was identified. Validation studies confirmed that vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (ATIC) associated with nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, and their phosphorylation required ALK activity. ATIC phosphorylation was documented in cell lines and primary tumors carrying ALK proteins and other tyrosine kinases, including TPR-Met and wild type c-Met. Functional analyses revealed that ALK-mediated ATIC phosphorylation enhanced its enzymatic activity, dampening the methotrexate-mediated transformylase activity inhibition. These findings demonstrate that proteomic approaches in well-controlled experimental settings allow the definition of informative proteomic profiles and the discovery of novel ALK downstream players that contribute to the maintenance of the neoplastic phenotype. Prediction of tumor responses to methotrexate may justify specific molecular-based chemotherapy.

  10. Processing ribonucleotides incorporated during eukaryotic DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica S.; Lujan, Scott A.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Preface The information encoded in DNA is influenced by the presence of non-canonical nucleotides, the most frequent of which are ribonucleotides. In this review we discuss recent discoveries about ribonucleotide incorporation into DNA during replication by the three major eukaryotic replicases, DNA polymerases α, δ and ε. The presence of ribonucleotides in DNA causes short deletion mutations and may result in the generation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks, leading to genomic instability. We describe how these ribonucleotides are removed from DNA by ribonucleotide excision repair and by topoisomerase 1. We discuss the biological consequences and the physiological roles of ribonucleotides in DNA, and consider how deficiencies in their removal from DNA may be important in the etiology of disease. PMID:27093943

  11. Rac1-mediated effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Adam, Oliver; Laufs, Ulrich

    2014-03-10

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) lower serum cholesterol concentrations and are beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. The positive clinical effects have only partially been reproduced with other lipid-lowering interventions suggesting potential statin effects in addition to cholesterol lowering. In experimental models, direct beneficial cardiovascular effects that are mediated by the inhibition of isoprenoids have been documented, which serve as lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules such as small Rho guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins, whose membrane localization and function are dependent on isoprenylation. Rac1 GTPase is an established master regulator of cell motility through the cortical actin reorganization and of reactive oxygen species generation through the regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity. Observations in cells, animals, and humans have implicated the activation of Rac1 GTPase as a key component of cardiovascular pathologies, including the endothelial dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, atrial fibrillation, stroke, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, the underlying signal transduction remains incompletely understood. Based on the recent advance made in Rac1 research in the cardiovascular system by using mouse models with transgenic overexpression of activated Rac1 or conditional knockout, as well as Rac1-specific small molecule inhibitor NSC 23766, the improved understanding of the Rac1-mediated effects statins may help to identify novel therapeutic targets and strategies.

  12. Evidence for the dimerization-mediated catalysis of methionine sulfoxide reductase A from Clostridium oremlandii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kitaik; Kwak, Geun-Hee; Park, Yeon Seung; Lee, Kong-Joo; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium oremlandii MsrA (CoMsrA) is a natively selenocysteine-containing methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase and classified into a 1-Cys type MsrA. CoMsrA exists as a monomer in solution. Herein, we report evidence that CoMsrA can undergo homodimerization during catalysis. The monomeric CoMsrA dimerizes in the presence of its substrate methionine sulfoxide via an intermolecular disulfide bond between catalytic Cys16 residues. The dimeric CoMsrA is resolved by the reductant glutaredoxin, suggesting the relevance of dimerization in catalysis. The dimerization reaction occurs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the occurrence of homodimer formation in the native selenoprotein CoMsrA is confirmed. We also determine the crystal structure of the dimeric CoMsrA, having the dimer interface around the two catalytic Cys16 residues. A central cone-shaped hole is present in the surface model of dimeric structure, and the two Cys16 residues constitute the base of the hole. Collectively, our biochemical and structural analyses suggest a novel dimerization-mediated mechanism for CoMsrA catalysis that is additionally involved in CoMsrA regeneration by glutaredoxin.

  13. Effect of prostaglandin reductase 1 (PTGR1) on gastric carcinoma using lentivirus-mediated system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Luo, Fen; Wang, Jun; Mao, Xiang; Chen, Zongyou; Wang, Zhiming; Guo, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is a digestive related malignant tumor with poor diagnosis and prognosis for advanced patients. PTGR1 (prostaglandin reductase 1), as a potential cancer biomarker, has not been reported in gastric carcinoma occurrence. To investigate the role of PTGR1 on gastric carcinoma cells, human PTGR1 was efficiently silenced by lentivirus-mediated system in MGC-803 cells confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot. Then cell proliferation, colony formation and cell cycle were determined after knockdown of PTGR1 by MTT assay, colony assay and flow cytometry, respectively and data suggested that PTGR1 down regulated MGC-803 cells significantly suppressed the proliferation and colony formation ability and induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase compared to controls (P < 0.001). Further investigation demonstrated knockdown of PTGR1 influenced cell proliferation and cell cycle via activating p21 and p53 signaling pathway described by Western blot assay. Our findings indicate that PTGR1 may be an oncogene in human gastric carcinoma and identified as a diagnosis and prognosis target for gastric carcinoma.

  14. PROTEOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CELLULAR RESPONSE TO NITROSATIVE STRESS MEDIATED BY S-NITROSOGLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE INHIBITION

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew W.; Yang, Zhonghui; Gooden, David M.; Thompson, J. Will; Ball, Carol H.; Turner, Meredith E.; Hou, Yongyong; Pi, Jingbo; Moseley, M. Arthur; Que, Loretta G.

    2012-01-01

    The S-nitrosoglutathione-metabolizing enzyme, GSNO reductase (GSNOR), has emerged as an important regulator of protein S-nitrosylation. GSNOR ablation is protective in models of asthma and heart failure, raising the idea that GSNOR inhibitors might hold therapeutic value. Here, we investigated the effects of a small molecule inhibitor of GSNOR (GSNORi) in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. We found that GSNORi increased protein S-nitrosylation in cytokine-stimulated cells, and we utilized stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to quantify the cellular response to this “nitrosative stress”. The expression of several cytokine-inducible immunodulators, including osteopontin, cyclooxygenase-2 and nitric oxide synthase isoform 2 (NOS2) were decreased by GSNORi. In addition, selective targets of the redox-regulated transcription factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)—including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and glutamate cysteine ligase modulatory subunit—were induced by GSNORi in a NOS2- and Nrf2-dependent manner. In cytokine-stimulated cells, Nrf2 protected from GSNORi-induced glutathione depletion and cytotoxicity, and HO-1 activity was required for downregulation of NOS2. Interestingly, GSNORi also affected a marked increase in NOS2 protein stability. Collectively, these data provide the most complete description of the global effects of GSNOR inhibition and demonstrate several important mechanisms for inducible response to GSNORi-mediated nitrosative stress. PMID:22390303

  15. EF24 induces ROS-mediated apoptosis via targeting thioredoxin reductase 1 in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Ying, Shilong; Feng, Zhiguo; Chen, Tongke; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Zhe; Qiu, Chenyu; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, and finding novel agents for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer is of urgent need. Diphenyl difluoroketone (EF24), a molecule having structural similarity to curcumin, exhibits potent anti-tumor activities by arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. Although EF24 demonstrates potent anticancer efficacy in numerous types of human cancer cells, the cellular targets of EF24 have not been fully defined. We report here that EF24 may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, EF24 induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to EF24 treatment. In vivo, EF24 treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden, and displays synergistic lethality with 5-FU against gastric cancer cells. Targeting TrxR1 with EF24 thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of EF24, and reveals that TrxR1 is a good target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26919110

  16. Thioredoxin reductase mediates cell death effects of the combination of beta interferon and retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, E R; Boyanapalli, M; Lindner, D J; Weihua, X; Hassel, B A; Jagus, R; Gutierrez, P L; Kalvakolanu, D V; Hofman, E R

    1998-11-01

    Interferons (IFNs) and retinoids are potent biological response modifiers. By using JAK-STAT pathways, IFNs regulate the expression of genes involved in antiviral, antitumor, and immunomodulatory actions. Retinoids exert their cell growth-regulatory effects via nuclear receptors, which also function as transcription factors. Although these ligands act through distinct mechanisms, several studies have shown that the combination of IFNs and retinoids synergistically inhibits cell growth. We have previously reported that IFN-beta-all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) combination is a more potent growth suppressor of human tumor xenografts in vivo than either agent alone. Furthermore, the IFN-RA combination causes cell death in several tumor cell lines in vitro. However, the molecular basis for these growth-suppressive actions is unknown. It has been suggested that certain gene products, which mediate the antiviral actions of IFNs, are also responsible for the antitumor actions of the IFN-RA combination. However, we did not find a correlation between their activities and cell death. Therefore, we have used an antisense knockout approach to directly identify the gene products that mediate cell death and have isolated several genes associated with retinoid-IFN-induced mortality (GRIM). In this investigation, we characterized one of the GRIM cDNAs, GRIM-12. Sequence analysis suggests that the GRIM-12 product is identical to human thioredoxin reductase (TR). TR is posttranscriptionally induced by the IFN-RA combination in human breast carcinoma cells. Overexpression of GRIM-12 causes a small amount of cell death and further enhances the susceptibility of cells to IFN-RA-induced death. Dominant negative inhibitors directed against TR inhibit its cell death-inducing functions. Interference with TR enzymatic activity led to growth promotion in the presence of the IFN-RA combination. Thus, these studies identify a novel function for TR in cell growth regulation.

  17. A cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase mediates the first step of denitrification in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Sann, R; Kostka, S; Friedrich, B

    1994-01-01

    Respiratory nitrite reductase (NIR) has been purified from the soluble extract of denitrifying cells of Alcaligenes eutrophus strain H16 to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme was induced under anoxic conditions in the presence of nitrite. Purified NIR showed typical features of a cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase. It appeared to be a dimer of kDa subunits, its activity was only weakly inhibited by the copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate, and spectral analysis revealed absorption maxima which were characteristic for the presence of heme c and heme d1. The isoelectric point of 8.6 was considerably higher than the pI determined for cd1 nitrite reductases from pseudomonads. Eighteen amino acids at the N-terminus of the A. eutrophus NIR, obtained by protein sequencing, showed no significant homology to the N-terminal region of nitrite reductases from Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  18. The nitric oxide production in the moss Physcomitrella patens is mediated by nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Medina-Andrés, Rigoberto; Solano-Peralta, Alejandro; Saucedo-Vázquez, Juan Pablo; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Pimentel-Cabrera, Jaime Arturo; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Lira-Ruan, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years multiple roles of the nitric oxide gas (•NO) have been uncovered in plant growth, development and many physiological processes. In seed plants the enzymatic synthesis of •NO is mediated by a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity performed by a still unknown enzyme(s) and nitrate reductase (NR). In green algae the •NO production has been linked only to NR activity, although a NOS gene was reported for Ostreococcus tauri and O. lucimarinus, no other Viridiplantae species has such gene. As there is no information about •NO synthesis neither for non-vascular plants nor for non-seed vascular plants, the interesting question regarding the evolution of the enzymatic •NO production systems during land plant natural history remains open. To address this issue the endogenous •NO production by protonema was demonstrated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The •NO signal was almost eliminated in plants treated with sodium tungstate, which also reduced the NR activity, demonstrating that in P. patens NR activity is the main source for •NO production. The analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed endogenous NO production and showed that •NO signal is accumulated in the cytoplasm of protonema cells. The results presented here show for the first time the •NO production in a non-vascular plant and demonstrate that the NR-dependent enzymatic synthesis of •NO is common for embryophytes and green algae.

  19. The Neurosteroidogenic Enzyme 5α-Reductase Mediates Psychotic-Like Complications of Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Frau, Roberto; Bini, Valentina; Soggiu, Alessio; Scheggi, Simona; Pardu, Alessandra; Fanni, Silvia; Roncada, Paola; Puligheddu, Monica; Marrosu, Francesco; Caruso, Donatella; Devoto, Paola; Bortolato, Marco

    2017-02-15

    Acute sleep deprivation (SD) can trigger or exacerbate psychosis- and mania-related symptoms; the neurobiological basis of these complications, however, remains elusive. Given the extensive involvement of neuroactive steroids in psychopathology, we hypothesized that the behavioral complications of SD may be contributed by 5α-reductase (5αR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of progesterone into the neurosteroid allopregnanolone. We first tested whether rats exposed to SD may exhibit brain-regional alterations in 5αR isoenzymes and neuroactive steroid levels; then, we assessed whether the behavioral and neuroendocrine alterations induced by SD may be differentially modulated by the administration of the 5αR inhibitor finasteride, as well as progesterone and allopregnanolone. SD selectively enhanced 5αR expression and activity, as well as AP levels, in the prefrontal cortex; furthermore, finasteride (10-100 mg/kg, IP) dose-dependently ameliorated PPI deficits, hyperactivity, and risk-taking behaviors, in a fashion akin to the antipsychotic haloperidol and the mood stabilizer lithium carbonate. Finally, PPI deficits were exacerbated by allopregnanolone (10 mg/kg, IP) and attenuated by progesterone (30 mg/kg, IP) in SD-subjected, but not control rats. Collectively, these results provide the first-ever evidence that 5αR mediates a number of psychosis- and mania-like complications of SD through imbalances in cortical levels of neuroactive steroids.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 15 February 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.13.

  20. The Nitric Oxide Production in the Moss Physcomitrella patens Is Mediated by Nitrate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Andrés, Rigoberto; Solano-Peralta, Alejandro; Saucedo-Vázquez, Juan Pablo; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Pimentel-Cabrera, Jaime Arturo; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.; Lira-Ruan, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years multiple roles of the nitric oxide gas (•NO) have been uncovered in plant growth, development and many physiological processes. In seed plants the enzymatic synthesis of •NO is mediated by a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity performed by a still unknown enzyme(s) and nitrate reductase (NR). In green algae the •NO production has been linked only to NR activity, although a NOS gene was reported for Ostreococcus tauri and O. lucimarinus, no other Viridiplantae species has such gene. As there is no information about •NO synthesis neither for non-vascular plants nor for non-seed vascular plants, the interesting question regarding the evolution of the enzymatic •NO production systems during land plant natural history remains open. To address this issue the endogenous •NO production by protonema was demonstrated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The •NO signal was almost eliminated in plants treated with sodium tungstate, which also reduced the NR activity, demonstrating that in P. patens NR activity is the main source for •NO production. The analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed endogenous NO production and showed that •NO signal is accumulated in the cytoplasm of protonema cells. The results presented here show for the first time the •NO production in a non-vascular plant and demonstrate that the NR-dependent enzymatic synthesis of •NO is common for embryophytes and green algae. PMID:25742644

  1. Biliverdin Reductase A (BVRA) Mediates Macrophage Expression of Interleukin-10 in Injured Kidney.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhizhi; Pei, Guangchang; Wang, Pengge; Yang, Juan; Zhu, Fengmin; Guo, Yujiao; Wang, Meng; Yao, Ying; Zeng, Rui; Liao, Wenhui; Xu, Gang

    2015-09-18

    Biliverdin reductase A is an enzyme, with serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activation, converting biliverdin (BV) to bilirubin (BR) in heme degradation pathway. It has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in monocytes and human glioblastoma. However, the function of BVRA in polarized macrophage was unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of BVRA on macrophage activation and polarization in injured renal microenvironment. Classically activated macrophages (M1macrophages) and alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophages) polarization of murine bone marrow derived macrophage was induced by GM-CSF and M-CSF. M1 polarization was associated with a significant down-regulation of BVRA and Interleukin-10 (IL-10), and increased secretion of TNF-α. We also found IL-10 expression was increased in BVRA over-expressed macrophages, while it decreased in BVRA knockdown macrophages. In contrast, BVRA over-expressed or knockdown macrophages had no effect on TNF-α expression level, indicating BVRA mediated IL-10 expression in macrophages. Furthermore, we observed in macrophages infected with recombinant adenoviruses BVRA gene, which BVRA over-expressed enhanced both INOS and ARG-1 mRNA expression, resulting in a specific macrophage phenotype. Through in vivo study, we found BVRA positive macrophages largely existed in mice renal ischemia perfusion injury. With the treatment of the regular cytokines GM-CSF, M-CSF or LPS, excreted in the injured renal microenvironment, IL-10 secretion was significantly increased in BVRA over-expressed macrophages. In conclusion, the BVRA positive macrophage is a source of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in injured kidney, which may provide a potential target for treatment of kidney disease.

  2. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils. PMID:24435070

  3. Measuring ribonucleotide incorporation into DNA in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Anders R; Williams, Jessica S; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotides are incorporated into genomes by DNA polymerases, they can be removed, and if not removed, they can have deleterious and beneficial consequences. Here, we describe an assay to quantify stable ribonucleotide incorporation by DNA polymerases in vitro, and an assay to probe for ribonucleotides in each of the two DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  4. Glutathione Reductase-Mediated Synthesis of Tellurium-Containing Nanostructures Exhibiting Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pugin, Benoit; Cornejo, Fabián A.; Muñoz-Díaz, Pablo; Muñoz-Villagrán, Claudia M.; Vargas-Pérez, Joaquín I.; Arenas, Felipe A.

    2014-01-01

    Tellurium, a metalloid belonging to group 16 of the periodic table, displays very interesting physical and chemical properties and lately has attracted significant attention for its use in nanotechnology. In this context, the use of microorganisms for synthesizing nanostructures emerges as an eco-friendly and exciting approach compared to their chemical synthesis. To generate Te-containing nanostructures, bacteria enzymatically reduce tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, using a classic biochemical approach, we looked for a novel tellurite reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain BNF22 and used it to generate tellurium-containing nanostructures. A new tellurite reductase was identified as glutathione reductase, which was subsequently overproduced in Escherichia coli. The characterization of this enzyme showed that it is an NADPH-dependent tellurite reductase, with optimum reducing activity at 30°C and pH 9.0. Finally, the enzyme was able to generate Te-containing nanostructures, about 68 nm in size, which exhibit interesting antibacterial properties against E. coli, with no apparent cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells. PMID:25193000

  5. Fumarate-Mediated Inhibition of Erythrose Reductase, a Key Enzyme for Erythritol Production by Torula corallina

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Koo, Bong-Seong; Kim, Sang-Yong

    2002-01-01

    Torula corallina, a strain presently being used for the industrial production of erythritol, has the highest erythritol yield ever reported for an erythritol-producing microorganism. The increased production of erythritol by Torula corallina with trace elements such as Cu2+ has been thoroughly reported, but the mechanism by which Cu2+ increases the production of erythritol has not been studied. This study demonstrated that supplemental Cu2+ enhanced the production of erythritol, while it significantly decreased the production of a major by-product that accumulates during erythritol fermentation, which was identified as fumarate by instrumental analyses. Erythrose reductase, a key enzyme that converts erythrose to erythritol in T. corallina, was purified to homogeneity by chromatographic methods, including ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. In vitro, purified erythrose reductase was significantly inhibited noncompetitively by increasing the fumarate concentration. In contrast, the enzyme activity remained almost constant regardless of Cu2+ concentration. This suggests that supplemental Cu2+ reduced the production of fumarate, a strong inhibitor of erythrose reductase, which led to less inhibition of erythrose reductase and a high yield of erythritol. This is the first report that suggests catabolite repression by a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate in T. corallina. PMID:12200310

  6. Aldose reductase induced by hyperosmotic stress mediates cardiomyocyte apoptosis: differential effects of sorbitol and mannitol.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Anita S; Ulloa, Juan Alberto; Chiong, Mario; Criollo, Alfredo; Eisner, Verónica; Barros, Luis Felipe; Lavandero, Sergio

    2003-10-03

    Cells adapt to hyperosmotic conditions by several mechanisms, including accumulation of sorbitol via induction of the polyol pathway. Failure to adapt to osmotic stress can result in apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we assessed the role of aldose reductase, the key enzyme of the polyol pathway, in cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmotic stress, elicited by exposure of cultured rat cardiac myocytes to the nonpermeant solutes sorbitol and mannitol, caused identical cell shrinkage and adaptive hexose uptake stimulation. In contrast, only sorbitol induced the polyol pathway and triggered stress pathways as well as apoptosis-related signaling events. Sorbitol resulted in activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p54 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and protein kinase B. Furthermore, sorbitol treatment resulting in induction and activation of aldose reductase, decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL, increased DNA fragmentation, and glutathione depletion. Apoptosis was attenuated by aldose reductase inhibition with zopolrestat and also by glutathione replenishment with N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, our data show that hypertonic shrinkage of cardiac myocytes alone is not sufficient to induce cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmolarity-induced cell death is sensitive to the nature of the osmolyte and requires induction of aldose reductase as well as a decrease in intracellular glutathione levels.

  7. Glutathione reductase-mediated synthesis of tellurium-containing nanostructures exhibiting antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Pugin, Benoit; Cornejo, Fabián A; Muñoz-Díaz, Pablo; Muñoz-Villagrán, Claudia M; Vargas-Pérez, Joaquín I; Arenas, Felipe A; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2014-11-01

    Tellurium, a metalloid belonging to group 16 of the periodic table, displays very interesting physical and chemical properties and lately has attracted significant attention for its use in nanotechnology. In this context, the use of microorganisms for synthesizing nanostructures emerges as an eco-friendly and exciting approach compared to their chemical synthesis. To generate Te-containing nanostructures, bacteria enzymatically reduce tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, using a classic biochemical approach, we looked for a novel tellurite reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain BNF22 and used it to generate tellurium-containing nanostructures. A new tellurite reductase was identified as glutathione reductase, which was subsequently overproduced in Escherichia coli. The characterization of this enzyme showed that it is an NADPH-dependent tellurite reductase, with optimum reducing activity at 30°C and pH 9.0. Finally, the enzyme was able to generate Te-containing nanostructures, about 68 nm in size, which exhibit interesting antibacterial properties against E. coli, with no apparent cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells.

  8. Nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd accumulation in Panax notoginseng roots by affecting root cell wall properties.

    PubMed

    Kan, Qi; Wu, Wenwei; Yu, Wenqian; Zhang, Jiarong; Xu, Jin; Rengel, Zed; Chen, Limei; Cui, Xiuming; Chen, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen is a traditional medicinal herb in China. However, the high capacity of its roots to accumulate cadmium (Cd) poses a potential risk to human health. Although there is some evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating Cd toxicity, the origin of Cd-induced NO and its function in plant responses to Cd remain unknown. In this study, we examined NO synthesis and its role in Cd accumulation in P. notoginseng roots. Cd-induced NO production was significantly decreased by application of the nitrate reductase inhibitor tungstate but not the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (N(G)-methyl-l-arginine acetate), indicating that nitrate reductase is the major contributor to Cd-induced NO production in P. notoginseng roots. Under conditions of Cd stress, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) increased Cd accumulation in root cell walls but decreased Cd translocation to the shoot. In contrast, the NO scavenger cPTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) and tungstate both significantly decreased NO-increased Cd retention in root cell walls. The amounts of hemicellulose 1 and pectin, together with pectin methylesterase activity, were increased with the addition of SNP but were decreased by cPTIO and tungstate. Furthermore, increases or decreases in hemicellulose 1 and pectin contents as well as pectin methylesterase activity fit well with the increased or decreased retention of Cd in the cell walls of P. notoginseng roots. The results suggest that nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd retention in P. notoginseng roots by modulating the properties of the cell wall.

  9. Regulation of Anticancer Styrylpyrone Biosynthesis in the Medicinal Mushroom Inonotus obliquus Requires Thioredoxin Mediated Transnitrosylation of S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; He, Meihong; Ding, Jianing; Xi, Qi; Loake, Gary J; Zheng, Weifa

    2016-11-21

    The medicinal macrofungus Inonotus obliquus widely utilized as folk medicine in Russia and Baltic countries is a source of phenylpropanoid-derived styrylpyrone polyphenols that can inhibit tumor proliferation. Insights into the regulatory machinery that controls I. obliquus styrylpyrone polyphenol biosynthesis will enable strategies to increase the production of these molecules. Here we show that Thioredoxin (Trx) mediated transnitrosylation of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) underpins the regulation of styrylpyrone production, driven by nitric oxide (NO) synthesis triggered by P. morii coculture. NO accumulation results in the S-nitrosylation of PAL and 4CL required for the synthesis of precursor phenylpropanoids and styrylpyrone synthase (SPS), integral to the production of styrylpyrone, inhibiting their activities. These enzymes are targeted for denitrosylation by Trx proteins, which restore their activity. Further, this Trx S-nitrosothiol (SNO) reductase activity was potentiated following S-nitrosylation of Trx proteins at a non-catalytic cysteine (Cys) residue. Intriguingly, this process was counterbalanced by Trx denitrosylation, mediated by Trx-dependent transnitrosylation of GSNOR. Thus, unprecedented interplay between Trx and GSNOR oxidoreductases regulates the biosynthesis of styrylpyrone polyphenols in I. obliquus.

  10. Regulation of Anticancer Styrylpyrone Biosynthesis in the Medicinal Mushroom Inonotus obliquus Requires Thioredoxin Mediated Transnitrosylation of S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanxia; He, Meihong; Ding, Jianing; Xi, Qi; Loake, Gary J.; Zheng, Weifa

    2016-01-01

    The medicinal macrofungus Inonotus obliquus widely utilized as folk medicine in Russia and Baltic countries is a source of phenylpropanoid-derived styrylpyrone polyphenols that can inhibit tumor proliferation. Insights into the regulatory machinery that controls I. obliquus styrylpyrone polyphenol biosynthesis will enable strategies to increase the production of these molecules. Here we show that Thioredoxin (Trx) mediated transnitrosylation of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) underpins the regulation of styrylpyrone production, driven by nitric oxide (NO) synthesis triggered by P. morii coculture. NO accumulation results in the S-nitrosylation of PAL and 4CL required for the synthesis of precursor phenylpropanoids and styrylpyrone synthase (SPS), integral to the production of styrylpyrone, inhibiting their activities. These enzymes are targeted for denitrosylation by Trx proteins, which restore their activity. Further, this Trx S-nitrosothiol (SNO) reductase activity was potentiated following S-nitrosylation of Trx proteins at a non-catalytic cysteine (Cys) residue. Intriguingly, this process was counterbalanced by Trx denitrosylation, mediated by Trx-dependent transnitrosylation of GSNOR. Thus, unprecedented interplay between Trx and GSNOR oxidoreductases regulates the biosynthesis of styrylpyrone polyphenols in I. obliquus. PMID:27869186

  11. Formation and Function of the Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Yun, Danny; Saleh, Lana; Bollinger, J. Martin; Krebs, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The β2 subunit of a class Ia or Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is activated when its carboxylate-bridged Fe2II/II cluster reacts with O2 to oxidize a nearby tyrosine (Y) residue to a stable radical (Y•). During turnover, the Y• in β2 is thought to reversibly oxidize a cysteine (C) in the α2 subunit to a thiyl radical (C•) by a long-distance (~35 Å) proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step. The C• in α2 then initiates reduction of the 2' position of the ribonucleoside-5'-diphosphate substrate by abstracting the hydrogen atom from C3'. The class I RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the prototype of a newly recognized subclass (Ic), which is characterized by the presence of a phenylalanine (F) residue at the site of β2 where the essential radical-harboring Y is normally found. We recently demonstrated that Ct RNR employs a heterobinuclear MnIV/FeIII cluster for radical initiation. In essence, the MnIV ion of the cluster functionally replaces the Y• of the conventional class I RNR. The Ct β2 protein also auto-activates by reaction of its reduced (MnII/FeII) metal cluster with O2. In this reaction, an unprecedented MnIV/FeIV intermediate accumulates almost stoichiometrically and decays by one-electron reduction of the FeIV site. This reduction is mediated by the near-surface residue, Y222, a residue with no functional counterpart in the well-studied conventional class I RNRs. In this review, we recount the discovery of the novel Mn/Fe redox cofactor in Ct RNR and summarize our current understanding of how it assembles and initiates nucleotide reduction. PMID:19061340

  12. Insig-mediated, sterol-accelerated degradation of the membrane domain of hamster 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew D; Lee, Soo Hee; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2009-09-25

    Sterol-accelerated degradation of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase is one of several mechanisms through which cholesterol synthesis is controlled in mammalian cells. This degradation results from sterol-induced binding of the membrane domain of reductase to endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2, which are carriers of a ubiquitin ligase called gp78. The ensuing gp78-mediated ubiquitination of reductase is a prerequisite for its rapid, 26 S proteasome-mediated degradation from endoplasmic reticulum membranes, a reaction that slows a rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. Here, we report that the membrane domain of hamster reductase is subject to sterol-accelerated degradation in Drosophila S2 cells, but only when mammalian Insig-1 or Insig-2 are co-expressed. This degradation mimics the reaction that occurs in mammalian cells with regard to its absolute requirement for the action of Insigs, sensitivity to proteasome inhibition, augmentation by nonsterol isoprenoids, and sterol specificity. RNA interference studies reveal that this degradation requires the Drosophila Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase and several other proteins, including a putative substrate selector, which associate with the enzyme in yeast and mammalian systems. These studies define Insigs as the minimal requirement for sterol-accelerated degradation of the membrane domain of reductase in Drosophila S2 cells.

  13. Ribonucleotides in DNA: Origins, repair and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica S.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    While primordial life is thought to have been RNA-based (Cech, Cold Spring Harbor Perspect. Biol. 4 (2012) a006742), all living organisms store genetic information in DNA, which is chemically more stable. Distinctions between the RNA and DNA worlds and our views of “DNA” synthesis continue to evolve as new details emerge on the incorporation, repair and biological effects of ribonucleotides in DNA genomes of organisms from bacteria through humans. PMID:24794402

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis: metronidazole and other nitroimidazole drugs are reduced by the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase and disrupt the cellular redox system. Implications for nitroimidazole toxicity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Kolarich, Daniel; Binder, Marina; Stadlmann, Johannes; Altmann, Friedrich; Duchêne, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Infections with the microaerophilic parasite Trichomonas vaginalis are treated with the 5-nitroimidazole drug metronidazole, which is also in use against Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and microaerophilic/anaerobic bacteria. Here we report that in T. vaginalis the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase displays nitroreductase activity with nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, and with the nitrofuran drug furazolidone. Reactive metabolites of metronidazole and other nitroimidazoles form covalent adducts with several proteins that are known or assumed to be associated with thioredoxin-mediated redox regulation, including thioredoxin reductase itself, ribonucleotide reductase, thioredoxin peroxidase and cytosolic malate dehydrogenase. Disulphide reducing activity of thioredoxin reductase was greatly diminished in extracts of metronidazole-treated cells and intracellular non-protein thiol levels were sharply decreased. We generated a highly metronidazole-resistant cell line that displayed only minimal thioredoxin reductase activity, not due to diminished expression of the enzyme but due to the lack of its FAD cofactor. Reduction of free flavins, readily observed in metronidazole-susceptible cells, was also absent in the resistant cells. On the other hand, iron-depleted T. vaginalis cells, expressing only minimal amounts of PFOR and hydrogenosomal malate dehydrogenase, remained fully susceptible to metronidazole. Thus, taken together, our data suggest a flavin-based mechanism of metronidazole activation and thereby challenge the current model of hydrogenosomal activation of nitroimidazole drugs.

  15. GENERAL CONTROL NONREPRESSED PROTEIN5-Mediated Histone Acetylation of FERRIC REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE3 Contributes to Iron Homeostasis in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianya; Liu, Zhenshan; Xu, Jianqin; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xin, Mingming; Ni, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is essential for plant growth and development. Here, we report that a mutation in GENERAL CONTROL NONREPRESSED PROTEIN5 (GCN5) impaired iron translocation from the root to the shoot in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Illumina high-throughput sequencing revealed 879 GCN5-regulated candidate genes potentially involved in iron homeostasis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that five genes (At3G08040, At2G01530, At2G39380, At2G47160, and At4G05200) are direct targets of GCN5 in iron homeostasis regulation. Notably, GCN5-mediated acetylation of histone 3 lysine 9 and histone 3 lysine 14 of FERRIC REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE3 (FRD3) determined the dynamic expression of FRD3. Consistent with the function of FRD3 as a citrate efflux protein, the iron retention defect in gcn5 was rescued and fertility was partly restored by overexpressing FRD3. Moreover, iron retention in gcn5 roots was significantly reduced by the exogenous application of citrate. Collectively, these data suggest that GCN5 plays a critical role in FRD3-mediated iron homeostasis. Our results provide novel insight into the chromatin-based regulation of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. PMID:26002909

  16. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of 3β-hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiuli; Jia, Dan; Zhao, Chenguang; Wang, Weiqi; Liu, Ting; Chen, Shuchao; Quan, Xiaoping; Sun, Deliang; Gao, Bing

    2014-01-01

    3β-Hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase (DHCR24) is a multifunctional enzyme that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has neuroprotective and cholesterol-synthesizing activities. DHCR24 overexpression confers neuroprotection against apoptosis caused by amyloid β deposition. The present study aimed to construct two recombinant adenoviruses driving DHCR24 expression specifically in neurons. Two SYN1 promoter DNA fragments were obtained from human (h) and rat (r). Recombinant Ad-r(h)SYN1-DHCR24 was transfected into AD-293, N2A (mouse neuroblastoma), and MIN6 (mouse pancreatic carcinoma) cells. Western blot analysis showed DHCR24 was specially expressed in 293 and N2A cells, but no specific band was found in MIN6 cells. This demonstrates that the recombinant adenoviruses successfully express DHCR24, and no expression is observed in non-neuronal cells. TUNEL assay results showed apoptosis was inhibited in adenovirus-transfected neurons. Detecting reactive oxygen species by immunofluorescence, we found that adenovirus transfection inhibits apoptosis through scavenging excess reactive oxygen species. Our findings show that the recombinant DHCR24 adenoviruses induce neuron-specific DHCR24 expression, and thereby lay the foundation for further studies on DHCR24 gene therapy for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25206847

  17. Thioredoxin reductase 1 ablation sensitizes colon cancer cells to methylseleninate-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Honeggar, Matthew; Beck, Robert; Moos, Philip J.

    2009-12-15

    The relationship between selenium and cancer is complex because individuals with low serum selenium levels benefit from selenium supplementation, but those with high serum selenium levels are at increased risk for other diseases. This suggests that the use of selenocompounds might be limited to particular circumstances, such as adjuvant therapy. A contributor to this dichotomy may be the activity of certain selenium containing enzymes like the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (TR1). We evaluated the cellular response to select selenocompounds that have anticancer activity when TR1 was attenuated by siRNA in RKO colon cancer cells. Methylseleninic acid (MSA), which is a substrate for TR1, enhanced cytotoxicity to colon cancer cells when TR1 was attenuated. MSA induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum, as measured by GRP78 protein levels. However, this pathway did not appear to account for the change in cytotoxicity when TR1 was attenuated. Instead, knockdown of the cytosolic TR plus incubation with MSA increased autophagy, as measured by LC3B cleavage, and apoptosis, as measured by Annexin V and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the use of selenocompounds with anticancer activity, like MSA, might be utilized most effectively with agents that targets TR1 in chemotherapeutic applications.

  18. Thioredoxin reductase 1 ablation sensitizes colon cancer cells to methylseleninate-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Honeggar, Matthew; Beck, Robert; Moos, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between selenium and cancer is complex because individuals with low serum selenium levels benefit from selenium supplementation, but those with high serum selenium levels are at increased risk for other diseases. This suggests that the use of selenocompounds might be limited to particular circumstances, such as adjuvant therapy. A contributor to this dichotomy may be the activity of certain selenium containing enzymes like the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (TR1). We evaluated the cellular response to select selenocompounds that have anticancer activity when TR1 was attenuated by siRNA in RKO colon cancer cells. Methylseleninic acid (MSA), which is a substrate for TR1, enhanced cytotoxicity to colon cancer cells when TR1 was attenuated. MSA induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum, as measured by GRP78 protein levels. However, this pathway did not appear to account for the change in cytotoxicity when TR1 was attenuated. Instead, knockdown of the cytosolic TR plus incubation with MSA increased autophagy, as measured by LC3B cleavage, and apoptosis, as measured by Annexin V and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the use of selenocompounds with anticancer activity, like MSA, might be utilized most effectively with agents that targets TR1 in chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:19782697

  19. Nitric Oxide (NO) Generation from Heme/Copper Assembly Mediated Nitrite Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hematian, Shabnam; Siegler, Maxime A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a cellular signaling molecule and vasodilator regulates a range of physiological and pathological processes. Nitrite (NO2−) is recycled in vivo to generate nitric oxide, particularly in physiologic hypoxia and ischemia. The cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) binuclear hemea3/CuB active site is one entity known to be responsible for cellular nitrite conversion to nitric oxide. We recently reported that a partially reduced heme/Cu assembly reduces nitrite ion, producing NO; the heme serves as the reductant and cupric ion provides a Lewis Acid interaction with nitrite, facilitating nitrite (N−O) bond cleavage (Hematian et al., J Am Chem Soc 134:18912–18915, 2012). To further investigate this nitrite reductase (NIR) chemistry, copper(II)-nitrito complexes with tri-and tetra-dentate ligands were used in this study, where either O,O'-bidentate or O-unidentate modes of nitrite binding to the cupric center are present. To study the role of the reducing ability of the ferrous heme center, two different tetraarylporphyrinate-iron(II) complexes, one with electron donating para-methoxy peripheral substituents, (TMPP)FeII, and the other with electron withdrawing 2,6-difluorophenyl substituents, (F8)FeII, were employed. The results show that differing nitrite coordination modes to copper(II) ion leads to varying kinetic behavior. Here, also, the ferrous heme is in all cases the source of the reducing equivalent required to take nitrite to nitric oxide, but the reduction ability of the heme center does not play a key role in the observed overall reaction rate. Based on our observations, reaction mechanisms are proposed and discussed in terms of heme/Cu heterobinuclear structures. PMID:24430198

  20. Nitric oxide generation from heme/copper assembly mediated nitrite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Hematian, Shabnam; Siegler, Maxime A; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a cellular signaling molecule and vasodilator regulates a range of physiological and pathological processes. Nitrite (NO2 (-)) is recycled in vivo to generate nitric oxide, particularly in physiologic hypoxia and ischemia. The cytochrome c oxidase binuclear heme a 3/CuB active site is one entity known to be responsible for conversion of cellular nitrite to nitric oxide. We recently reported that a partially reduced heme/copper assembly reduces nitrite ion, producing nitric oxide; the heme serves as the reductant and the cupric ion provides a Lewis acid interaction with nitrite, facilitating nitrite (N-O) bond cleavage (Hematian et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134:18912-18915, 2012). To further investigate this nitrite reductase chemistry, copper(II)-nitrito complexes with tridentate and tetradentate ligands were used in this study, where either O,O'-bidentate or O-unidentate modes of nitrite binding to the cupric center are present. To study the role of the reducing ability of the ferrous heme center, two different tetraarylporphyrinate-iron(II) complexes, one with electron-donating para-methoxy peripheral substituents and the other with electron-withdrawing 2,6-difluorophenyl substituents, were used. The results show that differing modes of nitrite coordination to the copper(II) ion lead to differing kinetic behavior. Here, also, the ferrous heme is in all cases the source of the reducing equivalent required to convert nitrite to nitric oxide, but the reduction ability of the heme center does not play a key role in the observed overall reaction rate. On the basis of our observations, reaction mechanisms are proposed and discussed in terms of heme/copper heterobinuclear structures.

  1. Induction of methotrexate resistance by retroviral-mediated transfer of a mutant dihydrofolate reductase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardone, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), a folate analog which inhibits the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), is an effective antineoplastic drug. However, MTX-induced myelosuppression limits the effectiveness of this agent. Selective induction of MTX resistance in bone marrow stem cells, prior to treatment with MTX, might prevent this toxicity and improve the therapeutic index of the drug. In these studies drug resistance was transferred to mouse and human bone marrow stem cells by retroviral expression vectors containing coding sequences of a mutant DHFR with a decreased affinity for MTX. Three retroviral expression vectors were analyzed. The CIS DR vector contained the mutant DHFR gene inserted into the replication-defective amphotropic 4070 virus, Cistor. The other vectors contained the mutant DHFR inserted into either the env region (SDHT1) or gag-pol region (SDHT2) of a replication-defective spleen focus-forming virus. All three constructs induced approximately a 200-fold resistance to MTX when transfected into NIH3T3 cells. Amphotropic infectious retroviruses were obtained by transfecting the mutant DHFR vectors into a packaging cell line, which supplied the gag, pol, and env proteins for virus production. Virus titers of 4.5 x 10/sup 3/ colony-forming units (CFU)/ml (CIS DR), 1.5 x 10/sup 4/ CFU/ml (SDHT2), and 5 x 10/sup 5/ CFU/ml (SDHT1) were measured by the transfer of MTX resistance to NIH3T3 cells. The amphotropic SDHT1 virus efficiently induced MTX resistance in cells of several species, including mouse NIH3T3 cells (5 x 10/sup 5/ CFU/ml), monkey CV1 cells (4 x 10/sup 3/ CFU/ml), and human MCF-7 cells (6 x 10/sup 4/ CFU/ml). When cocultured with SDHT1 virus-producing cells, both mouse and human bone marrow cells could be infected and rendered resistant to MTX. Mouse cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mouse helper T lymphocytes can also be made resistant to MTX.

  2. A Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Mediates Negative Signaling by Ammonium on Expression of Nitrate Reductase in Chlamydomonas[W

    PubMed Central

    de Montaigu, Amaury; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in plants and related organisms is a highly regulated and conserved pathway in which the enzyme nitrate reductase (NR) occupies a central position. Although some progress has been made in understanding the regulation of the protein, transcriptional regulation of the NR gene (NIA1) is poorly understood. This work describes a mechanism for the ammonium-mediated repression of NIA1. We report the characterization of a mutant defective in the repression of NIA1 and NR in response to ammonium and show that a gene (CYG56) coding for a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent guanylate cyclase (GC) was interrupted in this mutant. NO donors, cGMP analogs, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), and a calcium ionophore (A23187) repress the expression of NIA1 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type cells and also repress the expression of other ammonium-sensitive genes. In addition, the GC inhibitors LY83,583 (6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione) and ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one) release cells from ammonium repression. Intracellular NO and cGMP levels were increased in the presence of ammonium in wild-type cells. In the cyg56 mutant, NIA1 transcription was less sensitive to NO donors and A23187, but responded like the wild type to IBMX. Results presented here suggest that CYG56 participates in ammonium-mediated NIA1 repression through a pathway that involves NO, cGMP, and calcium and that similar mechanisms might be occurring in plants. PMID:20442374

  3. The role of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in plumbagin-induced, reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geun Hye; Ryu, Jung Min; Jeon, Yu Jin; Choi, Joonhyeok; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, You-Mie; Lee, Sangkyu; Bae, Jong-Sup; Jung, Jong-Wha; Chang, Woochul; Kim, Lark Kyun; Jee, Jun-Goo; Lee, Min Young

    2015-10-15

    Plumbagin is a secondary metabolite that was first identified in the Plumbago genus of plants. It is a naphthoquinone compound with anti-atherosclerosis, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, contraceptive, cardiotonic, immunosuppressive, and neuroprotective activities. However, the mechanisms of plumbagin's activities are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of plumbagin on HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells as well as LLC lung cancer cells, SiHa cervical carcinoma cells. Plumbagin significantly decreased HepG2 cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with plumbagin significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3/7 activity. Using the similarity ensemble approach (SEA)-a state-of-the-art cheminformatic technique-we identified two previously unknown cellular targets of plumbagin: thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione reductase (GR). This was then confirmed using protein- and cell-based assays. We found that plumbagin was directly reduced by TrxR, and that this reduction was inhibited by the TrxR inhibitor, sodium aurothiomalate (ATM). Plumbagin also decreased the activity of GR. Plumbagin, and the GR inhibitor sodium arsenite all increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and this increase was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) in HepG2 cells. Plumbagin increased TrxR-1 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression and pretreatment with NAC significantly attenuated the plumbagin-induced increase of TrxR-1 and HO-1 expression in HepG2 cells, LLC cells and SiHa cells. Pretreatment with NAC significantly prevented the plumbagin-induced decrease in cell viability in these cell types. In conclusion, plumbagin exerted its anticancer effect by directly interacting with TrxR and GR, and thus increasing intracellular ROS levels.

  4. NrdI Essentiality for Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reduction in Streptococcus pyogenes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Ignasi; Torrents, Eduard; Sahlin, Margareta; Gibert, Isidre; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2008-01-01

    The Streptococcus pyogenes genome harbors two clusters of class Ib ribonucleotide reductase genes, nrdHEF and nrdF*I*E*, and a second stand-alone nrdI gene, designated nrdI2. We show that both clusters are expressed simultaneously as two independent operons. The NrdEF enzyme is functionally active in vitro, while the NrdE*F* enzyme is not. The NrdF* protein lacks three of the six highly conserved iron-liganding side chains and cannot form a dinuclear iron site or a tyrosyl radical. In vivo, on the other hand, both operons are functional in heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli. The nrdF*I*E* operon requires the presence of the nrdI* gene, and the nrdHEF operon gained activity upon cotranscription of the heterologous nrdI gene from Streptococcus pneumoniae, while neither nrdI* nor nrdI2 from S. pyogenes rendered it active. Our results highlight the essential role of the flavodoxin NrdI protein in vivo, and we suggest that it is needed to reduce met-NrdF, thereby enabling the spontaneous reformation of the tyrosyl radical. The NrdI* flavodoxin may play a more direct role in ribonucleotide reduction by the NrdF*I*E* system. We discuss the possibility that the nrdF*I*E* operon has been horizontally transferred to S. pyogenes from Mycoplasma spp. PMID:18502861

  5. NrdI essentiality for class Ib ribonucleotide reduction in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Roca, Ignasi; Torrents, Eduard; Sahlin, Margareta; Gibert, Isidre; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2008-07-01

    The Streptococcus pyogenes genome harbors two clusters of class Ib ribonucleotide reductase genes, nrdHEF and nrdF*I*E*, and a second stand-alone nrdI gene, designated nrdI2. We show that both clusters are expressed simultaneously as two independent operons. The NrdEF enzyme is functionally active in vitro, while the NrdE*F* enzyme is not. The NrdF* protein lacks three of the six highly conserved iron-liganding side chains and cannot form a dinuclear iron site or a tyrosyl radical. In vivo, on the other hand, both operons are functional in heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli. The nrdF*I*E* operon requires the presence of the nrdI* gene, and the nrdHEF operon gained activity upon cotranscription of the heterologous nrdI gene from Streptococcus pneumoniae, while neither nrdI* nor nrdI2 from S. pyogenes rendered it active. Our results highlight the essential role of the flavodoxin NrdI protein in vivo, and we suggest that it is needed to reduce met-NrdF, thereby enabling the spontaneous reformation of the tyrosyl radical. The NrdI* flavodoxin may play a more direct role in ribonucleotide reduction by the NrdF*I*E* system. We discuss the possibility that the nrdF*I*E* operon has been horizontally transferred to S. pyogenes from Mycoplasma spp.

  6. Parallel analysis of ribonucleotide-dependent deletions produced by yeast Top1 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang-Eun; Huang, Shar-yin N.; Burgers, Peter M.; Shuman, Stewart; Pommier, Yves; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleotides are the most abundant non-canonical component of yeast genomic DNA and their persistence is associated with a distinctive mutation signature characterized by deletion of a single repeat unit from a short tandem repeat. These deletion events are dependent on DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) and are initiated by Top1 incision at the relevant ribonucleotide 3′-phosphodiester. A requirement for the re-ligation activity of Top1 led us to propose a sequential cleavage model for Top1-dependent mutagenesis at ribonucleotides. Here, we test key features of this model via parallel in vitro and in vivo analyses. We find that the distance between two Top1 cleavage sites determines the deletion size and that this distance is inversely related to the deletion frequency. Following the creation of a gap by two Top1 cleavage events, the tandem repeat provides complementarity that promotes realignment to a nick and subsequent Top1-mediated ligation. Complementarity downstream of the gap promotes deletion formation more effectively than does complementarity upstream of the gap, consistent with constraints to realignment of the strand to which Top1 is covalently bound. Our data fortify sequential Top1 cleavage as the mechanism for ribonucleotide-dependent deletions and provide new insight into the component steps of this process. PMID:27257064

  7. A new ribonucleotide from Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinfeng; Jin, Mei; Zhou, Wei; Diao, Shengbao; Zhou, Yi; Li, Shuaishuai; Wang, Xin; Pan, Shuai; Jin, Xuejun; Li, Gao

    2017-11-01

    One new ribonucleotide, 5'-(3''-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-3'-deoxyadenosine (1), and 14 known compounds (2-15) were isolated from an ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris. The chemical structures of these compounds were determined from 1D and 2D NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HMBC, HMQC and NOESY) and HR-ESI-MS spectra, and results were compared with data from the literature. The effects of all isolated compounds were measured on NF-κB activation, with compound 2 exhibiting significant inhibitory activity against TNF-α-induced NF-κB reporter gene expression in HeLa cells from 3 to 100 μM.

  8. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  9. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage.

  10. Ultraviolet-B-induced flavonoid accumulation in Betula pendula leaves is dependent upon nitrate reductase-mediated nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Dong, Ju-Fang; Jin, Hai-Hong; Sun, Li-Na; Xu, Mao-Jun

    2011-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in many physiological processes in plants. Nitric oxide generation and flavonoid accumulation are two early reactions of plants to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation. However, the source of UV-B-triggered NO generation and the role of NO in UV-B-induced flavonoid accumulation are not fully understood. In order to evaluate the origin of UV-B-triggered NO generation, we examined the responses of nitrate reductase (NR) activity and the expression levels of NIA1 and NIA2 genes in leaves of Betula pendula Roth (silver birch) seedlings to UV-B irradiation. The data show that UV-B irradiation stimulates NR activity and induces up-regulation of NIA1 but does not affect NIA2 expression during UV-B-triggered NO generation. Pretreatment of the leaves with NR inhibitors tungstate (TUN) and glutamine (Gln) abolishes not only UV-B-triggered NR activities but also UV-B-induced NO generation. Furthermore, application of TUN and Gln suppresses UV-B-induced flavonoid production in the leaves and the suppression of NR inhibitors on UV-B-induced flavonoid production can be reversed by NO via its donor sodium nitroprusside. Together, the data indicate that NIA1 in the leaves of silver birch seedlings is sensitive to UV-B and the UV-B-induced up-regulation of NIA1 may lead to enhancement of NR activity. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that NR is involved in UV-B-triggered NO generation and NR-mediated NO generation is essential for UV-B-induced flavonoid accumulation in silver birch leaves.

  11. Aldose reductase inhibitor improves insulin-mediated glucose uptake and prevents migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells induced by high glucose.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-05-01

    We examined involvement of the polyol pathway in high glucose-induced human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration using Boyden's chamber method. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 hours potentiated, in a concentration-dependent manner (5.6 to 22.2 mol/L), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) BB-mediated SMC migration. This potentiation was accompanied by an increase in PDGF BB binding, because of an increased number of PDGF-beta receptors, and this potentiation was blocked by the aldose reductase inhibitor epalrestat. Epalrestat at concentrations of 10 and 100 nmol/L inhibited high glucose-potentiated (22.2 mmol/L), PDGF BB-mediated migration. Epalrestat at 100 nmol/L inhibited a high glucose-induced increase in the reduced/oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ratio and membrane-bound protein kinase C (PKC) activity in SMCs. PKC inhibitors calphostin C (100 nmol/L) and chelerythrine (1 micromol/L) each inhibited high glucose-induced, PDGF BB-mediated SMC migration. High glucose-induced suppression of insulin-mediated [(3)H]-deoxyglucose uptake, which was blocked by both calphostin C (100 nmol/L) and chelerythrine (1 micromol/L), was decreased by epalrestat (100 nmol/L). Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 hours increased intracellular oxidative stress, which was directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by epalrestat (100 nmol/L). Antisense oligonucleotide to PKC-beta isoform inhibited high glucose-mediated changes in SMC migration, insulin-mediated [(3)H]-deoxyglucose uptake, and oxidative stress. These findings suggest that high glucose concentrations potentiate SMC migration in coronary artery and that the aldose reductase inhibitor epalrestat inhibits high glucose-potentiated, PDGF BB-induced SMC migration, possibly through suppression of PKC (PKC-beta), impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake, and oxidative stress.

  12. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  13. The Two Functional Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases of Enterococcus faecalis Do Not Mediate Triclosan Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Bi, Hongkai; Ma, Jincheng; Hu, Zhe; Zhang, Wenbin; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase catalyzes the last step of the elongation cycle in the synthesis of bacterial fatty acids. The Enterococcus faecalis genome contains two genes annotated as enoyl-ACP reductases, a FabI-type enoyl-ACP reductase and a FabK-type enoyl-ACP reductase. We report that expression of either of the two proteins restores growth of an Escherichia coli fabI temperature-sensitive mutant strain under nonpermissive conditions. In vitro assays demonstrated that both proteins support fatty acid synthesis and are active with substrates of all fatty acid chain lengths. Although expression of E. faecalis fabK confers to E. coli high levels of resistance to the antimicrobial triclosan, deletion of fabK from the E. faecalis genome showed that FabK does not play a detectable role in the inherent triclosan resistance of E. faecalis. Indeed, FabK seems to play only a minor role in modulating fatty acid composition. Strains carrying a deletion of fabK grow normally without fatty acid supplementation, whereas fabI deletion mutants make only traces of fatty acids and are unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs. PMID:24085780

  14. Characterization of developmental and stress mediated expression of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is an important enzyme for lignin biosynthesis as it catalyzes the first specific committed step in monolignol biosynthesis. We have cloned a full length coding sequence of CCR from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), which contains a 1,020-bp open reading frame (ORF), enco...

  15. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  16. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability.

  17. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  18. Induction of root Fe(lll) reductase activity and proton extrusion by iron deficiency is mediated by auxin-based systemic signalling in Malus xiaojinensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting; Zhang, Heng-Tao; Wang, Yi; Jia, Wen-Suo; Xu, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Xin-Zhong; Han, Zhen Hai

    2012-01-01

    Iron is a critical cofactor for a number of metalloenzymes involved in respiration and photosynthesis, but plants often suffer from iron deficiency due to limited supplies of soluble iron in the soil. Iron deficiency induces a series of adaptive responses in various plant species, but the mechanisms by which they are triggered remain largely unknown. Using pH imaging and hormone localization techniques, it has been demonstrated here that root Fe(III) reductase activity and proton extrusion upon iron deficiency are up-regulated by systemic auxin signalling in a Fe-efficient woody plant, Malus xiaojinensis. Split-root experiments demonstrated that Fe-deprivation in a portion of the root system induced a dramatic increase in Fe(III) reductase activity and proton extrusion in the Fe-supplied portion, suggesting that the iron deficiency responses were mediated by a systemic signalling. Reciprocal grafting experiments of M. xiaojinensis with Malus baccata, a plant with no capability to produce the corresponding responses, indicate that the initiation of the systemic signalling is likely to be determined by roots rather than shoots. Iron deficiency induced a substantial increase in the IAA content in the shoot apex and supplying exogenous IAA analogues (NAA) to the shoot apex could mimic the iron deficiency to trigger the corresponding responses. Conversely, preventing IAA transport from shoot to roots blocked the iron deficiency responses. These results strongly indicate that the iron deficiency-induced physiological responses are mediated by systemic auxin signalling. PMID:22058407

  19. Ribonucleotide reduction - horizontal transfer of a required function spans all three domains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ribonucleotide reduction is the only de novo pathway for synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. The reaction is catalysed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), an ancient enzyme family comprised of three classes. Each class has distinct operational constraints, and are broadly distributed across organisms from all three domains, though few class I RNRs have been identified in archaeal genomes, and classes II and III likewise appear rare across eukaryotes. In this study, we examine whether this distribution is best explained by presence of all three classes in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA), or by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of RNR genes. We also examine to what extent environmental factors may have impacted the distribution of RNR classes. Results Our phylogenies show that the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA) possessed a class I RNR, but that the eukaryotic class I enzymes are not directly descended from class I RNRs in Archaea. Instead, our results indicate that archaeal class I RNR genes have been independently transferred from bacteria on two occasions. While LECA possessed a class I RNR, our trees indicate that this is ultimately bacterial in origin. We also find convincing evidence that eukaryotic class I RNR has been transferred to the Bacteroidetes, providing a stunning example of HGT from eukaryotes back to Bacteria. Based on our phylogenies and available genetic and genomic evidence, class II and III RNRs in eukaryotes also appear to have been transferred from Bacteria, with subsequent within-domain transfer between distantly-related eukaryotes. Under the three-domains hypothesis the RNR present in the last common ancestor of Archaea and eukaryotes appears, through a process of elimination, to have been a dimeric class II RNR, though limited sampling of eukaryotes precludes a firm conclusion as the data may be equally well accounted for by HGT. Conclusions Horizontal gene transfer has clearly played an

  20. Ribonucleotide reduction - horizontal transfer of a required function spans all three domains.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Daniel; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Torrents, Eduard; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Poole, Anthony M

    2010-12-10

    Ribonucleotide reduction is the only de novo pathway for synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. The reaction is catalysed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), an ancient enzyme family comprised of three classes. Each class has distinct operational constraints, and are broadly distributed across organisms from all three domains, though few class I RNRs have been identified in archaeal genomes, and classes II and III likewise appear rare across eukaryotes. In this study, we examine whether this distribution is best explained by presence of all three classes in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA), or by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of RNR genes. We also examine to what extent environmental factors may have impacted the distribution of RNR classes. Our phylogenies show that the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA) possessed a class I RNR, but that the eukaryotic class I enzymes are not directly descended from class I RNRs in Archaea. Instead, our results indicate that archaeal class I RNR genes have been independently transferred from bacteria on two occasions. While LECA possessed a class I RNR, our trees indicate that this is ultimately bacterial in origin. We also find convincing evidence that eukaryotic class I RNR has been transferred to the Bacteroidetes, providing a stunning example of HGT from eukaryotes back to Bacteria. Based on our phylogenies and available genetic and genomic evidence, class II and III RNRs in eukaryotes also appear to have been transferred from Bacteria, with subsequent within-domain transfer between distantly-related eukaryotes. Under the three-domains hypothesis the RNR present in the last common ancestor of Archaea and eukaryotes appears, through a process of elimination, to have been a dimeric class II RNR, though limited sampling of eukaryotes precludes a firm conclusion as the data may be equally well accounted for by HGT. Horizontal gene transfer has clearly played an important role in the evolution

  1. A new role for an old enzyme: nitrate reductase-mediated nitric oxide generation is required for abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Desikan, Radhika; Griffiths, Rachael; Hancock, John; Neill, Steven

    2002-12-10

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), synthesized in response to water-deficit stress, induces stomatal closure via activation of complex signaling cascades. Recent work has established that nitric oxide (NO) is a key signaling molecule mediating ABA-induced stomatal closure. However, the biosynthetic origin of NO in guard cells has not yet been resolved. Here, we provide pharmacological, physiological, and genetic evidence that NO synthesis in Arabidopsis guard cells is mediated by the enzyme nitrate reductase (NR). Guard cells of wild-type Arabidopsis generate NO in response to treatment with ABA and nitrite, a substrate for NR. Moreover, NR-mediated NO synthesis is required for ABA-induced stomatal closure. However, in the NR double mutant, nia1, nia2 that has diminished NR activity, guard cells do not synthesize NO nor do the stomata close in response to ABA or nitrite, although stomatal opening is still inhibited by ABA. Furthermore, by using the ABA-insensitive (ABI) abi1-1 and abi2-1 mutants, we show that the ABI1 and ABI2 protein phosphatases are downstream of NO in the ABA signal-transduction cascade. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized signaling role for NR, that of mediating ABA-induced NO synthesis in Arabidopsis guard cells.

  2. Ribonucleotides Covalently Linked to Deoxyribonucleic Acid in T4 Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Speyer, J. F.; Chao, J.; Chao, L.

    1972-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 was grown in the presence of labeled uridine. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of the phage was shown to contain covalently attached ribonucleotides. The label appears not to be internal in the DNA strands. Presumably, it is at the ends of the DNA strands and this may be related to DNA initiation. PMID:4564585

  3. Enzymatic product-mediated stabilization of CdS quantum dots produced in situ: application for detection of reduced glutathione, NADPH, and glutathione reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Garai-Ibabe, Gaizka; Saa, Laura; Pavlov, Valeri

    2013-06-04

    Glutathione is the most abundant nonprotein molecule in the cell and plays an important role in many biological processes, including the maintenance of intracellular redox states, detoxification, and metabolism. Furthermore, glutathione levels have been linked to several human diseases, such as AIDS, Alzheimer disease, alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. A novel concept in bioanalysis is introduced and applied to the highly sensitive and inexpensive detection of reduced glutathione (GSH), over its oxidized form (GSSG), and glutathione reductase (GR) in human serum. This new fluorogenic bioanalytical system is based on the GSH-mediated stabilization of growing CdS nanoparticles. The sensitivity of this new assay is 5 pM of GR, which is 3 orders of magnitude better than other fluorogenic methods previously reported.

  4. Acrolein-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is mediated by alkylation of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin 1.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Spiess, Page C; Hristova, Milena; Hondal, Robert J; van der Vliet, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a major health concern worldwide, and many of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke (CS) can be attributed to its abundant electrophilic aldehydes, such as acrolein (2-propenal). Previous studies indicate that acrolein readily reacts with thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), a critical enzyme involved in regulation of thioredoxin (Trx)-mediated redox signaling, by alkylation at its selenocysteine (Sec) residue. Because alkylation of Sec within TrxR1 has significant implications for its enzymatic function, we explored the potential importance of TrxR1 alkylation in acrolein-induced activation or injury of bronchial epithelial cells. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial HBE1 cells to acrolein (1-30 μM) resulted in dose-dependent loss of TrxR thioredoxin reductase activity, which coincided with its alkylation, as determined by biotin hydrazide labeling, and was independent of initial GSH status. To test the involvement of TrxR1 in acrolein responses in HBE1 cells, we suppressed TrxR1 using siRNA silencing or augmented TrxR1 by cell supplementation with sodium selenite. Acrolein exposure of HBE1 cells induced dose-dependent activation of the MAP kinases, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38, and activation of JNK was markedly enhanced after selenite-mediated induction of TrxR1, and was associated with increased alkylation of TrxR1. Conversely, siRNA silencing of TrxR1 significantly suppressed the ability of acrolein to activate JNK, and also appeared to attenuate acrolein-dependent activation of ERK and p38. Alteration of initial TrxR1 levels by siRNA or selenite supplementation also affected initial Trx1 redox status and acrolein-mediated alkylation of Trx1, but did not significantly affect acrolein-mediated activation of HO-1 or cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that alkylation of TrxR1 and/or Trx1 may contribute directly to acrolein-mediated activation of MAP kinases such as JNK, and

  5. Effects of Acyclovir, Foscarnet, and Ribonucleotides on Herpes Simplex Virus-1 DNA Polymerase: Mechanistic Insights and a Novel Mechanism for Preventing Stable Incorporation of Ribonucleotides into DNA.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Ashwani Kumar; Kuchta, Robert D

    2016-02-23

    We examined the impact of two clinically approved anti-herpes drugs, acyclovir and Forscarnet (phosphonoformate), on the exonuclease activity of the herpes simplex virus-1 DNA polymerase, UL30. Acyclovir triphosphate and Foscarnet, along with the closely related phosphonoacetic acid, did not affect exonuclease activity on single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, blocking the polymerase active site due to either binding of Foscarnet or phosphonoacetic acid to the E-DNA complex or polymerization of acyclovir onto the DNA also had a minimal effect on exonuclease activity. The inability of the exonuclease to excise acyclovir from the primer 3'-terminus results from the altered sugar structure directly impeding phosphodiester bond hydrolysis as opposed to inhibiting binding, unwinding of the DNA by the exonuclease, or transfer of the DNA from the polymerase to the exonuclease. Removing the 3'-hydroxyl or the 2'-carbon from the nucleotide at the 3'-terminus of the primer strongly inhibited exonuclease activity, although addition of a 2'-hydroxyl did not affect exonuclease activity. The biological consequences of these results are twofold. First, the ability of acyclovir and Foscarnet to block dNTP polymerization without impacting exonuclease activity raises the possibility that their effects on herpes replication may involve both direct inhibition of dNTP polymerization and exonuclease-mediated destruction of herpes DNA. Second, the ability of the exonuclease to rapidly remove a ribonucleotide at the primer 3'-terminus in combination with the polymerase not efficiently adding dNTPs onto this primer provides a novel mechanism by which the herpes replication machinery can prevent incorporation of ribonucleotides into newly synthesized DNA.

  6. Structural and biochemical characterization of N[superscript 5]-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase and N[superscript 5]-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Brugarolas, Pedro; Duguid, Erica M.; Zhang, Wen; Poor, Catherine B.; He, Chuan

    2012-05-08

    With the rapid rise of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, new strategies against S. aureus are urgently needed. De novo purine biosynthesis is a promising yet unexploited target, insofar as abundant evidence has shown that bacteria with compromised purine biosynthesis are attenuated. Fundamental differences exist within the process by which humans and bacteria convert 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) to 4-carboxy-5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (CAIR). In bacteria, this transformation occurs through a two-step conversion catalyzed by PurK and PurE; in humans, it is mediated by a one-step conversion catalyzed by class II PurE. Thus, these bacterial enzymes are potential targets for selective antibiotic development. Here, the first comprehensive structural and biochemical characterization of PurK and PurE from S. aureus is presented. Structural analysis of S. aureus PurK reveals a nonconserved phenylalanine near the AIR-binding site that occupies the putative position of the imidazole ring of AIR. Mutation of this phenylalanine to isoleucine or tryptophan reduced the enzyme efficiency by around tenfold. The K{sub m} for bicarbonate was determined for the first time for a PurK enzyme and was found to be {approx}18.8 mM. The structure of PurE is described in comparison to that of human class II PurE. It is confirmed biochemically that His38 is essential for function. These studies aim to provide foundations for future structure-based drug-discovery efforts against S. aureus purine biosynthesis.

  7. The effect of a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor on androgen-mediated growth of the dog prostate.

    PubMed

    Wenderoth, U K; George, F W; Wilson, J D

    1983-08-01

    The administration of testosterone cypionate (0.4 mg/kg BW . day) to castrated male dogs caused a doubling of prostate weight within 4 weeks and an increase in the content of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in the prostate. When the 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor 17-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one (3 mg/kg BW . day) was administered simultaneously with testosterone cypionate, prostatic testosterone content increased from 0.5 +/- 0.2 to 4.1 +/- 1.3 ng/mg DNA, the increase in prostatic dihydrotestosterone content was prevented, and prostatic size decreased to half the starting weight. These results suggest that dihydrotestosterone formation plays a role in prostatic growth.

  8. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Riego, Ana M; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, Carla V; Florencio, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however, nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (ΔntrC), apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments.

  9. Evidence that processing of ribonucleotides in DNA by topoisomerase 1 is leading-strand specific.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jessica S; Clausen, Anders R; Lujan, Scott A; Marjavaara, Lisette; Clark, Alan B; Burgers, Peter M; Chabes, Andrei; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    Ribonucleotides incorporated during DNA replication are removed by RNase H2-dependent ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). In RER-defective yeast, topoisomerase 1 (Top1) incises DNA at unrepaired ribonucleotides, initiating their removal, but this is accompanied by RNA-DNA-damage phenotypes. Here we show that these phenotypes are incurred by a high level of ribonucleotides incorporated by a leading strand-replicase variant, DNA polymerase (Pol) ɛ, but not by orthologous variants of the lagging-strand replicases, Pols α or δ. Moreover, loss of both RNases H1 and H2 is lethal in combination with increased ribonucleotide incorporation by Pol ɛ but not by Pols α or δ. Several explanations for this asymmetry are considered, including the idea that Top1 incision at ribonucleotides relieves torsional stress in the nascent leading strand but not in the nascent lagging strand, in which preexisting nicks prevent the accumulation of superhelical tension.

  10. Effects of the 5α-reductase inhibitor dutasteride on rat prostate α1A-adrenergic receptor and its mediated contractility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Zha, Xinmin; Nagase, Keiko; Akino, Hironobu; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Ito, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Osamu

    2015-03-01

    To clarify the possible interference of the 5α-reductase inhibitor dutasteride with α-adrenergic blockers, whose action is mainly mediated by α1A-adrenergic receptor. Male rats were divided into dutasteride and vehicle-treated groups. The drug treatment group was treated with oral dutasteride 0.5 mg/kg/d, and the control group received vehicle only for 2 months. After the 2-month treatment, the rats' ventral prostate weight changes and the testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels in the serum were measured. In vitro organ-bath studies, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and tissue-segment binding were performed to determine the expression of α1A-adrenergic receptors and its mediated contractility. Dutasteride treatment significantly decreased the rats' ventral prostate weight, increased their testosterone levels, and decreased the dihydrotestosterone levels in their serum. There were no marked changes in the α1A-adrenergic receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression, relative phenylephrine-induced contractility, or nerve-mediated contractility between the groups. Dutasteride treatment caused no marked changes in the relative binding capacity of α1A-adrenergic receptor, whereas it greatly decreased the total protein expression of this subtype and its mediated maximal contraction in the whole ventral prostate. These results suggest that dutasteride does not interfere with α-adrenergic blockers but otherwise has beneficial effects on their actions. Therefore, the long-term administration of the combination of dutasteride with an α-adrenergic blocker might be a better choice for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Defining the RNaseH2 enzyme-initiated ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Margaret R.; Burkhart, Brett W.; Santangelo, Thomas J.; Gardner, Andrew F.

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of ribonucleotides during DNA replication has severe consequences for genome stability. Although eukaryotes possess a number of redundancies for initiating and completing repair of misincorporated ribonucleotides, archaea such as Thermococcus rely only upon RNaseH2 to initiate the pathway. Because Thermococcus DNA polymerases incorporate as many as 1,000 ribonucleotides per genome, RNaseH2 must be efficient at recognizing and nicking at embedded ribonucleotides to ensure genome integrity. Here, we show that ribonucleotides are incorporated by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis both in vitro and in vivo and a robust ribonucleotide excision repair pathway is critical to keeping incorporation levels low in wild-type cells. Using pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetics experiments, we also show that archaeal RNaseH2 rapidly cleaves at embedded ribonucleotides (200-450 s−1), but exhibits an ∼1,000-fold slower turnover rate (0.06–0.17 s−1), suggesting a potential role for RNaseH2 in protecting or marking nicked sites for further processing. We found that following RNaseH2 cleavage, the combined activities of polymerase B (PolB), flap endonuclease (Fen1), and DNA ligase are required to complete ribonucleotide processing. PolB formed a ribonucleotide-containing flap by strand displacement synthesis that was cleaved by Fen1, and DNA ligase sealed the nick for complete repair. Our study reveals conservation of the overall mechanism of ribonucleotide excision repair across domains of life. The lack of redundancies in ribonucleotide repair in archaea perhaps suggests a more ancestral form of ribonucleotide excision repair compared with the eukaryotic pathway. PMID:28373277

  12. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Shuang; Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin; Zhu, Daling

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway.

  13. Nitrate reductase-mediated early nitric oxide burst alleviates oxidative damage induced by aluminum through enhancement of antioxidant defenses in roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengliang; Lu, Lingli; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Wenjing; Yu, Yan; Liu, Xiaoxia; Hu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2014-03-01

    • Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in the physiological processes of plants. The role of NO release in the tolerance strategies of roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum) under aluminum (Al) stress was investigated using two genotypes with different Al resistances. • An early NO burst at 3 h was observed in the root tips of the Al-tolerant genotype Jian-864, whereas the Al-sensitive genotype Yang-5 showed no NO accumulation at 3 h but an extremely high NO concentration after 12 h. Stimulating NO production at 3 h in the root tips of Yang-5 with the NO donor relieved Al-induced root inhibition and callose production, as well as oxidative damage and ROS accumulation, while elimination of the early NO burst by NO scavenger aggravated root inhibition in Jian-864. • Synthesis of early NO in roots of Jian-864 was mediated through nitrate reductase (NR) but not through NO synthase. Elevated antioxidant enzyme activities were induced by Al stress in both wheat genotypes and significantly enhanced by NO donor, but suppressed by NO scavenger or NR inhibitor. • These results suggest that an NR-mediated early NO burst plays an important role in Al resistance of wheat through modulating enhanced antioxidant defense to adapt to Al stress.

  14. Effects of various compounds on lipid peroxidation mediated by detergent-solubilized rat liver NADPH-cytochrome C reductase.

    PubMed

    Kamataki, T; Sugita, O; Naminohira, S; Kitagawa, H

    1978-12-01

    A reconstituted lipid peroxidation system containing NADPH-cytochrome c reductase isolated from detergent-solubilized rat liver microsomes was used to determine the effects of several compounds, including drugs, on the lipid peroxidation activity. EDTA and ferrous ion were essential requirements for reconstitution of the activity. The addition of 1,10-phenanthroline to the system containing both EDTA and ferrous ion further enhanced the activity. Pyrocatecol, thymol, p-aminophenol, imipramine, p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) and alpha-tocopherol exhibited strong inhibition, aniline, N-monomethylaniline, aminopyrine, benzphetamine, SKF 525-A and NADP exhibited moderate inhibition, and phenol, benzoic acid, acetanilide and nicotinamide exhibited less or no inhibition at the concentrations lower than 1000 micron M. Metal ions such as Hg+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mn2+ and U6+ inhibited lipid peroxidation strongly. In addition, Cd2+, St2+ and Ca2+ exhibited less potent to moderate inhibition, and Ba2+ and Mg2+ were without effects on the activity. Among sulfhydryl compounds tested, dithiothreitol inhibited lipid peroxidation to a greater extent than did the other three compounds, glutathione, cysteine and mercaptoethanol.

  15. Thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase influence estrogen receptor α-mediated gene expression in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Abhi K; Ziegler, Yvonne S; McLeod, Ian X; Yates, John R; Nardulli, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells damages resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. In order to overcome the oxidative stress that occurs with ROS accumulation, cells must balance free radical production with an increase in the level of antioxidant enzymes that convert free radicals to less harmful species. We identified two antioxidant enzymes, thioredoxin (Trx) and Trx reductase (TrxR), in a complex associated with the DNA-bound estrogen receptor α (ERα). Western analysis and immunocytochemistry were used to demonstrate that Trx and TrxR are expressed in the cytoplasm and in the nuclei of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. More importantly, endogenously expressed ERα, Trx, and TrxR interact and ERα and TrxR associate with the native, estrogen-responsive pS2 and progesterone receptor genes in MCF-7 cells. RNA interference assays demonstrated that Trx and TrxR differentially influence estrogen-responsive gene expression and that together, 17β-estradiol, Trx, and TrxR alter hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels in MCF-7 cells. Our findings suggest that Trx and TrxR are multifunctional proteins that, in addition to modulating H2O2 levels and transcription factor activity, aid ERα in regulating the expression of estrogen-responsive genes in target cells. PMID:19620238

  16. Characterization of developmental- and stress-mediated expression of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ritesh; Choi, Bosung; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Park, Sang-Un; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Natarajan, Savithiry; Bae, Hanhong

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is an important enzyme for lignin biosynthesis as it catalyzes the first specific committed step in monolignol biosynthesis. We have cloned a full length coding sequence of CCR from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), which contains a 1,020-bp open reading frame (ORF), encoding 339 amino acids of 37.37 kDa, with an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.27 (JX524276, HcCCR2). BLAST result found that it has high homology with other plant CCR orthologs. Multiple alignment with other plant CCR sequences showed that it contains two highly conserved motifs: NAD(P) binding domain (VTGAGGFIASWMVKLLLEKGY) at N-terminal and probable catalytic domain (NWYCYGK). According to phylogenetic analysis, it was closely related to CCR sequences of Gossypium hirsutum (ACQ59094) and Populus trichocarpa (CAC07424). HcCCR2 showed ubiquitous expression in various kenaf tissues and the highest expression was detected in mature flower. HcCCR2 was expressed differentially in response to various stresses, and the highest expression was observed by drought and NaCl treatments.

  17. Thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase influence estrogen receptor alpha-mediated gene expression in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Abhi K; Ziegler, Yvonne S; McLeod, Ian X; Yates, John R; Nardulli, Ann M

    2009-12-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells damages resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. In order to overcome the oxidative stress that occurs with ROS accumulation, cells must balance free radical production with an increase in the level of antioxidant enzymes that convert free radicals to less harmful species. We identified two antioxidant enzymes, thioredoxin (Trx) and Trx reductase (TrxR), in a complex associated with the DNA-bound estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). Western analysis and immunocytochemistry were used to demonstrate that Trx and TrxR are expressed in the cytoplasm and in the nuclei of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. More importantly, endogenously expressed ERalpha, Trx, and TrxR interact and ERalpha and TrxR associate with the native, estrogen-responsive pS2 and progesterone receptor genes in MCF-7 cells. RNA interference assays demonstrated that Trx and TrxR differentially influence estrogen-responsive gene expression and that together, 17beta-estradiol, Trx, and TrxR alter hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels in MCF-7 cells. Our findings suggest that Trx and TrxR are multifunctional proteins that, in addition to modulating H(2)O(2) levels and transcription factor activity, aid ERalpha in regulating the expression of estrogen-responsive genes in target cells.

  18. Characterization of Developmental- and Stress-Mediated Expression of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductase in Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Park, Sang-Un; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Natarajan, Savithiry

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is an important enzyme for lignin biosynthesis as it catalyzes the first specific committed step in monolignol biosynthesis. We have cloned a full length coding sequence of CCR from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), which contains a 1,020-bp open reading frame (ORF), encoding 339 amino acids of 37.37 kDa, with an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.27 (JX524276, HcCCR2). BLAST result found that it has high homology with other plant CCR orthologs. Multiple alignment with other plant CCR sequences showed that it contains two highly conserved motifs: NAD(P) binding domain (VTGAGGFIASWMVKLLLEKGY) at N-terminal and probable catalytic domain (NWYCYGK). According to phylogenetic analysis, it was closely related to CCR sequences of Gossypium hirsutum (ACQ59094) and Populus trichocarpa (CAC07424). HcCCR2 showed ubiquitous expression in various kenaf tissues and the highest expression was detected in mature flower. HcCCR2 was expressed differentially in response to various stresses, and the highest expression was observed by drought and NaCl treatments. PMID:24723816

  19. The reaction mechanism of N-benzoylimidazole with ribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Liu, X Y; Yang, Z W; Wang, Q W; Xu, Y Z; Wang, Q Z; Xu, J F

    1987-01-01

    The reaction of uridine 3'-phosphate with benzoylimidazole in the absence and presence of a strong base was followed up by 31P and 1H nmr as well as paper electrophoresis. Possible reaction courses were proposed, the reaction rate constants were calculated and the reaction mechanism was discussed. It is possible to selectively acylate ribonucleotides with benzoylimidazole by appropriate choice of the base used. PMID:3588294

  20. Structure-function analysis of ribonucleotide bypass by B family DNA replicases

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Anders R.; Murray, Michael S.; Passer, Andrew R.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2013-11-01

    Ribonucleotides are frequently incorporated into DNA during replication, they are normally removed, and failure to remove them results in replication stress. This stress correlates with DNA polymerase (Pol) stalling during bypass of ribonucleotides in DNA templates. Here we demonstrate that stalling by yeast replicative Pols δ and ε increases as the number of consecutive template ribonucleotides increases from one to four. The homologous bacteriophage RB69 Pol also stalls during ribonucleotide bypass, with a pattern most similar to that of Pol ε. Crystal structures of an exonuclease-deficient variant of RB69 Pol corresponding to multiple steps in single ribonucleotide bypass reveal that increased stalling is associated with displacement of Tyr391 and an unpreferred C2´-endo conformation for the ribose. Even less efficient bypass of two consecutive ribonucleotides in DNA correlates with similar movements of Tyr391 and displacement of one of the ribonucleotides along with the primer-strand DNA backbone. These structure–function studies have implications for cellular signaling by ribonucleotides, and they may be relevant to replication stress in cells defective in ribonucleotide excision repair, including humans suffering from autoimmune disease associated with RNase H2 defects.

  1. Nucleotide pools dictate the identity and frequency of ribonucleotide incorporation in mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoberg, Emily; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Taylor, Robert W.; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Falkenberg, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the presence of ribonucleotides in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the present study we use a genome-wide approach to precisely map the location of these. We find that ribonucleotides are distributed evenly between the heavy- and light-strand of mtDNA. The relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides reflect that DNA polymerase γ discriminates the four ribonucleotides differentially during DNA synthesis. The observed pattern is also dependent on the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools and disease-causing mutations that change these pools alter both the absolute and relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides. Our analyses strongly suggest that DNA polymerase γ-dependent incorporation is the main source of ribonucleotides in mtDNA and argues against the existence of a mitochondrial ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in human cells. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that when dNTP pools are limiting, ribonucleotides serve as a source of building blocks to maintain DNA replication. Increased levels of embedded ribonucleotides in patient cells with disturbed nucleotide pools may contribute to a pathogenic mechanism that affects mtDNA stability and impair new rounds of mtDNA replication. PMID:28207748

  2. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-01-01

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  3. Triclosan Resistance in a Bacterial Fish Pathogen, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, is Mediated by an Enoyl Reductase, FabV.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raees; Lee, Myung Hwan; Joo, Hae-Jin; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Ahmad, Shabir; Choi, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2015-04-01

    Triclosan, the widely used biocide, specifically targets enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis system. Although the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida exhibits triclosan resistance, the nature of this resistance has not been elucidated. Here, we aimed to characterize the triclosan resistance of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida causing furunculosis. The fosmid library of triclosan-resistant A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida was constructed to select a fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance. With the fosmid clone showing triclosan resistance, a subsequent secondary library search resulted in the selection of subclone pTSR-1. DNA sequence analysis of pTSR-1 revealed the presence of a chromosomal-borne fabV-encoding ENR homolog. The ENR of A. salmonicida (FabVas) exhibited significant homology with previously known FabV, including the catalytic domain YX(8)K. fabVas introduction into E. coli dramatically increased its resistance to triclosan. Heterologous expression of FabVas might functionally replace the triclosan-sensitive FabI in vivo to confer E. coli with triclosan resistance. A genome-wide search for fabVas homologs revealed the presence of an additional fabV gene (fabVas2) paralog in A. salmonicida strains and the fabVas orthologs from other gram-negative fish pathogens. Both of the potential FabV ENRs expressed similarly with or without triclosan supplement. This is the first report about the presence of two potential FabV ENRs in a single pathogenic bacterium. Our result suggests that triclosan-resistant ENRs are widely distributed in various bacteria in nature, and the wide use of this biocide can spread these triclosan-tolerant ENRs among fish pathogens and other pathogenic bacteria.

  4. ROS-Mediated Inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase Contributes to the Activation of Anti-oxidative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Izabella; Holzmeister, Christian; Wirtz, Markus; Geerlof, Arie; Fröhlich, Thomas; Römling, Gaby; Kuruthukulangarakoola, Gitto T.; Linster, Eric; Hell, Rüdiger; Arnold, Georg J.; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants being involved in diverse physiological processes like germination, root growth, stomata closing and response to biotic and abiotic stress. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) as a biological NO donor has a very important function in NO signaling since it can transfer its NO moiety to other proteins (trans-nitrosylation). Such trans-nitrosylation reactions are equilibrium reactions and depend on GSNO level. The breakdown of GSNO and thus the level of S-nitrosylated proteins are regulated by GSNO-reductase (GSNOR). In this way, this enzyme controls S-nitrosothiol levels and regulates NO signaling. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana GSNOR activity is reversibly inhibited by H2O2 in vitro and by paraquat-induced oxidative stress in vivo. Light scattering analyses of reduced and oxidized recombinant GSNOR demonstrated that GSNOR proteins form dimers under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. Moreover, mass spectrometric analyses revealed that H2O2-treatment increased the amount of oxidative modifications on Zn2+-coordinating Cys47 and Cys177. Inhibition of GSNOR results in enhanced levels of S-nitrosothiols followed by accumulation of glutathione. Moreover, transcript levels of redox-regulated genes and activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes are increased in gsnor-ko plants, which may contribute to the enhanced resistance against oxidative stress. In sum, our results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent inhibition of GSNOR is playing an important role in activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms to damping oxidative damage and imply a direct crosstalk between ROS- and NO-signaling. PMID:27891135

  5. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: the role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2'-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Negatively Controls Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation via Inhibiting ROS/MAPKs/NF-κB Signaling Pathways Through a Catalytic Antioxidant Function

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hua; Wu, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Ling; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Wang, Wen; Guan, Xin-Lei; Luo, Han; Ni, Ming; Yang, Jing-Wen; Li, Ming-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative burst is one of the earliest biochemical events in the inflammatory activation of microglia. Here, we investigated the potential role of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), a key antioxidant enzyme, in the control of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. Results: MsrA was detected in rat microglia and its expression was upregulated on microglial activation. Silencing of MsrA exacerbated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of microglia and the production of inflammatory markers, indicating that MsrA may function as an endogenous protective mechanism for limiting uncontrolled neuroinflammation. Application of exogenous MsrA by transducing Tat-rMsrA fusion protein into microglia attenuated LPS-induced neuroinflammatory events, which was indicated by an increased Iba1 (a specific microglial marker) expression and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and this attenuation was accompanied by inhibiting multiple signaling pathways such as p38 and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB). These effects were due to MsrA-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) elimination, which may be derived from a catalytic effect of MsrA on the reaction of methionine with ROS. Furthermore, the transduction of Tat-rMsrA fusion protein suppressed the activation of microglia and the expression of pro-inflammatory factors in a rat model of neuroinflammation in vivo. Innovation: This study provides the first direct evidence for the biological significance of MsrA in microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. Conclusion: Our data provide a profound insight into the role of endogenous antioxidative defense systems such as MsrA in the control of microglial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 832–847. PMID:25602783

  7. Differential regulatory role of nitric oxide in mediating nitrate reductase activity in roots of tomato (Solanum lycocarpum)

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chong Wei; Du, Shao Ting; Zhang, Yong Song; Lin, Xian Yong; Tang, Cai Xian

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitric oxide (NO) has been demonstrated to stimulate the activity of nitrate reductase (NR) in plant roots supplied with a low level of nitrate, and to affect proteins differently, depending on the ratio of NO to the level of protein. Nitrate has been suggested to regulate the level of NO in plants. This present study examined interactive effects of NO and nitrate level on NR activity in roots of tomato (Solanum lycocarpum). Methods NR activity, mRNA level of NR gene and concentration of NR protein in roots fed with 0·5 mm or 5 mm nitrate and treated with the NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and diethylamine NONOate sodium (NONOate), and the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), were measured in 25-d-old seedlings. Key Results Addition of SNP and NONOate enhanced but cPTIO decreased NR activity in the roots fed with 0·5 mm nitrate. The opposite was true for the roots fed with 5 mm nitrate. However, the mRNA level of the NR gene and the protein concentration of NR enzyme in the roots were not affected by SNP treatment, irrespective of nitrate pre-treatment. Nevertheless, a low rate of NO gas increased while cPTIO decreased the NR activities of the enzyme extracts from the roots at both nitrate levels. Increasing the rate of NO gas further increased NR activity in the enzyme extracts of the roots fed with 0·5 mm nitrate but decreased it when 5 mm nitrate was supplied. Interestingly, the stimulative effect of NO gas on NR activity could be reversed by NO removal through N2 flushing in the enzyme extracts from the roots fed with 0·5 mm nitrate but not from those with 5 mm nitrate. Conclusions The effects of NO on NR activity in tomato roots depend on levels of nitrate supply, and probably result from direct interactions between NO and NR protein. PMID:19376780

  8. The anti-necrosis role of hypoxic preconditioning after acute anoxia is mediated by aldose reductase and sorbitol pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Ying; Ma, Zi-Min; Fan, Xue-Lai; Zhao, Tong; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Huang, Xin; Li, Ming-Ming; Xiong, Lei; Zhang, Kuan; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Fan, Ming

    2010-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that hypoxic preconditioning (HP) enhances the survival ability of the organism against the subsequent acute anoxia (AA). However, it is not yet clear whether necrosis induced by AA can be prevented by HP, and what are the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we examined the effect of HP (10% O(2), 48 h) on necrosis induced by AA (0% O(2), 24 h) in PC12 cells. We found that HP delayed the regulatory volume decrease and reduced cell swelling after 24 h of exposure to AA. Since aldose reductase (AR) is involved in cell volume regulation, we detected AR mRNA expression with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. The AR mRNA level was dramatically elevated by HP. Furthermore, an HP-induced decrease in cell injury was reversed by berberine chloride (BB), the inhibitor of AR. In addition, sorbitol synthesized from glucose catalyzed by AR is directly related to cell volume regulation. Subsequently, we tested sorbitol content in the cytoplasm. HP clearly elevated sorbitol content, while BB inhibited the elevation induced by HP. Further study showed that a strong inhibitor of sorbitol permease, quinidine, completely reversed the protection induced by HP after AA. These data provide evidence that HP prevents necrosis induced by AA and is mediated by AR and sorbitol pathway.

  9. Dimethyl sulfoxide elevates hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inhibiting the antioxidant function of methionine sulfoxide reductase A.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Geun-Hee; Choi, Seung Hee; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2010-09-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can be reduced to dimethyl sulfide by MsrA, which stereospecifically catalyzes the reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide to methionine. Our previous study showed that DMSO can competitively inhibit methionine sulfoxide reduction ability of yeast and mammalian MsrA in both in vitro and in vivo, and also act as a non-competitive inhibitor for mammalian MsrB2, specific for the reduction of methionine-R-sulfoxide, with lower inhibition effects. The present study investigated the effects of DMSO on the physiological antioxidant functions of methionine sulfoxide reductases. DMSO elevated hydrogen peroxide-mediated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell death, whereas it protected human SK-Hep1 cells against oxidative stress. DMSO reduced the protein-carbonyl content in yeast cells in normal conditions, but markedly increased protein-carbonyl accumulation under oxidative stress. Using Msr deletion mutant yeast cells, we demonstrated the DMSO's selective inhibition of the antioxidant function of MsrA in S. cerevisiae, resulting in an increase in oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity.

  10. Annatto Constituent Cis-Bixin Has Selective Antimyeloma Effects Mediated by Oxidative Stress and Associated with Inhibition of Thioredoxin and Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Tibodeau, Jennifer D.; Isham, Crescent R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In pursuit of the anticancer effects of seeds of the rain forest plant Bixa orellana (annatto), we found that its constituent cis-bixin induced cytotoxicity in a wide variety of tumor cell lines (IC50 values from 10 to 50 μM, 24-h exposures) and, importantly, also selectively killed freshly collected patient multiple myeloma cells and highly drug-resistant multiple myeloma cell lines. Mechanistic studies indicated that cis-bixin–induced cytotoxicity was greatly attenuated by co-treatment with glutathione or N-acetylcysteine (NAC); whereas fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) assays using the cell-permeable dyes 5-(and-6) chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA), or dihydroethidium demonstrated that cis-bixin rapidly induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in dose- and time-dependent fashions, collectively implicating ROS as contributory to cis-bixin–induced cytotoxicity. In pursuit of potential contributors to ROS imposition by cis-bixin, we found that cis-bixin inhibited both thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) activities at concentrations comparable to those required for cytotoxicity, implicating the inhibition of these redox enzymes as potentially contributing to its ability to impose cellular ROS and to kill cancer cells. Collectively, our studies indicate that the annatto constituent cis-bixin has intriguing selective antimyeloma activity that appears to be mediated through effects on redox signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 987–997. PMID:20170403

  11. Nitrate reductase mutation alters potassium nutrition as well as nitric oxide-mediated control of guard cell ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yizhou; Wang, Jian-Wen; Babla, Mohammad; Zhao, Chenchen; García-Mata, Carlos; Sani, Emanuela; Differ, Christopher; Mak, Michelle; Hills, Adrian; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining potassium (K(+) ) nutrition and a robust guard cell K(+) inward channel activity is considered critical for plants' adaptation to fluctuating and challenging growth environment. ABA induces stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) along with subsequent ion channel-mediated loss of K(+) and anions. However, the interactions of NO synthesis and signalling with K(+) nutrition and guard cell K(+) channel activities have not been fully explored in Arabidopsis. Physiological and molecular techniques were employed to dissect the interaction of nitrogen and potassium nutrition in regulating stomatal opening, CO2 assimilation and ion channel activity. These data, gene expression and ABA signalling transduction were compared in wild-type Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the nitrate reductase mutant nia1nia2. Growth and K(+) nutrition were impaired along with stomatal behaviour, membrane transport, and expression of genes associated with ABA signalling in the nia1nia2 mutant. ABA-inhibited K(+) in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for complete stomatal closure in nia1nia2. While NO is an important signalling component in ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, our findings demonstrate a more complex interaction associating potassium nutrition and nitrogen metabolism in the nia1nia2 mutant that affects stomatal function. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima: Structural Insights into Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-10-02

    In the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway, formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) amidotransferase, also known as PurL, catalyzes the conversion of FGAR, ATP, and glutamine to formyl glycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM), ADP, P{sub i}, and glutamate. Two forms of PurL have been characterized, large and small. Large PurL, present in most Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes, consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains three major domains: the N-terminal domain, the FGAM synthetase domain, and the glutaminase domain, with a putative ammonia channel located between the active sites of the latter two. Small PurL, present in Gram-positive bacteria and archaea, is structurally homologous to the FGAM synthetase domain of large PurL, and forms a complex with two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS. The structure of the PurS dimer is homologous with the N-terminal domain of large PurL, while PurQ, whose structure has not been reported, contains the glutaminase activity. In Bacillus subtilis, the formation of the PurLQS complex is dependent on glutamine and ADP and has been demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, a structure of the PurLQS complex from Thermotoga maritima is described revealing a 2:1:1 stoichiometry of PurS:Q:L, respectively. The conformational changes observed in TmPurL upon complex formation elucidate the mechanism of metabolite-mediated recruitment of PurQ and PurS. The flexibility of the PurS dimer is proposed to play a role in the activation of the complex and the formation of the ammonia channel. A potential path for the ammonia channel is identified.

  13. In vitro analysis of Hrd1p-mediated retrotranslocation of its multispanning membrane substrate 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Garza, Renee M; Sato, Brian K; Hampton, Randolph Y

    2009-05-29

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is responsible for the ubiquitin-mediated destruction of both misfolded and normal ER-resident proteins. ERAD substrates must be moved from the ER to the cytoplasm for ubiquitination and proteasomal destruction by a process called retrotranslocation. Many aspects of retrotranslocation are poorly understood, including its generality, the cellular components required, the energetics, and the mechanism of transfer through the ER membrane. To address these questions, we have developed an in vitro assay, using the 8-transmembrane span ER-resident Hmg2p isozyme of HMG-CoA reductase fused to GFP, which undergoes regulated ERAD mediated by the Hrd1p ubiquitin ligase. We have now directly demonstrated in vitro retrotranslocation of full-length, ubiquitinated Hmg2p-GFP to the aqueous phase. Hrd1p was rate-limiting for Hmg2p-GFP retrotranslocation, which required ATP, the AAA-ATPase Cdc48p, and its receptor Ubx2p. In addition, the adaptors Dsk2p and Rad23p, normally implicated in later parts of the pathway, were required. Hmg2p-GFP retrotranslocation did not depend on any of the proposed ER channel candidates. To examine the role of the Hrd1p transmembrane domain as a retrotranslocon, we devised a self-ubiquitinating polytopic substrate (Hmg1-Hrd1p) that undergoes ERAD in the absence of Hrd1p. In vitro retrotranslocation of full-length Hmg1-Hrd1p occurred in the absence of the Hrd1p transmembrane domain, indicating that it did not serve a required channel function. These studies directly demonstrate polytopic membrane protein retrotranslocation during ERAD and delineate avenues for mechanistic understanding of this general process.

  14. NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-mediated denitration reaction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene to yield nitrite in mammals.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Nishihara, Yuya; Amamiya, Masahiro; Wakayama, Toshihiko; Li, Song; Kikuchi, Tomohiro; Nakai, Yumi; Shimojo, Nobuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    While the biodegradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) via the release of nitrite is well established, mechanistic details of the reaction in mammals are unknown. To address this issue, we attempted to identify the enzyme from rat liver responsible for the production of nitrite from TNT. A NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450R) was isolated and identified from rat liver microsomes as the enzyme responsible for not only the release of nitrite from TNT but also formation of superoxide and 4-hydroxyamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-HADNT) under aerobic conditions. In this context, reactive oxygen species generated during P450R-catalyzed TNT reduction were found to be, at least in part, a mediator for the production of 4-HADNT from TNT via formation of 4-nitroso-2,6-dinitrotoluene. P450R did not catalyze the formation of the hydride-Meisenheimer complex (H(-)-TNT) that is thought to be an intermediate for nitrite release from TNT. Furthermore, in a time-course experiment, 4-HADNT formation reached a plateau level and then declined during the reaction between TNT and P450R with NADPH, while the release of nitrite was subjected to a lag period. Notably, the produced 4-HADNT can react with the parent compound TNT to produce nitrite and dimerized products via formation of a Janovsky complex. Our results demonstrate for the first time that P450R-mediated release of nitrite from TNT results from the process of chemical interaction of TNT and its 4-electron reduction metabolite 4-HADNT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzymatic Removal of Ribonucleotides from DNA Is Essential for Mammalian Genome Integrity and Development

    PubMed Central

    Reijns, Martin A.M.; Rabe, Björn; Rigby, Rachel E.; Mill, Pleasantine; Astell, Katy R.; Lettice, Laura A.; Boyle, Shelagh; Leitch, Andrea; Keighren, Margaret; Kilanowski, Fiona; Devenney, Paul S.; Sexton, David; Grimes, Graeme; Holt, Ian J.; Hill, Robert E.; Taylor, Martin S.; Lawson, Kirstie A.; Dorin, Julia R.; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA is undesirable given their increased susceptibility to hydrolysis. Ribonuclease (RNase) H enzymes that recognize and process such embedded ribonucleotides are present in all domains of life. However, in unicellular organisms such as budding yeast, they are not required for viability or even efficient cellular proliferation, while in humans, RNase H2 hypomorphic mutations cause the neuroinflammatory disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. Here, we report that RNase H2 is an essential enzyme in mice, required for embryonic growth from gastrulation onward. RNase H2 null embryos accumulate large numbers of single (or di-) ribonucleotides embedded in their genomic DNA (>1,000,000 per cell), resulting in genome instability and a p53-dependent DNA-damage response. Our findings establish RNase H2 as a key mammalian genome surveillance enzyme required for ribonucleotide removal and demonstrate that ribonucleotides are the most commonly occurring endogenous nucleotide base lesion in replicating cells. PMID:22579044

  16. Profiling ribonucleotide and deoxyribonucleotide pools perturbed by gemcitabine in human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian-Ru; Chen, Qian-Qian; Lam, Christopher Wai Kei; Wang, Cai-Yun; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Chang, Zee-Fen; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the dosage effect of gemcitabine, an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase (RR), on cellular levels of ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides using high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric method. As anticipated, after 4-h incubation of non-small cell lung cancer (A549) cells with gemcitabine at 0.5 and 2 μM, there were consistent reductions in levels of deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates (dNDP) and their corresponding deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTP). However, after 24-h exposure to 0.5 μM gemcitabine, the amounts of dNTP were increased by about 3 fold, whereas cells after 24-h 2 μM gemcitabine treatment exhibited deoxycytidine diphosphate (dCDP), deoxyadenosine diphosphate (dADP) and deoxyguanosine diphosphate (dGDP) levels less than 50% of control values, with deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) and deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) returning to the control level. Using cell cycle analysis, we found that 24-h incubation at 0.5 μM gemcitabine resulted in a significant increase in S phase arrest, while 2 μM treatment increased G0/G1 population. Our data demonstrated the correlation between the level of RR and the increased levels of dNTPs in the group of 0.5 μM treatment for 24-h with a markedly reduced level of dFdCTP. Accordingly, we proposed that the dosage of dFdC could determine the arrested phase of cell cycle, in turn affecting the recovery of dNTPs pools. PMID:27845436

  17. Regulation of Folate-Mediated One-Carbon Metabolism by Glycine N-Methyltransferase (GNMT) and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Lin, Yan-Jun; Tang, Feng-Yao; Ko, Hsin-An; Chiang, En-Pei

    2015-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is an important therapeutic target of human diseases. We extensively investigated how gene-nutrient interactions may modulate human cancer risk in 2 major folate metabolic genes, MTHFR and GNMT. The biochemical impacts of MTHFR and GNMT on methyl group supply, global DNA methylation, nucleotide biosynthesis, DNA damage, and partitioning of the folate dependent 1-carbon group were carefully studied. The distinct model systems used included: EB virus-transformed lymphoblasts expressing human MTHFR polymorphic genotypes; liver-derived GNMT-null cell-lines with and without GNMT overexpression; and HepG2 cells with stabilized inhibition of MTHFR using shRNA, GNMT wildtype, heterozygotous (GNMT(het)) and knockout (GNMT(nul)) mice. We discovered that the MTHFR TT genotype significantly reduces folate-dependent remethylation under folate restriction, but it assists purine synthesis when folate is adequate. The advantage of de novo purine synthesis found in the MTHFR TT genotype may account for the protective effect of MTHFR in human hematological malignancies. GNMT affects transmethylation kinetics and S-adenosylmethionine (adoMet) synthesis, and facilitates the conservation of methyl groups by limiting homocysteine remethylation fluxes. Restoring GNMT assists methylfolate-dependent reactions and ameliorates the consequences of folate depletion. GNMT expression in vivo improves folate retention and bioavailability in the liver. Loss of GNMT impairs nucleotide biosynthesis. Over-expression of GNMT enhances nucleotide biosynthesis and improves DNA integrity by reducing uracil misincorporation in DNA both in vitro and in vivo. The systematic series of studies gives new insights into the underlying mechanisms by which MTHFR and GNMT may participate in human tumor prevention.

  18. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  19. Immune-mediated myopathy related to anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase antibodies as an emerging cause of necrotizing myopathy induced by statins.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Clément; Beaufrére, Anne Marie; Boyer, Olivier; Drouot, Laurent; Soubrier, Martin; Tournadre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) associated with statin use and anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody is a new and emerging entity that supports a link between statin use and IMNM and raises the questions of distinct clinical phenotypes and treatment strategy. We describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a patient and discuss the spectrum of IMNM and statin-induced myopathies. A 65-year-old man was suffering from proximal muscle weakness and elevated CK levels, following exposure to statin therapy. The symptoms worsened despite discontinuation of the drug. At that point, no myositis-specific or -associated antibodies were detected. Malignancy screening did not reveal abnormalities. Muscle biopsy demonstrated a predominantly necrotizing myopathy with minimal lymphocytic infiltrates, MHC class I expression in necrotic muscle fibers, and complement deposition on scattered non-necrotic muscle fibers. Muscle protein analysis by western blot was normal. The patient did not improve with steroid and methotrexate and required monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Muscle strength gradually improved, CK levels normalized and IVIG were stopped 1 year later. Screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies, not available at the time of presentation, was highly positive. Identification of anti-HMGCR antibodies in statin-exposed patients with myopathy appears to be helpful both for differential diagnosis and for treatment strategy. In patients who did not improve after discontinuation of the statin treatment, a muscle biopsy should be performed as well as screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies. Patients with this disorder require aggressive immunosuppressive treatment.

  20. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model.

  1. Adrenergic activation of steroid 5alpha-reductase gene expression in rat C6 glioma cells: involvement of cyclic amp/protein kinase A-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kyoji; Arimochi, Hideki; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro

    2004-01-01

    Steroid 5alpha-reductase (5alpha-R) is well known as the enzyme converting progesterone and other steroid hormones to their 5alpha-reduced metabolites and has been reported to be localized in both neuronal and glial cells in the brain. Previously, the enzyme activity in glial cells has been shown to be enhanced either by coculturing with neuronal cells or by adding the conditioned medium of neuronal cells, suggesting a possible implication of neuro-glial interactions in the regulation of neurosteroid metabolism in the brain. In the present studies, the effects of adrenergic agonists on 5alpha-R mRNA and protein levels in rat C6 glioma cells were examined as one of the model experiments for investigating the influence of neuronal activity on the expression of 5alpha-R gene in the glial cell. The direct challenge of beta-adrenergic agonists to glioma cells resulted in the rapid and transient elevation of 5alpha-R mRNA levels through the activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A-mediated signaling pathway. Further studies showed that cAMP-induced 5alpha-R mRNA expression was completely abolished by pretreatment of cells with actinomycin D and also indicated that the elevation of 5alpha-R mRNA levels was accompanied by an increase in enzyme protein in the cells. These findings provide strong evidence that the stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors might induce the transcriptional activation of 5alpha-R gene expression in glial cells, proposing the possibility that neuronal activity might be involved in the production of neuroactive 5alpha-reduced steroids in the brain.

  2. Promoter analysis of the DHCR24 (3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase) gene: characterization of SREBP (sterol-regulatoryelement-binding protein)-mediated activation

    PubMed Central

    Daimiel, Lidia A.; Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Rodríguez-Acebes, Sara; Crespo, Lorena; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Martínez-Botas, Javier

    2012-01-01

    DHCR24 (3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase) catalyses the reduction of the C-24 double bond of sterol intermediates during cholesterol biosynthesis. DHCR24 has also been involved in cell growth, senescence and cellular response to oncogenic and oxidative stress. Despite its important roles, little is known about the transcriptional mechanisms controlling DHCR24 gene expression. We analysed the proximal promoter region and the cholesterol-mediated regulation of DHCR24. A putative SRE (sterol-regulatory element) at −98/−90 bp of the transcription start site was identified. Other putative regulatory elements commonly found in SREBP (SRE-binding protein)-targeted genes were also identified. Sterol responsiveness was analysed by luciferase reporter assays of approximately 1 kb 5′-flanking region of the human DHCR24 gene in HepG2 and SK-N-MC cells. EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) and ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays demonstrated cholesterol-dependent recruitment and binding of SREBPs to the putative SRE. Given the presence of several CACCC-boxes in the DHCR24 proximal promoter, we assessed the role of KLF5 (Krüppel-like factor 5) in androgen-regulated DHCR24 expression. DHT (dihydrotestosterone) increased DHCR24 expression synergistically with lovastatin. However, DHT was unable to activate the DHCR24 proximal promoter, whereas KLF5 did, indicating that this mechanism is not involved in the androgen-induced stimulation of DHCR24 expression. The results of the present study allow the elucidation of the mechanism of regulation of the DHCR24 gene by cholesterol availability and identification of other putative cis-acting elements which may be relevant for the regulation of DHCR24 expression. PMID:23050906

  3. Defective removal of ribonucleotides from DNA promotes systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; Kind, Barbara; Reijns, Martin A.M.; Berndt, Nicole; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Wolf, Christine; Tüngler, Victoria; Chara, Osvaldo; Lee, Young Ae; Hübner, Norbert; Bicknell, Louise; Blum, Sophia; Krug, Claudia; Schmidt, Franziska; Kretschmer, Stefanie; Koss, Sarah; Astell, Katy R.; Ramantani, Georgia; Bauerfeind, Anja; Morris, David L.; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Bubeck, Doryen; Leitch, Andrea; Ralston, Stuart H.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Gahr, Manfred; Witte, Torsten; Vyse, Timothy J.; Melchers, Inga; Mangold, Elisabeth; Nöthen, Markus M.; Aringer, Martin; Kuhn, Annegret; Lüthke, Kirsten; Unger, Leonore; Bley, Annette; Lorenzi, Alice; Isaacs, John D.; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Conrad, Karsten; Dahl, Andreas; Roers, Axel; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is continuously challenged by the DNA damage that arises during normal cell metabolism. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the genome surveillance enzyme ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), a pediatric disorder that shares features with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we determined that heterozygous parents of AGS patients exhibit an intermediate autoimmune phenotype and demonstrated a genetic association between rare RNASEH2 sequence variants and SLE. Evaluation of patient cells revealed that SLE- and AGS-associated mutations impair RNase H2 function and result in accumulation of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA. The ensuing chronic low level of DNA damage triggered a DNA damage response characterized by constitutive p53 phosphorylation and senescence. Patient fibroblasts exhibited constitutive upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and an enhanced type I IFN response to the immunostimulatory nucleic acid polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and UV light irradiation, linking RNase H2 deficiency to potentiation of innate immune signaling. Moreover, UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation was markedly enhanced in ribonucleotide-containing DNA, providing a mechanism for photosensitivity in RNase H2–associated SLE. Collectively, our findings implicate RNase H2 in the pathogenesis of SLE and suggest a role of DNA damage–associated pathways in the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:25500883

  4. Importance of the Maintenance Pathway in the Regulation of the Activity of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. The Escherichia coli class Ia RNR is composed of α and β subunits that form an α2β2 active complex. β contains the diferric tyrosyl radical (Y•) cofactor that is essential for the reduction process that occurs on α. [Y•] in vitro is proportional to RNR activity, and its regulation in vivo potentially represents a mechanism for controlling RNR activity. To examine this thesis, N- and C-terminal StrepII-tagged β under the control of an l-arabinose promoter were constructed. Using these constructs and with [l-arabinose] varying from 0 to 0.5 mM in the growth medium, [β] could be varied from 4 to 3300 µM. [Y•] in vivo and on affinity-purified Strep-β in vitro was determined by EPR spectroscopy and Western analysis. In both cases, there was 0.1–0.3 Y• radical per β. To determine if the substoichiometric Y• level was associated with apo β or diferric β, titrations of crude cell extracts from these growths were carried out with reduced YfaE, a 2Fe2S ferredoxin involved in cofactor maintenance and assembly. Each titration, followed by addition of O2 to assemble the cofactor and EPR analysis to quantitate Y•, revealed that β is completely loaded with a diferric cluster even when its concentration in vivo is 244 µM. These titrations, furthermore, resulted in 1 Y• radical per β, the highest levels reported. Whole cell Mössbauer analysis on cells induced with 0.5 mM arabinose supports high iron loading in β. These results suggest that modulation of the level of Y• in vivo in E. coli is a mechanism of regulating RNR activity. PMID:18314964

  5. The FinR-regulated essential gene fprA, encoding ferredoxin NADP+ reductase: Roles in superoxide-mediated stress protection and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Boonma, Siriwan; Romsang, Adisak; Duang-nkern, Jintana; Atichartpongkul, Sopapan; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has two genes encoding ferredoxin NADP(+) reductases, denoted fprA and fprB. We show here that P. aeruginosa fprA is an essential gene. However, the ΔfprA mutant could only be successfully constructed in PAO1 strains containing an extra copy of fprA on a mini-Tn7 vector integrated into the chromosome or carrying it on a temperature-sensitive plasmid. The strain containing an extra copy of the ferredoxin gene (fdx1) could suppress the essentiality of FprA. Other ferredoxin genes could not suppress the requirement for FprA, suggesting that Fdx1 mediates the essentiality of FprA. The expression of fprA was highly induced in response to treatments with a superoxide generator, paraquat, or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The induction of fprA by these treatments depended on FinR, a LysR-family transcription regulator. In vivo and in vitro analysis suggested that oxidized FinR acted as a transcriptional activator of fprA expression by binding to its regulatory box, located 20 bases upstream of the fprA -35 promoter motif. This location of the FinR box also placed it between the -35 and -10 motifs of the finR promoter, where the reduced regulator functions as a repressor. Under uninduced conditions, binding of FinR repressed its own transcription but had no effect on fprA expression. Exposure to paraquat or NaOCl converted FinR to a transcriptional activator, leading to the expression of both fprA and finR. The ΔfinR mutant showed an increased paraquat sensitivity phenotype and attenuated virulence in the Drosophila melanogaster host model. These phenotypes could be complemented by high expression of fprA, indicating that the observed phenotypes of the ΔfinR mutant arose from the inability to up-regulate fprA expression. In addition, increased expression of fprB was unable to rescue essentiality of fprA or the superoxide-sensitive phenotype of the ΔfinR mutant, suggesting distinct mechanisms of the FprA and FprB enzymes. PMID:28187184

  6. Darwinian Behavior in a Cold, Sporadically Fed Pool of Ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A testable, explicit origin for Darwinian behavior, feasible on a chaotic early Earth, would aid origins discussion. Here I show that a pool receiving unreliable supplies of unstable ribonucleotide precursors can recurrently fill this role. By using numerical integration, the differential equations governing a sporadically fed pool are solved, yielding quantitative constraints for the proliferation of molecules that also have a chemical phenotype. For example, templated triphosphate nucleotide joining is >104 too slow, suggesting that a group more reactive than pyrophosphate activated primordial nucleotides. However, measured literature rates are sufficient if the Initial Darwinian Ancestor (IDA) resembles a 5′-5′ cofactor-like dinucleotide RNA, synthesized via activation with a phosphorimidazolide-like group. A sporadically fed pool offers unforeseen advantages; for example, the pool hosts a novel replicator which is predominantly unpaired, even though it replicates. Such free template is optimized for effective selection during its replication. Pool nucleotides are also subject to a broadly based selection that impels the population toward replication, effective selection, and Darwinian behavior. Such a primordial pool may have left detectable modern traces. A sporadically fed ribonucleotide pool also fits a recognizable early Earth environment, has recognizable modern descendants, and suits the early shape of the phylogenetic tree of Earthly life. Finally, analysis points to particular data now needed to refine the hypothesis. Accordingly, a kinetically explicit chemical hypothesis for a terran IDA can be justified, and informative experiments seem readily accessible. Key Words: Cofactor—RNA—Origin of life—Replication—Initial Darwinian Ancestor (IDA). Astrobiology 12, 870–883. PMID:22946838

  7. Mechanism of Ribonucleotide Incorporation by Human DNA Polymerase η*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleotides and 2′-deoxyribonucleotides are the basic units for RNA and DNA, respectively, and the only difference is the extra 2′-OH group on the ribonucleotide sugar. Cellular rNTP concentrations are much higher than those of dNTP. When copying DNA, DNA polymerases not only select the base of the incoming dNTP to form a Watson-Crick pair with the template base but also distinguish the sugar moiety. Some DNA polymerases use a steric gate residue to prevent rNTP incorporation by creating a clash with the 2′-OH group. Y-family human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) is of interest because of its spacious active site (especially in the major groove) and tolerance of DNA lesions. Here, we show that hpol η maintains base selectivity when incorporating rNTPs opposite undamaged DNA and the DNA lesions 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer but with rates that are 103-fold lower than for inserting the corresponding dNTPs. X-ray crystal structures show that the hpol η scaffolds the incoming rNTP to pair with the template base (dG) or 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine with a significant propeller twist. As a result, the 2′-OH group avoids a clash with the steric gate, Phe-18, but the distance between primer end and Pα of the incoming rNTP increases by 1 Å, elevating the energy barrier and slowing polymerization compared with dNTP. In addition, Tyr-92 was identified as a second line of defense to maintain the position of Phe-18. This is the first crystal structure of a DNA polymerase with an incoming rNTP opposite a DNA lesion. PMID:26740629

  8. Investigating the intermediates in the reaction of ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Lactobacillus leichmannii : An application of HF EPR-RFQ technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzerova, Julia; Krymov, Vladimir; Gerfen, Gary J.

    2011-12-01

    In this investigation high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HFEPR) in conjunction with innovative rapid freeze-quench (RFQ) technology is employed to study the exchange-coupled thiyl radical-cob(II)alamin system in ribonucleotide reductase from a prokaryote Lactobacillus leichmannii. The size of the exchange coupling ( Jex) and the values of the thiyl radical g tensor are refined, while confirming the previously determined (Gerfen et al. (1996) [20]) distance between the paramagnets. Conclusions relevant to ribonucleotide reductase catalysis and the architecture of the active site are presented. A key part of this work has been the development of a unique RFQ apparatus for the preparation of millisecond quench time RFQ samples which can be packed into small (0.5 mm ID) sample tubes used for CW and pulsed HFEPR - lack of this ability has heretofore precluded such studies. The technology is compatible with a broad range of spectroscopic techniques and can be readily adopted by other laboratories.

  9. In Situ Imidazole Activation of Ribonucleotides for Abiotic RNA Oligomerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcar, Bradley T.; Jawed, Mohsin; Shah, Hari; McGown, Linda B.

    2015-06-01

    The hypothesis that RNA played a significant role in the origin of life requires effective and efficient abiotic pathways to produce RNA oligomers. The most successful abiotic oligomerization reactions to date have utilized high-energy, modified, or pre-activated ribonucleotides to generate strands of RNA up to 50-mers in length. In spite of their success, these modifications and pre-activation reactions significantly alter the ribonucleotides in ways that are highly unlikely to have occurred on a prebiotic Earth. This research seeks to address this problem by exploring an aqueous based method for activating the canonical ribonucleotides in situ using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and imidazole. The reactions were run with and without a montmorillonite clay catalyst and compared to reactions that used ribonucleotides that were pre-activated with imidazole. The effects of pH and ribonucleotide concentration were also investigated. The results demonstrate the ability of in situ activation of ribonucleotides to generate linear RNA oligomers in solution, providing an alternative route to produce RNA for use in prebiotic Earth scenarios.

  10. Analysis of Ribonucleotide Removal from DNA by Human Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    PubMed

    Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Kemp, Michael G; Hu, Jinchuan; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-12-11

    Ribonucleotides are incorporated into the genome during DNA replication. The enzyme RNase H2 plays a critical role in targeting the removal of these ribonucleotides from DNA, and defects in RNase H2 activity are associated with both genomic instability and the human autoimmune/inflammatory disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. Whether additional general DNA repair mechanisms contribute to ribonucleotide removal from DNA in human cells is not known. Because of its ability to act on a wide variety of substrates, we examined a potential role for canonical nucleotide excision repair in the removal of ribonucleotides from DNA. However, using highly sensitive dual incision/excision assays, we find that ribonucleotides are not efficiently targeted by the human nucleotide excision repair system in vitro or in cultured human cells. These results suggest that nucleotide excision repair is unlikely to play a major role in the cellular response to ribonucleotide incorporation in genomic DNA in human cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Tracking replication enzymology in vivo by genome-wide mapping of ribonucleotide incorporation.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Anders R; Lujan, Scott A; Burkholder, Adam B; Orebaugh, Clinton D; Williams, Jessica S; Clausen, Maryam F; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Fargo, David C; Smith, Duncan J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-03-01

    Ribonucleotides are frequently incorporated into DNA during replication in eukaryotes. Here we map genome-wide distribution of these ribonucleotides as markers of replication enzymology in budding yeast, using a new 5' DNA end-mapping method, hydrolytic end sequencing (HydEn-seq). HydEn-seq of DNA from ribonucleotide excision repair-deficient strains reveals replicase- and strand-specific patterns of ribonucleotides in the nuclear genome. These patterns support the roles of DNA polymerases α and δ in lagging-strand replication and of DNA polymerase ɛ in leading-strand replication. They identify replication origins, termination zones and variations in ribonucleotide incorporation frequency across the genome that exceed three orders of magnitude. HydEn-seq also reveals strand-specific 5' DNA ends at mitochondrial replication origins, thus suggesting unidirectional replication of a circular genome. Given the conservation of enzymes that incorporate and process ribonucleotides in DNA, HydEn-seq can be used to track replication enzymology in other organisms.

  12. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  13. The Zea mays glycine-rich RNA-binding protein MA16 is bound to a ribonucleotide(s) by a stable linkage.

    PubMed

    Freire, Miguel Angel

    2012-09-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the maize glycine-rich RNA-binding protein MA16 is developmentally regulated and it is involved in environmental stress responses. The MA16 protein shows a wide spectrum of RNA-binding activities. On the basis of in vivo labelling, where a [³²P]phosphate label was linked to the MA16 protein, Freire and Pages (Plant Mol Biol 29:797-807, 1995) suggested that the protein may be post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. However, further analysis showed that the [³²P]phosphate label was sensitive to different treatments, suggesting that modification distinct from protein phosphorylation might occur in the MA16 protein. Biochemical analysis revealed that this [³²P]phosphate labelling was resistant to phenol extraction and denaturing SDS-PAGE but sensitive to micrococcal nuclease, RNase A and RNase T1 treatments. The mobility of [³⁵S] labelled MA16 protein on SDS-PAGE did not significantly changed after the nuclease treatments suggesting that the [³²P]phosphate label associated to MA16 protein could be a ribonucleotide or a very short ribonucleotide chain. In addition, immunoprecipitation of labelled extracts showed that the ribonucleotide(s) linked to the MA16 protein was removed by phosphorolytic activity. This activity could be catalysed by a phosphate-dependent ribonuclease. The C-terminus of MA16 protein harbouring a glycine-rich domain was predicted to be an intrinsically disordered region.

  14. Utilization of ribonucleotides and RNA primers by Tetrahymena telomerase.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Greider, C W

    1995-11-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) DNA polymerase involved in telomere synthesis. A short sequence within the telomerase RNA component provides a template for de novo addition of the G-rich strand of a telomeric simple sequence repeat onto chromosome termini. In vitro, telomerase can elongate single-stranded DNA primers processively: one primer can be extended by multiple rounds of template copying before product dissociation. Telomerase will incorporate dNTPs or ddNTPs and will elongate any G-rich, single-stranded primer DNA. In this report, we show that Tetrahymena telomerase was able to incorporate a ribonucleotide, rGTP, into product polynucleotide. Synthesis of the product [d(TT)r(GGGG)]n was processive, suggesting that the chimeric product remained associated with the enzyme both at the active site and at a second, previously characterized, template-independent product binding site. As predicted by this finding, RNA-containing oligonucleotides served as primers for elongation. More than 3 nt of RNA at a primer 3' end decreased the quantity of product synthesis but increased the affinity of the primer for telomerase. Thus, RNA-containing primers were effective as competitive inhibitors of DNA primer elongation by telomerase. These results support the possible evolutionary origin of telomerase as an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

  15. High temperature triggers the metabolism of S-nitrosothiols in sunflower mediating a process of nitrosative stress which provokes the inhibition of ferredoxin-NADP reductase by tyrosine nitration.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana M; Carreras, Alfonso; Gómez-Rodríguez, Maria V; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Luque, Francisco; Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2011-11-01

    High temperature (HT) is considered a major abiotic stress that negatively affects both vegetative and reproductive growth. Whereas the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established under HT, less is known about the metabolism of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). In sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings exposed to HT, NO content as well as S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity and expression were down-regulated with the simultaneous accumulation of total S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). However, the content of tyrosine nitration (NO(2) -Tyr) studied by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and by confocal laser scanning microscope was induced. Nitroproteome analysis under HT showed that this stress induced the protein expression of 13 tyrosine-nitrated proteins. Among the induced proteins, ferredoxin-NADP reductase (FNR) was selected to evaluate the effect of nitration on its activity after heat stress and in vitro conditions using 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (peroxynitrite donor) as the nitrating agent, the FNR activity being inhibited. Taken together, these results suggest that HT augments SNOs, which appear to mediate protein tyrosine nitration, inhibiting FNR, which is involved in the photosynthesis process.

  16. A single side chain prevents Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) from incorporating ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Astatke, Mekbib; Ng, Kimmie; Grindley, Nigel D. F.; Joyce, Catherine M.

    1998-01-01

    Although nucleic acid polymerases from different families show striking similarities in structure, they maintain stringent specificity for the sugar structure of the incoming nucleoside triphosphate. The Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I selects its natural substrates, deoxynucleotides, over ribonucleotides by several thousand fold. Analysis of mutant Klenow fragment derivatives indicates that discrimination is provided by the Glu-710 side chain which sterically blocks the 2′-OH of an incoming rNTP. A nearby aromatic side chain, at position 762, plays an important role in constraining the nucleotide so that the Glu-710 “steric gate” can be fully effective. Even with the E710A mutation, which is extremely permissive for addition of a single ribonucleotide to a DNA primer, Klenow fragment does not efficiently synthesize pure RNA, indicating that additional barriers prevent the incorporation of successive ribonucleotides. PMID:9520378

  17. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  18. Renal reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:cytochrome c reductase-mediated metabolism of the carcinogen N-(4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl)acetamide

    SciTech Connect

    Mattammal, M.B.; Zenser, T.V.; Palmier, M.O.; Davis, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    N-(4-(5-Nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl)acetamide (NFTA) metabolism was examined in vitro using microsomes prepared from rat liver and renal cortex and from rabbit liver and renal cortex and outer and inner medulla. NFTA nitroreduction was observed with each tissue. Three mol of NADPH were used per mol of NFTA reduced. Substrate and inhibitor specificity suggested that the microsomal nitroreduction was due to NADPH:cytochrome c reductase. Metabolite(s) formed bound to protein, RNA, DNA, and synthetic polyribonucleotides. Maximum covalent binding was seen with polyguanylic acid. A guanosine-NFTA adduct was isolated. Binding was inhibited by sulfhydryl compounds and vitamin E. The (/sup 14/C)NFTA:glutathione or (/sup 3/H)glutathione:NFTA conjugates obtained from microsomal incubations showed identical chromatographic properties as the product obtained by the reaction of synthetic N-hydroxy-NFTA with (/sup 3/H)glutathione. Structures of synthetic N-hydroxy-NFTA and the microsomal reduction product 1-(4-(2-acetylaminothiazolyl))-3-cyano-1-propanone were established by mass spectrometry. The latter reduction product did not bind macromolecules. These results suggest that renal NADPH:cytochrome c reductase reduces NFTA to an N-hydroxy-NFTA intermediate that binds nucleophilic sites on macromolecules.

  19. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  20. NADH:Cytochrome b5 Reductase and Cytochrome b5 Can Act as Sole Electron Donors to Human Cytochrome P450 1A1-Mediated Oxidation and DNA Adduct Formation by Benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after activation by cytochrome P450 (P450). Here, we investigated whether NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) in the presence of cytochrome b5 can act as sole electron donor to human P450 1A1 during BaP oxidation and replace the canonical NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) system. We also studied the efficiencies of the coenzymes of these reductases, NADPH as a coenzyme of POR, and NADH as a coenzyme of CBR, to mediate BaP oxidation. Two systems containing human P450 1A1 were utilized: human recombinant P450 1A1 expressed with POR, CBR, epoxide hydrolase, and cytochrome b5 in Supersomes and human recombinant P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR and/or with CBR and cytochrome b5 in liposomes. BaP-9,10-dihydrodiol, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-9-ol, BaP-3-ol, a metabolite of unknown structure, and two BaP-DNA adducts were generated by the P450 1A1-Supersomes system, both in the presence of NADPH and in the presence of NADH. The major BaP-DNA adduct detected by 32P-postlabeling was characterized as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP (assigned adduct 1), while the minor adduct is probably a guanine adduct derived from 9-hydroxy-BaP-4,5-epoxide (assigned adduct 2). BaP-3-ol as the major metabolite, BaP-9-ol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, an unknown metabolite, and adduct 2 were observed in the system using P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR plus NADPH. When P450 1A1 was reconstituted with CBR and cytochrome b5 plus NADH, BaP-3-ol was the predominant metabolite too, and an adduct 2 was also generated. Our results demonstrate that the NADH/cytochrome b5/CBR system can act as the sole electron donor both for the first and second reduction of P450 1A1 during the oxidation of BaP in vitro. They suggest that NADH-dependent CBR can replace NADPH-dependent POR in the P450 1A1-catalyzed metabolism of BaP. PMID:27404282

  1. NADH:Cytochrome b5 Reductase and Cytochrome b5 Can Act as Sole Electron Donors to Human Cytochrome P450 1A1-Mediated Oxidation and DNA Adduct Formation by Benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Stiborová, Marie; Indra, Radek; Moserová, Michaela; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Kopka, Klaus; Philips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2016-08-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after activation by cytochrome P450 (P450). Here, we investigated whether NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) in the presence of cytochrome b5 can act as sole electron donor to human P450 1A1 during BaP oxidation and replace the canonical NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) system. We also studied the efficiencies of the coenzymes of these reductases, NADPH as a coenzyme of POR, and NADH as a coenzyme of CBR, to mediate BaP oxidation. Two systems containing human P450 1A1 were utilized: human recombinant P450 1A1 expressed with POR, CBR, epoxide hydrolase, and cytochrome b5 in Supersomes and human recombinant P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR and/or with CBR and cytochrome b5 in liposomes. BaP-9,10-dihydrodiol, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-9-ol, BaP-3-ol, a metabolite of unknown structure, and two BaP-DNA adducts were generated by the P450 1A1-Supersomes system, both in the presence of NADPH and in the presence of NADH. The major BaP-DNA adduct detected by (32)P-postlabeling was characterized as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP (assigned adduct 1), while the minor adduct is probably a guanine adduct derived from 9-hydroxy-BaP-4,5-epoxide (assigned adduct 2). BaP-3-ol as the major metabolite, BaP-9-ol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, an unknown metabolite, and adduct 2 were observed in the system using P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR plus NADPH. When P450 1A1 was reconstituted with CBR and cytochrome b5 plus NADH, BaP-3-ol was the predominant metabolite too, and an adduct 2 was also generated. Our results demonstrate that the NADH/cytochrome b5/CBR system can act as the sole electron donor both for the first and second reduction of P450 1A1 during the oxidation of BaP in vitro. They suggest that NADH-dependent CBR can replace NADPH-dependent POR in the P450 1A1-catalyzed metabolism of BaP.

  2. Antioxidative effects of diallyl trisulfide on hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity through regulation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-mediated thioredoxin reductase 1 expression in C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Sook; Kim, Gi-Yiung; Kim, Byung Woo; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2017-04-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) is one of the major sulfur-containing compounds in garlic oil. In this study, we analyzed the effects of DATS against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in C2C12 myoblasts. DATS preconditioning significantly attenuated H2O2-induced growth inhibition and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis by decreasing the generation of ROS. Treatment with DATS alone effectively upregulated the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), which was associated with the increased phosphorylation of Nrf2. However, the protective effects of DATS against H2O2-induced growth reduction and ROS accumulation were significantly abolished by auranofin, an inhibitor of TrxR activity. Moreover, DATS-mediated phosphorylation of Nrf2 and induction of TrxR1 were markedly reduced by genetic silencing of Nrf2. DATS treatment also induced the phosphorylation extracellular signal-regulating kinase (ERK), and analysis using specific inhibitors of cellular signaling pathways demonstrated that only ERK activation was involved in Nrf2 phosphorylation and TrxR1 induction. In addition, the cytoprotective potentials were abrogated in C2C12 cells pretreated with an ERK specific inhibitor. The results demonstrate that DATS protects against oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in C2C12 cells in part through the activation of Nrf2-mediated TrxR1 induction via the ERK signaling pathway.

  3. RNAi-mediated pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase gene silencing in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seed coat: consequences on lignans and neolignans accumulation.

    PubMed

    Renouard, Sullivan; Tribalatc, Marie-Aude; Lamblin, Frederic; Mongelard, Gaëlle; Fliniaux, Ophélie; Corbin, Cyrielle; Marosevic, Djurdjica; Pilard, Serge; Demailly, Hervé; Gutierrez, Laurent; Hano, Christophe; Mesnard, François; Lainé, Eric

    2014-09-15

    RNAi technology was applied to down regulate LuPLR1 gene expression in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seeds. This gene encodes a pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase responsible for the synthesis of (+)-secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), the major lignan accumulated in the seed coat. If flax lignans biological properties and health benefits are well documented their roles in planta remain unclear. This loss of function strategy was developed to better understand the implication of the PLR1 enzyme in the lignan biosynthetic pathway and to provide new insights on the functions of these compounds. RNAi plants generated exhibited LuPLR1 gene silencing as demonstrated by quantitative RT-PCR experiments and the failed to accumulate SDG. The accumulation of pinoresinol the substrate of the PLR1 enzyme under its diglucosylated form (PDG) was increased in transgenic seeds but did not compensate the overall loss of SDG. The monolignol flux was also deviated through the synthesis of 8-5' linked neolignans dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DCG) and dihydro-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DDCG) which were observed for the first time in flax seeds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Aldo-keto reductase 1C1 induced by interleukin-1β mediates the invasive potential and drug resistance of metastatic bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ryuji; Tsuda, Masumi; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanino, Mishie; Kimura, Taichi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Abe, Takashige; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Tanaka, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In treating bladder cancer, determining the molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance are urgent to improving long-term patient survival. One of the metabolic enzymes, aldo-keto reductase 1C1 (AKR1C1), plays an essential role in cancer invasion/metastasis and chemoresistance. In orthotopic xenograft models of a human bladder cancer cell line, UM-UC-3, metastatic sublines were established from tumors in the liver, lung, and bone. These cells possessed elevated levels of EMT-associated markers, such as Snail, Slug, or CD44, and exhibited enhanced invasion. By microarray analysis, AKR1C1 was found to be up-regulated in metastatic lesions, which was verified in metastatic human bladder cancer specimens. Decreased invasion caused by AKR1C1 knockdown suggests a novel role of AKR1C1 in cancer invasion, which is probably due to the regulation of Rac1, Src, or Akt. An inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β, was found to increase AKR1C1 in bladder cancer cell lines. One particular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flufenamic acid, antagonized AKR1C1 and decreased the cisplatin-resistance and invasion potential of metastatic sublines. These data uncover the crucial role of AKR1C1 in regulating both metastasis and drug resistance; as a result, AKR1C1 should be a potent molecular target in invasive bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27698389

  5. Single-Protein Tracking Reveals That NADPH Mediates the Insertion of Cytochrome P450 Reductase into a Biomimetic of the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Barnaba, Carlo; Martinez, Michael J; Taylor, Evan; Barden, Adam O; Brozik, James A

    2017-04-06

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is the redox partner for most human cytochrome P450 enzymes. It is also believed that CPR is an integral membrane protein exclusively. Herein, we report that, contrary to this belief, CPR can exist as a peripheral membrane protein in the absence of NADPH and will transition to an integral membrane protein in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of NADPH or greater. All experiments were performed in a solid-supported cushioned lipid bilayer that closely matched the chemical composition of the human endoplasmic reticulum and served as an ER biomimetic. The phase characteristics and fluidity of the ER biomimetic was characterized with fluorescence micrographs and temperature-dependent fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The interactions of CPR with the ER biomimetic were directly observed by tracking single CPR molecules using time-lapse single-molecule fluorescence imaging and subsequent analysis of tracks. These studies revealed dramatic changes in diffusion coefficient and the degree of partitioning of CPR as a function of NADPH concentration.

  6. Ellman's-reagent-mediated regeneration of trypanothione in situ: substrate-economical microplate and time-dependent inhibition assays for trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Chris J; Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Eggleston, Ian M; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2003-01-01

    Trypanothione reductase (TryR) is a key enzyme involved in the oxidative stress management of the Trypanosoma and Leishmania parasites, which helps to maintain an intracellular reducing environment by reduction of the small-molecular-mass disulphide trypanothione (T[S](2)) to its di-thiol derivative dihydrotrypanothione (T[SH](2)). TryR inhibition studies are currently impaired by the prohibitive costs of the native enzyme substrate T[S](2). Such costs are particularly notable in time-dependent and high-throughput inhibition assays. In the present study we report a protocol that greatly decreases the substrate quantities needed for such assays. This is achieved by coupling the assay with the chemical oxidant 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), which can rapidly re-oxidize the T[SH](2) product back into the disulphide substrate T[S](2), thereby maintaining constant substrate concentrations and avoiding deviations from rate linearity due to substrate depletion. This has enabled the development of a continuous microplate assay for both classical and time-dependent TryR inhibition in which linear reaction rates can be maintained for 60 min or more using minimal substrate concentrations (<1 microM, compared with a substrate K (m) value of 30 microM) that would normally be completely consumed within seconds. In this manner, substrate requirements are decreased by orders of magnitude. The characterization of a novel time-dependent inhibitor, cis -3-oxo-8,9b-bis-(N(1)-acrylamidospermidyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,9b-hexahydrobenzofuran (PK43), is also described using these procedures. PMID:12416994

  7. Analysis of cytochrome b5 reductase-mediated metabolism in the phytopathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici reveals novel functionalities implicated in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, Mark C.; Michaelson, Louise; Parker, Josie; Kelly, Steven; Thacker, Urvashi; Powers, Stephen J.; Bailey, Andy; Hammond-Kosack, Kim; Courbot, Mikael; Rudd, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Septoria tritici blotch (STB) caused by the Ascomycete fungus Zymoseptoria tritici is one of the most economically damaging diseases of wheat worldwide. Z. tritici is currently a major target for agricultural fungicides, especially in temperate regions where it is most prevalent. Many fungicides target electron transfer enzymes because these are often important for cell function. Therefore characterisation of genes encoding such enzymes may be important for the development of novel disease intervention strategies. Microsomal cytochrome b5 reductases (CBRs) are an important family of electron transfer proteins which in eukaryotes are involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids and complex lipids including sphingolipids and sterols. Unlike the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which possesses only one microsomal CBR, the fully sequenced genome of Z. tritici bears three possible microsomal CBRs. RNA sequencing analysis revealed that ZtCBR1 is the most highly expressed of these genes under all in vitro and in planta conditions tested, therefore ΔZtCBR1 mutant strains were generated through targeted gene disruption. These strains exhibited delayed disease symptoms on wheat leaves and severely limited asexual sporulation. ΔZtCBR1 strains also exhibited aberrant spore morphology and hyphal growth in vitro. These defects coincided with alterations in fatty acid, sphingolipid and sterol biosynthesis observed through GC–MS and HPLC analyses. Data is presented which suggests that Z. tritici may use ZtCBR1 as an additional electron donor for key steps in ergosterol biosynthesis, one of which is targeted by azole fungicides. Our study reports the first functional characterisation of CBR gene family members in a plant pathogenic filamentous fungus. This also represents the first direct observation of CBR functional ablation impacting upon fungal sterol biosynthesis. PMID:26074495

  8. The N-terminal Domain of Escherichia coli Assimilatory NADPH-Sulfite Reductase Hemoprotein Is an Oligomerization Domain That Mediates Holoenzyme Assembly.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Isabel; Pennington, Joseph M; Tao, Yeqing; Marshall, Alan G; Young, Nicolas L; Shang, Weifeng; Stroupe, M Elizabeth

    2015-07-31

    Assimilatory NADPH-sulfite reductase (SiR) from Escherichia coli is a structurally complex oxidoreductase that catalyzes the six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Two subunits, one a flavin-binding flavoprotein (SiRFP, the α subunit) and the other an iron-containing hemoprotein (SiRHP, the β subunit), assemble to make a holoenzyme of about 800 kDa. How the two subunits assemble is not known. The iron-rich cofactors in SiRHP are unique because they are a covalent arrangement of a Fe4S4 cluster attached through a cysteine ligand to an iron-containing porphyrinoid called siroheme. The link between cofactor biogenesis and SiR stability is also ill-defined. By use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange and biochemical analysis, we show that the α8β4 SiR holoenzyme assembles through the N terminus of SiRHP and the NADPH binding domain of SiRFP. By use of small angle x-ray scattering, we explore the structure of the SiRHP N-terminal oligomerization domain. We also report a novel form of the hemoprotein that occurs in the absence of its cofactors. Apo-SiRHP forms a homotetramer, also dependent on its N terminus, that is unable to assemble with SiRFP. From these results, we propose that homotetramerization of apo-SiRHP serves as a quality control mechanism to prevent formation of inactive holoenzyme in the case of limiting cellular siroheme.

  9. The N-terminal Domain of Escherichia coli Assimilatory NADPH-Sulfite Reductase Hemoprotein Is an Oligomerization Domain That Mediates Holoenzyme Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Askenasy, Isabel; Pennington, Joseph M.; Tao, Yeqing; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Shang, Weifeng; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Assimilatory NADPH-sulfite reductase (SiR) from Escherichia coli is a structurally complex oxidoreductase that catalyzes the six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Two subunits, one a flavin-binding flavoprotein (SiRFP, the α subunit) and the other an iron-containing hemoprotein (SiRHP, the β subunit), assemble to make a holoenzyme of about 800 kDa. How the two subunits assemble is not known. The iron-rich cofactors in SiRHP are unique because they are a covalent arrangement of a Fe4S4 cluster attached through a cysteine ligand to an iron-containing porphyrinoid called siroheme. The link between cofactor biogenesis and SiR stability is also ill-defined. By use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange and biochemical analysis, we show that the α8β4 SiR holoenzyme assembles through the N terminus of SiRHP and the NADPH binding domain of SiRFP. By use of small angle x-ray scattering, we explore the structure of the SiRHP N-terminal oligomerization domain. We also report a novel form of the hemoprotein that occurs in the absence of its cofactors. Apo-SiRHP forms a homotetramer, also dependent on its N terminus, that is unable to assemble with SiRFP. From these results, we propose that homotetramerization of apo-SiRHP serves as a quality control mechanism to prevent formation of inactive holoenzyme in the case of limiting cellular siroheme. PMID:26088143

  10. Neuroprotective role for carbonyl reductase?

    PubMed

    Maser, Edmund

    2006-02-24

    Oxidative stress is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Creutzfeld-Jakob diseases or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Reactive oxygen species seem to play a significant role in neuronal cell death in that they generate reactive aldehydes from membrane lipid peroxidation. Several neuronal diseases are associated with increased accumulation of abnormal protein adducts of reactive aldehydes, which mediate oxidative stress-linked pathological events, including cellular growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. Combining findings on neurodegeneration and oxidative stress in Drosophila with studies on the metabolic characteristics of the human enzyme carbonyl reductase (CR), it is clear now that CR has a potential physiological role for neuroprotection in humans. Several lines of evidence suggest that CR represents a significant pathway for the detoxification of reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and that CR in humans is essential for neuronal cell survival and to confer protection against oxidative stress-induced brain degeneration.

  11. Aldo-keto reductases mediate constitutive and inducible protection against aldehyde toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Robert C; Li, Dan; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Reactive aldehydes including methyl glyoxal, acrolein and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) have been implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. The reduction of aldehydes to alcohols by the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) family of enzymes may represent an important detoxication route within neuronal cells. In this study, the ability of AKR enzymes to protect human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against reactive aldehydes was assessed. Using gene-specific RNA interference (RNAi), we report that AKR7A2 makes a significant contribution to the reduction of methyl glyoxal in SH-SY5Y cells, with its knockdown altering the IC(50) from 410 to 25.8μM, and that AKR1C3 contributes to 4-HNE reduction, with its knockdown lowering the IC(50) from 1.25 to 0.58μM. In addition, we have shown that pretreatment of cells with sub-lethal concentrations of 4-HNE or methyl glyoxal leads to a significant increase in IC(50) when cells are exposed to higher concentrations of the toxic aldehyde. The IC(50) for methyl glyoxal increased from 410μM to 1.9mM, and the IC(50) for 4-HNE increased from 120 to 690nM. To investigate this protection, we show that pretreatment of cells with the AKR inhibitor sorbinil lead to decreased resistance to aldehydes. We show that AKR1C can be induced 8-fold in SH-SY5Y cells by treatment with sub-lethal concentrations of methyl glyoxal, and 5-fold by 4-HNE treatment. AKR1B is not induced by methyl glyoxal but is induced 10-fold by 4-HNE treatment. Furthermore, we have shown that this adaptive response can also be induced using the chemoprotective agent tert-butyl hydroquinone (t-BHQ), and that this also evokes an increase in the expression and activity of AKR1B and AKR1C. These findings highlight the potential for the interventional upregulation of AKR via non-toxic derivatives or natural compounds as a novel therapeutic approach towards the detoxication of aldehydes, with the aim of halting the progression of aldehyde-dependent neurodegenerative

  12. The MYC mRNA 3'-UTR couples RNA polymerase II function to glutamine and ribonucleotide levels.

    PubMed

    Dejure, Francesca R; Royla, Nadine; Herold, Steffi; Kalb, Jacqueline; Walz, Susanne; Ade, Carsten P; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Vanselow, Jens T; Schlosser, Andreas; Wolf, Elmar; Kempa, Stefan; Eilers, Martin

    2017-07-03

    Deregulated expression of MYC enhances glutamine utilization and renders cell survival dependent on glutamine, inducing "glutamine addiction". Surprisingly, colon cancer cells that express high levels of MYC due to WNT pathway mutations are not glutamine-addicted but undergo a reversible cell cycle arrest upon glutamine deprivation. We show here that glutamine deprivation suppresses translation of endogenous MYC via the 3'-UTR of the MYC mRNA, enabling escape from apoptosis. This regulation is mediated by glutamine-dependent changes in adenosine-nucleotide levels. Glutamine deprivation causes a global reduction in promoter association of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and slows transcriptional elongation. While activation of MYC restores binding of MYC and RNAPII function on most promoters, restoration of elongation is imperfect and activation of MYC in the absence of glutamine causes stalling of RNAPII on multiple genes, correlating with R-loop formation. Stalling of RNAPII and R-loop formation can cause DNA damage, arguing that the MYC 3'-UTR is critical for maintaining genome stability when ribonucleotide levels are low. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. A ribonucleotide Origin for Life - Fluctuation and Near-ideal Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarus, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Oligoribonucleotides are potentially capable of Darwinian evolution - they may replicate and can express an independent chemical phenotype, as embodied in modern enzymatic cofactors. Using quantitative chemical kinetics on a sporadically fed ribonucleotide pool, unreliable supplies of unstable activated ribonucleotides A and B at low concentrations recurrently yield a replicating AB polymer with a potential chemical phenotype. Self-complementary replication in the pool occurs during a minority (here ≈ 35 %) of synthetic episodes that exploit coincidental overlaps between 4, 5 or 6 spikes of arbitrarily arriving substrates. Such uniquely productive synthetic episodes, in which near-ideal reaction sequences recur at random, account for most AB oligonucleotide synthesis, and therefore underlie the emergence of net replication under realistic primordial conditions. Because overlapping substrate spikes are unexpectedly frequent, and in addition, complex spike sequences appear disproportionately, a sporadically fed pool can host unexpectedly complex syntheses. Thus, primordial substrate fluctuations are not necessarily a barrier to Darwinism, but instead can facilitate early evolution.

  14. Substitution of Ribonucleotides in the T7 RNA Polymerase Promoter Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out to examine the effects of ribonucleotide substitution at various locations within the promoter element for T7 RNA polymerase. Ribonucleotides could be introduced at most positions without significantly decreasing transcription efficiency. A critical window of residues that were intolerant of RNA substitution was defined for both the non-template and template strands of the promoter. These residues are involved in important contacts with the AT-rich recognition loop, specificity loop, and P-intercalating hairpin of the polymerase. These results highlight the malleability of T7 RNA polymerase in recognizing its promoter element and suggest that promoters with altered backbone conformations may be used in molecular biology applications that employ T7 RNA polymerase for in vitro transcription.

  15. Substitution of Ribonucleotides in the T7 RNA Polymerase Promoter Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out to examine the effects of ribonucleotide substitution at various locations within the promoter element for T7 RNA polymerase. Ribonucleotides could be introduced at most positions without significantly decreasing transcription efficiency. A critical window of residues that were intolerant of RNA substitution was defined for both the non-template and template strands of the promoter. These residues are involved in important contacts with the AT-rich recognition loop, specificity loop, and P-intercalating hairpin of the polymerase. These results highlight the malleability of T7 RNA polymerase in recognizing its promoter element and suggest that promoters with altered backbone conformations may be used in molecular biology applications that employ T7 RNA polymerase for in vitro transcription.

  16. A Mn(IV)/Fe(IV) Intermediate in Assembly of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Hoffart, Lee M.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2008-01-01

    We recently showed that the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from the human pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, uses a MnIV/FeIII cofactor to generate protein and substrate radicals in its catalytic mechanism [Jiang, W., Yun, D., Saleh, L., Barr, E. W., Xing, G., Hoffart, L. M., Maslak, M.-A., Krebs, C., and Bollinger, J. M., Jr. (2007) Science 316, 1188-1191]. Here, we have dissected the mechanism of formation of this novel heterobinuclear redox cofactor from the MnII/FeII cluster and O2. An intermediate with a g = 2 EPR signal that shows hyperfine coupling to both 55Mn and 57Fe accumulates almost quantitatively in a second order reaction between O2 and the reduced R2 complex. The otherwise slow decay of the intermediate to the active MnIV/FeIII-R2 complex is accelerated by the presence of the one-electron reductant, ascorbate, implying that the intermediate is more oxidized than MnIV/FeIII. Mössbauer spectra show that the intermediate contains a high-spin FeIV center. Its chemical and spectroscopic properties establish that the intermediate is a MnIV/FeIV-R2 complex with an S = 1/2 electronic ground state arising from antiferromagnetic coupling between the MnIV (SMn = 3/2) and high-spin FeIV (SFe = 2) sites. PMID:17616152

  17. Swinger RNAs with sharp switches between regular transcription and transcription systematically exchanging ribonucleotides: Case studies.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    During RNA transcription, DNA nucleotides A,C,G, T are usually matched by ribonucleotides A, C, G and U. However occasionally, this rule does not apply: transcript-DNA homologies are detectable only assuming systematic exchanges between ribonucleotides. Nine symmetric (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric (X ↔ Y ↔ Z, e.g. A ↔ C ↔ G) exchanges exist, called swinger transcriptions. Putatively, polymerases occasionally stabilize in unspecified swinger conformations, possibly similar to transient conformations causing punctual misinsertions. This predicts chimeric transcripts, part regular, part swinger-transformed, reflecting polymerases switching to swinger polymerization conformation(s). Four chimeric Genbank transcripts (three from human mitochondrion and one murine cytosolic) are described here: (a) the 5' and 3' extremities reflect regular polymerization, the intervening sequence exchanges systematically between ribonucleotides (swinger rule G ↔ U, transcript (1), with sharp switches between regular and swinger sequences; (b) the 5' half is 'normal', the 3' half systematically exchanges ribonucleotides (swinger rule C ↔ G, transcript (2), with an intercalated sequence lacking homology; (c) the 3' extremity fits A ↔ G exchanges (10% of transcript length), the 5' half follows regular transcription; the intervening region seems a mix of regular and A ↔ G transcriptions (transcript 3); (d) murine cytosolic transcript 4 switches to A ↔ U + C ↔ G, and is fused with A ↔ U + C ↔ G swinger transformed precursor rRNA. In (c), each concomitant transcript 5' and 3' extremities match opposite genome strands. Transcripts 3 and 4 combine transcript fusions with partial swinger transcriptions. Occasional (usually sharp) switches between regular and swinger transcriptions reveal greater coding potential than detected until now, suggest stable polymerase swinger conformations.

  18. Activated ribonucleotides undergo a sugar pucker switch upon binding to a single-stranded RNA template.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Zhang, Shenglong; Szostak, Jack W

    2012-02-29

    Template-directed polymerization of chemically activated ribonucleotide monomers, such as nucleotide 5'-phosphorimidazolides, has been studied as a model for nonenzymatic RNA replication during the origin of life. Kinetic studies of the polymerization of various nucleotide monomers on oligonucleotide templates have suggested that the A-form (C3'-endo sugar pucker) conformation is optimal for both monomers and templates for efficient copying. However, RNA monomers are predominantly in the C2'-endo conformation when free in solution, except for cytidine, which is approximately equally distributed between the C2'-endo and C3'-endo conformations. We hypothesized that ribonucleotides undergo a switch in sugar pucker upon binding to an A-type template and that this conformational switch allows or enhances subsequent polymerization. We used transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (TrNOESY), which can be used for specific detection of the bound conformation of small-molecule ligands with relatively weak affinity to receptors, to study the interactions between nucleotide 5'-phosphorimidazolides and single-stranded oligonucleotide templates. We found that the sugar pucker of activated ribonucleotides switches from C2'-endo in the free state to C3'-endo upon binding to an RNA template. This switch occurs only on RNA and not on DNA templates. Furthermore, activated 2'-deoxyribonucleotides maintain a C2'-endo sugar pucker in both the free and template-bound states. Our results provide a structural explanation for the observations that activated ribonucleotides are superior to activated deoxyribonucleotides and that RNA templates are superior to DNA templates in template-directed nonenzymatic primer-extension reactions. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  19. The structure of apo and holo forms of xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase from Candida tenuis.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-07-16

    Xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase dependent on NADPH or NADH and belongs to the largely monomeric aldo-keto reductase superfamily of proteins. It catalyzes the first step in the assimilation of xylose, an aldose found to be a major constituent monosaccharide of renewable plant hemicellulosic material, into yeast metabolic pathways. It does this by reducing open chain xylose to xylitol, which is reoxidized to xylulose by xylitol dehydrogenase and metabolically integrated via the pentose phosphate pathway. No structure has yet been determined for a xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase or a family 2 aldo-keto reductase. The structures of the Candida tenuis xylose reductase apo- and holoenzyme, which crystallize in spacegroup C2 with different unit cells, have been determined to 2.2 A resolution and an R-factor of 17.9 and 20.8%, respectively. Residues responsible for mediating the novel dimeric interface include Asp-178, Arg-181, Lys-202, Phe-206, Trp-313, and Pro-319. Alignments with other superfamily members indicate that these interactions are conserved in other dimeric xylose reductases but not throughout the remainder of the oligomeric aldo-keto reductases, predicting alternate modes of oligomerization for other families. An arrangement of side chains in a catalytic triad shows that Tyr-52 has a conserved function as a general acid. The loop that folds over the NAD(P)H cosubstrate is disordered in the apo form but becomes ordered upon cosubstrate binding. A slow conformational isomerization of this loop probably accounts for the observed rate-limiting step involving release of cosubstrate. Xylose binding (K(m) = 87 mM) is mediated by interactions with a binding pocket that is more polar than a typical aldo-keto reductase. Modeling of xylose into the active site of the holoenzyme using ordered waters as a guide for sugar hydroxyls suggests a convincing mode of substrate binding.

  20. Coupling of NAD+ Biosynthesis and Nicotinamide Ribosyl Transport: Characterization of NadR Ribonucleotide Kinase Mutants of Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Sauer, Elizabeta; Reidl, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we characterized a pathway necessary for the processing of NAD+ and for uptake of nicotinamide riboside (NR) in Haemophilus influenzae. Here we report on the role of NadR, which is essential for NAD+ utilization in this organism. Different NadR variants with a deleted ribonucleotide kinase domain or with a single amino acid change were characterized in vitro and in vivo with respect to cell viability, ribonucleotide kinase activity, and NR transport. The ribonucleotide kinase mutants were viable only in a nadV+ (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) background, indicating that the ribonucleotide kinase domain is essential for cell viability in H. influenzae. Mutations located in the Walker A and B motifs and the LID region resulted in deficiencies in both NR phosphorylation and NR uptake. The ribonucleotide kinase function of NadR was found to be feedback controlled by NAD+ under in vitro conditions and by NAD+ utilization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the NR phosphorylation step is essential for both NR uptake across the inner membrane and NAD+ synthesis and is also involved in controlling the NAD+ biosynthesis rate. PMID:15968050

  1. Coupling of NAD+ biosynthesis and nicotinamide ribosyl transport: characterization of NadR ribonucleotide kinase mutants of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Sauer, Elizabeta; Reidl, Joachim

    2005-07-01

    Previously, we characterized a pathway necessary for the processing of NAD+ and for uptake of nicotinamide riboside (NR) in Haemophilus influenzae. Here we report on the role of NadR, which is essential for NAD+ utilization in this organism. Different NadR variants with a deleted ribonucleotide kinase domain or with a single amino acid change were characterized in vitro and in vivo with respect to cell viability, ribonucleotide kinase activity, and NR transport. The ribonucleotide kinase mutants were viable only in a nadV+ (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) background, indicating that the ribonucleotide kinase domain is essential for cell viability in H. influenzae. Mutations located in the Walker A and B motifs and the LID region resulted in deficiencies in both NR phosphorylation and NR uptake. The ribonucleotide kinase function of NadR was found to be feedback controlled by NAD+ under in vitro conditions and by NAD+ utilization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the NR phosphorylation step is essential for both NR uptake across the inner membrane and NAD+ synthesis and is also involved in controlling the NAD+ biosynthesis rate.

  2. Role of protein farnesylation events in the ABA-mediated regulation of the Pinoresinol-Lariciresinol Reductase 1 (LuPLR1) gene expression and lignan biosynthesis in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Corbin, Cyrielle; Decourtil, Cédric; Marosevic, Djurdjica; Bailly, Marlène; Lopez, Tatiana; Renouard, Sullivan; Doussot, Joël; Dutilleul, Christelle; Auguin, Daniel; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Lainé, Eric; Lamblin, Frédéric; Hano, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    A Linum usitatissimum LuERA1 gene encoding a putative ortholog of the ERA1 (Enhanced Response to ABA 1) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana (encoding the beta subunit of a farnesyltransferase) was analyzed in silico and for its expression in flax. The gene and the protein sequences are highly similar to other sequences already characterized in plants and all the features of a farnesyltransferase were detected. Molecular modeling of LuERA1 protein confirmed its farnesyltransferase nature. LuERA1 is expressed in the vegetative organs and also in the outer seedcoat of the flaxseed, where it could modulate the previously observed regulation operated by ABA on lignan synthesis. This effect could be mediated by the regulation of the transcription of a key gene for lignan synthesis in flax, the LuPLR1 gene, encoding a pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase. The positive effect of manumycin A, a specific inhibitor of farnesyltransferase, on lignan biosynthesis in flax cell suspension systems supports the hypothesis of the involvement of such an enzyme in the negative regulation of ABA action. In Arabidopsis, ERA1 is able to negatively regulate the ABA effects and the mutant era1 has an enhanced sensitivity to ABA. When expressed in an Arabidopsis cell suspension (heterologous system) LuERA1 is able to reverse the effect of the era1 mutation. RNAi experiments in flax targeting the farnesyltransferase β-subunit encoded by the LuERA1 gene led to an increase LuPLR1 expression level associated with an increased content of lignan in transgenic calli. Altogether these results strongly suggest a role of the product of this LuERA1 gene in the ABA-mediated upregulation of lignan biosynthesis in flax cells through the activation of LuPLR1 promoter. This ABA signaling pathway involving ERA1 probably acts through the ABRE box found in the promoter sequence of LuPLR1, a key gene for lignan synthesis in flax, as demonstrated by LuPLR1 gene promoter-reporter experiments in flax cells using wild

  3. Hydroxyurea induces hydroxyl radical-mediated cell death in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Bryan W.; Kohanski, Michael A.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Winkler, Jonathan A.; Collins, James J.; Walker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Hydroxyurea (HU) specifically inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), depleting dNTP pools and leading to replication fork arrest. While HU inhibition of RNR has been recognized for decades, the mechanism by which it leads to cell death remains unknown. To investigate the mechanism of HU-induced cell death we used a systems-level approach to determine the genomic and physiological responses of E. coli to HU treatment. Our results suggest a model by which HU treatment rapidly induces a set of protective responses to manage genomic instability in the majority of the cell population. Continued HU stress activates iron uptake as well as the toxins MazF and RelE whose activity causes the synthesis of incompletely translated proteins and stimulation of the envelope stress response system. These effects alter the properties of one of the cell’s two terminal cytochrome oxidases in the electron transport chain, causing an increase in the production of superoxide. The increased superoxide production from the respiratory chain together with the increased iron uptake fuels the formation of hydroxyl radicals that contribute to HU-induced cell death. This work significantly expands our understanding of HU-mediated cell death and more broadly suggests a pathway whereby replication fork arrest leads to cell death. PMID:20005847

  4. Coupling of the guanosine glycosidic bond conformation and the ribonucleotide cleavage reaction: implications for barnase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Roca, Maite; De Maria, Leonardo; Wodak, Shoshana J; Moliner, Vicente; Tuñón, Iñaki; Giraldo, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    To examine the possible relationship of guanine-dependent GpA conformations with ribonucleotide cleavage, two potential of mean force (PMF) calculations were performed in aqueous solution. In the first calculation, the guanosine glycosidic (Gchi) angle was used as the reaction coordinate, and computations were performed on two GpA ionic species: protonated (neutral) or deprotonated (negatively charged) guanosine ribose O2 '. Similar energetic profiles featuring two minima corresponding to the anti and syn Gchi regions were obtained for both ionic forms. For both forms the anti conformation was more stable than the syn, and barriers of approximately 4 kcal/mol were obtained for the anti --> syn transition. Structural analysis showed a remarkable sensitivity of the phosphate moiety to the conformation of the Gchi angle, suggesting a possible connection between this conformation and the mechanism of ribonucleotide cleavage. This hypothesis was confirmed by the second PMF calculations, for which the O2 '--P distance for the deprotonated GpA was used as reaction coordinate. The computations were performed from two selected starting points: the anti and syn minima determined in the first PMF study of the deprotonated guanosine ribose O2'. The simulations revealed that the O2 ' attack along the syn Gchi was more favorable than that along the anti Gchi: energetically, significantly lower barriers were obtained in the syn than in the anti conformation for the O--P bond formation; structurally, a lesser O2 '--P initial distance, and a better suited orientation for an in-line attack was observed in the syn relative to the anti conformation. These results are consistent with the catalytically competent conformation of barnase-ribonucleotide complex, which requires a guanine syn conformation of the substrate to enable abstraction of the ribose H2 ' proton by the general base Glu73, thereby suggesting a coupling between the reactive substrate conformation and enzyme structure

  5. Complexed Structures of Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima Describe a Novel ATP Binding Protein Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Anand, Ruchi; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-09-11

    Formylglycinamide ribonucleotide amidotransferase (FGAR-AT) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM) from formylglycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) and glutamine in the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway. FGAR-AT is encoded by the purL gene. Two types of PurL have been detected. The first type, found in eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria, consists of a single 140 kDa polypeptide chain and is designated large PurL (lgPurL). The second type, small PurL (smPurL), is found in archaea and Gram-positive bacteria and consists of an 80 kDa polypeptide chain. SmPurL requires two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS, for activity. PurL is a member of a protein superfamily that contains a novel ATP-binding domain. Structures of several members of this superfamily are available in the unliganded form. We determined five different structures of FGAR-AT from Thermotoga maritima in the presence of substrates, a substrate analogue, and a product. These complexes have allowed a detailed description of the novel ATP-binding motif. The availability of a ternary complex enabled mapping of the active site, thus identifying potential residues involved in catalysis. The complexes show a conformational change in the active site compared to the unliganded structure. Surprising discoveries, an ATP molecule in an auxiliary site of the protein and the conformational changes associated with its binding, provoke speculation about the regulatory role of the auxiliary site in formation of the PurLSQ complex as well as the evolutionary relationship of PurLs from different organisms.

  6. Replication of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA entails transient ribonucleotide incorporation throughout the lagging strand

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Takehiro; Reyes, Aurelio; Cluett, Tricia J; Yang, Ming-Yao; Bowmaker, Mark; Jacobs, Howard T; Holt, Ian J

    2006-01-01

    Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication of birds and mammals frequently entails ribonucleotide incorporation throughout the lagging strand (RITOLS). Based on a combination of two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoretic analysis and mapping of 5′ ends of DNA, initiation of RITOLS replication occurs in the major non-coding region of vertebrate mtDNA and is effectively unidirectional. In some cases, conversion of nascent RNA strands to DNA starts at defined loci, the most prominent of which maps, in mammalian mtDNA, in the vicinity of the site known as the light-strand origin. PMID:17066082

  7. Carbon-carbon double-bond reductases in nature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minmin; Hu, Haihong; Ma, Li; Zhou, Quan; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2014-08-01

    Reduction of C = C bonds by reductases, found in a variety of microorganisms (e.g. yeasts, bacteria, and lower fungi), animals, and plants has applications in the production of metabolites that include pharmacologically active drugs and other chemicals. Therefore, the reductase enzymes that mediate this transformation have become important therapeutic targets and biotechnological tools. These reductases are broad-spectrum, in that, they can act on isolation/conjugation C = C-bond compounds, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives, and nitro compounds. In addition, several mutations in the reductase gene have been identified, some associated with diseases. Several of these reductases have been cloned and/or purified, and studies to further characterize them and determine their structure in order to identify potential industrial biocatalysts are still in progress. In this study, crucial reductases for bioreduction of C = C bonds have been reviewed with emphasis on their principal substrates and effective inhibitors, their distribution, genetic polymorphisms, and implications in human disease and treatment.

  8. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems.

  9. Divergent prebiotic synthesis of pyrimidine and 8-oxo-purine ribonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stairs, Shaun; Nikmal, Arif; Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Szostak, Jack W.; Powner, Matthew W.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding prebiotic nucleotide synthesis is a long standing challenge thought to be essential to elucidating the origins of life on Earth. Recently, remarkable progress has been made, but to date all proposed syntheses account separately for the pyrimidine and purine ribonucleotides; no divergent synthesis from common precursors has been proposed. Moreover, the prebiotic syntheses of pyrimidine and purine nucleotides that have been demonstrated operate under mutually incompatible conditions. Here, we tackle this mutual incompatibility by recognizing that the 8-oxo-purines share an underlying generational parity with the pyrimidine nucleotides. We present a divergent synthesis of pyrimidine and 8-oxo-purine nucleotides starting from a common prebiotic precursor that yields the β-ribo-stereochemistry found in the sugar phosphate backbone of biological nucleic acids. The generational relationship between pyrimidine and 8-oxo-purine nucleotides suggests that 8-oxo-purine ribonucleotides may have played a key role in primordial nucleic acids prior to the emergence of the canonical nucleotides of biology.

  10. Fermentative production of ribonucleotides from whey by Kluyveromyces marxianus: effect of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Húngaro, Humberto Moreira; Calil, Natalia Oliveira; Ferreira, Aline Siqueira; Chandel, Anuj Kumar; da Silva, Silvio Silvério

    2013-10-01

    Ribonucleotides have shown many promising applications in food and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of the present study was to produce ribonucleotides (RNA) by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 8,554 utilizing cheese whey, a dairy industry waste, as a main substrate under batch fermentation conditions. The effects of temperature, pH, aeration rate, agitation and initial cellular concentration were studied simultaneously through factorial design for RNA, biomass production and lactose consumption. The maximum RNA production (28.66 mg/g of dry biomass) was observed at temperature 30°C, pH 5.0 and 1 g/l of initial cellular concentration after 2 h of fermentation. Agitation and aeration rate did not influence on RNA concentration (p > 0.05). Maximum lactose consumption (98.7%) and biomass production (6.0 g/l) was observed after 12 h of incubation. This study proves that cheese whey can be used as an adequate medium for RNA production by K. marxianus under the optimized conditions at industrial scale.

  11. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  12. Impact of ribonucleotide incorporation by DNA polymerases β and λ on oxidative base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Furrer, Antonia; Rösinger, Marcel; Bertoletti, Federica; Mentegari, Elisa; Chiapparini, Giulia; Imhof, Ralph; Ziegler, Nathalie; Sturla, Shana J.; Hübscher, Ulrich; van Loon, Barbara; Maga, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a very frequent source of DNA damage. Many cellular DNA polymerases (Pols) can incorporate ribonucleotides (rNMPs) during DNA synthesis. However, whether oxidative stress-triggered DNA repair synthesis contributes to genomic rNMPs incorporation is so far not fully understood. Human specialized Pols β and λ are the important enzymes involved in the oxidative stress tolerance, acting both in base excision repair and in translesion synthesis past the very frequent oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G). We found that Pol β, to a greater extent than Pol λ can incorporate rNMPs opposite normal bases or 8-oxo-G, and with a different fidelity. Further, the incorporation of rNMPs opposite 8-oxo-G delays repair by DNA glycosylases. Studies in Pol β- and λ-deficient cell extracts suggest that Pol β levels can greatly affect rNMP incorporation opposite oxidative DNA lesions. PMID:26917111

  13. Profiling ribonucleotide modifications at full-transcriptome level: a step toward MS-based epitranscriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Rebecca E.; Quinn, Ryan; Sayre, Jackie L.

    2015-01-01

    The elucidation of the biological significance of RNA post-transcriptional modifications is hampered by the dearth of effective high-throughput sequencing approaches for detecting, locating, and tracking their levels as a function of predetermined experimental factors. With the goal of confronting this knowledge gap, we devised a strategy for completing global surveys of all ribonucleotide modifications in a cell, which is based on the analysis of whole cell extracts by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Our approach eschews chromatographic separation to promote instead the direct application of MS techniques capable of providing detection, differentiation, and quantification of post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) in complex ribonucleotide mixtures. Accurate mass analysis was used to carry out database-aided identification of PTMs, whereas multistep tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) and consecutive reaction monitoring (CRM) provided the necessary structural corroboration. We demonstrated that heat-map plots afforded by ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) can provide comprehensive modification profiles that are unique for different cell types and metabolic states. We showed that isolated tRNA samples can be used as controlled sources of PTMs in standard-additions quantification. Intrinsic internal standards enable direct comparisons of heat-maps obtained under different experimental conditions, thus offering the opportunity to evaluate the global effects of such conditions on the expression levels of all PTMs simultaneously. This type of comparative analysis will be expected to support the investigation of the system biology of RNA modifications, which will be aimed at exploring mutual correlations of their expression levels and providing new valuable insights into their biological significance. PMID:25995446

  14. Profiling ribonucleotide modifications at full-transcriptome level: a step toward MS-based epitranscriptomics.

    PubMed

    Rose, Rebecca E; Quinn, Ryan; Sayre, Jackie L; Fabris, Daniele

    2015-07-01

    The elucidation of the biological significance of RNA post-transcriptional modifications is hampered by the dearth of effective high-throughput sequencing approaches for detecting, locating, and tracking their levels as a function of predetermined experimental factors. With the goal of confronting this knowledge gap, we devised a strategy for completing global surveys of all ribonucleotide modifications in a cell, which is based on the analysis of whole cell extracts by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Our approach eschews chromatographic separation to promote instead the direct application of MS techniques capable of providing detection, differentiation, and quantification of post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) in complex ribonucleotide mixtures. Accurate mass analysis was used to carry out database-aided identification of PTMs, whereas multistep tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) and consecutive reaction monitoring (CRM) provided the necessary structural corroboration. We demonstrated that heat-map plots afforded by ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) can provide comprehensive modification profiles that are unique for different cell types and metabolic states. We showed that isolated tRNA samples can be used as controlled sources of PTMs in standard-additions quantification. Intrinsic internal standards enable direct comparisons of heat-maps obtained under different experimental conditions, thus offering the opportunity to evaluate the global effects of such conditions on the expression levels of all PTMs simultaneously. This type of comparative analysis will be expected to support the investigation of the system biology of RNA modifications, which will be aimed at exploring mutual correlations of their expression levels and providing new valuable insights into their biological significance. © 2015 Rose et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. Structural analysis of the active site geometry of N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M; Firestine, Steven M

    2008-12-16

    N(5)-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N(5)-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N(5)-CAIR, MgADP, and P(i). The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N(5)-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P(i) bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-A resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P(i) complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P(i) rather than ATP. The bound P(i) shifts by approximately 3 A relative to the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N(5)-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N(5)-CAIR synthetase.

  16. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  17. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  18. Histochemical localization of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, K C; Duke, S O

    1981-01-01

    NADH-dependent nitrate reductase (E.C. 1.6.6.1) was ultrastructurally localized in norflurazon-treated and control soybean cotyledons [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] by a method based upon the increase in osmiophilia due to the formation of an azo dye. The reaction product was observed in small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm. An apparent transport of nitrite to the plastid, the site of nitrite reduction, may occur through fusion of the nitrite-containing vesicles with the chloroplast envelope. Plants grown in tungstate lacked nitrate reductase activity as measured by standard assay procedures, and showed no increase in osmiophilia, suggesting a degree of specificity of this cytochemical procedure.

  19. Crystal Structure and Function of 5-Formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; White, Robert H.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-08-06

    Purine biosynthesis requires 10 enzymatic steps in higher organisms, while prokaryotes require an additional enzyme for step 6. In most organisms steps 9 and 10 are catalyzed by the purH gene product, a bifunctional enzyme with both 5-formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (FAICAR) synthase and inosine monophosphate (IMP) cyclohydrolase activity. Recently it was discovered that Archaea utilize different enzymes to catalyze steps 9 and 10. An ATP-dependent FAICAR synthetase is encoded by the purP gene, and IMP cyclohydrolase is encoded by the purO gene. We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of FAICAR synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii complexed with various ligands, including the tertiary substrate complex and product complex. The enzyme belongs to the ATP grasp superfamily and is predicted to use a formyl phosphate intermediate formed by an ATP-dependent phosphorylation. In addition, we have determined the structures of a PurP orthologue from Pyrococcus furiosus, which is functionally unclassified, in three crystal forms. With approximately 50% sequence identity, P. furiosus PurP is structurally homologous to M. jannaschii PurP. A phylogenetic analysis was performed to explore the possible role of this functionally unclassified PurP.

  20. [Synergistic effect and quantification of 5'-ribonucleotides in a chicken soup].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrezy, Carla; Sangronis, Elba

    2006-09-01

    The international and national regulation permits the addition of flavour enhancers such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and inosinic and guanilic acids and their fosfated salts (IMP or GMP, respectively) alone or combined to dehydrated mixtures of broths and soups in order to obtain a synergistic. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine, through a sensorial panel, the synergistic effect on the flavour of a dehydrated chicken soup to which flavour enhancers were added and (2) quantify the 5'-ribonucleotides in such matrix. The intensity of the chicken flavour was determined using a previously trained 6-member panel. The 5'-ribonucleotidos were determined using the HPLC technique. The results using the panel demonstrated that the combination of GMS, IMF and GMF used potentiates significantly (p < 0.05) the flavour of the dehydrated chicken soup, which allows the use of less quantity of them to obtain the same effect on the flavour. The chemical analysis of the 5'-ribonucleotidos in the dehydrated chicken soup reflected a percentage of recovery of 93.6% for MSG and 90.5% for IMF.

  1. Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics Analysis of Ribonucleotide and RNA Metabolism in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Tan, Jinlian; McKinney, Martin M; Lane, Andrew N

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a simple NMR-based method to determine the turnover of nucleotides and incorporation into RNA by stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM) in A549 lung cancer cells. This method requires no chemical degradation of the nucleotides or chromatography. During cell growth, the free ribonucleotide pool is rapidly replaced by de novo synthesized nucleotides. Using [U-(13)C]-glucose and [U-(13)C,(15)N]-glutamine as tracers, we showed that virtually all of the carbons in the nucleotide riboses were derived from glucose, whereas glutamine was preferentially utilized over glucose for pyrimidine ring biosynthesis, via the synthesis of Asp through the Krebs cycle. Incorporation of the glutamine amido nitrogen into the N3 and N9 positions of the purine rings was also demonstrated by proton-detected (15)N NMR. The incorporation of (13)C from glucose into total RNA was measured and shown to be a major sink for the nucleotides during cell proliferation. This method was applied to determine the metabolic action of an anti-cancer selenium agent (methylseleninic acid or MSA) on A549 cells. We found that MSA inhibited nucleotide turnover and incorporation into RNA, implicating an important role of nucleotide metabolism in the toxic action of MSA on cancer cells.

  2. An error-prone family Y DNA polymerase (DinB homolog from Sulfolobus solfataricus) uses a 'steric gate' residue for discrimination against ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    DeLucia, Angela M; Grindley, Nigel D F; Joyce, Catherine M

    2003-07-15

    DNA polymerases of the A and B families, and reverse transcriptases, share a common mechanism for preventing incorporation of ribonucleotides: a highly conserved active site residue obstructing the position that would be occupied by a 2' hydroxyl group on the incoming nucleotide. In the family Y (lesion bypass) polymerases, the enzyme active site is more open, with fewer contacts to the DNA and nucleotide substrates. Nevertheless, ribonucleotide discrimination by the DinB homolog (Dbh) DNA polymerase of Sulfolobus solfataricus is as stringent as in other polymerases. A highly conserved aromatic residue (Phe12 in Dbh) occupies a position analogous to the residues responsible for excluding ribonucleotides in other DNA polymerases. The F12A mutant of Dbh incorporates ribonucleoside triphosphates almost as efficiently as deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, and, unlike analogous mutants in other polymerase families, shows no barrier to adding multiple ribonucleotides, suggesting that Dbh can readily accommodate a DNA-RNA duplex product. Like other members of the DinB group of bypass polymerases, Dbh makes single-base deletion errors at high frequency in particular sequence contexts. When making a deletion error, ribonucleotide discrimination by wild-type and F12A Dbh is the same as in normal DNA synthesis, indicating that the geometry of nucleotide binding is similar in both circumstances.

  3. Genome-wide mapping of embedded ribonucleotides and other non-canonical nucleotides using emRiboSeq and EndoSeq

    PubMed Central

    Ding, James; Taylor, Martin S.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Reijns, Martin A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleotides are the most common non-canonical nucleotides incorporated into the genome of replicating cells. They are efficiently removed by ribonucleotide excision repair initiated by Ribonuclease (RNase) H2 cleavage. In the absence of RNase H2, such embedded ribonucleotides can be used to track DNA polymerase activity in vivo. To determine their precise location in Saccharomyces cerevisiae we developed embedded Ribonucleotide Sequencing (emRiboSeq), which uses recombinant RNase H2 to selectively create ligatable 3’-hydroxyl groups, in contrast to alternative methods that utilize alkaline hydrolysis. EmRiboSeq allows reproducible, strand-specific and potentially quantitative detection of embedded ribonucleotides at single-nucleotide resolution. This protocol can be adapted for the genome-wide mapping of other non-canonical bases by replacing RNase H2 with specific nicking endonucleases, a method we term Endonuclease Sequencing (EndoSeq). With the protocol taking <5 days to complete, these methods allow the in vivo study of DNA replication and repair, including the identification of replication origins and termination regions. PMID:26313479

  4. Molybdenum effector of fumarate reductase repression and nitrate reductase induction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S; Lin, E C

    1987-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the presence of nitrate prevents the utilization of fumarate as an anaerobic electron acceptor. The induction of the narC operon encoding the nitrate reductase is coupled to the repression of the frd operon encoding the fumarate reductase. This coupling is mediated by nitrate as an effector and the narL product as the regulatory protein (S. Iuchi and E. C. C. Lin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:3901-3905, 1987). The protein-ligand complex appears to control narC positively but frd negatively. In the present study we found that a molybdenum coeffector acted synergistically with nitrate in the regulation of frd and narC. In chlD mutants believed to be impaired in molybdate transport (or processing), full repression of phi(frd-lac) and full induction of phi(narC-lac) by nitrate did not occur unless the growth medium was directly supplemented with molybdate (1 microM). This requirement was not clearly manifested in wild-type cells, apparently because it was met by the trace quantities of molybdate present as a contaminant in the mineral medium. In chlB mutants, which are known to accumulate the Mo cofactor because of its failure to be inserted as a prosthetic group into proteins such as nitrate reductase, nitrate repression of frd and induction of narC were also intensified by molybdate supplementation. In this case a deficiency of the molybdenum coeffector might have resulted from enhanced feedback inhibition of molybdate transport (or processing) by the elevated level of the unutilized Mo cofactor. In addition, mutations in chlE, which are known to block the synthesis of the organic moiety of the Mo cofactor, lowered the threshold concentration of nitrate (< 1 micromole) necessary for frd repression and narC induction. These changes could be explained simply by the higher intracellular nitrate attainable in cells lacking the ability to destroy the effector. PMID:3301812

  5. Sterol-induced dislocation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase from membranes of permeabilized cells.

    PubMed

    Elsabrouty, Rania; Jo, Youngah; Dinh, Tammy T; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2013-11-01

    The polytopic endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of cholesterol and nonsterol isoprenoids. Excess sterols cause the reductase to bind to ER membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2, which are carriers for the ubiquitin ligases gp78 and Trc8. The resulting gp78/Trc8-mediated ubiquitination of reductase marks it for recognition by VCP/p97, an ATPase that mediates subsequent dislocation of reductase from ER membranes into the cytosol for proteasomal degradation. Here we report that in vitro additions of the oxysterol 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), exogenous cytosol, and ATP trigger dislocation of ubiquitinated and full-length forms of reductase from membranes of permeabilized cells. In addition, the sterol-regulated reaction requires the action of Insigs, is stimulated by reagents that replace 25-HC in accelerating reductase degradation in intact cells, and is augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of deubiquitinating enzymes markedly enhances sterol-dependent ubiquitination of reductase in membranes of permeabilized cells, leading to enhanced dislocation of the enzyme. Considered together, these results establish permeabilized cells as a viable system in which to elucidate mechanisms for postubiquitination steps in sterol-accelerated degradation of reductase.

  6. An in vitro system for measuring genotoxicity mediated by human CYP3A4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fasullo, Michael; Freedland, Julian; St John, Nicholas; Cera, Cinzia; Egner, Patricia; Hartog, Matthew; Ding, Xinxin

    2017-05-01

    P450 activity is required to metabolically activate many chemical carcinogens, rendering them highly genotoxic. CYP3A4 is the most abundantly expressed P450 enzyme in the liver, accounting for most drug metabolism and constituting 50% of all hepatic P450 activity. CYP3A4 is also expressed in extrahepatic tissues, including the intestine. However, the role of CYP3A4 in activating chemical carcinogens into potent genotoxins is unclear. To facilitate efforts to determine whether CYP3A4, per se, can activate carcinogens into potent genotoxins, we expressed human CYP3A4 in the DNA-repair mutant (rad4 rad51) strain of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and tested the novel, recombinant yeast strain for ability to report CYP3A4-mediated genotoxicity of a well-known genotoxin, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ). Yeast microsomes containing human CYP3A4, but not those that do not contain CYP3A4, were active in hydroxylation of diclofenac, a known CYP3A4 substrate drug, a result confirming CYP3A4 activity in the recombinant yeast strain. In cells exposed to AFB1 , the expression of CYP3A4 supported DNA adduct formation, chromosome rearrangements, cell death, and expression of the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, Rnr3, a marker of DNA damage. Expression of CYP3A4 also conferred sensitivity in rad4 rad51 mutants exposed to colon carcinogen, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx). These data confirm the ability of human CYP3A4 to mediate the genotoxicity of AFB1 , and illustrate the usefulness of the CYP3A4-expressing, DNA-repair mutant yeast strain for screening other chemical compounds that are CYP3A4 substrates, for potential genotoxicity. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:217-227, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Adoption and validation of Ribonucleotide Reductase (RNR)-based real-time assays for detection of HLB ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Huanglongbing (HLB), aka Citrus Greening, is a well-known destructive disease that threatens the multi-billion dollar citrus industry in the United States and citrus production in other countries around the world. The presumptive causal agent of HLB, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas), is of...

  8. ATR-CHK1-E2F3 signaling transactivates human ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 for DNA repair induced by the chemical carcinogen MNNG.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Song, Rui; Zhong, Tingting; Lou, Meng; Wang, Tingyang; Qi, Hongyan; Shen, Jing; Zhu, Lijun; Shao, Jimin

    2016-04-01

    N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), an alkylating agent and an environmental carcinogen, causes DNA lesions and even carcinomas. DNA damage responses induced by MNNG activate various DNA repair genes and related signaling pathways. The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of human RR small subunit M2 (hRRM2) in response to MNNG. In this study, we demonstrated that the RRM2 gene was transactivated by MNNG exposure more strongly than the other small subunit, p53R2. The upregulated RRM2 translocated to the nucleus for DNA repair. Further study showed that E2F3 transactivated RRM2 expression by directly binding to its promoter after MNNG exposure. The transactivation was enhanced by the upregulation of NFY, which bound to the RRM2 promoter adjacent to the E2F3 binding site and interacted with E2F3. In response to MNNG treatment, E2F3 accumulated mainly through its phosphorylation at S124 and was dependent on ATR-CHK1 signaling. In comparison, p53R2 played a relatively weaker role in the MNNG-induced DNA damage response, and its transcription was regulated by the ATR-CHK2-E2F1/p53 pathway. We suggest that MNNG-stimulated ATR/CHK1 signaling stabilizes E2F3 by S124 phosphorylation, and then E2F3 together with NFY co-transactivate RRM2 expression for DNA repair. We propose a new mechanism for RRM2 regulation to maintain genome stability in response to environmental chemical carcinogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Deletion of Marek’s disease virus large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR) impairs virus growth in vitro and in vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a highly cell-associated lymphotropic alphaherpesvirus, is the causative agent of a neoplastic disease in domestic chickens, called Marek’s disease (MD). In the unique long region of the MDV genome, open reading frames UL39 and UL40 encode the large and small subunits o...

  10. Elucidation of the bicarbonate binding site and insights into the carboxylation mechanism of (N(5))-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthase (PurK) from Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Tuntland, Micheal L; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Johnson, Michael E; Fung, Leslie W M

    2014-11-01

    Structures of (N(5))-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthase (PurK) from Bacillus anthracis with various combinations of ATP, ADP, Mg(2+), bicarbonate and aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) in the active site are presented. The binding site of bicarbonate has only been speculated upon previously, but is shown here for the first time. The binding involves interactions with the conserved residues Arg272, His274 and Lys348. These structures provide insights into each ligand in the active site and allow a possible mechanism to be proposed for the reaction that converts bicarbonate and AIR, in the presence of ATP, to produce (N(5))-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide. The formation of a carboxyphosphate intermediate through ATP phosphoryl transfer is proposed, followed by carboxylation of AIR to give the product, facilitated by a cluster of conserved residues and an active-site water network.

  11. Mycobacterium smegmatis DinB2 misincorporates deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides during templated synthesis and lesion bypass

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Heather; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis DinB2 is the founder of a clade of Y-family DNA polymerase that is naturally adept at utilizing rNTPs or dNTPs as substrates. Here we investigate the fidelity and lesion bypass capacity of DinB2. We report that DinB2 is an unfaithful DNA and RNA polymerase with a distinctive signature for misincorporation of dNMPs, rNMPs and oxoguanine nucleotides during templated synthesis in vitro. DinB2 has a broader mutagenic spectrum with manganese than magnesium, though low ratios of manganese to magnesium suffice to switch DinB2 to its more mutagenic mode. DinB2 discrimination against incorrect dNTPs in magnesium is primarily at the level of substrate binding affinity, rather than kpol. DinB2 can incorporate any dNMP or rNMP opposite oxo-dG in the template strand with manganese as cofactor, with a kinetic preference for synthesis of an A:oxo-dG Hoogsteen pair. With magnesium, DinB2 is adept at synthesizing A:oxo-dG or C:oxo-dG pairs. DinB2 effectively incorporates deoxyribonucleotides, but not ribonucleotides, opposite an abasic site, with kinetic preference for dATP as the substrate. We speculate that DinB2 might contribute to mycobacterial mutagenesis, oxidative stress and quiescence, and discuss the genetic challenges to linking the polymerase biochemistry to an in vivo phenotype. PMID:25352547

  12. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  13. An electron transport system in maize roots for reactions of glutamate synthase and nitrite reductase : physiological and immunochemical properties of the electron carrier and pyridine nucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Oaks, A; Jacquot, J P; Vidal, J; Gadal, P

    1985-06-01

    A non-heme iron containing protein which bears an antigenic similarity to ferredoxin from spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.) has been identified in extracts prepared from young roots of maize (Zea mays L., hybrid W64A x W182E). The ferredoxin-like root electron carrier could substitute for ferredoxin in a cytochrome c reduction system in which pyridine nucleotide (NADPH) reduces the root electron carrier in a reaction catalyzed by ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (EC 1.6.7.1) from spinach leaves. However, the root electron carrier did not mediate the photoreduction of NADP(+) in an illuminated reconstituted chloroplast system.A pyridine nucleotide reductase which shares identical immunological determinants with the ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase from spinach leaves has also been characterized from maize roots. Root pyridine nucleotide reductase mediated the transfer of electrons from either NADPH or NADH to cytochrome c via ferredoxin or the root electron carrier. Under chemical reducing conditions with sodium dithionite and bicarbonate, the ferredoxin-like root electron carrier served as an electron carrier for the ferredoxin-requiring glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.7.1) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1) obtained from maize roots or leaves. In the presence of root pyridine nucleotide reductase and root electron carrier, either NADPH or NADH served as the primary electron donor for glutamate synthesis in extracts from maize roots or leaves. The electron transport system originating with NADH or NADPH, was, however, not able to mediate the reduction of NO(2) (-) to NH(3).

  14. Structure of genes narL and narX of the nar (nitrate reductase) locus in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, V; Parales, J; Merkel, S M

    1989-01-01

    narL and narX mediate nitrate induction of nitrate reductase synthesis and nitrate repression of fumarate reductase synthesis. We report here the nucleotide sequences of narL and narX. The deduced protein sequences aid in defining distinct subclasses of regulators and sensors in the family of two-component regulatory proteins. PMID:2649492

  15. Cloning of a chicken liver cDNA encoding 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylase and 5-aminoimidazole-4-N-succinocarboxamide ribonucleotide synthetase by functional complementation of Escherichia coli pur mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z D; Dixon, J E; Zalkin, H

    1990-01-01

    We have used functional complementation of Escherichia coli pur mutants to clone avian cDNA encoding 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) carboxylase-5-aminoimidazole-4-N-succinocarboxamide ribonucleotide (SAICAR) synthetase, the bifunctional enzyme catalyzing steps 6 and 7 in the pathway for de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. Mutational analyses have been used to establish the structure-function relationship: NH2-SAICAR synthetase-AIR carboxylase-COOH. The amino acid sequence of the SAICAR synthetase domain is homologous to that of bacterial purC-encoded enzymes, and the sequence of the following AIR carboxylase domain is homologous to that of bacterial purE-encoded enzymes. In E. coli, AIR carboxylase is the product of genes purEK with the purK subunit postulated to have a role in CO2 binding. The avian enzyme lacks sequences corresponding to purK yet functions in E. coli. Functional complementation of E. coli pur mutants can be used to clone additional avian cDNAs for de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. Images PMID:1691501

  16. Cyclohexanol and methylcyclohexanols. A family of inhibitors of hepatic HMGCoA reductase in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miciak, A; White, D A; Middleton, B

    1986-10-15

    Oral dosing of rats with cyclohexanol and methylcyclohexanols resulted in the inhibition of hepatic HMGCoA reductase. Neither cyclohexane or cyclohexane diols exerted any effects. Inhibition was not due to alcohol dehydrogenase mediated changes in redox state since 3,3',5-trimethylcyclohexanol (TMC), a non substrate for alcohol dehydrogenase, was a potent inhibitor of HMGCoA reductase. Following a single dose of TMC there was no alteration in total hepatic HMGCoA reductase activity for more than 6 hr after which the enzyme activity was depressed in a dose-dependent manner. The normal diurnal rhythm of HMGCoA reductase was reduced in amplitude following TMC administration but the phase was unaltered and the t 1/2 for activity decay following the peak of activity was unaffected. Prior to the inhibitory effect of a TMC dose becoming apparent in total HMGCoA reductase activity we found that the expressed activity of the enzyme (after isolation in F- medium to suppress endogenous protein phosphatase) was depressed by 43%. The inhibitory effect of TMC on total HMGCoA reductase activity seen 8 hr or more after dosing was reflected by inhibition of sterol synthesis in liver measured in vivo after [3H]-H2O administration.

  17. Mechanisms Employed by Escherichia coli to Prevent Ribonucleotide Incorporation into Genomic DNA by Pol V

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John P.; Vaisman, Alexandra; Kuban, Wojciech; Goodman, Myron F.; Woodgate, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli pol V (UmuD′2C), the main translesion DNA polymerase, ensures continued nascent strand extension when the cellular replicase is blocked by unrepaired DNA lesions. Pol V is characterized by low sugar selectivity, which can be further reduced by a Y11A “steric-gate” substitution in UmuC that enables pol V to preferentially incorporate rNTPs over dNTPs in vitro. Despite efficient error-prone translesion synthesis catalyzed by UmuC_Y11A in vitro, strains expressing umuC_Y11A exhibit low UV mutability and UV resistance. Here, we show that these phenotypes result from the concomitant dual actions of Ribonuclease HII (RNase HII) initiating removal of rNMPs from the nascent DNA strand and nucleotide excision repair (NER) removing UV lesions from the parental strand. In the absence of either repair pathway, UV resistance and mutagenesis conferred by umuC_Y11A is significantly enhanced, suggesting that the combined actions of RNase HII and NER lead to double-strand breaks that result in reduced cell viability. We present evidence that the Y11A-specific UV phenotype is tempered by pol IV in vivo. At physiological ratios of the two polymerases, pol IV inhibits pol V–catalyzed translesion synthesis (TLS) past UV lesions and significantly reduces the number of Y11A-incorporated rNTPs by limiting the length of the pol V–dependent TLS tract generated during lesion bypass in vitro. In a recA730 lexA(Def) ΔumuDC ΔdinB strain, plasmid-encoded wild-type pol V promotes high levels of spontaneous mutagenesis. However, umuC_Y11A-dependent spontaneous mutagenesis is only ∼7% of that observed with wild-type pol V, but increases to ∼39% of wild-type levels in an isogenic ΔrnhB strain and ∼72% of wild-type levels in a ΔrnhA ΔrnhB double mutant. Our observations suggest that errant ribonucleotides incorporated by pol V can be tolerated in the E. coli genome, but at the cost of higher levels of cellular mutagenesis. PMID:23144626

  18. Inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling under replication stress induced by nucleotide depletion in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    DNA replication checkpoint is a highly conserved cellular signaling pathway critical for maintaining genome integrity in eukaryotes. It is activated when DNA replication is perturbed. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, perturbed replication forks activate the sensor kinase Rad3 (ATR/Mec1), which works cooperatively with mediator Mrc1 and the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp to phosphorylate the effector kinase Cds1 (CHK2/Rad53). Phosphorylation of Cds1 promotes autoactivation of the kinase. Activated Cds1 diffuses away from the forks and stimulates most of the checkpoint responses under replication stress. Although this signaling pathway has been well understood in fission yeast, how the signaling is initiated and thus regulated remains incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that deletion of lem2(+) sensitizes cells to the inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, hydroxyurea. However, the underlying mechanism is still not well understood. This study shows that in the presence of hydroxyurea, Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling for Cds1 activation. Without Lem2, all known Rad3-dependent phosphorylations critical for replication checkpoint signaling are seriously compromised, which likely causes the aberrant mitosis and drug sensitivity observed in this mutant. Interestingly, the mutant is not very sensitive to DNA damage and the DNA damage checkpoint remains largely intact, suggesting that the main function of Lem2 is to facilitate checkpoint signaling in response to replication stress. Since Lem2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein, these results also suggest that the replication checkpoint may be spatially regulated inside the nucleus, a previously unknown mechanism.

  19. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  20. Triapine Disrupts CtIP-mediated Homologous Recombination Repair and Sensitizes Ovarian Cancer Cells to PARP and Topoisomerase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Whicker, Margaret E.; Lee, Yashang; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors exploit synthetic lethality to target epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with hereditary BRCA mutations and defects in homologous recombination repair (HRR). However, such an approach is limited to a small subset of EOC patients and compromised by restored HRR due to secondary mutations in BRCA genes. Here, it was demonstrated that triapine, a small molecule inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, enhances the sensitivity of BRCA wild-type EOC cells to the PARP inhibitor olaparib and the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide. Triapine abolishes olaparib-induced BRCA1 and Rad51 foci, and disrupts BRCA1 interaction with the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex in BRCA1 wild-type EOC cells. It has been shown that phosphorylation of CtIP (RBBP8) is required for interaction with BRCA1 and with MRN to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) resection during S- and G2-phases of the cell cycle. Mechanistic studies within reveal that triapine inhibits CDK activity and blocks olaparib-induced CtIP phosphorylation through Chk1 activation. Furthermore, triapine abrogates etoposide-induced CtIP phosphorylation and DSB resection as evidenced by marked attenuation of RPA32 phosphorylation. Concurrently, triapine obliterates etoposide-induced BRCA1 foci and sensitizes BRCA1 wild-type EOC cells to etoposide. Using a GFP-based HRR assay, it was determined that triapine suppresses HRR activity induced by an I-SceI-generated DSB. These results suggest that triapine augments the sensitivity of BRCA wild-type EOC cells to drug-induced DSBs by disrupting CtIP-mediated HRR. PMID:24413181

  1. Human aldose reductase and human small intestine aldose reductase are efficient retinal reductases: consequences for retinoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Crosas, Bernat; Hyndman, David J; Gallego, Oriol; Martras, Sílvia; Parés, Xavier; Flynn, T Geoffrey; Farrés, Jaume

    2003-08-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyse the reduction of a variety of carbonyl compounds, such as carbohydrates, aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and steroids. We have studied the retinal reductase activity of human aldose reductase (AR), human small-intestine (HSI) AR and pig aldehyde reductase. Human AR and HSI AR were very efficient in the reduction of all- trans -, 9- cis - and 13- cis -retinal ( k (cat)/ K (m)=1100-10300 mM(-1).min(-1)), constituting the first cytosolic NADP(H)-dependent retinal reductases described in humans. Aldehyde reductase showed no activity with these retinal isomers. Glucose was a poor inhibitor ( K (i)=80 mM) of retinal reductase activity of human AR, whereas tolrestat, a classical AKR inhibitor used pharmacologically to treat diabetes, inhibited retinal reduction by human AR and HSI AR. All- trans -retinoic acid failed to inhibit both enzymes. In this paper we present the AKRs as an emergent superfamily of retinal-active enzymes, putatively involved in the regulation of retinoid biological activity through the assimilation of retinoids from beta-carotene and the control of retinal bioavailability.

  2. Structural Analysis of the Active Site Geometry of N[superscript 5]-Carboxyaminoimidazole Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.; Firestine, Steven M.

    2009-09-11

    N{sub 5}-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N{sub 5}-CAIR, MgADP, and P{sub i}. The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P{sub i} bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P{sub i} complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P{sub i} rather than ATP. The bound P{sub i} shifts by approximately 3 {angstrom} relative to the {gamma}-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase.

  3. Topoisomerase I Alone Is Sufficient to Produce Short DNA Deletions and Can Also Reverse Nicks at Ribonucleotide Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shar-yin Naomi; Ghosh, Sanchari; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide monophosphates (rNMPs) are among the most frequent form of DNA aberration, as high ratios of ribonucleotide triphosphate:deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pools result in approximately two misincorporated rNMPs/kb of DNA. The main pathway for the removal of rNMPs is by RNase H2. However, in a RNase H2 knock-out yeast strain, a topoisomerase I (Top1)-dependent mutator effect develops with accumulation of short deletions within tandem repeats. Proposed models for these deletions implicated processing of Top1-generated nicks at rNMP sites and/or sequential Top1 binding, but experimental support has been lacking thus far. Here, we investigated the biochemical mechanism of the Top1-induced short deletions at the rNMP sites by generating nicked DNA substrates bearing 2′,3′-cyclic phosphates at the nick sites, mimicking the Top1-induced nicks. We demonstrate that a second Top1 cleavage complex adjacent to the nick and subsequent faulty Top1 religation led to the short deletions. Moreover, when acting on the nicked DNA substrates containing 2′,3′-cyclic phosphates, Top1 generated not only the short deletion, but also a full-length religated DNA product. A catalytically inactive Top1 mutant (Top1-Y723F) also induced the full-length products, indicating that Top1 binding independent of its enzymatic activity promotes the sealing of DNA backbones via nucleophilic attacks by the 5′-hydroxyl on the 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate. The resealed DNA would allow renewed attempt for repair by the error-free RNase H2-dependent pathway in vivo. Our results provide direct evidence for the generation of short deletions by sequential Top1 cleavage events and for the promotion of nick religation at rNMP sites by Top1. PMID:25887397

  4. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  6. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450’s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and β-naphthoflavone treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from β-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury. PMID:20561902

  7. Evaluation of bioreductive activation of anticancer drugs idarubicin and mitomycin C by NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome P450 2B4.

    PubMed

    Celik, Haydar; Arinç, Emel

    2013-03-01

    This study attempted to investigate the ability of microsomal NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome P450 2B4 to reductively activate idarubicin and mitomycin C. In vitro plasmid DNA damage experiments and assays using purified hepatic enzymes were employed to examine their respective roles in the metabolic activation of anticancer drugs. Mitomycin C was found to be not a good substrate for microsomal b5 reductase unlike P450 reductase. It produced low amounts of strand breaks in DNA when incubated with b5 reductase and its one-electron reduction by purified enzyme was found as negligible. Our findings revealed that P450 reductase-mediated metabolism of idarubicin resulted in a large increase in single-strand DNA breaks, whereas, b5 reductase neither catalyzed the reduction of idarubicin nor mediated the formation of DNA damage in the presence of idarubicin. The reconstitution studies, on the other hand, have identified rabbit liver CYP2B4 isozyme as being a potential candidate enzyme for reductive bioactivation of idarubicin and mitomycin C. Thus, the present novel findings strongly suggest that while b5 reductase could not play a key role in the cytotoxic and/or antitumor effects of idarubicin and mitomycin C, CYP2B4 could potentiate their activity in combination with P450 reductase.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... About half of these individuals adopt a male gender role in adolescence or early adulthood. Related Information ... 1730-5. Citation on PubMed Cohen-Kettenis PT. Gender change in 46,XY persons with 5alpha-reductase- ...

  9. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  10. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  11. Structural and biochemical properties of cloned and expressed human and rat steroid 5. alpha. -reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, S.; Russell, D.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The microsomal enzyme steroid 5{alpha}-reductase is responsible for the conversion of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone. In man, this steroid acts on a variety of androgen-responsive target tissues to mediate such diverse endocrine processes as male sexual differentiation in the fetus and prostatic growth in men. Here we describe the isolation, structure, and expression of a cDNA encoding the human steroid 5{alpha}-reductase. A rat cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human prostate cDNA library. A 2.1-kilobase cDNA was identified and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the human steroid 5{alpha}-reductase was a hydrophobic protein of 259 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 29,462. A comparison of the human and rat protein sequences revealed a 60% identity. Transfection of expression vectors containing the human and rat cDNAs into simian COS cells resulted in the synthesis of high levels of steroid 5{alpha}-reductase enzyme activity. Both enzymes expressed in COS cells showed similar substrate specificities for naturally occurring steroid hormones. However, synthetic 4-azasteroids demonstrated marked differences in their abilities to inhibit the human and rat steroid 5{alpha}-reductases.

  12. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  13. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  14. Cerulenin-mediated apoptosis is involved in adenine metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Sun, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hyun-Jee; Choi, Shin-Jung; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Simon, Julian . E-mail: jsimon@fhcrc.org; Won, Misun . E-mail: misun@kribb.re.kr

    2006-10-27

    Cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitor, induces apoptosis of variety of tumor cells. To elucidate mode of action by cerulenin, we employed the proteomics approach using Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The differential protein expression profile of S. pombe revealed that cerulenin modulated the expressions of proteins involved in stresses and metabolism, including both ade10 and adk1 proteins. The nutrient supplementation assay demonstrated that cerulenin affected enzymatic steps transferring a phosphoribosyl group. This result suggests that cerulenin accumulates AMP and p-ribosyl-s-amino-imidazole carboxamide (AICAR) and reduces other necessary nucleotides, which induces feedback inhibition of enzymes and the transcriptional regulation of related genes in de novo and salvage adenine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, the deregulation of adenine nucleotide synthesis may interfere ribonucleotide reductase and cause defects in cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation. In conclusion, cerulenin induces apoptosis through deregulation of adenine nucleotide biosynthesis resulting in nuclear division defects in S. pombe.

  15. Characterization of three mycobacterial DinB (DNA polymerase IV) paralogs highlights DinB2 as naturally adept at ribonucleotide incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Heather; Uson, Maria Loressa; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    This study unveils Mycobacterium smegmatis DinB2 as the founder of a clade of Y-family DNA polymerase that is naturally adept at incorporating ribonucleotides by virtue of a leucine in lieu of a canonical aromatic steric gate. DinB2 efficiently scavenges limiting dNTP and rNTP substrates in the presence of manganese. DinB2's sugar selectivity factor, gauged by rates of manganese-dependent dNMP versus rNMP addition, is 2.7- to 3.8-fold. DinB2 embeds ribonucleotides during DNA synthesis when rCTP and dCTP are at equimolar concentration. DinB2 can incorporate at least 16 consecutive ribonucleotides. In magnesium, DinB2 has a 26- to 78-fold lower affinity for rNTPs than dNTPs, but only a 2.6- to 6-fold differential in rates of deoxy versus ribo addition (kpol). Two other M. smegmatis Y-family polymerases, DinB1 and DinB3, are characterized here as template-dependent DNA polymerases that discriminate strongly against ribonucleotides, a property that, in the case of DinB1, correlates with its aromatic steric gate side chain. We speculate that the unique ability of DinB2 to utilize rNTPs might allow for DNA repair with a ‘ribo patch’ when dNTPs are limiting. Phylogenetic analysis reveals DinB2-like polymerases, with leucine, isoleucine or valine steric gates, in many taxa of the phylum Actinobacteria. PMID:25200080

  16. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  17. Chicken muscle aldose reductase: purification, properties and relationship to other chicken aldo/keto reductases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D G; Davidson, W S

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme that catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of a wide range of aromatic and hydroxy-aliphatic aldehydes was purified from chicken breast muscle. This enzyme shares many properties with mammalian aldose reductases including molecular weight, relative substrate specificity, Michaelis constants, an inhibitor specificity. Therefore, it seems appropriate to call this enzyme an aldose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21). Chicken muscle aldose reductase appears to be kinetically identical to an aldose reductase that has been purified from chicken kidney (Hara et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 133, 207-214) and to hen muscle L-glycol dehydrogenase (Bernado et al., Biochim. biophys. Acta 659, 189-198). The association of this aldose reductase with muscular dystrophy in the chick is discussed.

  18. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  19. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  20. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  1. Substrate Recognition, Protein Dynamics, and Iron-Sulfur Cluster in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Chartron, Justin; Carroll, Kate S.; Shiau, Carrie; Gao, Hong; Leary, Julie A.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Stout, C. David

    2006-01-01

    APS reductase catalyzes the first committed step of reductive sulfate assimilation in pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is a promising target for drug development. We report the 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa APS reductase in the thiosulfonate intermediate form of the catalytic cycle and with substrate bound. The structure, high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry, and quantitative kinetic analysis, establish that the two chemically discrete steps of the overall reaction take place at distinct sites on the enzyme, mediated via conformational flexibility of the C-terminal 18 residues. The results address the mechanism by which sulfonucleotide reductases protect the covalent but labile enzyme-intermediate prior to release of sulfite by the protein cofactor thioredoxin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa APS reductase contains an [4Fe-4S] cluster that is essential for catalysis. The structure reveals an unusual mode of cluster coordination by tandem cysteines and suggests how this arrangement might facilitate conformational change and cluster interaction with substrate. Assimilatory PAPS reductases are evolutionarily related, homologous enzymes that catalyze the same overall reaction, but do so in the absence of an [Fe-S] cluster. The APS reductase structure reveals adaptive use of a phosphate-binding loop for recognition of the APS O3′ hydroxyl, or alternatively, the PAPS 3′-phosphate. PMID:17010373

  2. The prenyltransferase UBIAD1 is the target of geranylgeraniol in degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Marc M; Elsabrouty, Rania; Seemann, Joachim; Jo, Youngah; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder in humans characterized by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in the cornea. SCD-associated mutations have been identified in the gene encoding UBIAD1, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K2. Here, we show that sterols stimulate binding of UBIAD1 to the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMG CoA reductase, which is subject to sterol-accelerated, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol through an unknown mechanism. Geranylgeraniol inhibits binding of UBIAD1 to reductase, allowing its degradation and promoting transport of UBIAD1 from the ER to the Golgi. CRISPR-CAS9-mediated knockout of UBIAD1 relieves the geranylgeraniol requirement for reductase degradation. SCD-associated mutations in UBIAD1 block its displacement from reductase in the presence of geranylgeraniol, thereby preventing degradation of reductase. The current results identify UBIAD1 as the elusive target of geranylgeraniol in reductase degradation, the inhibition of which may contribute to accumulation of cholesterol in SCD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05560.001 PMID:25742604

  3. Short- and long-term regulation of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by a 4-methylcoumarin.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Laura; Segatto, Marco; Simeoni, Veronica; Balducci, Valentina; Dhawan, Ashish; Parmar, Virinder S; Prasad, Ashok K; Saso, Luciano; Incerpi, Sandra; Pallottini, Valentina

    2011-07-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the most significant risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Cholesterol homeostasis is regulated by both the receptor-mediated endocytosis of Low Density Lipoproteins by LDL receptors and de novo cholesterol synthesis via the rate-limiting enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Although statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase substrate competitors, have revolutionized the management of cardiovascular diseases by lowering serum LDL, their side effects range from myalgia to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment with antioxidant compounds could represent an efficient alternative in the modulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity. Indeed it has already been demonstrated that the rise in reactive oxygen species levels causes the complete dephosphorylation and, in turn activation of the enzyme. Many coumarins and their derivatives have the special ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species or show a lipid lowering potential. Here we evaluated whether the coumarin, 4-methylesculetin could exert both the ability to scavenge ROS and to modulate 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in HepG2 cell line where the enzyme activity dysregulation induced by reactive oxygen species has already been reported. The antioxidant property of 4-methylesculetin led to the reduction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activation state through the increase of the enzyme phosphorylation. In addition, this coumarin showed the ability to modulate 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase protein levels both by transcriptional and degradational events independent of its antioxidant activity.

  4. Crystal Structure of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae 3'-Phosphoadenosine-5'-Phosphosulfate Reductase Complexed With Adenosine 3',5'-Bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Lemongello, D.; Segel, I.H.; Fisher, A.J.

    2009-05-28

    Most assimilatory bacteria, fungi, and plants species reduce sulfate (in the activated form of APS or PAPS) to produce reduced sulfur. In yeast, PAPS reductase reduces PAPS to sulfite and PAP. Despite the difference in substrate specificity and catalytic cofactor, PAPS reductase is homologous to APS reductase in both sequence and structure, and they are suggested to share the same catalytic mechanism. Metazoans do not possess the sulfate reduction pathway, which makes APS/PAPS reductases potential drug targets for human pathogens. Here, we present the 2.05 A resolution crystal structure of the yeast PAPS reductase binary complex with product PAP bound. The N-terminal region mediates dimeric interactions resulting in a unique homodimer assembly not seen in previous APS/PAPS reductase structures. The 'pyrophosphate-binding' sequence (47)TTAFGLTG(54) defines the substrate 3'-phosphate binding pocket. In yeast, Gly54 replaces a conserved aspartate found in APS reductases vacating space and charge to accommodate the 3'-phosphate of PAPS, thus regulating substrate specificity. Also, for the first time, the complete C-terminal catalytic motif (244)ECGIH(248) is revealed in the active site. The catalytic residue Cys245 is ideally positioned for an in-line attack on the beta-sulfate of PAPS. In addition, the side chain of His248 is only 4.2 A from the Sgamma of Cys245 and may serve as a catalytic base to deprotonate the active site cysteine. A hydrophobic sequence (252)RFAQFL(257) at the end of the C-terminus may provide anchoring interactions preventing the tail from swinging away from the active site as seen in other APS/PAPS reductases.

  5. Differences in glutamic acid and 5'-ribonucleotide contents between flesh and pulp of tomatoes and the relationship with umami taste.

    PubMed

    Oruna-Concha, Maria-Jose; Methven, Lisa; Blumenthal, Heston; Young, Christopher; Mottram, Donald S

    2007-07-11

    A difference in taste characteristics between the outer flesh and the inner pulp of tomatoes has been observed; in particular the pulp, which contains the seeds, had more umami taste. Analysis of the free amino acids and 5'-ribonucleotides in the different parts of 13 varieties of tomatoes showed that in all cases the pulp contained higher levels of glutamic acid, 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP), 5'-guanosine monophosphate, 5'-uridine monophosphate, and 5'-cytidine monophosphate. The mean concentration of glutamic acid in the flesh was 1.26 g/kg and that in the pulp 4.56 g/kg but in some varieties the difference between pulp and flesh was more than 6-fold. For AMP, the mean concentration in the flesh was 80 mg/kg and that in the pulp was 295 mg/kg with one variety showing an 11-fold difference between pulp and flesh. These differences in concentration of these compounds, which are known to possess umami characteristics, provide an explanation for the perceived difference in umami taste between the flesh and pulp of tomatoes.

  6. N7-platinated ribonucleotides are not incorporated by RNA polymerases. New perspectives for a rational design of platinum antitumor drugs.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Michele; Romano, Alessandro; De Castro, Federica; Girelli, Chiara R; Antonucci, Daniela; Migoni, Danilo; Verri, Tiziano; Fanizzi, Francesco P

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we assessed the capacity of RNA polymerases to use platinated ribonucleotides as substrates for RNA synthesis by testing the incorporation of the model compound [Pt(dien)(N7-5'-GTP)] (dien=diethylenetriamine; GTP=5'-guanosine triphosphate) into a natural RNA sequence. The yield of in vitro transcription operated by T7 RNA polymerase, on the LacZ (Escherichia coli gene encoding for β-galactosidase) sequence, decreases progressively with decreasing the concentration of natural GTP, in favor of the platinated nucleotide, [Pt(dien)(N7-5'-GTP)]. Comparison of the T7 RNA polymerase transcription activities for [Pt(dien)(N7-5'-GTP)] compound incorporation reaction test, with respect to the effect of a decreasing concentration of natural GTP, showed no major differences. A specific inhibitory effect of compound [Pt(dien)(N7-5'-GTP)] (which may pair the complementary base on the DNA strand, without being incorporated in the RNA by the T7 RNA polymerase) was evidenced. Our findings therefore suggest that RNA polymerases, unlike DNA polymerases, are unable to incorporate N7-platinated nucleotides into newly synthesized nucleic acids. In this respect, specifically designed N7-platinated nucleotides based compounds could be used in alternative to the classical platinum based drugs. This approach may offer a possible strategy to target specifically DNA, without affecting RNA, and is potentially able to better modulate pharmacological activity.

  7. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  8. Alteration of the alkaloid profile in genetically modified tobacco reveals a role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in nicotine N-demethylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolic network. This enzyme catalyzes reduction of 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF. The latter donates its methyl group to homocysteine forming Met, which is then used for the syn...

  9. Isolation, sequence identification and tissue expression profile of two novel soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y

    2009-09-01

    The complete mRNA sequences of two soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase, were amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. The sequence analysis of these two genes revealed that soybean vestitone reductase gene encodes a protein of 327 amino acids which has high homology with the vestitone reductase of Medicago sativa (77%). The soybean chalcone reductase gene encodes a protein of 314 amino acids that has high homology with the chalcone reductase of kudzu vine (88%) and medicago sativa (83%). The expression profiles of the soybean vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase genes were studied and the results indicated that these two soybean genes were differentially expressed in detected soybean tissues including leaves, stems, roots, inflorescences, embryos and endosperm. Our experiment established the foundation for further research on these two soybean genes.

  10. Fumarate Reductase Activity of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Aue, B. J.; Diebel, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Some characteristics of a fumarate reductase from Streptococcus faecalis are described. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.4; optimal activity was observed when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer was adjusted to 0.088. The Km value of the enzyme for reduced flavin mononucleotide was 2 × 10−4 m as determined with a 26-fold preparation. In addition to fumarate, the enzyme reduced maleate and mesaconate. No succinate dehydrogenase activity was detected, but succinate did act as an inhibitor of the fumarate reductase activity. Other inhibitors were malonate, citraconate, and trans-, trans-muconate. Metal-chelating agents did not inhibit the enzyme. A limited inhibition by sulfhydryl-binding agents was observed, and the preparations were sensitive to air oxidation and storage. Glycine, alanine, histidine, and possibly lysine stimulated fumarate reductase activity in the cell-free extracts. However, growth in media supplemented with glycine did not enhance fumarate reductase activity. The enzymatic activity appears to be constitutive. PMID:4960892

  11. Synthesis of symmetric disulfides as potential alternative substrates for trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Jaouhari, R; Besheya, T; McKie, J H; Douglas, K T

    1995-12-01

    The synthesis of a series of symmetrical disulfides as potential substrates of trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase was described. The key intermediate in the synthetic approach was the choice of S-(t)butylmercapto-L-cysteine (1). The spermidine ring in the native substrate, trypanothione disulfide (TSST), was replaced with 3-dimethyl-aminopropylamine (DMAPA), while theγ-Glu moiety was replaced by phenylalanyl or tryptophanyl residues. The same modifications in theγ-Glu moiety of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) were applied.

  12. Identification of the Arabidopsis CHL3 gene as the nitrate reductase structural gene NIA2.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, J Q; Crawford, N M

    1991-01-01

    Chlorate, the chlorine analog of nitrate, is a herbicide that has been used to select mutants impaired in the process of nitrate assimilation. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutations at any one of eight distinct loci confer resistance to chlorate. The molecular identities of the genes at these loci are not known; however, one of these loci--chl3--maps very near the nitrate reductase structural gene NIA2. Through the isolation, characterization, and genetic analysis of new chlorate-resistant mutants generated by gamma irradiation, we have been able to demonstrate that the CHL3 gene and the NIA2 gene are identical. Three new chlorate-resistant mutants were identified that had deletions of the entire NIA2 gene. These nia2 null mutants were viable and still retained 10% of wild-type nitrate reductase activity in the leaves of the plants. All three deletion mutations were found to be new alleles of chl3. Introduction of the NIA2 gene back into these chl3 mutants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation partially complemented their mutant phenotype. From these data, we conclude that Arabidopsis has at least two functional nitrate reductase genes and that the NIA2 gene product accounts for the majority of the leaf nitrate reductase activity and chlorate sensitivity of Arabidopsis plants. PMID:1840922

  13. Copper-dependent inhibition and oxidative inactivation with affinity cleavage of yeast glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Tsubouchi, Ryoko; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshino, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    Effects of copper on the activity and oxidative inactivation of yeast glutathione reductase were analyzed. Glutathione reductase from yeast was inhibited by cupric ion and more potently by cuprous ion. Copper ion inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to the substrate GSSG and NADPH. The Ki values of the enzyme for Cu(2+) and Cu(+) ion were determined to be 1 and 0.35 μM, respectively. Copper-dependent inactivation of glutathione reductase was also analyzed. Hydrogen peroxide and copper/ascorbate also caused an inactivation with the cleavage of peptide bond of the enzyme. The inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme was prevented by addition of catalase, suggesting that hydroxyl radical produced through the cuprous ion-dependent reduction of oxygen is responsible for the inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme. SDS-PAGE and TOF-MS analysis confirmed eight fragments, which were further determined to result from the cleavage of the Met17-Ser18, Asn20-Thr21, Glu251-Gly252, Ser420-Pro421, Pro421-Thr422 bonds of the enzyme by amino-terminal sequencing analysis. Based on the kinetic analysis and no protective effect of the substrates, GSSG and NADPH on the copper-mediated inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme, copper binds to the sites apart from the substrate-sites, causing the peptide cleavage by hydroxyl radical. Copper-dependent oxidative inactivation/fragmentation of glutathione reductase can explain the prooxidant properties of copper under the in vivo conditions.

  14. Roles of rat and human aldo-keto reductases in metabolism of farnesol and geranylgeraniol

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Chisato; Soda, Midori; Kanamori, Ayano; Kitade, Yukio; Ohno, Satoshi; Tajima, Kazuo; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Farnesol (FOH) and geranylgeraniol (GGOH) with multiple biological actions are produced from the mevalonate pathway, and catabolized into farnesoic acid and geranylgeranoic acid, respectively, via the aldehyde intermediates (farnesal and geranylgeranial). We investigated the intracellular distribution, sequences and properties of the oxidoreductases responsible for the metabolic steps in rat tissues. The oxidation of FOH and GGOH into their aldehyde intermediates were mainly mediated by alcohol dehydrogenases 1 (in the liver and colon) and 7 (in the stomach and lung), and the subsequent step into the carboxylic acids was catalyzed by a microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase. In addition, high reductase activity catalyzing the aldehyde intermediates into FOH (or GGOH) was detected in the cytosols of the extra-hepatic tissues, where the major reductase was identified as aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C15. Human reductases with similar specificity were identified as AKR1B10 and AKR1C3, which most efficiently reduced farnesal and geranylgeranial among seven enzymes in the AKR1A-1C subfamilies. The overall metabolism from FOH to farnesoic acid in cultured cells was significantly decreased by overexpression of AKR1C15, and increased by addition of AKR1C3 inhibitors, tolfenamic acid and R-flurbiprofen. Thus, AKRs (1C15 in rats, and 1B10 and 1C3 in humans) may play an important role in controlling the bioavailability of FOH and GGOH. PMID:21187079

  15. Regulation of rat liver hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by a new class of noncompetitive inhibitors. Effects of dichloroacetate and related carboxylic acids on enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Stacpoole, P W; Harwood, H J; Varnado, C E

    1983-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) markedly reduces circulating cholesterol levels in animals and in patients with combined hyperlipoproteinemia or homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). To investigate the mechanism of its cholesterol-lowering action, we studied the effects of DCA and its hepatic metabolites, glyoxylate and oxalate, on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) obtained from livers of healthy, reverse light-cycled rats. Oral administration of DCA for 4 d decreased HMG CoA reductase activity 46% at a dose of 50 mg/kg per d, and 82% at a dose of 100 mg/kg per d. A 24% decrease in reductase activity was observed as early as 1 h after a single dose of 50 mg/kg DCA. The inhibitory effect of the drug was due to a fall in both expressed enzyme activity and the total number of reductase molecules present. DCA also decreased reductase activity when added to suspensions of isolated hepatocytes. With chronic administration, DCA inhibited 3H2O incorporation into cholesterol by 38% and into triglycerides by 52%. When liver microsomes were incubated with DCA, the pattern of inhibition of reductase activity was noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (inhibition constant [Ki] 11.8 mM) and NADPH (Ki 11.6 mM). Inhibition by glyoxylate was also noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (Ki 1.2 mM) and NADPH (Ki 2.7 mM). Oxalate inhibited enzyme activity only at nonsaturating concentrations of NADPH (Ki 5.6 mM). Monochloroacetate, glycollate, and ethylene glycol, all of which can form glyoxylate, also inhibited reductase activity. Using solubilized and 60-fold purified HMG CoA reductase, we found that the inhibitory effect of glyoxylate was reversible. Furthermore, the inhibition by glyoxylate was an effect exerted on the reductase itself, rather than on its regulatory enzymes, reductase kinase and reductase phosphatase. We conclude that the cholesterol-lowering effect of DCA is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of endogenous cholesterol

  16. Fhit interaction with ferredoxin reductase triggers generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Trapasso, Francesco; Pichiorri, Flavia; Gaspari, Marco; Palumbo, Tiziana; Aqeilan, Rami I; Gaudio, Eugenio; Okumura, Hiroshi; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Di Leva, Giampiero; Fabbri, Muller; Birk, David E; Raso, Cinzia; Green-Church, Kari; Spagnoli, Luigi G; Venuta, Salvatore; Huebner, Kay; Croce, Carlo M

    2008-05-16

    Fhit protein is lost in most cancers, its restoration suppresses tumorigenicity, and virus-mediated FHIT gene therapy induces apoptosis and suppresses tumors in preclinical models. We have used protein cross-linking and proteomics methods to characterize a Fhit protein complex involved in triggering Fhit-mediated apoptosis. The complex includes Hsp60 and Hsp10 that mediate Fhit stability and may affect import into mitochondria, where it interacts with ferredoxin reductase, responsible for transferring electrons from NADPH to cytochrome P450 via ferredoxin. Viral-mediated Fhit restoration increases production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, followed by increased apoptosis of lung cancer cells under oxidative stress conditions; conversely, Fhit-negative cells escape apoptosis, carrying serious oxidative DNA damage that may contribute to an increased mutation rate. Characterization of Fhit interacting proteins has identified direct effectors of the Fhit-mediated apoptotic pathway that is lost in most cancers through loss of Fhit.

  17. Construction and characterization of nitrate reductase-based amperometric electrode and nitrate assay of fertilizers and drinking water.

    PubMed

    Glazier, S A; Campbell, E R; Campbell, W H

    1998-04-15

    The construction and characterization of a nitrate reductase-based amperometric electrode for determination of nitrate ion is described. The electrode consisted of nitrate reductase held by dialysis membrane onto a Nafion-coated glassy carbon electrode. Methyl viologen was allowed to absorb into the Nafion layer, which acted as a reservoir for the electron mediator. The utility of the electrode to assay fertilizer and water sample for nitrate was demonstrated. The assays conducted with this electrode compared well with colorimetric and potentiometric assays of the same samples.

  18. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  19. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o−) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o− cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions. PMID:26637637

  20. Reduction of the degradation activity of umami-enhancing purinic ribonucleotide supplement in miso by the targeted suppression of acid phosphatases in the Aspergillus oryzae starter culture.

    PubMed

    Marui, Junichiro; Tada, Sawaki; Fukuoka, Mari; Wagu, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Yohei; Kitamoto, Noriyuki; Sugimoto, Tatsuya; Hattori, Ryota; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi

    2013-09-02

    Miso (fermented soybean paste) is a traditional Japanese fermented food, and is now used worldwide. The solid-state culture of filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, grown on rice is known as rice-koji, and is important as a starter for miso fermentation because of its prominent hydrolytic enzyme activities. Recently, commercial miso products have been supplemented with purinic ribonucleotides, such as inosine monophosphate (IMP) and guanine monophosphate, to enhance the characteristic umami taste of glutamate in miso. Because the purinic ribonucleotides are degraded by enzymes such as acid phosphatases in miso, heat inactivation is required prior to the addition of these flavorings. However, heat treatment is a costly process and reduces the quality of miso. Therefore, an approach to lower acid phosphatase activities in koji culture is necessary. Transcriptional analysis using an A. oryzae KBN8048 rice-koji culture showed that eight of the 13 acid phosphatase (aph) genes were significantly down-regulated by the addition of phosphoric acid in the preparation of the culture in a concentration-dependent manner, while aphC expression was markedly up-regulated under the same conditions. The eight down-regulated genes might be under the control of the functional counterpart of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator Pho4, which specifically regulates phosphatase genes in response to the ambient phosphate availability. However, the regulatory mechanism of aphC was not clear. The IMP dephosphorylation activities in rice-koji cultures of KBN8048 and the aphC deletion mutant (ΔaphC) were reduced by up to 30% and 70%, respectively, in cultures with phosphoric acid, while protease and amylase activity, which is important for miso fermentation, was minimally affected. The miso products fermented using the rice-koji cultures of KBN8048 and ΔaphC prepared with phosphoric acid had reductions in IMP dephosphorylation activity of 80% and 90%, respectively, without

  1. Effect of ribonucleotides embedded in a DNA template on HIV-1 reverse transcription kinetics and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Noble, Erin; Nguyen, Laura A; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Baek

    2013-05-03

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) frequently incorporates ribonucleoside triphosphates (rNTPs) during proviral DNA synthesis, particularly under the limited dNTP conditions found in macrophages. We investigated the mechanistic impacts of an rNMP embedded in DNA templates on HIV-1 RT-mediated DNA synthesis. We observed that the template-embedded rNMP induced pausing of RT and delayed DNA synthesis kinetics at low macrophage dNTP concentrations but not at high T cell dNTP concentrations. Although the binding affinity of RT to the rNMP-containing template-primer was not altered, the dNTP incorporation kinetics of RT were significantly reduced at one nucleotide upstream and downstream of the rNMP site, leading to pause sites. Finally, HIV-1 RT becomes more error-prone at rNMP sites with an elevated mismatch extension capability but not enhanced misinsertion capability. Together these data suggest that rNMPs embedded in DNA templates may influence reverse transcription kinetics and impact viral mutagenesis in macrophages.

  2. FRUCTOSE-6-PHOSPHATE REDUCTASE FROM SALMONELLA GALLINARUM

    PubMed Central

    Zancan, Glaci T.; Bacila, Metry

    1964-01-01

    Zancan, Glaci T. (Universidade do Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil), and Metry Bacila. Fructose-6-phosphate reductase from Salmonella gallinarum. J. Bacteriol. 87:614–618. 1964.—A fructose-6-phosphate reductase present in cell-free extracts of Salmonella gallinarum was purified approximately 42 times. The optimal pH for this enzyme is 8.0. The enzyme is specific for fructose-6-phosphate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The dissociation constants are 1.78 × 10−4m for fructose-6-phosphate and 8.3 × 10−5m for NADH. The Q10, reaction order, and equilibrium constant were determined. The enzyme is sensitive to p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, but not to o-iodosobenzoic acid nor to N-ethylmaleimide. PMID:14127579

  3. Characterization of human platelet glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Moroff, G; Kosow, D P

    1978-12-08

    Glutathione reductase (NAD(P)h:oxidized glutathione oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 1000-fold from the cytoplasmic fraction of human platelets. Salts, including the heretofore unreported effect of sodium citrate, activate the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione. Sodium citrate and monovalent salt activation appears to involve multiple sites having different binding affinities. At sub-saturating sodium phosphate, non-linear double reciprocal plots indicative of substrate activation by oxidized glutathione were observed. Initial velocity double reciprocal plots at sub-saturating and saturating concentrations of phosphate generate a family of converging lines. NADP+ is a partial inhibitor, indicating that the reduction of oxidized glutathione can proceed by more than one pathway. FMN, FAD, and riboflavin inhibit platelet glutathione reductase by influencing only the V while nitrofurantoin inhibition is associated with an increase Koxidized glutathione and a decreased V.

  4. Reduced bone mass and muscle strength in male 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated mice.

    PubMed

    Windahl, Sara H; Andersson, Niklas; Börjesson, Anna E; Swanson, Charlotte; Svensson, Johan; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Sjögren, Klara; Shao, Ruijin; Lagerquist, Marie K; Ohlsson, Claes

    2011-01-01

    Androgens are important regulators of bone mass but the relative importance of testosterone (T) versus dihydrotestosterone (DHT) for the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) in bone is unknown. 5α-reductase is responsible for the irreversible conversion of T to the more potent AR activator DHT. There are two well established isoenzymes of 5α-reductase (type 1 and type 2), encoded by separate genes (Srd5a1 and Srd5a2). 5α-reductase type 2 is predominantly expressed in male reproductive tissues whereas 5α-reductase type 1 is highly expressed in liver and moderately expressed in several other tissues including bone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5α-reductase type 1 for bone mass using Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Four-month-old male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had reduced trabecular bone mineral density (-36%, p<0.05) and cortical bone mineral content (-15%, p<0.05) but unchanged serum androgen levels compared with wild type (WT) mice. The cortical bone dimensions were reduced in the male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice as a result of a reduced cortical periosteal circumference compared with WT mice. T treatment increased the cortical periosteal circumference (p<0.05) in orchidectomized WT mice but not in orchidectomized Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice demonstrated a reduced forelimb muscle grip strength compared with WT mice (p<0.05). Female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had slightly increased cortical bone mass associated with elevated circulating levels of androgens. In conclusion, 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated male mice have reduced bone mass and forelimb muscle grip strength and we propose that these effects are due to lack of 5α-reductase type 1 expression in bone and muscle. In contrast, the increased cortical bone mass in female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice, is an indirect effect mediated by elevated circulating androgen levels.

  5. Reduced Bone Mass and Muscle Strength in Male 5α-Reductase Type 1 Inactivated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Windahl, Sara H.; Andersson, Niklas; Börjesson, Anna E.; Swanson, Charlotte; Svensson, Johan; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Sjögren, Klara; Shao, Ruijin; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Ohlsson, Claes

    2011-01-01

    Androgens are important regulators of bone mass but the relative importance of testosterone (T) versus dihydrotestosterone (DHT) for the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) in bone is unknown. 5α-reductase is responsible for the irreversible conversion of T to the more potent AR activator DHT. There are two well established isoenzymes of 5α-reductase (type 1 and type 2), encoded by separate genes (Srd5a1 and Srd5a2). 5α-reductase type 2 is predominantly expressed in male reproductive tissues whereas 5α-reductase type 1 is highly expressed in liver and moderately expressed in several other tissues including bone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5α-reductase type 1 for bone mass using Srd5a1−/− mice. Four-month-old male Srd5a1−/− mice had reduced trabecular bone mineral density (−36%, p<0.05) and cortical bone mineral content (−15%, p<0.05) but unchanged serum androgen levels compared with wild type (WT) mice. The cortical bone dimensions were reduced in the male Srd5a1−/− mice as a result of a reduced cortical periosteal circumference compared with WT mice. T treatment increased the cortical periosteal circumference (p<0.05) in orchidectomized WT mice but not in orchidectomized Srd5a1−/− mice. Male Srd5a1−/− mice demonstrated a reduced forelimb muscle grip strength compared with WT mice (p<0.05). Female Srd5a1−/− mice had slightly increased cortical bone mass associated with elevated circulating levels of androgens. In conclusion, 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated male mice have reduced bone mass and forelimb muscle grip strength and we propose that these effects are due to lack of 5α-reductase type 1 expression in bone and muscle. In contrast, the increased cortical bone mass in female Srd5a1−/− mice, is an indirect effect mediated by elevated circulating androgen levels. PMID:21731732

  6. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  7. Incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides by a dNTP-binding cleft mutated reverse transcriptase in hepatitis B virus core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hee-Young; Kim, Hye-Young; Jung, Jaesung; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2008-01-05

    Our recent observation that hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase (P) might initiate minus-strand DNA synthesis without primer [Kim et al., (2004) Virology 322, 22-30], raised a possibility that HBV P protein may have the potential to function as an RNA polymerase. Thus, we mutated Phe 436, a bulky amino acid with aromatic side chain, at the putative dNTP-binding cleft in reverse transcriptase (RT) domain of P protein to smaller amino acids (Gly or Val), and examined RNA polymerase activity. HBV core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein were able to incorporate {sup 32}P-ribonucleotides, but not HBV core particles containing wild type (wt), priming-deficient mutant, or RT-deficient mutant P proteins. Since all the experiments were conducted with core particles isolated from transfected cells, our results indicate that the HBV RT mutant core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein could incorporate both deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides in replicating systems.

  8. Application of artificial neural network to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil on ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianru; Chen, QianQian; Lam, Christopher Wai Kei; Wang, Caiyun; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Xu, Fengguo; Jiang, ZhiHong; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides are essential metabolites that play important roles in a broad range of key cellular functions. Their intracellular levels could also reflect the action of nucleoside analogues. We investigated the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on ribonucleotide and deoxyribonucleotide pool sizes in cells upon exposure to 5-FU for different durations. Unsupervised and supervised artificial neural networks were compared for comprehensive analysis of global responses to 5-FU. As expected, deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) increased after 5-FU incubation due to the inhibition of thymine monophosphate (TMP) synthesis. Interestingly, the accumulation of dUMP could not lead to increased levels of deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) and deoxyuridine diphosphate (dUDP). After the initial fall in intracellular deoxythymidine triphosphate (TTP) concentration, its level recovered and increased from 48 h exposure to 5-FU, although deoxythymidine diphosphate (TDP) and TMP continued to decrease compared with the control group. These findings suggest 5-FU treatment caused unexpected changes in intracellular purine polls, such as increases in deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP), adenosine-triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP) pools. Further elucidation of the mechanism of action of 5-FU in causing these changes should enhance development of strategies that will increase the anticancer activity of 5-FU while decreasing its resistance. PMID:26578061

  9. Methionine sulfoxide reductase contributes to meeting dietary methionine requirements

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are present in all aerobic organisms. They contribute to antioxidant defenses by reducing methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. However, the actual in vivo roles of these reductases are not well defined. Since methionine is an essential amino acid in mammals, we hypothesized that methionine sulfoxide reductases may provide a portion of the dietary methionine requirement by recycling methionine sulfoxide. We used a classical bioassay, the growth of weanling mice fed diets varying in methionine, and applied it to mice genetically engineered to alter the levels of methionine sulfoxide reductase A or B1. Mice of all genotypes were growth retarded when raised on chow containing 0.10% methionine instead of the standard 0.45% methionine. Retardation was significantly greater in knockout mice lacking both reductases. We conclude that the methionine sulfoxide reductases can provide methionine for growth in mice with limited intake of methionine, such as may occur in the wild. PMID:22521563

  10. Association of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) -317AA genotype with poor response to methotrexate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Milic, Vera; Jekic, Biljana; Lukovic, Ljiljana; Bunjevacki, Vera; Milasin, Jelena; Novakovic, Ivana; Damnjanovic, Tatjana; Popovic, Branka; Maksimovic, Nela; Damjanov, Nemanja; Radunovic, Goran; Pejnovic, Nada; Krajinovic, Maja

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genetic predictors of methotrexate (MTX) treatment response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have great importance for optimising drug doses required for clinical benefit without toxicity. In a group of 125 RA patients treated with MTX we investigated whether selected polymorphisms in genes relevant for MTX action (aminoimidazole-4-carboxiamide ribonucleotide transformylase, ATIC, and dihydrofolate reductase, DHFR) modulate disease activity and/or have impact on therapy side effects. The efficacy of treatment was estimated both by the disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28), based on EULAR criteria, and relative DAS28 (rDAS28) score. Adverse drug events (ADEs) were also recorded. RA patients were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP method, followed by an association study between ATIC -129T>G, DHFR -216T>C and DHFR -317A>G polymorphisms and the efficacy and toxicity of MTX. According to the EULAR response criteria, 96 RA patients (76.8%) were classified as responders (good/moderate response) and 29 (23.2%) as non-responders (poor response). rDAS28 values ranged from -0.01 to 0.80 (mean value 0.31±0.19). Among 125 patients enrolled in this study 39 experienced at least one side effect. The DHFR -317AA genotype was associated with the less favourable response (reduction in rDAS28 score, p=0.05). None of the analysed polymorphisms was associated with MTX toxicity. RA patients with DHFR-317AA genotype had less favourable response to MTX. Further studies in larger patient populations are necessary to confirm the relationship between the analysed polymorphisms and MTX treatment response.

  11. Interaction of ribonucleotides with oxide and silicate minerals under varying environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillie, C.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Hazen, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Large quantities of nucleic acids are found in natural environments, released after the death of an organism and subsequent cell lysis [1]. Nucleic acids are known to adsorb on mineral surfaces [2, 3, 4], which protect them from degradation, whether enzymatic [5, 6] or UV-mediated [7]. It may then contribute to the extracellular genetic pool available in soils to microorganisms for horizontal gene transfers [8]. In order to better understand the behaviour of extracellular nucleic acids in soils, we have investigated the interactions between nucleotides, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP, 5'-AMP and 5'-UMP, and α-alumina as a model compound for Al in six-fold coordination in soil minerals. We carried out batch adsorption experiments over a wide range of pH, ionic strength and surface loading. Alumina adsorbs high amounts of nucleotides > 2 μmol/m2. In similar environmental conditions, swelling clays such as nontronite and montmorillonite adsorb less than 0.1 μmol/m2 if the total surface area is taken under consideration. However, if only the edges of clay particles are considered, the amount of nucleotides adsorbed reaches values between 1.2 and 2 μmol/m2 [9], similar to the alumina and consistent with ';oxide-like' surface sites on the edges of the clay particles. Surface complexation modeling enabled us to predict the speciation of the surface species on the alumina, as well as the stoichiometry and thermodynamic equilibrium constants for the adsorption of nucleotides. We used the extended triple-layer model (ETLM), that takes into account the electrical work linked to the desorption of chemisorbed water molecules during the formation of inner-sphere complexes. Two surface species are thought to form on the surface of corundum: a monodentate inner-sphere complex, dominant at pH < 7.5, and a bidentate outer-sphere complex, dominant at higher pH. Both complexes involve interactions between the negatively charged phosphate group and the positively charged surface of alumina. Our

  12. Structural Elucidation of Chalcone Reductase and Implications for Deoxychalcone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bomati, Erin K.; Austin, Michael B.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    4,2′,4′,6′-tetrahydroxychalcone (chalcone) and 4,2′,4′-trihydroxychalcone (deoxychalcone) serve as precursors of ecologically important flavonoids and isoflavonoids. Deoxychalcone formation depends on chalcone synthase and chalcone reductase; however, the identity of the chalcone reductase substrate out of the possible substrates formed during the multistep reaction catalyzed by chalcone synthase remains experimentally elusive. We report here the three-dimensional structure of alfalfa chalcone reductase bound to the NADP+ cofactor and propose the identity and binding mode of its substrate, namely the non-aromatized coumaryl-trione intermediate of the chalcone synthase-catalyzed cyclization of the fully extended coumaryl-tetraketide thioester intermediate. In the absence of a ternary complex, the quality of the refined NADP+-bound chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for computer-assisted docking to evaluate the likelihood of possible substrates. Interestingly, chalcone reductase adopts the three-dimensional structure of the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. The aldo/keto reductase fold is structurally distinct from all known ketoreductases of fatty acid biosynthesis, which instead belong to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. The results presented here provide structural support for convergent functional evolution of these two ketoreductases that share similar roles in the biosynthesis of fatty acids/polyketides. In addition, the chalcone reductase structure represents the first protein structure of a member of the aldo/ketoreductase 4 family. Therefore, the chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for the homology modeling of other aldo/ketoreductase 4 family members, including the reductase involved in morphine biosynthesis, namely codeinone reductase. PMID:15970585

  13. Nitrite Reductase NirBD Is Induced and Plays an Important Role during In Vitro Dormancy of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Shamim; Khan, Arshad; Sohaskey, Charles D.; Jagannath, Chinnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the strongest reducers of nitrate among all mycobacteria. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite, mediated by nitrate reductase (NarGHJI) of M. tuberculosis, is induced during the dormant stage, and the enzyme has a respiratory function in the absence of oxygen. Nitrite reductase (NirBD) is also functional during aerobic growth when nitrite is the sole nitrogen source. However, the role of NirBD-mediated nitrite reduction during the dormancy is not yet characterized. Here, we analyzed nitrite reduction during aerobic growth as well as in a hypoxic dormancy model of M. tuberculosis in vitro. When nitrite was used as the sole nitrogen source in the medium, the organism grew and the reduction of nitrite was evident in both hypoxic and aerobic cultures of M. tuberculosis. Remarkably, the hypoxic culture of M. tuberculosis, compared to the aerobic culture, showed 32- and 4-fold-increased expression of nitrite reductase (NirBD) at the transcription and protein levels, respectively. More importantly, a nirBD mutant of M. tuberculosis was unable to reduce nitrite and compared to the wild-type (WT) strain had a >2-log reduction in viability after 240 h in the Wayne model of hypoxic dormancy. Dependence of M. tuberculosis on nitrite reductase (NirBD) was also seen in a human macrophage-based dormancy model where the nirBD mutant was impaired for survival compared to the WT strain. Overall, the increased expression and essentiality of nitrite reductase in the in vitro dormancy models suggested that NirBD-mediated nitrite reduction could be critical during the persistent stage of M. tuberculosis. PMID:23935045

  14. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  15. Limited proteolysis of the nitrate reductase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Y; Ogura, N; Nakagawa, H

    1988-12-25

    The functional structure of assimilatory NADH-nitrate reductase from spinach leaves was studied by limited proteolysis experiments. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with trypsin, two stable products of 59 and 45 kDa were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The fragment of 45 kDa was purified by Blue Sepharose chromatography. NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were associated with this 45-kDa fragment which contains FAD, heme, and NADH binding fragment. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, two major peaks were observed by high performance liquid chromatography size exclusion gel filtration. FMNH2-nitrate reductase and reduced methyl viologen-nitrate reductase activities were associated with the first peak of 170 kDa which consists of two noncovalently associated (75-90-kDa) fragments. NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, however, was associated with the second peak which consisted of FAD and NADH binding sites. Incubation of the 45-kDa fragment with S. aureus V8 protease produced two major fragments of 28 and 14 kDa which contained FAD and heme, respectively. These results indicate that the molybdenum, heme, and FAD components of spinach nitrate reductase are contained in distinct domains which are covalently linked by exposed hinge regions. The molybdenum domain appears to be important in the maintenance of subunit interactions in the enzyme complex.

  16. The deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 has two DMSO reductases in distinct subcellular locations.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lei; Jian, Huahua; Xiao, Xiang

    2017-07-07

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) acts as a substantial sink for dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in deep waters and is therefore considered a potential electron acceptor supporting abyssal ecosystems. Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was isolated from west Pacific deep-sea sediments, and two functional DMSO respiratory subsystems are essential for maximum growth of WP3 under in situ conditions (4°C/20 MPa). However, the relationship between these two subsystems and the electron transport pathway underlying DMSO reduction by WP3 remain unknown. In this study, both DMSO reductases (type I and type VI) in WP3 were found to be functionally independent, despite their close evolutionary relationship. Moreover, immunogold labeling of DMSO reductase subunits revealed that the type I DMSO reductase was localized on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane, whereas the type VI DMSO reductase was located within the periplasmic space. CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane-bound tetraheme c-type cytochrome, served as a preferential electron transport protein for both the type I and type VI DMSO reductases, in which type VI accepted electrons from CymA in a DmsE- and DmsF-independent manner. Based on these results, we proposed a core electron transport model of DMSO reduction in the deep-sea bacterium S. piezotolerans WP3. These results collectively suggest that the possession of two sets of DMSO reductases with distinct subcellular localizations might be an adaptive strategy for WP3 to achieve maximum DMSO utilization in deep-sea environments.Importance: As the dominant methylated sulfur compound in deep oceanic water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been suggested to play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycle of the volatile anti-greenhouse gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Two sets of DMSO respiratory systems in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 have previously been identified to mediate DMSO reduction under in situ conditions (4°C/20 MPa). Here, we report that the two DMSO

  17. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  18. The orphan protein bis-γ-glutamylcystine reductase joins the pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductase family

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juhan; Copley, Shelley D.

    2014-01-01

    Facile DNA sequencing became possible decades after many enzymes had been purified and characterized. Consequently, there are still “orphan” enyzmes whose activity is known but the genes that encode them have not been identified. Identification of the genes encoding orphan enzymes is important because it allows correct annotation of genes of unknown function or with mis-assigned function. Bis-γ-glutamylcystine reductase (GCR) is an orphan protein that was purified in 1988. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of bis-γ-glutamylcystine. γ-Glutamylcysteine (γ-Glu-Cys) is the major low molecular weight thiol in halobacteria. We purified GCR from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and identified the sequence of 23 tryptic peptides by NanoLC electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. These peptides cover 62% of the protein predicted to be encoded by a gene in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 that is annotated as mercuric reductase. GCR and mercuric reductase activities were assayed using enzyme that was expressed in E. coli and re-folded from inclusion bodies. The enzyme had robust GCR activity, but no mercuric reductase activity. The genomes of most, but not all, halobacteria for which whole genome sequences are available have close homologs of GCR, suggesting that there is more to be learned about the low molecular weight thiols used in halobacteria. PMID:23560638

  19. The MUC4 mucin mediates gemcitabine resistance of human pancreatic cancer cells via the Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter family

    PubMed Central

    Skrypek, Nicolas; Duchêne, Bélinda; Hebbar, Mohamed; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The fluorinated analog of deoxycytidine, Gemcitabine (Gemzar®), is the main chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer, but survival remains weak mainly because of the high resistance of tumors to the drug. Recent works have shown that the mucin MUC4 may confer an advantage to pancreatic tumor cells by modifying their susceptibility to drugs. However, the cellular mechanism(s) responsible for this MUC4-mediated resistance is unknown. The aim of this work was to identify the cellular mechanisms responsible for gemcitabine resistance linked to MUC4 expression. CAPAN-2 and CAPAN-1 adenocarcinomatous pancreatic cancer cell lines were used to establish stable MUC4-deficient clones (MUC4-KD) by shRNA interference. Measurement of the IC50 index using tetrazolium salt test indicated that MUC4-deficient cells were more sensitive to gemcitabine. This was correlated with increased Bax/BclXL ratio and apoptotic cell number. Expression of Equilibrative/Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter (hENT1, hCNT1/3), deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), ribonucleotide reductase (RRM1/2) and Multidrug-resistance Protein (MRP3/4/5) was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western-blotting. Alteration of MRP3, MRP4, hCNT1 and hCNT3 expression was observed in MUC4-KD cells but only hCNT1 alteration was correlated to MUC4 expression and sensitivity to gemcitabine. Decreased activation of MAPK, JNK and NF-κB pathways was observed in MUC4-deficient cells in which NF-κB pathway was found to play an important role both in sensitivity to gemcitabine and in hCNT1 regulation. Finally and accordingly to our in vitro data, we found that MUC4 expression was conversely correlated to that of hCNT1 in tissues from patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This work describes a new mechanism of pancreatic cancer cell resistance to gemcitabine in which the MUC4 mucin negatively regulates the hCNT1 transporter expression via the NF-κB pathway. Altogether, these data point out to MUC4 and hCNT1 as potential targets

  20. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are required by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  1. Serenoa repens (Permixon) inhibits the 5alpha-reductase activity of human prostate cancer cell lines without interfering with PSA expression.

    PubMed

    Habib, Fouad K; Ross, Margaret; Ho, Clement K H; Lyons, Valerie; Chapman, Karen

    2005-03-20

    The phytotherapeutic agent Serenoa repens is an effective dual inhibitor of 5alpha-reductase isoenzyme activity in the prostate. Unlike other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, Serenoa repens induces its effects without interfering with the cellular capacity to secrete PSA. Here, we focussed on the possible pathways that might differentiate the action of Permixon from that of synthetic 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. We demonstrate that Serenoa repens, unlike other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, does not inhibit binding between activated AR and the steroid receptor-binding consensus in the promoter region of the PSA gene. This was shown by a combination of techniques: assessment of the effect of Permixon on androgen action in the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line revealed no suppression of AR and maintenance of PSA protein expression at control levels. This was consistent with reporter gene experiments showing that Permixon failed to interfere with AR-mediated transcriptional activation of PSA and that both testosterone and DHT were equally effective at maintaining this activity. Our results demonstrate that despite Serenoa repens effective inhibition of 5alpha-reductase activity in the prostate, it did not suppress PSA secretion. Therefore, we confirm the therapeutic advantage of Serenoa repens over other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors as treatment with the phytotherapeutic agent will permit the continuous use of PSA measurements as a useful biomarker for prostate cancer screening and for evaluating tumour progression.

  2. 3-Methyleneoxindole Reductase of Peas 1

    PubMed Central

    Moyed, H. S.; Williamson, Valerie

    1967-01-01

    A 100-fold purification of a reduced triphosphopyridine nucleotide/3-methyleneoxindole reductase of peas has been achieved using conventional protein fractionation procedures. Reduced diphosphopyridine nucleotide is 25-fold less effective than reduced triphosphopyridine nucleotide as the reductant. The preparation is free of other reductase activities including those linking the oxidation of reduced pyridine nucleotide coenzymes to the reduction of cytochrome c; vitamins K1, K2, and K3; O2; nitrate; oxidized glutathione; and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium. The affinity of the enzyme for 3-methyleneoxindole (Ks = 0.5 mm 3-methyleneoxindole) is relatively high. It is, therefore, reasonable to assume that 3-methyleneoxindole is the normal substrate. The enzyme is inhibited by indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-aldehyde, and by l-naph-thaleneacetic acid. While these are not especially powerful inhibitors (K1 = 1.9-4.0 mm) the competitive relationship with 3-methyleneoxindole indicates that significant inhibition might occur at low intracellular concentrations of the substrate. PMID:6042360

  3. Enzyme toolbox: novel enantiocomplementary imine reductases.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Philipp N; Fademrecht, Silvia; Hofelzer, Sebastian; Pleiss, Jürgen; Leipold, Friedemann; Turner, Nicholas J; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-10-13

    Reducing reactions are among the most useful transformations for the generation of chiral compounds in the fine-chemical industry. Because of their exquisite selectivities, enzymatic approaches have emerged as the method of choice for the reduction of C=O and activated C=C bonds. However, stereoselective enzymatic reduction of C=N bonds is still in its infancy-it was only recently described after the discovery of enzymes capable of imine reduction. In our work, we increased the spectrum of imine-reducing enzymes by database analysis. By combining the currently available knowledge about the function of imine reductases with the experimentally uncharacterized diversity stored in protein sequence databases, three novel imine reductases with complementary enantiopreference were identified along with amino acids important for catalysis. Furthermore, their reducing capability was demonstrated by the reduction of the pharmaceutically relevant prochiral imine 2-methylpyrroline. These novel enzymes exhibited comparable to higher catalytic efficiencies than previously described enzymes, and their biosynthetic potential is highlighted by the full conversion of 2-methylpyrroline in whole cells with excellent selectivities.

  4. Soluble ascorbate free radical reductase in the human lens.

    PubMed

    Bando, M; Obazawa, H

    1994-01-01

    A major and a minor ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase were separated from the soluble fraction in the human lens cortex by DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange column chromatography. These AFR reductases also exhibited diaphorase activity using dichlorophenolindophenol and ferricyanide as electron acceptors. The major AFR reductase was partially purified by 5'AMP-Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography. This partially purified AFR reductase showed a single band of diaphorase activity in native polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. This activity band corresponded to the major protein observed in protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue. However, the protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue showed this activity band surrounded by diffused staining. Molecular weight of the partially purified AFR reductase was determined to be 32 kDa by gel filtration, and the apparent Km value for AFR was about 15 microM. This major lens AFR reductase could be distinguished from soluble Neurospora, Euglena and cucumber AFR reductases, and from two ubiquitous enzymes with reduction activity of AFR and/or foreign compounds, ie, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and DT-diaphorase, by their molecular weights, Km values and/or ion-exchange chromatographic behaviors.

  5. Functional and Phylogenetic Divergence of Fungal Adenylate-Forming Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    A key step in fungal l-lysine biosynthesis is catalyzed by adenylate-forming l-α-aminoadipic acid reductases, organized in domains for adenylation, thiolation, and the reduction step. However, the genomes of numerous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes contain an unexpectedly large number of additional genes encoding similar but functionally distinct enzymes. Here, we describe the functional in vitro characterization of four reductases which were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. The Ceriporiopsis subvermispora serine reductase Nps1 features a terminal ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) domain and thus belongs to a hitherto undescribed class of fungal multidomain enzymes. The second major class is characterized by the canonical terminal short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain and represented by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora Nps3 as the first biochemically characterized l-α-aminoadipic acid reductase of basidiomycete origin. Aspergillus flavus l-tyrosine reductases LnaA and LnbA are members of a distinct phylogenetic clade. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that fungal adenylate-forming reductases are more diverse than previously recognized and belong to four distinct classes. PMID:25085485

  6. Structure of an integral membrane sterol reductase from Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Roberti, Rita; Blobel, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are essential biological molecules in the majority of life forms. Sterol reductases1 including Delta-14 sterol reductase (C14SR), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) and 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) reduce specific carbon-carbon double bonds of the sterol moiety using a reducing cofactor during sterol biosynthesis. Lamin B Receptor2 (LBR), an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, also contains a functional C14SR domain. Here we report the crystal structure of a Delta-14 sterol reductase (maSR1) from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a homolog of human C14SR, LBR, and DHCR7, with the cofactor NADPH. The enzyme contains 10 transmembrane segments (TM). Its catalytic domain comprises the C-terminal half (containing TM6-10) and envelops two interconnected pockets, one of which faces the cytoplasm and houses NADPH, while the other one is accessible from the lipid bilayer. Comparison with a soluble steroid 5β-reductase structure3 suggests that the reducing end of NADPH meets the sterol substrate at the juncture of the two pockets. A sterol reductase activity assay proves maSR1 can reduce the double bond of a cholesterol biosynthetic intermediate demonstrating functional conservation to human C14SR. Therefore, our structure as a prototype of integral membrane sterol reductases provides molecular insight into mutations in DHCR7 and LBR for inborn human diseases. PMID:25307054

  7. Structural and biochemical characterization of cinnamoyl-coa reductases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cinnamoyl-coenzyme A reductase (CCR) catalyzes the reduction of hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters using NADPH to produce hydroxycinnamyl aldehyde precursors in lignin synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of cinnamoyl-CoA reductases from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a str...

  8. Role of Helicobacter pylori methionine sulfoxide reductase in urease maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Lisa G.; Mahawar, Manish; Sharp, Joshua S.; Benoit, Stéphane; Maier, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is due in part to urease and Msr (methionine sulfoxide reductase). Upon exposure to relatively mild (21% partial pressure of O2) oxidative stress, a Δmsr mutant showed both decreased urease specific activity in cell-free extracts and decreased nickel associated with the partially purified urease fraction as compared with the parent strain, yet urease apoprotein levels were the same for the Δmsr and wild-type extracts. Urease activity of the Δmsr mutant was not significantly different from the wild-type upon non-stress microaerobic incubation of strains. Urease maturation occurs through nickel mobilization via a suite of known accessory proteins, one being the GTPase UreG. Treatment of UreG with H2O2 resulted in oxidation of MS-identified methionine residues and loss of up to 70% of its GTPase activity. Incubation of pure H2O2-treated UreG with Msr led to reductive repair of nine methionine residues and recovery of up to full enzyme activity. Binding of Msr to both oxidized and non-oxidized UreG was observed by cross-linking. Therefore we conclude Msr aids the survival of H. pylori in part by ensuring continual UreG-mediated urease maturation under stress conditions. PMID:23181726

  9. Optical observation of correlated motions in dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengyang; Niessen, Katherine; Pace, James; Cody, Vivian; Markelz, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Enzyme function relies on its structural flexibility to make conformational changes for substrate binding and product release. An example of a metabolic enzyme where such structural changes are vital is dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). DHFR is essential in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for the nucleotide biosynthesis by catalyzing the reduction of dihydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate. NMR dynamical measurements found large amplitude fast dynamics that could indicate rigid-body, twisting-hinge motion for ecDHFR that may mediate flux. The role of such long-range correlated motions in function was suggested by the observed sharp decrease in enzyme activity for the single point mutation G121V, which is remote from active sites. This decrease in activity may be caused by the mutation interfering with the long-range intramolecular vibrations necessary for rapid access to functional configurations. We use our new technique of crystal anisotropy terahertz microscopy (CATM), to observe correlated motions in ecDHFR crystals with the bonding of NADPH and methotrexate. We compare the measured intramolecular vibrational spectrum with calculations using normal mode analysis.

  10. The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs): Overview.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2015-06-05

    The aldo-keto reductase (AKR) protein superfamily contains >190 members that fall into 16 families and are found in all phyla. These enzymes reduce carbonyl substrates such as: sugar aldehydes; keto-steroids, keto-prostaglandins, retinals, quinones, and lipid peroxidation by-products. Exceptions include the reduction of steroid double bonds catalyzed by AKR1D enzymes (5β-reductases); and the oxidation of proximate carcinogen trans-dihydrodiol polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; while the β-subunits of potassium gated ion channels (AKR6 family) control Kv channel opening. AKRs are usually 37kDa monomers, have an (α/β)8-barrel motif, display large loops at the back of the barrel which govern substrate specificity, and have a conserved cofactor binding domain. AKRs catalyze an ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism in which NAD(P)H cofactor binds first and leaves last. In enzymes that favor NADPH, the rate of release of NADP(+) is governed by a slow isomerization step which places an upper limit on kcat. AKRs retain a conserved catalytic tetrad consisting of Tyr55, Asp50, Lys84, and His117 (AKR1C9 numbering). There is conservation of the catalytic mechanism with short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) even though they show different protein folds. There are 15 human AKRs of these AKR1B1, AKR1C1-1C3, AKR1D1, and AKR1B10 have been implicated in diabetic complications, steroid hormone dependent malignancies, bile acid deficiency and defects in retinoic acid signaling, respectively. Inhibitor programs exist world-wide to target each of these enzymes to treat the aforementioned disorders. Inherited mutations in AKR1C and AKR1D1 enzymes are implicated in defects in the development of male genitalia and bile acid deficiency, respectively, and occur in evolutionarily conserved amino acids. The human AKRs have a large number of nsSNPs and splice variants, but in many instances functional genomics is lacking. AKRs and their variants are now poised to be interrogated using

  11. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  12. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  13. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  14. A high-throughput assay format for determination of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, N.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Choudary, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a microplate-based high-throughput procedure for rapid assay of the enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, using extremely small volumes of reagents. The new procedure offers the advantages of rapidity, small sample size-nanoliter volumes, low cost, and a dramatic increase in the throughput sample number that can be analyzed simultaneously. Additional advantages can be accessed by using microplate reader application software packages that permit assigning a group type to the wells, recording of the data on exportable data files and exercising the option of using the kinetic or endpoint reading modes. The assay can also be used independently for detecting nitrite residues/contamination in environmental/food samples. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Expression in Escherichia coli of Cytochrome c Reductase Activity from a Maize NADH:Nitrate Reductase Complementary DNA 1

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Wilbur H.

    1992-01-01

    A cDNA clone was isolated from a maize (Zea mays L. cv W64A×W183E) scutellum λgt11 library using maize leaf NADH:nitrate reductase Zmnr1 cDNA clone as a hybridization probe; it was designated Zmnr1S. Zmnr1S was shown to be an NADH:nitrate reductase clone by nucleotide sequencing and comparison of its deduced amino acid sequence to Zmnr1. Zmnr1S, which is 1.8 kilobases in length and contains the code for both the cytochrome b and flavin adenine dinucleotide domains of nitrate reductase, was cloned into the EcoRI site of the Escherichia coli expression vector pET5b and expressed. The cell lysate contained NADH:cytochrome c reductase activity, which is a characteristic partial activity of NADH:nitrate reductase dependent on the cytochrome b and flavin adenine dinucleotide domains. Recombinant cytochrome c reductase was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on monoclonal antibody Zm2(69) Sepharose. The purified cytochrome c reductase, which had a major size of 43 kilodaltons, was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies for maize leaf NADH:nitrate reductase and bound these antibodies when blotted to nitrocellulose. Ultraviolet and visible spectra of oxidized and NADH-reduced recombinant cytochrome c reductase were nearly identical with those of maize leaf NADH:nitrate reductase. These two enzyme forms also had very similar kinetic properties with respect to NADH-dependent cytochrome c and ferricyanide reduction. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668941

  16. Production of (R)-Ethyl-4-Chloro-3-Hydroxybutanoate Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae YOL151W Reductase Immobilized onto Magnetic Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2015-11-01

    For the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, chiral alcohols are useful intermediates. Among them, (R)-ethyl-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate ((R)-ECHB) is an important building block for the synthesis of L-carnitine. (R)-ECHB is produced from ethyl-4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (ECOB) by a reductase-mediated, enantioselective reduction reaction. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YOL151W reductase that is expressed in Escherichia coli cells exhibited an enantioselective reduction reaction toward ECOB. By virtue of the C-terminal His-tag, the YOL151W reductase was purified from the cell-free extract using Ni(2+)-NTA column chromatography and immobilized onto Ni(2+)-magnetic microparticles. The physical properties of the immobilized reductase (Imm-Red) were measured using electron microscopy, a magnetic property measurement system, and a zeta potential system; the average size of the particles was approximately 1 μm and the saturated magnetic value was 31.76 emu/g. A neodymium magnet was used to recover the immobilized enzyme within 2 min. The Imm-Red showed an optimum temperature at 45°C and an optimum pH at 6.0. In addition, Bacillus megaterium glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was produced in the E. coli cells and was used in the coupling reaction to regenerate the NADPH cofactor. The reduction/oxidation coupling reaction composed of the Imm-Red and GDH converted 20 mM ECOB exclusively into (R)- ECHB with an e.e.p value of 98%.

  17. Aldo–Keto Reductase 1B10 and Its Role in Proliferation Capacity of Drug-Resistant Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Wada, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The human aldo–keto reductase AKR1B10, originally identified as an aldose reductase-like protein and human small intestine aldose reductase, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase that metabolizes a variety of endogenous compounds, such as aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and dicarbonyl compounds, and some drug ketones. The enzyme is highly expressed in solid tumors of several tissues including lung and liver, and as such has received considerable interest as a relevant biomarker for the development of those tumors. In addition, AKR1B10 has been recently reported to be significantly up-regulated in some cancer cell lines (medulloblastoma D341 and colon cancer HT29) acquiring resistance toward chemotherapeutic agents (cyclophosphamide and mitomycin c), suggesting the validity of the enzyme as a chemoresistance marker. Although the detailed information on the AKR1B10-mediated mechanisms leading to the drug resistance process is not well understood so far, the enzyme has been proposed to be involved in functional regulations of cell proliferation and metabolism of drugs and endogenous lipids during the development of chemoresistance. This article reviews the current literature focusing mainly on expression profile and roles of AKR1B10 in the drug resistance of cancer cells. Recent developments of AKR1B10 inhibitors and their usefulness in restoring sensitivity to anticancer drugs are also reviewed. PMID:22319498

  18. Enzymatic reduction of complex redox dyes using NADH-dependent reductase from Bacillus subtilis coupled with cofactor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Mojca; Pricelius, Sina; Guebitz, Georg M; Kokol, Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Conventional vat dyeing involves chemical reduction of dyes into their water-soluble leuco form generating considerable amounts of toxic chemicals in effluents. In the present study, a new beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide disodium salt (NADH)-dependent reductase isolated from Bacillus subtilis was used to reduce the redox dyes CI Acid Blue 74, CI Natural Orange 6, and CI Vat Blue 1 into their water-soluble leuco form. Enzymatic reduction was optimized in relation to pH and temperature conditions. The reductase was able to reduce Acid Blue 74 and Natural Orange 6 in the presence of the stoichiometrically consumed cofactor NADH; meanwhile, Vat Blue 1 required the presence of mediator 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone. Oxygen from air was used to reoxidize the dyes into their initial forms. The enzymatic reduction of the dyes was studied and the kinetic constants determined, and these were compared to the chemically-reduced leuco form. The enzyme responsible for the reduction showed homology to a NADH-dependent reductase from B. subtilis based on results from the MS/MS peptide mass mapping of the tryptically digested protein. Additionally, the reduction of Acid Blue 74 to its leuco form by reductase from B. subtilis was confirmed using NADH regenerated by the oxidation of formic acid with formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii in the same solution.

  19. Kinetic mechanism of pulmonary carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, K; Nakayama, T; Nakagawa, M; Hara, A; Sawada, H

    1988-05-15

    The kinetic mechanism of guinea-pig lung carbonyl reductase was studied at pH 7 in the forward reaction with five carbonyl substrates and NAD(P)H and in the reverse reaction with propan-2-ol and NAD(P)+. In each case the enzyme mechanism was sequential, and product-inhibition studies were consistent with a di-iso ordered bi bi mechanism, in which NAD(P)H binds to the enzyme first and NAD(P)+ leaves last and the binding of cofactor induces isomerization. The kinetic and binding studies of the cofactors and several inhibitors such as pyrazole, benzoic acid, Cibacron Blue and benzamide indicate that the cofactor and Cibacron Blue bind to the free enzyme whereas the other inhibitors bind to the binary and/or ternary complexes.

  20. Kinetic mechanism of pulmonary carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, K; Nakayama, T; Nakagawa, M; Hara, A; Sawada, H

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of guinea-pig lung carbonyl reductase was studied at pH 7 in the forward reaction with five carbonyl substrates and NAD(P)H and in the reverse reaction with propan-2-ol and NAD(P)+. In each case the enzyme mechanism was sequential, and product-inhibition studies were consistent with a di-iso ordered bi bi mechanism, in which NAD(P)H binds to the enzyme first and NAD(P)+ leaves last and the binding of cofactor induces isomerization. The kinetic and binding studies of the cofactors and several inhibitors such as pyrazole, benzoic acid, Cibacron Blue and benzamide indicate that the cofactor and Cibacron Blue bind to the free enzyme whereas the other inhibitors bind to the binary and/or ternary complexes. PMID:3048244

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: biochemical characterization and medical significance.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylenetetrahydofolate (CH2-H4folate) to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (CH3-H4folate). The enzyme employs a noncovalently-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which accepts reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H and transfers them to CH2-H4folate. The reaction provides the sole source of CH3-H4folate, which is utilized by methionine synthase in the synthesis of methionine from homocysteine. MTHFR plays a key role in folate metabolism and in the homeostasis of homocysteine; mutations in the enzyme lead to hyperhomocyst(e)inemia. A common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and depression in adults, and of neural tube defects in the fetus. The mutation also confers protection for certain types of cancers. This review presents the current knowledge of the enzyme, its biochemical characterization, and medical significance.

  2. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Gennis, Robert B; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2011-11-01

    Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol: O₂ oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O₂ and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O₂-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O₂, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  4. Enhanced silver nanoparticle synthesis by optimization of nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Gopalram, Shubaash; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Deepak, Venkataraman; Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructure materials are attracting a great deal of attention because of their potential for achieving specific processes and selectivity, especially in biological and pharmaceutical applications. The generation of silver nanoparticles using optimized nitrate reductase for the reduction of Ag(+) with the retention of enzymatic activity in the complex is being reported. This report involves the optimization of enzyme activity to bring about enhanced nanoparticle synthesis. Response surface methodology and central composite rotary design (CCRD) were employed to optimize a fermentation medium for the production of nitrate reductase by Bacillus licheniformis at pH 8. The four variables involved in the study of nitrate reductase were Glucose, Peptone, Yeast extract and KNO(3). Glucose had a significant effect on nitrate reductase production. The optimized medium containing (%) Glucose: 1.5, Peptone: 1, Yeast extract: 0.35 and KNO(3): 0.35 resulted in a nitrate reductase activity of 452.206 U/ml which is same as that of the central level. The medium A (showing least nitrate reductase activity) and the medium B (showing maximum nitrate reductase activity) were compared for the synthesis. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the particles exhibited a peak at 431 nm and the A(431) for the medium B was 2-fold greater than that of the medium A. The particles were also characterized using TEM. The particles synthesized using the optimized enzyme activity ranged from 10 to 80 nm and therefore can be extended to various medicinal applications.

  5. Fhit Interaction with Ferredoxin Reductase Triggers Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Apoptosis of Cancer Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Trapasso, Francesco; Pichiorri, Flavia; Gaspari, Marco; Palumbo, Tiziana; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Gaudio, Eugenio; Okumura, Hiroshi; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Di Leva, Giampiero; Fabbri, Muller; Birk, David E.; Raso, Cinzia; Green-Church, Kari; Spagnoli, Luigi G.; Venuta, Salvatore; Huebner, Kay; Croce, Carlo M.

    2008-01-01

    Fhit protein is lost in most cancers, its restoration suppresses tumorigenicity, and virus-mediated FHIT gene therapy induces apoptosis and suppresses tumors in preclinical models. We have used protein cross-linking and proteomics methods to characterize a Fhit protein complex involved in triggering Fhit-mediated apoptosis. The complex includes Hsp60 and Hsp10 that mediate Fhit stability and may affect import into mitochondria, where it interacts with ferredoxin reductase, responsible for transferring electrons from NADPH to cytochrome P450 via ferredoxin. Viral-mediated Fhit restoration increases production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, followed by increased apoptosis of lung cancer cells under oxidative stress conditions; conversely, Fhit-negative cells escape apoptosis, carrying serious oxidative DNA damage that may contribute to an increased mutation rate. Characterization of Fhit interacting proteins has identified direct effectors of the Fhit-mediated apoptotic pathway that is lost in most cancers through loss of Fhit. PMID:18319262

  6. Azo Reductase Activity of Intact Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is Dependent on the Fre1p Component of Plasma Membrane Ferric Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Patrícia A.; Paiva, Sandra; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Casal, Margarida; Cardoso, M. Helena; Ramalho, M. Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Unspecific bacterial reduction of azo dyes is a process widely studied in correlation with the biological treatment of colored wastewaters, but the enzyme system associated with this bacterial capability has never been positively identified. Several ascomycete yeast strains display similar decolorizing behaviors. The yeast-mediated process requires an alternative carbon and energy source and is independent of previous exposure to the dyes. When substrate dyes are polar, their reduction is extracellular, strongly suggesting the involvement of an externally directed plasma membrane redox system. The present work demonstrates that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ferric reductase system participates in the extracellular reduction of azo dyes. The S. cerevisiae Δfre1 and Δfre1 Δfre2 mutant strains, but not the Δfre2 strain, showed much-reduced decolorizing capabilities. The FRE1 gene complemented the phenotype of S. cerevisiae Δfre1 cells, restoring the ability to grow in medium without externally added iron and to decolorize the dye, following a pattern similar to the one observed in the wild-type strain. These results suggest that under the conditions tested, Fre1p is a major component of the azo reductase activity. PMID:16000801

  7. Carboxylation mechanism and stereochemistry of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, a carboxylating enoyl-thioester reductase

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Brecht, Volker; Fuchs, Georg; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective reductions are important reactions in chemistry and biology, and reductases from biological sources are increasingly applied in organic synthesis. In contrast, carboxylases are used only sporadically. We recently described crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA but also the reductive carboxylation of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to ethylmalonyl-CoA. In this study, the complete stereochemical course of both reactions was investigated in detail. The pro-(4R) hydrogen of NADPH is transferred in both reactions to the re face of the C3 position of crotonyl-CoA. In the course of the carboxylation reaction, carbon dioxide is incorporated in anti fashion at the C2 atom of crotonyl-CoA. For the reduction reaction that yields butyryl-CoA, a solvent proton is added in anti fashion instead of the CO2. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase is a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and shares the same phylogenetic origin. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from NAD(P)H within this superfamily is highly conserved, although the substrates and reduction reactions catalyzed by its individual representatives differ quite considerably. Our findings led to a reassessment of the stereospecificity of enoyl(-thioester) reductases and related enzymes with respect to their amino acid sequence, revealing a general pattern of stereospecificity that allows the prediction of the stereochemistry of the hydride transfer for enoyl reductases of unknown specificity. Further considerations on the reaction mechanism indicated that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase may have evolved from enoyl-CoA reductases. This may be useful for protein engineering of enoyl reductases and their application in biocatalysis. PMID:19458256

  8. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  9. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  10. Modulation of plant HMG-CoA reductase by protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Leivar, Pablo; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis, critical not only for normal plant development, but also for the adaptation to demanding environmental conditions. Consistent with this notion, plant HMGR is modulated by many diverse endogenous signals and external stimuli. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in auxin, abscisic acid, ethylene and brassinosteroid signaling and now emerges as a positive and negative multilevel regulator of plant HMGR, both during normal growth and in response to a variety of stress conditions. The interaction with HMGR is mediated by B″ regulatory subunits of PP2A, which are also calcium binding proteins. The new discoveries uncover the potential of PP2A to integrate developmental and calcium-mediated environmental signals in the control of plant HMGR. PMID:21701259

  11. Investigation of the stereochemical course of ene reductase-catalysed reactions by deuterium labelling.

    PubMed

    Brenna, Elisabetta; Fronza, Giovanni; Fuganti, Claudio; Parmeggiani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The stereoselective reduction of suitably substituted C═C bonds mediated by enzymes, called ene reductases, has received great attention in the last decade. Some successful applications of this biocatalysed procedure to the synthesis of chiral active pharmaceutical ingredients have been reported in the literature. The generation of suitable models to be used for predicting the stereochemical outcome of this kind of reductions is a challenging task. In the last years we have exploited deuterium labelling to investigate the stereochemical course of the enzyme-mediated reductions of a wide collection of substrates belonging to well-defined chemical classes. The results of this research have allowed us to draw conclusions on the relationship between the structural characteristics of the substrate and the binding mode it adopts in the enzyme active site. The collected data can be exploited to create an empirical model to rationalise and predict the stereoselectivity of old yellow enzyme (OYE)-catalysed reductions.

  12. Exploration of Nitrate Reductase Metabolic Pathway in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Vinícius; Diniz, Carlos; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Barh, Debmalya

    2017-01-01

    Based on the ability of nitrate reductase synthesis, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is classified into two biovars: Ovis and Equi. Due to the presence of nitrate reductase, the Equi biovar can survive in absence of oxygen. On the other hand, Ovis biovar that does not have nitrate reductase is able to adapt to various ecological niches and can grow on certain carbon sources. Apart from these two biovars, some other strains are also able to carry out the reduction of nitrate. The enzymes that are involved in electron transport chain are also identified by in silico methods. Findings about pathogen metabolism can contribute to the identification of relationship between nitrate reductase and the C. pseudotuberculosis pathogenicity, virulence factors, and discovery of drug targets. PMID:28316974

  13. Exploration of Nitrate Reductase Metabolic Pathway in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sintia; Sousa, Cassiana; Abreu, Vinícius; Diniz, Carlos; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Lage, Andrey P; Barh, Debmalya; Azevedo, Vasco

    2017-01-01

    Based on the ability of nitrate reductase synthesis, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is classified into two biovars: Ovis and Equi. Due to the presence of nitrate reductase, the Equi biovar can survive in absence of oxygen. On the other hand, Ovis biovar that does not have nitrate reductase is able to adapt to various ecological niches and can grow on certain carbon sources. Apart from these two biovars, some other strains are also able to carry out the reduction of nitrate. The enzymes that are involved in electron transport chain are also identified by in silico methods. Findings about pathogen metabolism can contribute to the identification of relationship between nitrate reductase and the C. pseudotuberculosis pathogenicity, virulence factors, and discovery of drug targets.

  14. Enantioselective imine reduction catalyzed by imine reductases and artificial metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Gamenara, Daniela; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2014-05-21

    Adding value to organic synthesis. Novel imine reductases enable the enantioselective reduction of imines to afford optically active amines. Likewise, novel bioinspired artificial metalloenzymes can perform the same reaction as well. Emerging proof-of-concepts are herein discussed.

  15. Identification and Characterization of the Missing Pyrimidine Reductase in the Plant Riboflavin Biosynthesis Pathway1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Ghulam; Frelin, Océane; Roje, Sanja; Ellens, Kenneth W.; Ali, Kashif; Guan, Jiahn-Chou; Garrett, Timothy J.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gregory, Jesse F.; McCarty, Donald R.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is the precursor of the flavin coenzymes flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide. In Escherichia coli and other bacteria, sequential deamination and reduction steps in riboflavin biosynthesis are catalyzed by RibD, a bifunctional protein with distinct pyrimidine deaminase and reductase domains. Plants have two diverged RibD homologs, PyrD and PyrR; PyrR proteins have an extra carboxyl-terminal domain (COG3236) of unknown function. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PyrD (encoded by At4g20960) is known to be a monofunctional pyrimidine deaminase, but no pyrimidine reductase has been identified. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that plant PyrR proteins have a catalytically competent reductase domain but lack essential zinc-binding residues in the deaminase domain, and that the Arabidopsis PyrR gene (At3g47390) is coexpressed with riboflavin synthesis genes. These observations imply that PyrR is a pyrimidine reductase without deaminase activity. Consistent with this inference, Arabidopsis or maize (Zea mays) PyrR (At3g47390 or GRMZM2G090068) restored riboflavin prototrophy to an E. coli ribD deletant strain when coexpressed with the corresponding PyrD protein (At4g20960 or GRMZM2G320099) but not when expressed alone; the COG3236 domain was unnecessary for complementing activity. Furthermore, recombinant maize PyrR mediated NAD(P)H-dependent pyrimidine reduction in vitro. Import assays with pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts showed that PyrR and PyrD are taken up and proteolytically processed. Ablation of the maize PyrR gene caused early seed lethality. These data argue that PyrR is the missing plant pyrimidine reductase, that it is plastid localized, and that it is essential. The role of the COG3236 domain remains mysterious; no evidence was obtained for the possibility that it catalyzes the dephosphorylation that follows pyrimidine reduction. PMID:23150645

  16. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  17. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-09-15

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  18. Amelioration of Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis of Rats by an Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, Epalrestat

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yining; Yang, Jieren

    2015-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is known to play a crucial role in the mediation of diabetic and cardiovascular complications. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that allergen-induced airway remodeling and ovalbumin-induced asthma is mediated by AR. Epalrestat is an aldose reductase inhibitor that is currently available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Whether AR is involved in pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and whether epalrestat attenuates pulmonary fibrosis remains unknown. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/kg) in rats. Primary pulmonary fibroblasts were cultured to investigate the proliferation by BrdU incorporation method and flow cytometry. The expression of AR, TGF-β1, α-SMA and collagen I was analyzed by immunohistochemisty, real-time PCR or western blot. In vivo, epalrestat treatment significantly ameliorated the bleomycin-mediated histological fibrosis alterations and blocked collagen deposition concomitantly with reversing bleomycin-induced expression up-regulation of TGF-β1, AR, α-SMA and collagen I (both mRNA and protein). In vitro, epalrestat remarkably attenuated proliferation of pulmonary fibroblasts and expression of α-SMA and collagen I induced by TGF-β1, and this inhibitory effect of epalrestat was accompanied by inhibiting AR expression. Knockdown of AR gene expression reversed TGF-β1-induced proliferation of fibroblasts, up-regulation of α-SMA and collagen I expression. These findings suggest that AR plays an important role in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and epalrestat inhibited the progression of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is mediated via inhibiting of AR expression. PMID:26330752

  19. Human carbonyl reductase catalyzes reduction of 4-oxonon-2-enal.

    PubMed

    Doorn, Jonathan A; Maser, Edmund; Blum, Andreas; Claffey, David J; Petersen, Dennis R

    2004-10-19

    4-Oxonon-2-enal (4ONE) was demonstrated to be a product of lipid peroxidation, and previous studies found that it was highly reactive toward DNA and protein. The present study sought to determine whether carbonyl reductase (CR) catalyzes reduction of 4ONE, representing a potential pathway for metabolism of the lipid peroxidation product. Recombinant CR was cloned from a human liver cDNA library, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified by metal chelate chromatography. Both 4ONE and its glutathione conjugate were found to be substrates for CR, and kinetic parameters were calculated. TLC analysis of reaction products revealed the presence of three compounds, two of which were identified as 4-hydroxynon-2-enal (4HNE) and 1-hydroxynon-2-en-4-one (1HNO). GC/MS analysis confirmed 4HNE and 1HNO and identified the unknown reaction product as 4-oxononanal (4ONA). Analysis of oxime derivatives of the reaction products via LC/MS confirmed the unknown as 4ONA. The time course for CR-mediated, NADPH-dependent 4ONE reduction and appearance of 4HNE and 1HNO was determined using HPLC, demonstrating 4HNE to be a major product and 1HNO and 4ONA to be minor products. Simulated structures of 4ONE in the active site of CR/NADPH calculated via docking experiments predict the ketone positioned as primary hydride acceptor. Results of the present study demonstrate that 4ONE is a substrate for CR/NADPH and the enzyme may represent a pathway for biotransformation of the lipid. Furthermore, these findings reveal that CR catalyzes hydride transfer selectively to the ketone but also to the aldehyde and C=C of 4ONE, resulting in 4HNE, 1HNO, and 4ONA, respectively.

  20. Tales of Dihydrofolate Binding to R67 Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homotetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase possesses 222 symmetry and a single active site pore. This situation results in a promiscuous binding site that accommodates either the substrate, dihydrofolate (DHF), or the cofactor, NADPH. NADPH interacts more directly with the protein as it is larger than the substrate. In contrast, the p-aminobenzoyl-glutamate tail of DHF, as monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance and crystallography, is disordered when bound. To explore whether smaller active site volumes (which should decrease the level of tail disorder by confinement effects) alter steady state rates, asymmetric mutations that decreased the half-pore volume by ∼35% were constructed. Only minor effects on kcat were observed. To continue exploring the role of tail disorder in catalysis, 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide-mediated cross-linking between R67 DHFR and folate was performed. A two-folate, one-tetramer complex results in the loss of enzyme activity where two symmetry-related K32 residues in the protein are cross-linked to the carboxylates of two bound folates. The tethered folate could be reduced, although with a ≤30-fold decreased rate, suggesting decreased dynamics and/or suboptimal positioning of the cross-linked folate for catalysis. Computer simulations that restrain the dihydrofolate tail near K32 indicate that cross-linking still allows movement of the p-aminobenzoyl ring, which allows the reaction to occur. Finally, a bis-ethylene-diamine-α,γ-amide folate adduct was synthesized; both negatively charged carboxylates in the glutamate tail were replaced with positively charged amines. The Ki for this adduct was ∼9-fold higher than for folate. These various results indicate a balance between folate tail disorder, which helps the enzyme bind substrate while dynamics facilitates catalysis. PMID:26637016

  1. Mechanistic studies of ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Lactobacillus leichmannii

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase (RTPR) was investigated using isotope effect and substrate specificity studies. These experiments were conducted on RTPR purified by a new method from Lactobacillus leichmannii. Isotope effect studies using (3{prime}-{sup 3}H)UTP and (3{prime}-{sup 3}H)ATP demonstrated that the 3{prime} C-H bond of the nucleotide is cleaved in order to cleave the 2{prime} C-OH bond. AdoCbl does not act as a direct H abstractor from the 3{prime} position of the substrate, but instead is thought to act as a radical chain initiator to generate an amino acid radical on the enzyme. Further support for this enzyme mediated cleavage of the 3{prime} C-H bond of the nucleotide and the novel role of AdoCbl came from studies using (3{prime}{sup 3}H)2{prime}-chloro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine 5{prime}-triphosphate ((3{prime}-{sup 3}H)CIUTP). Evidence is presented that during the course of this reaction, the {sup 3}H abstracted from the 3{prime} position of (3{prime}-{sup 3}H)CIUTP was either exchanged with the solvent or returned to the {beta} face of the 2{prime} position to produce (2{prime}{sup 3}H)-2{prime}-deoxy-3{prime}-ketoUTP. This result demonstrates that RTPR is capable of catalyzing a rearrangement reaction. The significance of the RTPR-catalyzed rearrangement with respect to the AdoCbl-dependent enzymes which catalyze rearrangements is discussed.

  2. Distribution of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activity among microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouji; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Yoda, Koji; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nimura-Matsune, Kaori; Mura, Kiyoshi; Tokue, Chiyoko; Katoh, Tetzuya; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) constitutes a large family of enzymes found in microorganisms, animals, and plants, but the detection of the activities of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductases (peroxiredoxin reductases) in cell extracts, and the purification based on peroxide reductase activity, have only been done in bacteria and Trypanosomatidae. A peroxiredoxin reductase (NADH oxidase) from a bacterium, Amphibacillus, displayed only poor activities in the presence of purified Prx from Saccharomyces or Synechocystis, while it is highly active in the presence of bacterial Prx. These results suggested that an enzyme system different from that in bacteria might exist for the reduction of Prx in yeast and cyanobacteria. Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activities were detected in cell extracts of Saccharomyces, Synechocystis, and Chlorella, and the enzyme activities of Saccharomyces and Chlorella were induced under vigorously aerated culture conditions and intensive light exposure conditions, respectively. Partial purification of Prx-linked peroxidase from the induced yeast cells indicated that the Prx-linked peroxidase system consists of two protein components, namely, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. This finding is consistent with the previous report on its purification based on its protein protection activity against oxidation [Chae et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 27670-27678 (1994)]. In this study we have confirmed that Prx-linked peroxidase activity are widely distributed, not only in bacteria species and Trypanosomatidae, but also in yeast and photosynthetic microorganisms, and showed reconstitution of the activity from partially purified interspecies components.

  3. Engineering Styrene Monooxygenase for Biocatalysis: Reductase-Epoxidase Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Heine, Thomas; Tucker, Kathryn; Okonkwo, Nonye; Assefa, Berhanegebriel; Conrad, Catleen; Scholtissek, Anika; Schlömann, Michael; Gassner, George; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and related compounds by two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) has targeted these enzymes for development as biocatalysts. In the present work, we prepare genetically engineered fusion proteins that join the C-terminus of the epoxidase (StyA) to the N-terminus of the reductase (StyB) through a linker peptide and demonstrate their utility as biocatalysts in the synthesis of Tyrain purple and other indigoid dyes. A single-vector expression system offers a simplified platform for transformation and expansion of the catalytic function of styrene monooxygenases, and the resulting fusion proteins are self-regulated and couple efficiently NADH oxidation to styrene epoxidation. We find that the reductase domain proceeds through a sequential ternary-complex mechanism at low FAD concentration and a double-displacement mechanism at higher concentrations of FAD. Single-turnover studies indicate an observed rate constant for FAD-to-FAD hydride transfer of ~8 s(-1). This step is rate limiting in the styrene epoxidation reaction and helps to ensure that flavin reduction and styrene epoxidation reactions proceed without wasteful side reactions. Comparison of the reductase activity of the fusion proteins with the naturally occurring reductase, SMOB, and N-terminally histidine-tagged reductase, NSMOB, suggests that the observed changes in catalytic mechanism are due in part to an increase in flavin-binding affinity associated with the N-terminal extension of the reductase.

  4. Oxygen-Insensitive Nitroreductases NfsA and NfsB of Escherichia coli Function under Anaerobic Conditions as Lawsone-Dependent Azo Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jörg; Stolz, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Quinones can function as redox mediators in the unspecific anaerobic reduction of azo compounds by various bacterial species. These quinones are enzymatically reduced by the bacteria and the resulting hydroquinones then reduce in a purely chemical redox reaction the azo compounds outside of the cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the addition of lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) to anaerobically incubated cells of Escherichia coli resulted in a pronounced increase in the reduction rates of different sulfonated and polymeric azo compounds. In the present study it was attempted to identify the enzyme system(s) responsible for the reduction of lawsone by E. coli and thus for the lawsone-dependent anaerobic azo reductase activity. An NADH-dependent lawsone reductase activity was found in the cytosolic fraction of the cells. The enzyme was purified by column chromatography and the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein was determined. The sequence obtained was identical to the sequence of an oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase (NfsB) described earlier from this organism. Subsequent biochemical tests with the purified lawsone reductase activity confirmed that the lawsone reductase activity detected was identical with NfsB. In addition it was proven that also a second oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase of E. coli (NfsA) is able to reduce lawsone and thus to function under adequate conditions as quinone-dependent azo reductase. PMID:12788749

  5. Microsecond subdomain folding in dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Iwakura, Masahiro; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2011-07-08

    The characterization of microsecond dynamics in the folding of multisubdomain proteins has been a major challenge in understanding their often complex folding mechanisms. Using a continuous-flow mixing device coupled with fluorescence lifetime detection, we report the microsecond folding dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a two-subdomain α/β/α sandwich protein known to begin folding in this time range. The global dimensions of early intermediates were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer, and the dynamic properties of the local Trp environments were monitored by fluorescence lifetime detection. We found that substantial collapse occurs in both the locally connected adenosine binding subdomain and the discontinuous loop subdomain within 35 μs of initiation of folding from the urea unfolded state. During the fastest observable ∼550 μs phase, the discontinuous loop subdomain further contracts, concomitant with the burial of Trp residue(s), as both subdomains achieve a similar degree of compactness. Taken together with previous studies in the millisecond time range, a hierarchical assembly of DHFR--in which each subdomain independently folds, subsequently docks, and then anneals into the native conformation after an initial heterogeneous global collapse--emerges. The progressive acquisition of structure, beginning with a continuously connected subdomain and spreading to distal regions, shows that chain entropy is a significant organizing principle in the folding of multisubdomain proteins and single-domain proteins. Subdomain folding also provides a rationale for the complex kinetics often observed.

  6. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  7. Inhibition of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 by unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Yashiro, Koji

    2016-11-01

    A human member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, AKR1B10, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase toward various carbonyl compounds including reactive aldehydes, and is normally expressed in intestines. The enzyme is overexpressed in several extraintestinal cancers, and suggested as a potential target for cancer treatment. We found that saturated and cis-unsaturated fatty acids inhibit AKR1B10. Among the saturated fatty acids, myristic acid was the most potent, showing the IC50 value of 4.2 μM cis-Unsaturated fatty acids inhibited AKR1B10 more potently, and linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids showed the lowest IC50 values of 1.1 μM. The inhibition by these fatty acids was reversible and kinetically competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the Ki values of 0.24-1.1 μM. These fatty acids, except for α-linoleic acid, were much less inhibitory to structurally similar aldose reductase. Site-directed mutagenesis study suggested that the fatty acids interact with several active site residues of AKR1B10, of which Gln114, Val301 and Gln303 are responsible for the inhibitory selectivity. Linoleic and arachidonic acids also effectively inhibited AKR1B10-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in HCT-15 cells. Thus, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids may be used as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of cancers that up-regulate AKR1B10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2011-09-06

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC{sub 50} values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands.

  9. Sulfite reductase protects plants against sulfite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rheinlands Ruhm') and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation.

  10. 4'-Thio-oligo-beta-D-ribonucleotides: synthesis of beta-4'-thio-oligouridylates, nuclease resistance, base pairing properties, and interaction with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Bellon, L; Barascut, J L; Maury, G; Divita, G; Goody, R; Imbach, J L

    1993-01-01

    We present the synthesis and the study of properties of a new series of modified oligonucleotides, namely 4'-thio-oligo-beta-D-ribonucleotides (4'-S-RNA). Homo-oligonucleotides of this class (4'-SU6 and 4'-SU12) were prepared from the previously known thionucleosides using the phosphoramidite methodology. The comparison of the substrate properties of 4'-SU6 and its natural analog U6 with respect to four nucleases indicates that the former is much more resistant than the latter. Such resistance to nucleases in addition to relatively high Tm values for 4'-SU12 hybridized with Poly(A) show that these new 4'-S-RNA are good candidates for potential antisense effects. The oligonucleotides 4'-SU6 and 4'-SU12 have been also evaluated as non sequence specific inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. All available evidences, based primarily on fluorescence measurements, are consistent with the binding of 4'-SU6 and 4'-SU12 to RT at a site which is different from the polymerase site of the enzyme. PMID:7683133

  11. Purification and properties of proline reductase from Clostridium sticklandii.

    PubMed

    Seto, B; Stadtman, T C

    1976-04-25

    Proline reductase of Clostridium sticklandii is a membrane-bound protein and is released by treatment with detergents. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity and is estimated by gel filtration and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation to have a molecular weight of 298,000 to 327,000. A minimum molecular weight of 30,000 to 31,000 was calculated on the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and amino acid composition. Amino acid analysis showed a preponderance of acidic amino acids. No tryptophan was