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Sample records for rice brittle culm

  1. BRITTLE CULM1, Which Encodes a COBRA-Like Protein, Affects the Mechanical Properties of Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunhai; Qian, Qian; Zhou, Yihua; Yan, Meixian; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Mu; Fu, Zhiming; Wang, Yonghong; Han, Bin; Pang, Xiaoming; Chen, Mingsheng; Li, Jiayang

    2003-01-01

    Plant mechanical strength is an important agronomic trait. To understand the molecular mechanism that controls the plant mechanical strength of crops, we characterized the classic rice mutant brittle culm1 (bc1) and isolated BC1 using a map-based cloning approach. BC1, which encodes a COBRA-like protein, is expressed mainly in developing sclerenchyma cells and in vascular bundles of rice. In these types of cells, mutations in BC1 cause not only a reduction in cell wall thickness and cellulose content but also an increase in lignin level, suggesting that BC1, a gene that controls the mechanical strength of monocots, plays an important role in the biosynthesis of the cell walls of mechanical tissues. PMID:12953108

  2. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-Like Protein, Functions in Cellulose Assembly through Binding Cellulose Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baocai; Liu, Xiangling; Yan, Meixian; Zhang, Lanjun; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Mu; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1), a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs) function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity. PMID:23990797

  3. Culm in rice straw as a new source for sugar recovery via enzymatic saccharification.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeung-yil; Arakane, Mitsuhiro; Shiroma, Riki; Ike, Masakazu; Tokuyasu, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Rice straw was manually dissected and two main fractions were recovered: a culm and a leaf sheath/blade fraction, in order to evaluate their potential as feedstocks for the recovery of fermentable sugars. In the case of cv. Koshihikari and Milkyqueen, most soft carbohydrates (SCs: glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, and beta-1,3-1,4-glucan) were present in the culms, reaching 47.9% and 89.2% of total SCs in the two main fractions. The results also indicated that beta-glucans (cellulose and beta-1,3-1,4-glucan) and xylan in the culms were more susceptible to direct enzymatic attack than those in the leaf sheath/blades. Thus the culm has high potential as a new feedstock for the extraction of fermentable sugars in a concentrated form, as compared to whole rice straw and the leaf sheath/blade. In this study, a novel method of separating a culm from the whole rice straw by means of wind power was also evaluated.

  4. Increased lodging resistance in long-culm, low-lignin gh2 rice for improved feed and bioenergy production

    PubMed Central

    Ookawa, Taiichiro; Inoue, Kazuya; Matsuoka, Makoto; Ebitani, Takeshi; Takarada, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ueda, Tadamasa; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Sugiyama, Chisato; Nakaba, Satoshi; Funada, Ryo; Kato, Hiroshi; Kanekatsu, Motoki; Toyota, Koki; Motobayashi, Takashi; Vazirzanjani, Mehran; Tojo, Seishu; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Lignin modification has been a breeding target for the improvements of forage digestibility and energy yields in forage and bioenergy crops, but decreased lignin levels are often accompanied by reduced lodging resistance. The rice mutant gold hull and internode2 (gh2) has been identified to be lignin deficient. GH2 has been mapped to the short arm of chromosome 2 and encodes cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). We developed a long-culm variety, ‘Leaf Star’, with superior lodging resistance and a gh phenotype similar to one of its parents, ‘Chugoku 117’. The gh loci in Leaf Star and Chugoku 117 were localized to the same region of chromosome 2 as the gh2 mutant. Leaf Star had culms with low lignin concentrations due to a natural mutation in OsCAD2 that was not present in Chugoku 117. However, this variety had high culm strength due to its strong, thick culms. Additionally, this variety had a thick layer of cortical fiber tissue with well-developed secondary cell walls. Our results suggest that rice can be improved for forage and bioenergy production by combining superior lodging resistance, which can be obtained by introducing thick and stiff culm traits, with low lignin concentrations, which can be obtained using the gh2 variety. PMID:25298209

  5. FINE CULM1 (FC1) Works Downstream of Strigolactones to Inhibit the Outgrowth of Axillary Buds in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Minakuchi, Kosuke; Kameoka, Hiromu; Yasuno, Naoko; Umehara, Mikihisa; Luo, Le; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Hanada, Atsushi; Ueno, Kotomi; Asami, Tadao; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kyozuka, Junko

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of highly branched mutants of pea, Arabidopsis and rice have demonstrated that strigolactones (SLs) act as hormones that inhibit shoot branching. The identification of genes that work downstream of SLs is required for a better understanding of how SLs control the growth of axillary buds. We found that the increased tillering phenotype of fine culm1 (fc1) mutants of rice is not rescued by the application of 1 μM GR24, a synthetic SL analog. Treatment with a high concentration of GR24 (10 μM) causes suppression of tiller growth in wild-type plants, but is not effective on fc1 mutants, implying that proper FC1 functioning is required for SLs to inhibit bud growth. Overexpression of FC1 partially rescued d3-2 defects in the tiller growth and plant height. An in situ hybridization analysis showed that FC1 mRNA accumulates in axillary buds, the shoot apical meristem, young leaves, vascular tissues and the tips of crown roots. FC1 mRNA expression was not significantly affected by GR24, suggesting that transcriptional induction may not be the mechanism by which SLs affect FC1 functioning. On the other hand, the expression level of FC1 is negatively regulated by cytokinin treatment. We propose that FC1 acts as an integrator of multiple signaling pathways and is essential to the fine-tuning of shoot branching in rice. PMID:20547591

  6. The rice REDUCED CULM NUMBER11 gene controls vegetative growth under low-temperature conditions in paddy fields independent of RCN1/OsABCG5.

    PubMed

    Funabiki, Atsushi; Takano, Sho; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2013-10-01

    Low temperature tolerance during vegetative growth is an important objective in rice (Oryza sativa L.) breeding programs. We isolated a novel reduced culm number mutant, designated reduced culm number11 (rcn11), by screening under low-temperature condition in a paddy fields. Since the shoot architecture of the rcn11 was very similar to that of the rcn1, we examined whether RCN11 is involved in RCN1/OsABCG5-associated vegetative growth control. The rcn11 mutant has no mutation in the RCN1/OsABCG5 gene and rcn11 has no effect on RCN1/OsABCG5 gene expression. In the rcn1 mutant, RCN1/OsABCG5 was upregulated showing that RCN1/OsABCG5 is controlled by negative feedback regulation. Absence of an effect of rcn11 on RCN1/OsABCG5 feedback regulation supported that RCN11 is not involved in the RCN1/OsABCG5-associated transport system. A genetic allelism test and molecular mapping study showed that rcn11 is independent of rcn1 on rice chromosome 3 and located on chromosome 8. The rcn1 rcn11 phenotype suggests that RCN11 acts on vegetative growth independent of RCN1/OsABCG5. A root development comparison between rcn1 and rcn11 in young seedlings represented that rcn11 reduced crown root number and elongation, whereas rcn1 reduced lateral root density and elongation. Thus, rcn11 will shed new light on vegetative growth control under low temperature.

  7. A Missense Mutation in the Zinc Finger Domain of OsCESA7 Deleteriously Affects Cellulose Biosynthesis and Plant Growth in Rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daofeng; Qin, Yanling; Fang, Jingjing; Yuan, Shoujiang; Peng, Lixiang; Zhao, Jinfeng; Li, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    Rice is a model plant species for the study of cellulose biosynthesis. We isolated a mutant, S1-24, from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated plants of the japonica rice cultivar, Nipponbare. The mutant exhibited brittle culms and other pleiotropic phenotypes such as dwarfism and partial sterility. The brittle culms resulted from reduced mechanical strength due to a defect in thickening of the sclerenchyma cell wall and reduced cellulose content in the culms of the S1-24 mutant. Map-based gene cloning and a complementation assay showed that phenotypes of the S1-24 mutant were caused by a recessive point mutation in the OsCESA7 gene, which encodes cellulose synthase A subunit 7. The missense mutation changed the highly conserved C40 to Y in the zinc finger domain. The OsCESA7 gene is expressed predominantly in the culm at the mature stage, particularly in mechanical tissues such as vascular bundles and sclerenchyma cells, consistent with the brittle phenotype in the culm. These results indicate that OsCESA7 plays an important role in cellulose biosynthesis and plant growth. PMID:27092937

  8. Uncovering a Nuisance Influence of a Phenological Trait of Plants Using a Nonlinear Structural Equation: Application to Days to Heading and Culm Length in Asian Cultivated Rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Onogi, Akio; Ideta, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takuma; Ebana, Kaworu; Yamasaki, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phenological traits of plants, such as flowering time, are linked to growth phase transition. Thus, phenological traits often influence other traits through the modification of the duration of growth period. This influence is a nuisance in plant breeding because it hampers genetic evaluation of the influenced traits. Genetic effects on the influenced traits have two components, one that directly affects the traits and one that indirectly affects the traits via the phenological trait. These cannot be distinguished by phenotypic evaluation and ordinary linear regression models. Consequently, if a phenological trait is modified by introgression or editing of the responsible genes, the phenotypes of the influenced traits can change unexpectedly. To uncover the influence of the phenological trait and evaluate the direct genetic effects on the influenced traits, we developed a nonlinear structural equation (NSE) incorporating a nonlinear influence of the phenological trait. We applied the NSE to real data for cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.): days to heading (DH) as a phenological trait and culm length (CL) as the influenced trait. This showed that CL of the cultivars that showed extremely early heading was shortened by the strong influence of DH. In a simulation study, it was shown that the NSE was able to infer the nonlinear influence and direct genetic effects with reasonable accuracy. However, the NSE failed to infer the linear influence in this study. When no influence was simulated, an ordinary bi-trait linear model (OLM) tended to infer the genetic effects more accurately. In such cases, however, by comparing the NSE and OLM using an information criterion, we could assess whether the nonlinear assumption of the NSE was appropriate for the data analyzed. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the NSE in revealing the phenotypic influence of phenological traits. PMID:26859143

  9. Uncovering a Nuisance Influence of a Phenological Trait of Plants Using a Nonlinear Structural Equation: Application to Days to Heading and Culm Length in Asian Cultivated Rice (Oryza Sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Onogi, Akio; Ideta, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takuma; Ebana, Kaworu; Yamasaki, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Phenological traits of plants, such as flowering time, are linked to growth phase transition. Thus, phenological traits often influence other traits through the modification of the duration of growth period. This influence is a nuisance in plant breeding because it hampers genetic evaluation of the influenced traits. Genetic effects on the influenced traits have two components, one that directly affects the traits and one that indirectly affects the traits via the phenological trait. These cannot be distinguished by phenotypic evaluation and ordinary linear regression models. Consequently, if a phenological trait is modified by introgression or editing of the responsible genes, the phenotypes of the influenced traits can change unexpectedly. To uncover the influence of the phenological trait and evaluate the direct genetic effects on the influenced traits, we developed a nonlinear structural equation (NSE) incorporating a nonlinear influence of the phenological trait. We applied the NSE to real data for cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.): days to heading (DH) as a phenological trait and culm length (CL) as the influenced trait. This showed that CL of the cultivars that showed extremely early heading was shortened by the strong influence of DH. In a simulation study, it was shown that the NSE was able to infer the nonlinear influence and direct genetic effects with reasonable accuracy. However, the NSE failed to infer the linear influence in this study. When no influence was simulated, an ordinary bi-trait linear model (OLM) tended to infer the genetic effects more accurately. In such cases, however, by comparing the NSE and OLM using an information criterion, we could assess whether the nonlinear assumption of the NSE was appropriate for the data analyzed. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the NSE in revealing the phenotypic influence of phenological traits.

  10. Carbon dioxide emission from bamboo culms.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, E J; Sabulal, B; Nair, D N K; Johnson, A J; Kumar, C S P

    2016-05-01

    Bamboos are one of the fastest growing plants on Earth, and are widely considered to have high ability to capture and sequester atmospheric carbon, and consequently to mitigate climate change. We tested this hypothesis by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions from bamboo culms and comparing them with their biomass sequestration potential. We analysed diurnal effluxes from Bambusa vulgaris culm surface and gas mixtures inside hollow sections of various bamboos using gas chromatography. Corresponding variations in gas pressure inside the bamboo section and culm surface temperature were measured. SEM micrographs of rhizome and bud portions of bamboo culms were also recorded. We found very high CO2 effluxes from culm surface, nodes and buds of bamboos. Positive gas pressure and very high concentrations of CO2 were observed inside hollow sections of bamboos. The CO2 effluxes observed from bamboos were very high compared to their carbon sequestration potential. Our measurements suggest that bamboos are net emitters of CO2 during their lifespan.

  11. Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis for Culm Elongation of the World's Largest Bamboo (Dendrocalamus sinicus).

    PubMed

    Cui, Kai; Wang, Haiying; Liao, Shengxi; Tang, Qi; Li, Li; Cui, Yongzhong; He, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Dendrocalamus sinicus is the world's largest bamboo species with strong woody culms, and known for its fast-growing culms. As an economic bamboo species, it was popularized for multi-functional applications including furniture, construction, and industrial paper pulp. To comprehensively elucidate the molecular processes involved in its culm elongation, Illumina paired-end sequencing was conducted. About 65.08 million high-quality reads were produced, and assembled into 81,744 unigenes with an average length of 723 bp. A total of 64,338 (79%) unigenes were annotated for their functions, of which, 56,587 were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 35,262 were annotated in the Swiss-Prot database. Also, 42,508 and 21,009 annotated unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 33,920 unigenes were assigned to 128 KEGG pathways. Meanwhile, 8,553 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 81,534 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, respectively. Additionally, 388 transcripts encoding lignin biosynthesis were detected, among which, 27 transcripts encoding Shikimate O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) specifically expressed in D. sinicus when compared to other bamboo species and rice. The phylogenetic relationship between D. sinicus and other plants was analyzed, suggesting functional diversity of HCT unigenes in D. sinicus. We conjectured that HCT might lead to the high lignin content and giant culm. Given that the leaves are not yet formed and culm is covered with sheaths during culm elongation, the existence of photosynthesis of bamboo culm is usually neglected. Surprisedly, 109 transcripts encoding photosynthesis were identified, including photosystem I and II, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport and F-type ATPase, and 24 transcripts were characterized as antenna

  12. Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis for Culm Elongation of the World’s Largest Bamboo (Dendrocalamus sinicus)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Wang, Haiying; Liao, Shengxi; Tang, Qi; Li, Li; Cui, Yongzhong; He, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Dendrocalamus sinicus is the world’s largest bamboo species with strong woody culms, and known for its fast-growing culms. As an economic bamboo species, it was popularized for multi-functional applications including furniture, construction, and industrial paper pulp. To comprehensively elucidate the molecular processes involved in its culm elongation, Illumina paired-end sequencing was conducted. About 65.08 million high-quality reads were produced, and assembled into 81,744 unigenes with an average length of 723 bp. A total of 64,338 (79%) unigenes were annotated for their functions, of which, 56,587 were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 35,262 were annotated in the Swiss-Prot database. Also, 42,508 and 21,009 annotated unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 33,920 unigenes were assigned to 128 KEGG pathways. Meanwhile, 8,553 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 81,534 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, respectively. Additionally, 388 transcripts encoding lignin biosynthesis were detected, among which, 27 transcripts encoding Shikimate O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) specifically expressed in D. sinicus when compared to other bamboo species and rice. The phylogenetic relationship between D. sinicus and other plants was analyzed, suggesting functional diversity of HCT unigenes in D. sinicus. We conjectured that HCT might lead to the high lignin content and giant culm. Given that the leaves are not yet formed and culm is covered with sheaths during culm elongation, the existence of photosynthesis of bamboo culm is usually neglected. Surprisedly, 109 transcripts encoding photosynthesis were identified, including photosystem I and II, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport and F-type ATPase, and 24 transcripts were characterized as antenna

  13. Carbon dioxide emission from bamboo culms.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, E J; Sabulal, B; Nair, D N K; Johnson, A J; Kumar, C S P

    2016-05-01

    Bamboos are one of the fastest growing plants on Earth, and are widely considered to have high ability to capture and sequester atmospheric carbon, and consequently to mitigate climate change. We tested this hypothesis by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions from bamboo culms and comparing them with their biomass sequestration potential. We analysed diurnal effluxes from Bambusa vulgaris culm surface and gas mixtures inside hollow sections of various bamboos using gas chromatography. Corresponding variations in gas pressure inside the bamboo section and culm surface temperature were measured. SEM micrographs of rhizome and bud portions of bamboo culms were also recorded. We found very high CO2 effluxes from culm surface, nodes and buds of bamboos. Positive gas pressure and very high concentrations of CO2 were observed inside hollow sections of bamboos. The CO2 effluxes observed from bamboos were very high compared to their carbon sequestration potential. Our measurements suggest that bamboos are net emitters of CO2 during their lifespan. PMID:26802362

  14. Compartmentation of sucrose during radial transfer in mature sorghum culm

    PubMed Central

    Tarpley, Lee; Vietor, Donald M

    2007-01-01

    Background The sucrose that accumulates in the culm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and other large tropical andropogonoid grasses can be of commercial value, and can buffer assimilate supply during development. Previous study conducted with intact plants showed that sucrose can be radially transferred to the intracellular compartment of mature ripening sorghum internode without being hydrolysed. In this study, culm-infused radiolabelled sucrose was traced between cellular compartments and among related metabolites to determine if the compartmental path of sucrose during radial transfer in culm tissue was symplasmic or included an apoplasmic step. This transfer path was evaluated for elongating and ripening culm tissue of intact plants of two semidwarf grain sorghums. The metabolic path in elongating internode tissue was also evaluated. Results On the day after culm infusion of the tracer sucrose, the specific radioactivity of sucrose recovered from the intracellular compartment of growing axillary-branch tissue was greater (nearly twice) than that in the free space, indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through symplasmic routes. In contrast, the sucrose specific radioactivity in the intracellular compartment of the mature (ripening) culm tissue was probably less (about 3/4's) than that in free space indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through routes that included an apoplasmic step. In growing internodes of the axillary branch of sorghum, the tritium label initially provided in the fructose moiety of sucrose molecules was largely (81%) recovered in the fructose moiety, indicating that a large portion of sucrose molecules is not hydrolysed and resynthesized during radial transfer. Conclusion During radial transfer of sucrose in ripening internodes of intact sorghum plants, much of the sucrose is transferred intact (without hydrolysis and resynthesis) and primarily through a path that includes an apoplasmic step. In

  15. 48. Northwest Side of Breaker, from Culm Bank, date unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Northwest Side of Breaker, from Culm Bank, date unknown Historic Photograph, Photographer Unknown; Collection of William Everett, Jr. (Wilkes-Barre,PA), photocopy by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  16. Children with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Special help given to children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is described, including adapted equipment to allow for writing and use of a classroom assistant to aid participation in a regular classroom. (CL)

  17. Understanding the importance wet, unimproved Culm grasslands have for the provision of multiple ecosystem services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Richard; Elliot, Mark; Warren, Susan; Puttock, Alan

    2014-05-01

    It is increasingly recognised that catchments must be carefully managed for the provision of multiple, sometimes conflicting ecosystem services. This requires an increased interdisciplinary environmental understanding to inform management policy and practices by government, landowners and stakeholders. The Culm National Character Area (NCA) covers 3,500 square kilometres in South West England with Culm grasslands consisting of wet unimproved, species rich pastures, typically on poorly drained soils. Since the 1960's, policy changes have encouraged the drainage of large areas of land for agricultural improvement and consequently Culm grassland sites have become highly fragmented. There are currently 575 Culm grassland sites in the Culm NCA with a mean area of 7 ha. Traditionally, Culm grasslands have been managed by light grazing and scrub management. Since 2008, Devon Wildlife Trust's Working Wetlands project has been working with farmers and landowners to manage and restore and recreate Culm grasslands. It is part of South West Water's Upstream Thinking initiative and is now augmented by the Northern Devon Nature Improvement Area programme. However, from a hydrological perspective, Culm and similar unimproved grasslands remain poorly understood. In addition to their recognised conservation and biodiversity importance; unimproved grasslands such as Culm are thought to have a high water storage capacity, reducing runoff and therefore flooding during wet periods, whilst slowly releasing and filtering water to help maintain water quality, and base river flows during dry periods. Therefore, if properly understood and managed Culm soils have the potential to play an important role in the management of catchment water resources. Furthermore, Culm grassland soils are thought to have a high potential for the sequestration and storage of carbon, an increasingly valuable ecosystem service. This study aims to increase understanding of the influence Culm grasslands have upon

  18. Gibberellin deficiency pleiotropically induces culm bending in sorghum: an insight into sorghum semi-dwarf breeding

    PubMed Central

    Ordonio, Reynante L.; Ito, Yusuke; Hatakeyama, Asako; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto; Sazuka, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of symmetrical cell growth in the culm is important for proper culm development. So far, the involvement of gibberellin (GA) in this process has not yet been demonstrated in sorghum. Here, we show that GA deficiency resulting from any loss-of-function mutation in four genes (SbCPS1, SbKS1, SbKO1, SbKAO1) involved in the early steps of GA biosynthesis, not only results in severe dwarfism but also in abnormal culm bending. Histological analysis of the bent culm revealed that the intrinsic bending was due to an uneven cell proliferation between the lower and upper sides of culm internodes. GA treatment alleviated the bending and dwarfism in mutants, whereas the GA biosynthesis inhibitor, uniconazole, induced such phenotypes in wild-type plants— both in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating an important role of GA in controlling erectness of the sorghum culm. Finally, we propose that because of the tight relationship between GA deficiency-induced dwarfism and culm bending in sorghum, GA-related mutations have unlikely been selected in the history of sorghum breeding, as could be inferred from previous QTL and association studies on sorghum plant height that did not pinpoint GA-related genes. PMID:24924234

  19. Gibberellin deficiency pleiotropically induces culm bending in sorghum: an insight into sorghum semi-dwarf breeding.

    PubMed

    Ordonio, Reynante L; Ito, Yusuke; Hatakeyama, Asako; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto; Sazuka, Takashi

    2014-06-13

    Regulation of symmetrical cell growth in the culm is important for proper culm development. So far, the involvement of gibberellin (GA) in this process has not yet been demonstrated in sorghum. Here, we show that GA deficiency resulting from any loss-of-function mutation in four genes (SbCPS1, SbKS1, SbKO1, SbKAO1) involved in the early steps of GA biosynthesis, not only results in severe dwarfism but also in abnormal culm bending. Histological analysis of the bent culm revealed that the intrinsic bending was due to an uneven cell proliferation between the lower and upper sides of culm internodes. GA treatment alleviated the bending and dwarfism in mutants, whereas the GA biosynthesis inhibitor, uniconazole, induced such phenotypes in wild-type plants--both in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating an important role of GA in controlling erectness of the sorghum culm. Finally, we propose that because of the tight relationship between GA deficiency-induced dwarfism and culm bending in sorghum, GA-related mutations have unlikely been selected in the history of sorghum breeding, as could be inferred from previous QTL and association studies on sorghum plant height that did not pinpoint GA-related genes.

  20. Kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in maturing sugarcane culm tissue.

    PubMed

    Uys, Lafras; Botha, Frederik C; Hofmeyr, Jan-Hendrik S; Rohwer, Johann M

    2007-01-01

    Biochemically, it is not completely understood why or how commercial varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) are able to accumulate sucrose in high concentrations. Such concentrations are obtained despite the presence of sucrose synthesis/breakdown cycles (futile cycling) in the culm of the storage parenchyma. Given the complexity of the process, kinetic modelling may help to elucidate the factors governing sucrose accumulation or direct the design of experimental optimisation strategies. This paper describes the extension of an existing model of sucrose accumulation (Rohwer, J.M., Botha, F.C., 2001. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data. Biochem. J. 358, 437-445) to account for isoforms of sucrose synthase and fructokinase, carbon partitioning towards fibre formation, and the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyrophosphate-dependent PFK and aldolase. Moreover, by including data on the maximal activity of the enzymes as measured in different internodes, a growth model was constructed that describes the metabolic behaviour as sugarcane parenchymal tissue matures from internodes 3-10. While there was some discrepancy between modelled and experimentally determined steady-state sucrose concentrations in the cytoplasm, steady-state fluxes showed a better fit. The model supports a hypothesis of vacuolar sucrose accumulation against a concentration gradient. A detailed metabolic control analysis of sucrose synthase showed that each isoform has a unique control profile. Fructose uptake by the cell and sucrose uptake by the vacuole had a negative control on the futile cycling of sucrose and a positive control on sucrose accumulation, while the control profile for neutral invertase was reversed. When the activities of these three enzymes were changed from their reference values, the effects on futile cycling and sucrose accumulation were amplified. The model can be run online at the JWS Online

  1. Fracture of brittle solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, R. D.; Nash, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    Upon completion of this experiment, the student should be able to give an elementary account of brittle versus ductile failure, conduct a three-point bend test on a tensile testing machine, and statistically analyze experimental data that exhibit inherently wide scatter. The experimental procedure is described.

  2. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  3. Modeling of ductile and brittle/brittle laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.P.

    1996-02-01

    A micro-mechanical ``spring``-network model was used to simulate the deformation and fracture behaviors of ductile/brittle and brittle/brittle laminates. Effects of interfacial cohesion, moduli, grain boundary cohesion, yield stress are presented and compared with available experiments. We found that composites with higher yield stress and lower interfacial cohesion are tougher.

  4. Measuring bulrush culm relationships to estimate plant biomass within a southern California treatment wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, Joan S. (Thullen); Cade, Brian S.; Sartoris, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of emergent vegetation biomass can be time consuming and labor intensive. To establish a less onerous, yet accurate method, for determining emergent plant biomass than by direct measurements we collected vegetation data over a six-year period and modeled biomass using easily obtained variables: culm (stem) diameter, culm height and culm density. From 1998 through 2005, we collected emergent vegetation samples (Schoenoplectus californicus andSchoenoplectus acutus) at a constructed treatment wetland in San Jacinto, California during spring and fall. Various statistical models were run on the data to determine the strongest relationships. We found that the nonlinear relationship: CB=β0DHβ110ε, where CB was dry culm biomass (g m−2), DH was density of culms × average height of culms in a plot, and β0 and β1 were parameters to estimate, proved to be the best fit for predicting dried-live above-ground biomass of the two Schoenoplectus species. The random error distribution, ε, was either assumed to be normally distributed for mean regression estimates or assumed to be an unspecified continuous distribution for quantile regression estimates.

  5. Design, construction, operation and evaluation of a prototype culm combustion boiler/heater unit. Final design of prototype unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A final design of a prototype anthracite culm combustion boiler has been accomplished under Phase I of DOE Contract ET-78-C-01-3269. The prototype boiler has been designed to generate 20,000 pounds per hour of 150 psig saturated steam using low Btu (4000 Btu per pound) anthracite culm as a fuel. This boiler will be located at the industrial park of the Shamokin Area Industrial Corporation (SAIC). This program is directed at demonstrating the commercial viability of anthracite culm fueled FBC steam generation systems.

  6. Determinants of water circulation in a woody bamboo species: afternoon use and night-time recharge of culm water storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Goldstein, Guillermo; Sun, Mei; Ma, Ren-Yi; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2015-09-01

    To understand water-use strategies of woody bamboo species, sap flux density (Fd) in the culms of a woody bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris Schrader ex Wendland) was monitored using the thermal dissipation method. The daytime and night-time Fd were analyzed in the dry and rainy seasons. Additionally, diurnal changes in root pressure, culm circumference, and stomatal conductance (gs) were investigated to characterize the mechanisms used to maintain diurnal water balance of woody bamboos. Both in the dry and rainy seasons, daytime Fd responded to vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in an exponential fashion, with a fast initial increase in Fd when VPD increased from 0 to 1 kPa. The Fd and gs started to increase very fast as light intensity and VPD increased in the morning, but they decreased sharply once the maximum value was achieved. The Fd response of this woody bamboo to VPD was much faster than that of representative trees and palms growing in the same study site, suggesting its fast sap flow and stomatal responses to changes in ambient environmental factors. The Fd in the lower and higher culm positions started to increase at the same time in the morning, but the Fd in the higher culm position was higher than that of the lower culm in the afternoon. Consistently, distinct decreases in its culm circumference in the afternoon were detected. Therefore, unlike trees, water storage of bamboo culms was not used for its transpiration in the morning but in the afternoon. Nocturnal sap flow of this woody bamboo was also detected and related to root pressure. We conclude that this bamboo has fast sap flow/stomatal responses to irradiance and evaporative demands, and it uses substantial water storage for transpiration in the afternoon, while root pressure appears to be a mechanism resulting in culm water storage recharge during the night. PMID:26232783

  7. Effects of high NH(+) 4 on K(+) uptake, culm mechanical strength and grain filling in wheat.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingan; Sun, Mingze; Wang, Fahong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Bo; Si, Jisheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Shengdong; Li, Huawei

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that a high external NH(+) 4 concentration depresses many processes in plant development, but the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. To determine whether the negative effects of high levels of NH(+) 4 are related to competitive cation uptake, wheat was grown in a field with moderate (18 g N m(-2)) and high (30 g N m(-2)) supplies of NH(+) 4 in the presence or absence of additional K(+) (6 g K2O m(-2)) to examine culm mechanical strength, the main components of the vascular bundle, nitrogen (N) remobilization and the grain-filling rate. The results indicated that an excessive supply of NH(+) 4 significantly decreased culm mechanical strength, the cellulose and lignin contents of vascular bundles, the N remobilization efficiency (NRE) and the grain-filling rate compared with a moderate level of NH(+) 4. The additional provision of K(+) considerably alleviated these negative effects of high NH(+) 4, resulting in a 19.41-26.95% increase in culm mechanical strength during grain filling and a 34.59% increase in the NRE. An assay using the scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) showed that the net rate of transmembrane K(+) influx decreased by 84.62%, and measurements using flame photometry demonstrated that the K(+) content decreased by 36.13% in wheat plants subjected to high NH(+) 4. This study indicates that the effects of high NH(+) 4 on culm mechanical strength, cellulose and lignin contents, the NRE and the grain-filling rate are probably associated with inhibition of K(+) uptake in wheat. PMID:25566278

  8. Effects of high NH+4 on K+ uptake, culm mechanical strength and grain filling in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingan; Sun, Mingze; Wang, Fahong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Bo; Si, Jisheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Shengdong; Li, Huawei

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that a high external NH+4 concentration depresses many processes in plant development, but the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. To determine whether the negative effects of high levels of NH+4 are related to competitive cation uptake, wheat was grown in a field with moderate (18 g N m−2) and high (30 g N m−2) supplies of NH+4 in the presence or absence of additional K+ (6 g K2O m−2) to examine culm mechanical strength, the main components of the vascular bundle, nitrogen (N) remobilization and the grain-filling rate. The results indicated that an excessive supply of NH+4 significantly decreased culm mechanical strength, the cellulose and lignin contents of vascular bundles, the N remobilization efficiency (NRE) and the grain-filling rate compared with a moderate level of NH+4. The additional provision of K+ considerably alleviated these negative effects of high NH+4, resulting in a 19.41–26.95% increase in culm mechanical strength during grain filling and a 34.59% increase in the NRE. An assay using the scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) showed that the net rate of transmembrane K+ influx decreased by 84.62%, and measurements using flame photometry demonstrated that the K+ content decreased by 36.13% in wheat plants subjected to high NH+4. This study indicates that the effects of high NH+4 on culm mechanical strength, cellulose and lignin contents, the NRE and the grain-filling rate are probably associated with inhibition of K+ uptake in wheat. PMID:25566278

  9. Improving barley culm robustness for secured crop yield in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Dockter, Christoph; Hansson, Mats

    2015-06-01

    The Green Revolution combined advancements in breeding and agricultural practice, and provided food security to millions of people. Daily food supply is still a major issue in many parts of the world and is further challenged by future climate change. Fortunately, life science research is currently making huge progress, and the development of future crop plants will be explored. Today, plant breeding typically follows one gene per trait. However, new scientific achievements have revealed that many of these traits depend on different genes and complex interactions of proteins reacting to various external stimuli. These findings open up new possibilities for breeding where variations in several genes can be combined to enhance productivity and quality. In this review we present an overview of genes determining plant architecture in barley, with a special focus on culm length. Many genes are currently known only through their mutant phenotypes, but emerging genomic sequence information will accelerate their identification. More than 1000 different short-culm barley mutants have been isolated and classified in different phenotypic groups according to culm length and additional pleiotropic characters. Some mutants have been connected to deficiencies in biosynthesis and reception of brassinosteroids and gibberellic acids. Still other mutants are unlikely to be connected to these hormones. The genes and corresponding mutations are of potential interest for development of stiff-straw crop plants tolerant to lodging, which occurs in extreme weather conditions with strong winds and heavy precipitation. PMID:25614659

  10. Soft matter: Brittle for breakfast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    Crushing a brittle porous medium such as a box of cereal causes the grains to break up and rearrange themselves. A lattice spring model based on simple physical assumptions gives rise to behaviours that are complex enough to reproduce diverse compaction patterns.

  11. Protection of brittle film against cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, J.; Sklenka, J.; Čerstvý, R.

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on the protection of the brittle Zrsbnd Sisbnd O film against cracking in bending by the highly elastic top film (over-layer). In experiments the Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films with different elemental composition and structure were used. Both the brittle and highly elastic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering using a dual magnetron. The brittle film easily cracks in bending. On the other hand, the highly elastic film exhibits enhanced resistance to cracking in bending. Main characteristic parameters of both the brittle and highly elastic films are given. Special attention is devoted to the effect of the structure (crystalline, amorphous) of both the brittle and highly elastic top film on the resistance of cracking of the brittle film. It was found that (1) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline brittle films easily crack in bending, (2) the highly elastic film can have either X-ray amorphous or crystalline structure and (3) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline, highly elastic top films perfectly protect the brittle films against cracking in bending. The structure, mechanical properties and optical transparency of the brittle and highly elastic sputtered Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films are described in detail. At the end of this article, the principle of the low-temperature formation of the highly elastic films is also explained.

  12. Evaluation of the brittleness of the rocks using various brittleness indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Dae-Sung; Jung, Yong-Bok; Park, Chan; Park, Eui-Seob

    2015-04-01

    In general, the rock has the feature of drastically reduced bearing capacity during the small strain by the brittle characteristic. Because brittleness is considered as both of inherent property and behavior of materials, various brittleness indices have been proposed and based on these the brittleness degrees of the rock are determined. The brittleness indices are used for evaluating the stability of brittle failure in deep mines or underground excavations, drillability evaluation in the well drilling field, sawability evaluation in the building stone field and others. In recent years there has been utilized as a descriptor of the hydraulic fracturing in shale gas and enhanced geothermal system. In this paper, we estimated the brittleness index of different types of rocks using various brittleness indices proposed by previous researchers and investigated their relationship and applicability. The commonly used brittleness index in Rock Mechanics is the ratio between uniaxial compressive strength and tensile strength. In Reservior Geomechanics, the indices using dynamic elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio calculated from well logging data are generally used. In higher brittleness or brittleness index, the rock shows the following characteristics; low values of elongation of grains, fracture failure, formation of fines and debris, a higher ratio of compressive to tensile strength, higher resilience, higher internal friction angle, formation of cracks in indentation, easy to fracture etc.. The brittleness index showed relatively good relations with rock intrinsic properties such as uniaxial compressive strength, elastic modulus and fracture toughness in particular rock types. The correlation among brittleness index using geophysical logging data was shown. However, it was difficult to find a relationship of the brittleness indices between uses in traditional Rock Mechanics and Reservoir Geomechanics. Since some brittleness indices have no special meaning, a careful

  13. Brittle microtectonics: principles and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. L.

    Brittle microtectonics as defined here is the application of mesofracture analysis to the solution of tectonic problems. For the determination of regionally significant stress or strain trajectories the ideal suite of structures comprises kinematic indicators such as mesofaults, shear zones, arrays of en échelon cracks, kink bands, stylolites and fibrous veins. However, in many tectonic settings joints are the only widespread structures capable of being analysed. The principal criteria for classifying joints into extension, hybrid and shear classes are fracture-system architecture and symmetry, surface morphology, dihedral angles and thin-section characteristics. The architecture of orthogonal extension joints is commonly T-shaped, the younger joint abutting the older one. Neighbouring conjugate hybrid or shear joints generally define X, Y or V shapes but some X patterns are artefacts of unrelated cross-cutting fractures. Conjugate joints enclosing dihedral angles of less than 45° are common; they are interpreted as hybrid failure surfaces initiated in the shear-extension fracture transition. The orientations of many joint sets in platforms are related to far-field stresses generated during plate motion and the subsidence, uplift and inversion of basins. Even within a single joint set there is commonly field evidence to show that it developed during a multiphase failure sequence. Some joints are younger than folds but where a system was established before the close of folding the surfaces commonly become the sites of slip, dilation or pressure solution, and are thus transformed into structures no longer classed as joints.

  14. Computational brittle fracture using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPBM. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPBM. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we have simulated a number of experiments. We discuss three of these simulations in this paper. The first experiment consists of a brittle steel sphere impacting a plate. The experimental sphere fragment patterns are compared to the calculations. The second experiment is a steel flyer plate in which the recovered steel target crack patterns are compared to the calculated crack patterns. We also briefly describe a simulation of a tungsten rod impacting a heavily confined alumina target, which has been recently reported on in detail.

  15. Brittleness Effect on Rock Fatigue Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Hamid Reza; Ghazvinian, Abdolhadi

    2014-09-01

    The damage evolution mechanism of rocks is one of the most important aspects in studying of rock fatigue behavior. Fatigue damage evolution of three rock types (onyx marble, sandstone and soft limestone) with different brittleness were considered in the present study. Intensive experimental tests were conducted on the chosen rock samples and acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used in some of them to monitor the fracturing process. Experimental tests indicated that brittleness strongly influences damage evolution of rocks in the course of static and dynamic loading. AE monitoring revealed that micro-crack density induced by the applied loads during different stages of the failure processes increases as rock brittleness increases. Also, results of fatigue tests on the three rock types indicated that the rock with the most induced micro-cracks during loading cycles has the least fatigue life. Furthermore, the condition of failure surfaces of the studied rocks samples, subjected to dynamic and static loading, were evaluated and it was concluded that the roughness of failure surfaces is influenced by loading types and rock brittleness. Dynamic failure surfaces were rougher than static ones and low brittle rock demonstrate a smoother failure surface compared to high brittle rock.

  16. Fracturing and brittleness index analyses of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Primarini, Mutia; Houben, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a fracture network in rocks has a crucial control on the flow behaviour of fluids. In addition, an existing network of fractures , influences the propagation of new fractures during e.g. hydraulic fracturing or during a seismic event. Understanding of the type and characteristics of the fracture network that will be formed during e.g. hydraulic fracturing is thus crucial to better predict the outcome of a hydraulic fracturing job. For this, knowledge of the rock properties is crucial. The brittleness index is often used as a rock property that can be used to predict the fracturing behaviour of a rock for e.g. hydraulic fracturing of shales. Various terminologies of the brittleness index (BI1, BI2 and BI3) exist based on mineralogy, elastic constants and stress-strain behaviour (Jin et al., 2014, Jarvie et al., 2007 and Holt et al., 2011). A maximum brittleness index of 1 predicts very good and efficient fracturing behaviour while a minimum brittleness index of 0 predicts a much more ductile shale behaviour. Here, we have performed systematic petrophysical, acoustic and geomechanical analyses on a set of shale samples from Whitby (UK) and we have determined the three different brittleness indices on each sample by performing all the analyses on each of the samples. We show that each of the three brittleness indices are very different for the same sample and as such it can be concluded that the brittleness index is not a good predictor of the fracturing behaviour of shales. The brittleness index based on the acoustic data (BI1) all lie around values of 0.5, while the brittleness index based on the stress strain data (BI2) give an average brittleness index around 0.75, whereas the mineralogy brittleness index (BI3) predict values below 0.2. This shows that by using different estimates of the brittleness index different decisions can be made for hydraulic fracturing. If we would rely on the mineralogy (BI3), the Whitby mudstone is not a suitable

  17. Prototype anthracite culm combustion boiler/heater unit. Quarterly technical report No. 4, July 1-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    There are currently about 910 million cubic yards of anthracite culm (mine refuse) contained in 800 separate banks in a 480 square mile area in the Wilkes-Barre (W-B) anthracite mining region. Although this material represents a significant fuel value, equivalent to approximately 1.25 billion barrels of fuel oil, the culm banks have accumulated because no satisfactory method of combusting this fuel was available until the relatively recent development of the atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) steam generator. A program was initiated in October 1978 to design, construct and evaluate a 100,000 pph AFB steam generator burning anthracite culm with the addition of fresh anthracite, if required. The unit is to demonstrate the technical, economical and environmental feasibility of producing 150 psig saturated steam for district heating in downtown W-B. Phase I of the program consists of the design of the atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) plant and a hot model test program. Phase II of the program consists of construction, operation, testing and evaluation of the boiler and boiler plant.

  18. Structure and biomechanics of culms of Phragmites australis used for reeds of Japanese wind instrument "hichiriki".

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nobuchi, Tadashi; Nakafushi, Yuta; Nose, Masateru; Shiojiri, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Hichiriki is a traditional Japanese double-reed wind instrument used in Japanese ancient imperial court music, gagaku, which has been performed since the 7th century. The best reeds for hichiriki have been made of culms or stems of Phragmites australis (P. australis) that are harvested from only a limited reed bed at Udono near Kyoto. The aim of this study is to elucidate why the stems from Udono are the best materials for hichiriki reeds. Plant anatomy was examined for choice stems of P. australis grown in different reed beds in Japan as well as morphology, and the local indentation hardness and Young's modulus of tissues on the cross-sections of some representatives of hichiriki reeds were measured. It is concluded that the good stems for hichiriki reeds have an outer diameter of about 11 mm, a wall thickness of about 1 mm and comparatively homogeneous structure where harder materials, such as epidermis, hypodermis, sclerenchymatous cells, and vascular bundle sheaths with hard walls, are orderly deployed with softer materials such as parenchyma cells and vascular bundles. This structure has smaller differences of hardness and Young's modulus between the hard and soft materials in the reed, providing the best music performance.

  19. Structure and biomechanics of culms of Phragmites australis used for reeds of Japanese wind instrument "hichiriki".

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nobuchi, Tadashi; Nakafushi, Yuta; Nose, Masateru; Shiojiri, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Hichiriki is a traditional Japanese double-reed wind instrument used in Japanese ancient imperial court music, gagaku, which has been performed since the 7th century. The best reeds for hichiriki have been made of culms or stems of Phragmites australis (P. australis) that are harvested from only a limited reed bed at Udono near Kyoto. The aim of this study is to elucidate why the stems from Udono are the best materials for hichiriki reeds. Plant anatomy was examined for choice stems of P. australis grown in different reed beds in Japan as well as morphology, and the local indentation hardness and Young's modulus of tissues on the cross-sections of some representatives of hichiriki reeds were measured. It is concluded that the good stems for hichiriki reeds have an outer diameter of about 11 mm, a wall thickness of about 1 mm and comparatively homogeneous structure where harder materials, such as epidermis, hypodermis, sclerenchymatous cells, and vascular bundle sheaths with hard walls, are orderly deployed with softer materials such as parenchyma cells and vascular bundles. This structure has smaller differences of hardness and Young's modulus between the hard and soft materials in the reed, providing the best music performance. PMID:25626987

  20. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  1. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  2. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  3. Guadua zuloagae sp. nov., the First Petrified Bamboo Culm Record from the Ituzaingó Formation (Pliocene), Paraná Basin, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Mariana; Zucol, Alejandro F.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The anatomical characterization and morphology of Guadua zuloagae nov. sp. (Poaceae–Bambusoideae) culm was determined. This material was collected at the Toma Vieja fossil locality, Paraná basin, Argentina. This fossil culm is the first record of Bambusoideae in sediments of the Pliocene from the Ituzaingó Formation. The studied specimen was compared with the taxa of the Bambusoideae sub-family, especially with the American woody bamboos and others taxa that have woody culms, including Arundo, Thysalonaena and Gynerium. Methods The material was preserved by siliceous cellular permineralization, and it was prepared for microscopic examination by surface polishing and thin sections. The morphology and anatomy of this new species were described. The estimated height, critical buckling height and safety factor were calculated on the basis of the fossil bamboo diameter using the formula of Niklas. The relationship and comparison with the nearest living relatives (NLRs) are discussed. Key Results Well-preserved petrified culm with internodes and nodes from the Pliocene of Argentina provides the basis for the description of a new fossil bamboo, Guadua zuloagae. The results of the anatomical analysis of the fossil bamboo showed a great affinity with the extant species Guadua angustifolia and constitute the first evidence of petrified bamboo culm. Conclusions The new fossil bamboo culm constitutes the only fossil record, preserved as permineralized by silicification, in the world. This fossil record indicates that the genus Guadua was more widespread in the past than today. Discovery of G. zuloagae allows the presence of a Bambusoideae understorey in the mixed forests described for the Ituzaingó Formation to be inferred. The climatic conditions inferred from fossil bamboo and sedimentary deposits indicate a temperate-warm, humid climate. PMID:17728337

  4. Johanna and Tommy: Two Preschoolers in Sweden with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millde, Kristina; Brodin, Jane

    Information is presented for caregivers of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bones) and their families. Approximately five children with brittle bones are born in Sweden annually. Two main types of brittle bone disease have been identified: congenita and tarda. Typical symptoms include numerous and unexpected fractures, bluish…

  5. An educational program on structural design with brittle /ceramic/ materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. I.

    1978-01-01

    The organization of a proposed ceramic structural materials program is described, and a suggested course sequence for college-level and graduate-level courses is presented. The course work on ceramics and brittle fracture are intended to lead to a brittle material design project and a brittle material design problem. Criteria for the selection of appropriate projects/problems are considered.

  6. Activity and distribution of methane-oxidizing bacteria in flooded rice soil microcosms and in rice plants (Oryza sativa)

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, U.; Frenzel, P.

    1997-04-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and its atmospheric concentration has been increasing for decades. Flooded rice fields are one of the major sources of methane emissions to the atmosphere. These emissions are the net result of methane production by methanogenic bacteria in anoxic environments and methane oxidation by methane oxidizing bacteria in oxic environments. This study describes both the activity and distribution of methane oxidizing bacteria in microcosms used as a model for flooded rice fields. Then the process was characterized and localized, and finally the distribution of these organisms on the roots and culm, the size of the rhizosphere and the changes associated with plant age were examined. 59 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Fracture in compression of brittle solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The fracture of brittle solids in monotonic compression is reviewed from both the mechanistic and phenomenological points of view. The fundamental theoretical developments based on the extension of pre-existing cracks in general multiaxial stress fields are recognized as explaining extrinsic behavior where a single crack is responsible for the final failure. In contrast, shear faulting in compression is recognized to be the result of an evolutionary localization process involving en echelon action of cracks and is termed intrinsic.

  8. Fracture of Silicate Glasses: Ductile or Brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Jean-Pierre; Wiederhorn, Sheldon M.

    2004-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy is used to investigate the possibility of cavity formation during crack growth in silicate glasses. Matching areas on both fracture surfaces were mapped and then compared. For silica glass, and soda-lime-silicate glass, the fracture surfaces matched to a resolution of better than 0.3 nm normal to the surface and 5 nm parallel to the surface. We could find no evidence for cavity formation in our study and suggest that completely brittle fracture occurs in glass.

  9. Micromechanics of brittle creep in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses well below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress (“brittle creep”). Here we provide a micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990), and the crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non linear, and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt rock samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as an inflexion between those two end-member phases. The minimum strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term strain rate as a function of depth in the upper crust due to the action of the applied stresses: in this way, sub-critical cracking reduces the failure stress in a manner equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. We also investigate the competition with pressure solution in porous rocks, and show that the transition from sub

  10. Fabrication of brittle materials -- current status

    SciTech Connect

    Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    The research initiatives in the area of precision fabrication will be continued in the upcoming year. Three students, T. Bifano (PhD), P. Blake (PhD) and E. Smith (MS), finished their research programs in the last year. Sections 13 and 14 will summarize the essential results from the work of the Materials Engineering students Blake and Smith. Further details will be presented in forthcoming publications that are now in preparation. The results from Bifano`s thesis have been published in adequate detail and need not be summarized further. Three new students, S. Blackley (MS), H. Paul (PhD), and S. Smith (PhD) have joined the program and will continue the research efforts in precision fabrication. The programs for these students will be outlined in Sections 15 and 16. Because of the success of the earlier work in establishing new process models and experimental techniques for the study of diamond turning and diamond grinding, the new programs will, in part, build upon the earlier work. This is especially true for investigations concerned with brittle materials. The basic understanding of material response of nominally brittle materials during machining or grinding operations remains as a challenge. The precision fabrication of brittle materials will continue as an area of emphasis for the Precision Engineering Center.

  11. Modeling of dynamic fragmentation in brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Olga

    Fragmentation of brittle materials under high rates of loading is commonly encountered in materials processing and under impact loading conditions. Theoretical models intended to correlate the features of dynamic fragmentation have been suggested during the past few years with the goal of providing a rational basis for prediction of fragment sizes. In this thesis, a new model based on the dynamics of the process is developed. In this model, the spatial distribution and strength variation representative of flaws in real brittle materials are taken into account. The model captures the competition between rising mean stress in a brittle material due to an imposed high strain rate and falling mean stress due to loss of compliance. The model is studied computationally through an adaptation of a concept introduced by Xu and Needleman (1994). The deformable body is first divided into many small regions. Then, the mechanical behavior of the material is characterized by two constitutive relations, a volumetric constitutive relationship between stress and strain within the small continuous regions and a cohesive surface constitutive relationship between traction and displacement discontinuity across the cohesive surfaces between the small regions. These surfaces provide prospective fracture paths. Numerical experiments were conducted for a system with initial and boundary conditions similar to those invoked in the simple energy balance models, in order to provide a basis for comparison. It is found that, these models lead to estimates of fragment size which are an order of magnitude larger than those obtained by a more detailed calculation. The differences indicate that the simple analytical models, which deal with the onset of fragmentation but not its evolution, are inadequate as a basis for a complete description of a dynamic fragmentation process. The computational model is then adapted to interpret experimental observations on the increasing energy dissipation for

  12. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  13. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  14. Modeling of transformation toughening in brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    LeSar, R.; Rollett, A.D. ); Srolovitz, D.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-01-24

    Results from modeling of transformation toughening in brittle materials using a discrete micromechanical model are presented. The material is represented as a two-dimensional triangular array of nodes connected by elastic springs. Microstructural effects are included by varying the spring parameters for the bulk, grain boundaries, and transforming particles. Using the width of the damage zone and the effective compliance (after the initial creation of the damage zone) as measures of fracture toughness, we find that there is a strong dependence of toughness on the amount, size, and shape of the transforming particles, with the maximum toughness achieved with the higher amounts of the larger particles.

  15. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  16. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices like those used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  17. Brittle and semi-brittle behaviours of a carbonate rock: influence of water and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Regnet, J. B.; Dimanov, A.; Guéguen, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic deformation can either occur with dilatancy or compaction, implying differences in porosity changes, failure and petrophysical properties. In this study, the roles of water as a pore fluid, and of temperature, on the deformation and failure of a micritic limestone (white Tavel limestone, porosity 14.7 per cent) were investigated under triaxial stresses. For each sample, a hydrostatic load was applied up to the desired confining pressure (from 0 up to 85 MPa) at either room temperature or at 70 °C. Two pore fluid conditions were investigated at room temperature: dry and water saturated. The samples were deformed up to failure at a constant strain rate of ˜10-5 s-1. The experiments were coupled with ultrasonic wave velocity surveys to monitor crack densities. The linear trend between the axial crack density and the relative volumetric strain beyond the onset of dilatancy suggests that cracks propagate at constant aspect ratio. The decrease of ultrasonic wave velocities beyond the onset of inelastic compaction in the semi-brittle regime indicates the ongoing interplay of shear-enhanced compaction and crack development. Water has a weakening effect on the onset of dilatancy in the brittle regime, but no measurable influence on the peak strength. Temperature lowers the confining pressure at which the brittle-semi-brittle transition is observed but does not change the stress states at the onset of inelastic compaction and at the post-yield onset of dilatancy.

  18. Major and trace elements in pyrope almandine garnets as sediment provenance indicators of the Lower Carboniferous Culm sediments, Drahany Uplands, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čopjaková, Renata; Sulovský, Petr; Paterson, Bruce A.

    2005-05-01

    The Lower Carboniferous Culm Basin is part of the European Variscan foreland basin. Garnet is an abundant heavy mineral at all stratigraphic levels of the Culm sediments (the Protivanov, Rozstání and Myslejovice Formation from base to top). This paper compares the major element (electron microprobe) and trace element (LA-ICP-MS) compositions of garnet for the purpose of studying the provenance of the Culm sediments. The polymict garnet assemblages ranging from the Protivanov to lower part of the Myslejovice Formation (Goniatite zones Pe γ-Go α) pass into oligomict ones dominated by pyrope-almandine garnets (uppermost part of the Myslejovice Formation; Goniatite zones Go β-Go γ). As the predominant low-grossular pyrope-almandines from oligomict garnet assemblages are very uniform and homogeneous in major element composition, we studied their trace element composition and zoning. Pyrope-almandine garnets are poor in LREE and show enrichment in HREE; the chondrite-normalized patterns are almost flat from Dy to Lu and show a significant negative Eu anomaly, typical for granulite-grade garnets. Major element compositions of detrital low-grossular pyrope-almandines can only be matched with some granulites and garnetiferous felsic gneisses of the Bohemian Massif. Garnets from granulites cropping out at the present-day erosion level of the Bohemian Massif have usually higher Ca and/or lower Mg contents. The major and trace element compositions and zoning patterns of pyrope-almandine garnets from the upper part of the Myslejovice Formation compare well with garnets from the Miroslav granulites and small Moldanubian granulite bodies west of the Třebíč Massif. The Moldanubian granulites are commonly associated with mantle-derived peridotites and eclogites. The presence of detrital Cr-spinels with high Cr# and low Mg# (single grains of Cr-spinels and fine-grained kelyphitic intergrowths of Cr-spinel with chlorite) comparable with spinel types from Moldanubian

  19. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  20. Reliability Analysis of Brittle, Thin Walled Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan A Salem and Lynn Powers

    2007-02-09

    One emerging application for ceramics is diesel particulate filters being used order to meet EPA regulations going into effect in 2008. Diesel particulates are known to be carcinogenic and thus need to be minimized. Current systems use filters made from ceramics such as mullite and corderite. The filters are brittle and must operate at very high temperatures during a burn out cycle used to remove the soot buildup. Thus the filters are subjected to thermal shock stresses and life time reliability analysis is required. NASA GRC has developed reliability based design methods and test methods for such applications, such as CARES/Life and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C1499 “Standard Test Method for Equibiaxial Strength of Ceramics.”

  1. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  2. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  3. Precise estimation of genomic regions controlling lodging resistance using a set of reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ookawa, Taiichiro; Aoba, Ryo; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ueda, Tadamasa; Takai, Toshiyuki; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Ando, Tsuyu; Adachi, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Makoto; Ebitani, Takeshi; Kato, Yoichiro; Mulsanti, Indria Wahyu; Kishii, Masahiro; Reynolds, Matthew; Piñera, Francisco; Kotake, Toshihisa; Kawasaki, Shinji; Motobayashi, Takashi; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Severe lodging has occurred in many improved rice varieties after the recent strong typhoons in East and Southeast Asian countries. The indica variety Takanari possesses strong culm characteristics due to its large section modulus, which indicates culm thickness, whereas the japonica variety Koshihikari is subject to substantial bending stress due to its thick cortical fibre tissue. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for lodging resistance and to eliminate the effects of genetic background, we used reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Takanari. The oppositional effects of QTLs for section modulus were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosomes 1, 5 and 6, suggesting that these QTLs are not affected by the genetic background and are controlled independently by a single factor. The candidate region of a QTL for section modulus included SD1. The section modulus of NIL-sd1 was lower than that of Koshihikari, whereas the section modulus of NIL-SD1 was higher than that of Takanari. This result indicated that those regions regulate the culm thickness. The reciprocal effects of the QTLs for cortical fibre tissue thickness were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosome 9 using CSSLs. PMID:27465821

  4. Precise estimation of genomic regions controlling lodging resistance using a set of reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines in rice.

    PubMed

    Ookawa, Taiichiro; Aoba, Ryo; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ueda, Tadamasa; Takai, Toshiyuki; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Ando, Tsuyu; Adachi, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Makoto; Ebitani, Takeshi; Kato, Yoichiro; Mulsanti, Indria Wahyu; Kishii, Masahiro; Reynolds, Matthew; Piñera, Francisco; Kotake, Toshihisa; Kawasaki, Shinji; Motobayashi, Takashi; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2016-07-28

    Severe lodging has occurred in many improved rice varieties after the recent strong typhoons in East and Southeast Asian countries. The indica variety Takanari possesses strong culm characteristics due to its large section modulus, which indicates culm thickness, whereas the japonica variety Koshihikari is subject to substantial bending stress due to its thick cortical fibre tissue. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for lodging resistance and to eliminate the effects of genetic background, we used reciprocal chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Takanari. The oppositional effects of QTLs for section modulus were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosomes 1, 5 and 6, suggesting that these QTLs are not affected by the genetic background and are controlled independently by a single factor. The candidate region of a QTL for section modulus included SD1. The section modulus of NIL-sd1 was lower than that of Koshihikari, whereas the section modulus of NIL-SD1 was higher than that of Takanari. This result indicated that those regions regulate the culm thickness. The reciprocal effects of the QTLs for cortical fibre tissue thickness were confirmed in both genetic backgrounds on chromosome 9 using CSSLs.

  5. Identification of drought-response genes and a study of their expression during sucrose accumulation and water deficit in sugarcane culms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability of sugarcane to accumulate high concentrations of sucrose in its culm requires adaptation to maintain cellular function under the high solute load. We have investigated the expression of 51 genes implicated in abiotic stress to determine their expression in the context of sucrose accumulation by studying mature and immature culm internodes of a high sucrose accumulating sugarcane cultivar. Using a sub-set of eight genes, expression was examined in mature internode tissues of sugarcane cultivars as well as ancestral and more widely related species with a range of sucrose contents. Expression of these genes was also analysed in internode tissue from a high sucrose cultivar undergoing water deficit stress to compare effects of sucrose accumulation and water deficit. Results A sub-set of stress-related genes that are potentially associated with sucrose accumulation in sugarcane culms was identified through correlation analysis, and these included genes encoding enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism, a sugar transporter and a transcription factor. Subsequent analysis of the expression of these stress-response genes in sugarcane plants that were under water deficit stress revealed a different transcriptional profile to that which correlated with sucrose accumulation. For example, genes with homology to late embryogenesis abundant-related proteins and dehydrin were strongly induced under water deficit but this did not correlate with sucrose content. The expression of genes encoding proline biosynthesis was associated with both sucrose accumulation and water deficit, but amino acid analysis indicated that proline was negatively correlated with sucrose concentration, and whilst total amino acid concentrations increased about seven-fold under water deficit, the relatively low concentration of proline suggested that it had no osmoprotectant role in sugarcane culms. Conclusions The results show that while there was a change in stress-related gene

  6. Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of a prototype culm combustion boiler/heater unit. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 21, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed on the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit, Phase I - Engineering Design and Analysis, Phase II - Prototype Plant Construction and Phase III - Start-Up and Operation during the period October 1, 1981 through December 31, 1981. The objectives of the program as well as the technical progress and problem areas encountered during the reporting period are presented. Seven shakedown tests were run. Start-up and shakedown testing was completed. Four parametric tests were run. Performance data are presented with the exception of boiler efficiency which will be reported once chemical analyses are completed. Total boiler operation time through the end of this quarter - 1225 h, 50 min; operating time on culm and culm/limestone - 682 h, 43 min. Inspection revealed no problems with boiler tube wear. Sulfur capture greater than 94% was demonstrated (design is 88%). A turndown of better than 4 to 1 was shown (design is 2.5 to 1). Computer control of most of the loops has been successful and manual control was also demonstrated.

  7. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick

  8. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  9. Theory of friction based on brittle fracture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of friction is presented that may be more applicable to geologic materials than the classic Bowden and Tabor theory. In the model, surfaces touch at the peaks of asperities and sliding occurs when the asperities fail by brittle fracture. The coefficient of friction, ??, was calculated from the strength of asperities of certain ideal shapes; for cone-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.1 and for wedge-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.15. For actual situations which seem close to the ideal model, observed ?? was found to be very close to 0.1, even for materials such as quartz and calcite with widely differing strengths. If surface forces are present, the theory predicts that ?? should decrease with load and that it should be higher in a vacuum than in air. In the presence of a fluid film between sliding surfaces, ?? should depend on the area of the surfaces in contact. Both effects are observed. The character of wear particles produced during sliding and the way in which ?? depends on normal load, roughness, and environment lend further support to the model of friction presented here. ?? 1967 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. Modeling failure in brittle porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keles, Ozgur

    Brittle porous materials (BPMs) are used for battery, fuel cell, catalyst, membrane, filter, bone graft, and pharmacy applications due to the multi-functionality of their underlying porosity. However, in spite of its technological benefits the effects of porosity on BPM fracture strength and Weibull statistics are not fully understood--limiting a wider use. In this context, classical fracture mechanics was combined with two-dimensional finite element simulations not only to account for pore-pore stress interactions, but also to numerically quantify the relationship between the local pore volume fraction and fracture statistics. Simulations show that even the microstructures with the same porosity level and size of pores differ substantially in fracture strength. The maximum reliability of BPMs was shown to be limited by the underlying pore--pore interactions. Fracture strength of BMPs decreases at a faster rate under biaxial loading than under uniaxial loading. Three different types of deviation from classic Weibull behavior are identified: P-type corresponding to a positive lower tail deviation, N-type corresponding to a negative lower tail deviation, and S-type corresponding to both positive upper and lower tail deviations. Pore-pore interactions result in either P-type or N-type deviation in the limit of low porosity, whereas S-type behavior occurs when clusters of low and high fracture strengths coexist in a fracture data.

  11. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  12. Brittle Failure of a Compactive Porous Sandstone under True Triaxial Conventional and Novel Stress Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Haimson, B.

    2011-12-01

    We conducted two series of true triaxial tests in Coconino Sandstone (17.5% porosity; 96% quartz), in which square cuboidal rock specimens (19 x 19 x 38mm) were independently compressed in three principal directions, using the UW-Madison true triaxial testing apparatus. In the conventional series of true triaxial tests the least and intermediate principal stresses (σ3 and σ2) were maintained constant, while the largest stress (σ1) was raised at a rate of 0.1 MPa/s until brittle failure occurred in the form of shear fracture or fault. Eight different σ3 levels were attempted (between 0 and 150 MPa), to cover the full range of brittle behavior up to the point of brittle-ductile transition. σ2 varied between σ2 = σ3 and σ2 = σ1. The results reinforced previous findings in crystalline rocks that both resistance to faulting and fault angle increase as σ2 rises above σ3 (Haimson and Chang, 2000; Chang and Haimson, 2000), albeit at a reduced rate. This is contrary to the Mohr-Coulomb model, which predicts no σ2 effect on either. Plotting all the data points as τoct vs. σoct (where τoct is the octahedral shear stress and σoct is the mean normal stress, both at fault initiation) reveals a trend that can be loosely fitted by a quadratic equation (R = 0.95). A better fit is obtained if the mean stress σoct is reduced to its 2D equivalent (σ1+σ3)/2 (R = 0.99). Brittle failure characteristics varied from single fault at σ3 lower than 120 MPa, to multiple parallel and conjugate faults at σ3 = 120-150 MPa (a characteristic of brittle-ductile transition, Paterson and Wong, 2005). Conventional true triaxial tests, however, do not maintain constant any of the three principal stress invariants during loading. Tests using a novel loading path with fixed deviatoric stress state facilitate comparison with a theory that predicts failure as a bifurcation from homogeneous deformation (Rudnicki and Rice, 1975). We conducted a series of tests in which σ3 (between 0 and

  13. Molecular marker dissection of rice (Oryza sativa L.) plant architecture under temperate and tropical climates.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Fukuta, Y; Sato, T; Osaki, M; Khush, G S

    2003-11-01

    Rice ( Oryza sativa L.) plants develop vertically with shoot elongation and horizontally with tillering. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize genomic regions influencing the rice plant architecture by quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for the component traits: culm length (CL), panicle length (PnL), panicle number (PnN) and tiller number (TN). For this QTL analysis, 191 recombinant inbred lines (F(7)) derived from a cross of Milyang 23 (M23) and Akihikari (AK) were grown in 1995, 1996 and 1997 (May-Oct) in Joetsu, Japan (temperate climate), and in the 2000 dry season (Jan-Apr), the 2000 wet season (Jun-Oct) and the 2001 dry season in Los Baños, The Philippines (tropical climate). Results showed that rice plant architecture was influenced by 19 genomic regions categorized into five groups. In Group I, two regions (on chrs. 6 and 11) affected shoot elongation (CL and PnL) and tillering (PnN and TN) in opposite directions more significantly in Los Baños than in Joetsu. In Group II, two regions (chrs. 3 and 12) affected shoot elongation, whereas in Group III, five regions [chrs. 1 (two), 2, 3 and 9] affected only culm length (CL). Expressions of four regions of Group III were influenced by either tropical or temperate environments. In Group IV, seven regions (chrs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9) controlled panicle development (PnN or PnL), and in Group V, three regions (chrs. 1, 2 and 3) regulated tillering (PnN or TN). Characterizing these 19 genomic regions provided a detailed analysis of rice plant architecture with emphasis on the multiple effect and environmental responsive regions.

  14. Microscopic mechanisms of the brittleness of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Tabuteau, H; Mora, S; Porte, G; Abkarian, M; Ligoure, C

    2009-04-17

    We show that a large class of viscoelastic fluids, i.e., transient networks, are brittle according to the Griffith's theory of solid fracture. However, contrary to solids, cracks are intrinsic to the material arising from the equilibrium nature of the fluid microstructure. The brittleness of these fluids comes from thermal fluctuations of bonds distribution. In this approach, the rupture stress is predicted to be on the order of the Young modulus, in very good agreement with experimental values.

  15. Dependence of tablet brittleness on tensile strength and porosity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Chang, Shao-Yu; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Paul, Shubhajit; Perumalla, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Shi, Limin; Sun, Wei-Jhe; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-09-30

    An analysis of data collected from 25 sets of diverse pharmaceutical powders has identified that an exponential growth function satisfactorily describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tablet porosity while a power law function well describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tensile strength. These equations have the potential to facilitate better characterization of tablet mechanical properties and to guide the design and optimization of pharmaceutical tablet products. PMID:26226338

  16. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data.

    PubMed Central

    Rohwer, J M; Botha, F C

    2001-01-01

    Sucrose accumulation in developing sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) is accompanied by a continuous synthesis and cleavage of sucrose in the storage tissues. Despite numerous studies, the factors affecting sucrose accumulation are still poorly understood, and no consistent pattern has emerged which pinpoints certain enzyme activities as important controlling steps. Here, we develop an approach based on pathway analysis and kinetic modelling to assess the biochemical control of sucrose accumulation and futile cycling in sugar cane. By using the concept of elementary flux modes, all possible routes of futile cycling of sucrose were enumerated in the metabolic system. The available kinetic data for the pathway enzymes were then collected and assembled in a kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in sugar cane culm tissue. Although no data were fitted, the model agreed well with independent experimental results: in no case was the difference between calculated and measured fluxes and concentrations greater than 2-fold. The model thus validated was then used to assess different enhancement strategies for increasing sucrose accumulation. First, the control coefficient of each enzyme in the system on futile cycling of sucrose was calculated. Secondly, the activities of those enzymes with the numerically largest control coefficients were varied over a 5-fold range to determine the effect on the degree of futile cycling, the conversion efficiency from hexoses into sucrose, and the net sucrose accumulation rate. In view of the modelling results, overexpression of the fructose or glucose transporter or the vacuolar sucrose import protein, as well as reduction of cytosolic neutral invertase levels, appear to be the most promising targets for genetic manipulation. This offers a more directed improvement strategy than cumbersome gene-by-gene manipulation. The kinetic model can be viewed and interrogated on the World Wide Web at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za. PMID:11513743

  17. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, J M; Botha, F C

    2001-09-01

    Sucrose accumulation in developing sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) is accompanied by a continuous synthesis and cleavage of sucrose in the storage tissues. Despite numerous studies, the factors affecting sucrose accumulation are still poorly understood, and no consistent pattern has emerged which pinpoints certain enzyme activities as important controlling steps. Here, we develop an approach based on pathway analysis and kinetic modelling to assess the biochemical control of sucrose accumulation and futile cycling in sugar cane. By using the concept of elementary flux modes, all possible routes of futile cycling of sucrose were enumerated in the metabolic system. The available kinetic data for the pathway enzymes were then collected and assembled in a kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in sugar cane culm tissue. Although no data were fitted, the model agreed well with independent experimental results: in no case was the difference between calculated and measured fluxes and concentrations greater than 2-fold. The model thus validated was then used to assess different enhancement strategies for increasing sucrose accumulation. First, the control coefficient of each enzyme in the system on futile cycling of sucrose was calculated. Secondly, the activities of those enzymes with the numerically largest control coefficients were varied over a 5-fold range to determine the effect on the degree of futile cycling, the conversion efficiency from hexoses into sucrose, and the net sucrose accumulation rate. In view of the modelling results, overexpression of the fructose or glucose transporter or the vacuolar sucrose import protein, as well as reduction of cytosolic neutral invertase levels, appear to be the most promising targets for genetic manipulation. This offers a more directed improvement strategy than cumbersome gene-by-gene manipulation. The kinetic model can be viewed and interrogated on the World Wide Web at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za.

  18. Ultrasonic Apparatus for Pulverizing Brittle Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Dolgin, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2004-01-01

    The figure depicts an apparatus that pulverizes brittle material by means of a combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibration, hammering, and abrasion. The basic design of the apparatus could be specialized to be a portable version for use by a geologist in collecting powdered rock samples for analysis in the field or in a laboratory. Alternatively, a larger benchtop version could be designed for milling and mixing of precursor powders for such purposes as synthesis of ceramic and other polycrystalline materials or preparing powder samples for x-ray diffraction or x-ray fluorescence measurements to determine crystalline structures and compositions. Among the most attractive characteristics of this apparatus are its light weight and the ability to function without need for a large preload or a large power supply: It has been estimated that a portable version could have a mass <0.5 kg, would consume less than 1 W h of energy in milling a 1-cm3 volume of rock, and could operate at a preload <10 N. The basic design and principle of operation of this apparatus are similar to those of other apparatuses described in a series of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the two most relevant being Ultrasonic/ Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38 and Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanisms for Deep Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. As before, vibrations are excited by means of a piezoelectric actuator, an ultrasonic horn, and a mass that is free to move axially over a limited range. As before, the ultrasonic harmonic motion of the horn drives the free-mass in a combination of ultrasonic harmonic and lower-frequency hammering motion. In this case, the free-mass is confined within a hollow cylinder that serves as a crushing chamber, and the free-mass serves as a crushing or milling tool. The hammering of the free-mass against a material sample at the lower end of the chamber grinds the sample into

  19. Brittle and semibrittle creep in a low porosity carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Dimanov, Alexandre; Guéguen, Yves

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of limestones at room temperature is brittle at low confining pressure and becomes semi-brittle with the increase of the confining pressure. The brittle behavior is characterized by a macroscopic dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop when cracks coalesce at failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation movements and twinning) and microcracking. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of pore fluid and time on the mechanical behavior. Constant strain rate triaxial deformation experiments and stress-stepping creep experiments were performed on white Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%). Elastic wave velocity evolutions were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. Constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for confining pressure in the range of 5-90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. In this regime, water-saturation decreases the differential stress at the onset of crack propagation and enhances macroscopic dilatancy. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity and micro-cracking. However, in this regime, our results show that water-saturation has no clear effect at the onset of inelastic compaction. Stress stepping creep experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition. In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack propagation and/or nucleation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant because of plastic pore collapse. But, following stress steps are dilatant because of crack nucleation and/or propagation. However, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last

  20. Interview: commercial translation of cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine: learning by experience. Interview by Emily Culme-Seymour.

    PubMed

    Haseltine, William A

    2011-07-01

    Dr Haseltine speaks to Emily Culme-Seymour, Assistant Commissioning Editor William A Haseltine, PhD has an active career in both Science and Business. He was a professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health (MA, USA) from 1976 to 1993, where he was Founder and Chair of two academic research departments. He is well known for his pioneering work on cancer, HIV/AIDS and genomics. He has authored more than 200 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals and is the author of several books. He is the founder of Human Genome Sciences, Inc. and served as the Chairman and CEO of the company until 2004. He is also the founder of several other successful biotechnology companies. William Haseltine is currently Chairman and President of ACCESS Health International, Inc., which supports access to affordable, high-quality health services in low, middle and high income countries, and Chairman of the Haseltine Foundation for Science and the Arts, which fosters a dialog between sciences and the arts. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Scripps Institute for Medical Research and the Institute of Chemical Engineering, the University of Mumbai, India. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the IE University, Madrid, the President's Council of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, the Advisory Council for the Koch Institute of MIT, a member of the University Council Committee on technology transfer, Yale University, and is a Lifetime Governor of the New York Academy of Science (NY, USA). He is an honorary member of the Board of Trustees of the Brookings Institution, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Center for Emerging Markets of the Indian School of Business, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Board of AID for AIDS International, and a member of the Chairman's Circle of the Asia Society. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Metropolitan Opera (NY, USA), the Chairman's Council of the Metropolitan Museum (NY, USA), the International

  1. Interview: commercial translation of cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine: learning by experience. Interview by Emily Culme-Seymour.

    PubMed

    Haseltine, William A

    2011-07-01

    Dr Haseltine speaks to Emily Culme-Seymour, Assistant Commissioning Editor William A Haseltine, PhD has an active career in both Science and Business. He was a professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health (MA, USA) from 1976 to 1993, where he was Founder and Chair of two academic research departments. He is well known for his pioneering work on cancer, HIV/AIDS and genomics. He has authored more than 200 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals and is the author of several books. He is the founder of Human Genome Sciences, Inc. and served as the Chairman and CEO of the company until 2004. He is also the founder of several other successful biotechnology companies. William Haseltine is currently Chairman and President of ACCESS Health International, Inc., which supports access to affordable, high-quality health services in low, middle and high income countries, and Chairman of the Haseltine Foundation for Science and the Arts, which fosters a dialog between sciences and the arts. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Scripps Institute for Medical Research and the Institute of Chemical Engineering, the University of Mumbai, India. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the IE University, Madrid, the President's Council of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, the Advisory Council for the Koch Institute of MIT, a member of the University Council Committee on technology transfer, Yale University, and is a Lifetime Governor of the New York Academy of Science (NY, USA). He is an honorary member of the Board of Trustees of the Brookings Institution, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Center for Emerging Markets of the Indian School of Business, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Board of AID for AIDS International, and a member of the Chairman's Circle of the Asia Society. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Metropolitan Opera (NY, USA), the Chairman's Council of the Metropolitan Museum (NY, USA), the International

  2. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of rice pectin methylesterases: Implication of functional roles of pectin modification in rice physiology.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho Young; Nguyen, Hong Phuong; Lee, Chanhui

    2015-07-01

    Pectin, which is enriched in primary cell walls and middle lamellae, is an essential polysaccharide in all higher plants. Homogalacturonans (HGA), a major form of pectin, are synthesized and methylesterified by enzymes localized in the Golgi apparatus and transported into the cell wall. Depending on cell type, the degree and pattern of pectin methylesterification are strictly regulated by cell wall-localized pectin methylesterases (PMEs). Despite its importance in plant development and growth, little is known about the physiological functions of pectin in rice, which contains 43 different types of PME. The presence of pectin in rice cell walls has been substantiated by uronic acid quantification and immunodetection of JIM7 monoclonal antibodies. We performed PME activity assays with cell wall proteins isolated from different rice tissues. In accordance with data from Arabidopsis, the highest activity was observed in germinating tissues, young culm, and spikelets, where cells are actively elongating. Transcriptional profiling of OsPMEs by real-time PCR and meta-analysis indicates that PMEs exhibit spatial- and stress-specific expression patterns during rice development. Based on in silico analysis, we identified subcellular compartments, isoelectric point, and cleavage sites of OsPMEs. Our findings provide an important tool for further studies seeking to unravel the functional importance of pectin modification during plant growth and abiotic and biotic responses of grass plants.

  3. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  5. Cuttability Assessment of Selected Rocks Through Different Brittleness Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursun, Arif Emre; Gokay, M. Kemal

    2016-04-01

    Prediction of cuttability is a critical issue for successful execution of tunnel or mining excavation projects. Rock cuttability is also used to determine specific energy, which is defined as the work done by the cutting force to excavate a unit volume of yield. Specific energy is a meaningful inverse measure of cutting efficiency, since it simply states how much energy must be expended to excavate a unit volume of rock. Brittleness is a fundamental rock property and applied in drilling and rock excavation. Brittleness is one of the most crucial rock features for rock excavation. For this reason, determination of relations between cuttability and brittleness will help rock engineers. This study aims to estimate the specific energy from different brittleness values of rocks by means of simple and multiple regression analyses. In this study, rock cutting, rock property, and brittleness index tests were carried out on 24 different rock samples with different strength values, including marble, travertine, and tuff, collected from sites around Konya Province, Turkey. Four previously used brittleness concepts were evaluated in this study, denoted as B 1 (ratio of compressive to tensile strength), B 2 (ratio of the difference between compressive and tensile strength to the sum of compressive and tensile strength), B 3 (area under the stress-strain line in relation to compressive and tensile strength), and B 9 = S 20, the percentage of fines (<11.2 mm) formed in an impact test for the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) model as well as B 9p (B 9 as predicted from uniaxial compressive, Brazilian tensile, and point load strengths of rocks using multiple regression analysis). The results suggest that the proposed simple regression-based prediction models including B 3, B 9, and B 9p outperform the other models including B 1 and B 2 and can be used for more accurate and reliable estimation of specific energy.

  6. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Necessary to the development and understanding of brittle fiber reinforced composites is a means to statistically describe fiber strength and strain-to-failure behavior. A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers is presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  7. Atomic scale origin of crack resistance in brittle fracture.

    PubMed

    Mattoni, A; Colombo, L; Cleri, F

    2005-09-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of the intrinsic crack resistance in the Griffith theory of brittle fracture by means of atomic-scale simulations. By taking cubic SiC as a typical brittle material, we show that the widely accepted identification of intrinsic crack resistance with the free surface energy underestimates the energy-release rate. The strain dependence of the Young modulus and surface energy, as well as allowance for lattice trapping, improve the estimate of the crack resistance. In the smallest scale limit, crack resistance can be fitted by an empirical elastoplastic model.

  8. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Samulyak, Roman; Lu, Cao

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  9. [Does brittle diabetes exist as a clinical entity?].

    PubMed

    Eliaschewitz, Freddy Goldberg; Franco, Denise Reis

    2009-06-01

    The best comprehension about the instability of the glycemia levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients and the availability of new alternatives to successfully control it, like insulin pump therapy and the insulin analogues, underlined the questions about the brittle diabetes existence as a clinical entity as well as the necessity of define it. The aim of this article was to describe the concept of brittle diabetes in the light of the latest advances in the treatment of type 1 diabetes and propose objective criteria to evaluate the level of glucose liability.

  10. Wild rice, hypoallergenic rice--immunologic comparison.

    PubMed

    Yum, Hye-Yung; Lee, Kyung Eun; Choi, Sung Youn; Yang, Hea Sun; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn; Lee, Sang-Il

    2006-01-01

    Rice is a cereal that is mainly produced and widely consumed in Asian countries including Korea. Several reports have suggested a role of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity in asthma and eczema associated with ingestion or inhalation of rice. In Japan, hypoallergenic rices are used for a substitute of common rice in some atopic patients. We performed this study to identify major allergens of rice and changed allergenicity in cooked and hypoallergenic rice. We purified crude extracts from a variety of rice and analyzed their protein distributions by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Based on UniCAP test and skin-prick test, we selected sera with high sensitivity and analyzed specific IgE binding to rice by immunoblotting. In addition, the inhibition rate among some rice was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and CAP test. As the result of this study, rice with various origins and polishing levels had no difference in protein band pattern. After cooking, it was difficult to detect protein bands distributed in raw rice; and, even through IgE immunoblot analysis, it was impossible to differentiate between wild and hypoallergenic rice. In addition, both wild and hypoallergenic rice still had IgE binding activity on their remaining protein bands. In conclusion, almost all proteins of rice were excluded or weakened in the process of boiling and IgE binding activity still remained even in hypoallergenic rice.

  11. Determination of fractionation of oxygen isotopes between rice grain and environmental water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, R.; Ghosh, P.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of plant organic matter (POM) serves as a valuable proxy for paleoclimatic studies [1].The δ18O of POM emulates the isotopic composition of the source water [2]. Rice crop cultivation goes back to 12,000 years, when rice was first domesticated in China and the earliest cultivation of rice observed in India was during 3000- 2500 BC. Presently rice is cultivated in many countries around the world including India where the prerequisite of saturated soil water condition for optimum growth of rice crop is provided by the South west monsoons. Earlier studies on δ18O of rice have been limited to its geographic characterization [3]. However, detailed investigations to determine fractionation of oxygen isotopes in water, in different parts of a rice plant, with rice seed organic matter is the primary objective of this work. This is important for understanding the mechanism responsible for the transfer of source water signature to the seed organics and can facilitate understanding of past monsoonal regime using well preserved rice grain remains from archaeological sites. Water from the leaves and culms was extracted by means of heating and cryogenic distillation in a vacuum extraction system [4]. The source water and the water extracted from plant parts were analysed by CO2 equilibration method using Gas Bench peripheral. Rice seed powder, after removal of husk, is composed primarily of starch and were analysed using High Temperature Conversion-Elemental Analyser. Both these peripherals were coupled to an Isotope Ratio Mass spectrometer- MAT253 (Thermo Finnigan). Experimental results discussed here were based on greenhouse and field based studies of water and seed organic composition. The water fed to the plant in the green house showed an average δ18O value of -0.50‰ whereas the field water from irrigation covering the time of grain filling ranges between -1.03‰ and -3.08‰. Figure 1 displays the extent of enrichment recorded in

  12. Maize Brittle stalk2 encodes a COBRA-like protein expressed in early organ development but required for tissue flexibility at maturity.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Anoop; Langewisch, Tiffany; Olek, Anna; Multani, Dilbag S; McCann, Maureen C; Vermerris, Wilfred; Carpita, Nicholas C; Johal, Gurmukh

    2007-12-01

    The maize (Zea mays) brittle stalk2 (bk2) is a recessive mutant, the aerial parts of which are easily broken. The bk2 phenotype is developmentally regulated and appears 4 weeks after planting, at about the fifth-leaf stage. Before this time, mutants are indistinguishable from wild-type siblings. Afterward, all organs of the bk2 mutants turn brittle, even the preexisting ones, and they remain brittle throughout the life of the plant. Leaf tension assays and bend tests of the internodes show that the brittle phenotype does not result from loss of tensile strength but from loss in flexibility that causes the tissues to snap instead of bend. The Bk2 gene was cloned by a combination of transposon tagging and a candidate gene approach and found to encode a COBRA-like protein similar to rice (Oryza sativa) BC1 and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) COBRA-LIKE4. The outer periphery of the stalk has fewer vascular bundles, and the sclerids underlying the epidermis possess thinner secondary walls. Relative cellulose content is not strictly correlated with the brittle phenotype. Cellulose content in mature zones of bk2 mature stems is lowered by 40% but is about the same as wild type in developing stems. Although relative cellulose content is lowered in leaves after the onset of the brittle phenotype, total wall mass as a proportion of dry mass is either unchanged or slightly increased, indicating a compensatory increase in noncellulosic carbohydrate mass. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated an increase in phenolic ester content in the walls of bk2 leaves and stems. Total content of lignin is unaffected in bk2 juvenile leaves before or after appearance of the brittle phenotype, but bk2 mature and developing stems are markedly enriched in lignin compared to wild-type stems. Despite increased lignin in bk2 stems, loss of staining with phloroglucinol and ultraviolet autofluorescence is observed in vascular bundles and sclerid layers. Consistent with the infrared

  13. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  14. Micromechanics of Brittle Creep Under Triaxial Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time-dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail (i) at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and (ii) even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we provide a micromechanical model and experimental results describing time-dependent brittle creep of water-saturated granite under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of microcracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing-crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strain and strain rates are then computed from the change in energy potential due to microcrack growth. They are non-linear, and compare well with complementary experimental results obtained on granite samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decreasing crack growth rate , due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as merely an inflexion between the two end-member phases.

  15. Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of a prototype culm-combustion boiler/heater unit. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed on the Prototype Culm Combustion Boiler/Heater Unit, Phase I - Engineering Design and Analysis and Phase II - Prototype Plant Construction during the period October 1, 1980 through December 31, 1980. The objectives of the program as well as the technical progress and problem areas encountered during the reporting period are presented. The final detail design effort was completed and the final design report submitted. Progress on procurement activity authorized by full Phase II release on March 20, 1980, is discussed. Following approval by DOE, a purchase order was placed with the Norflor Construction Corporation for the prototype plant construction which began in November. Construction of the access roadway installation of the electric power, sewer and water lines was completed during this reporting period. Boiler construction continued.

  16. A partial skeletal proteome of the brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaver, Ryan W.

    The formation of mineralized tissue was critical to the evolution and diversification of metazoans and remains functionally significant in most animal lineages. Of special importance is the protein found occluded within the mineral matrix, which facilitates the process of biomineralization and modulates the final mineral structure. These skeletal matrix proteins have well been described in several species, including the sea urchin Stronglyocentrotus purpuratus, an important model organism. Biomineralization research is limited in other echinoderm classes. This research encompasses the first description of mineral matrix proteins in a member of the echinoderm class Ophiuroidea. This work describes the skeletal matrix proteins of the brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii using bioinformatic and proteomic techniques. General characteristics of matrix protein are described and a number of candidate biomineralization related genes have been identified, cloned, and sequenced. The unique evolutionary and biochemical properties of brittle star skeletal matrix proteins are also described.

  17. The Brittle-Ductile Transition - A Self-Consistent Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, B.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Ord, A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth is commonly viewed as a switch between two different constitutive behaviors, plastic and viscous, and is represented in models by various formulations. We show that thermal-mechanical coupling leads to a self consistent view where the BDT emerges naturally within one constitutive framework once a critical temperature is attained. Viscous folding occurs above this temperature and brittle fracturing below. Seismic activity is maximised at the BDT. Orogenesis emerges as a thermal-mechanical decoupling near the BDT during flexing of the lithosphere with the development of "crocodile" -like structures, fold-nappe systems and far-travelled thrust sheets. For quartz- feldspar composite materials this transition lies in a critical range of 500 K to 580 K.

  18. Elastic-plastic-brittle transitions and avalanches in disordered media.

    PubMed

    Kale, Sohan; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2014-01-31

    A spring lattice model with the ability to simulate elastic-plastic-brittle transitions in a disordered medium is presented. The model is based on bilinear constitutive law defined at the spring level and power-law-type disorder introduced in the yield and failure limits of the springs. The key parameters of the proposed model effectively control the disorder distribution, significantly affecting the stress-strain response, the damage accumulation process, and the fracture surfaces. The model demonstrates a plastic strain avalanche behavior for perfectly plastic as well as hardening materials with a power-law distribution, in agreement with the experiments and related models. The strength of the model is in its generality and ability to interpolate between elastic-plastic hardening and elastic-brittle transitions.

  19. Brittle cleavage fracture: An overview of some historical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, P.C.

    1997-12-31

    Many aspects of cleavage fracture were not well understood by the mid-1950s when George R. Irwin coined the term Fracture Mechanics. This discussion will attempt to relate some of the common concepts and misconceptions of that period. The leadership of Dr. Irwin in developing new concepts and methods for clarifying the understanding of brittle fracture will be emphasized here. An essential part of the progress made was to bring together the Engineering Mechanics, Metallurgy, and Physics of the subject into a reasoned balance in trying to further understand the nature of the phenomena. This is illustrated by recalling some of the personalities of that time period and their concepts and claims and how they interacted to make progress toward today`s state of knowledge. Indeed today`s closer ties between fields such as mechanics and metallurgy were in part caused by these requirements of analysis of Brittle Cleavage Fracture.

  20. An electronic criterion for assessing intrinsic brittleness of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. F.; Jones, T. E.; Wu, Y.; Lu, Z. P.; Halas, S.; Durakiewicz, T.; Eberhart, M. E.

    2014-07-14

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are characterized by a number of remarkable physical and mechanical properties. Unfortunately, these same materials are often intrinsically brittle, which limits their utility. Consequently, considerable effort has been expended searching for correlations between the phenomenologically complex mechanical properties of metallic glasses and more basic properties, such correlations might provide insight into the structure and bonding controlling the deformation properties of BMGs. While conducting such a search, we uncovered a weak correlation between a BMG’s work function and its susceptibility to brittle behavior. We argue that the basis for this correlation is a consequence of a component of the work function – the surface dipole – and a fundamental bond property related to the shape of the charge density at a bond critical point. Together these observations suggest that simple first principle calculations might be useful in the search for tougher BMGs.

  1. Time-dependent Brittle Deformation in Darley Dale Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2008-12-01

    The characterization of time-dependent brittle rock deformation is fundamental to understanding the long- term evolution and dynamics of the Earth's upper crust. The chemical influence of water promotes time- dependent deformation through stress corrosion cracking that allows rocks to deform at stresses far below their short-term failure strength. Here we report results from a study of time-dependent brittle creep in water- saturated samples of Darley Dale sandstone (initial porosity of 13%). Conventional creep experiments (or 'static fatigue' tests) show that time to failure decreases dramatically with the imposed deviatoric stress. They also suggest the existence of a critical level of damage beyond which localized failure develops. Sample variability results however in significant scattering in the experimental data and numerous tests are needed to clearly define a relation between the strain rate and the applied stress. We show here that stress-stepping experiments provide a means to overcome this problem and that it is possible this way to obtain the strain rate dependence on applied stress with a single test. This allows to study in details the impact of various thermodynamical conditions on brittle creep. The influence of effective stress was investigated in stress-stepping experiments with effective confining pressures of 10, 30 and 50 MPa (whilst maintaining a constant pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa). In addition to the expected purely mechanical influence of an elevated effective stress our results also demonstrate that stress corrosion appears to be inhibited at higher effective stresses. The influence of doubling the pore fluid pressure however, whilst maintaining a constant effective stress, is shown to have no effect on the rate of stress corrosion. We then discuss the results in light of acoustic emission hypocentre location data and optical microscope analysis and use our experimental data to validate proposed macroscopic creep laws. Finally, using

  2. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers in presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  3. Patterns of brittle deformation under extension on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of fractures at regular length scales is a widespread feature of Venusian tectonics. Models of lithospheric deformation under extension based on non-Newtonian viscous flow and brittle-plastic flow develop localized failure at preferred wavelengths that depend on lithospheric thickness and stratification. The characteristic wavelengths seen in rift zones and tessera can therefore provide constraints on crustal and thermal structure. Analytic solutions were obtained for growth rates in infinitesimal perturbations imposed on a one-dimensional, layered rheology. Brittle layers were approximated by perfectly-plastic, uniform strength, overlying ductile layers exhibiting thermally-activated power-law creep. This study investigates the formation of faults under finite amounts of extension, employing a finite-element approach. Our model incorporates non-linear viscous rheology and a Coulomb failure envelope. An initial perturbation in crustal thickness gives rise to necking instabilities. A small amount of velocity weakening serves to localize deformation into planar regions of high strain rate. Such planes are analogous to normal faults seen in terrestrial rift zones. These 'faults' evolve to low angle under finite extension. Fault spacing, orientation and location, and the depth to the brittle-ductile transition, depend in a complex way on lateral variations in crustal thickness. In general, we find that multiple wavelengths of deformation can arise from the interaction of crustal and mantle lithosphere.

  4. Transcriptome pyrosequencing of the Antarctic brittle star Ophionotus victoriae.

    PubMed

    Burns, Gavin; Thorndyke, Michael C; Peck, Lloyd S; Clark, Melody S

    2013-03-01

    Brittle stars are included within a whole range of species, which contribute to knowledge in the medically important area of tissue regeneration. All brittle stars regenerate lose limbs, but the rate at which this occurs is highly variable and species-specific. One of the slowest rates of arm regeneration reported so far is that of the Antarctic Ophionotus victoriae. Additionally, O. victoriae also has an unusual delay in the onset of regeneration of about 5months. Both processes are of interest for the areas of regeneration biology and adaptation to cold environments. One method of understanding the details of regeneration events in brittle stars is to characterise the genes involved. In the largest transcriptome study of any ophiuroid to date, we describe the results of mRNA pyrosequencing from pooled samples of regenerating arms of O. victoriae. The sequencing reads resulted in 18,000 assembled contiguous sequences of which 19% were putatively annotated by blast sequence similarity searching. We focus on the identification of major gene families and pathways with potential relevance to the regenerative processes including the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, Hox genes, the SOX gene family and the TGF beta signalling pathways. These data significantly increase the amount of ophiuroid sequences publicly available and provide candidate transcripts for the further investigation of the unusual regenerative process in this Antarctic ophiuroid. PMID:23904059

  5. Interpreting finite element results for brittle materials in endodontic restorations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Finite element simulation has been used in last years for analysing the biomechanical performance of post-core restorations in endodontics, but results of these simulations have been interpreted in most of the works using von Mises stress criterion. However, the validity of this failure criterion for brittle materials, which are present in these restorations, is questionable. The objective of the paper is to analyse how finite element results for brittle materials of endodontic restorations should be interpreted to obtain correct conclusions about the possible failure in the restoration. Methods Different failure criteria (Von Mises, Rankine, Coulomb-Mohr, Modified Mohr and Christensen) and material strength data (diametral tensile strength and flexural strength) were considered in the study. Three finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate an endodontic restoration and two typical material tests: diametral tensile test and flexural test. Results Results showed that the Christensen criterion predicts similar results as the Von Mises criterion for ductile components, while it predicts similar results to all other criteria for brittle components. The different criteria predict different failure points for the diametral tensile test, all of them under multi-axial stress states. All criteria except Von Mises predict failure for flexural test at the same point of the specimen, with this point under uniaxial tensile stress. Conclusions From the results it is concluded that the Christensen criterion is recommended for FEM result interpretation in endodontic restorations and that the flexural test is recommended to estimate tensile strength instead of the diametral tensile test. PMID:21635759

  6. Guidelines for Design and Analysis of Large, Brittle Spacecraft Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. Y.

    1993-01-01

    There were two related parts to this work. The first, conducted at The Aerospace Corporation was to develop and define methods for integrating the statistical theory of brittle strength with conventional finite element stress analysis, and to carry out a limited laboratory test program to illustrate the methods. The second part, separately funded at Aerojet Electronic Systems Division, was to create the finite element postprocessing program for integrating the statistical strength analysis with the structural analysis. The second part was monitored by Capt. Jeff McCann of USAF/SMC, as Special Study No.11, which authorized Aerojet to support Aerospace on this work requested by NASA. This second part is documented in Appendix A. The activity at Aerojet was guided by the Aerospace methods developed in the first part of this work. This joint work of Aerospace and Aerojet stemmed from prior related work for the Defense Support Program (DSP) Program Office, to qualify the DSP sensor main mirror and corrector lens for flight as part of a shuttle payload. These large brittle components of the DSP sensor are provided by Aerojet. This document defines rational methods for addressing the structural integrity and safety of large, brittle, payload components, which have low and variable tensile strength and can suddenly break or shatter. The methods are applicable to the evaluation and validation of such components, which, because of size and configuration restrictions, cannot be validated by direct proof test.

  7. Transcriptome pyrosequencing of the Antarctic brittle star Ophionotus victoriae.

    PubMed

    Burns, Gavin; Thorndyke, Michael C; Peck, Lloyd S; Clark, Melody S

    2013-03-01

    Brittle stars are included within a whole range of species, which contribute to knowledge in the medically important area of tissue regeneration. All brittle stars regenerate lose limbs, but the rate at which this occurs is highly variable and species-specific. One of the slowest rates of arm regeneration reported so far is that of the Antarctic Ophionotus victoriae. Additionally, O. victoriae also has an unusual delay in the onset of regeneration of about 5months. Both processes are of interest for the areas of regeneration biology and adaptation to cold environments. One method of understanding the details of regeneration events in brittle stars is to characterise the genes involved. In the largest transcriptome study of any ophiuroid to date, we describe the results of mRNA pyrosequencing from pooled samples of regenerating arms of O. victoriae. The sequencing reads resulted in 18,000 assembled contiguous sequences of which 19% were putatively annotated by blast sequence similarity searching. We focus on the identification of major gene families and pathways with potential relevance to the regenerative processes including the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, Hox genes, the SOX gene family and the TGF beta signalling pathways. These data significantly increase the amount of ophiuroid sequences publicly available and provide candidate transcripts for the further investigation of the unusual regenerative process in this Antarctic ophiuroid.

  8. On failure in polycrystalline and amorphous brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Neil

    2009-06-01

    The response of brittle materials to uniaxial compressive shock loading is still not well understood. Describing the physical mechanisms resulting from the more complex triaxial states that result from impact and penetration is thus empirical. The physical interpretation of the yield point of brittle materials in one-dimensional strain (the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL)), the rate dependence of this threshold, the form of stress histories and the effect of polycrystalline microstructure still remain to be comprehensively explained. However, evidence of failure occurring in glasses and ceramics behind a travelling front that follows a shock front has been accumulated and verified in several laboratories. Such a boundary has been called a failure front. The variations in properties across this front include complete loss of tensile strength, partial loss of shear strength, reduction in acoustic impedance, lowered sound speed and opacity to light. It is the object of this work to collect observations of these phenomena and their relation to failure and the HEL in brittle materials. Further, to relate these uniaxial strain measurements of their failed states to the depth of penetration (DoP) in the widely conducted test. British Crown Copyright MoD/2009.

  9. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    PubMed Central

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  10. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  11. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs.

  12. Morphology based field rice density detection from rice transplant stage to rice jointing stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X. D.; Cao, Z. G.; Wang, Y.; Ye, M. N.; Yu, Z. H.; Li, Y. N.

    2013-10-01

    Rice yield estimation is an important aspect in the agriculture research field. For the rice yield estimation, rice density is one of its useful factors. In this paper, we propose a new method to automatically detect the rice density from the rice transplanting stage to rice jointing stage. It devotes to detect rice planting density by image low-level features of the rice image sequences taken in the fields. Moreover, a rice jointing stage automatic detection method is proposed so as to terminate the rice density detection algorithm. The validities of the proposed rice density detection method and the rice jointing stage automatic detection method are proved in the experiment.

  13. Different responses to N(+) beam implantation between diploid and autotetraploid rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengming; Huang, Qunce; Qin, Guangyong; Zhao, Shuaipeng

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the biological effects of N(+) beam implantation in different ploidy rice. N(+) beam implantation had increase effect in tillers number, spikelet fertility, grain yield per plant, si-phellem cell size, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, flag leaf dry weight, flag leaf culm dry weight, stomatal length, vascular bundle area, and protein and starch content and decrease effect in 1,000-grain weight, stomatal width and chlorophyll, calcium, sodium, and zinc content for all rice lines. N(+) beam implantation had opposite effect on diploid and autotetraploid rice lines in vascular bundle area, stomatal complexes areas, epidermal cell size, era length, area of air spaces, midrib length, papilla number, flag leaf length, flag leaf width, flag leaf area, and cadmium, copper, ferrum, magnesium and phosphorus content. Twenty traits of diploid line and ten traits of autotetraploid line are significantly increased by N(+) beam in this experiment, ranging from 6.8 to 362.7 % in diploid line and 7.9 to 131.7 % in autotetraploid line. Six traits of diploid lines and 15 traits of autotetraploid line are significantly decreased by N(+) beam implantation in this experiment, ranging from 8.9 to 87.4 % in diploid line and 5.6 to 88.5 % in autotetraploid line.

  14. Artificial selection for a green revolution gene during japonica rice domestication.

    PubMed

    Asano, Kenji; Yamasaki, Masanori; Takuno, Shohei; Miura, Kotaro; Katagiri, Satoshi; Ito, Tomoko; Doi, Kazuyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ebana, Kaworu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Innan, Hideki; Kitano, Hidemi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    The semidwarf phenotype has been extensively selected during modern crop breeding as an agronomically important trait. Introduction of the semidwarf gene, semi-dwarf1 (sd1), which encodes a gibberellin biosynthesis enzyme, made significant contributions to the "green revolution" in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Here we report that SD1 was involved not only in modern breeding including the green revolution, but also in early steps of rice domestication. We identified two SNPs in O. sativa subspecies (ssp.) japonica SD1 as functional nucleotide polymorphisms (FNPs) responsible for shorter culm length and low gibberellin biosynthetic activity. Genetic diversity analysis among O. sativa ssp. japonica and indica, along with their wild ancestor O. rufipogon Griff, revealed that these FNPs clearly differentiate the japonica landrace and O. rufipogon. We also found a dramatic reduction in nucleotide diversity around SD1 only in the japonica landrace, not in the indica landrace or O. rufipogon. These findings indicate that SD1 has been subjected to artificial selection in rice evolution and that the FNPs participated in japonica domestication, suggesting that ancient humans already used the green revolution gene.

  15. NAL1 allele from a rice landrace greatly increases yield in modern indica cultivars.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Daisuke; Trijatmiko, Kurniawan Rudi; Tagle, Analiza Grubanzo; Sapasap, Maria Veronica; Koide, Yohei; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Gannaban, Ritchel Bueno; Nishimura, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Seiji; Fukuta, Yoshimichi; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Slamet-Loedin, Inez Hortense; Ishimaru, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Nobuya

    2013-12-17

    Increasing crop production is essential for securing the future food supply in developing countries in Asia and Africa as economies and populations grow. However, although the Green Revolution led to increased grain production in the 1960s, no major advances have been made in increasing yield potential in rice since then. In this study, we identified a gene, SPIKELET NUMBER (SPIKE), from a tropical japonica rice landrace that enhances the grain productivity of indica cultivars through pleiotropic effects on plant architecture. Map-based cloning revealed that SPIKE was identical to NARROW LEAF1 (NAL1), which has been reported to control vein pattern in leaf. Phenotypic analyses of a near-isogenic line of a popular indica cultivar, IR64, and overexpressor lines revealed increases in spikelet number, leaf size, root system, and the number of vascular bundles, indicating the enhancement of source size and translocation capacity as well as sink size. The near-isogenic line achieved 13-36% yield increase without any negative effect on grain appearance. Expression analysis revealed that the gene was expressed in all cell types: panicles, leaves, roots, and culms supporting the pleiotropic effects on plant architecture. Furthermore, SPIKE increased grain yield by 18% in the recently released indica cultivar IRRI146, and increased spikelet number in the genetic background of other popular indica cultivars. The use of SPIKE in rice breeding could contribute to food security in indica-growing regions such as South and Southeast Asia.

  16. Neogene transtensional brittle tectonics in the Lepontine D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanic, C.; Sue, C.; Champagnac, J.-D.

    2009-04-01

    The Lepontine Dome is investigated regarding faulting and paleostress, which allows to constrain the late brittle deformation of this gneissic core. Its tectonic evolution under brittle conditions was determined using fault mapping and paleostress inversions. Three brittle phases were reconstructed. The older phase is a NW-SE extension restricted to the eastern parts of the Dome. The second phase (major signal) is an upper Miocene transtension with stable orogen-parallel sigma3 axes (NE-SW), which is found from the Mont-Blanc to the Bergell massifs. The late phase is a N-S extension, expressed north of the Dome, and probably linked to the current collapse of the belt. The stress fields we determine for the Lepontine Dome are very similar to the stress fields determined by Champagnac et al (2006) westward in the South-Valais area, with a major signal in orogen-parallel extension and a minor signal in orogen-perpendicular extension. In the close vicinity of the Simplon fault, Grosjean et al (2004) only reported the orogen-parallel extensional stress field. Eastward, in the Bergell area, Ciancaleoni and Marquer (2008) also found a very regular NE-SW extensional paleostress field, using similar methods. Indeed, the main paleostress field determined in the Lepontine Dome is very homogeneous from a regional viewpoint. It is largely dominated by the NE-SW brittle extension, described in the whole northwestern Alps. The Lepontine Dome also bears witness of two minor extensional signals (N-S and WNW-ESE directions of extension). The absolute dating of this orogen-parallel extensional phase is based on the occurrence of pseudotachylytes locally injected in the related fault system. Pseudotachylyte development is directly linked to frictional heating due to earthquake and faulting. The Ar/Ar dating of three pseudotachylytes samples of the Lepontine Dome provided ages in the range of 9-11 Ma ±1 (Allanic, et al., 2006). Thus, one can attribute a global 10 Ma age for the orogen

  17. What controls the strength and brittleness of shale rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, Erik; Reinicke, Andreas; Meier, Tobias; Makasi, Masline; Dresen, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With respect to the productivity of gas shales, in petroleum science the mechanical behavior of shales is often classified into rock types of high and low 'brittleness', sometimes also referred to as 'fraccability'. The term brittleness is not well defined and different definitions exist, associated with elastic properties (Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus), with strength parameters (compressive and tensile strength), frictional properties (cohesion, friction coefficient), hardness (indentation), or with the strain or energy budget (ratio of reversible to the total strain or energy, respectively). Shales containing a high amount of clay and organic matter are usually considered as less brittle. Similarly, the strength of shales is usually assumed to be low if they contain a high fraction of weak phases. We performed mechanical tests on a series of shales with different mineralogical compositions, varying porosity, and low to high maturity. Using cylindrical samples, we determined the uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength, static Young's modulus, the tensile strength, and Mode I fracture toughness. The results show that in general the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) linearly increases with increasing Young's modulus (E) and both parameters increase with decreasing porosity. However, the strength and elastic modulus is not uniquely correlated with the mineral content. For shales with a relatively low quartz and high carbonate content, UCS and E increase with increasing quartz content, whereas for shales with a relatively low amount for carbonates, but high quartz content, both parameters increase with decreasing fraction of the weak phases (clays, kerogen). In contrast, the average tensile strength of all shale-types appears to increase with increasing quartz fraction. The internal friction coefficient of all investigated shales decreases with increasing pressure and may approach rather high values (up to ≡ 1). Therefore, the mechanical strength and

  18. Cavitation-Induced Fracture Causes Nanocorrugations in Brittle Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, I.; Narasimhan, R.; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2016-07-01

    Brittle metallic glasses exhibit a unique and intriguing fracture morphology of periodic nanocorrugations whose spacing and amplitude are of the order of tens of nanometers. We show through continuum simulations that they fail by spontaneous and simultaneous cavitation within multiple weak zones arising due to intrinsic atomic density fluctuations ahead of a notch tip. Dynamic crack growth would then occur along curved but narrowly confined shear bands that link the growing cavities. This mechanism involves little dissipation and also explains the formation of nanocorrugations.

  19. Cavitation-Induced Fracture Causes Nanocorrugations in Brittle Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Narasimhan, R; Ramamurty, Upadrasta

    2016-07-22

    Brittle metallic glasses exhibit a unique and intriguing fracture morphology of periodic nanocorrugations whose spacing and amplitude are of the order of tens of nanometers. We show through continuum simulations that they fail by spontaneous and simultaneous cavitation within multiple weak zones arising due to intrinsic atomic density fluctuations ahead of a notch tip. Dynamic crack growth would then occur along curved but narrowly confined shear bands that link the growing cavities. This mechanism involves little dissipation and also explains the formation of nanocorrugations. PMID:27494475

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Culm Cellulose Content in Barley Reveals Candidate Genes Co-Expressed with Members of the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Kelly; Burton, Rachel A.; Sznajder, Beata; Rafalski, Antoni J.; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Mather, Diane E.; Taylor, Jillian; Steffenson, Brian J.; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a fundamentally important component of cell walls of higher plants. It provides a scaffold that allows the development and growth of the plant to occur in an ordered fashion. Cellulose also provides mechanical strength, which is crucial for both normal development and to enable the plant to withstand both abiotic and biotic stresses. We quantified the cellulose concentration in the culm of 288 two – rowed and 288 six – rowed spring type barley accessions that were part of the USDA funded barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) program in the USA. When the population structure of these accessions was analysed we identified six distinct populations, four of which we considered to be comprised of a sufficient number of accessions to be suitable for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These lines had been genotyped with 3072 SNPs so we combined the trait and genetic data to carry out GWAS. The analysis allowed us to identify regions of the genome containing significant associations between molecular markers and cellulose concentration data, including one region cross-validated in multiple populations. To identify candidate genes we assembled the gene content of these regions and used these to query a comprehensive RNA-seq based gene expression atlas. This provided us with gene annotations and associated expression data across multiple tissues, which allowed us to formulate a supported list of candidate genes that regulate cellulose biosynthesis. Several regions identified by our analysis contain genes that are co-expressed with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A (HvCesA) across a range of tissues and developmental stages. These genes are involved in both primary and secondary cell wall development. In addition, genes that have been previously linked with cellulose synthesis by biochemical methods, such as HvCOBRA, a gene of unknown function, were also associated with cellulose levels in the association panel. Our analyses provide new insights into the

  1. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Culm Cellulose Content in Barley Reveals Candidate Genes Co-Expressed with Members of the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Houston, Kelly; Burton, Rachel A; Sznajder, Beata; Rafalski, Antoni J; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Mather, Diane E; Taylor, Jillian; Steffenson, Brian J; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a fundamentally important component of cell walls of higher plants. It provides a scaffold that allows the development and growth of the plant to occur in an ordered fashion. Cellulose also provides mechanical strength, which is crucial for both normal development and to enable the plant to withstand both abiotic and biotic stresses. We quantified the cellulose concentration in the culm of 288 two--rowed and 288 six--rowed spring type barley accessions that were part of the USDA funded barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) program in the USA. When the population structure of these accessions was analysed we identified six distinct populations, four of which we considered to be comprised of a sufficient number of accessions to be suitable for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These lines had been genotyped with 3072 SNPs so we combined the trait and genetic data to carry out GWAS. The analysis allowed us to identify regions of the genome containing significant associations between molecular markers and cellulose concentration data, including one region cross-validated in multiple populations. To identify candidate genes we assembled the gene content of these regions and used these to query a comprehensive RNA-seq based gene expression atlas. This provided us with gene annotations and associated expression data across multiple tissues, which allowed us to formulate a supported list of candidate genes that regulate cellulose biosynthesis. Several regions identified by our analysis contain genes that are co-expressed with cellulose synthase A (HvCesA) across a range of tissues and developmental stages. These genes are involved in both primary and secondary cell wall development. In addition, genes that have been previously linked with cellulose synthesis by biochemical methods, such as HvCOBRA, a gene of unknown function, were also associated with cellulose levels in the association panel. Our analyses provide new insights into the genes that

  2. Self-repair of cracks in brittle material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most effective uses for self repair is in material systems that crack because the cracks can allow the repair chemical to flow into the crack damage sites in all three dimensions. In order for the repair chemical to stay in the damage site and flow along to all the crack and repair there must be enough chemical to fill the entire crack. The repair chemical must be designed appropriately for the particular crack size and total volume of cracks. In each of the three examples of self repair in crackable brittle systems, the viscosity and chemical makeup and volume of the repair chemicals used is different for each system. Further the chemical delivery system has to be designed for each application also. Test results from self repair of three brittle systems are discussed. In "Self Repair of Concrete Bridges and Infrastructure" two chemicals were used due to different placements in bridges to repair different types of cracks- surface shrinkage and shear cracks, In "Airplane Wings and Fuselage, in Graphite" the composite has very different properties than the concrete bridges. In the graphite for airplane components the chemical also had to survive the high processing temperatures. In this composite the cracks were so definite and deep and thin that the repair chemical could flow easily and repair in all layers of the composite. In "Ceramic/Composite Demonstrating Self Repair" the self repair system not only repaired the broken ceramic but also rebounded the composite to the ceramic layer

  3. A generalized law for brittle deformation of Westerly granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A semiempirical constitutive law is presented for the brittle deformation of intact Westerly granite. The law can be extended to larger displacements, dominated by localized deformation, by including a displacement-weakening break-down region terminating in a frictional sliding regime often described by a rate- and state-dependent constitutive law. The intact deformation law, based on an Arrhenius type rate equation, relates inelastic strain rate to confining pressure Pc, differential stress ????, inelastic strain ??i, and temperature T. The basic form of the law for deformation prior to fault nucleation is In ????i = c - (E*/RT) + (????/a??o)sin-??(???? i/2??o) where ??o and ??o are normalization constants (dependent on confining pressure), a is rate sensitivity of stress, and ?? is a shape parameter. At room temperature, eight experimentally determined coefficients are needed to fully describe the stress-strain-strain rate response for Westerly granite from initial loading to failure. Temperature dependence requires apparent activation energy (E* ??? 90 kJ/mol) and one additional experimentally determined coefficient. The similarity between the prefailure constitutive law for intact rock and the rate- and state-dependent friction laws for frictional sliding on fracture surfaces suggests a close connection between these brittle phenomena.

  4. The initiation of brittle faults in crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.

    2015-08-01

    Faults in the upper crust initiate from pre-existing (inherited) or precursory (early-formed) structures and typically grow by the mechanical interaction and linkage of these structures. In crystalline rock, rock architecture, composition, cooling, and exhumation influence the initiation of faults, with contrasting styles observed in plutonic rocks, extrusive igneous rocks, and foliated metamorphic rocks. Brittle fault growth in granitic rock is commonly controlled by the architecture of inherited joints or preexisting dikes. In basalt, abundant joints control the surface expression of faulting, and enhanced compliance due to abundant joints leads to folding and deformation asymmetry in the fault zone. Highly reactive mafic minerals likely become rapidly evolving fault rocks. In foliated metamorphic rocks, fault initiation style is strongly influenced by strength anisotropy relative to the principal stress directions, with fracturing favored when the foliation is aligned with the directions of principal stress. The continuity of micas within the foliation also influences the micromechanics of fault initiation. Brittle kink bands are an example of a strain-hardening precursory structure unique to foliated rock. Each of these fault initiation processes produces different initial fault geometry and spatial heterogeneity that influence such properties as fault permeability and seismogenesis.

  5. The maize brittle 1 gene encodes amyloplast membrane polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T D; Kaneko, Y

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein, formed of 56 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the maize (Zea mays L.) wild-type Brittle1 (Bt1) protein fused to the glutathione-S-transferase gene, was synthesized in Escherichia coli, and used to raise antibodies. Following affinity purification, the antibodies recognized a set of 38- to 42-kDa proteins in endosperm from wild-type Bt1 plants, as well as from brittle2, shrunken2 and sugary1 plants, but not in mutant bt1 endosperm. Bt1 proteins were not detected with the preimmune antibodies. A low level of Bt1-specific proteins was detected at 10 d after pollination (DAP) and increased to a plateau at 16 DAP. At the same time, the ratio of slow- to fast-migrating forms of the protein decreased. During endosperm fractionation by differential centrifugation and membrane sedimentation in sucrose gradients, the Bt1 proteins co-purified with the carotenoid-containing plastid membranes. They were localized to amyloplasts by electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry; most of the signal was detected at the plastid periphery. These results are consistent with predictions made from the deduced amino-acid sequence and previous in-vitro experiments that the bt1 locus encodes amyloplast membrane proteins. PMID:7647682

  6. Cyclic fatigue of intrinsically brittle ceramics in contact with spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.K.; Jung, Y.G.; Peterson, I.M.; Lawn, B.R.

    1999-12-10

    Contact damage modes in cyclic loading with spheres are investigated in three nominally brittle ceramics, soda-lime glass, porcelain and fine-grain silicon nitride, in moist environments. Initial damage at small numbers of cycles and low loads consists of tensile-driven macroscopic cone cracks (brittle mode). Secondary damage at large numbers of cycles and high loads consists of shear-driven distributed microdamage (quasi-plastic mode), with attendant radial cracks and a new form of deeply penetrating subsidiary cone cracks. Strength tests on indented specimens are used to quantify the degree of damage. Both damage modes degrade the strength: the first, immediately after cone crack initiation, relatively slowly; the second, after development of radial cracks, much more rapidly. A fracture mechanics model describing the first mode, based on time-integration of slow growth of cone cracks, is presented. This model provides simple power-law relations for the remaining strength in terms of number of cycles and contact load for materials design. Extrapolations of these relations into the quasi-plastic region are shown to be non-conservative, highlighting the need for further understanding of the deleterious quasi-plastic mode in tougher ceramics. Comparison with static contact data indicates a strong mechanical (as opposed to chemical) component in the cyclic fatigue in the quasi-plastic region.

  7. The maize brittle 1 gene encodes amyloplast membrane polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T D; Kaneko, Y

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein, formed of 56 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the maize (Zea mays L.) wild-type Brittle1 (Bt1) protein fused to the glutathione-S-transferase gene, was synthesized in Escherichia coli, and used to raise antibodies. Following affinity purification, the antibodies recognized a set of 38- to 42-kDa proteins in endosperm from wild-type Bt1 plants, as well as from brittle2, shrunken2 and sugary1 plants, but not in mutant bt1 endosperm. Bt1 proteins were not detected with the preimmune antibodies. A low level of Bt1-specific proteins was detected at 10 d after pollination (DAP) and increased to a plateau at 16 DAP. At the same time, the ratio of slow- to fast-migrating forms of the protein decreased. During endosperm fractionation by differential centrifugation and membrane sedimentation in sucrose gradients, the Bt1 proteins co-purified with the carotenoid-containing plastid membranes. They were localized to amyloplasts by electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry; most of the signal was detected at the plastid periphery. These results are consistent with predictions made from the deduced amino-acid sequence and previous in-vitro experiments that the bt1 locus encodes amyloplast membrane proteins.

  8. Micromechanisms of intergranular brittle ftacture in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitek, V.

    1991-06-01

    Grain boundaries in intermetallic compounds such as Ni3A1 are inherently brittle. The reason is usually sought in grain boundary cohesion but in metals even brittle fracture is accompanied by some local plasticity and thus not only cohesion but also dislocation mobility in the boundary region need to be studied. We first discuss here the role of an irreversible shear deformation at the crack tip during microcrack propagation assuming that these two processes are concomitant. It is shown that a pre-existing crack cannot propagate in a brittle manner once the dislocation emission occurs. However, if a microcrack nucleates during loading it can propagate concurrently with the development of the irreversible shear deformation at the crack tip. The latter is then the major energy dissipating process. In the second part of this paper we present results of atomistic studies of grain boundaries in Ni3A1 and CU3Au which suggest that substantial structural differences exist between strongly and weakly ordered L12 alloys. We discuss then the consequence of these differences for intergranular brittleness in the framework of the above model for microcrack propagation. On this basis we propose an explanation for the intrinsic intergranular brittleness in some L12 alloys and relate it directly to the strength of ordering. Les joints de grains dans les composés intermétalliques de type Ni3AI sont de nature fragile. L'origine de cette fragilité est habituellement dans la cohésion des joints de grains. Dans les métaux, cependant, même la rupture fragile est accompagnée d'une certaine déformation plastique locale, de telle sorte que non seulement la cohésion mais aussi la mobilité des dislocations près des joints doit être étudiée. Nous discutons d'abord le rôle d'une déformation en cisaillement irréversible en tête de fissure pendant la propagation de cette fissure, en supposant que les deux processus sont concomitants. Nous montrons qu'une fissure préexistante ne

  9. Rice Production and Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briers, Gary; Lee, Jasper S.

    This guide contains lesson plans for use in secondary programs of agricultural education in geographical areas in which rice is produced. Six units and 13 problem areas are organized into teaching plans that cover the broad nature of rice production. The six units are: (1) determining the importance and history of rice production; (2) determining…

  10. Method for preparing surfaces of metal composites having a brittle phase for plating. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Coates, C.W.; Wilson, T.J.

    1982-05-19

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing surfaces of two-phase metal composites having relatively brittle and malleable components for plating with corrosion-resistant material. In practice of the present invention, the surfaces of the composite are etched to remove a major portion or fraction of the brittle component. The etched surface is then peened with particulates for breaking the brittle component from the surfaces and for spreading or smearing the malleable component over the surfaces. The peened surface is then chemically cleaned of residual traces of the brittle component to which the corrosion-resistant material may be plated thereon in an adherent manner.

  11. High-throughput measurement of rice tillers using a conveyor equipped with x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wanneng; Xu, Xiaochun; Duan, Lingfeng; Luo, Qingming; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian

    2011-02-01

    Tillering is one of the most important agronomic traits because the number of shoots per plant determines panicle number, a key component of grain yield. The conventional method of counting tillers is still manual. Under the condition of mass measurement, the accuracy and efficiency could be gradually degraded along with fatigue of experienced staff. Thus, manual measurement, including counting and recording, is not only time consuming but also lack objectivity. To automate this process, we developed a high-throughput facility, dubbed high-throughput system for measuring automatically rice tillers (H-SMART), for measuring rice tillers based on a conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) system and industrial conveyor. Each pot-grown rice plant was delivered into the CT system for scanning via the conveyor equipment. A filtered back-projection algorithm was used to reconstruct the transverse section image of the rice culms. The number of tillers was then automatically extracted by image segmentation. To evaluate the accuracy of this system, three batches of rice at different growth stages (tillering, heading, or filling) were tested, yielding absolute mean absolute errors of 0.22, 0.36, and 0.36, respectively. Subsequently, the complete machine was used under industry conditions to estimate its efficiency, which was 4320 pots per continuous 24 h workday. Thus, the H-SMART could determine the number of tillers of pot-grown rice plants, providing three advantages over the manual tillering method: absence of human disturbance, automation, and high throughput. This facility expands the application of agricultural photonics in plant phenomics.

  12. Nuclear and Chloroplast DNA Variation Provides Insights into Population Structure and Multiple Origin of Native Aromatic Rices of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pritesh Sundar; Rao, Gundimeda Jwala Narasimha; Jena, Sudipta; Samal, Rashmita; Patnaik, Ashok; Patnaik, Sasank Sekhar Chyau; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad Namdeorao; Sharma, Srigopal; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2016-01-01

    A large number of short grain aromatic rice suited to the agro-climatic conditions and local preferences are grown in niche areas of different parts of India and their diversity is evolved over centuries as a result of selection by traditional farmers. Systematic characterization of these specialty rices has not been attempted. An effort was made to characterize 126 aromatic short grain rice landraces, collected from 19 different districts in the State of Odisha, from eastern India. High level of variation for grain quality and agronomic traits among these aromatic rices was observed and genotypes having desirable phenotypic traits like erect flag leaf, thick culm, compact and dense panicles, short plant stature, early duration, superior yield and grain quality traits were identified. A total of 24 SSR markers corresponding to the hyper variable regions of rice chromosomes were used to understand the genetic diversity and to establish the genetic relationship among the aromatic short grain rice landraces at nuclear genome level. SSR analysis of 126 genotypes from Odisha and 10 genotypes from other states revealed 110 alleles with an average of 4.583 and the Nei's genetic diversity value (He) was in the range of 0.034-0.880 revealing two sub-populations SP 1 (membership percentage-27.1%) and SP 2 (72.9%). At the organelle genomic level for the C/A repeats in PS1D sequence of chloroplasts, eight different plastid sub types and 33 haplotypes were detected. The japonica (Nipponbare) subtype (6C7A) was detected in 100 genotypes followed by O. rufipogon (KF428978) subtype (6C6A) in 13 genotypes while indica (93-11) sub type (8C8A) was seen in 14 genotypes. The tree constructed based on haplotypes suggests that short grain aromatic landraces might have independent origin of these plastid subtypes. Notably a wide range of diversity was observed among these landraces cultivated in different parts confined to the State of Odisha. PMID:27598392

  13. Selenate-enriched urea granules are a highly effective fertilizer for selenium biofortification of paddy rice grain.

    PubMed

    Premarathna, Lakmalie; McLaughlin, Mike J; Kirby, Jason K; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Stacey, Samuel; Chittleborough, David J

    2012-06-13

    This study examined the effects of applied selenium (Se) species, time of application, method of application, and soil water management regimen on the accumulation of Se in rice plants. Plants were grown to maturity in a temperature- and humidity-controlled growth chamber using three water management methods: field capacity (FC), submerged until harvest, and submerged and drained 2 weeks before harvest. Two Se species, selenate (SeO4(2-)) and selenite (SeO3(2-)), were applied at a rate equivalent to 30 g ha(-1). Four application methods were employed as follows: (i) Se applied at soil preparation, (ii) Se-enriched urea granules applied to floodwater at heading; (iii) foliar Se applied at heading; and (iv) fluid fertilizer Se applied to soil or floodwater at heading. Total Se concentrations in rice grains, husks, leaves, culms, and roots were measured, as well as Se speciation in grains from the Se-enriched urea granule treatment. Highest Se concentrations in the grain occurred with SeO4(2-) and with fertilizer applied at heading stage; SeO4(2-)-enriched urea granules applied at heading increased grain Se concentrations 5-6-fold (by 450-600 μg kg(-1)) compared to the control (no fertilizer Se applied) in all water treatments. Under paddy conditions other Se fertilization strategies were much less effective. Drainage before harvesting caused Se to accumulate in/on rice roots, possibly through adsorption onto iron plaque on roots. Rice grains contained Se mainly in the organic form as selenomethionine (SeM), which comprised >90% of the total grain Se in treatments fertilized with SeO4(2-)-enriched urea granules. The results of this study clearly show that of the fertilizer strategies tested biofortification of Se in rice grains can best be achieved in lowland rice by broadcast application of SeO4(2-)-enriched urea granules to floodwater at heading stage.

  14. High-throughput measurement of rice tillers using a conveyor equipped with x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanneng; Xu, Xiaochun; Duan, Lingfeng; Luo, Qingming; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian

    2011-02-01

    Tillering is one of the most important agronomic traits because the number of shoots per plant determines panicle number, a key component of grain yield. The conventional method of counting tillers is still manual. Under the condition of mass measurement, the accuracy and efficiency could be gradually degraded along with fatigue of experienced staff. Thus, manual measurement, including counting and recording, is not only time consuming but also lack objectivity. To automate this process, we developed a high-throughput facility, dubbed high-throughput system for measuring automatically rice tillers (H-SMART), for measuring rice tillers based on a conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) system and industrial conveyor. Each pot-grown rice plant was delivered into the CT system for scanning via the conveyor equipment. A filtered back-projection algorithm was used to reconstruct the transverse section image of the rice culms. The number of tillers was then automatically extracted by image segmentation. To evaluate the accuracy of this system, three batches of rice at different growth stages (tillering, heading, or filling) were tested, yielding absolute mean absolute errors of 0.22, 0.36, and 0.36, respectively. Subsequently, the complete machine was used under industry conditions to estimate its efficiency, which was 4320 pots per continuous 24 h workday. Thus, the H-SMART could determine the number of tillers of pot-grown rice plants, providing three advantages over the manual tillering method: absence of human disturbance, automation, and high throughput. This facility expands the application of agricultural photonics in plant phenomics.

  15. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  16. Peripartum anesthetic management of a patient with brittle cornea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ioscovich, A; Grisaru-Granovsky, S; Halpern, S; Shapiro, Y

    2011-03-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that affects the connective tissue. The syndrome is caused by genetic changes in the 4.7-Mb interval between the D16S3423 and D16S3425 markers on the 16q24 chromosome and mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 gene (ZNF469). BCS is characterized by thin and fragile cornea that tends to perforate spontaneously or as a result of minor trauma to the eye. In addition, the patient usually suffers from hearing loss, mental retardation, hyperextensibility of skin and joints, as well as varying degrees of scoliosis. This phenotypical expression presents an interesting challenge to anesthetic care. We briefly present the perioperative management of a patient with BCS who underwent three cesarean sections. PMID:21258811

  17. Brittle fracture in associative polymers: the case of ionomer melts.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Aamir; Huang, Qian; Chen, Quan; Colby, Ralph H; Alvarez, Nicolas J; Hassager, Ole

    2016-09-28

    Ionomers are interesting due to their applications in coatings, adhesives, films and packaging materials. A study of the underlying mechanisms for fracture in ionomers is consequently of both practical as well as theoretical interest. In this study, we employ high speed imaging coupled with uniaxial extensional rheometry to delineate the mechanics leading to the brittle fracture of ionomer melts. When these ionomers are elongated at a rate higher than the inverse relaxation time of physical crosslinks, an edge fracture occurs at a critical stress. Parabolic fracture profiles provide evidence that the phenomenon is purely elastic and bulk dissipation has little impact on the crack profile. Experimental results are interpreted within the Griffiths theory for linear elastic materials and the de Gennes theory for viscoelastic materials.

  18. Brittle fracture in associative polymers: the case of ionomer melts.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Aamir; Huang, Qian; Chen, Quan; Colby, Ralph H; Alvarez, Nicolas J; Hassager, Ole

    2016-09-28

    Ionomers are interesting due to their applications in coatings, adhesives, films and packaging materials. A study of the underlying mechanisms for fracture in ionomers is consequently of both practical as well as theoretical interest. In this study, we employ high speed imaging coupled with uniaxial extensional rheometry to delineate the mechanics leading to the brittle fracture of ionomer melts. When these ionomers are elongated at a rate higher than the inverse relaxation time of physical crosslinks, an edge fracture occurs at a critical stress. Parabolic fracture profiles provide evidence that the phenomenon is purely elastic and bulk dissipation has little impact on the crack profile. Experimental results are interpreted within the Griffiths theory for linear elastic materials and the de Gennes theory for viscoelastic materials. PMID:27539982

  19. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  20. Methods for assessing the structural reliability of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiman, S. W. (Editor); Hudson, C. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Failure from contact-induced surface flaws is considered along with controlled indentation flaws for construction of toughness and fatigue master maps, fatigue properties of ceramics with natural and controlled flaws, and a statistical analysis of size and stress state effects on the strength of an alumina ceramic. Attention is also given to dynamic and static fatigue of a machinable glass ceramic, the effect of multiregion crack growth on proof testing, and a fracture mechanics analysis of defect sizes. Other topics explored are related to the effect of temperature and humidity on delayed failure of optical glass fibers, subthreshold indentation flaws in the study of fatigue properties of ultrahigh-strength glass, the lifetime prediction for hot-pressed silicon nitride at high temperatures, static fatigue in high-performance ceramics, and requirements for flexure testing of brittle materials.

  1. Design with brittle materials - An interdisciplinary educational program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. I.; Bollard, R. J. H.; Hartz, B. J.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Love, W. J.; Scott, W. D.; Taggart, R.; Whittemore, O. J.

    1980-01-01

    A series of interdisciplinary design courses being offered to senior and graduate engineering students at the University of Washington is described. Attention is given to the concepts and some of the details on group design projects that have been undertaken during the past two years. It is noted that ceramic materials normally demonstrate a large scatter in strength properties. As a consequence, when designing with these materials, the conventional 'mil standards' design stresses with acceptable margins of safety cannot by employed and the designer is forced to accept a probable number of failures in structures of a given brittle material. It is this prediction of the probability of failure for structures of given, well-characterized materials that forms the basis for this series of courses.

  2. New probability distribution for the strength of brittle fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Black, C.M.; Durham, S.D.; Lynch, J.D.; Padgett, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    Brittle fibers, used in modern fibrous composite materials, are found in many structures such as ships, airplanes, swimming pools, etc.These fibers are commonly made from materials such as boron, glass, and carbon. There can be substantial benefits in using fiber composites rather than the traditional materials such as metal and wood, including lighter weight and added stiffness. For example, seventy-five to eighty percent of a projected Grumman aircraft will be constructed from carbon fiber composites. This will reduce the weight of the structure by an estimated 26 percent (Gordon, 1988). However, the intrinsic tensile strength per unit volume of most fibers is less than that of most metals. Their strength is a function of their microstructure, the fiber length, and the number and types of flaws in the fiber. (JS)

  3. Using Brittle Fragmentation Theory to represent Aerosol Mineral Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Improved estimates of dust aerosol effects upon climate require the characterization of dust mineral and chemical composition. Regional variations in soil mineral composition lead to variations in dust aerosol composition. Yet, deriving aerosol mineral content also requires knowledge of the parent soil size distribution along with the fragmentation of soil particles and aggregates during the emission process. These processes modify the size distribution and mineral abundance of the emitted aerosols compared to the parent soil. An additional challenge for modeling is that global atlases of soil texture and composition are based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates, particularly phyllosilicates, that are encountered in natural soils, drastically altering the original size distribution of the soil that is subject to wind erosion. We propose both a semi-empirical and theoretical method to constrain the size-resolved mineral composition of emitted dust aerosols based on global atlases of soil texture and composition. Our semi-empirical method re-aggregates clay phyllosilicate minerals into larger soil particle sizes and constrains the size distribution of each emitted mineral based on observed mineral distributions at the source. Our theoretical method extends Kok's brittle fragmentation theory to individual minerals. To this end we reconstruct the undisturbed size distribution for each mineral as a function of soil texture and soil type and calculate the emitted size distribution applying brittle fragmentation and assuming homogeneous fragmentation properties among the mineral aggregates. These approaches were tested within the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE. We discuss the improvements achieved and suggest future developments.

  4. Research in rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1999, 2.4-3 million acres of rice were planted annually nationwide. Rice fields are a major component of the contemporary landscapes in the Gulf Coastal Plain, the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, and Central Valley of California. In 1998, approximately 600,000 acres of rice were planted in Louisiana. In the Louisiana plant commodities report for 1998, total value for rice was over $350 million; sugarcane was the only plant commodity that exceeded this value. Louisiana has over 2,000 rice farmers supporting over 12,000 jobs in the state. Rice fields in the United States receive high use by wildlife, especially shorebirds, wading birds, and waterfowl. Waterbirds use rice fields for food, shelter, and breeding habitat.

  5. Extraction of light filth from rice flours, extruded rice products, and rice paper: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Dent, R G

    1982-09-01

    Two new methods were developed for the extraction of rodent hairs and insect fragments from rice products: one for rice flour and one for extruded rice products and rice paper. A 100 g sample of rice flour was extracted with mineral oil-40% isopropanol, followed by a water phase as needed for additional cycles. For extruded rice products and rice paper, a 225 g sample of each was initially extracted as above, followed by a single extraction with mineral oil-20% isopropanol. Both methods used an acid hydrolysis pretreatment followed by wet sieving and a percolator extraction. Average rodent hair recoveries were 77.8% for rice flour and 82.2% for extruded rice products and rice paper. Average insect fragment recoveries were 89.6% for rice flour and 91.9% for extruded rice products and rice paper. Both methods were adopted official first action. PMID:7130079

  6. Mechanism of methane transport from the rhizosphere to the atmosphere through rice plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nouchi, Isamu ); Mariko, Shigeru ); Aoki, Kazuyuki )

    1990-09-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of methane transport from the rhizosphere into the atmosphere through rice plants (Oryza sativa L.), the methane emission rate was measured from a shoot whose roots had been kept in a culture solution with a high methane concentration or exposed to methane gas in the gas phase by using a cylindrical chamber. No clear correlation was observed between change in the transpiration rate and that in the methane emission rate. Methane was mostly released from the culm, which is an aggregation of leaf sheaths, but not from the leaf blade. Micropores which are different from stomata were newly found at the abaxial epidermis of the leaf sheath by scanning electron microscopy. The measured methane emission rate was much higher than the calculated methane emission rate that would result from transpiration and the methane concentration in the culture solution. Rice roots absorb methane gas in the gas phase without water uptake. These results suggest that methane dissolved in the soil water surrounding the roots diffuses into the cell-wall water of the root cells, gasifies in the root cortex, and then is mostly released through the micropores in the leaf sheaths.

  7. Activation of Big Grain1 significantly improves grain size by regulating auxin transport in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linchuan; Tong, Hongning; Xiao, Yunhua; Che, Ronghui; Xu, Fan; Hu, Bin; Liang, Chengzhen; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Jiayang; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-09-01

    Grain size is one of the key factors determining grain yield. However, it remains largely unknown how grain size is regulated by developmental signals. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a dominant mutant big grain1 (Bg1-D) that shows an extra-large grain phenotype from our rice T-DNA insertion population. Overexpression of BG1 leads to significantly increased grain size, and the severe lines exhibit obviously perturbed gravitropism. In addition, the mutant has increased sensitivities to both auxin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, whereas knockdown of BG1 results in decreased sensitivities and smaller grains. Moreover, BG1 is specifically induced by auxin treatment, preferentially expresses in the vascular tissue of culms and young panicles, and encodes a novel membrane-localized protein, strongly suggesting its role in regulating auxin transport. Consistent with this finding, the mutant has increased auxin basipetal transport and altered auxin distribution, whereas the knockdown plants have decreased auxin transport. Manipulation of BG1 in both rice and Arabidopsis can enhance plant biomass, seed weight, and yield. Taking these data together, we identify a novel positive regulator of auxin response and transport in a crop plant and demonstrate its role in regulating grain size, thus illuminating a new strategy to improve plant productivity. PMID:26283354

  8. Rice shoot branching requires an ATP-binding cassette subfamily G protein.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Naoko; Takamure, Itsuro; Kidou, Shin-ichiro; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Ureshi, An-na; Funabiki, Atsushi; Ashikaga, Kazunori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yano, Masahiro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2009-01-01

    * Shoot branching is important for the establishment of plant architecture and productivity. * Here, characterization of rice (Oryza sativa) reduced culm number 1 (rcn1) mutants revealed that Rcn1 positively controls shoot branching by promoting the outgrowth of lateral shoots. Molecular studies revealed that Rcn1 encodes a novel member of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily G (ABCG subfamily), also known as the white-brown complex (WBC) subfamily, and is designated OsABCG5. * Rcn1 is expressed in leaf primordia of main and axillary shoots, and in the vascular cells and leaf epidermis of older leaves. In addition, Rcn1 is expressed in the crown root primordia, endodermis, pericycle and stele in the root. No effect on Rcn1 expression in shoots or roots was seen when the roots were treated with auxins. Phenotypic analyses of rcn1 and tillering dwarf 3 (d3) double mutants at the seedling stage clarified that Rcn1 works independently of D3 in the branching inhibitor pathway. * Rcn1 is the first functionally defined plant ABCG protein gene that controls shoot branching and could thus be significant in future breeding for high-yielding rice. PMID:19140940

  9. Activation of Big Grain1 significantly improves grain size by regulating auxin transport in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linchuan; Tong, Hongning; Xiao, Yunhua; Che, Ronghui; Xu, Fan; Hu, Bin; Liang, Chengzhen; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Jiayang; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-09-01

    Grain size is one of the key factors determining grain yield. However, it remains largely unknown how grain size is regulated by developmental signals. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a dominant mutant big grain1 (Bg1-D) that shows an extra-large grain phenotype from our rice T-DNA insertion population. Overexpression of BG1 leads to significantly increased grain size, and the severe lines exhibit obviously perturbed gravitropism. In addition, the mutant has increased sensitivities to both auxin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, whereas knockdown of BG1 results in decreased sensitivities and smaller grains. Moreover, BG1 is specifically induced by auxin treatment, preferentially expresses in the vascular tissue of culms and young panicles, and encodes a novel membrane-localized protein, strongly suggesting its role in regulating auxin transport. Consistent with this finding, the mutant has increased auxin basipetal transport and altered auxin distribution, whereas the knockdown plants have decreased auxin transport. Manipulation of BG1 in both rice and Arabidopsis can enhance plant biomass, seed weight, and yield. Taking these data together, we identify a novel positive regulator of auxin response and transport in a crop plant and demonstrate its role in regulating grain size, thus illuminating a new strategy to improve plant productivity.

  10. Activation of Big Grain1 significantly improves grain size by regulating auxin transport in rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linchuan; Tong, Hongning; Xiao, Yunhua; Che, Ronghui; Xu, Fan; Hu, Bin; Liang, Chengzhen; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Jiayang; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-01-01

    Grain size is one of the key factors determining grain yield. However, it remains largely unknown how grain size is regulated by developmental signals. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a dominant mutant big grain1 (Bg1-D) that shows an extra-large grain phenotype from our rice T-DNA insertion population. Overexpression of BG1 leads to significantly increased grain size, and the severe lines exhibit obviously perturbed gravitropism. In addition, the mutant has increased sensitivities to both auxin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, whereas knockdown of BG1 results in decreased sensitivities and smaller grains. Moreover, BG1 is specifically induced by auxin treatment, preferentially expresses in the vascular tissue of culms and young panicles, and encodes a novel membrane-localized protein, strongly suggesting its role in regulating auxin transport. Consistent with this finding, the mutant has increased auxin basipetal transport and altered auxin distribution, whereas the knockdown plants have decreased auxin transport. Manipulation of BG1 in both rice and Arabidopsis can enhance plant biomass, seed weight, and yield. Taking these data together, we identify a novel positive regulator of auxin response and transport in a crop plant and demonstrate its role in regulating grain size, thus illuminating a new strategy to improve plant productivity. PMID:26283354

  11. Characterization and molecular cloning of a serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (OsSHM1) in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dekai; Liu, Heqin; Li, Sujuan; Zhai, Guowei; Shao, Jianfeng; Tao, Yuezhi

    2015-09-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is important for one carbon metabolism and photorespiration in higher plants for its participation in plant growth and development, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. A rice serine hydroxymethyltransferase gene, OsSHM1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis SHM1, was isolated using map-based cloning. The osshm1 mutant had chlorotic lesions and a considerably smaller, lethal phenotype under natural ambient CO2 concentrations, but could be restored to wild type with normal growth under elevated CO2 levels (0.5% CO2 ), showing a typical photorespiratory phenotype. The data from antioxidant enzymes activity measurement suggested that osshm1 was subjected to significant oxidative stress. Also, OsSHM1 was expressed in all organs tested (root, culm, leaf, and young panicle) but predominantly in leaves. OsSHM1 protein is localized to the mitochondria. Our study suggested that molecular function of the OsSHM1 gene is conserved in rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:25641188

  12. Semi-brittle flow of granitoid fault rocks in experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, Matej; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée.; Drury, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Field studies and seismic data show that semi-brittle flow of fault rocks probably is the dominant deformation mechanism at the base of the seismogenic zone at the so-called frictional-viscous transition. To understand the physical and chemical processes accommodating semi-brittle flow, we have performed an experimental study on synthetic granitoid fault rocks exploring a broad parameter space (temperature, T = 300, 400, 500, and 600°C, confining pressure, Pc ≈ 300, 500, 1000, and 1500 MPa, shear strain rate, γṡ ≈ 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, and 10-6 s-1, to finite shear strains, γ = 0-5). The experiments have been carried out using a granular material with grain size smaller than 200 µm with a little H2O added (0.2 wt %). Only two experiments (performed at the fastest strain rates and lowest temperatures) have failed abruptly right after reaching peak strength (τ ~ 1400 MPa). All other samples reach high shear stresses (τ ~ 570-1600 MPa) then weaken slightly (by Δτ ~ 10-190 MPa) and continue to deform at a more or less steady state stress level. Clear temperature dependence and a weak strain rate dependence of the peak as well as steady state stress levels are observed. In order to express this relationship, the strain rate-stress sensitivity has been fit with a stress exponent, assuming γ˙ ∝ τn and yields high stress exponents (n ≈ 10-140), which decrease with increasing temperature. The microstructures show widespread comminution, strain partitioning, and localization into slip zones. The slip zones contain at first nanocrystalline and partly amorphous material. Later, during continued deformation, fully amorphous material develops in some of the slip zones. Despite the mechanical steady state conditions, the fabrics in the slip zones and outside continue to evolve and do not reach a steady state microstructure below γ = 5. Within the slip zones, the fault rock material progressively transforms from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. We

  13. SAFOD Brittle Microstructure and Mechanics Knowledge Base (BM2KB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, Hassan A.; Broda Cindi, M.; Hadizadeh, Jafar; Kumar, Anuj

    2013-07-01

    Scientific drilling near Parkfield, California has established the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), which provides the solid earth community with short range geophysical and fault zone material data. The BM2KB ontology was developed in order to formalize the knowledge about brittle microstructures in the fault rocks sampled from the SAFOD cores. A knowledge base, instantiated from this domain ontology, stores and presents the observed microstructural and analytical data with respect to implications for brittle deformation and mechanics of faulting. These data can be searched on the knowledge base‧s Web interface by selecting a set of terms (classes, properties) from different drop-down lists that are dynamically populated from the ontology. In addition to this general search, a query can also be conducted to view data contributed by a specific investigator. A search by sample is done using the EarthScope SAFOD Core Viewer that allows a user to locate samples on high resolution images of core sections belonging to different runs and holes. The class hierarchy of the BM2KB ontology was initially designed using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which was used as a visual guide to develop the ontology in OWL applying the Protégé ontology editor. Various Semantic Web technologies such as the RDF, RDFS, and OWL ontology languages, SPARQL query language, and Pellet reasoning engine, were used to develop the ontology. An interactive Web application interface was developed through Jena, a java based framework, with AJAX technology, jsp pages, and java servlets, and deployed via an Apache tomcat server. The interface allows the registered user to submit data related to their research on a sample of the SAFOD core. The submitted data, after initial review by the knowledge base administrator, are added to the extensible knowledge base and become available in subsequent queries to all types of users. The interface facilitates inference capabilities in the

  14. Brittle-tough transitions during crack growth in toughened adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoules, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The use of structural adhesives in automotive applications relies on an effective understanding of their performance under crash conditions. In particular, there is considerable potential for mechanics-based modeling of the interaction between an adhesive layer and the adherends, to replace current empirical approaches to design. Since energy dissipation during a crash, mediated by plastic deformation of the structure, is a primary consideration for automotive applications, traditional approaches of fracture mechanics are not appropriate. Cohesive-zone models that use two fracture parameters - cohesive strength and toughness - have been shown to provide a method for quantitative mechanics analysis. Combined numerical and experimental techniques have been developed to deduce the toughness and strength parameters of adhesive layers, allowing qualitative modeling of the performance of adhesive joints. These techniques have been used to study the failure of joints, formed from a toughened adhesive and sheet metal, over a wide range of loading rates. Two fracture modes are observed: quasi-static crack growth and dynamic crack growth. The quasi-static crack growth is associated with a toughened mode of failure; the dynamic crack growth is associated with a more brittle mode of failure. The results of the experiments and analyses indicate that the fracture parameters for quasi-static crack growth in this toughened system are essentially rate independent, and that quasi-static crack growth can occur even at the highest crack velocities. Effects of rate appear to be limited to the ease with which a transition to dynamic fracture could be triggered. This transition appears to be stochastic in nature, and it does not appear to be associated with the attainment of any critical value for crack velocity or loading rate. Fracture-mechanics models exist in the literature for brittle-ductile transitions in rate-dependent polymers, which rely on rate dependent values of toughness

  15. Dietary antioxidants and magnesium in type 1 brittle asthma: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J; Tunnicliffe, W; Duncanson, R; Ayres, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Type 1 brittle asthma is a rare form of asthma. Atopy, psychosocial factors and diet may contribute to this condition. As increased dietary magnesium has a beneficial effect on lung function and selenium, vitamins A, C and E have antioxidant properties, a study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that patients with brittle asthma have diets deficient in these nutrients compared with subjects with non-brittle asthma and healthy adults.
METHODS—A case control study of the dietary intakes of 20 subjects with brittle asthma, 20 with non-brittle asthma, and 20 healthy adults was performed using five day weighed dietary records. Intake of magnesium was the primary outcome measure with selenium and vitamins A, C and E as secondary outcomes. Serum levels were measured at the same time as the dietary assessment.
RESULTS—Sixty subjects (27 men) of mean age 49.5 years were recruited and completed the study. Subjects with brittle asthma had statistically lower median dietary intakes of vitamins A and E than the other groups (vitamin A: brittle asthma 522.5 µg/day, non-brittle asthma 869.5 µg/day, healthy adults 806.5 µg/day; vitamin E: brittle asthma 4.3 mg/day, non-brittle asthma 4.6 mg/day, healthy adults 4.5 mg/day). Median dietary intakes for the other nutrients were not significantly different between groups. Serum levels were within normal ranges for each nutrient in all subjects. Intakes less than the reference nutrient intake (RNI) for magnesium and vitamins A and C, and less than the safe intake (SI) for vitamin E were more likely in patients with brittle asthma than in those with non-brittle asthma.
CONCLUSION—Nutrient deficiency and reduced antioxidant activity may contribute to disease activity in type 1 brittle asthma, although a prospective study of replacement therapy will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

 PMID:10325914

  16. Biology and epidemiology of rice viruses.

    PubMed

    Hibino, H

    1996-01-01

    The 15 known viruses that occur in rice are rice black-streaked dwarf, rice bunchy stunt, rice dwarf, rice gall dwarf, rice giallume, rice grassy stunt, rice hoja blanca, rice necrosis mosaic, rice ragged stunt, rice stripe necrosis, rice stripe, rice transitory yellowing, rice tungro bacilliform, rice tungro spherical, and rice yellow mottle viruses. This paper describes their geographical distribution, relation to vectors, infection cycles, field dispersal, and development, and lists recorded outbreaks of the viruses. Many rice viruses have become serious problems since rice cultivation has been intensified. Double-cropping of rice using improved, photo-insensitive cultivars of short growth duration has significantly influenced the incidence of these viruses. PMID:15012543

  17. Fracture toughness of brittle materials determined with chevron notch specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Bursey, R. T.; Munz, D.; Pierce, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The use of chevron-notch specimens for determining the plane strain fracture toughness (K sub Ic) of brittle materials is discussed. Three chevron-notch specimens were investigated: short bar, short rod, and four-point-bend. The dimensionless stress intensity coefficient used in computing K sub Ic is derived for the short bar specimen from the superposition of ligament-dependent and ligament-independent solutions for the straight through crack, and also from experimental compliance calibrations. Coefficients for the four-point-bend specimen were developed by the same superposition procedure, and with additional refinement using the slice model of Bluhm. Short rod specimen stress intensity coefficients were determined only by experimental compliance calibration. Performance of the three chevron-notch specimens and their stress intensity factor relations were evaluated by tests on hot-pressed silicon nitride and sintered aluminum oxide. Results obtained with the short bar and the four-point-bend specimens on silicon nitride are in good agreement and relatively free of specimen geometry and size effects within the range investigated. Results on aluminum oxide were affected by specimen size and chevron-notch geometry, believed due to a rising crack growth resistance curve for the material. Only the results for the short bar specimen are presented in detail.

  18. Thermal stress fracture in elastic-brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    The reported investigation shows that the assessment of the possibility of the thermal fracture of brittle materials depends upon an accurate evaluation of the thermal stresses and the determination of the resulting stress intensity factors. The stress intensity factors can be calculated in a variety of ways ranging from the very precise to approximate, but only for a limited number of geometries. The main difficulty is related to the determination of the thermal stress field because of its unusual character and its dependence upon boundary conditions at points far from the region of thermal activity. Examination of a number of examples suggests that the best visualization of the thermal stresses and any associated fracture can be made by considering the problem to be the combination of thermal and isothermal problems or by considering that the prime effect of the temperature is in the generation of thermal strains and that the thermal stresses are simply the result of the region trying to accommodate these strains.

  19. Brittle fracture in a periodic structure with internal potential energy

    PubMed Central

    Mishuris, Gennady S.; Slepyan, Leonid I.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a brittle fracture taking account of self-equilibrated distributed stresses existing at microlevel in the absence of external forces. To determine how the latter can affect the crack equilibrium and growth, a model of a structured linearly elastic body is introduced, consisting of two equal symmetrically arranged layers (or half-planes) connected by an interface as a prospective crack path. The interface comprises a discrete set of elastic bonds. In the initial state, the bonds are assumed to be stressed in such a way that tensile and compressive forces of the same value alternate. In the general considerations, the layers are assumed to be of an unspecified periodic structure, where such self-equilibrated stresses may also exist. A two-line chain and a lattice are examined as the specified structure. We consider the states of the body-with-a-crack under such microlevel stresses (MS) and under a combined action of the remote forces and MS. Analytical solutions to the considered problems are presented based on the introduction of a selective discrete transform. We demonstrate that MS can increase as well as decrease the crack resistance depending on the internal energy level. We also discuss different scenarios of the crack growth. PMID:24808756

  20. A numerical analysis of crack growth in brittle microcracking composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-04-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was performed to elucidate the mechanism of microcracking on the observed fracture behavior of brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results indicate that the energy expenditure due the microcrack nucleation seems not to contribute significantly to the resistance to crack growth. The main controlling parameter appears to be elastic interaction of the microcracks with the main crack in the absence of a reinforcing phase; therefore, the microcrack density plays an important role. In the case of the composites, the interaction of the main crack with the stress fields of the reinforcing phase, rather than interaction of microcracks, is the controlling parameter for the resistance to the crack growth even in the presence of a large population of microcracks. It will be also shown that the crack branching and crack kinking can readily develop as a result of microcracking.

  1. Experiments on oblique rifting in brittle-ductile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tron, Virginie; Brun, Jean-Pierre

    1991-03-01

    Oblique rifting arises when the bulk extension direction is not perpendicular to the boundaries of a deforming zone. Several scale experiments of oblique rifting acting on a brittle-ductile system are here presented. Models are two-layer slabs of sand and silicone. Uniaxial stretching is applied oblique to the external boundaries ( α = 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°). Resulting fault patterns are analysed on both the free surface and serial cross-sections. In the experiments oblique rifting is characterized by en-echelon fault patterns, mean fault trends not perpendicular to the stretching vector, and mean initial fault dips higher than for dip-slip normal faults. For low obliquity rifting (α ⩾ 45°) curved faults are frequent, displacement along them varying from dip-slip to dominantly strike-slip. For high obliquity rifting (α < 45°) motion is partitioned amongst distinct families of oblique-slip faults and strike-slip faults.

  2. Simulating Brittle Fracture of Rocks using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajarshi; Cleary, Paul W.

    2009-05-01

    Numerical modelling can assist in understanding and predicting complex fracture processes. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a particle-based Lagrangian method that is particularly suited to the analysis of fracture due to its capacity to model large deformation and to track free surfaces generated. A damage model is used to predict the fracture of elastic solids. The damage parameter represents the volume-averaged micro-fracture of the volume of material represented by an SPH particle. Evolution of damage is predicted using the strain history of each particle. Damage inhibits the transmission of tensile stress between particles, and once it reaches unity, the interface becomes unable to transmit tensile stress, resulting in a macro-crack. Connected macro-cracks lead to complete fragmentation. In this paper, we explore the ability of an SPH-based damage model to predict brittle fracture of rocks during impact. Rock shape is found to have considerable influence on the fracture process, the fragment sizes, the energy dissipation during impact, and the post-fracture motion of the fragments.

  3. A Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology for sea ice modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansereau, Véronique; Weiss, Jérôme; Saramito, Pierre; Lattes, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    A new rheological model is developed that builds on an elasto-brittle (EB) framework used for sea ice and rock mechanics, with the intent of representing both the small elastic deformations associated with fracturing processes and the larger deformations occurring along the faults/leads once the material is highly damaged and fragmented. A viscous-like relaxation term is added to the linear-elastic constitutive law together with an effective viscosity that evolves according to the local level of damage of the material, like its elastic modulus. The coupling between the level of damage and both mechanical parameters is such that within an undamaged ice cover the viscosity is infinitely large and deformations are strictly elastic, while along highly damaged zones the elastic modulus vanishes and most of the stress is dissipated through permanent deformations. A healing mechanism is also introduced, counterbalancing the effects of damaging over large timescales. In this new model, named Maxwell-EB after the Maxwell rheology, the irreversible and reversible deformations are solved for simultaneously; hence drift velocities are defined naturally. First idealized simulations without advection show that the model reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics and deformation: strain localization, anisotropy, intermittency and associated scaling laws.

  4. Delayed brittle-like fragmentation of vesicular magma analogue by decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Masaharu; Ichihara, Mie; Shimanuki, Susumu; Okabe, Wataru; Shida, Tsukasa

    2013-05-01

    A rapid decompression experiment using syrup containing gas bubbles was conducted in order to clarify the fragmentation of vesicular magma, which is a key phenomenon in volcanic eruptions. We focus on brittle-like fragmentation, which occurs with a longer time scale than brittle fragmentation. The response of the bubbly syrup to the decompression for various viscosities and porosities was tested under various initial pressures, pressure differences, and decompression times. The response observed by high-speed photography was classified using the Deborah number DeDT, which is defined as the ratio of the viscoelastic relaxation time of the syrup to the decompression time, the maximum differential stress at the bubble surface Δσmax, and a measure of instantaneous brittleness at the bubble surface βc at the time when the differential stress at the surface reaches the critical fracture stress Δσc. In a number of the experimental runs in which both DeDT and βc indicated ductile response of the material, brittle-like fragmentation occurred when Δσmax substantially exceeded Δσc. For all of the runs in which brittle-like fragmentation was observed, the onset of fragmentation was delayed substantially from the relaxation time, whereas the onset occurred within the characteristic time for viscous expansion of the bubbles. In many cases of brittle-like fragmentation, fragmentation continued after the onset triggered by a single decompression event. Detailed analysis indicates that brittle-like fragmentation started with a sudden release of the gas in the bubbly syrup through a surface crack, which might lead to an increase in local brittleness. Magma fragmentation may be viewed as sequential brittle-like fragmentation. This view may provide an explanation for the observed time delay for the onset of an explosive eruption after a triggering decompression event.

  5. Determinants for grading Malaysian rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChePa, Noraziah; Yusoff, Nooraini; Ahmad, Norhayati

    2016-08-01

    Due to un-uniformity of rice grading practices in Malaysia, zones which actively producing rice in Malaysia are using their own way of grading rice. Rice grading is important in determining rice quality and its subsequent price in the market. It is an important process applied in the rice production industry with the purpose of ensuring that the rice produced for the market meets the quality requirements of consumer. Two important aspects that need to be considered in determining rice grades are grading technique and determinants to be used for grading (usually referred as rice attributes). This article proposes the list of determinants to be used in grading Malaysian rice. Determinants were explored through combination of extensive literature review and series of interview with the domain experts and practitioners. The proposed determinants are believed to be beneficial to BERNAS in improving the current Malaysian rice grading process.

  6. A Brittle-Ductile Transition Preserved in the Sierra Crest Shear Zone, Sierra Nevada, CA: a Natural Laboratory for Examining Rheologically-Controlled Brittle and Ductile Deformation Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, S.; Paterson, S. R.; Hartman, S. M.; Jiang, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Sierra Crest shear zone (SCSZ), an ~300 km long Late Cretaceous dextral transpressive ductile-brittle shear system in the eastern central Sierra Nevada, CA partitioned tectonic boundary conditions during a fundamental rheological transition in the upper crust from ductile to brittle deformation due to the exhumation and cooling of the arc. The SCSZ represents a well-exposed and data-rich 'natural laboratory' to study the mechanisms driving evolving strain partitioning and rheology. The SCSZ transitioned from a broad swath of partitioned ductile shear zones, comprised of anastomosing simple shear dominated zones separated by pure shear dominated domains, to a complex partitioned brittle fault system, expressed as brittle slip, veining, brecciation, and pseudotachylyte formation along discrete structures, as arc magmatism shut down, the arc cooled, and exhumation rates increased. Previous studies have documented evolving deformation partitioning in the ductile system indicated by variable fabric development ranging from preserved bedding to mylonites, the spread of lineation orientations, and variable kinematics. Multi-generational brittle fabrics that are variably ductilely deformed and the orientation of 1st and 2nd order brittle structures, both concordant and discordant with ductile shears, indicate that partitioning also evolved during the complex rheological transition. Structural, strain, P-T-t, geochronologic, and field data provide controls on parameters (e.g. lithology, fluids, strain, preexisting structure, timing, P-T conditions) needed to model the development of the SCSZ in anisotropic crust undergoing a transition in rheology and tectonic boundary conditions. As rheological heterogeneity will lead to deformation partitioning throughout intervening scales, it is unrealistic to apply single scale models to this investigation. Thus, we propose to compare the above observations to predictions made by a model (MOPLA; Jiang, 2014) of progressive

  7. Modeling the comminution and flow of granular brittle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, D. R.; Cooper, T.

    2003-09-01

    Penetration weapons or explosive charges in brittle materials (such as ceramics or hard rock) cause fracture and fragmentation near the cavity boundary to produce a bed of fragmented or granulated material. Subsequent large shear deformation and flow of the granulated material occur under confining pressures that range from many GPa to zero. Under these conditions the granulated material exhibits both dilatancy and compaction. In addition, the granules undergo further comminution with a resultant reduction in average granule size, and often with localization into a layer of very fine fragments next to the cavity wall. This paper presents an update of a previously-reported mesomechanical model of these processes that is based on an analogy with atomic dislocation theory[1,2]. That is, the model focuses on a description of the flux of lines of spaces (dislocations) between granules across the boundaries of a relevant volume element (RVE) rather than on the granules themselves, and on the nucleation of new dislocations inside the control volume by comminution of granules. Outward dislocation flux from the RVE causes compaction whereas inward flux causes dilatancy. The model is cast in the form of a multiplane plasticity model in which granule sliding on interfaces is restricted to a finite number of planar surfaces with specified initial orientations. The planes are allowed to rotate during deformation. The model is designed for use in finite element computer codes, and correlations are shown with long rod penetration experiments. A parameter sensitivity study reveals that the penetration behavior is strongly dependent on initial porosity, coefficient of friction between sliding granules, and on details of the granule comminution process.

  8. Making rice even healthier!

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is a naturally healthy food, but what if it could be made even healthier? Would Americans eat more rice if it could be advertised to be a 'New and Improved' source of calcium to promote bone growth, or iron to prevent anemia? Grocery stores are full of foods that are vitamin enhanced to attract...

  9. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  10. Hydraulic fracture and toughening of a brittle layer bonded to a hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Noselli, Giovanni; Trepat, Xavier; Desimone, Antonio; Arroyo, Marino

    Brittle materials fracture under tensile or shear stress. When stress attains a critical threshold, crack propagation becomes unstable and proceeds dynamically. In the presence of several precracks, a brittle material always propagates only the weakest crack, leading to catastrophic failure. Here, we show that all these features of brittle fracture are radically modified when the material susceptible to cracking is bonded to a poroelastic medium, such as a hydrogel, a common situation in biological tissues. In particular, we show that the brittle material can fracture in compression and can resist cracking in tension, thanks to the hydraulic coupling with the hydrogel. In the case of multiple cracks, we find that localized fracture occurs when the permeability of the hydrogel is high, whereas decreased permeability leads to toughening by promoting multiple cracking. Our results may contribute to the understanding of fracture in biological tissues and provide inspiration for the design of tough, biomimetic materials.

  11. Method for preparing surfaces of metal composites having a brittle phase for plating

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Cameron W.; Wilson, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing surfaces of two-phase metal composites having relatively brittle and malleable components for plating with corrosion-resistant material. In practice of the present invention, the surfaces of the composites are etched to remove a major portion or fraction of the brittle component. The etched surface is then peened with particulates for breaking the brittle component from the surfaces and for spreading or smearing the malleable component over the surfaces. The peened surface is then chemically cleaned of residual traces of the brittle component so as to provide a surface of essentially the malleable component to which the corrosion-resistant material may be plated thereon in an adherent manner.

  12. Determination of the ductile-brittle transition temperature from the microplastic-strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. K.; Solntsev, Yu. P.

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the determination of the tendency of cast and deformed steels to brittle fracture using the temperature dependence of the small-plastic-strain rate is studied. The temperature corresponding to the maximum in this curve is found to indicate an abrupt decrease in the steel plasticity, which makes it possible to interpret it as the ductile-brittle transition temperature depending only on the structure of a material.

  13. Synthesis and single crystal structure refinement of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kalo, Hussein; Milius, Wolfgang; Braeu, Michael; Breu, Josef

    2013-02-15

    A sodium brittle mica with the ideal composition [Na{sub 4}]{sup inter}[Mg{sub 6}]{sup oct}[Si{sub 4}Al{sub 4}]{sup tet}O{sub 20}F{sub 4} was synthesized via melt synthesis in a gas tight crucible. This mica is unusual inasmuch as the known mica structure holds only room for two interlayer cations per unit cell and inasmuch as it readily hydrates despite the high layer charge while ordinary micas and brittle micas are non-swelling. The crystal structure of one-layer hydrate sodium brittle mica was determined and refined from single crystal X-ray data. Interlayer cations reside at the center of the distorted hexagonal cavities and are coordinated by the three inner basal oxygen atoms. The coordination of the interlayer cation is completed by three interlayer water molecules residing at the center of the interlayer region. The relative position of adjacent 2:1-layers thus is fixed by these octahedrally coordinated interlayer cations. Pseudo-symmetry leads to extensive twinning. In total five twin operations generate the same environment for the interlayer species and are energetically degenerate. - Graphical abstract: The sodium brittle mica has been successfully synthesized by melt synthesis and the crystal structure of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt synthesis yielded coarse grained sodium brittle mica which showed little disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium brittle mica hydrated completely to the state of one-layer hydrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica could therefore be determined and refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrangement of upper and lower tetrahedral sheet encompassing interlayer cation were clarified.

  14. The Brittle-Ductile Transition in Crystal and Bubble-bearing Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Cordonnier, B.; Tripoli, B.; Ulmer, P.; Reusser, E.; Marone, F.; Burlini, L.

    2011-12-01

    The strain response of magma is critically dependent upon its viscosity, the magnitude of the applied stress and the experimental time-scale. The brittle-ductile transition in pure silicate melts is expected for an applied stress approaching 108±0.5 Pa (Dingwell, 1997). However, magmas are mostly mixture of crystal and bubble-bearing silicate melts. To date, there are no data to constrain the ductile-brittle transition for three-phase magmas. Thus, we conducted consistent torsion experiments at high temperature (673-973 K) and high pressure (200 MPa), in the strain rate range 1*10-5-4*10-3 s-1, using a HT-HP internally-heated Paterson-type rock deformation apparatus. The samples are composed of hydrous haplogranitic glass, quartz crystals (24-65 vol%) and CO2-rich gas-pressurized bubbles (9-12 vol%). The applied strain rate was increased until brittle failure occurred; micro-fracturing and healing processes commonly occurred before sample macroscopic fracturing. The experimental results highlight a clear relationship between the effective viscosity of the three-phase magmas, strain rate, temperature and the onset of brittle-ductile behavior. Crystal- and bubble-free melts at high viscosity (1011-1011.6 Pa*s at 673 K) show brittle behavior in the strain rate range between 1*10-4 and 5*10-4 s-1. For comparable viscosities crystal and bubble-bearing magmas show a transition to brittle behavior at lower strain rates. Synchrotron-based 3D imaging of fractured samples, show the presence of fractures with an antithetic trend with respect to shear strain directions. The law found in this study expresses the transition from ductile to brittle behavior for real magmas and could significantly improve our understanding of the control of brittle processes on extrusion of high-viscosity magmas and degassing at silicic volcanoes.

  15. Brittleness of twig bases in the genus Salix: fracture mechanics and ecological relevance.

    PubMed

    Beismann, H; Wilhelmi, H; Baillères, H; Spatz, H C; Bogenrieder, A; Speck, T

    2000-03-01

    The twig bases within the genus Salix were investigated. Brittleness of twig bases as defined in the literature neither correlates with Young's modulus nor with growth strains, which were measured for S. alba, S. fragilis and S. x rubens. For the species S. alba, S. appendiculata, S. eleagnos, S. fragilis, S. purpurea, S. triandra, S. viminalis, and S. x rubens, fracture surfaces of broken twigs were investigated and semiquantitatively described in terms of 'relative roughness' (ratio of rough area of fracture surface over whole area of fracture surface). The relative roughness clearly corresponds with the classification into brittle and nonbrittle species given in the literature. An attempt was made to quantify brittleness with mechanical tests. The absolute values of stress and strain do not correlate with the brittleness of the twig bases as defined by the relative roughness. However, the 'index stress' (ratio of stress at yield over stress at fracture) or the 'index strain' (ratio of strain at yield over strain at fracture), correlate well with the relative roughness. The graphic analysis of index stress against index strain reveals a straight line on which the eight species are ordered according to their brittleness. Depending on growth form and habitat, brittle twig bases of willows may function ecologically as mechanical safety mechanisms and, additionally, as a propagation mechanism.

  16. A new approach to rock brittleness and its usability at prediction of drillability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özfırat, M. Kemal; Yenice, Hayati; Şimşir, Ferhan; Yaralı, Olgay

    2016-07-01

    Rock brittleness is one of the most important issues in rock drilling and cutting. The relations between drillability and brittleness will assist engineers in excavation works. The demand for representative rock parameters related to planning of underground excavations is increasing, as these parameters constitute fundamental input for obtaining the most reliable cost and time estimates. In rock cutting mechanics, the effects of the rock and brittleness on the efficiency of drilling and excavation are examined by many researchers. In this study, 41 different rock types were tested in laboratory to investigate the relations between the drilling rate index and different brittleness values. Firstly, the relations defined in literature are tested. Strength tests are made according to International Society for Rock Mechanics standards. In addition Norwegian University of Science and Technology standards are used to determine drilling rate index. Then, a new brittleness index is proposed which is the arithmetic average of uniaxial compressive strength and tensile strength. Considering the regression analysis carried out, it was seen that the proposed formula showed good correlation for these samples handled in this study. As a result of this study, a high correlation is obtained between the proposed index and drilling rate index values (R:0.84). The results are found to be at least reliable as well as other brittleness equations given in literature.

  17. Analysis of the progressive failure of brittle matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.

    1995-01-01

    This report investigates two of the most common modes of localized failures, namely, periodic fiber-bridged matrix cracks and transverse matrix cracks. A modification of Daniels' bundle theory is combined with Weibull's weakest link theory to model the statistical distribution of the periodic matrix cracking strength for an individual layer. Results of the model predictions are compared with experimental data from the open literature. Extensions to the model are made to account for possible imperfections within the layer (i.e., nonuniform fiber lengths, irregular crack spacing, and degraded in-situ fiber properties), and the results of these studies are presented. A generalized shear-lag analysis is derived which is capable of modeling the development of transverse matrix cracks in material systems having a general multilayer configuration and under states of full in-plane load. A method for computing the effective elastic properties for the damaged layer at the global level is detailed based upon the solution for the effects of the damage at the local level. This methodology is general in nature and is therefore also applicable to (0(sub m)/90(sub n))(sub s) systems. The characteristic stress-strain response for more general cases is shown to be qualitatively correct (experimental data is not available for a quantitative evaluation), and the damage evolution is recorded in terms of the matrix crack density as a function of the applied strain. Probabilistic effects are introduced to account for the statistical nature of the material strengths, thus allowing cumulative distribution curves for the probability of failure to be generated for each of the example laminates. Additionally, Oh and Finney's classic work on fracture location in brittle materials is extended and combined with the shear-lag analysis. The result is an analytical form for predicting the probability density function for the location of the next transverse crack occurrence within a crack bounded

  18. Forecasting volcanic eruptions: the control of elastic-brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Christopher; Robertson, Robert; Wall, Richard; Steele, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    At volcanoes reawakening after long repose, patterns of unrest normally reflect the elastic-brittle deformation of crust above a magma reservoir. Local fault movements, detected as volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, increase in number with surface deformation, at first approximately exponentially and then linearly. The trends describe how crustal behaviour evolves from quasi-elastic deformation under an increasing stress to inelastic deformation under a constant stress. They have been quantified and verified against experiments for deformation in compression [1]. We have extended the analysis to extensional deformation. The results agree well with field data for crust being stretched by a pressurizing magmatic system [2]. They also provide new criteria for enhancing the definitions of alert levels and preferred times to eruption. The VT-deformation sequence is a field proxy for changes in deformation with applied stress. The transition from quasi-elastic to inelastic behaviour is characterised in extension by the ratio of differential failure stress SF to tensile strength σT. Unrest data from at least basaltic to andesitic stratovolcanoes, as well as large calderas, yield preferred values for SF/σT ≤ 4, coinciding with the range for tensile failure expected from established theoretical constraints (from Mohr-Coulomb-Griffiths failure). We thus associate the transition with the approach to tensile rupture at the wall of a pressurized magma reservoir. In particular, values of about 2 are consistent with the rupture of a cylindrical reservoir, such as a closed conduit within a volcanic edifice, whereas values of about 3 suggest an approximately spherical reservoir, such as may exist at deeper levels. The onset of inelastic behaviour reflects the emergence of self-accelerating crack growth under a constant stress. Applied to forecasting eruptions, it provides a new and objective criterion for raising alert levels during an emergency; it yields the classic linear

  19. An investigation of brittle fracture using continuous acoustic emisson monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. D.; Young, R. P.; Mair, K.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) investigations of brittle rock fracture in controlled laboratory experiments allow a detailed 3-D examination of the spatial and temporal evolution of micro-fracture growth. These observations provide valuable insights into the micro-mechanical processes involved in the development of macro-scale fault structures. Processing techniques similar to those of Earthquake Seismology are employed to locate and resolve the focal mechanisms of AE events, however at this small scale, sampling rates of 10 MHz are required. At these high sampling frequencies, technological constraints necessitate the use of triggering logic in conventional AE recording hardware. After an event is triggered, a 'downtime' period is experienced while the waveform data is downloaded. However, the AE rate increases to thousands per second, prior to dynamic fracture propagation, and so the inherent periods of downtime result in a very low proportion of events being recorded. Therefore the observational capacities of conventional AE systems are severely limited during the crucial period of fracture growth. The importance of recording a complete AE data set during the critical moments of fracture prompted the development and manufacture of a novel ultrasonic monitoring system; The Giga Recorder. This system can record up to two minutes of waveform data onto a 40 GB Random Access Memory (RAM), sampled at 10 MHz, on 16 channels. The RAM continuously rewrites, meaning at any point in time, the preceding two minutes of waveform data are stored, and can be downloaded following the critical experimental period. In addition, triggered events are recorded throughout the entire period of AE activity. Here we present results from the initial laboratory experiments using the Giga Recorder. A series of Chevron Notched Brazilian Disk granite samples were uniaxially loaded to failure, under a variety of loading rates. During each test, a tensile fracture propagated from the pre-cut notch

  20. A Novel FC116/BC10 Mutation Distinctively Causes Alteration in the Expression of the Genes for Cell Wall Polymer Synthesis in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wei, Feng; Guo, Kai; Hu, Zhen; Li, Yuyang; Xie, Guosheng; Wang, Yanting; Cai, Xiwen; Peng, Liangcai; Wang, Lingqiang

    2016-01-01

    We report isolation and characterization of a fragile culm mutant fc116 that displays reduced mechanical strength caused by decreased cellulose content and altered cell wall structure in rice. Map-based cloning revealed that fc116 was a base substitution mutant (G to A) in a putative beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (C2GnT) gene (LOC_Os05g07790, allelic to BC10). This mutation resulted in one amino acid missing within a newly-identified protein motif “R, RXG, RA.” The FC116/BC10 gene was lowly but ubiquitously expressed in the all tissues examined across the whole life cycle of rice, and slightly down-regulated during secondary growth. This mutant also exhibited a significant increase in the content of hemicelluloses and lignins, as well as the content of pentoses (xylose and arabinose). But the content of hexoses (glucose, mannose, and galactose) was decreased in both cellulosic and non-cellulosic (pectins and hemicelluloses) fractions of the mutant. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that the typical genes in the fc116 mutant were up-regulated corresponding to xylan biosynthesis, as well as lignin biosynthesis including p-hydroxyphenyl (H), syringyl (S), and guaiacyl (G). Our results indicate that FC116 has universal function in regulation of the cell wall polymers in rice. PMID:27708650

  1. Ethylene Biosynthesis Is Promoted by Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acids during Lysigenous Aerenchyma Formation in Rice Roots.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Takaki; Shiono, Katsuhiro; Nagano, Minoru; Fukazawa, Aya; Ando, Miho; Takamure, Itsuro; Mori, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Kato, Kiyoaki; Nakazono, Mikio

    2015-09-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa) roots, lysigenous aerenchyma, which is created by programmed cell death and lysis of cortical cells, is constitutively formed under aerobic conditions, and its formation is further induced under oxygen-deficient conditions. Ethylene is involved in the induction of aerenchyma formation. reduced culm number1 (rcn1) is a rice mutant in which the gene encoding the ATP-binding cassette transporter RCN1/OsABCG5 is defective. Here, we report that the induction of aerenchyma formation was reduced in roots of rcn1 grown in stagnant deoxygenated nutrient solution (i.e. under stagnant conditions, which mimic oxygen-deficient conditions in waterlogged soils). 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) is a key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis. Stagnant conditions hardly induced the expression of ACS1 in rcn1 roots, resulting in low ethylene production in the roots. Accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) of 24, 26, and 28 carbons was reduced in rcn1 roots. Exogenously supplied VLCFA (26 carbons) increased the expression level of ACS1 and induced aerenchyma formation in rcn1 roots. Moreover, in rice lines in which the gene encoding a fatty acid elongase, CUT1-LIKE (CUT1L; a homolog of the gene encoding Arabidopsis CUT1, which is required for cuticular wax production), was silenced, both ACS1 expression and aerenchyma formation were reduced. Interestingly, the expression of ACS1, CUT1L, and RCN1/OsABCG5 was induced predominantly in the outer part of roots under stagnant conditions. These results suggest that, in rice under oxygen-deficient conditions, VLCFAs increase ethylene production by promoting 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid biosynthesis in the outer part of roots, which, in turn, induces aerenchyma formation in the root cortex.

  2. Ethylene Biosynthesis Is Promoted by Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acids during Lysigenous Aerenchyma Formation in Rice Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Takaki; Shiono, Katsuhiro; Nagano, Minoru; Fukazawa, Aya; Ando, Miho; Takamure, Itsuro; Mori, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Kato, Kiyoaki; Nakazono, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa) roots, lysigenous aerenchyma, which is created by programmed cell death and lysis of cortical cells, is constitutively formed under aerobic conditions, and its formation is further induced under oxygen-deficient conditions. Ethylene is involved in the induction of aerenchyma formation. reduced culm number1 (rcn1) is a rice mutant in which the gene encoding the ATP-binding cassette transporter RCN1/OsABCG5 is defective. Here, we report that the induction of aerenchyma formation was reduced in roots of rcn1 grown in stagnant deoxygenated nutrient solution (i.e. under stagnant conditions, which mimic oxygen-deficient conditions in waterlogged soils). 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) is a key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis. Stagnant conditions hardly induced the expression of ACS1 in rcn1 roots, resulting in low ethylene production in the roots. Accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) of 24, 26, and 28 carbons was reduced in rcn1 roots. Exogenously supplied VLCFA (26 carbons) increased the expression level of ACS1 and induced aerenchyma formation in rcn1 roots. Moreover, in rice lines in which the gene encoding a fatty acid elongase, CUT1-LIKE (CUT1L; a homolog of the gene encoding Arabidopsis CUT1, which is required for cuticular wax production), was silenced, both ACS1 expression and aerenchyma formation were reduced. Interestingly, the expression of ACS1, CUT1L, and RCN1/OsABCG5 was induced predominantly in the outer part of roots under stagnant conditions. These results suggest that, in rice under oxygen-deficient conditions, VLCFAs increase ethylene production by promoting 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid biosynthesis in the outer part of roots, which, in turn, induces aerenchyma formation in the root cortex. PMID:26036614

  3. The anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect of the methanol extract from brittle star

    PubMed Central

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Mousavi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-angiogenic therapy is a crucial step in cancer treatment. The discovery of new anti-angiogenic compounds from marine organisms has become an attractive concept in anti-cancer therapy. Because little data correlated to the pro- and anti-angiogenic efficacies of Ophiuroidea, which include brittle star, the current study was designed to explore the anti-angiogenic potential of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The anti-proliferative effect of brittle star extract on A2780cp cells was examined by MTT assays, and transcriptional expression of VEGF and b-FGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. In an in vivo model, 40 fertilized Ross eggs were divided into control and three experimental groups. The experimental groups were incubated with brittle star extract at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml, and photographed by photo-stereomicroscopy. Ultimately, numbers and lengths of vessels were measured by Image J software. Data were analyzed with SPSS software (p<0.05). Results: Results illustrated that the brittle star extract exerted a dose- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect on A2780cp cancer cells. In addition, VEGF and b-FGF expression decreased with brittle star methanol extract treatment. Macroscopic evaluations revealed significant changes in the second and third experimental group compared to controls (p<0.05). Conclusion: These finding revealed the anti-angiogenic effects of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo confer novel insight into the application of natural marine products in angiogenesis-related pathologies. PMID:26989740

  4. Quantitative comparisons of analogue models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Analogue model experiments are widely used to gain insights into the evolution of geological structures. In this study, we present a direct comparison of experimental results of 14 analogue modelling laboratories using prescribed set-ups. A quantitative analysis of the results will document the variability among models and will allow an appraisal of reproducibility and limits of interpretation. This has direct implications for comparisons between structures in analogue models and natural field examples. All laboratories used the same frictional analogue materials (quartz and corundum sand) and prescribed model-building techniques (sieving and levelling). Although each laboratory used its own experimental apparatus, the same type of self-adhesive foil was used to cover the base and all the walls of the experimental apparatus in order to guarantee identical boundary conditions (i.e. identical shear stresses at the base and walls). Three experimental set-ups using only brittle frictional materials were examined. In each of the three set-ups the model was shortened by a vertical wall, which moved with respect to the fixed base and the three remaining sidewalls. The minimum width of the model (dimension parallel to mobile wall) was also prescribed. In the first experimental set-up, a quartz sand wedge with a surface slope of ˜20° was pushed by a mobile wall. All models conformed to the critical taper theory, maintained a stable surface slope and did not show internal deformation. In the next two experimental set-ups, a horizontal sand pack consisting of alternating quartz sand and corundum sand layers was shortened from one side by the mobile wall. In one of the set-ups a thin rigid sheet covered part of the model base and was attached to the mobile wall (i.e. a basal velocity discontinuity distant from the mobile wall). In the other set-up a basal rigid sheet was absent and the basal velocity discontinuity was located at the mobile wall. In both types of experiments

  5. Ultraprecision machining of micro-structured functional surfaces on brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D. P.; Wong, Y. S.; Hong, G. S.

    2011-09-01

    Ultraprecision micro-structured functional surfaces on hard and brittle materials, e.g. ceramic and glass, are gaining increasing application in a range of areas such as engineering optics and semiconductor and biomedical products. However, due to their tendency of being damaged in brittle fracture in machining, it is challenging to achieve both a high surface finish and complex surface shapes. In this paper, ultraprecision machining of micro-structured functional surfaces on brittle materials by fast tool servo diamond turning is studied. A machining model has been developed to ensure ductile regime machining of the brittle material, in which the material is removed by both plastic deformation and brittle fracture, but the cracks produced are prevented from being extended into the finished surface. Based on the model, an iterative numerical method has been proposed to predict the maximum feed rate for producing crack-free micro-structured surfaces. Machining experiments on typical micro-structured functional surfaces have been carried out to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method for producing ultraprecision micro-structured functional surfaces.

  6. Brittle Rock Modeling Approach and its Validation Using Excavation-Induced Micro-Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Chi; Li, Tian-Bin; Xing, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Hang; Wang, Min-Jie; Liu, Tian-Yi; Chen, Guo-Qing; Chen, Zi-Quan

    2016-08-01

    With improvements to the bonded-particle model, a custom indicator of crack intensity is introduced to grade rock fractures accurately. Brittle fracturing of rock mass is studied using the bonded-particle model; here, "brittle" refers to the process where more energy is released towards making particles collide and disperse, and hence results in the quick emergence of "chain cracks". Certain principles concerning how to construct brittle rock are then proposed. Furthermore, a modeling approach for brittle rocks based on the adaptive continuum/discontinuum (AC/DC) method is proposed to aid the construction of large-scale models of tunnel excavations. To connect with actual tunneling conditions, fundamental mechanical properties, the mechanism for brittle fracturing, the joint distribution, and the initial stress field are considered in the modeling approach. Results from micro-seismic monitoring of a tunnel excavation confirmed the suitability of this modeling approach to simulate crack behavior, and results show that simulated cracking exhibit similar trends (evolution, location, and intensity) with micro-seismic cracking.

  7. Shaping a better rice plant.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan

    2010-06-01

    Two studies describe how regulatory variation at the rice gene OsSPL14 can lead to altered plant morphology and improve grain yield. These studies support the possibility of improving rice yield through changing plant architecture.

  8. Variation of depth to the brittle-ductile transition due to cooling of a midcrustal intrusion.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The depth to the brittle-ductile transition in the crust is often defined by the intersection of a shear resistance relation in the brittle upper crust that increases linearly with depth and a power law relation for ductile flow in the lower crust that depends strongly on T. Transient variation of this depth caused by a magmatic intrusion at a depth near the regional transition can be modelled by a heat conduction model for a rectangular parallelepiped superimposed on a linear geothermal gradient. When parameters appropriate for the southeastern US are used, a moderate-sized intrusion is found to decrease the transition depth by as much as 7 km; significant variations last approx 10 m.y. Since the base of the seismogenic zone is identified with the brittle-ductile transition, these results imply that intrusions of late Tertiary age or younger could be important sources of clustered seismicity. -A.W.H.

  9. Analytical model of brittle destruction based on hypothesis of scale similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Arakcheev, A. S. Lotov, K. V.

    2012-08-15

    The size distribution of dust particles in thermonuclear (fusion) devices is closely described by a power law, which may be related to the brittle destruction of materials. The hypothesis of scale similarity leads to the conclusion that the size distribution of particles formed as a result of a brittle destruction is described by a power law with the exponent -{alpha} that can range from -4 to -1. The model of brittle destruction is described in terms of the fractal geometry, and the distribution exponent is expressed via the fractal dimension of packing. Under additional assumptions, it is possible to refine the {alpha} value and, vice versa, to determine the type of destruction using the measured size distribution of particles.

  10. ADOLESCENT ROMANCE AND DELINQUENCY: A FURTHER EXPLORATION OF HIRSCHI'S "COLD AND BRITTLE" RELATIONSHIPS HYPOTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Peggy C; Lonardo, Robert A; Manning, Wendy D; Longmore, Monica A

    2010-11-28

    Hirschi argued that delinquent youth tend to form relatively "cold and brittle" relationships with peers, depicting these youths as deficient in their attachments to others. The current analysis explores connections between delinquency and the character of adolescent romantic ties, drawing primarily on the first wave of the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study, and focusing on 957 teens with dating experience. We examine multiple relationship qualities/dynamics in order to explore both the "cold" and "brittle" dimensions of Hirschi's hypothesis. Regarding the "cold" assumption, results suggest that delinquency is not related to perceived importance of the romantic relationship, level of intimate self-disclosure or feelings of romantic love, and more delinquent youth actually report more frequent contact with their romantic partners. Analyses focused on two dimensions tapping the "brittle" description indicate that while durations of a focal relationship do not differ according to level of respondent delinquency, more delinquent youths report higher levels of verbal conflict.

  11. Simulation study on the avalanche process of the mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Han, Kui

    2016-01-01

    The mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model is an extension model based on the classical fiber bundle model to describe the nonbrittle failure process of some hierarchical structure materials such as spider silk. In order to explore the breaking dynamic properties of the hierarchical structure materials in short-range correlation, the mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model in local load sharing condition is detailed and numerically studied. The impacts of the proportion of plastic fibers and the plastic strength of a single plastic fiber on the macroscopic constitutive behavior, the avalanche size distribution and the step number of the external load increasing are investigated, respectively. The numerical results show that the insert of plastic fibers will hinder the brittle fracture process; as a result, both the macroscopic mechanical natures and the statistical properties of fracture are significantly influenced.

  12. ADOLESCENT ROMANCE AND DELINQUENCY: A FURTHER EXPLORATION OF HIRSCHI'S "COLD AND BRITTLE" RELATIONSHIPS HYPOTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Peggy C; Lonardo, Robert A; Manning, Wendy D; Longmore, Monica A

    2010-11-28

    Hirschi argued that delinquent youth tend to form relatively "cold and brittle" relationships with peers, depicting these youths as deficient in their attachments to others. The current analysis explores connections between delinquency and the character of adolescent romantic ties, drawing primarily on the first wave of the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study, and focusing on 957 teens with dating experience. We examine multiple relationship qualities/dynamics in order to explore both the "cold" and "brittle" dimensions of Hirschi's hypothesis. Regarding the "cold" assumption, results suggest that delinquency is not related to perceived importance of the romantic relationship, level of intimate self-disclosure or feelings of romantic love, and more delinquent youth actually report more frequent contact with their romantic partners. Analyses focused on two dimensions tapping the "brittle" description indicate that while durations of a focal relationship do not differ according to level of respondent delinquency, more delinquent youths report higher levels of verbal conflict. PMID:21423845

  13. Sometimes two arms are enough--an unusual life-stage in brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea).

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Sabine; Alme, Øydis

    2015-08-03

    Off West Africa (Angola-Morocco), benthos samples were collected in the years 2005-2012. These contained 124 specimens of brittle stars with two long arms and three extremely short or absent arms and an elongated, narrow disc. These unusual brittle stars, as well as 33 specimens with five fully developed arms, were identified as Amphiura ungulata. The specimens with unequal arms were juvenile stages, whereas adults had five equal arms. The large number of specimens with unequal arms suggests that this condition is not the result of damage and regeneration, but a normal growth pattern in this species. This study documents the morphology by SEM, amends the species description, and discusses possible explanations for the evolution of this condition. Although brittle star species with unequal arm growth have been reported, this is an extreme case that was unknown before this study.

  14. Extra-electron induced covalent strengthening and generalization of intrinsic ductile-to-brittle criterion

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Haiyang; Chen, Xing-Qiu; Liu, Peitao; Xing, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiyue; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2012-01-01

    Traditional strengthening ways, such as strain, precipitation, and solid-solution, come into effect by pinning the motion of dislocation. Here, through first-principles calculations we report on an extra-electron induced covalent strengthening mechanism, which alters chemical bonding upon the introduction of extra-valence electrons in the matrix of parent materials. It is responsible for the brittle and high-strength properties of Al12W-type compounds featured by the typical fivefold icosahedral cages, which are common for quasicrystals and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). In combination with this mechanism, we generalize ductile-to-brittle criterion in a universal hyperbolic form by integrating the classical Pettifor's Cauchy pressure with Pugh's modulus ratio for a wide variety of materials with cubic lattices. This study provides compelling evidence to correlate Pugh's modulus ratio with hardness of materials and may have implication for understanding the intrinsic brittleness of quasicrystals and BMGs. PMID:23056910

  15. Ultrastructure of the wild rice Oryza grandiglumis (Gramineae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ethel; Quesada, Tania; Espinoza, Ana M

    2006-06-01

    Oryza grandiglumis is a wild species of rice endemic to tropical America. This species was first found in 1998 in the wetlands of Caño Negro, located in the northern part of Costa Rica. Twenty five plants of O. grandiglumis were processed for scanning electron microscope. An ultrastructural description of the leaf blade, ligule, auricles, spikelet and caryopsis, with an emphasis on structures of taxonomic value. The leaf blade has a characteristic cuticular wax pattern, composed of dense rod-like structures, and is surrounded by papillae, zipper-like silica cells, abundant bulky prickle trichomes, and hooked trichomes. The blade's edge has three rows of hooked prickle trichomes of various sizes. The auricles wrapped the culm, with long attenuated trichomes at the edges; the base was surrounded by oblong cells. The ligule is a blunt membrane covered by short prickle trichomes. Spikelet morphology is characteristic of the Poaceae family, but the sterile lemmas were nearly as long as the fertile lemmas, and they have an unique crown-like structure of lignified spines between the rachilla and the fertile lemmas. Comparison with Brazilian specimens of O. grandiglumis revealed little differences in the ultrastructural characteristics. PMID:18494308

  16. Rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter while replacing white rice with brown rice.

    PubMed

    Manickavasagan, Annamalai; Al-Marhubi, Insaaf Mohd; Dev, Satyanarayan

    2014-06-01

    Rice-blackgram batter is a raw material for many traditional convenience foods in Asia. Reformulation of traditional convenience food by replacing white rice with whole rice (brown rice) is a novel method to reduce the consumption of refined grain and increase the intake of whole grain in our diet. In this study, rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter was investigated while replacing white rice with brown rice at five levels (T1--0% replacement (control), T2--25% replacement, T3--50% replacement, T4--75% replacement, and T5--100% replacement). The shear stress versus shear rate plot indicates that the rice-blackgram batter exhibited non-Newtonian fluid behavior (shear thinning property) even after 100% replacement of white rice with brown rice. The rheological characteristics of rice-blackgram batters fitted reasonably well in Cassan (r2 = 0.8521-0.9856) and power law (r2 = 0.8042-0.9823) models. Brown rice replacement at all levels did not affect the flow behavior index, yield stress, consistency coefficient, and apparent viscosity of batter at 25 degrees C. However, at higher temperature, the viscosity was greater for T4 and T5 (no difference between them) than T1, T2, and T3 (no difference between them) batters. Further research is required to determine the sensory attributes and acceptability of the cooked products with brown rice-blended batter.

  17. Rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter while replacing white rice with brown rice.

    PubMed

    Manickavasagan, Annamalai; Al-Marhubi, Insaaf Mohd; Dev, Satyanarayan

    2014-06-01

    Rice-blackgram batter is a raw material for many traditional convenience foods in Asia. Reformulation of traditional convenience food by replacing white rice with whole rice (brown rice) is a novel method to reduce the consumption of refined grain and increase the intake of whole grain in our diet. In this study, rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter was investigated while replacing white rice with brown rice at five levels (T1--0% replacement (control), T2--25% replacement, T3--50% replacement, T4--75% replacement, and T5--100% replacement). The shear stress versus shear rate plot indicates that the rice-blackgram batter exhibited non-Newtonian fluid behavior (shear thinning property) even after 100% replacement of white rice with brown rice. The rheological characteristics of rice-blackgram batters fitted reasonably well in Cassan (r2 = 0.8521-0.9856) and power law (r2 = 0.8042-0.9823) models. Brown rice replacement at all levels did not affect the flow behavior index, yield stress, consistency coefficient, and apparent viscosity of batter at 25 degrees C. However, at higher temperature, the viscosity was greater for T4 and T5 (no difference between them) than T1, T2, and T3 (no difference between them) batters. Further research is required to determine the sensory attributes and acceptability of the cooked products with brown rice-blended batter. PMID:23751544

  18. Possible transient creep events in a brittle-ductile continental crust: observations, experiments and potential models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavier, Luc

    2016-04-01

    In a given tectonic province and over thousands to millions of years, slip on faults is believed to be constant and approximately equal to the local tectonic rate in agreement with rigid plate tectonic theory. In this model the ductile lower crust flows in response to this steady plate motion. Moreover brittle and ductile behaviors interact only at a sharp boundary defined as the brittle ductile transition (BDT). However in the continental lithosphere brittle and ductile behavior may coexist over a large range of pressure and temperature conditions for different mineral compositions. This generates heterogeneities in the brittle and ductile crust that are often ignored in models of shear zones. We hypothesize that the interaction between brittle (elastic) and ductile (viscous) behavior may cause deviations from steady-state slip and generates transient creep events on shear zones that release many meters of creep over years to thousands of years marked by a single period of tectonic activity followed by quiescence. We present a set of numerical and analytical models, analogue experiments as well as some observations in nature that may support this hypothesis. In this presentation we extend an analytic formulation to model creep events within shear zones at the transition between brittle and ductile behavior in the crust. We assume that creep events are triggered by a set of interconnected fractures modeled as propagating dislocations. The amount of connectivity controls the nature and the intensity of the transient creep events. The shear zone behaves as a forced damped oscillator that can release strain accumulated during jammed/locked periods. The creep can be over-, critically-, or under-damped. The time scale of the events may vary between seconds to thousands of years depending on the viscous, elastic and plastic (fractures) properties of the shear zone.

  19. Prediction of Brittle Failure for TBM Tunnels in Anisotropic Rock: A Case Study from Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammyr, Øyvind

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of spalling and rock burst is especially important for hard rock TBM tunneling, because failure can have larger impact than in a drill and blast tunnel and ultimately threaten excavation feasibility. The majority of research on brittle failure has focused on rock types with isotropic behavior. This paper gives a review of existing theory and its application before a 3.5-m-diameter TBM tunnel in foliated granitic gneiss is used as a case to study brittle failure characteristics of anisotropic rock. Important aspects that should be considered in order to predict brittle failure in anisotropic rock are highlighted. Foliation is responsible for considerable strength anisotropy and is believed to influence the preferred side of v-shaped notch development in the investigated tunnel. Prediction methods such as the semi- empirical criterion, the Hoek- Brown brittle parameters, and the non-linear damage initiation and spalling limit method give reliable results; but only as long as the angle between compression axis and foliation in uniaxial compressive tests is relevant, dependent on the relation between tunnel trend/plunge, strike/dip of foliation, and tunnel boundary stresses. It is further demonstrated that local in situ stress variations, for example, due to the presence of discontinuities, can have profound impact on failure predictions. Other carefully documented case studies into the brittle failure nature of rock, in particular anisotropic rock, are encouraged in order to expand the existing and relatively small database. This will be valuable for future TBM planning and construction stages in highly stressed brittle anisotropic rock.

  20. Influence of Composition and Deformation Conditions on the Strength and Brittleness of Shale Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Reinicke, A.; Meier, T.; Makasi, M.; Dresen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Stimulation of shale gas reservoirs by hydraulic fracturing operations aims to increase the production rate by increasing the rock surface connected to the borehole. Prospective shales are often believed to display high strength and brittleness to decrease the breakdown pressure required to (re-) initiate a fracture as well as slow healing of natural and hydraulically induced fractures to increase the lifetime of the fracture network. Laboratory deformation tests were performed on several, mainly European black shales with different mineralogical composition, porosity and maturity at ambient and elevated pressures and temperatures. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and elastic moduli strongly depend on shale composition, porosity, water content, structural anisotropy, and on pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions, but less on strain rate. We observed a transition from brittle to semibrittle deformation at high P-T conditions, in particular for high porosity shales. At given P-T conditions, the variation of compressive strength and Young's modulus with composition can be roughly estimated from the volumetric proportion of all components including organic matter and pores. We determined also brittleness index values based on pre-failure deformation behavior, Young's modulus and bulk composition. At low P-T conditions, where samples showed pronounced post-failure weakening, brittleness may be empirically estimated from bulk composition or Young's modulus. Similar to strength, at given P-T conditions, brittleness depends on the fraction of all components and not the amount of a specific component, e.g. clays, alone. Beside strength and brittleness, knowledge of the long term creep properties of shales is required to estimate in-situ stress anisotropy and the healing of (propped) hydraulic fractures.

  1. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  2. The Potential of Brittle Star Extracted Polysaccharide in Promoting Apoptosis via Intrinsic Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-cancer potential of marine natural products such as polysaccharides represented therapeutic potential in oncological researches. In this study, total polysaccharide from brittle star [Ophiocoma erinaceus (O. erinaceus)] was extracted and chemopreventive efficacy of Persian Gulf brittle star polysaccharide was investigated in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. Methods: To extract polysaccharide, dried brittle stars were ground and extracted mechanically. Then, detection of polysaccharide was performed by phenol sulfuric acid, Ultra Violet (UV)-sulfuric acid method and FTIR. The anti proliferative activity of isolated polysaccharide was examined by MTT assay and evaluation of cell death was done through morphological cell changes; Propodium Iodide staining, fluorescence microscopy and caspase-3, -9 enzymatic measurements. To assess its underlying mechanism, expression of Bax, Bcl-2 was evaluated. Results: The polysaccharide detection methods demonstrated isolation of crude polysaccharide from Persian Gulf brittle star. The results revealed that O. erinaceus polysaccharide suppressed the proliferation of HeLa cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Morphological observation of DAPI and Acridine Orange/Propodium Iodide staining was documented by typical characteristics of apoptotic cell death. Flow cytometry analyses exhibited the accumulation of treated cells in sub-G1 region. Additionally, polysaccharide extracted induced intrinsic apoptosis via up-regulation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax along with down-regulation of Bcl-2 in HeLa cells. Conclusion: Taken together, the apoptosis inducing effect of brittle star polysaccharide via intrinsic pathway confirmed the anti tumor potential of marine polysaccharide. Therefore, these findings proposed new insight into anti cancer properties of brittle star polysaccharide as a promising agent in cervical cancer treatment. PMID:26605009

  3. The width of fault zones in a brittle-viscous lithosphere: Strike-slip faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    1991-01-01

    A fault zone in an ideal brittle material overlying a very weak substrate could, in principle, consist of a single slip surface. Real fault zones have a finite width consisting of a number of nearly parallel slip surfaces on which deformation is distributed. The hypothesis that the finite width of fault zones reflects stresses due to quasistatic flow in the ductile substrate of a brittle surface layer is explored. Because of the simplicity of theory and observations, strike-slip faults are examined first, but the analysis can be extended to normal and thrust faulting.

  4. Micromechanics-Based Permeability Evolution in Brittle Materials at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, Thibaut; Bhat, Harsha S.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a micromechanics-based permeability evolution model for brittle materials at high strain rates (≥ 100 s^{-1}). Extending for undrained deformation the mechanical constitutive description of brittle solids, whose constitutive response is governed by micro-cracks, we now relate the damage-induced strains to micro-crack aperture. We then use an existing permeability model to evaluate the permeability evolution. This model predicts both the percolative and connected regime of permeability evolution of Westerly Granite during triaxial loading at high strain rate. This model can simulate pore pressure history during earthquake coseismic dynamic ruptures under undrained conditions.

  5. Ductile-to-Brittle transition in <111> hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.

    2010-10-01

    The deformation mechanism and the character of fracture of <111> austenitic Hadfield steel single crystals are studied during tension in the temperature range 77-673 K by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that a change in the fracture mechanism from ductile to brittle fracture according to the fractography criterion takes place at a higher temperature than that determined from a change in the elongation to failure of the single crystals. The ductile-to-brittle transition in the Hadfield steel single crystals is shown to be related to a high level of deforming stresses induced by solid-solution hardening and to mechanical twinning.

  6. Apparatus for measuring internal friction Q factors in brittle materials. [applied to lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Curnow, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A flexural analog of the torsion pendulum for measuring the Young's modulus and the internal friction Q factor of brittle materials has been developed for Q greater than 10 to the 3rd measurements at a zero static stress and at 10 to the -7th strains of brittle materials in the Hz frequency range. The present design was motivated by the desire to measure Q in fragile lunar return samples at zero static stress to shed light on the anomalously low attenuation of seismic waves on the moon. The use of the apparatus is demonstrated with data on fused silica and on a terrestrial analog of lunar basalt.

  7. Modeling moisture movement in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is one of the leading food crops in the world. At harvest, rice normally has higher moisture content than the moisture content considered safe for its storage, which creates the necessity for a drying process before its storage. In addition to drying, moisture movement within the rice kernels a...

  8. Survey of arsenic and its speciation in rice products such as breakfast cereals, rice crackers and Japanese rice condiments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guo-Xin; Williams, Paul N; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Deacon, Claire; Carey, Anne-Marie; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Joerg; Meharg, Andrew A

    2009-04-01

    Rice has been demonstrated to be one of the major contributors to arsenic (As) in human diets in addition to drinking water, but little is known about rice products as an additional source of As exposure. Rice products were analyzed for total As and a subset of samples were measured for arsenic speciation using high performance liquid chromatography interfaced with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). A wide range of rice products had total and inorganic arsenic levels that typified those found in rice grain including, crisped rice, puffed rice, rice crackers, rice noodles and a range of Japanese rice condiments as well as rice products targeted at the macrobiotic, vegan, lactose intolerant and gluten intolerance food market. Most As in rice products are inorganic As (75.2-90.1%). This study provides a wider appreciation of how inorganic arsenic derived from rice products enters the human diet. PMID:18775567

  9. Methane potential and biodegradability of rice straw, rice husk and rice residues from the drying process.

    PubMed

    Contreras, L M; Schelle, H; Sebrango, C R; Pereda, I

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural solid residues are a potential renewable energy source. Rice harvesting and production in Sancti Spíritus province, Cuba, currently generates residues without an environmentally sustainable disposal route. Rice residues (rice straw, rice husk and rice residues from the drying process) are potentially an important carbon source for anaerobic digestion. For this paper, rice residues were placed for 36 days retention time in anaerobic batch reactor environments at both mesophilic (37 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. Biogas and methane yield were determined as well as biogas composition. The results showed that rice straw as well as rice residues from the drying process had the highest biogas and methane yield. Temperature played an important role in determining both biogas yield and kinetics. In all cases, rice straw produced the highest yields; under mesophilic conditions the biogas yield was 0.43 m(3) kg(VS)(-1), under thermophilic conditions biogas yield reached 0.52 m(3) kg(VS)(-1). In the case of the rice husk, the biodegradability was very low. Methane content in all batches was kept above 55% vol. All digested material had a high carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio, even though significant biodegradation was recorded with the exception of rice husk. A first-order model can be used to describe the rice crop residues fermentation effectively.

  10. Effect of rice variety and nutrient management on rice productivity in organic rice system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for organic rice has been increasing for decades. However, the information on sustainable organic rice production systems is still lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of soil amendment products, nitrogen rate, and variety on rice grain yield, yield components, ...

  11. Nuclear and Chloroplast DNA Variation Provides Insights into Population Structure and Multiple Origin of Native Aromatic Rices of Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pritesh Sundar; Rao, Gundimeda Jwala Narasimha; Patnaik, Ashok; Patnaik, Sasank Sekhar Chyau; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad Namdeorao; Sharma, Srigopal; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2016-01-01

    A large number of short grain aromatic rice suited to the agro-climatic conditions and local preferences are grown in niche areas of different parts of India and their diversity is evolved over centuries as a result of selection by traditional farmers. Systematic characterization of these specialty rices has not been attempted. An effort was made to characterize 126 aromatic short grain rice landraces, collected from 19 different districts in the State of Odisha, from eastern India. High level of variation for grain quality and agronomic traits among these aromatic rices was observed and genotypes having desirable phenotypic traits like erect flag leaf, thick culm, compact and dense panicles, short plant stature, early duration, superior yield and grain quality traits were identified. A total of 24 SSR markers corresponding to the hyper variable regions of rice chromosomes were used to understand the genetic diversity and to establish the genetic relationship among the aromatic short grain rice landraces at nuclear genome level. SSR analysis of 126 genotypes from Odisha and 10 genotypes from other states revealed 110 alleles with an average of 4.583 and the Nei’s genetic diversity value (He) was in the range of 0.034–0.880 revealing two sub-populations SP 1 (membership percentage-27.1%) and SP 2 (72.9%). At the organelle genomic level for the C/A repeats in PS1D sequence of chloroplasts, eight different plastid sub types and 33 haplotypes were detected. The japonica (Nipponbare) subtype (6C7A) was detected in 100 genotypes followed by O. rufipogon (KF428978) subtype (6C6A) in 13 genotypes while indica (93–11) sub type (8C8A) was seen in 14 genotypes. The tree constructed based on haplotypes suggests that short grain aromatic landraces might have independent origin of these plastid subtypes. Notably a wide range of diversity was observed among these landraces cultivated in different parts confined to the State of Odisha. PMID:27598392

  12. Augmenting in vitro shoot multiplication by vipul (triacontanol) and adventitious rhizogenesis by rice bran extract in Dendrocalamus strictus.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Y; Rana, P K; Shirin, F; Ansari, S A

    2001-02-01

    Like other bamboo species, Dendrocalamus strictus flowers gregariously after a prolonged intermast period of 48 years and constitutes an ideal material for in vitro clonal propagation. In this study, MS liquid medium containing 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mL/L vipul (Godrej Agrovet, Ltd., Sachin, India), a commercial formulation of triacontanol, with or without BA (3.0 mg/L) was tested for in vitro shoot multiplication and 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mL/L of 20% (w/v) alcoholic/aqueous rice bran extract (alone or in combination) with NAA (3 mg/L) used for in vitro adventitious rhizogenesis in single node culture derived shoots of Dendrocalamus strictus.. After a multiplication cycle for 4-5 week, vipul (0.5 mL/L) with BA (3.0 mg/L) in the culture medium induced 4.59 fold shoot multiplication rate whereas application of BA and vipul alone had corresponding values of 3.29 and 0.53 fold respectively. Maximum vipul concentration (2 mL/L) with BA (3 mg/L) exhibited shoot multiplication higher than (or equal to) that of BA alone. Maximum in vitro rooting percentage (55.66%) was obtained on half MS medium enriched with alcoholic rice bran extract (2.5 mL/L) and NAA (3 mg/L). This is the first investigation reporting amelioration of in vitro shoot multiplication rate by triacontanol and rooting percentage by rice bran extract in explants from mature bamboo culms. The protocol is economical and rapid for in vitro clonal propagation of Dendrocalamus strictus.

  13. A statistical, micromechanical theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Sines, G.

    1978-01-01

    A general theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials is presented. This theory proposes that failure is brought about by structural weakening from accumulated crack damage which increases with the stress level. The statistics of the flaw distribution and the mechanism of crack initiation and extension are important. A sample calculation using the theory is given to demonstrate its application

  14. Development of material model for assessment of brittle cracking behavior of plexiglas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. J.; Iqbal, N.; Saeed, H. A.; Tarar, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the brittle cracking behavior of Plexiglas material when subjected to indentation loading. Indentation tests were conducted on Modified Vickers testing machine to acquire the experimental data in the form of load-displacement curve. Several mechanical properties such as hardness, yielding stress and fracture toughness have been ascertained from the analysis of the experimental data. The experimental data then used to create a mathematical model of Plexiglas for its brittle cracking behavior with indentation loading. Furthermore, a numerical simulation based study was carried out to simulate the brittle cracking in Plexiglas plate when subjected to indentation loading. The simulations were performed in the FE solver Abaqus. The brittle cracking model in Abaqus/Explicit is used which determines the required force and displacement to produce crack in Plexiglas. Finally a comparison of simulation results was made to the experimental data to validate the FEA procedures and accuracy of predictions. The numerical predictions of load-displacement curve found remarkably consistent with experimental results.

  15. Study on the cutting mechanism and the brittle ductile transition model of isotropic pyrolyric graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghai; Wang, Hujun; Liu, Zhonghai

    2010-12-01

    Isotropic pyrolyric graphite (IPG) is a new kind of brittle material, it can be used for sealing the aero-engine turbine shaft and the ethylene high-temperature equipment. It not only has the general advantages of ordinal carbonaceous materials such as high temperature resistance, lubrication and abrasion resistance, but also has the advantages of impermeability and machinability that carbon/carbon composite doesn't have. Therefore, it has broad prospects for development. Mechanism of brittle-ductile transition of IPG is the foundation of precision cutting while the plastic deformation of IPG is the essential and the most important mechanical behavior of precision cutting. Using the theory of strain gradient, the mechanism of this material removal during the precision cutting is analyzed. The critical cutting thickness of IPG is calculated for the first time. Furthermore, the cutting process parameters such as cutting depth, feed rate which corresponding to the scale of brittle-ductile transition deformation of IPG are calculated. In the end, based on the theory of micromechanics, the deformation behaviors of IPG such as brittle fracture, plastic deformation and mutual transformation process are all simulated under the Sih.G.C fracture criterion. The condition of the simulation is that the material under the pressure-shear loading conditions .The result shows that the best angle during the IPG precision cutting is -30°. The theoretical analysis and the simulation result are validated by precision cutting experiments.

  16. Study on the cutting mechanism and the brittle ductile transition model of isotropic pyrolyric graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghai; Wang, Hujun; Liu, Zhonghai

    2011-05-01

    Isotropic pyrolyric graphite (IPG) is a new kind of brittle material, it can be used for sealing the aero-engine turbine shaft and the ethylene high-temperature equipment. It not only has the general advantages of ordinal carbonaceous materials such as high temperature resistance, lubrication and abrasion resistance, but also has the advantages of impermeability and machinability that carbon/carbon composite doesn't have. Therefore, it has broad prospects for development. Mechanism of brittle-ductile transition of IPG is the foundation of precision cutting while the plastic deformation of IPG is the essential and the most important mechanical behavior of precision cutting. Using the theory of strain gradient, the mechanism of this material removal during the precision cutting is analyzed. The critical cutting thickness of IPG is calculated for the first time. Furthermore, the cutting process parameters such as cutting depth, feed rate which corresponding to the scale of brittle-ductile transition deformation of IPG are calculated. In the end, based on the theory of micromechanics, the deformation behaviors of IPG such as brittle fracture, plastic deformation and mutual transformation process are all simulated under the Sih.G.C fracture criterion. The condition of the simulation is that the material under the pressure-shear loading conditions .The result shows that the best angle during the IPG precision cutting is -30°. The theoretical analysis and the simulation result are validated by precision cutting experiments.

  17. The transition from brittle faulting to cataclastic flow in porous sandstones: Mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Teng-Fong; David, Christian; Zhu, Wenlu

    1997-02-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the inelastic and failure behavior of six sandstones with porosities ranging from 15% to 35%. A broad range of effective pressures was used so that the transition in failure mode from brittle faulting to cataclastic flow could be observed. In the brittle faulting regime, shear-induced dilation initiates in the prepeak stage at a stress level C' which increases with effective mean stress. Under elevated effective pressures, a sample fails by cataclastic flow. Strain hardening and shear-enhanced compaction initiates at a stress level C* which decreases with increasing effective mean stress. The critical stresses C' and C* were marked by surges in acoustic emission. In the stress space, C* maps out an approximately elliptical yield envelope, in accordance with the critical state and cap models. Using plasticity theory, the flow rule associated with this yield envelope was used to predict porosity changes which are comparable to experimental data. In the brittle faulting regime the associated flow rule predicts dilatancy to increase with decreasing effective pressure in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The data were also compared with prediction of a nonassociative model on the onset of shear localization. Experimental data suggest that a quantitative measure of brittleness is provided by the grain crushing pressure (which decreases with increasing porosity and grain size). Geologic data on tectonic faulting in siliciclastic formations (of different porosity and grain size) are consistent with the laboratory observations.

  18. Metastatic Inhibitory and Radical Scavenging Efficacies of Saponins Extracted from the Brittle Star (Ophiocoma erinaceus).

    PubMed

    Amini, Elaheh; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharara, Javad; Parivar, Kazem; Asili, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Echinodermata use saponins in chemical defense against pathogens and predators. The molecular mechanisms of antimetastatic effects of brittle star saponins are still unknown. The present study examined antioxidant capacity and invasive ability in HeLa carcinoma cells exposed to brittle star crude saponins. Discolorating methods with DPPH and ABTS and expression of SOD-2 with RT-PCR were used to estimate the antioxidant activity. The anti-invasive activity of extracted saponins was examined through adhesion of HeLa cells to extracellular matrix, wound healing and evaluation of the mRNA levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by real time-PCR. The results showed that extracted saponins had cytotoxicity against cervical cancer cells and ABTS and DPPH scavenging properties with IC50 values of 604.5, 1012 μg/ml, respectively. Further, we found that, in wound healing assay, brittle star saponins could prevent invasion of HeLa cells in a concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, cell adhesion assay demonstrated blockage of cell attachment to extracellular matrix with an IC50 concentration of 16.1μg/ml. The significant dose dependent down regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in treated cells demonstrated that isolated saponins can decline tumor metastasis in vitro. The brittle star saponins remarkably prevented cervical cancer invasion and migration associated with down regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression. Therefore, saponins could be suggested as an anti-invasive candidate against cervical cancer and an antioxidant as well.

  19. Children with Brittle Bones: An Examination of Their Educational Needs and Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1983-01-01

    A study of the educational achievements of 40 children (5-16 years old) with osteogenesis imperfecta, brittle bone disease, revealed no differences between Ss and control Ss without the condition in terms of nonverbal intelligence. Differences were found, however, in writing speed. Inteviews with children, teachers, and parents revealed…

  20. Measurement of the ductile to brittle transition temperature for waste tank cooling coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on ASTM A106 carbon steel archived from SRS waste tanks to determine the susceptibility of the cooling coils to brittle fracture during a seismic event. The highest ductile to brittle transition temperature measured was [minus]5[degree]F and, with the addition of a 30[degree]F safety factor, the minimum safe operating temperature was determined to be 25[degree]F. Calculations also showed that a pre-existing circumferential flaw that is 2.2in. long would be necessary to initiate brittle fracture of the pipe. These results demonstrate that the pipes will not be susceptible to brittle fracture if the cooling water inlet temperature is lowered to 50[degree]F. Visual observation of the inner and outer walls of the pipe showed no localized attack or significant wall thinning. A 100--200 micron zinc coating is probably the reason for the lack of corrosion. A build-up of zinc slag occurred at pipe fittings where the weld had burned through. Although no attack was observed, the slag created several crevices which have the potential to trap the chromated water and initiate localized attack.

  1. Measurement of the ductile to brittle transition temperature for waste tank cooling coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on ASTM A106 carbon steel archived from SRS waste tanks to determine the susceptibility of the cooling coils to brittle fracture during a seismic event. The highest ductile to brittle transition temperature measured was {minus}5{degree}F and, with the addition of a 30{degree}F safety factor, the minimum safe operating temperature was determined to be 25{degree}F. Calculations also showed that a pre-existing circumferential flaw that is 2.2in. long would be necessary to initiate brittle fracture of the pipe. These results demonstrate that the pipes will not be susceptible to brittle fracture if the cooling water inlet temperature is lowered to 50{degree}F. Visual observation of the inner and outer walls of the pipe showed no localized attack or significant wall thinning. A 100--200 micron zinc coating is probably the reason for the lack of corrosion. A build-up of zinc slag occurred at pipe fittings where the weld had burned through. Although no attack was observed, the slag created several crevices which have the potential to trap the chromated water and initiate localized attack.

  2. Brittle fracture phase-field modeling of a short-rod specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, Ivana; Tupek, Michael R.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2015-09-01

    Predictive simulation capabilities for modeling fracture evolution provide further insight into quantities of interest in comparison to experimental testing. Based on the variational approach to fracture, the advent of phase-field modeling achieves the goal to robustly model fracture for brittle materials and captures complex crack topologies in three dimensions.

  3. Rice disease management under organic production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in organic rice production has increased because of the increased market demand for organic rice. Texas organic rice acreage has constantly increased over the last decade, reaching 32,000 acres in 2012. Texas is now the leading state in organic rice production in the U.S. Organic rice is p...

  4. Organic Rice Production: Challenges and Opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The market demand for organically produced rice has grown steadily with the majority of the acreage now being located in Texas and California. A wide range of organic products are marketed including conventional long and medium grain rice, aromatic or scented rice, rice with colored bran, and rice f...

  5. How does tooth cusp radius of curvature affect brittle food item processing?

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A; Dumont, Elizabeth R; Godfrey, Laurie R; Grosse, Ian R

    2013-07-01

    Tooth cusp sharpness, measured by radius of curvature (RoC), has been predicted to play a significant role in brittle/hard food item fracture. Here, we set out to test three existing hypotheses about this relationship: namely, the Blunt and Strong Cusp hypotheses, which predict that dull cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture, and the Pointed Cusp hypothesis, which predicts that sharp cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture using a four cusp bunodont molar. We also put forth and test the newly constructed Complex Cusp hypothesis, which predicts that a mixture of dull and sharp cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture. We tested the four hypotheses using finite-element models of four cusped, bunodont molars. When testing the three existing hypotheses, we assumed all cusps had the same level of sharpness (RoC), and gained partial support for the Blunt Cusp hypotheses. We found no support for the Pointed Cusp or Strong Cusp hypotheses. We used the Taguchi sampling method to test the Complex Cusps hypothesis with a morphospace created by independently varying the radii of curvature of the four cusps in the buccolingual and mesiodistal directions. The optimal occlusal morphology for fracturing brittle food items consists of a combination of sharp and dull cusps, which creates high stress concentrations in the food item while stabilizing the food item and keeping the stress concentrations in the enamel low. This model performed better than the Blunt Cusp hypothesis, suggesting a role for optimality in the evolution of cusp form.

  6. Role of fluid overpressures in crustal strength and the form of the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.

    2014-12-01

    The classic crustal strength-depth model of Brace and Kolhstedt (1980) (see figure) based on experimental rock mechanics depends in the brittle regime on the critical assumption of linearly increasing hydrostatic pore-fluid pressures. This leads to a predicted linearly increasing brittle strength that is well established based on deep borehole stress measurements in crystalline crust. In contrast, fluid overpressures are widely documented in orogenic belts based on borehole data, seismic velocity analysis and analysis of veins, in some cases showing complex fault-valve pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic. Typical observed overpressure-depth relationships predict a brittle crustal strength that is approximately constant with depth in contrast with the classic model. This constant-strength behavior below the fluid-retention depth (ZFRD in figure) has been confirmed using deep borehole stress and fluid-pressure measurements (Suppe, 2014). Recent ductile-plastic modeling of disequilibrium compaction suggests that pressure solution promotes further increases in overpressure and weakening, promoting a very prolonged low-strength brittle-ductile transition. Overpressured conditions can be inferred to exist over a substantial fraction of crustal thickness, spanning the brittle-ductile transition, in several tectonic environments, most straightforwardly in shale-rich clastic sedimentary basins built to sea level on oceanic or highly thinned continental crust such as the US Gulf Coast and Niger Delta. These thick accumulations commonly deform into shale-rich plate boundary mountain belts (e.g. Bangladesh/Miyanmar, Makran, Trinidad/Barbados, Gulf of Alaska, southern Taiwan and New Zealand). There is deep geophysical evidence for near lithostatic pore-fluid pressures existing to depths of 20-30km based on Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Q observations. We present active examples from Taiwan and New Zealand, combining borehole data and seismic tomography.

  7. Brittle creep and subcritical crack propagation in glass submitted to triaxial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Céline; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves; Bouyer, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    An experimental work is presented that aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanical evolution of cracks under brittle creep conditions. Brittle creep may be an important slow deformation process in the Earth's crust. Synthetic glass samples have been used to observe and document brittle creep due to slow crack-propagation. A crack density of 0.05 was introduced in intact synthetic glass samples by thermal shock. Creep tests were performed at constant confining pressure (15 MPa) for water saturated conditions. Data were obtained by maintaining the differential-stress constant in steps of 24 h duration. A set of sensors allowed us to record strains and acoustic emissions during creep. The effect of temperature on creep was investigated from ambient temperature to 70°C. The activation energy for crack growth was found to be 32 kJ/mol. In secondary creep, a large dilatancy was observed that did not occur in constant strain rate tests. This is correlated to acoustic emission activity associated with crack growth. As a consequence, slow crack growth has been evidenced in glass. Beyond secondary creep, failure in tertiary creep was found to be a progressive process. The data are interpreted through a previously developed micromechanical damage model that describes crack propagation. This model allows one to predict the secondary brittle creep phase and also to give an analytical expression for the time to rupture. Comparison between glass and crystalline rock indicates that the brittle creep behavior is probably controlled by the same process even if stress sensitivity for glass is lower than for rocks.

  8. Exploring Japan through Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtan, Linda S.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the role of rice in Japanese culture by presenting historical background and teaching activities in a variety of categories, such as language, sociology, history, and contemporary politics. Suggests teachers create cross-cultural comparisons; for example, the role of corn in the United States. Provides a list of teacher resources. (CMK)

  9. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  10. Discrete element modeling on the crack evolution behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yan-Hua; Ranjith, P. G.; Jiao, Yu-Yong; Ji, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Based on experimental results of brittle, intact sandstone under uniaxial compression, the micro-parameters were firstly confirmed by adopting particle flow code (PFC^{2D}). Then, the validation of the simulated models were cross checked with the experimental results of brittle sandstone containing three parallel fissures under uniaxial compression. The simulated results agreed very well with the experimental results, including the peak strength, peak axial strain, and ultimate failure mode. Using the same micro-parameters, the numerical models containing a new geometry of three fissures are constructed to investigate the fissure angle on the fracture mechanical behavior of brittle sandstone under uniaxial compression. The strength and deformation parameters of brittle sandstone containing new three fissures are dependent to the fissure angle. With the increase of the fissure angle, the elastic modulus, the crack damage threshold, and the peak strength of brittle sandstone containing three fissures firstly increase and secondly decrease. But the peak axial strain is nonlinearly related to the fissure angle. In the entire process of deformation, the crack initiation and propagation behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression are investigated with respect to the fissure angle. Six different crack coalescence modes are identified for brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression. The influence of the fissure angle on the length of crack propagation and crack coalescence stress is evaluated. These investigated conclusions are very important for ensuring the stability and safety of rock engineering with intermittent structures.

  11. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  12. Evaluation of brittleness of porcelain fused to pure titanium by fracture toughness, hardness and fracture energy.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Yoshifumi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Goto, Takayasu; Nagasawa, Toru

    2003-12-01

    To elucidate the cause of brittleness of porcelain fused to pure titanium (PFPT) which leads to chipping and cracking similar to that of conventional porcelain in clinical use, fracture toughness KIc, hardness (Hv and Hk) and fracture energy gamma reflecting the bonding energy of atoms were evaluated. In KIc there were no differences between PFPT and conventional porcelain, nor for Hv and Hk, but for the gamma of PFPT calculated from the KIc and the Young modulus measured by the resonance method there was less than that of conventional porcelain. These results indicate that mechanical properties such as KIc and hardness cannot always substantiate the brittleness of PFPT experienced in practical use. However, a comparatively small gamma of PFPT may suggest a fatigue crack growth as a more likely phenomenon as it occurs more easily than the conventional one in oral.

  13. Linking Nanoscales and Dislocation Shielding to the Ductile-Brittle Transition of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsala, Eric; Teresi, Claire; Gerberich, William W.

    2016-06-01

    The ductile-brittle transition of nano/microscale silicon is explored at low-temperature, high stress conditions. A pathway to eventual mechanism maps describing this ductile-brittle transition behavior using sample size, strain rate, and temperature is outlined. First, a discussion of variables controlling the BDT in silicon is given and discussed in the context of development of eventual modeling that could simultaneously incorporate all their effects. For description of energy dissipation by dislocation nucleation from a crack tip, three critical input parameters are identified: the effective stress, activation volume, and activation energy for dislocation motion. These are discussed individually relating to the controlling variables for the BDT. Lastly, possibilities for measuring these parameters experimentally are also described.

  14. Amish brittle hair syndrome gene maps to 7p14.1.

    PubMed

    Seboun, Eric; Lemainque, Arnaud; Jackson, Charles E

    2005-04-30

    The brittle hair syndrome (BHS) is characterized by short stature, intellectual impairment, brittle hair, and decreased fertility in 20 members from a large Amish consanguineous kindred previously reported affected with this syndrome. We mapped the BHS gene by genome scan to chromosome 7p14.1. Evidence of linkage was supported by a maximum multipoint LOD score of 6 obtained with GENEHUNTER for the linkage interval defined by markers D7S484-D7S2422 distant by 17.2 cM. Two-point linkage analysis performed with SUPERLINK yielded a LOD score of 9.02 at theta = 0 for marker D7S2497 located within that interval. Analysis of haplotypes homozygous-by-descent allowed fine mapping of the BHS gene within a 4.81 cM interval delimited by markers D7S2497 and D7S691, a region that spreads over 3.42 Mb. PMID:15723315

  15. Study on subsurface-inclined crack propagation during machining of brittle crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiawen; Chen, Jianbin; Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen

    2016-05-01

    There is an immense need to obtain high-quality surface and subsurface on brittle material owing to the advantage of its improved performance. Thus, in this paper, we proposed a mechanical and numerical study of fracture mechanics from the perspective of external loading and indentation geometry in brittle machining. Stress intensity factors are computed to analyze various impacts of external loading and indentation configuration on subsurface crack propagation. Results indicate that the main fracture mode for inclined crack is shear rather than opening and the apex angle of the indentation plays an important role in fracture behavior. As a certain external loading is exerted to the surface of the silicon, a large apex angle of indentation may lead to strong shielding effect on mode II crack propagation. A relationship between critical value of external loading to the crack propagation and the apex angle of the indentation is given in this paper that shows quantitative indication for suppression of crack growth.

  16. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  17. Brittle-fault deformation history in the NW Himalaya (Himachal Pradesh, India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintersberger, E.; Decker, K.; Thiede, R.; Strecker, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Himalayan mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau are the manifestations of intense crustal shortening and uplift along the southern margin of Eurasia associated with the India-Eurasia collision. While crustal shortening has been focused at lower elevations until the present day along the southern boundary of the Lesser Himalaya and the Siwalik ranges, several generations of both, orogen-parallel and orogen-perpendicular extensional structures have developed. These structures characterize the higher-elevation regions within the Higher and Tethyan Himalaya, suggesting syntectonic extension. In the NW Himalaya (India), extending from the deeply cut gorges of the Sutlej and Spiti rivers to the Garhwal Himalaya, closely spaced young normal faults, focal mechanisms of earthquakes with magnitudes between 5.2 and 6.8, and regional GPS measurements reveal ongoing E-W extension. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other extensional features observed in the Himalaya, this direction is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the NE-SW regional shortening direction. Here, we present new data obtained from structural geological mapping, fault kinematic analysis of hundreds of brittle faults, and remote sensing spanning the area between the Tso Morari Lake in the Tibetan Himalaya in the north and the mountain front in the Garhwal Himalaya in the south (30°-33°N/77°-79°E). In addition, we integrated published data on extensional phenomena in this region of the Himalaya. In the Garhwal Himalaya and the Sutlej-Spiti region, we collected and analyzed outcrop-scale brittle fault-planes with displacements of up to several cm. To analyze fault kinematic data (strike and dip of the fault, slip direction and sense of slip) for these micro-faults, we calculated strain axes for approx. 100 outcrop locations using the TectonicsFP program. This data set, as well as field observations on crosscutting relationships, mineralization of fault planes, and correlations with deformation structures

  18. Plasticity and an Inverse Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Strontium Titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gumbsch, P.; Taeri-Baghbadrani, S.; Brunner, D.; Sigle, W.; Ruehle, M.

    2001-08-20

    The use of ceramic materials is often restricted by a transition from ductile behavior to brittle fracture with decreasing temperature. For example, strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3} ) is known to be extremely fragile and brittle below 1300 K. It is therefore surprising to find that SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals can be deformed in compression below 1050 K again. Extensive plastic deformation up to 7% strain at low yield stresses of the order of only 120 MPa is possible at room temperature. Low temperature plasticity is carried by the same <110>{l_brace}1{bar 1} 0{r_brace} dislocations as the high temperature deformation along the <001> axis. From this we conclude that these dislocations must exist in two different core configurations.

  19. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of tungsten under shock loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Gray, G.T. III

    1993-02-01

    In an effort to characterize the ductile-brittle transition behavior of warm forged tungsten under shock loading conditions, we have performed shock/soft-recovery experiments at 22 and 4000 C. Results at 22 C indicate that shock (19 GPa) induced strains appear to be accommodated by fracture processes, i.e. there were no indications of shock induced plastic deformation and the test sample was reduced to rubble. At 400 C, the test sample was recovered intact and the shock induced plasticity caused deformation banding and an increase in the dislocation density of the material. For reasons unclear, almost no change in the post shock mechanical behavior was observed, despite the significant changes in the microstructure. The results of these experiments demonstrate the principal of a ductile-brittle transition behavior of tungsten under uniaxial shock loading conditions and indicate that explosively driven deformation of tungsten of this material will result in pulverization due to shock loading.

  20. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haoran; Chew, Huck Beng; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of Li{sub x}Si electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si–Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si–Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li–Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the Li{sub x}Si alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  1. High-resolution phase contrast imaging of brittle failure during impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Kyle; Jensen, Brian; Shengnian, Luo; Hooks, Daniel; Yeager, John; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2012-02-01

    Heterogeneous processes involved in brittle failure necessitate in situ, spatially resolved observation. An impact capability has recently been developed in which synchrotron phase contrast imaging (PCI), at the 32-ID beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, can be used to resolve crack interfaces during dynamic deformation. The imaging is both fast and high-resolution as images with approximately 3 micrometer resolution are obtained from single x-ray pulses (<100 ps duration). Experiments have been performed to investigate questions regarding velocimetry interpretation, the effect of stress states, and whether cracking can occur under uniaxial compression. Uniaxial compression and tension in planar impact configurations and cylindrical impact penetration has been used to vary stress states and observe failure. PCI and velocimetry results from these experiments will be presented for a range of brittle materials spanning glasses and ceramics.

  2. Nonadiabatic Study of Dynamic Electronic Effects during Brittle Fracture of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofanis, Patrick L.; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A., III; Xiao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    It has long been observed that brittle fracture of materials can lead to emission of high energy electrons and UV photons, but an atomistic description of the origin of such processes has lacked. We report here on simulations using a first-principles-based electron force field methodology with effective core potentials to describe the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics during brittle fracture in silicon crystal. Our simulations replicate the correct response of the crack tip velocity to the threshold critical energy release rate, a feat that is inaccessible to quantum mechanics methods or conventional force-field-based molecular dynamics. We also describe the crack induced voltages, current bursts, and charge carrier production observed experimentally during fracture but not previously captured in simulations. We find that strain-induced surface rearrangements and local heating cause ionization of electrons at the fracture surfaces.

  3. Nonadiabatic study of dynamic electronic effects during brittle fracture of silicon.

    PubMed

    Theofanis, Patrick L; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A; Xiao, Hai

    2012-01-27

    It has long been observed that brittle fracture of materials can lead to emission of high energy electrons and UV photons, but an atomistic description of the origin of such processes has lacked. We report here on simulations using a first-principles-based electron force field methodology with effective core potentials to describe the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics during brittle fracture in silicon crystal. Our simulations replicate the correct response of the crack tip velocity to the threshold critical energy release rate, a feat that is inaccessible to quantum mechanics methods or conventional force-field-based molecular dynamics. We also describe the crack induced voltages, current bursts, and charge carrier production observed experimentally during fracture but not previously captured in simulations. We find that strain-induced surface rearrangements and local heating cause ionization of electrons at the fracture surfaces. PMID:22400860

  4. Superior room-temperature ductility of typically brittle quasicrystals at small sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Kuczera, Pawel; Sologubenko, Alla; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Steurer, Walter; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity. Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual properties. However, a well-known bottleneck that impedes their widespread application is their intrinsic brittleness: plastic deformation has been found to only be possible at high temperatures or under hydrostatic pressures, and their deformation mechanism at low temperatures is still unclear. Here, we report that typically brittle quasicrystals can exhibit remarkable ductility of over 50% strains and high strengths of ~4.5 GPa at room temperature and sub-micrometer scales. In contrast to the generally accepted dominant deformation mechanism in quasicrystals--dislocation climb, our observation suggests that dislocation glide may govern plasticity under high-stress and low-temperature conditions. The ability to plastically deform quasicrystals at room temperature should lead to an improved understanding of their deformation mechanism and application in small-scale devices.

  5. Prediction of material strength and fracture of brittle materials using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwwerf, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The design of many devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in windshields; and rock and concrete that are used in oil wells. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, they did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  6. Pinch and swell structures: evidence for brittle-viscous behaviour in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, R.; Piazolo, S.; Daczko, N.

    2015-04-01

    The flow properties of middle to lower crustal rocks are commonly represented by viscous flow. However, examples of pinch and swell structures found in a mid-crustal high strain zone at St. Anne Point (Fiordland, New Zealand) suggest pinch and swell structures are initiated by brittle failure of the more competent layer in conjunction with material softening. On this basis we develop a flexible numerical model using brittle-viscous flow where Mohr-Coulomb failure is utilised to initiate pinch and swell structure development. Results show that pinch and swell structures develop in a competent layer in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow provided the competent layer has enough viscosity contrast and initially fails brittlely. The degree of material softening after initial failure is shown to impact pinch and swell characteristics with high rates of material softening causing the formation of thick necks between swells by limiting the successful localisation of strain. The flow regime and yielding characteristics of the matrix do not impact pinch and swell structure formation itself, so long as the matrix is less competent. To aid analysis of the structures and help derive the flow properties of rocks in the field, we define three stages of pinch and swell development and offer suggestions for measurements to be made in the field. Our study suggests that Mohr-Coulomb behaviour combined with viscous flow is an appropriate way to represent the heterogeneous rocks of the middle to lower crust. This type of mid-crustal rheological behaviour has significant influence on the localization of strain at all scales. For example, inclusion of Mohr-Coulomb brittle failure with viscous flow in just some mid-crustal layers within a crustal scale model will result in strain localisation throughout the whole crustal section allowing the development of through-going high strain structures from the upper crust into the middle and lower crust. This localization then has a significant

  7. A model for multiple-drop-impact erosion of brittle solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, O. G.

    1971-01-01

    A statistical model for the multiple-drop-impact erosion of brittle solids was developed. An equation for calculating the rate of erosion is given. The development is not complete since two quantities that are needed to calculate the rate of erosion with use of the equation must be assessed from experimental data. A partial test of the equation shows that it gives results that are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  8. Fracture propagation in brittle materials as a standard dissipative process: General theorems and crack tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, A.; Fantoni, F.

    2016-10-01

    The present work frames the problem of three-dimensional quasi-static crack propagation in brittle materials into the theory of standard dissipative processes. Variational formulations are stated. They characterize the three dimensional crack front "quasi-static velocity" as minimizer of constrained quadratic functionals. An implicit in time crack tracking algorithm that computationally handles the constraint via the penalty method algorithm is introduced and proof of concept is provided.

  9. A Weibull brittle material failure model for the ABAQUS computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.

    1991-08-01

    A statistical failure theory for brittle materials that traces its origins to the Weibull distribution function is developed for use in the general purpose ABAQUS finite element computer program. One of the fundamental assumptions for this development is that Mode 1 microfractures perpendicular to the direction of the principal stress contribute independently to the fast fracture. The theory is implemented by a user subroutine for ABAQUS. Example problems illustrating the capability and accuracy of the model are given. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  10. From boron carbide to glass: Absorption of an elongated high-speed projectile in brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, B. V.

    2016-09-01

    Penetration into boron carbide of an elongated high-speed projectile in the form of a copper jet produced by an explosion of a cumulative charge is studied. The efficiency of absorption of a copper jet in different brittle materials for evaluating their protective ability is compared. Conditions for the absence of the influence of the lateral unloading wave on the penetration zone, which provide the minimum penetration depth, are determined.

  11. Shakedown of Composite Frames Taking into Account Plastic and Brittle Fracture of Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawdin, Piotr; Bulanov, George

    2015-03-01

    In the paper the mathematical model of the optimization problem of limit and shakedown analysis for composite plane frames, containing elastic-plastic and brittle elements under low-cyclic loading, is proposed. It is assumed that the load varies randomly within the specified domain, and limited plastic redistribution of forces in such structures occurs. An example of the shakedown analyses of the composite frame is given.

  12. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: STM, TEM and electron channeling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The original thrust of this grant was to apply newly developed techniques in scanning tunneling and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the mechanism of brittle fracture. This grant spun-off several new directions in that some of the findings on bulk structural materials could be utilized on thin films or intermetallic single crystals. Modeling and material evaluation efforts in this grant are represented in a figure. Out of this grant evolved the field the author has designated as Contact Fracture Mechanics. By appropriate modeling of stress and strain distribution fields around normal indentations or scratch tracks, various measures of thin film fracture or decohesion and brittle fracture of low ductility intermetallics is possible. These measures of fracture resistance in small volumes are still evolving and as such no standard technique or analysis has been uniformly accepted. For brittle ceramics and ceramic films, there are a number of acceptable analyses such as those published by Lawn, Evans and Hutchinson. For more dissipative systems involving metallic or polymeric films and/or substrates, there is still much to be accomplished as can be surmised from some of the findings in the present grant. In Section 2 the author reviews the funding history and accomplishments associated mostly with bulk brittle fracture. This is followed by Section 3 which covers more recent work on using novel techniques to evaluate fracture in low ductility single crystals or thin films using micromechanical probes. Basically Section 3 outlines how the recent work fits in with the goals of defining contact fracture mechanics and gives an overview of how the several examples in Section 4 (the Appendices) fit into this framework.

  13. The pale brittle stem mushroom, Psathyrella candolleana (higher Basidiomycetes): an indigenous medicinal mushroom new to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Habib, Mouthana N; Holliday, John C; Tura, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The pale brittle stem mushroom, Psathyrella candolleana, a species new to Iraq, is described from the sub-arid region of Aljazira (Iraq). Both classical taxonomy and DNA analyses confirm the identification of the fungus strain (RM-0861) as P. candolleana, a species that belongs to the family Psatherellaceae known to possess medicinal properties. Being a saprophyte, this fungus is cultivatable in laboratory conditions and therefore shows potential for production and use as a medicinal mushroom in human and veterinary health.

  14. Final report of experimental laboratory-scale brittle fracture studies of glasses and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, L.J.; Mecham, W.J.; Reedy, G.T.; Steindler, M.J.

    1982-10-01

    An experimental program was conducted to characterize the fragments generated when brittle glasses and ceramics are impacted. The direct application of the results is to radioactive waste forms for which the effects of accidental impacts must be known or predictable. Two major measurable experimental responses used for characterization of these effects are (1) the size distribution of the fragments, including the sizes that are respirable, and (2) the increase in surface area of the brittle test specimen. This report describes the glass and ceramic materials characterized, the procedures and techniques used for the characterization of size distributions and surface areas, and the results of the two key responses of the impact tests. Five alternative methods of determining size distributions were compared. Also examined were the effects of diametral and axial specimen impact configurations and the use of mechanical stops to eliminate secondary crushing during testing. Microscopic characterizations of Pyrex and SRL 131 simulated waste glass and SYNROC fragments were also performed. Preliminary correlations of impact energy with key size-distribution parameters, fragment surface areas, and respirable fines were proposed as useful for future verification and for use with modeling and scale-up studies of brittle fracture of larger realistic waste forms. The impact fragments of all specimens could be described by lognormal size distributions.

  15. The conserved genetic background for pluteus arm development in brittle stars and sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Morino, Yoshiaki; Koga, Hiroyuki; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Echinoderm pluteus larvae are considered a classical example of convergent evolution that occurred in sea urchins and brittle stars. Several genes are known to be involved in the development of pluteus arms in sea urchins, including fgfA, pax2/5/8, pea3, otp, wnt5, and tet. To determine whether the convergent evolution of larval arms also involves these genes in brittle stars, their expression patterns were determined in brittle star. We found that all genes showed similar expression in the arms of ophiopluteus to that seen in echinopluteus, suggesting that convergent evolution of pluteus arms occurred by recruitment of a similar set of genes. This may be explained by our observation that some of these genes are also expressed in the spine rudiment of direct-type development sea urchins. We propose an evolutionary scenario wherein the pluteus arms of both echinopluteus and ophiopluteus were acquired by independent co-options of the genetic module responsible for the projection of the adult skeleton.

  16. Rock Drilling Performance Evaluation by an Energy Dissipation Based Rock Brittleness Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    To reliably estimate drilling performance both tool-rock interaction laws along with a proper rock brittleness index are required to be implemented. In this study, the performance of a single polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter cutting and different drilling methods including PDC rotary drilling, roller-cone rotary drilling and percussive drilling were investigated. To investigate drilling performance by rock strength properties, laboratory PDC cutting tests were performed on different rocks to obtain cutting parameters. In addition, results of laboratory and field drilling on different rocks found elsewhere in literature were used. Laboratory and field cutting and drilling test results were coupled with values of a new rock brittleness index proposed herein and developed based on energy dissipation withdrawn from the complete stress-strain curve in uniaxial compression. To quantify cutting and drilling performance, the intrinsic specific energy in rotary-cutting action, i.e. the energy consumed in pure cutting action, and drilling penetration rate values in percussive action were used. The results show that the new energy-based brittleness index successfully describes the performance of different cutting and drilling methods and therefore is relevant to assess drilling performance for engineering applications.

  17. A multi-step transmission electron microscopy sample preparation technique for cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials.

    PubMed

    Weiss Brennan, Claire V; Walck, Scott D; Swab, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    A new technique for the preparation of heavily cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials for examination in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is described in detail. In this study, cross-sectional TEM samples were prepared from indented silicon carbide (SiC) bulk ceramics, although this technique could also be applied to other brittle and/or multiphase materials. During TEM sample preparation, milling-induced damage must be minimized, since in studying deformation mechanisms, it would be difficult to distinguish deformation-induced cracking from cracking occurring due to the sample preparation. The samples were prepared using a site-specific, two-step ion milling sequence accompanied by epoxy vacuum infiltration into the cracks. This technique allows the heavily cracked, brittle ceramic material to stay intact during sample preparation and also helps preserve the true microstructure of the cracked area underneath the indent. Some preliminary TEM results are given and discussed in regards to deformation studies in ceramic materials. This sample preparation technique could be applied to other cracked and/or heavily damaged materials, including geological materials, archaeological materials, fatigued materials, and corrosion samples.

  18. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  19. Brittle-to-quasibrittle transition in bundles of nonlinear elastic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Chandreyee; Manna, S. S.

    2016-09-01

    Properties of the fiber bundle model have been studied using equal load-sharing dynamics where each fiber obeys a nonlinear stress (s )-strain (x ) characteristic function s =G (x ) till its breaking threshold. In particular, four different functional forms have been studied: G (x ) =eα x , 1 +xα , xα, and x eα x where α is a continuously tunable parameter of the model in all cases. Analytical studies, supported by extensive numerical calculations of this model, exhibit a brittle to quasibrittle phase transition at a critical value of αc only in the first two cases. This transition is characterized by the weak power law modulated logarithmic (brittle) and logarithmic (quasibrittle) dependence of the relaxation time on the two sides of the critical point. Moreover, the critical load σc(α ) for the global failure of the bundle depends explicitly on α in all cases. In addition, four more cases have also been studied, where either the nonlinear functional form or the probability distribution of breaking thresholds has been suitably modified. In all these cases similar brittle to quasibrittle transitions have been observed.

  20. Brittleness index calculation and evaluation for CBM reservoirs based on AVO simultaneous inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Dong, Shouhua; Huang, Yaping; Wang, Haolong; Chen, Guiwu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a new approach is proposed for coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir brittleness index (BI) calculations. The BI, as a guide for fracture area selection, is calculated by dynamic elastic parameters (dynamic Young's modulus Ed and dynamic Poisson's ratio υd) obtained from an amplitude versus offset (AVO) simultaneous inversion. Among the three different classes of CBM reservoirs distinguished on the basis of brittleness in the theoretical part of this study, class I reservoirs with high BI values are identified as preferential target areas for fracturing. Therefore, we derive the AVO approximation equation expressed by Ed and υd first. This allows the direct inversion of the dynamic elastic parameters through the pre-stack AVO simultaneous inversion, which is based on Bayes' theorem. Thereafter, a test model with Gaussian white noise and a through-well seismic profile inversion is used to demonstrate the high reliability of the inversion parameters. Accordingly, the BI of a CBM reservoir section from the Qinshui Basin is calculated using the proposed method and a class I reservoir section detected through brittleness evaluation. From the outcome of this study, we believe the adoption of this new approach could act as a guide and reference for BI calculations and evaluations of CBM reservoirs.

  1. The role of fluids on the brittle-ductile transition in the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg; Beeler, Nick

    2015-04-01

    To characterize stress and deformation style at the base of the seismogenic zone we investigate how the mechanical properties of fluid-rock systems respond to variations in temperature and strain rate. The role of fluids on the processes responsible for the brittle-ductile transition in quartz-rich rocks has not been explored at experimental conditions where the kinetic competition between microcracking and viscous flow is similar to that expected in the Earth. Our initial analysis of this competition suggests that the effective pressure law for sliding friction should not work as effectively near the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) as it does at shallow conditions. Our motivation comes from three observations. First, extrapolation of quartzite flow laws indicates the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) occurs at ~300 °C at geologic strain rates for conditions where fault strength is controlled by a coefficient of friction of ~0.6 with a hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure gradient. Second, we suggest that the preservation of relatively high stress microstructures indicates that the effective stress law must sometimes evolve rapidly near the BDT. There is abundant evidence for the presence of fluids during viscous deformation of mylonites (e.g., recrystallization and redistribution of micas, dissolution and reprecipitation of quartz). The relatively high viscous stresses inferred from these microstructures are incompatible with the standard effective stress relationship. A similar "paradox" is evident at experimental conditions where viscous creep is studied in the laboratory. In this case, the presence of fluid (which should produce low effective stress) does not promote localized brittle failure, even though these experiments are conducted under undrained conditions. Third, experiments on partially molten rocks illustrate viscous creep behavior during both drained compaction and undrained triaxial deformation tests, even though the melt pressure approaches or equals

  2. Micromechanics of brittle creep and implications for the strength of the upper crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-04-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water or other aqueous solutions promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we present a new micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modelled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' power law description of stress corrosion crack growth. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non-linear and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain rate) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain rate as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep, with apparently constant strain rate, arises as merely an inflexion between these two end-member phases. The strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature conditions, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term differential stress as a function of depth in the upper crust for tectonic loading rates: sub-critical cracking induces an offset of the rock strength, which is equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. For porous rocks, the competition between sub

  3. Deciphering the brittle evolution of SW Norway through a combined structural, mineralogical and geochronological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, Thomas; Viola, Giulio; Fredin, Ola; Zwingmann, Horst; Wilkinson, Camilla Maya; Ganerød, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    SW Norway has experienced a complex brittle history after cessation of the Caledonian orogeny, and the recent discoveries of major hydrocarbon reserves in heavily fractured and weathered basement offshore SW Norway has triggered a renewed interest in understanding this complex tectonic evolution. In this contribution we present results from a multidisciplinary study combining lineament analysis, field work, paleo-stress inversion, mineralogical characterization and radiometric dating in the Bømlo area of SW Norway in order to develop a tectonic model for the brittle evolution of this important region. The study area mainly consists of the Rolvsnes granodiorite (U-Pb zircon age of ca. 466 Ma), which is devoid of penetrative ductile deformation features. The first identified brittle faults are muscovite-bearing top-to-the-NNW thrusts and E-W striking dextral strike-slip faults decorated with stretched biotite. These are mechanically compatible and are assigned to the same NNW-SSE transpressional regime. Ar-Ar muscovite and biotite dates of ca. 450 Ma (Late Ordovician) indicate fault activity in the course of a Taconian-equivalent orogenic event. During the subsequent Silurian Laurentia-Baltica collision variably oriented, lower-grade chlorite and epidote-coated faults formed in response to a ENE-WSW compressional stress regime. A large number of mainly N-S striking normal faults consist of variably thick fault gouge cores with illite, quartz, kaolinite, calcite and epidote mineralizations, accommodating mainly E-W extension. K-Ar dating of illites separated from representative fault gouges and zones of altered granodiorite constrain deformation ranging from the Permian to the Late Jurassic, indicating a long history of crustal extension where faults were repeatedly activated. In addition, a set of ca. SW-NE striking faults associated with alteration zones give Cretaceous dates, either representing a young phase of NW-SE extension or reactivation of previously formed

  4. Outcrossing Potential between U.S. Blackhull Red Rice and Indica Rice Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy red rice is a major weed pest of rice in the southern U.S. Outcrossing between red rice and commercial tropical japonica rice cultivars has resulted in new weed biotypes that further hinder the effectiveness of weed management. In recent years, indica rice has been used increasingly as a ger...

  5. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â...) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF... classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  6. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â...) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF... classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  7. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â...) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF... classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled...

  8. Description of new dry granular materials of variable cohesion and friction coefficient: Implications for laboratory modeling of the brittle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M. M.; Bulois, C.; Mourgues, R.; Galland, O.; Legland, J.-B.; Gruber, C.

    2016-08-01

    Cohesion and friction coefficient are fundamental parameters for scaling brittle deformation in laboratory models of geological processes. However, they are commonly not experimental variable, whereas (1) rocks range from cohesion-less to strongly cohesive and from low friction to high friction and (2) strata exhibit substantial cohesion and friction contrasts. This brittle paradox implies that the effects of brittle properties on processes involving brittle deformation cannot be tested in laboratory models. Solving this paradox requires the use of dry granular materials of tunable and controllable brittle properties. In this paper, we describe dry mixtures of fine-grained cohesive, high friction silica powder (SP) and low-cohesion, low friction glass microspheres (GM) that fulfill this requirement. We systematically estimated the cohesions and friction coefficients of mixtures of variable proportions using two independent methods: (1) a classic Hubbert-type shear box to determine the extrapolated cohesion (C) and friction coefficient (μ), and (2) direct measurements of the tensile strength (T0) and the height (H) of open fractures to calculate the true cohesion (C0). The measured values of cohesion increase from 100 Pa for pure GM to 600 Pa for pure SP, with a sub-linear trend of the cohesion with the mixture GM content. The two independent cohesion measurement methods, from shear tests and tension/extensional tests, yield very similar results of extrapolated cohesion (C) and show that both are robust and can be used independently. The measured values of friction coefficients increase from 0.5 for pure GM to 1.05 for pure SP. The use of these granular material mixtures now allows testing (1) the effects of cohesion and friction coefficient in homogeneous laboratory models and (2) testing the effect of brittle layering on brittle deformation, as demonstrated by preliminary experiments. Therefore, the brittle properties become, at last, experimental variables.

  9. 21 CFR 137.350 - Enriched rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enriched rice. 137.350 Section 137.350 Food and... Related Products § 137.350 Enriched rice. (a) The foods for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are forms of milled rice (except rice coated with talc and glucose...

  10. Red yeast rice for dysipidemia.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Shariq; Al Badarin, Firas J; DiNicolantonio, James J; Lavie, Carl J; O'Keefe, James H

    2013-01-01

    Red yeast rice is an ancient Chinese food product that contains monacolins, chemical substances that are similar to statins in their mechanisms of action and lipid lowering properties. Several studies have found red yeast rice to be moderately effective at improving the lipid profile, particularly for lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. One large randomized controlled study from China found that red yeast rice significantly improved risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and overall survival in patients following myocardial infarction. Thus, red yeast rice is a potentially useful over-the-counter cholesterol-lowering agent. However, many red yeast rice formulations are non-standardized and unregulated food supplements, and there is a need for further research and regulation of production.

  11. RCN1/OsABCG5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is required for hypodermal suberization of roots in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Shiono, Katsuhiro; Ando, Miho; Nishiuchi, Shunsaku; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kohtaro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Matsuo, Yuichi; Yasuno, Naoko; Yamanouchi, Utako; Fujimoto, Masaru; Takanashi, Hideki; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus B; Shitan, Nobukazu; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Takamure, Itsuro; Yano, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Schreiber, Lukas; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2014-10-01

    Suberin is a complex polymer composed of aliphatic and phenolic compounds. It is a constituent of apoplastic plant interfaces. In many plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa), the hypodermis in the outer part of roots forms a suberized cell wall (the Casparian strip and/or suberin lamellae), which inhibits the flow of water and ions and protects against pathogens. To date, there is no genetic evidence that suberin forms an apoplastic transport barrier in the hypodermis. We discovered that a rice reduced culm number1 (rcn1) mutant could not develop roots longer than 100 mm in waterlogged soil. The mutated gene encoded an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter named RCN1/OsABCG5. RCN1/OsABCG5 gene expression in the wild type was increased in most hypodermal and some endodermal roots cells under stagnant deoxygenated conditions. A GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 fusion protein localized at the plasma membrane of the wild type. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, well suberized hypodermis developed in wild types but not in rcn1 mutants. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, apoplastic tracers (periodic acid and berberine) were blocked at the hypodermis in the wild type but not in rcn1, indicating that the apoplastic barrier in the mutant was impaired. The amount of the major aliphatic suberin monomers originating from C(28) and C(30) fatty acids or ω-OH fatty acids was much lower in rcn1 than in the wild type. These findings suggest that RCN1/OsABCG5 has a role in the suberization of the hypodermis of rice roots, which contributes to formation of the apoplastic barrier.

  12. Non-invasive imaging of cellulose microfibril orientation within plant cell walls by polarized Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Singh, Seema; Joo, Michael; Vega-Sanchez, Miguel; Ronald, Pamela; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils represent the major scaffold of plant cell walls. Different packing and orientation of the microfibrils at the microscopic scale determines the macroscopic properties of cell walls and thus affect their functions with a profound effect on plant survival. We developed a polarized Raman microspectroscopic method to determine cellulose microfibril orientation within rice plant cell walls. Employing an array of point measurements as well as area imaging and subsequent Matlab-assisted data processing, we were able to characterize the distribution of cellulose microfibril orientation in terms of director angle and anisotropy magnitude. Using this approach we detected differences between wild type rice plants and the rice brittle culm mutant, which shows a more disordered cellulose microfibril arrangement, and differences between different tissues of a wild type rice plant. This novel non-invasive Raman imaging approach allows for quantitative assessment of cellulose fiber orientation in cell walls of herbaceous plants, an important advancement in cell wall characterization.

  13. Geometry and cross cutting relationships of brittle deformation on Kea (Greece, W. Cyclades)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenschaub, M.; Grasemann, B.; Iglseder, C.; Rice, A. H. N.

    2009-04-01

    The Aegean region represents an active extensional regime formed since the Oligocene due to roll-back of the African Plate within the Eurasian-African collision zone. Extension led to metamorphic core complex formation along low-angle normal faults, causing exhumation of rocks originating near the brittle-ductile transition zone. Bi-directional extension kinematics have been documented in the Attic-Cycladic-Crystalline Complex; the Eastern Cyclades show a top-to-N/NE extension whilst the Western Cyclades show top-to-S-SW extension. Kea, at the western end of the Western Cyclades shows evidence of a poly-metamorphic evolution, with relics of high-pressure metamorphism strongly overprinted by Oligocene-Miocene greenschist facies metamorphism. Kea comprises a footwall of chloritic schists with quartz lenses interlayered with calcite-mylonites. These are overlain by a ductile-brittle shear zone with a consistent top-to-SSW kinematics together with a WNW-ESE oriented shortening component, forming locally a strong crenulation cleavage. Stretching and mineral lineations have a mean NE-SW trend. Detailed structural investigations of the deformation in the western area of Kea (Pisses) were based on remote sensing analysis of fracture trends. This showed two dominant strike directions: ca. NE-SW and NW-SE. Fractures were spaced at ca. 2 - 2.5 m. From the north of Pisses southwards, the angle between the two main fracture directions changes gradually from a rhombohedral geometry (ca. 50°/130° angles between fractures, with the acute angle facing westwards) into an orthogonal geometry (ca. 90°/90°). Field observations revealed that both fracture geometries comprised steeply dipping (60°-90°) and mainly conjugate fractures. Due to the homogenous nature of the pelitic schists, offsets could only rarely be estimated; the maximum recorded was < 40 cm. Reverse offsets were never seen. Reliable slickenside lineations were also not seen. Early fractures show a brittle

  14. Brittle deformation and exhumation mechanisms in the core of the Eastern Alps, The Tauern Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Audrey; Garcia, Sebastian; Rosenberg, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Tauern Window (TW) is a Tertiary structural and thermal dome located in the core of the Eastern Alpine orogen and in front of the Dolomite indenter. The Penninic basement and cover units within the TW attained their thermal peak about 30 Myr ago (e.g., Selverstone et al., 1992) followed by cooling and exhumation from Early Oligocene to late Miocene time (e.g., Grundmann and Morteani, 1985). Most exhumation was partly accommodated by two normal faults at the western and eastern ends of the TW (Brenner and Katschberg faults, respectively). Although these normal faults are well described in the literature, their roles in the exhumation of the TW are still under debate: Exhumation accommodated primarily by folding and erosion (e.g., Rosenberg et al., 2004) versus exhumation mainly accommodated by Brenner and Katschberg normal faulting (e.g., Selverstone, 1988; Ratschbacher et al., 1989). New fault-slip data from the TW allow us to reconstruct paleostress axes by inversion and to constrain the relative roles of the folding and orogen-parallel extension during the late deformation history of the TW, in the brittle-field. Our results show little evidence of compression and a clear zoning of the paleostress field in the TW. In the central part of the TW, the σ1 direction is sub-horizontal N-S to NE-SW (strike-slip), whereas it is steep in the footwall of the Brenner and the Katschberg normal faults. Local variability of the σ3 direction are observed; indeed, the σ3 direction varies from E-W to WNW-ESE along the Brenner fault, to NW-SE along the Jaufen fault, the inferred southern continuation of the Brenner fault (Schneider et al., this session). Along the Katschberg fault, the σ3 direction is mainly NNW-SSE oriented, which is consistent with extension in front of a triangular dead zone shape induced by the WSW-striking Dolomites indenter. Nearly no evidence of a stress field compatible with upright folding (D2 phase of deformation) was found in the brittle domain

  15. The failure of brittle materials under overall compression: Effects of loading rate and defect distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Bhasker

    The constitutive behaviors and failure processes of brittle materials under far-field compressive loading are studied in this work. Several approaches are used: experiments to study the compressive failure behavior of ceramics, design of experimental techniques by means of finite element simulations, and the development of micro-mechanical damage models to analyze and predict mechanical response of brittle materials under far-field compression. Experiments have been conducted on various ceramics, (primarily on a transparent polycrystalline ceramic, aluminum oxynitride or AlON) under loading rates ranging from quasi-static (˜ 5X10-6) to dynamic (˜ 200 MPa/mus), using a servo-controlled hydraulic test machine and a modified compression Kolsky bar (MKB) technique respectively. High-speed photography has also been used with exposure times as low as 20 ns to observe the dynamic activation, growth and coalescence of cracks and resulting damage zones in the specimen. The photographs were correlated in time with measurements of the stresses in the specimen. Further, by means of 3D finite element simulations, an experimental technique has been developed to impose a controlled, homogeneous, planar confinement in the specimen. The technique can be used in conjunction with a high-speed camera to study the in situ dynamic failure behavior of materials under confinement. AlON specimens are used for the study. The statically pre-compressed specimen is subjected to axial dynamic compressive loading using the MKB. Results suggest that confinement not only increases the load carrying capacity, it also results in a non-linear stress evolution in the material. High-speed photographs also suggest an inelastic deformation mechanism in AlON under confinement which evolves more slowly than the typical brittle-cracking type of damage in the unconfined case. Next, an interacting micro-crack damage model is developed that explicitly accounts for the interaction among the micro-cracks in

  16. New perspectives on the transition between discrete fracture, fragmentation, and pulverization during brittle failure of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Ghaffari, H.; Barber, T. J.; Borjas, C.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of Earth's tectonic plates are typically measured in millimeters to tens of centimeters per year, seemingly confirming the generally-held view that tectonic processes are slow, and have been throughout Earth's history. In line with this perspective, the vast majority of laboratory rock mechanics research focused on failure in the brittle regime has been limited to experiments utilizing slow loading rates. On the other hand, many natural processes that pose significant risk for humans (e.g., earthquakes and extraterrestrial impacts), as well as risks associated with human activities (blow-outs, explosions, mining and mine failures, projectile penetration), occur at rates that are hundreds to thousands of times faster than those typically simulated in the laboratory. Little experimental data exists to confirm or calibrate theoretical models explaining the connection between these dramatic events and the pulverized rocks found in fault zones, impacts, or explosions; however the experimental data that does exist is thought-provoking: At the earth's surface, the process of brittle fracture passes through a critical transition in rocks at high strain rates (101-103s-1) between regimes of discrete fracture and distributed fragmentation, accompanied by a dramatic increase in strength. Previous experimental works on this topic have focused on key thresholds (e.g., peak stress, peak strain, average strain rate) that define this transition, but more recent work suggests that this transition is more fundamentally dependent on characteristics (e.g., shape) of the loading pulse and related microcrack dynamics, perhaps explaining why for different lithologies different thresholds more effectively define the pulverization transition. In this presentation we summarize some of our work focused on this transition, including the evolution of individual defects at the microscopic, microsecond scale and the energy budget associated with the brittle fragmentation process as a

  17. Bridging micro to macroscale fracture properties in highly heterogeneous brittle solids: weak pinning versus fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasoya, Manish; Lazarus, Véronique; Ponson, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    The effect of strong toughness heterogeneities on the macroscopic failure properties of brittle solids is investigated in the context of planar crack propagation. The basic mechanism at play is that the crack is locally slowed down or even trapped when encountering tougher material. The induced front deformation results in a selection of local toughness values that reflect at larger scale on the material resistance. To unravel this complexity and bridge micro to macroscale in failure of strongly heterogeneous media, we propose a homogenization procedure based on the introduction of two complementary macroscopic properties: An apparent toughness defined from the loading required to make the crack propagate and an effective fracture energy defined from the rate of energy released by unit area of crack advance. The relationship between these homogenized properties and the features of the local toughness map is computed using an iterative perturbation method. This approach is applied to a circular crack pinned by a periodic array of obstacles invariant in the radial direction, which gives rise to two distinct propagation regimes: A weak pinning regime where the crack maintains a stationary shape after reaching an equilibrium position and a fingering regime characterized by the continuous growth of localized regions of the fronts while the other parts remain trapped. Our approach successfully bridges micro to macroscopic failure properties in both cases and illustrates how small scale heterogeneities can drastically affect the overall failure response of brittle solids. On a broader perspective, we believe that our approach can be used as a powerful tool for the rational design of heterogeneous brittle solids and interfaces with tailored failure properties.

  18. What do we know about the initiation and early stages of brittle faulting in crystalline rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    The styles of initiation and subsequent growth of faults control fault length-slip scaling, the internal structure of fault zones, and fault-rock properties, influencing seismogenic behavior and fluid flow along the faults. Observations by many researchers over the last several decades have illustrated that faults in the upper crust initiate on pre-existing (inherited) or precursory (early-formed) structures and grow by the mechanical interaction and linkage of these structures. These pre-existing and precursory structures are typically mode I fractures (joints, veins, dikes) but may also be semi-brittle shear zones (such as deformation bands in porous sandstone). Research in the granitic outcrops of the central Sierra Nevada (California) has provided significant insight into the geometry and fundamental mechanics of the early stages of fault development. This work has shown that faults in plutonic rocks initiate on pre-existing or precursory joints or dikes and that the discontinuous nature of early mode I fractures has a strong influence on the subsequent development of the fault zone. In basalt, we have similarly observed the important influence of preexisting joints, and, at a broader scale, precursory, semi-brittle shear zones in the form of fault-tip monoclines. In metamorphic rocks, foliation appears to control the initial development of faults, influencing fault orientation, or enabling precursory structures such as kink bands. Kink bands, like deformation bands in porous sandstone, accommodate only small strains before locking, but then become strong inclusions in the material, serving to localize brittle fractures. The quasi-static mechanics of isotropic, isothermal linear-elastic materials in two and three dimensions provides first order understanding of controls on interaction and linkage of early structures, including the concentration of stresses and local stress reorientation. Fruitful research directions important to faulting in crystalline rock

  19. Dykes, cups, saucers and sills: Analogue experiments on magma intrusion into brittle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, L.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2008-07-01

    Magma is transported in the crust by blade-like intrusions such as dykes, sills, saucers, and also collects in thicker laccoliths, lopoliths and plutons. Recently, the importance and great number of shallow (< 5 km) saucer-shaped intrusions has been recognized. Lopoliths and cup-shaped intrusions have also been reported in many geological contexts. Our field observations indicate that many intrusions, especially those emplaced into breccias or fractured rocks, have bulging, lobate margins and have shear faults at their bulbous terminations. Such features suggest that magma can propagate along a self-induced shear fault rather than a hydraulic tension-fracture. To investigate this we use analogue models to explore intrusion propagation in a brittle country rock. The models consist of the injection of analogue magma (honey or Golden syrup) in a granular material (sand or sieved ignimbrite) that is a good analogue for brittle or brecciated rocks. These models have the advantage (over other models that use gelatin) to well represent the properties of brittle materials by allowing both shear-faults and tension fractures to be produced at suitable stresses. In our experiments we mainly obtain vertical dykes and inverted-cone like structures that we call cup-shaped intrusions. Dykes bifurcate into cup-shaped intrusions at depths depending on their viscosity. All cup-shaped intrusions uplift a central block. By injecting against a vertical glass plate we obtain detailed observations of the intrusion propagation style. We observe that dykes commonly split and produce cup-shaped intrusions near the surface and that shear zone-related intrusions develop at the dyke tip. We conclude that many dykes propagate as a viscous indenter resulting from shear failure of host rock rather than tensional hydraulic fracturing of host rocks. The shear propagation model provides an explanation for the shape and formation of cup-shaped intrusions, saucer-sills and lopoliths.

  20. Tectonic tremor and brittle seismic events triggered along the Eastern Denali Fault in northwest Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, J. P.; Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor has been observed in a number of plate-bounding tectonic environments around the world. It can occur both spontaneously (i.e. ambient) and as a result of small stress perturbations from passing seismic waves (i.e. triggered). Because tremor occurs beneath the seismogenic zone (> 15 km), it is important to understand where and how tremor occurs to discern its relationship with shallower earthquakes. In this study, we search for triggered tremor and brittle seismic events along the Eastern Denali Fault (EDF) in northwest Canada, an intraplate strike-slip region where previously tremor has not been observed. We retrieve seismic data for 19 distant earthquakes from 9 broadband stations monitored by the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN). We apply high-pass or band-pass filters to the seismic data to suppress signals from distant events and search for local sources. Triggered tremor signals exhibit high-frequency contents, have long duration (> 15 s), are coincident with passing surface waves of the distant earthquakes, and are observable among nearby stations. Using this simple approach, we have identified 4 mainshocks that triggered tremor in our study region: the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku, 2012/04/11 Mw8.6 Sumatra, 2012/10/28 Mw7.7 Haida Gwaii, and 2013/01/05 Mw7.5 Craige earthquakes. Our initial locations indicate that the tremor source occurs on or near the southeastern portion of the EDF near the fault trace. In addition to the triggered tremor sources, we also identified many 'brittle' events with very short durations triggered by the Rayleigh waves of the 2012/10/28 Mw7.7 Haida Gwaii earthquake. While we were unable to locate these brittle events, they appear to be seismically similar to triggered icequakes observed in Antarctica (Peng et al., 2013) and occur during the dilatational strain changes caused by the Rayleigh waves.

  1. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  2. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  3. Process diagnostics for precision grinding brittle materials in a production environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    Precision grinding processes are steadily migrating from research laboratory environments into manufacturing production lines as precision machines and processes become increasingly more commonplace throughout industry. Low-roughness, low-damage precision grinding is gaining widespread commercial acceptance for a host of brittle materials including advanced structural ceramics. The development of these processes is often problematic and requires diagnostic information and analysis to harden the processes for manufacturing. This paper presents a series of practical precision grinding tests developed and practiced at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that yield important information to help move a new process idea into production.

  4. Brittle-viscous deformation cycles in the dry lower continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Many rheological models of the lithosphere (based on "strength envelopes") predict a weak aseismic lower crust below the strong brittle upper crust. An alternative view, based on the distribution of crustal seismicity, is that the lower crust could also be strong and seismic. It has been suggested that a strong, seismogenic lower crust results from the dry conditions of granulite facies rocks, which inhibit crystal plastic flow. This study investigates exhumed networks of shear zones from Nusfjord (Lofoten, northern Norway) to understand initiation and localization of viscous shearing in the dry lower crust. In the study area, different sets of ultramylonitic shear zones are hosted in the massive coarse-grained anorthosite. Metamorphic conditions of 720 °C, 0.9 GPa have been estimated for ductile deformation using amphibole-plagioclase geothermobarometry. Field evidence indicates that ductile shearing exploited pseudotachylyte veins and the associated damage zone of extensive fracturing. Undeformed pseudotachylyte veins locally overprint mylonitic pseudotachylytes suggesting that frictional melting occurred at the same metamorphic conditions of mylonitization. The deep crustal origin of the pseudotachylytes is also indicated by (1) the presence of microlites of labradoritic plagioclase and clinopyroxene, and of dendritic garnet, and (2) the recrystallization of clinopyroxene in the damage zone flanking the pseudotachylyte veins. Therefore the association of pseudotachylytes and mylonites records brittle-viscous deformation cycles under lower crustal conditions. The ultramylonites show phase mixing, fine grain size (5-20 μm) and equant shape of all minerals. Nucleation of amphibole in triple junctions and dilatant sites is common. EBSD analysis indicates that the minerals in the matrix are internally strain free and do not show a crystallographic preferred orientation. Taken together, these observations suggest that diffusion creep and grain boundary sliding were

  5. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  6. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  7. Thermal shock resistance of brittle ceramic materials with embedded elliptical cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. M.; Wang, B. L.

    2011-10-01

    An analytical model is established for the prediction of the thermal shock resistance of a ceramic plate with an embedded elliptical crack with ideal thermal insulation. The thermal stress intensity factors at the crack fronts are formulated by fitting the thermal stress to a polynomial form in an un-cracked plate. The thermal shock resistance of sapphire ceramic is evaluated as an example. In addition, the numerical solution of thermal shock resistance suitable for practical engineering applications is provided. The model developed applies to any brittle material in high temperature applications.

  8. Estimating the tensile strength of super hard brittle materials using truncated spheroidal specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serati, Mehdi; Alehossein, Habib; Williams, David J.

    2015-05-01

    New approaches need to be introduced to measure the tensile capacity of super hard materials since the standard methods are not effective. To pursue this objective, a series of laboratory tests were constructed to replicate the fracture mechanism of diamond-based materials. Experiments indicate that under a certain compressive test condition, stresses normal to the axisymmetric line in truncated spheroidal specimens (bullet-shaped specimens) are in tension contributing to the tensile fracture of the material. From experimental and numerical studies, it is concluded that semi-prolate spheroidal specimens can be used to determine precisely the tensile strength of brittle stiff diamond-like composites.

  9. Lithospheric deformation and fault growth in brittle/ductile media under collision and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, S.; Davy, P.

    2003-04-01

    Lithosphere deformation styles (compression, extension and strike-slip) result from the interplay between various forces and rheologies. In this study, we attempt at determining the mechanical parameters that control deformation style in colliding systems. We especially point out the role of gravity and of brittle/ductile coupling on fault growth and deformation patterns. The results are obtained from a compilation of several tenths of laboratory experiments designed to be analogue to lithosphere deformation. A large diversity of geometry and dynamics are actually observed when varying model parameters (thickness of layers, viscosities, densities) and boundary conditions (boundary shape, compression velocity). For experiments, whose rheology is almost entirely brittle, deformation is strongly localized in a few large faults. On the contrary, if ductile layers are mechanically prevailing, deformation is diffuse with no large fault. This observation has been quantified by the localization parameter G (Bonnet, 1997). G expresses the strength ratio between brittle and ductile layers. The other main effect comes from gravity force, whose ratio with strength, determines the mode of deformation. In systems with large (small, resp.) gravity forces, extensive (compressive resp.) structures are prevailing. The Argand number Ar (England and McKenzie, 1982), which is the ratio between gravity forces and total strength, is a dimensionless quantification of this effect. Fifty analogue experiments (from bibliography or especially performed for this study) have been analyzed. All are of the same kind: uniaxial compression with one or two stress-free boundaries, brittle-sand/ductile-silicone layering overlying a very fluid honey bath that ensures isostatic force. Details of the experimental technique including governing equations, rheological parameters and lithosphere analogy are described in Davy and Cobbold (1991). All the experiments cover the range of admissible parameters

  10. Relationships between brittle deformation, weathering and landscape development during the Mesozoic in Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Giulio; Fredin, Ola; Scheiber, Thomas; Brönner, Marco; Zwingmann, Horst; Knies, Jochen

    2015-04-01

    Pre-Quaternary weathering is generally considered responsible for the formation of rather common, yet poorly constrained, saprolite remnants onshore Scandinavia. Understanding the genesis of these weathering products and placing them into an adequate tectonic and climatic framework is currently of great interest for two reasons. First, the origin of the landscape in Scandinavia, where deep weathering is thought to have played a fundamental role, is the subject of a lively debate hinged around the number and age of episodes of regional uplift and denudation. Second, there have been recent discoveries of major hydrocarbon reserves within weathered basement highs in the North Sea immediately offshore Norway. Invariably, these basement highs are also severely fractured and faulted and a genetic relationship between brittle deformation, weathering and landscape development is suggested by a number of observations. Within the recently launched BASE project, we aim to establish a temporal and conceptual framework for brittle tectonics, weathering patterns and landscape evolution by constraining the age and rate of weathering and by isotopically dating selected faults intimately linked to weathered basement blocks. Initial efforts have focused on fractured and weathered granitoid rocks of Caledonian age exposed in western Norway. There, saprolites are found as small pockets within a joint valley landscape, which was likely stripped by Quaternary glaciations. Saprolite distribution is mostly structurally controlled as deep weathering and alteration occur predominantly in association with fractures and along faulted corridors. Structural analysis has allowed the geometric and kinematic interpretation of the exposed fracture and fault patterns and we could assign them to a number of distinct brittle deformation episodes characterised by robust paleostress tensors. The K-Ar dating of illites separated from structurally constrained faults indicates a long strain localization

  11. A multiscale coupling method for the modeling of dynamics of solids with application to brittle cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiantao Yang, Jerry Z. E, Weinan

    2010-05-20

    We present a multiscale model for numerical simulations of dynamics of crystalline solids. The method combines the continuum nonlinear elasto-dynamics model, which models the stress waves and physical loading conditions, and molecular dynamics model, which provides the nonlinear constitutive relation and resolves the atomic structures near local defects. The coupling of the two models is achieved based on a general framework for multiscale modeling - the heterogeneous multiscale method (HMM). We derive an explicit coupling condition at the atomistic/continuum interface. Application to the dynamics of brittle cracks under various loading conditions is presented as test examples.

  12. Brittle tectonic history document the late- to post-orogenic evolution in the Lufilian Arc, RDCongo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipata, Louis; Delvaux, Damien; Ntabwoba Sebagenzi, Mwene; Cailteux, Jean-Jacques; Sintubin, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Pan-African orogenic processes in Centra Africa involve intracontinental collision but also late-orogenic and intraplate processes that occurred in dominantly brittle conditions and can be documented by fault kinematic analysis and paleostress reconstructions. The Congo and Tanzania cratons in Central Africa are surrounded by Pan-African belts orogenic belts which all entered almost synchronously in collision stage in the early Paleozoic. While their tectonic history up to the collision stage is increasingly better documented by ductile deformation and metamorphic studies, their late evolution remain poorly known as soon as they enter in the brittle deformation regime. This results in an incomplete understanding of the orogenic processes, especially when the transition from ductile to the brittle regime occurred at the end of the orogenic compression. In this case, the last compressional stages and the entire late orogenic extension and extensional collapse stages remain undocumented. This is the case for the Lufilian orogeny which developed along the southern margin of the Congo Craton in Central Africa during the pan-African and was marked by a collisional event with crustal thickening and white schist formation at 550-530 Ma. The Lufilian Arc which forms the external part of the Lufilian orogeny developed as an arcuate fold-and-thrust belt. Its foreland is formed by the Kundelungu plateau, between the Bangweulu block and the Kibaran belt. This entire region is also tectonically active, as part of the incipient SW branch of the East African rift system. The long period between the paroxysm of the Lufilian orogeny and the late Neogene to Quaternary rifting has been investigated by fault-kinematic analysis and paleostress reconstruction in open mines spread over the entire arc and foreland. Paleostress tensors were computed from 23 sites totaling 1900 fault-slip data by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and a succession of 8 brittle

  13. Ultrastructural morphologic description of the wild rice species Oryza latifolia (Poaceae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ethel; Montiel, Mayra; Espinoza, Ana M

    2003-06-01

    The wild rice species Oryza latifolia is endemic to Tropical America, allotetraploid and has a CCDD genome type. It belongs to the officinalis group of the genus Oryza. This species is widely distributed throughout the lowlands of Costa Rica and it is found on different life zones, having great morphologic diversity. The purpose of this research is to perform a morphologic description of O. latifolia samples of three Costa Rican localities (Carara, Liberia and Cañas) and to see if the phenotypic diversity of the species is reflected at the ultra-structure level. Structures such as the leaf blade, ligule, auricles and spikelet were analyzed. Leaf blade morphology of the specimens from the three localities is characterized by the presence of diamond-shaped stomata with papillae, zipper-like rows of silica cells; a variety of evenly distributed epicuticular wax papillae and bulky prickle trichomes. The central vein of the leaf blade from the Cañas populations is glabrous, while those from Carara and Liberia have abundant papillae. There are also differences among the borders of the leaf blade between these locations. Cañas and Liberia present alternating large and small prickle trichomes ca. 81 and 150 microns, while Carara exhibits even sized prickle trichomes of ca. 93 microns. Auricles from Cañas are rectangular and present long trichomes along the surface ca. 1.5 mm, while those of Liberia and Carara wrap the culm and exhibit trichomes only in the borders. The ligule from the plants of Carara has an acute distal tip, while that of Cañas and Liberia is blunt. The Liberia spikelet has large lignified spines while Cañas and Carara show flexible trichomes. PMID:15162727

  14. Ultrastructural morphologic description of the wild rice species Oryza latifolia (Poaceae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ethel; Montiel, Mayra; Espinoza, Ana M

    2003-06-01

    The wild rice species Oryza latifolia is endemic to Tropical America, allotetraploid and has a CCDD genome type. It belongs to the officinalis group of the genus Oryza. This species is widely distributed throughout the lowlands of Costa Rica and it is found on different life zones, having great morphologic diversity. The purpose of this research is to perform a morphologic description of O. latifolia samples of three Costa Rican localities (Carara, Liberia and Cañas) and to see if the phenotypic diversity of the species is reflected at the ultra-structure level. Structures such as the leaf blade, ligule, auricles and spikelet were analyzed. Leaf blade morphology of the specimens from the three localities is characterized by the presence of diamond-shaped stomata with papillae, zipper-like rows of silica cells; a variety of evenly distributed epicuticular wax papillae and bulky prickle trichomes. The central vein of the leaf blade from the Cañas populations is glabrous, while those from Carara and Liberia have abundant papillae. There are also differences among the borders of the leaf blade between these locations. Cañas and Liberia present alternating large and small prickle trichomes ca. 81 and 150 microns, while Carara exhibits even sized prickle trichomes of ca. 93 microns. Auricles from Cañas are rectangular and present long trichomes along the surface ca. 1.5 mm, while those of Liberia and Carara wrap the culm and exhibit trichomes only in the borders. The ligule from the plants of Carara has an acute distal tip, while that of Cañas and Liberia is blunt. The Liberia spikelet has large lignified spines while Cañas and Carara show flexible trichomes.

  15. Management of severely brittle diabetes by continuous subcutaneous and intramuscular insulin infusions: evidence for a defect in subcutaneous insulin absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, J C; Home, P D; Bilous, R W; Keen, H; Alberti, K G

    1981-01-01

    Severely brittle diabetes is defined as a rare subtype of insulin-dependent diabetes with wide, fast, unpredictable, and inexplicable swings in blood glucose concentration, often culminating in ketoacidosis or hypoglycaemic coma. To assess the role of inappropriate type, amount, or timing of insulin treatment and the route of administration as a cause of severe brittleness six patients with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, which provides a high degree of optimisation of dosage with exogenous insulin in stable diabetics. The glycaemic control achieved during continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion was compared with that during continuous intramuscular insulin infusion. Six patients with non-brittle diabetes were also treated by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. These patients achieved the expected improvement in glycaemic control (mean +/- SD plasma glucose concentration 5.1 +/- 2.3 mmol/l (92 +/- 41 mg/100 ml)), but not the patients with brittle diabetes remained uncontrolled with continuous subcutaneous infusion (13.6 +/- 5.8 mmol/1 (245 +/- 105 mg/100 ml) compared with 10.3 +/- 4.1 mmol/l (186 +/- 74 mg/100 ml) during treatment with optimised conventional subcutaneous injections). During continuous intramuscular infusion, however, glycaemic control in five of the patients with brittle diabetes was significantly improved (7.7 +/- 2.6 mmol/l (139 +/- 47 mg/100 ml). The remaining patient with brittle diabetes, previously safely controlled only with continuous intravenous insulin, did not respond to continuous intramuscular infusion. It is concluded that in five of the six patients with brittle diabetes studied here impaired or irregular absorption of insulin from the subcutaneous site played a more important part in their hyperlability than inappropriate injection strategies. This absorption defect was presumably bypassed by the intramuscular route. PMID:6780019

  16. Soil Incorporation of Silica-Rich Rice Husk Decreases Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Grain.

    PubMed

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Morris, Andrew H; Gill, Rattandeep; Kearns, Kelli A; Mann, Jessica N; Paukett, Michelle; Leskanic, Corey

    2016-05-18

    Arsenic decreases rice yield, and inorganic grain As threatens human health; thus, strategies to decrease rice As are critically needed. Increased plant-available silica (Si) can decrease rice As, yet the source of Si matters. Rice husk, an underutilized and Si-rich byproduct of rice production that contains less labile C and an order of magnitude less As than rice straw, may be an economically viable Si resource to decrease rice As, yet the impact of rice husk incorporation on As in the rice-soil nexus has not been reported. This proof-of-concept study shows that rice husk incorporation to soil (1% w/w) decreases inorganic grain As by 25-50% without negatively affecting grain Cd, yield, or dissolved CH4 levels. Rice husk is a critical yet perhaps overlooked resource to improve soil quality through enhanced nutrient availability and attenuate human health risks through consumption of As-laden grain. PMID:27109244

  17. KrF excimer laser precision machining of hard and brittle ceramic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Lu, Jian-Yi; Huang, Jin-Xia

    2014-06-01

    KrF excimer laser precision machining of porous hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials was studied to find a suitable way of machining the materials into various desired shapes and sizes without distorting their intrinsic structure and porosity. Calcium phosphate glass ceramics (CPGs) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were chosen for the study. It was found that KrF excimer laser can cut both CPGs and HA with high efficiency and precision. The ablation rates of CPGs and HA are respectively 0.081 µm/(pulse J cm(-2)) and 0.048 µm/(pulse  J cm(-2)), while their threshold fluences are individually 0.72 and 1.5 J cm(-2). The cutting quality (smoothness of the cut surface) is a function of laser repetition rate and cutting speed. The higher the repetition rate and lower the cutting speed, the better the cutting quality. A comparison between the cross sections of CPGs and HA cut using the excimer laser and using a conventional diamond cutting blade indicates that those cut by the excimer laser could retain their intrinsic porosity and geometry without distortion. In contrast, those cut by conventional machining had distorted geometry and most of their surface porosities were lost. Therefore, when cutting hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials to prepare scaffold and implant or when sectioning them for porosity evaluation, it is better to choose KrF excimer laser machining.

  18. Analytical and numerical analysis of frictional damage in quasi brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q. Z.; Zhao, L. Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    Frictional sliding and crack growth are two main dissipation processes in quasi brittle materials. The frictional sliding along closed cracks is the origin of macroscopic plastic deformation while the crack growth induces a material damage. The main difficulty of modeling is to consider the inherent coupling between these two processes. Various models and associated numerical algorithms have been proposed. But there are so far no analytical solutions even for simple loading paths for the validation of such algorithms. In this paper, we first present a micro-mechanical model taking into account the damage-friction coupling for a large class of quasi brittle materials. The model is formulated by combining a linear homogenization procedure with the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the irreversible thermodynamics framework. As an original contribution, a series of analytical solutions of stress-strain relations are developed for various loading paths. Based on the micro-mechanical model, two numerical integration algorithms are exploited. The first one involves a coupled friction/damage correction scheme, which is consistent with the coupling nature of the constitutive model. The second one contains a friction/damage decoupling scheme with two consecutive steps: the friction correction followed by the damage correction. With the analytical solutions as reference results, the two algorithms are assessed through a series of numerical tests. It is found that the decoupling correction scheme is efficient to guarantee a systematic numerical convergence.

  19. Structural hierarchies define toughness and defect-tolerance despite simple and mechanically inferior brittle building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Dipanjan; Buehler, Markus J.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralized biological materials such as bone, sea sponges or diatoms provide load-bearing and armor functions and universally feature structural hierarchies from nano to macro. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effect of hierarchical structures on toughness and defect-tolerance based on a single and mechanically inferior brittle base material, silica, using a bottom-up approach rooted in atomistic modeling. Our analysis reveals drastic changes in the material crack-propagation resistance (R-curve) solely due to the introduction of hierarchical structures that also result in a vastly increased toughness and defect-tolerance, enabling stable crack propagation over an extensive range of crack sizes. Over a range of up to four hierarchy levels, we find an exponential increase in the defect-tolerance approaching hundred micrometers without introducing additional mechanisms or materials. This presents a significant departure from the defect-tolerance of the base material, silica, which is brittle and highly sensitive even to extremely small nanometer-scale defects. PMID:22355554

  20. Generalized Reliability Methodology Applied to Brittle Anisotropic Single Crystals. Degree awarded by Washington Univ., 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    2002-01-01

    A generalized reliability model was developed for use in the design of structural components made from brittle, homogeneous anisotropic materials such as single crystals. The model is based on the Weibull distribution and incorporates a variable strength distribution and any equivalent stress failure criteria. In addition to the reliability model, an energy based failure criterion for elastically anisotropic materials was formulated. The model is different from typical Weibull-based models in that it accounts for strength anisotropy arising from fracture toughness anisotropy and thereby allows for strength and reliability predictions of brittle, anisotropic single crystals subjected to multiaxial stresses. The model is also applicable to elastically isotropic materials exhibiting strength anisotropy due to an anisotropic distribution of flaws. In order to develop and experimentally verify the model, the uniaxial and biaxial strengths of a single crystal nickel aluminide were measured. The uniaxial strengths of the <100> and <110> crystal directions were measured in three and four-point flexure. The biaxial strength was measured by subjecting <100> plates to a uniform pressure in a test apparatus that was developed and experimentally verified. The biaxial strengths of the single crystal plates were estimated by extending and verifying the displacement solution for a circular, anisotropic plate to the case of a variable radius and thickness. The best correlation between the experimental strength data and the model predictions occurred when an anisotropic stress analysis was combined with the normal stress criterion and the strength parameters associated with the <110> crystal direction.

  1. Migrating swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the lower crust beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelly, D.R.; Hill, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Brittle-failure earthquakes in the lower crust, where high pressures and temperatures would typically promote ductile deformation, are relatively rare but occasionally observed beneath active volcanic centers. Where they occur, these earthquakes provide a rare opportunity to observe volcanic processes in the lower crust, such as fluid injection and migration, which may induce brittle faulting under these conditions. Here, we examine recent short-duration earthquake swarms deep beneath the southwestern margin of Long Valley Caldera, near Mammoth Mountain. We focus in particular on a swarm that occurred September 29-30, 2009. To maximally illuminate the spatial-temporal progression, we supplement catalog events by detecting additional small events with similar waveforms in the continuous data, achieving up to a 10-fold increase in the number of locatable events. We then relocate all events, using cross-correlation and a double-difference algorithm. We find that the 2009 swarm exhibits systematically decelerating upward migration, with hypocenters shallowing from 21 to 19 km depth over approximately 12 hours. This relatively high migration rate, combined with a modest maximum magnitude of 1.4 in this swarm, suggests the trigger might be ascending CO2 released from underlying magma.

  2. Predicting the Reliability of Brittle Material Structures Subjected to Transient Proof Test and Service Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Baker, Eric H.

    Brittle materials today are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts, thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing brittle material components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The NASA CARES/Life 1 (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structure/Life) code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. This capability includes predicting the time-dependent failure probability of ceramic components against catastrophic rupture when subjected to transient thermomechanical loads (including cyclic loads). The developed methodology allows for changes in material response that can occur with temperature or time (i.e. changing fatigue and Weibull parameters with temperature or time). For this article an overview of the transient reliability methodology and how this methodology is extended to account for proof testing is described. The CARES/Life code has been modified to have the ability to interface with commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) codes executed for transient load histories. Examples are provided to demonstrate the features of the methodology as implemented in the CARES/Life program.

  3. Visco-poroelastic damage model for brittle-ductile failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Zhu, Wenlu; Shalev, Eyal

    2015-04-01

    The coupling between damage accumulation, dilation, and compaction during loading of sandstones is responsible for different structural features such as localized deformation bands and homogeneous inelastic deformation. We distinguish and quantify the role of each deformation mechanism using new mathematical model and its numerical implementation. Formulation includes three different deformation regimes: (I) quasi-elastic deformation characterized by material strengthening and compaction; (II) cataclastic flow characterized by damage increase and compaction; and (III) brittle failure characterized by damage increase, dilation, and shear localization. Using a three-dimensional numerical model, we simulate the deformation behavior of cylindrical porous Berea sandstone samples under different confining pressures. The obtained stress, strain, porosity changes and macroscopic deformation features well reproduce the laboratory results. The model predicts different rock behavior as a function of confining pressures. The quasi-elastic and brittle regimes associated with formation of shear and/or dilatant bands occur at low effective pressures. The model also successfully reproduces cataclastic flow and homogeneous compaction under high pressures. Complex behavior with overlap of common features of all regimes is simulated under intermediate pressures, resulting with localized compaction or shear enhanced compaction bands. Numerical results elucidate three steps in the formation of compaction bands: (1) dilation and subsequent shear localization, (2) formation of shear enhanced compaction band, and (3) formation of pure compaction band.

  4. Modeling and analysis of ductility of brittle materials using indentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guoyan; Lu, Zhe; Bai, Jianming; Yu, Fangsu

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, many optical elements are fabricated by means of glass molding using hard and brittle inserts such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Silicon Nitride (Si3N4). However, for those hard-to-machine materials, the most feasible solution is still with ultra-precision grinding and following polishing. Hence, it is necessary and meaningful to study their plastic properties for the development of optical fabrication and ultra-precision manufacturing process. However, the conventional methods including compression test and indentation fracture mechanics are not sufficient to obtain the accurate parameters and still lack of reliable supporting of the machining process. To solve this problem, this paper presents a novel way to correlate the plastic properties to the indentation data using dimensional analysis for the two sorts of hard and brittle materials of SiC and Si3N4. Through integrating the data obtained by the indentation tests and the modeling method presented in this paper, stress-strain behavior, yield stress σy, yield strain epsilony and strain hardening exponent n could be determined. The processing performance of these two materials reflected by the above parameters are consistent with the conclusions drawing from the indentation crack development under varying loads during the indentation test, which verifies the effectiveness and feasibility of the presented modeling method.

  5. An Experimental Study of the Fracture Coalescence Behaviour of Brittle Sandstone Specimens Containing Three Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Q.; Yang, D. S.; Jing, H. W.; Li, Y. H.; Wang, S. Y.

    2012-07-01

    To analyse the fracture coalescence behaviour of rock, rectangular prismatic sandstone specimens (80 × 160 × 30 mm in size) containing three fissures were tested under uniaxial compression. The strength and deformation behaviours of the specimens are first analysed by investigating the effects of the ligament angle β2 on the peak strength, peak strain and crack initiation stress of the specimens. To confirm the sequence of crack coalescence, a photographic monitoring technique is used throughout the entire period of deformation. Based on the results, the relationship between the real-time crack coalescence process and the axial stress-strain curve of brittle sandstone specimens is also developed, and this relationship can be used to evaluate the macroscopic deformation characteristics of pre-cracked rock. The equivalent strain evolution fields of the specimen, with α = β1 = 45° and β2 = 90°, are obtained using the digital image correlation technique and show good agreement with the experimental results of pre-cracked brittle sandstone. These experimental results are expected to improve the understanding of fracture mechanisms and be used in rock engineering with intermittent structures, such as deep underground excavated tunnels.

  6. Superior room-temperature ductility of typically brittle quasicrystals at small sizes.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Kuczera, Pawel; Sologubenko, Alla; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Steurer, Walter; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity. Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual properties. However, a well-known bottleneck that impedes their widespread application is their intrinsic brittleness: plastic deformation has been found to only be possible at high temperatures or under hydrostatic pressures, and their deformation mechanism at low temperatures is still unclear. Here, we report that typically brittle quasicrystals can exhibit remarkable ductility of over 50% strains and high strengths of ∼4.5 GPa at room temperature and sub-micrometer scales. In contrast to the generally accepted dominant deformation mechanism in quasicrystals-dislocation climb, our observation suggests that dislocation glide may govern plasticity under high-stress and low-temperature conditions. The ability to plastically deform quasicrystals at room temperature should lead to an improved understanding of their deformation mechanism and application in small-scale devices. PMID:27515779

  7. Dominant time scale for brittle fragmentation of vesicular magma by decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Masaharu; Kuribara, Hideaki; Ichihara, Mie

    2008-07-01

    Brittle fragmentation was examined in a vesicular material analogous to magma, in this case, maltose syrup with bubbles. All the key time scales for magma fragmentation are controlled in the experiment using a rapid decompression facility. It was found that the onset of fragmentation can be well characterized using the Maxwell relaxation time τ r and the decompression time Δt dec, in the case where sufficiently large stress is generated in the material. As the ratio Δt dec/τ r increases from less than unity to over fifty, the response of the specimen changes from brittle fragmentation to ductile expansion without fragmentation. During the transition, the specimen exhibits small ductile deformation before the onset of fragmentation. The transition occurs even though the stress at the bubble wall is the same. The results suggest that Δt dec/τ r is the controlling parameter not only for the onset of, but also for the variation of magma fragmentation by decompression.

  8. Brittle and Ductile Behavior in Deep-Seated Landslides: Learning from the Vajont Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto; Rigo, Elia

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanical behavior of the unstable Mt. Toc slope before the 1963 catastrophic collapse, considering both the measured data (surface displacements and microseismicity) and the updated geological model of the prehistoric rockslide. From February 1960 up to 9 October 1963, the unstable mass behaved as a brittle-ductile `mechanical system,' characterized by remarkable microseismicity as well as by considerable surface displacements (up to 4-5 m). Recorded microshocks were the result of progressive rock fracturing of distinct resisting stiff parts made up of intact rock (indentations, undulations, and rock bridges). The main resisting stiff part was a large rock indentation located at the NE extremity of the unstable mass that acted as a mechanical constraint during the whole 1960-1963 period, inducing a progressive rototranslation toward the NE. This large constraint failed in autumn 1960, when an overall slope failure took place, as emphasized by the occurrence of the large perimetrical crack in the upper slope. In this circumstance, the collapse was inhibited by a reblocking phenomenon of the unstable mass that had been previously destabilized by the first reservoir filling. Progressive failure of localized intact rock parts progressively propagated westwards as a consequence of the two further filling-drawdown cycles of the reservoir (1962 and 1963). The characteristic brittle-ductile behavior of the Vajont landslide was made possible by the presence of a very thick (40-50 m) and highly deformable shear zone underlying the upper rigid rock mass (100-120 m thick).

  9. Superior room-temperature ductility of typically brittle quasicrystals at small sizes

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yu; Kuczera, Pawel; Sologubenko, Alla; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Steurer, Walter; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity. Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual properties. However, a well-known bottleneck that impedes their widespread application is their intrinsic brittleness: plastic deformation has been found to only be possible at high temperatures or under hydrostatic pressures, and their deformation mechanism at low temperatures is still unclear. Here, we report that typically brittle quasicrystals can exhibit remarkable ductility of over 50% strains and high strengths of ∼4.5 GPa at room temperature and sub-micrometer scales. In contrast to the generally accepted dominant deformation mechanism in quasicrystals—dislocation climb, our observation suggests that dislocation glide may govern plasticity under high-stress and low-temperature conditions. The ability to plastically deform quasicrystals at room temperature should lead to an improved understanding of their deformation mechanism and application in small-scale devices. PMID:27515779

  10. Life Predicted in a Probabilistic Design Space for Brittle Materials With Transient Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Palfi, Tamas; Reh, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Analytical techniques have progressively become more sophisticated, and now we can consider the probabilistic nature of the entire space of random input variables on the lifetime reliability of brittle structures. This was demonstrated with NASA s CARES/Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code combined with the commercially available ANSYS/Probabilistic Design System (ANSYS/PDS), a probabilistic analysis tool that is an integral part of the ANSYS finite-element analysis program. ANSYS/PDS allows probabilistic loads, component geometry, and material properties to be considered in the finite-element analysis. CARES/Life predicts the time dependent probability of failure of brittle material structures under generalized thermomechanical loading--such as that found in a turbine engine hot-section. Glenn researchers coupled ANSYS/PDS with CARES/Life to assess the effects of the stochastic variables of component geometry, loading, and material properties on the predicted life of the component for fully transient thermomechanical loading and cyclic loading.

  11. Brittle metallic glass deforms plastically at room temperature in glassy multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parmanand; Yubuta, Kunio; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa

    2009-07-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are emerging as a new class of materials that can have applications ranging from structural materials to materials for future nanotechnology. However, catastrophic mechanical failure is a serious issue hindering the use of these materials in engineering applications. Here we introduce an approach to understanding and solving the problem of brittleness of metallic glasses. We have shown that even a very brittle metallic glass (La based) can be forced to deform plastically at room temperature if it is made in the form of multilayers involving other metallic glasses, i.e., a two-phase glass. The mechanically soft glassy layer (La based) having a lower critical shear stress acts as a nucleation or an initiation site for shear bands and the mechanically hard glassy layer (Zr based) acts as an obstacle to the propagation of shear bands. This process results in the multiplication of shear bands. Since the shear bands are associated with a local rise in temperature, a large number of shear bands can raise the overall temperature of the soft layer and eventually can drive it to the supercooled liquid state, where deformation of metallic glass is very large and homogeneous. The results reported here not only clarify the mechanism of large plastic deformation in two-phase glassy alloys but also suggest the possibility of a different kind of two-phase bulk glassy alloys exhibiting large plastic deformation at room temperature.

  12. KrF excimer laser precision machining of hard and brittle ceramic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Lu, Jian-Yi; Huang, Jin-Xia

    2014-06-01

    KrF excimer laser precision machining of porous hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials was studied to find a suitable way of machining the materials into various desired shapes and sizes without distorting their intrinsic structure and porosity. Calcium phosphate glass ceramics (CPGs) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were chosen for the study. It was found that KrF excimer laser can cut both CPGs and HA with high efficiency and precision. The ablation rates of CPGs and HA are respectively 0.081 µm/(pulse J cm(-2)) and 0.048 µm/(pulse  J cm(-2)), while their threshold fluences are individually 0.72 and 1.5 J cm(-2). The cutting quality (smoothness of the cut surface) is a function of laser repetition rate and cutting speed. The higher the repetition rate and lower the cutting speed, the better the cutting quality. A comparison between the cross sections of CPGs and HA cut using the excimer laser and using a conventional diamond cutting blade indicates that those cut by the excimer laser could retain their intrinsic porosity and geometry without distortion. In contrast, those cut by conventional machining had distorted geometry and most of their surface porosities were lost. Therefore, when cutting hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials to prepare scaffold and implant or when sectioning them for porosity evaluation, it is better to choose KrF excimer laser machining. PMID:24784833

  13. Structural hierarchies define toughness and defect-tolerance despite simple and mechanically inferior brittle building blocks.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dipanjan; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-01-01

    Mineralized biological materials such as bone, sea sponges or diatoms provide load-bearing and armor functions and universally feature structural hierarchies from nano to macro. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effect of hierarchical structures on toughness and defect-tolerance based on a single and mechanically inferior brittle base material, silica, using a bottom-up approach rooted in atomistic modeling. Our analysis reveals drastic changes in the material crack-propagation resistance (R-curve) solely due to the introduction of hierarchical structures that also result in a vastly increased toughness and defect-tolerance, enabling stable crack propagation over an extensive range of crack sizes. Over a range of up to four hierarchy levels, we find an exponential increase in the defect-tolerance approaching hundred micrometers without introducing additional mechanisms or materials. This presents a significant departure from the defect-tolerance of the base material, silica, which is brittle and highly sensitive even to extremely small nanometer-scale defects.

  14. Structural hierarchies define toughness and defect-tolerance despite simple and mechanically inferior brittle building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Dipanjan; Buehler, Markus J.

    2011-07-01

    Mineralized biological materials such as bone, sea sponges or diatoms provide load-bearing and armor functions and universally feature structural hierarchies from nano to macro. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effect of hierarchical structures on toughness and defect-tolerance based on a single and mechanically inferior brittle base material, silica, using a bottom-up approach rooted in atomistic modeling. Our analysis reveals drastic changes in the material crack-propagation resistance (R-curve) solely due to the introduction of hierarchical structures that also result in a vastly increased toughness and defect-tolerance, enabling stable crack propagation over an extensive range of crack sizes. Over a range of up to four hierarchy levels, we find an exponential increase in the defect-tolerance approaching hundred micrometers without introducing additional mechanisms or materials. This presents a significant departure from the defect-tolerance of the base material, silica, which is brittle and highly sensitive even to extremely small nanometer-scale defects.

  15. Micromechanics of brittle faulting and cataclastic flow in Mount Etna basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Baud, Patrick; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Wong, Teng-fong

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how the strength of volcanic rocks varies with stress state, pressure, and microstructural attributes is fundamental to understanding the dynamics and tectonics of a volcanic system and also very important in applications such as geothermics or reservoir management in volcanic environments. In this study we investigated the micromechanics of deformation and failure in basalt, focusing on samples from Mount Etna. We performed 65 uniaxial and triaxial compression experiments on nominally dry and water-saturated samples covering a porosity range between 5 and 16%, at effective pressures up to 200 MPa. Dilatancy and brittle faulting were observed in all samples with porosity of 5%. Water-saturated samples were found to be significantly weaker than comparable dry samples. Shear-enhanced compaction was observed at effective pressures as low as 80 MPa in samples of 8% porosity. Microstructural data revealed the complex interplay of microcracks, pores, and phenocrysts on dilatant failure and inelastic compaction in basalt. The micromechanics of brittle failure is controlled by wing crack propagation under triaxial compression and by pore-emanated cracking under uniaxial compression especially in the more porous samples. The mechanism of inelastic compaction in basalt is cataclastic pore-collapse in agreement with a recent dual-porosity model.

  16. Influence of surface cracks on laser-induced damage resistance of brittle KH₂PO₄ crystal.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Chen, Mingjun; Liao, Wei; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Jinghe; Xiao, Yong; Li, Mingquan

    2014-11-17

    Single point diamond turning (SPDT) currently is the leading finishing method for achieving ultra-smooth surface on brittle KH(2)PO(4) crystal. In this work, the light intensification modulated by surface cracks introduced by SPDT cutting is numerically simulated using finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The results indicate that the light intensification caused by surface cracks is wavelength, crack geometry and position dependent. Under the irradiation of 355 nm laser, lateral cracks on front surfaces and conical cracks on both front and rear surfaces can produce light intensification as high as hundreds of times, which is sufficient to trigger avalanche ionization and finally lower the laser damage resistance of crystal components. Furthermore, we experimentally tested the laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) on both crack-free and flawed crystal surfaces. The results imply that brittle fracture with a series of surface cracks is the dominant source of laser damage initiation in crystal components. Due to the negative effect of surface cracks, the LIDT on KDP crystal surface could be sharply reduced from 7.85J/cm(2) to 2.33J/cm(2) (355 nm, 6.4 ns). In addition, the experiment of laser-induced damage growth is performed and the damage growth behavior agrees well with the simulation results of light intensification caused by surface cracks with increasing crack depths.

  17. Defining the Brittle Failure Envelopes of Individual Reaction Zones Observed in CO2-Exposed Wellbore Cement.

    PubMed

    Hangx, Suzanne J T; van der Linden, Arjan; Marcelis, Fons; Liteanu, Emilia

    2016-01-19

    To predict the behavior of the cement sheath after CO2 injection and the potential for leakage pathways, it is key to understand how the mechanical properties of the cement evolves with CO2 exposure time. We performed scratch-hardness tests on hardened samples of class G cement before and after CO2 exposure. The cement was exposed to CO2-rich fluid for one to six months at 65 °C and 8 MPa Ptotal. Detailed SEM-EDX analyses showed reaction zones similar to those previously reported in the literature: (1) an outer-reacted, porous silica-rich zone; (2) a dense, carbonated zone; and (3) a more porous, Ca-depleted inner zone. The quantitative mechanical data (brittle compressive strength and friction coefficient) obtained for each of the zones suggest that the heterogeneity of reacted cement leads to a wide range of brittle strength values in any of the reaction zones, with only a rough dependence on exposure time. However, the data can be used to guide numerical modeling efforts needed to assess the impact of reaction-induced mechanical failure of wellbore cement by coupling sensitivity analysis and mechanical predictions. PMID:26690239

  18. Rice scene radiation research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Data requirements, tasks to be accomplished, and the technical approaches to be used in identifying the characteristics of rice for crop inventories are listed as well as methods for estimating crop development and assessing its conditions.

  19. Rice Reoviruses in Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rice reoviruses, transmitted by leafhopper or planthopper vectors in a persistent propagative manner, seriously threaten the stability of rice production in Asia. Understanding the mechanisms that enable viral transmission by insect vectors is a key to controlling these viral diseases. This review describes current understanding of replication cycles of rice reoviruses in vector cell lines, transmission barriers, and molecular determinants of vector competence and persistent infection. Despite recent breakthroughs, such as the discoveries of actin-based tubule motility exploited by viruses to overcome transmission barriers and mutually beneficial relationships between viruses and bacterial symbionts, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of transmission mechanisms. Advances in genome sequencing, reverse genetics systems, and molecular technologies will help to address these problems. Investigating the multiple interaction systems among the virus, insect vector, insect symbiont, and plant during natural infection in the field is a central topic for future research on rice reoviruses. PMID:27296147

  20. Differentiation of weedy traits in ALS-resistant red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a weedy form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that competes aggressively with rice in the southern U.S., reduces yields and contaminates rice grains. The introduction of ClearfieldTM rice, a nontransgenic, herbicide-resistant rice cultivar a decade ago has led to increased use of imazet...

  1. Storage stability of flour-blasted brown rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown rice was blasted with rice flour rather than sand in a sand blaster to make microscopic nicks and cuts so that water can easily penetrate into the brown rice endosperm and cook the rice in a shorter time. The flour-blasted American Basmati brown rice, long grain brown rice, and parboiled long...

  2. Simulation of seismic waves in the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) using a Burgers model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Flavio; Farina, Biancamaria; Carcione, José Maria

    2014-05-01

    The seismic characterization of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth's crust is of great importance for the study of high-enthalpy geothermal fields in the proximity of magmatic zones. It is well known that the BDT can be viewed as the transition between zones with viscoelastic and plastic behavior, i.e., the transition between the upper, cooler, brittle crustal zone, and the deeper ductile zone. Depending on stress and temperature conditions, the BDT behavior is basically determined by the viscosity of the crustal rocks, which acts as a key factor. In situ shear stress and temperature are related to shear viscosity and steady-state creep flow through the Arrhenius equation, and deviatory stress by octahedral stress criterion. We present a numerical approach to simulate the propagation of P-S and SH seismic waves in a 2D model of the heterogeneous Earth's crust. The full-waveform simulation code is based on a Burgers mechanical model (Carcione, 2007), which enables us to describe both the seismic attenuation effects and the steady-state creep flow (Carcione and Poletto, 2013; Carcione et al. 2013). The differential equations of motion are calculated for the Burgers model, and recast in the velocity-stress formulation. Equations are solved in the time domain using memory variables. The approach uses a direct method based on the Runge-Kutta technique, and the Fourier pseudo-spectral methods, for time integration and for spatial derivation, respectively. In this simulation we assume isotropic models. To test the code, the signals generated by the full-waveform simulation algorithm are compared with success to analytic solutions obtained with different shear viscosities. Moreover, synthetic results are calculated to simulate surface and VSP seismograms in a realistic rheological model with a dramatic temperature change, to study the observability of BDT by seismic reflection methods. The medium corresponds to a selected rheology of the Iceland scenario

  3. Expansins in deepwater rice internodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyung-Taeg; Kende, H.

    1997-04-01

    Cell walls of deepwater rice internodes undergo long-term extension (creep) when placed under tension in acidic buffers. This is indicative of the action of the cell wall-loosening protein expansion. Wall extension had a pH optimum of around 4.0 and was abolished by boiling. Acid-induced extension of boiled cell walls could be reconstituted by addition of salt-extracted rice or cucumber cell wall proteins. Cucumber expansion antibody recognized a single protein band of 24.5-kD apparent molecular mass on immunoblots of rice cell wall proteins. Expansions were partially purified by concanavalin A affinity chromatography and sulfopropyl (SP) cation-exchange chromatography. The latter yielded two peaks with extension activity (SP20 and SP29), and immunoblot analysis showed that both of these active fractions contained expansion of 24.5-kD molecular mass. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP20 expansion is identical to that deduced from the rice expansion cDNA Os-EXP1. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP29 expansion matches that deduced from the rice expansion cDNA Os-EXP2 in six of eight amino acids. Our results show that two expansions occur in the cell walls of rice internodes and that they may mediate acid-induced wall extension.

  4. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  5. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  6. Outcrossing potential between U.S. red rice (Oryza sativa) and Chinese indica rice (Oryza sativa) lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice in southern U.S. rice fields remains a widespread, economically challenging problem despite nearly a decade of rice production systems that include true-breeding rice cultivars and indica-derived hybrid rice with resistance to imazethapyr. Both of these herbicide-resistant rice systems hav...

  7. Genetic analysis of atypical U.S. red rice phenotypes: indications of prior gene flow in rice fields?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is a troublesome weed problem in rice fields of the southern U.S. Outcrossing between rice and red rice occurs at low rates, resulting in a broad array of plant types. SSR markers were used to evaluate the genetic backgrounds of atypical red rice types obtained from rice farms in comparis...

  8. Processing Conditions, Rice Properties, Health and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Poritosh; Orikasa, Takahiro; Okadome, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR). Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR) seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled), and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43–54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society. PMID:21776212

  9. Transient creep, aseismic damage and slow failure in Carrara marble deformed across the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Walker, E.; Thompson, B. D.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.; Young, R. P.

    2006-09-01

    Two triaxial compression experiments were performed on Carrara marble at high confining pressure, in creep conditions across the brittle-ductile transition. During cataclastic deformation, elastic wave velocity decrease demonstrated damage accumulation (microcracks). Keeping differential stress constant and reducing normal stress induced transient creep events (i.e., fast accelerations in strain) due to the sudden increase of microcrack growth. Tertiary creep and brittle failure followed as damage came close to criticality. Coalescence and rupture propagation were slow (60-200 seconds with ~150 MPa stress drops and millimetric slips) and radiated little energy in the experimental frequency range (0.1-1 MHz). Microstructural analysis pointed out strong interactions between intra-crystalline plastic deformation (twinning and dislocation glide) and brittle deformation (microcracking) at the macroscopic level. Our observations highlight the dependence of acoustic efficiency on the material's rheology, at least in the ultrasonic frequency range, and the role played by pore fluid diffusion as an incubation process for delayed failure triggering.

  10. Brittle Cornea Syndrome: Case Report with Novel Mutation in the PRDM5 Gene and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Avgitidou, Georgia; Siebelmann, Sebastian; Bachmann, Bjoern; Kohlhase, Juergen; Heindl, Ludwig M; Cursiefen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with acute corneal hydrops on the left eye and spontaneous corneal rupture on the right eye. A diagnosis of brittle cornea syndrome was confirmed by molecular analysis. A novel mutation, the homozygous variant c.17T>G, p.V6G, was found in the gene for PR-domain-containing protein 5 (PRDM5) in exon 1. Brittle cornea syndrome is a rare connective tissue disease with typical ocular, auditory, musculoskeletal, and cutaneous disorders. Almost all patients suffer from declined vision due to corneal scarring, thinning, and rupture. The most common ophthalmologic findings include keratoconus, progressive central corneal thinning, high myopia, irregular astigmatism, retinal detachment, and high risk for spontaneous corneal or scleral rupture. In addition to describing the case with a novel mutation here we review the current literature on brittle cornea syndrome pathogenesis, clinical findings, and therapy.

  11. Natural rice rhizospheric microbes suppress rice blast infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The natural interactions between plant roots and their rhizospheric microbiome are vital to plant fitness, modulating both growth promotion and disease suppression. In rice (Oryza sativa), a globally important food crop, as much as 30% of yields are lost due to blast disease caused by fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Capitalizing on the abilities of naturally occurring rice soil bacteria to reduce M. oryzae infections could provide a sustainable solution to reduce the amount of crops lost to blast disease. Results Naturally occurring root-associated rhizospheric bacteria were isolated from California field grown rice plants (M-104), eleven of which were taxonomically identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Bacterial isolates were tested for biocontrol activity against the devastating foliar rice fungal pathogen, M. oryzae pathovar 70–15. In vitro, a Pseudomonas isolate, EA105, displayed antibiosis through reducing appressoria formation by nearly 90% as well as directly inhibiting fungal growth by 76%. Although hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a volatile commonly produced by biocontrol pseudomonads, the activity of EA105 seems to be independent of its HCN production. During in planta experiments, EA105 reduced the number of blast lesions formed by 33% and Pantoea agglomerans isolate, EA106 by 46%. Our data also show both EA105 and EA106 trigger jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) dependent induced systemic resistance (ISR) response in rice. Conclusions Out of 11 bacteria isolated from rice soil, pseudomonad EA105 most effectively inhibited the growth and appressoria formation of M. oryzae through a mechanism that is independent of cyanide production. In addition to direct antagonism, EA105 also appears to trigger ISR in rice plants through a mechanism that is dependent on JA and ET signaling, ultimately resulting in fewer blast lesions. The application of native bacteria as biocontrol agents in combination with

  12. Diversity of global rice markets and the science required for consumer-targeted rice breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of different quality traits that make up the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice ...

  13. Origin and evolution of extensional faults within the ductile-to-brittle transition, Badwater Turtleback, Death Valley, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G. . Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Field relations in the footwall of the Badwater Turtleback suggest a model for two geometrically distinct sets of brittle faults. The model shows how extensional brittle faults may (1) initiate within mylonite zones as a result of strain incompatibilities, and (2) become inactive as a function of decreased dip angles. Cross-cutting relations indicate that, as the footwall cooled, late stages of ductile strain concentrated in calcite marble shear zones while brittle faults formed within the other rocks. These faults fall into two groups: decollement-style faults (DSF) and high angle faults (HAF). They must have formed concurrently with calcite mylonitization because they locally terminate at the calcite shear zones. DSF are subparallel to mylonitic foliation and locally re-occupy calcite shear zones. They are moderately nonplanar, discontinuous at scales of 10--100m, and show limited evidence for transport parallel to stretching lineations in adjacent mylonites. HAF cut foliation at high angles. These faults either (1) end downwards into unfractured calcite mylonite, (2) cut calcite mylonite and join underlying DSF, or (3) cut calcite mylonite and DSF. Where they join DSF, HAF are strongly listric and maintain integrity as distinct slip surfaces within the DSF zone (see inset). DSF formed at rheological boundaries and at places where actively deforming calcite marble pinched out into brittle rocks. HAF formed in brittle upper plates of calcite marble shear zones to accommodate differences in strain between brittle and nonbrittle rock. With continued strain and consequent cooling and eastward tilting of the footwall, calcite shear zones stopped deforming ductility, became occupied by DSF, and gradually rotated to lower angles.

  14. The influence of porosity and vesicle size on the brittle strength of volcanic rocks and magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng

    2014-09-01

    Volcanic rocks and magma display a wide range of porosity and vesicle size, a result of their complex genesis. While the role of porosity is known to exert a fundamental control on strength in the brittle field, less is known as to the influence of vesicle size. To help resolve this issue, here, we lean on a combination of micromechanical (Sammis and Ashby's pore-emanating crack model) and stochastic (rock failure and process analysis code) modelling. The models show, for a homogenous vesicle size, that an increase in porosity (in the form of circular vesicles, from 0 to 40 %) and/or vesicle diameter (from 0.1 to 2.0 mm) results in a dramatic reduction in strength. For example, uniaxial compressive strength can be reduced by about a factor of 5 as porosity is increased from 0 to 40 %. The presence of vesicles locally amplifies the stress within the groundmass and promotes the nucleation of vesicle-emanating microcracks that grow in the direction of the applied macroscopic stress. As strain increases, these microcracks continue to grow and eventually coalesce leading to macroscopic failure. Vesicle clustering, which promotes the overlap and interaction of the tensile stress lobes at the north and south poles of neighbouring vesicles, and the increased ease of microcrack interaction, is encouraged at higher porosity and reduces sample strength. Once a microcrack nucleates at the vesicle wall, larger vesicles impart higher stress intensities at the crack tips, allowing microcracks to propagate at a lower applied macroscopic stress. Larger vesicles also permit a shorter route through the groundmass for the macroscopic shear fracture. This explains the reduction in strength at higher vesicle diameters (at a constant porosity). The modelling highlights that the reduction in strength as porosity or vesicle size increases is nonlinear; the largest reductions are observed at low porosity and small vesicle diameters. In detail, we find that vesicle diameter can play an

  15. De Novo Adult Transcriptomes of Two European Brittle Stars: Spotlight on Opsin-Based Photoreception.

    PubMed

    Delroisse, Jérôme; Mallefet, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology allows to obtain a deeper and more complete view of transcriptomes. For non-model or emerging model marine organisms, NGS technologies offer a great opportunity for rapid access to genetic information. In this study, paired-end Illumina HiSeqTM technology has been employed to analyse transcriptomes from the arm tissues of two European brittle star species, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea. About 48 million Illumina reads were generated and 136,387 total unigenes were predicted from A. filiformis arm tissues. For O. aranea arm tissues, about 47 million reads were generated and 123,324 total unigenes were obtained. Twenty-four percent of the total unigenes from A. filiformis show significant matches with sequences present in reference online databases, whereas, for O. aranea, this percentage amounts to 23%. In both species, around 50% of the predicted annotated unigenes were significantly similar to transcripts from the purple sea urchin, the closest species to date that has undergone complete genome sequencing and annotation. GO, COG and KEGG analyses were performed on predicted brittle star unigenes. We focused our analyses on the phototransduction actors involved in light perception. Firstly, two new echinoderm opsins were identified in O. aranea: one rhabdomeric opsin (homologous to vertebrate melanopsin) and one RGR opsin. The RGR-opsin is supposed to be involved in retinal regeneration while the r-opsin is suspected to play a role in visual-like behaviour. Secondly, potential phototransduction actors were identified in both transcriptomes using the fly (rhabdomeric) and mammal (ciliary) classical phototransduction pathways as references. Finally, the sensitivity of O.aranea to monochromatic light was investigated to complement data available for A. filiformis. The presence of microlens-like structures at the surface of dorsal arm plate of O. aranea could potentially explain phototactic behaviour differences

  16. Mechanical behavior of low porosity carbonate rock: from brittle creep to ductile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this experimental study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a low porosity (9%) white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite) at P-Q conditions beyond the elastic domain. It has been shown that in sandstones composed of quartz, cracks are developing under these conditions. However, in carbonates, calcite minerals can meanwhile also exhibit microplasticity. The samples were deformed in the triaxial cell of the Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris at effective confining pressures ranging from 35 MPa to 85 MPa and room temperature. Experiments were carried on dry and water saturated samples to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Time dependency was investigated by a creep steps methodology: at each step, differential stress was increased rapidly and kept constant for at least 24h. During these steps elastic wave velocities (P and S) and permeability were measured continuously. Our results show two different creep behaviors: (1) brittle creep is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile creep is observed at higher confining pressures. These two creep behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes. Indeed, in the brittle domain, the primary creep is associated with a decrease of elastic wave velocities and an increase of permeability, and no secondary creep is observed. In the ductile domain, the primary creep

  17. Ultraprecision, high stiffness CNC grinding machines for ductile mode grinding of brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Patrick A.; Carlisle, Keith; Shore, Paul; Read, R. F.

    1990-10-01

    Under certain controlled conditions it is now possible to machine brittle materials such as glasses and ceramics using single or multi-point diamond tools (grinding), so that material is removed by plastic flow, leaving crack-free surfaces. This process is called 'shear' or 'ductile' mode grinding. It represents a major breakthrough in modern manufacturing engineering since it promises to enable: - complex optical components, both transmission and reflecting to be generated by advanced CNC machines with very little (or even zero) subsequent polishing. - complex shaped components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, etc. to be finish machined after near net shape forming, to high precision in advanced ceramics such as silicon nitride, without inducing micro-cracking and thus lowering ultimate rupture strength and fatigue life. Ductile mode "damage free" grinding occurs when the volume of materials stressed by each grit of the grinding wheel is small enough to yield rather than exhibit brittle fracture, i.e. cracking. In practice, this means maintaining the undeformed chip thickness to below the ductile-brittle transition value; this varies from material to material but is generally in the order of 0.1 pm or 100 nm, (hence the term "nanogrinding" is sometimes used) . Thus the critical factors for operating successfully in the ductile regime are machine system accuracy and dynamic stiffness between each grit and the workpiece. In detail this means: (i) High precision 'truing' of the diamond grits, together with dressing of the wheel bond to ensure adequate ' openness'; (ii) Design and build of the grinding wheel spindle with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, radial and axial, must be considerably less than 100 nfl. (iii) Design and build of the workpiece carriage motion system with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, linear or rotary, must be well within 100 nm. (iv) Smooth, rumble-free, high-stiffness servo-drives controlling the motions

  18. Friction experiments of halite in brittle-ductile transition with high pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.; Takahashi, M.; Katayama, I.

    2015-12-01

    Flow stress of rock (τ) approximately linearly depends on normal stress on a shear zone (σn) minus pore pressure (p) in a brittle regime, and insensitive to σn in a fully plastic regime where pores are isolated and filled with fluid of high pressure comparable to the mean stress, like oil drops in water. How p affects τ in the transitional regime is not fully understood, although it is a key to understanding many important geological problems such as role of fluids in deformation mechanism, stress and strength profile of the crust, seismogenic depth range, and so on. The effective normal stress σe is often given by σe = σn - α p (α: a constant around 1 in the brittle regime), and frictional resistance, by τ = f σe (f: friction coefficient). Recently, Hirth and Beeler [2015] proposed a model of the effective stress law in the transitional regime. Because of increasing ratio of real area of contact to nominal area of frictional interface, α may decrease to zero towards fully plastic regime, causing a sharper peak in the strength profile than a conventional Brace-Goetze strength profile which is sometimes referred to as "Christmas tree". We investigated this idea by means of friction experiments at high temperature and pore pressure. We used halite as an analogue material which undergoes a transition from brittle to fully plastic regime under convenient conditions [Shimamoto, 1986]. We conducted friction experiments of a pre-cut sliding interface filled with halite gouge with gas-medium triaxial apparatus in Hiroshima University, at 150 MPa confining pressure, from room temperature to 210 °C, and from atmospheric pressure to more than 100 MPa fluid (argon gas) pressure in a reservoir. Our preliminary result shows that the sharp peak in the flow stress is probably absent. A phenomenological smooth connection proposed by Shimamoto and Noda [2014] based on friction experiments without a jacket (i.e. atmospheric pore pressure) may work in explaining the

  19. De Novo Adult Transcriptomes of Two European Brittle Stars: Spotlight on Opsin-Based Photoreception.

    PubMed

    Delroisse, Jérôme; Mallefet, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology allows to obtain a deeper and more complete view of transcriptomes. For non-model or emerging model marine organisms, NGS technologies offer a great opportunity for rapid access to genetic information. In this study, paired-end Illumina HiSeqTM technology has been employed to analyse transcriptomes from the arm tissues of two European brittle star species, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea. About 48 million Illumina reads were generated and 136,387 total unigenes were predicted from A. filiformis arm tissues. For O. aranea arm tissues, about 47 million reads were generated and 123,324 total unigenes were obtained. Twenty-four percent of the total unigenes from A. filiformis show significant matches with sequences present in reference online databases, whereas, for O. aranea, this percentage amounts to 23%. In both species, around 50% of the predicted annotated unigenes were significantly similar to transcripts from the purple sea urchin, the closest species to date that has undergone complete genome sequencing and annotation. GO, COG and KEGG analyses were performed on predicted brittle star unigenes. We focused our analyses on the phototransduction actors involved in light perception. Firstly, two new echinoderm opsins were identified in O. aranea: one rhabdomeric opsin (homologous to vertebrate melanopsin) and one RGR opsin. The RGR-opsin is supposed to be involved in retinal regeneration while the r-opsin is suspected to play a role in visual-like behaviour. Secondly, potential phototransduction actors were identified in both transcriptomes using the fly (rhabdomeric) and mammal (ciliary) classical phototransduction pathways as references. Finally, the sensitivity of O.aranea to monochromatic light was investigated to complement data available for A. filiformis. The presence of microlens-like structures at the surface of dorsal arm plate of O. aranea could potentially explain phototactic behaviour differences

  20. De Novo Adult Transcriptomes of Two European Brittle Stars: Spotlight on Opsin-Based Photoreception

    PubMed Central

    Mallefet, Jérôme; Flammang, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology allows to obtain a deeper and more complete view of transcriptomes. For non-model or emerging model marine organisms, NGS technologies offer a great opportunity for rapid access to genetic information. In this study, paired-end Illumina HiSeqTM technology has been employed to analyse transcriptomes from the arm tissues of two European brittle star species, Amphiura filiformis and Ophiopsila aranea. About 48 million Illumina reads were generated and 136,387 total unigenes were predicted from A. filiformis arm tissues. For O. aranea arm tissues, about 47 million reads were generated and 123,324 total unigenes were obtained. Twenty-four percent of the total unigenes from A. filiformis show significant matches with sequences present in reference online databases, whereas, for O. aranea, this percentage amounts to 23%. In both species, around 50% of the predicted annotated unigenes were significantly similar to transcripts from the purple sea urchin, the closest species to date that has undergone complete genome sequencing and annotation. GO, COG and KEGG analyses were performed on predicted brittle star unigenes. We focused our analyses on the phototransduction actors involved in light perception. Firstly, two new echinoderm opsins were identified in O. aranea: one rhabdomeric opsin (homologous to vertebrate melanopsin) and one RGR opsin. The RGR-opsin is supposed to be involved in retinal regeneration while the r-opsin is suspected to play a role in visual-like behaviour. Secondly, potential phototransduction actors were identified in both transcriptomes using the fly (rhabdomeric) and mammal (ciliary) classical phototransduction pathways as references. Finally, the sensitivity of O.aranea to monochromatic light was investigated to complement data available for A. filiformis. The presence of microlens-like structures at the surface of dorsal arm plate of O. aranea could potentially explain phototactic behaviour differences

  1. Multi-scale modeling of microstructure dependent intergranular brittle fracture using a quantitative phase-field based method

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-12-07

    In this study, the fracture behavior of brittle materials is strongly influenced by their underlying microstructure that needs explicit consideration for accurate prediction of fracture properties and the associated scatter. In this work, a hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued to model microstructure sensitive brittle fracture. A quantitative phase-field based fracture model is utilized to capture the complex crack growth behavior in the microstructure and the related parameters are calibrated from lower length scale atomistic simulations instead of engineering scale experimental data. The workability of this approach is demonstrated by performing porosity dependent intergranular fracture simulations in UO2 and comparing the predictions with experiments.

  2. Thermal treatment-induced ductile-to-brittle transition of submicron-sized Si pillars fabricated by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yue-cun; Xie, De-gang; Ning, Xiao-hui; Shan, Zhi-wei

    2015-02-23

    Si pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) had been reported to have a critical size of 310–400 nm, below which their deformation behavior would experience a brittle-to-ductile transition at room temperature. Here, we demonstrated that the size-dependent transition was actually stemmed from the amorphous Si (a-Si) shell introduced during the FIB fabrication process. Once the a-Si shell was crystallized, Si pillars would behave brittle again with their modulus comparable to their bulk counterpart. The analytical model we developed has been proved to be valid in deriving the moduli of crystalline Si core and a-Si shell.

  3. Can the co-cultivation of rice and fish help sustain rice production?

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangliang; Zhang, Jian; Ren, Weizheng; Guo, Liang; Cheng, Yongxu; Li, Jiayao; Li, Kexin; Zhu, Zewen; Zhang, Jiaen; Luo, Shiming; Cheng, Lei; Tang, Jianjun; Chen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Because rice feeds half of the world's population, a secure global food supply depends on sustainable rice production. Here we test whether the co-cultivation of rice and fish into one "rice-fish system" (RFS; fish refers to aquatic animals in this article) could help sustain rice production. We examined intensive and traditional RFSs that have been widely practiced in China. We found that rice yields did not decrease when fish yield was below a threshold value in each intensive RFS. Below the thresholds, moreover, fish yields in intensive RFSs can be substantially higher than those in traditional RFS without reducing rice yield. Relative to rice monoculture, the use of fertilizer-nitrogen and pesticides decreased, and the farmers' net income increased in RFSs. The results suggest that RFSs can help sustain rice production, and suggest that development of co-culture technologies (i.e. proper field configuration for fish and rice) is necessary to achieve the sustainability. PMID:27349875

  4. Characterization of Strength of Intact Brittle Rock Considering Confinement-Dependent Failure Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Peter K.; Kim, Bo-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    As technologies for deep underground development such as tunneling underneath mountains or mass mining at great depths (>1,000 m) are implemented, more difficult ground conditions in highly stressed environments are encountered. Moreover, the anticipated stress level at these depths easily exceeds the loading capacity of laboratory testing, so it is difficult to properly characterize what the rock behavior would be under high confinement stress conditions. If rock is expected to fail in a brittle manner, behavior changes associated with the relatively low tensile strength, such as transition from splitting to the shear failure, have to be considered and reflected in the adopted failure criteria. Rock failure in tension takes place at low confinement around excavations due to tensile or extensional failure in heterogeneous rocks. The prospect of tensile-dominant brittle failure diminishes as the confinement increases away from the excavation boundary. Therefore, it must be expected that the transition in the failure mechanism, from tensile to shear, occurs as the confinement level increases and conditions for extensional failure are prevented or strongly diminished. However, conventional failure criteria implicitly consider only the shear failure mechanism (i.e., failure envelopes touching Mohr stress circles), and thus, do not explicitly capture the transition of failure modes from tensile to shear associated with confinement change. This paper examines the methodologies for intact rock strength determination as the basic input data for engineering design of deep excavations. It is demonstrated that published laboratory test data can be reinterpreted and better characterized using an s-shaped failure criterion highlighting the transition of failure modes in brittle failing rock. As a consequence of the bi-modal nature of the failure envelope, intact rock strength data are often misinterpreted. If the intact rock strength is estimated by standard procedures from

  5. Linking megathrust earthquakes to brittle deformation in a fossil accretionary complex.

    PubMed

    Dielforder, Armin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Vennemann, Torsten; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Seismological data from recent subduction earthquakes suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate that shift accretionary wedges into an unstable state. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures preserved in fossil accretionary complexes. The importance of coseismically induced wedge failure has therefore remained largely elusive. Here we show that brittle faulting and vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by subduction-related earthquakes. Early veins formed at shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, subsequent vein formation occurred by normal faulting and extensional fracturing at deeper levels in response to coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study demonstrates how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which respond in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively.

  6. Model of brittle matrix composite toughening based on discrete fiber reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical approach for the analysis of the effectiveness of fiber reinforcement in brittle matrix composites is presented. The analytical method allows consideration of discrete fiber distribution and examination of the development of crack growth parameters on microscale. The problem associated with the bridging zone development is addressed here; therefore, the bridging zone is considered to be smaller than the main preexisting crack, and the small scale approach is used. The mechanics of the reinforcement is accurately accounted for in the process zone of a growing crack. Closed form solutions characterizing the initial failure process are presented for linear and nonlinear force - fiber pullout displacement relationships. The implicit exact solution for the extended bridging zone is presented as well.

  7. A graphene meta-interface for enhancing the stretchability of brittle oxide layers.

    PubMed

    Won, Sejeong; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Sang Bong; Hwangbo, Yun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Lee, Hak-Joo; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2016-03-01

    Oxide materials have recently attracted much research attention for applications in flexible and stretchable electronics due to their excellent electrical properties and their compatibility with established silicon semiconductor processes. Their widespread uptake has been hindered, however, by the intrinsic brittleness and low stretchability. Here we investigate the use of a graphene meta-interface to enhance the electromechanical stretchability of fragile oxide layers. Electromechanical tensile tests of indium tin oxide (ITO) layers on polymer substrates were carried out with in situ observations using an optical microscope. It was found that the graphene meta-interface reduced the strain transfer between the ITO layer and the substrate, and this behavior was well described using a shear lag model. The graphene meta-interface provides a novel pathway for realizing flexible and stretchable electronic applications based on oxide layers. PMID:26540317

  8. Tensile cracking of a brittle conformal coating on a rough substrate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reedy, Jr., E. D.

    2016-04-07

    This note examines the effect of interfacial roughness on the initiation and growth of channel cracks in a brittle film. A conformal film with cusp-like surface flaws that replicate the substrate roughness is investigated. This type of surface flaw is relatively severe in the sense that stress diverges as the cusp-tip is approached (i.e., there is a power-law stress singularity). For the geometry and range of film properties considered, the analysis suggests that smoothing the substrate could substantially increase the film’s resistance to the formation of the through-the-thickness cracks that precede channel cracking. Furthermore, smoothing the substrate’s surface has amore » relatively modest effect on the film stress needed to propagate a channel crack.« less

  9. A method to evaluate the three-dimensional roughness of fracture surfaces in brittle geomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tatone, Bryan S A; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2009-12-01

    Conventionally, the evaluation of fracture surface roughness in brittle geomaterials, such as concrete and rock, has been based on the measurement and analysis of two-dimensional profiles rather than three-dimensional (3D) surfaces. The primary reason for doing so was the lack of tools capable of making 3D measurements. However, in recent years, several optical and mechanical measurement tools have become available, which are capable of quickly and accurately producing high resolution point clouds defining 3D surfaces. This paper provides a methodology for evaluating the surface roughness and roughness anisotropy using these 3D surface measurements. The methodology is presented step-by-step to allow others to easily adopt and implement the process to analyze their own surface measurement data. The methodology is demonstrated by digitizing a series of concrete fracture surfaces and comparing the estimated 3D roughness parameters with qualitative observations and estimates of the well-known roughness coefficient, R(s).

  10. Displacement Forecasting Method in Brittle Crack Surrounding Rock Under Excavation Unloading Incorporating Opening Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. J.; Yang, W. M.; Wang, L. G.; Butler, I. B.

    2014-11-01

    Splitting failure, which is recognized as a special engineering geology phenomenon, occurs continually in the brittle rock mass of caverns during underground excavation. In this paper, a splitting model of linear slippage crack groups is built with fracture mechanics, energy analysis, and crack extension theories. Considering intrinsic cracks in rock mass and change of outer stress, intrinsic cracks propagate into macroscopical splitting cracks that are approximately parallel to the side wall of caverns. The splitting criterion of cavern rock mass and the method for predicting displacement in view of splitting opening displacement are proposed. In the end, the forecasting method is applied to the Jinping-I Hydropower Station, underground caverns engineering in China, the splitting failure zone and forecasting displacement are accordant with the monitoring data. The new forecasting displacement method is proven to contribute to the construction of similar underground caverns.

  11. Fracture Testing at Small-Length Scales: From Plasticity in Si to Brittleness in Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya, B. Nagamani; Jayaram, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The field of micro-/nano-mechanics of materials has been driven, on the one hand by the development of ever smaller structures in devices, and, on the other, by the need to map property variations in large systems that are microstructurally graded. Observations of `smaller is stronger' have also brought in questions of accompanying fracture property changes in the materials. In the wake of scattered articles on micro-scale fracture testing of various material classes, this review attempts to provide a holistic picture of the current state of the art. In the process, various reliable micro-scale geometries are shown, challenges with respect to instrumentation to probe ever smaller length scales are discussed and examples from recent literature are put together to exhibit the expanse of unusual fracture response of materials, from ductility in Si to brittleness in Pt. Outstanding issues related to fracture mechanics of small structures are critically examined for plausible solutions.

  12. Mafic rocks at the brittle-viscous transition - interplay between fracturing, reaction and viscous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Sina; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2015-04-01

    Deformation experiments have been performed on crushed Maryland Dibase (~ 55% Plg(An60-70), 42% Px, 3% accessories, 0.2 w.t.-% H2O added) in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus in order to explore the brittle-viscous transition and the interplay between deformation and mineral reactions. Shear experiments at constant displacement rate of 1e-8 m/s (resulting shear strain rate ~ 1e-5 /s) are conducted at T=600 to 800°C and confining pressures of Pc = 1.0 and 1.5 GPa. Below 700°C, the microstructure is dominated by brittle deformation processes. At 700°C, the steady state strength approaches the Goetze criterion. The microstructure shows less evidence of brittle deformation and the onset of mineral reactions and diffusive mass transport are observed. Samples deformed at 800°C sustain significantly lower stresses than the Goetze criterion and reaction products are far more abundant. For both, 700°C and 800°C experiments, the main reaction products are Amph, Plg(An45-50) and zoisite (Zo, at Pc=1.5). Deformation localizes in all experiments. At 700°C, displacement takes place either along shear fractures or in shear bands formed by fine grained Plg and fibrous Amph. Reaction products such as Amph and Plg occur almost restricted along such zones of localized deformation. Strain energy introduced by early fracturing seems to be an important factor enhancing reaction kinetics. At 800°C, strain localizes into broader shear bands formed by a mixture of Plg + Amph (+ Zo). Phases in shear bands are extremely fine grained with equivalent diameters between 0.1 - 0.4 µm for Plg. Px grains rarely show signs of deformation and mostly form porphyroclasts overgrown by Amph. Fracturing is largely absent. The spatial distribution of Amph within the shear bands indicates material transport and precipitation of Amph between Plg-Plg boundaries. Thermodynamic modeling suggests that phases such as Grt + Cpx should grow abundantly but grow only in minor amounts (< 1 vol.-%). Amph and

  13. Linking megathrust earthquakes to brittle deformation in a fossil accretionary complex

    PubMed Central

    Dielforder, Armin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Vennemann, Torsten; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Seismological data from recent subduction earthquakes suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate that shift accretionary wedges into an unstable state. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures preserved in fossil accretionary complexes. The importance of coseismically induced wedge failure has therefore remained largely elusive. Here we show that brittle faulting and vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by subduction-related earthquakes. Early veins formed at shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, subsequent vein formation occurred by normal faulting and extensional fracturing at deeper levels in response to coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study demonstrates how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which respond in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively. PMID:26105966

  14. A Unified Cohesive Zone Approach to Model Ductile Brittle Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a unified cohesive zone model has been proposed to predict, Ductile to Brittle Transition, DBT, in Reactor Pressure Vessel, RPV, steels. A general procedure is described to obtain the Cohesive Zone Model, CZM, parameters for the different temperatures and fracture probabilities. In order to establish the full master-curve, the procedure requires three calibration points with one at the upper-shelf for ductile fracture and two for the fracture probabilities, Pf, of 5% and 95% at the lower-shelf. In the current study, these calibrations were carried out by utilizing the experimental fracture toughness values and flow curves. After the calibration procedure, the simulations of fracture behavior (ranging from completely unstable to stable crack extension behavior) in one inch thick compact tension specimens at different temperatures yielded values that were comparable to the experimental fracture toughness values, indicating the viability of such unified modeling approach.

  15. Linking megathrust earthquakes to brittle deformation in a fossil accretionary complex.

    PubMed

    Dielforder, Armin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Vennemann, Torsten; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Seismological data from recent subduction earthquakes suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate that shift accretionary wedges into an unstable state. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures preserved in fossil accretionary complexes. The importance of coseismically induced wedge failure has therefore remained largely elusive. Here we show that brittle faulting and vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by subduction-related earthquakes. Early veins formed at shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, subsequent vein formation occurred by normal faulting and extensional fracturing at deeper levels in response to coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study demonstrates how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which respond in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively. PMID:26105966

  16. The role of microcracking on the crack growth resistance of brittle solids and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1994-10-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was preformed to elucidate the influence of microcracking on the fracture behavior of microcracking brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete nucleating microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results obtained from the finite element analysis are compared with the continuum description of the microcracking. Although continuum description can provide a reasonable estimation of shielding, it fails to resolve the details of micromechanism of toughening resulting from microcracking, since not every shielding event during the course of crack extension corresponds to an increase in the R-curve. Moreover, as seen in the composite cases, the local events leading to toughening behavior may not be associated with the microcracking even in the presence of a large population of microcracks.

  17. Metamorphic core complexes: Expression of crustal extension by ductile-brittle shearing of the geologic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metamorphic core complexes and detachment fault terranes in the American Southwest are products of stretching of continental crust in the Tertiary. The physical and geometric properties of the structures, fault rocks, and contact relationships that developed as a consequence of the extension are especially well displayed in southeastern Arizona. The structures and fault rocks, as a system, reflect a ductile-through-brittle continuum of deformation, with individual structures and faults rocks showing remarkably coordinated strain and displacement patterns. Careful mapping and analysis of the structural system has led to the realization that strain and displacement were partitioned across a host of structures, through a spectrum of scales, in rocks of progressively changing rheology. By integrating observations made in different parts of the extensional system, especially at different inferred depth levels, it has been possible to construct a descriptive/kinematic model of the progressive deformation that achieved continental crustal extension in general, and the development of metamorphic core complexes in particular.

  18. Origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Li, Y.; Liu, Q. C.; Zhou, X. M.; Liu, L. W.; Liu, C. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids has been a subject of debate. Using in situ, high-speed, strain field mapping of a representative material, polymethylmethacrylate, we reveal that shock loading leads to heterogeneity in a compressive strain field, which in turn gives rise to localized lateral tension and shear through Poisson's effects, and, subsequently, localized microdamage. A failure wave nucleates from the impact surface and its propagation into the microdamage zone is self-sustained, triggering interior failure. Its velocity increases with increasing shock strength and eventually approaches the shock velocity. The seemingly puzzling phenomena observed in previous experiments, including incubation time, failure wave velocity variations, and surface roughness effects, can all be explained consistently with the nucleation and growth of the microdamage, and the effects of loading strength and preexisting defects.

  19. Morphological study of elastic-plastic-brittle transitions in disordered media.

    PubMed

    Kale, Sohan; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2014-10-01

    We use a spring lattice model with springs following a bilinear elastoplastic-brittle constitutive behavior with spatial disorder in the yield and failure thresholds to study patterns of plasticity and damage evolution. The elastic-perfectly plastic transition is observed to follow percolation scaling with the correlation length critical exponent ν≈1.59, implying the universality class corresponding to the long-range correlated percolation. A quantitative analysis of the plastic strain accumulation reveals a dipolar anisotropy (for antiplane loading) which vanishes with increasing hardening modulus. A parametric study with hardening modulus and ductility controlled through the spring level constitutive response demonstrates a wide spectrum of behaviors with varying degree of coupling between plasticity and damage evolution. PMID:25375508

  20. Coeval brittle and ductile structures associated with extreme deformation partitioning in a multilayer sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Alsop, G. Ian; Carreras, Jordi

    2009-05-01

    An investigation on the effects of a strong rheological contrast in the deformation of layered anisotropic rocks is presented. The study focuses on the geometric and kinematic analysis of complex structures developed within and adjacent to a thin marble-metapsammite multilayer unit from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt (NE Spain). Zones of high ductile strain localise in the marble layers, which exhibit complex folds, whereas metapsammites show mostly brittle (boudinage) structures. These structures strongly contrast with coeval retrogressive discrete shear zones developed in the surrounding migmatitic schists. The extreme strain partitioning is due to the rheological contrast between different lithological layers. In addition, the specific orientation of this multilayer unit induces a reversal of local kinematics with regard to bulk kinematics. Consequently, caution should be exercised when interpreting regional tectonics in highly partitioned domains associated with rheological heterogeneities.

  1. Modeling the viscoelastic and brittle fracture response of a high explosive in an Eulerian hydrocode

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, S.P.; Johnson, J.N.; Burkett, M.W.

    1998-12-31

    A constitutive model that incorporates brittle-fracture-mechanics and viscoelastic material response for PBX-9501 has been developed and implemented in the two-dimensional hydrocode MESA. The hydrocode with the visco-cracking model has been applied to numerous low-rate deformation and low-speed impact events. Several low-speed impact experiments that have quantified the deformation to the explosive have been used to assess the hydrocode and model for this type of material response problem. Comparisons between MESA w/visco-cracking model calculations and experimentally measured mechanical deformation to the explosive showed that reasonable agreement was achieved for the measured magnitude of deformation but the deformation profiles/shapes were found to be different.

  2. Cavity expansion resistance of brittle materials obeying a two-curve pressure-shear behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathy, Sikhanda S.; Bless, Stephan J.

    2000-10-01

    We derived a closed-form solution for the pressure required to open a spherical or a cylindrical cavity in brittle materials which demonstrate a two-curve pressure-shear behavior. The material is allowed to crack under tension and fail under shear; only both failure modes result in comminution. Since the cavity expansion pressure is closely related to the penetration resistance of a target material, this solution identifies the material parameters that are important in impact and penetration problems. It is found that cracking and comminution can be prevented when a large enough confinement pressure is present, and the resulting high cavity expansion resistance could explain the intriguing phenomenon of interface defeat. The effects of dilatancy, and shear strength of comminuted ceramic on cavity expansion pressure are explicitly revealed.

  3. Mechanical behavior and brittle-ductile transition of high-chromium martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odnobokova, M. V.; Kipelova, A. Yu.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents data on the static tensile tests and dynamic impact-toughness tests of a highchromium martensitic 10Kh9V1M1FBR steel (0.12 wt % C, 9.8 wt % Cr, 0.93 wt % W, 1.01 wt % Mo, 0.2 wt % V, 0.05 wt % Nb, 0.05 wt % N, 0.003 wt % B, 0.36 wt % Mn, 0.2 wt % Ni, 0.06 wt % Si, 0.01 wt % P, 0.008 wt % S, 0.02 wt % Cu, 0.1 wt % Co, 0.015 wt % Al, and the remainder is Fe) in the temperature range from 20 to-196°C. In the case of static loading, a reduction in the temperature leads to an increase in the strength characteristics; upon a drop in the temperature from 20 to-100°C, the plasticity also increases. This is connected with the fact that the ductile fracture remains the basic mechanism down to cryogenic temperatures. The brittle-ductile transition related to the transition from ductile intragranular fracture to quasibrittle one is observed at-45°C. The steel exhibits high impact toughness to the temperature of-60°C ( KCV -60 = 95 J/cm2), at which the fraction of the ductile component in fracture is equal to 20%. At 80°C, the impact toughness decreases down to critical values (30 J/cm2), which correlates with the decrease in the fraction of the ductile component on the fracture surface down to 1%. The further decrease in the impact toughness down to 10 J/cm2 at-196°C is related to the transition from intragranular to intergranular brittle fracture.

  4. Impact-induced brittle deformation, porosity loss, and aqueous alteration in the Murchison CM chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Romy D.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Zolensky, Mike; Behr, Whitney M.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray computed tomographic scanning of a 44 g Murchison stone (USNM 5487) reveals a preferred alignment of deformed, partially altered chondrules, which define a prominent foliation and weak lineation in 3D. The presence of a lineation and evidence for a component of rotational, noncoaxial shear suggest that the deformation was caused by impact. Olivine optical extinction indicates that the sample can be classified as shock stage S1, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and electron microscopy reveal that plastic deformation within the chondrules was minimal and that brittle deformation in the form of fracturing, cataclasis, and grain boundary sliding was the dominant microstructural strain-accommodating mechanism. Textural evidence such as serpentine veins parallel to the foliation fabric and crosscutting alteration veins strongly suggest that some aqueous alteration post-dated or was contemporaneous with the deformation and that multiple episodes of fracturing and mineralization occurred. Finally, using the deformed shape of the chondrules we estimate that the strain experienced by Murchison was 17-43%. This combined with the current measured porosity of Murchison suggests that the original bulk porosity of Murchison prior to its deformation was 32.2-53.4% and likely at the upper end of this range due to chondrule compressibility, providing a unique estimate of pre-deformation porosity for a carbonaceous chondrite. Our findings suggest that significant porosity loss, deformation, and compaction from impact can occur on chondrite parent bodies whose samples may record only a low level of shock, and that significant chondrule deformation resulting in a chondrite foliation fabric can occur primarily through brittle processes and does not require plastic deformation of grains.

  5. Time-resolved study of femtosecond laser induced micro-modifications inside transparent brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Domke, M.; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processing of optically transparent or semi-transparent, brittle materials is finding wide use in various manufacturing sectors. For example, in consumer electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets, cover glass needs to be cut precisely in various shapes. The unique advantage of material processing with femtosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition in nearly all types of solid materials. When an ultra-short laser pulse is focused inside glass, only the localized region in the neighborhood of the focal volume absorbs laser energy by nonlinear optical absorption. Therefore, the processing volume is strongly defined, while the rest of the target stays unaffected. Thus ultra-short pulse lasers allow cutting of the chemically strengthened glasses such as Corning Gorilla glass without cracking. Non-ablative cutting of transparent, brittle materials, using the newly developed femtosecond process ClearShapeTM from Spectra-Physics, is based on producing a micron-sized material modification track with well-defined geometry inside. The key point for development of the process is to understand the induced modification by a single femtosecond laser shot. In this paper, pump-probe microscopy techniques have been applied to study the defect formation inside of transparent materials, namely soda-lime glass samples, on a time scale between one nanosecond to several tens of microseconds. The observed effects include acoustic wave propagation as well as mechanical stress formation in the bulk of the glass. Besides better understanding of underlying physical mechanisms, our experimental observations have enabled us to find optimal process parameters for the glass cutting application and lead to better quality and speed for the ClearShapeTM process.

  6. Brittle-viscous deformation of vein quartz under fluid-rich lower greenschist facies conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjøll, H. J.; Viola, G.; Menegon, L.; Sørensen, B. E.

    2015-06-01

    We studied by Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) and optical microscopy a coarse-grained (ca. 0.5-6 mm) quartz vein embedded in a phyllonitic matrix to gain insights into the recrystallization mechanisms and the processes of strain localization in quartz deformed under lower greenschist facies conditions, broadly coincident with the brittle-viscous transition. The vein deformed during faulting along a phyllonitic thrust of Caledonian age within the Porsa Imbricate Stack in the Paleoproterozoic Repparfjord Tectonic Window in northern Norway. The phyllonite hosting the vein formed at the expense of a metabasaltic protolith through feldspar breakdown to form interconnected layers of fine, synkinematic phyllosilicates. In the mechanically weak framework of the phyllonite, the quartz vein acted as a relatively rigid body. Viscous deformation in the vein was initially accommodated by quartz basal slip. Under the prevailing deformation conditions, however, dislocation glide- and possibly creep-accommodated deformation of quartz was inefficient, and this resulted in localized strain hardening. In response to the (1) hardening, (2) progressive and cyclic increase of the fluid pressure, and (3) increasing competence contrast between the vein and the weakly foliated host phyllonite, vein quartz crystals began to deform by brittle processes along specific, suitably oriented lattice planes, creating microgouges along microfractures. Nucleated new grains rapidly sealed these fractures as fluids penetrated the actively deforming system. The grains grew initially by solution precipitation and later by grain boundary migration. We suggest that the different initial orientation of the vein crystals led to strain accommodation by different mechanisms in the individual crystals, generating remarkably different microstructures. Crystals suitably oriented for basal slip, for example, accommodated strain mainly viscously and experienced only minor fracturing. Instead, crystals

  7. A graphene meta-interface for enhancing the stretchability of brittle oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Sejeong; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Sang Bong; Hwangbo, Yun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Lee, Hak-Joo; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2016-02-01

    Oxide materials have recently attracted much research attention for applications in flexible and stretchable electronics due to their excellent electrical properties and their compatibility with established silicon semiconductor processes. Their widespread uptake has been hindered, however, by the intrinsic brittleness and low stretchability. Here we investigate the use of a graphene meta-interface to enhance the electromechanical stretchability of fragile oxide layers. Electromechanical tensile tests of indium tin oxide (ITO) layers on polymer substrates were carried out with in situ observations using an optical microscope. It was found that the graphene meta-interface reduced the strain transfer between the ITO layer and the substrate, and this behavior was well described using a shear lag model. The graphene meta-interface provides a novel pathway for realizing flexible and stretchable electronic applications based on oxide layers.Oxide materials have recently attracted much research attention for applications in flexible and stretchable electronics due to their excellent electrical properties and their compatibility with established silicon semiconductor processes. Their widespread uptake has been hindered, however, by the intrinsic brittleness and low stretchability. Here we investigate the use of a graphene meta-interface to enhance the electromechanical stretchability of fragile oxide layers. Electromechanical tensile tests of indium tin oxide (ITO) layers on polymer substrates were carried out with in situ observations using an optical microscope. It was found that the graphene meta-interface reduced the strain transfer between the ITO layer and the substrate, and this behavior was well described using a shear lag model. The graphene meta-interface provides a novel pathway for realizing flexible and stretchable electronic applications based on oxide layers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05412e

  8. Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) for Development of EGS Reservoirs in Ductile Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Muraoka, H.; Tsuchiya, N.; Ito, H.

    2012-12-01

    EGS (Enhanced Geothermal System) geothermal has been identified as a most promising method of geothermal development because of its potential applicability to a much wider range of sites, many of which have previously been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems with EGS technologies have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties in establishing universal design/development methodologies, and the occurrence of induced seismicity, suggesting that there may be limitations in realizing EGS in earthquake-prone compression tectonic zones. We propose a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement. This potentially has a number of advantages including: (a) simpler design and control of the reservoir, (b) nearly full recovery of injected water, (c) sustainable production, (d) lower cost when developed in relatively shallower ductile zones in compression tectonic settings, (e) large potential quantities of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f) the establishment of a universal design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. To further assess the potential of EGS reservoir development in ductile zones we have initiated the "Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP)". It is intended that the first few years of the JBBP will be spent in basic scientific investigation and necessary technology development, including studies on rock mechanics in the brittle/ductile regime, characterization of ductile rock masses, development of modeling methodologies/technologies, and investigations of induced/triggered earthquakes. We expect to drill a deep experimental borehole that will penetrate the ductile zone in northeast Japan after basic studies are completed. The feasibility of EGS reservoir development in the ductile zone will then be assessed through observations and

  9. A damage mechanics approach for quantifying stress changes due to brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Natural fault zones or man-made injection or production of fluid impact the regional stress distribution in Earth's crust and can be responsible for localized stress discontinuities. Understanding the processes controlling fracturing of the porous rocks and mechanical behaviour of fault zones is therefore of interest for several applications including geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes controlling the deformation of porous rocks during and after brittle failure. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To illustrate the model, simulation of a compaction experiment of a sandstone leading to shear failure will be presented which allows to quantify the stress drop accompanying the failure. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field scale to simulate hydraulic fracturing and assess the resulting changes in the stress field.

  10. Fabric controls on the brittle failure of folded gneiss and schist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Zanchetta, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally studied the brittle failure behaviour of folded gneiss and schist. Rock fabric and petrography were characterised by meso-structural analyses, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and SEM imaging. Uniaxial compression, triaxial compression and indirect tension laboratory tests were performed to characterise their strength and stress-strain behaviour. Fracture patterns generated in compression were resolved in 3D through X-ray computed tomography at different resolutions (30 to 625 μm). Uniaxial compression tests revealed relatively low and scattered values of unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and Young's modulus, with no obvious relationships with the orientation of foliation. Samples systematically failed in four brittle modes, involving different combinations of shear fractures along foliation or parallel to fold axial planes, or the development of cm-scale shear zones. Fracture quantification and microstructural analysis show that different failure modes occur depending on the mutual geometrical arrangement and degree of involvement of two distinct physical anisotropies, i.e. the foliation and the fold axial planes. The Axial Plane Anisotropy (APA) is related to micro-scale grain size reduction and shape preferred orientation within quartz-rich domains, and to mechanical rotation or initial crenulation cleavage within phyllosilicate-rich domains at fold hinge zones. In quartz-rich rocks (gneiss), fracture propagation through quartz aggregates forming the APA corresponds to higher fracture energy and strength than found for fracture through phyllosilicate-rich domains. This results in a strong dependence of strength on the failure mode. Conversely, in phyllosilicate-rich rocks (schist), all the failure modes are dominated by the strength of phyllosilicates, resulting in a sharp reduction of strength anisotropy.

  11. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  12. Rice aroma and flavor: a literature review.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aroma and flavor of cooked rice are major criteria for preference among consumers. Small variations in these sensory properties can make rice highly desired or unacceptable to consumers. Human sensory analyses have identified over a dozen different aromas and flavors in rice. Instrumental ana...

  13. New market opportunities for rice grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding efforts for rice have been focusing on increasing yield and improving quality (milling yield and grain quality), while maintaining cooked rice sensory properties to meet consumer preferences. These breeding targets will no doubt continue as the main foci for the rice industry. However, the ...

  14. Brittle deformation and slope failure at the North Menan Butte tuff cone, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, Chris H.

    2014-01-01

    The manifestation of brittle deformation within inactive slumps along the North Menan Butte, a basaltic tuff cone in the Eastern Snake River Plain, is investigated through field and laboratory studies. Microstructural observations indicate that brittle strain is localized along deformation bands, a class of structural discontinuity that is predominant within moderate to high-porosity, clastic sedimentary rocks. Various subtypes of deformation bands are recognized in the study area based on the sense of strain they accommodate. These include dilation bands (no shear displacement), dilational shear bands, compactional shear bands and simple shear bands (no volume change). Measurements of the host rock permeability between the deformation bands indicate that the amount of brittle strain distributed throughout this part of the rock is negligible, and thus deformation bands are the primary means by which brittle strain is manifest within this tuff. Structural discontinuities that are similar in appearance to deformation bands are observed in other basaltic tuffs. Therefore deformation bands may represent a common structural feature of basaltic tuffs that have been widely misclassified as fractures. Slumping and collapse along the flanks of active volcanoes strongly influence their eruptive behavior and structural evolution. Therefore characterizing the process of deformation band and fault growth within basaltic tuff is key to achieving a more complete understanding of the evolution of basaltic volcanoes and their associated hazards.

  15. Micromechanics of failure in brittle geomaterials. Final technical report (for 7/1/1994 - 8/31/2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Teng-fong

    2000-12-01

    The overall objective was to provide a fundamental understanding of brittle failure processes in porous and compact geomaterials. This information is central to energy-related programs such as oil and gas exploration/production, reservoir engineering, drilling technology, geothermal energy recovery, nuclear waste isolation, and environmental remediation. The effects of key parameters such as grain boundary structure and cementation, damage state, and load path on the deformation and failure model of brittle geomaterials are still largely unknown. The research methodology emphasized the integration of experimental rock mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and detailed analysis using fracture mechanics, continuum plasticity theory, and numerical methods. Significant progress was made in elucidating the micromechanics of brittle failure in compact crystalline rocks, as well as high-porosity siliciclastic and carbonate rocks. Substantial effort was expended toward applying a new quantitative three-dimensional imaging technique to geomaterials and for developing enhanced image analysis capabilities. The research is presented under the following topics: technique for imaging the 3-D pore structure of geomaterials; mechanics of compressive failure in sandstone; effect of water on compressive failure of sandstone; micromechanics of compressive failure: observation and model; and the brittle-ductile transition in porous carbonate rocks.

  16. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.J.; Busch, D.E.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of simultaneous displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on the ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti specimens irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE).

  17. Rice epigenomics and epigenetics: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangsong; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2013-05-01

    During recent years rice genome-wide epigenomic information such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, which are important for genome activity has been accumulated. The function of a number of rice epigenetic regulators has been studied, many of which are found to be involved in a diverse range of developmental and stress-responsive pathways. Analysis of epigenetic variations among different rice varieties indicates that epigenetic modification may lead to inheritable phenotypic variation. Characterizing phenotypic consequences of rice epigenomic variations and the underlining chromatin mechanism and identifying epialleles related to important agronomic traits may provide novel strategies to enhance agronomically favorable traits and grain productivity in rice.

  18. Tillering and panicle branching genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-hong; Shang, Fei; Lin, Qun-ting; Lou, Chen; Zhang, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important staple food crops in the world, and rice tillering and panicle branching are important traits determining grain yield. Since the gene MONOCULM 1 (MOC 1) was first characterized as a key regulator in controlling rice tillering and branching, great progress has been achieved in identifying important genes associated with grain yield, elucidating the genetic basis of yield-related traits. Some of these important genes were shown to be applicable for molecular breeding of high-yielding rice. This review focuses on recent advances, with emphasis on rice tillering and panicle branching genes, and their regulatory networks. PMID:24345551

  19. Tillering and panicle branching genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-hong; Shang, Fei; Lin, Qun-ting; Lou, Chen; Zhang, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important staple food crops in the world, and rice tillering and panicle branching are important traits determining grain yield. Since the gene MONOCULM 1 (MOC 1) was first characterized as a key regulator in controlling rice tillering and branching, great progress has been achieved in identifying important genes associated with grain yield, elucidating the genetic basis of yield-related traits. Some of these important genes were shown to be applicable for molecular breeding of high-yielding rice. This review focuses on recent advances, with emphasis on rice tillering and panicle branching genes, and their regulatory networks.

  20. Incorporating rice residues into paddy soils affects methylmercury accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huike; Zhong, Huan; Wu, Jialu

    2016-06-01

    Paddy fields are characterized by frequent organic input (e.g., fertilization and rice residue amendment), which may affect mercury biogeochemistry and bioaccumulation. To explore potential effects of rice residue amendment on methylmercury (MMHg) accumulation in rice, a mercury-contaminated paddy soil was amended with rice root (RR), rice straw (RS) or composted rice straw (CS), and planted with rice. Incorporating RS or CS increased grain MMHg concentration by 14% or 11%. The observed increases could be attributed to the elevated porewater MMHg levels and thus enhanced MMHg uptake by plants, as well as increased MMHg translocation to grain within plants. Our results indicated for the first time that rice residue amendment could significantly affect MMHg accumulation in rice grain, which should be considered in risk assessment of MMHg in contaminated areas. PMID:26974480

  1. Objective evaluation of whiteness of cooked rice and rice cakes using a portable spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Asanome, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Keitaro; Sano, Tomoyoshi; Saito, Hiroshi; Abe, Yohei; Chuba, Masaru; Nishio, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    The whiteness of cooked rice and rice cakes was evaluated using a portable spectrophotometer with a whiteness index (WI). Also, by using boiled rice for measurement of Mido values by Mido Meter, it was possible to infer the whiteness of cooked rice without rice cooking. In the analysis of varietal differences of cooked rice, 'Tsuyahime', 'Koshihikari' and 'Koshinokaori' showed high whiteness, while 'Satonoyuki' had inferior whiteness. The whiteness of rice cakes made from 'Koyukimochi' and 'Dewanomochi' was higher than the whiteness of those made from 'Himenomochi' and 'Koganemochi'. While there was a significant correlation (r = 0.84) between WI values and whiteness scores of cooked rice by the sensory test, no correlation was detected between the whiteness scores and Mido values, indicating that the values obtained by a spectrophotometer differ from those obtained by a Mido Meter. Thus, a spectrophotometer may be a novel device for measurement of rice eating quality.

  2. The Border Ranges shear zone, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska: An example of an ancient brittle-ductile transition zone

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, K.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Border Ranges fault system in southern Alaska forms the tectonic boundary between the Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia (PAW) composite terrane and the Chugach terrane. In Glacier Bay National Park, the Border Ranges fault system is a north-northwest trending, 10 kilometer wide zone of ductile shear zones and brittle faults hereafter referred to as the Border Ranges shear zone. Three-dimensional strain analyses of plagioclase lathes in the foliated calc-alkaline plutons reveals a strong flattening fabric with the plane of maximum flattening (XY-plane) oriented northwest-southeast and dipping steeply to the southwest. The distribution and shapes of sub-elliptical mafic enclaves in the calc-alkaline plutons show a similarly oriented flattening fabric. Coeval brittle and ductile deformational processes are indicated by: (1) ductile shear zones narrowing to brittle faults at the outcrop scale; and (2) undulose quartz with subgrain development, kinked biotite, twinned and undulose feldspar, and fractured and twinned hornblende often within a single thin-section. Amphibole geobarometry indicates that two of the calc-alkaline plutons deformed by the shear zone crystallized at pressures of approximately 3 kilobars equivalent to 10 to 12 kilometers depth. Metamorphic mineral assemblages within the mylonites indicate deformation under lower greenschist facies conditions (300--400 C). The shear zone may represent a snapshot of the brittle-ductile transition of an ancient convergent-transform plate boundary. As such, this unique exposure may be an ancient analogue for the brittle-ductile transition of the present day San Andreas fault system.

  3. Weedy (red) rice: An emerging constraint to global rice production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ongoing increases in the human population necessitate that rice will continue to be an essential aspect of food security for the 21st century. While production must increase in the coming decades to meet demand, such increases will be accompanied by diminished natural resources and rising productio...

  4. Insights into molecular mechanism of blast resistance in weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice is a serious pest in direct-seeded rice fields in the U.S. and worldwide. Under suitable conditions, weedy rice can reduce crop yields up to 70%. However, weedy rice may carry novel disease resistance genes. Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major disease wo...

  5. A phenomenological molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Lin, Panpan; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2014-09-01

    This work formulates, at a molecular level, a phenomenological theoretical description of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in tensile extension, exhibited by all polymeric glasses of high molecular weight (MW). The starting point is our perception of a polymer glass (under large deformation) as a structural hybrid, consisting of a primary structure due to the van der Waals bonding and a chain network whose junctions are made of pairs of hairpins and function like chemical crosslinks due to the intermolecular uncrossability. During extension, load-bearing strands (LBSs) emerge between the junctions in the affinely strained chain network. Above the BDT, i.e., at "warmer" temperatures where the glass is less vitreous, the influence of the chain network reaches out everywhere by activating all segments populated transversely between LBSs, starting from those adjacent to LBSs. It is the chain network that drives the primary structure to undergo yielding and plastic flow. Below the BDT, the glassy state is too vitreous to yield before the chain network suffers a structural breakdown. Thus, brittle failure becomes inevitable. For any given polymer glass of high MW, there is one temperature TBD or a very narrow range of temperature where the yielding of the glass barely takes place as the chain network also reaches the point of a structural failure. This is the point of the BDT. A theoretical analysis of the available experimental data reveals that (a) chain pullout occurs at the BDT when the chain tension builds up to reach a critical value fcp during tensile extension; (b) the limiting value of fcp, extrapolated to far below the glass transition temperature Tg, is of a universal magnitude around 0.2-0.3 nN, for all eight polymers examined in this work; (c) pressurization, which is known [K. Matsushige, S. V. Radcliffe, and E. Baer, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 20, 1853 (1976)] to make brittle polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) ductile at room temperature

  6. Failure processes in soft and quasi-brittle materials with nonhomogeneous microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Daniel W.

    Material failure pervades the fields of materials science and engineering; it occurs at various scales and in various contexts. Understanding the mechanisms by which a material fails can lead to advancements in the way we design and build the world around us. For example, in structural engineering, understanding the fracture of concrete and steel can lead to improved structural systems and safer designs; in geological engineering, understanding the fracture of rock can lead to increased efficiency in oil and gas extraction; and in biological engineering, understanding the fracture of bone can lead to improvements in the design of bio-composites and medical implants. In this thesis, we numerically investigate a wide spectrum of failure behavior; in soft and quasi-brittle materials with nonhomogeneous microstructures considering a statistical distribution of material properties. The first topic we investigate considers the influence of interfacial interactions on the macroscopic constitutive response of particle reinforced elastomers. When a particle is embedded into an elastomer, the polymer chains in the elastomer tend to adsorb (or anchor) onto the surface of the particle; creating a region in the vicinity of each particle (often referred to as an interphase) with distinct properties from those in the bulk elastomer. This interphasial region has been known to exist for many decades, but is primarily omitted in computational investigations of such composites. In this thesis, we present an investigation into the influence of interphases on the macroscopic constitutive response of particle filled elastomers undergoing large deformations. In addition, at large deformations, a localized region of failure tends to accumulate around inclusions. To capture this localized region of failure (often referred to as interfacial debonding), we use cohesive zone elements which follow the Park-Paulino-Roesler traction-separation relation. To account for friction, we present a new

  7. Elastic geobarometry and the role of brittle failure on pressure release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Mattia Luca; Angel, Ross John; Rustioni, Greta; Milani, Sula; Nimis, Paolo; Chiara Domeneghetti, Maria; Marone, Federica; Harris, Jeff W.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Mineral inclusions trapped in their hosts can provide fundamental information about geological processes. Recent developments in elastic geobarometry, for example, allow the retrieval of encapsulation pressures for host-inclusion pairs. In principle this method can be applied to any mineral-mineral pair so long as both the residual pressure on an inclusion (Pinc), and the equations of state for both host and inclusion are either known or determined (Angel et al., 2015). However, Angel et al. (2014) outlined some boundary conditions, one of which was that deformation in the host-inclusion pair has to be purely elastic. Thus this caveat would exclude from analysis all the inclusions that are surrounded by cracks, indicative of brittle deformation, which may result in partial or complete release of the Pinc. If however the effects of cracks surrounding trapped mineral inclusions could be quantitatively modelled, then the applicability of "elastic" geobarometry might be extended to a much larger number of inclusion-host pairs. We report the results of a pilot experiment in which the stress states (i.e. the residual pressure) have been determined for 10 olivine inclusions still entrapped in 5 diamonds. Inclusion pressures were determined from the unit-cell volumes of the olivines measured in-situ in the diamonds by X-ray diffraction. The olivine equations of state were determined from the olivine compositions by in-situ X-ray structure refinement. Values of Pinc range from 0.19 to 0.53 GPa. In order to quantify the degree of brittle failure surrounding the inclusions, the same set of samples were also investigated by synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography (SRXTM at TOMCAT, Swiss LightSource). Preliminary results showed that at the spatial resolution of our experiments (pixel size of 0.34μm), 90% of the inclusions trapped in our set of diamonds were surrounded by cracks. The volume of the cracks has been determined from 3D reconstruction with an accuracy of about 4%. Our

  8. Experimental Determination of the Fracture Toughness and Brittleness of the Mancos Shale, Utah.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Mike; Meredith, Phil; Crawford, Brian

    2013-04-01

    non-linearity. This produces hysteresis during cyclic loading, allowing for the calculation of a brittleness coefficient using the residual displacement after successive loading cycles. This can then be used to define a brittleness corrected Fracture Toughness, KIcc. We report anisotropic KIcc values and a variety of supporting measurements made on the Mancos Shale in the three principle Mode-I crack orientations (Arrester, Divider and Short-Transverse) using a modified Short-Rod sample geometry. The Mancos is an Upper Cretaceous shale from western Colorado and eastern Utah with a relatively high siliclastic content for a gas target formation. The Short-Rod methodology involves the propagation of a crack through a triangular ligament in a chevron-notched cylindrical sample [3]. A very substantial anisotropy is observed in the loading curves and KIcc values for the three crack orientations, with the Divider orientation having KIcc values 25% higher than the other orientations. The measured brittleness for these Mancos shales is in the range 1.5-2.1; higher than for any other rocks we have found in the literature. This implies that the material is extremely non-linear. Increases in KIcc with increasing confining pressure are also investigated, as Shale Gas reservoirs occur at depths where confining pressure may be as high as 35MPa and temperature as high as 100oC. References [1] C.A. Green, P. Styles & B.J. Baptie, "Preese Hall Shale Gas Fracturing", Review & Recommendations for Induced Seismic Mitigation, 2012. [2] N.R. Warpinski & M.B. Smith, "Rock Mechanics and Fracture Geometry", Recent advances in Hydraulic Fracturing, SPE Monograms, Vol. 12, pp. 57-80, 1990. [3] F. Ouchterlony, "International Society for Rock Mechanics Commision on Testing Methods: Suggested Methods for Determining the Fracture Toughness of Rock", International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Science & Geomechanics Abstracts, Vol. 25, 1988.

  9. Naturally Constrained Profiles of the Strength of the Middle Crust Near the Brittle-Ductile Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, W. M.; Platt, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    We present a method in which paleopiezometry, Ti-in-quartz thermobarometry (Titani-Q), and simple 2-D thermal modeling can be used to construct naturally constrained profiles of crustal strength in areas of exhumed mid-crustal rocks. As an example, we examine the footwall of the Whipple Mountains metamorphic core complex (WMCC). Rocks in the WMCC were initially deformed at ~ 20 km depth by distributed ductile shear, and were then progressively overprinted by localized ductile shear zones and eventually by discrete brittle fracture as the footwall was cooled and exhumed toward the brittle-ductile transition (BDT). Increasing localization and cooling during exhumation allowed earlier microstructures to be preserved, and rocks in the WMCC therefore represent several ‘points’ in temperature-stress space (and by inference depth-stress space). We collected mylonitic granitoids from four transects near the Whipple detachment fault and applied the experimental piezometer of Stipp and Tullis (2003, GRL, vol. 30, no. 21), and the Titani-Q thermobarometer of Thomas et al. (submitted manuscript) to individual quartz-rich domains. To relate the temperature measurements from each sample with depth, we use a finite-element code to solve the 2D heat-transfer equation for the temperature distribution below the detachment, using published cooling rates and standard material parameters. Some samples have quartz ribbons with a consistent dynamically recrystallized grain size and uniform temperature distributions and thus represent a single point in stress-depth space. Others are ‘composite’ in that a progression from distributed high-T low-stress deformation to low-T high stress deformation can be tracked at the field and micro-scale. We distinguish different phases of this down-temperature progression based on 1) changes in dynamically recrystallized grain sizes and quartz crystallographic preferred orientation patterns measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD); and

  10. Developing an Experimental Simulation Method for Rock Avalanches: Fragmentation Behavior of Brittle Analogue Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Rosenau, Matthias; Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Gravitational mass movement on earth and other planets show a scale dependent behavior, of which the physics is not fully understood. In particular, the runout distance for small to medium sized landslides (volume < 106m3) can be predicted by a simple Coulomb friction law consistent with a constant kinetic coefficient of friction at the landslide base. This implies that the runout can be considered independent of volume. Large volume landslides (rock avalanches), however, show a dependence of runout on volume. This break in scaling behavior suggests that different dynamics control small and large landslides/rock avalanches. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this scale dependent behavior, but no consensus has been reached. Experimental simulations of rock avalanches usually involve transport of loose granular material down a chute. Though such granular avalanche models provide important insights into avalanche dynamics, they imply that the material fully disintegrate instantaneously. Observations from nature, however, suggests that a transition from solid to "liquid" occurs over some finite distance downhill, critically controlling the mobility and energy budget of the avalanche. Few experimental studies simulated more realistically the material failing during sliding and those were realized in a labscale centrifuge, where the range of volumes/scales is limited. To develop a new modeling technique to study the scale dependent runout behavior of rock avalanches, we designed, tested and verified several brittle materials allowing fragmentation to occur under normal gravity conditions. According to the model similarity theory, the analogue material must behave dynamically similar to the rocks in natural rock avalanches. Ideally, the material should therefore deform in a brittle manner with limited elastic and ductile strains up to a certain critical stress, beyond which the material breaks and deforms irreversibly. According to scaling relations derived

  11. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though

  12. Development of agglomerated directly compressible diluent consisting of brittle and ductile materials.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Mukesh C; Jogani, Pranav D; Bariya, Shital E H

    2003-01-01

    adjuvants absorb very little moisture in the moisture uptake study. The results of dilution potential study reveal that up to 30% nimesulide, a poorly compressible drug, can be incorporated in the coprocessed product. In vitro drug dissolution from capsules containing pure drug powder and compressed tablets was comparable (f2 = 79). The results reveal that the desired product characters can be obtained by varying the quantity of MCC (a ductile material that undergoes plastic deformation), lactose (brittle material with low-fragmentation propensity), and DCP (brittle material with high-fragmentation propensity). PMID:12760565

  13. Brittle Solvers: Lessons and insights into effective solvers for visco-plasticity in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, M. W.; May, D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Plasticity/Fracture and rock failure are essential ingredients in geodynamic models as terrestrial rocks do not possess an infinite yield strength. Numerous physical mechanisms have been proposed to limit the strength of rocks, including low temperature plasticity and brittle fracture. While ductile and creep behavior of rocks at depth is largely accepted, the constitutive relations associated with brittle failure, or shear localisation, are more controversial. Nevertheless, there are really only a few macroscopic constitutive laws for visco-plasticity that are regularly used in geodynamics models. Independent of derivation, all of these can be cast as simple effective viscosities which act as stress limiters with different choices for yield surfaces; the most common being a von Mises (constant yield stress) or Drucker-Prager (pressure dependent yield-stress) criterion. The choice of plasticity model, however, can have significant consequences for the degree of non-linearity in a problem and the choice and efficiency of non-linear solvers. Here we describe a series of simplified 2 and 3-D model problems to elucidate several issues associated with obtaining accurate description and solution of visco-plastic problems. We demonstrate that1) Picard/Successive substitution schemes for solution of the non-linear problems can often stall at large values of the non-linear residual, thus producing spurious solutions2) Combined Picard/Newton schemes can be effective for a range of plasticity models, however, they can produce serious convergence problems for strongly pressure dependent plasticity models such as Drucker-Prager.3) Nevertheless, full Drucker-Prager may not be the plasticity model of choice for strong materials as the dynamic pressures produced in these layers can develop pathological behavior with Drucker-Prager, leading to stress strengthening rather than stress weakening behavior.4) In general, for any incompressible Stoke's problem, it is highly advisable to

  14. Rice brans, rice bran oils, and rice hulls: composition, food and industrial uses, and bioactivities in humans, animals, and cells.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel

    2013-11-13

    Rice plants produce bioactive rice brans and hulls that have been reported to have numerous health-promoting effects in cells, animals, and humans. The main objective of this review is to consolidate and integrate the widely scattered information on the composition and the antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulating effects of rice brans from different rice cultivars, rice bran oils derived from rice brans, rice hulls, liquid rice hull smoke derived from rice hulls, and some of their bioactive compounds. As part of this effort, this paper also presents brief summaries on the preparation of health-promoting foods including bread, corn flakes, frankfurters, ice cream, noodles, pasta, tortillas, and zero-trans-fat shortening as well as industrial products such bioethanol and biodiesel fuels. Also covered are antibiotic, antiallergic, anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, cardiovascular, allelochemical, and other beneficial effects and the mechanisms of the bioactivities. The results show that food-compatible and safe formulations with desirable nutritional and biological properties can be used to develop new multifunctional foods as well as bioethanol and biodiesel fuel. The overlapping aspects are expected to contribute to a better understanding of the potential impact of the described health-promoting potential of the rice-derived brans, oils, and hulls in food and medicine. Such an understanding will enhance nutrition and health and benefit the agricultural and industrial economies. PMID:24175575

  15. The impact of herbicide-resistant rice technology on phenotypic diversity and population structure of United States weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of imazethapyr herbicide-resistant (HR) Clearfield® rice (Oryza sativa L.) to control weedy rice has increased in the past 12 years to comprise about 60% of rice acreage in Arkansas, where 43% of rice in the USA was planted in 2013. To assess the impact of HR cultivated rice on herbicide res...

  16. Agriculture Education. Soybeans and Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural education. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) soybeans, (2) rice, and (3) orientation. Each of the 17 units of instruction follows a typical format: terminal objective, specific…

  17. Rice production in relation to soil quality under different rice-based cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ba, Linh; Sleutel, Steven; Nguyen Van, Qui; Thi, Guong Vo; Le Van, Khoa; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Soil quality of shallow paddy soils may be improved by introducing upland crops and thus a more diverse crop cultivation pattern. Yet, the causal relationship between crop performance and enhanced soil traits in rice-upland crop rotations remains elusive. The objectives of this study were to (i) find correlations among soil properties under different rice-upland crop systems and link selected soil properties to rice growth and yield, (ii) present appropriate values of soil parameters for sustainable rice productivity in heavy clay soil, (iii) evaluate the effect of rotating rice with upland crops on rice yield and economic benefit in a long-term experiment. A rice-upland crop rotational field experiment in the Vietnamese Mekong delta was conducted for 10 years using a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replications. Treatments were: (i) rice-rice-rice (control - conventional system as farmers' practice), (ii) rice-maize-rice, (iii) rice-mung bean-rice, and (iv) rice-mung bean-maize. Soil and plant sampling were performed after harvest of the rice crop at the end of the final winter-spring cropping season (i.e. year 10). Results show differences in rice growth and yield, and economic benefit as an effect of the crop rotation system. These differences were linked with changes in bulk density, soil porosity, soil aggregate stability index, soil penetration resistance, soil macro-porosity, soil organic carbon, acid hydrolysable soil C and soil nutrient elements, especially at soil depth of 20-30 cm. This is evidenced by the strong correlation (P < 0.01) between rice plant parameters, rice yield and soil properties such as bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance, soil organic carbon and Chydrolysable. It turned out that good rice root growth and rice yield corresponded to bulk density values lower than 1.3 Mg m-3, soil porosity higher than 50%, penetration resistance below 1.0 MPa, and soil organic carbon above 25 g kg-1. The optimal

  18. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  19. A brittle-ductile high- and low-angle fault related to the Kea extensional detachment (W Cyclades., Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenschaub, M.; Grasemann, B.; Iglseder, C.; Rice, A. H. N.; Schneider, D.; Zamolyi, A.

    2010-05-01

    Roll-back of the African Plate within the Eurasian-African collision zone since the Oligocene/Miocene led to extension in the Cyclades along low-angle normal fault zones and exhumation of rocks from near the brittle-ductile transition zone. On the island of Kea (W Cyclades), which represents such a crustal scale low-angle fault zone with top-to-SSW kinematics, remote sensing analysis of brittle fault lineaments in the Pissis area (W Kea) demonstrates two dominant strike directions: ca. NE-SW and NW-SE. From the north of Pisses southwards, the angle between the two main fault directions changes gradually from a rhombohedral geometry (ca. 50°/130° angle between faults, with the acute angle facing westwards) to an orthogonal geometry. The aim of this study is the development of this fault system. We investigate, if this fault system is related to the Miocene extension or if it is related to a later overprinting event (e.g. the opening of the Corinth) Field observations revealed that the investigated lineaments are high-angle (50-90° dip) brittle/ductile conjugate, faults. Due to the lack of marker layers offsets could only rarely be estimated. Locally centimetre thick marble layers in the greenschists suggest a displacement gradient along the faults with a maximum offset of less than 60 cm. Large displacement gradients are associated with a pronounced ductile fault drag in the host rocks. In some instances, high-angle normal faults were observed to link kinematically with low-angle, top-to-SSW brittle/ductile shear bands. Both the high- and the low-angle faults have a component of ductile shear, which is overprinted by brittle deformation mechanisms. In thin-section, polyphase mode-2 cracks are filled mainly with calcite and quartz (ultra)cataclasites, sometimes followed by further opening with fluid-related iron-rich carbonate (ankeritic) precipitation. CL analysis reveals several generations of cements, indicating multiple phases of cataclastic deformation and

  20. Tectonic stress field of brittle deformation within 2000 m of the main borehole of Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Li, P.; Wang, L.

    2004-12-01

    Four phases of tectonic stress fields: There exist a complex brittle fracture system and a tectonic stress field within 2000 m of the main hole. According to the features of its fillings, three different types of brittle strain phenomena may distinguished; they are microfractures filled by quartz, calcite, chlorite and other minerals, microfractures with films of minerals such as quartz and calcite or with striation lineation, and microfractures with neither mineral filling nor mineral films. They represent the early, middle and late phases and deep, middle and shallow tectonic levels of brittle deformation, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that four phases of tectonic stress fields, i.e. dominantly ESE and WNW compression, NE-SW regional compression, N-S compression and vertical extension, occur in the stage of brittle deformation. The modern tectonic stress field on the eastern side of the Tanlu fault is regionally very stable. In the brittle and brittle-ductile transition belts, the dominant mode of stress action constraining the emplacement of the Sulu high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic belt is ESE-WNW compression, which shows certain stability in time and space. The determination of in-situ stress from wellbore breakouts: The breakouts began to occur under the depth of 1200m in the main borehole of Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD), 82 breakout images are collected from acoustic borehole televiewer data between 1200m and 2010 m. The averaged orientation of breakouts is 324.8¡a¡A3.3¡a. The averaged orientation of maximum horizontal stress is 54.8¡a¡A3.3¡a. Using parameters measured from breakouts (depth and width of breakout) and rock cohesive strength determined from triaxial rock compression and deformation test, the magnitudes of principal stress are calculated at 16 different depths of 1269m, 1500m, 2000m and so on. Overburden stress is calculated using the density logging data. According to the orientations and

  1. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials

    PubMed Central

    Montemayor, L. C.; Wong, W. H.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Greer, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) < 0.3 for the same (a/l); bending begins to play a significant role in failure as (a/w) increases. This experimental and computational work demonstrates that the discrete-continuum duality of architected structural meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials. PMID:26837581

  2. Application of fracture toughness scaling models to the ductile-to- brittle transition

    SciTech Connect

    Link, R.E.; Joyce, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition range was conducted. A large number of ASTM A533, Grade B steel, bend and tension specimens with varying crack lengths were tested throughout the transition region. Cleavage fracture toughness scaling models were utilized to correct the data for the loss of constraint in short crack specimens and tension geometries. The toughness scaling models were effective in reducing the scatter in the data, but tended to over-correct the results for the short crack bend specimens. A proposed ASTM Test Practice for Fracture Toughness in the Transition Range, which employs a master curve concept, was applied to the results. The proposed master curve over predicted the fracture toughness in the mid-transition and a modified master curve was developed that more accurately modeled the transition behavior of the material. Finally, the modified master curve and the fracture toughness scaling models were combined to predict the as-measured fracture toughness of the short crack bend and the tension specimens. It was shown that when the scaling models over correct the data for loss of constraint, they can also lead to non-conservative estimates of the increase in toughness for low constraint geometries.

  3. Reliability Analysis of Brittle Material Structures - Including MEMS(?) - With the CARES/Life Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2002-01-01

    Brittle materials are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts. thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The CARES/Life code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. For this presentation an interview of the CARES/Life program will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on describing the latest enhancements to the code for reliability analysis with time varying loads and temperatures (fully transient reliability analysis). Also, early efforts in investigating the validity of using Weibull statistics, the basis of the CARES/Life program, to characterize the strength of MEMS structures will be described as as well as the version of CARES/Life for MEMS (CARES/MEMS) being prepared which incorporates single crystal and edge flaw reliability analysis capability. It is hoped this talk will open a dialog for potential collaboration in the area of MEMS testing and life prediction.

  4. Brittle diabetes: long-term control with a portable, continuous, intravenous insulin infusion system.

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, J

    1981-01-01

    A young woman had severe brittle diabetes mellitus that was critically unmanageable with all conventional insulin treatment. Continuous subcutaneous and intramuscular infusions of insulin also failed to control her metabolic instability. Use of a continuous intravenous infusion, however, whereby a portable, variable-rate, battery-operated syringe pump delivered insulin through a subcutaneously tunnelled central venous catheter, resulted in good control. When she was receiving hourly intramuscular insulin injections (a mean of 778 IU daily) mean blood glucose concentrations had been 22.1 +/- 1.4 mmol/l (398 +/- 25 mg/100 microliters). After she had received the intravenous infusion for one month as an outpatient mean blood glucose concentration was 8.2 +/- 0.46 mmol/l (148 +/- 8 mg/100 microliters) and only 80 IU insulin daily was required. Follow-up after over five months of use showed that few complications had occurred. The system is simple to use and safe, and the diabetes had been stabilised such that she could enjoy a near-normal life style. PMID:6797511

  5. Impact of the integration of a Maxwell-elastic-brittle rheology in NEMO-LIM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulier, Jonathan; Fichefet, Thierry; Legat, Vincent; Weiss, Jérôme; Dansereau, Véronique

    2015-04-01

    Satellite observations of the Arctic sea ice show the existence of a dense mesh of leads constantly opening and closing over short time scales. Those leads are highly linked to the presence of linear kinematic features which are quasi linear patterns present in the strain field that stretch all across the Arctic basin. Current sea ice models fail to reproduce those linear kinematic features and the observed statistical distribution of deformation rate. In order to refine the physical representation of sea ice dynamics into sea ice models, a new approach has been adopted for the rheology of sea ice. This approach, based on a Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology, is being integrated in the NEMO-LIM3 global ocean-sea ice model (\\url{www.nemo-ocean.eu} ; \\url{www.elic.ucl.ac.be/lim}). In the present study, we examine the influence of the new rheology on the statistical characteristics of the simulated deformation rate and on the ability of the model to reproduce the existence of leads within the ice pack. We will also address the impact of the representation of leads on the fluxes between atmosphere and ocean.

  6. Fracture property of Y-shaped cracks of brittle materials under compression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zheming; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of Y-shaped cracks of brittle materials under compression, compression tests by using square cement mortar specimens with Y-shaped crack were conducted. A true triaxial loading device was applied in the tests, and the major principle stresses or the critical stresses were measured. The results show that as the branch angle θ between the branch crack and the stem crack is 75°, the cracked specimen has the lowest strength. In order to explain the test results, numerical models of Y-shaped cracks by using ABAQUS code were established, and the J-integral method was applied in calculating crack tip stress intensity factor (SIF). The results show that when the branch angle θ increases, the SIF K I of the branch crack increases from negative to positive and the absolute value K II of the branch crack first increases, and as θ is 50°, it is the maximum, and then it decreases. Finally, in order to further investigate the stress distribution around Y-shaped cracks, photoelastic tests were conducted, and the test results generally agree with the compressive test results. PMID:25013846

  7. Fracture Property of Y-Shaped Cracks of Brittle Materials under Compression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zheming; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of Y-shaped cracks of brittle materials under compression, compression tests by using square cement mortar specimens with Y-shaped crack were conducted. A true triaxial loading device was applied in the tests, and the major principle stresses or the critical stresses were measured. The results show that as the branch angle θ between the branch crack and the stem crack is 75°, the cracked specimen has the lowest strength. In order to explain the test results, numerical models of Y-shaped cracks by using ABAQUS code were established, and the J-integral method was applied in calculating crack tip stress intensity factor (SIF). The results show that when the branch angle θ increases, the SIF KI of the branch crack increases from negative to positive and the absolute value KII of the branch crack first increases, and as θ is 50°, it is the maximum, and then it decreases. Finally, in order to further investigate the stress distribution around Y-shaped cracks, photoelastic tests were conducted, and the test results generally agree with the compressive test results. PMID:25013846

  8. Dirty Electricity Elevates Blood Sugar Among Electrically Sensitive Diabetics and May Explain Brittle Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Havas, Magda

    2008-01-01

    Transient electromagnetic fields (dirty electricity), in the kilohertz range on electrical wiring, may be contributing to elevated blood sugar levels among diabetics and prediabetics. By closely following plasma glucose levels in four Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics, we find that they responded directly to the amount of dirty electricity in their environment. In an electromagnetically clean environment, Type 1 diabetics require less insulin and Type 2 diabetics have lower levels of plasma glucose. Dirty electricity, generated by electronic equipment and wireless devices, is ubiquitous in the environment. Exercise on a treadmill, which produces dirty electricity, increases plasma glucose. These findings may explain why brittle diabetics have difficulty regulating blood sugar. Based on estimates of people who suffer from symptoms of electrical hypersensitivity (3–35%), as many as 5–60 million diabetics worldwide may be affected. Exposure to electromagnetic pollution in its various forms may account for higher plasma glucose levels and may contribute to the misdiagnosis of diabetes. Reducing exposure to electromagnetic pollution by avoidance or with specially designed GS filters may enable some diabetics to better regulate their blood sugar with less medication and borderline or pre-diabetics to remain non diabetic longer. PMID:18568931

  9. New brittle bone disorder: report of a family with six affected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, G; Haga, N; Aoki, K; Hamazaki, M; Taniguchi, K; Iwaya, T

    1999-06-01

    We report on a family in which four females and two males in three generations had a previously undescribed brittle bone disorder that was dominantly transmitted through a maternal line. The cardinal manifestations of the disorder comprised dolichocephaly with frontal bossing, hypoplasia of the midface, postpubertal prognathism, micromelic short stature, coarse trabeculae of the entire skeleton, and bone fragility of variable degrees. Mild spondylar modification and iliac hypoplasia were other hallmarks that were recognized in childhood. The proband, a 19-year-old male, was most severely affected with multiple wormian bones in the calvaria, repetitive fractures, intractable bowing of the legs and forearms, and pseudofractures of the long bones with metaphyseal narrowing. His male cousin was next severely affected with angular deformity restricted to the forearm. The four females were much less affected without angular deformity. The mode of inheritance was thus consistent with either an autosomal dominant trait with sex-influence or an X-linked semidominant trait. Histological bone examination in the proband showed atrophy and fibrous degeneration of the lamellar trabeculae and disorganized chondro-osseous junction, which implied that the disorder involved both intramembranous and enchondral ossifications. PMID:10340645

  10. Micropolar effect on the cataclastic flow and brittle-ductile transition in high-porosity rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheyuan; Sun, WaiChing; Fish, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    A micromechanical distinct element method (DEM) model is adopted to analyze the grain-scale mechanism that leads to the brittle-ductile transition in cohesive-frictional materials. The cohesive-frictional materials are idealized as particulate assemblies of circular disks. While the frictional sliding of disks is sensitive to the normal compressive stress exerted on contacts, normal force can be both caused by interpenetration and long-range cohesive bonding between two particles. Our numerical simulations indicate that the proposed DEM model is able to replicate the gradual shift of porosity change from dilation to compaction and failure pattern from localized failures to cataclastic flow upon rising confining pressure in 2-D biaxial tests. More importantly, the micropolar effect is examined by tracking couple stress and microcrack initiation to interpret the transition mechanism. Numerical results indicate that the first invariant of the couple stress remains small for specimen sheared under low confining pressure but increases rapidly when subjected to higher confining pressure. The micropolar responses inferred from DEM simulations reveal that microcracking may occur in a more diffuse and stable manner when the first invariant of the macroscopic couple stress are of higher magnitudes.

  11. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  12. Isogeometric phase-field modeling of brittle and ductile fracture in shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Marreddy; Kiendl, Josef; De Lorenzis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Phase-field modeling of brittle and ductile fracture is a modern promising approach that enables a unified description of complicated failure processes (including crack initiation, propagation, branching, merging), as well as its efficient numerical treatment [1-4]. In the present work, we apply this approach to model fracture in shell structures, considering both thin and thick shells. For thin shells, we use an isogeometric Kirchhoff-Love shell formulation [5-6], which exploits the high continuity of the isogeometric shape functions in order to avoid rotational degrees of freedom, i.e., the shell geometry is modeled as a surface and its deformation is fully described by the displacements of this surface. For thick shells, we use an isogeometric assumed natural strain (ANS) solid shell formulation [7], i.e., a 3D solid formulation enhanced with the ANS method in order to alleviate geometrical locking effects. According to the discretization of the structural formulations, an isogeometric basis is also used for the phase-field. While the phase-field fracture formulation for solid shells is basically the same as for standard solids, some reformulation is necessary for thin shells, accounting for the interaction of stresses devoted to membrane and bending deformation. We test both formulations on several numerical examples and perform comparisons of the results obtained by the two methods to each other as well as to reference solutions, which confirm the validity and applicability of the presented methods.

  13. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemayor, L. C.; Wong, W. H.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Greer, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) < 0.3 for the same (a/l); bending begins to play a significant role in failure as (a/w) increases. This experimental and computational work demonstrates that the discrete-continuum duality of architected structural meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials.

  14. Large-scale 3D modeling of projectile impact damage in brittle plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagraves, A.; Radovitzky, R.

    2015-10-01

    The damage and failure of brittle plates subjected to projectile impact is investigated through large-scale three-dimensional simulation using the DG/CZM approach introduced by Radovitzky et al. [Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng. 2011; 200(1-4), 326-344]. Two standard experimental setups are considered: first, we simulate edge-on impact experiments on Al2O3 tiles by Strassburger and Senf [Technical Report ARL-CR-214, Army Research Laboratory, 1995]. Qualitative and quantitative validation of the simulation results is pursued by direct comparison of simulations with experiments at different loading rates and good agreement is obtained. In the second example considered, we investigate the fracture patterns in normal impact of spheres on thin, unconfined ceramic plates over a wide range of loading rates. For both the edge-on and normal impact configurations, the full field description provided by the simulations is used to interpret the mechanisms underlying the crack propagation patterns and their strong dependence on loading rate.

  15. An ESPI experimental study on the phenomenon of fracture in glass. Is it brittle or plastic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Royer-Carfagni, Gianni

    2011-07-01

    The crack opening displacement (COD) in annealed soda-lime (float) glass has been measured with an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) apparatus using coherent laser light. Specimens, naturally pre-cracked with a particular technique, were loaded under strain-driven bending until crack propagated; at regular intervals loading was paused to let the crack reach subcritical equilibrium and the COD measured. By using a post-processing algorithm comparing four images lighted with phase-shifted laser beams, surface displacements could be measured at a resolution of 0.01 μm. Glass transparency has allowed to see through that the propagating crack front is not sharp but curved, jagged and merged in an opaque neighborhood. Numerical simulations show that the measured CODs cannot be reproduced if cohesive surface forces à la Barenblatt-Dugdale bridge the crack lips; instead a plastic-like region must form in a bulk neighborhood of the tip, where inelastic strains are associated with volume increase rather than deviatoric distortion. For this, a Gurson-Tvergaard model of porous plasticity, accounting for the formation of microvoids/microcracks, has been found more efficient than classical von Mises plasticity. This study confirms the formation at the crack tip of a process zone, whose occurrence in brittle materials like glass is still a subject of controversy.

  16. FAILPROB--A Computer Program to Compute the Probability of Failure of a Brittle Component

    SciTech Connect

    WELLMAN, GERALD W.

    2002-02-01

    FAILPROB is a computer program that applies the Weibull statistics characteristic of brittle failure of a material along with the stress field resulting from a finite element analysis to determine the probability of failure of a component. FAILPROB uses the statistical techniques for fast fracture prediction (but not the coding) from the N.A.S.A. - CARES/life ceramic reliability package. FAILPROB provides the analyst at Sandia with a more convenient tool than CARES/life because it is designed to behave in the tradition of structural analysis post-processing software such as ALGEBRA, in which the standard finite element database format EXODUS II is both read and written. This maintains compatibility with the entire SEACAS suite of post-processing software. A new technique to deal with the high local stresses computed for structures with singularities such as glass-to-metal seals and ceramic-to-metal braze joints is proposed and implemented. This technique provides failure probability computation that is insensitive to the finite element mesh employed in the underlying stress analysis. Included in this report are a brief discussion of the computational algorithms employed, user instructions, and example problems that both demonstrate the operation of FAILPROB and provide a starting point for verification and validation.

  17. A micromechanical basis for partitioning the evolution of grainbridging in brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Foulk III, J.W.; Cannon, R.M.; Johnson, G.C.; Klein, P.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-10-09

    A micromechanical model is developed for grain bridging inmonolithic ceramics. Specifically, bridge formation of a single,non-equiaxed grain spanning adjacent grains is addressed. A cohesive zoneframework enables crack initiation and propagation along grainboundaries. The evolution of the bridge is investigated through avariance in both grain angle and aspect ratio. We propose that thebridging process can be partitioned into five distinct regimes ofresistance: propagate, kink, arrest, stall, and bridge. Although crackpropagation and kinking are well understood, crack arrest and subsequent"stall" have been largely overlooked. Resistance during the stall regimeexposes large volumes of microstructure to stresses well in excess of thegrain boundary strength. Bridging can occur through continued propagationor reinitiation ahead of the stalled crack tip. The driving forcerequired to reinitiate is substantially greater than the driving forcerequired to kink. In addition, the critical driving force to reinitiateis sensitive to grain aspect ratio but relatively insensitive to grainangle. The marked increase in crack resistance occurs prior to bridgeformation and provides an interpretation for the rapidly risingresistance curves which govern the strength of many brittle materials atrealistically small flaw sizes.

  18. A brittle failure model for long-period seismic events recorded at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyre, Thomas S.; Bean, Christopher J.; De Barros, Louis; Martini, Francesca; Lokmer, Ivan; Mora, Mauricio M.; Pacheco, Javier F.; Soto, Gerardo J.

    2015-03-01

    A temporary seismic network, consisting of 23 broadband and six short-period stations, was installed in a dense network at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica, between 8 March and 4 May 2011. During this time 513 long-period (LP) events were observed. Due to their pulse-like waveforms, the hypothesis that the events are generated by a slow-failure mechanism, based on a recent new model by Bean et al. (2014), is tested. A significant number (107) of the LPs are jointly inverted for their source locations and mechanisms, using full-waveform moment tensor inversion. The locations are mostly shallow, with depths < 800 m below the active Southwest Crater. The results of the decompositions of the obtained moment tensor solutions show complex source mechanisms, composed of high proportions of isotropic and low, but seemingly significant, proportions of compensated linear vector dipole and double-couple components. It is demonstrated that this can be explained as mode I tensile fracturing with a strong shear component. The source mechanism is further investigated by exploring scaling laws within the data. The LPs recorded follow relationships very similar to those of conventional earthquakes, exhibiting frequency-magnitude and corner frequency versus magnitude relationships that can be explained by brittle failure. All of these observations indicate that a slow-failure source model can successfully describe the generation of short-duration LP events at Turrialba Volcano.

  19. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  20. New Methods in Exploring Old Topics: Case Studying Brittle Diabetes in the Family Context

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Wudy, Stefan A.; Brosig, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. In questing for a more refined quantitative research approach, we revisited vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling for the analysis of time series data in the context of the so far poorly explored concept of family dynamics surrounding instable diabetes type 1 (or brittle diabetes). Method. We adopted a new approach to VAR analysis from econometrics referred to as the optimized multivariate lag selection process and applied it to a set of raw data previously analyzed through standard approaches. Results. We illustrated recurring psychosomatic circles of cause and effect relationships between emotional and somatic parameters surrounding glycemic control of the child's diabetes and the affective states of all family members. Conclusion. The optimized multivariate lag selection process allowed for more specific, dynamic, and statistically reliable results (increasing R2 tenfold in explaining glycemic variability), which were derived from a larger window of past explanatory variables (lags). Such highly quantitative versus historic more qualitative approaches to case study analysis of psychosomatics surrounding diabetes in adolescents were reflected critically. PMID:26634215

  1. Composites reinforced via mechanical interlocking of surface-roughened microplatelets within ductile and brittle matrices.

    PubMed

    Libanori, R; Carnelli, D; Rothfuchs, N; Binelli, M R; Zanini, M; Nicoleau, L; Feichtenschlager, B; Albrecht, G; Studart, A R

    2016-06-01

    Load-bearing reinforcing elements in a continuous matrix allow for improved mechanical properties and can reduce the weight of structural composites. As the mechanical performance of composite systems are heavily affected by the interfacial properties, tailoring the interactions between matrices and reinforcing elements is a crucial problem. Recently, several studies using bio-inspired model systems suggested that interfacial mechanical interlocking is an efficient mechanism for energy dissipation in platelet-reinforced composites. While cheap and effective solutions are available at the macroscale, the modification of surface topography in micron-sized reinforcing elements still represents a challenging task. Here, we report a simple method to create nanoasperities with tailored sizes and densities on the surface of alumina platelets and investigate their micromechanical effect on the energy dissipation mechanisms of nacre-like materials. Composites reinforced with roughened platelets exhibit improved mechanical properties for both organic ductile epoxy and inorganic brittle cement matrices. Mechanical interlocking increases the modulus of toughness (area under the stress-strain curve) by 110% and 56% in epoxy and cement matrices, respectively, as compared to those reinforced with flat platelets. This interlocking mechanism can potentially lead to a significant reduction in the weight of mechanical components while retaining the structural performance required in the application field. PMID:27070938

  2. A Criterion for Brittle Failure of Rocks Using the Theory of Critical Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Jorge; Cicero, Sergio; Sagaseta, César

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical criterion for brittle failure of rocks and heavily over-consolidated soils. Griffith's model of a randomly oriented defect under a biaxial stress state is used to keep the criterion simple. The Griffith's criterion is improved because the maximum tensile strength is not evaluated at the boundary of the defect but at a certain distance from the boundary, known as half of the critical distance. This fracture criterion is known as the point method, and is part of the theory of critical distances, which is utilised in fracture mechanics. The proposed failure criterion has two parameters: the inherent tensile strength, σ 0, and the ratio of the half-length of the initial crack/flaw to the critical distance, a/ L. These parameters are difficult to measure but they may be correlated with the uniaxial compressive and tensile strengths, σ c and σ t. The proposed criterion is able to reproduce the common range of strength ratios for rocks and heavily overconsolidated soils ( σ c/ σ t = 3-50) and the influence of several microstructural rock properties, such as texture and porosity. Good agreement with laboratory tests reported in the literature is found for tensile and low-confining stresses.

  3. How tough is Brittle Bone? Investigating Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Mouse Bone††

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, A.; Zimmermann, E. A.; Paluszny, A.; Tang, S. Y.; Bale, H.; Busse, B.; Alliston, T.; Kazakia, G.

    2015-01-01

    The multiscale hierarchical structure of bone is naturally optimized to resist fractures. In osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease, genetic mutations affect the quality and/or quantity of collagen, dramatically increasing bone fracture risk. Here we reveal how the collagen defect results in bone fragility in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (oim), which has homotrimeric α1(I) collagen. At the molecular level we attribute the loss in toughness to a decrease in the stabilizing enzymatic crosslinks and an increase in non-enzymatic crosslinks, which may break prematurely inhibiting plasticity. At the tissue level, high vascular canal density reduces the stable crack growth, and extensive woven bone limits the crack-deflection toughening during crack growth. This demonstrates how modifications at the bone molecular level have ramifications at larger length scales affecting the overall mechanical integrity of the bone; thus, treatment strategies have to address multiscale properties in order to regain bone toughness. In this regard, findings from the heterozygous oim bone, where defective as well as normal collagen are present, suggest that increasing the quantity of healthy collagen in these bones helps to recover toughness at the multiple length scales. PMID:24420672

  4. Thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium: new insights from analogue modelling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Schellart, Wouter; Tomas, Ricardo; Grigorova, Vili; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We present analogue modelling experimental results concerning thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium, to try to evaluate the influence exerted by different prescribed interference angles in the formation of morpho-structural interference fault patterns. All the experiments were conceived to simulate simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults defining a (corner) zone of interference, contrasting with previously reported discrete (time and space) superposition of alternating thrust and strike-slip events. Different interference angles of 60°, 90° and 120° were experimentally investigated by comparing the specific structural configurations obtained in each case. Results show that a deltoid-shaped morpho-structural pattern is consistently formed in the fault interference (corner) zone, exhibiting a specific geometry that is fundamentally determined by the different prescribed fault interference angle. Such angle determines the orientation of the displacement vector shear component along the main frontal thrust direction, determining different fault confinement conditions in each case, and imposing a complying geometry and kinematics of the interference deltoid structure. Model comparison with natural examples worldwide shows good geometric and kinematic similarity, pointing to the existence of matching underlying dynamic process. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013.

  5. [Major domestication traits in Asian rice].

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Jun; Wang, Hong-Ru; Chu, Cheng-Cai

    2012-11-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is an excellent model plant in elucidation of cereal domestication. Loss of seed shattering, weakened dormancy, and changes in plant architecture were thought to be three key events in the rice domestication and creating the high-yield, uniform-germinating, and densely-planting modern rice. Loss of shattering is considered to be the direct morphological evidence for identifying domesticated rice. Two major shattering QTLs, Sh4 and qSH1, have displayed different domestication histories. Weakened seed dormancy is essential for synchronous germination in agricultural production. Genes Sdr4, qSD7-1, and qSD12 impose a global and complementary adaptation strategies in controlling seed dormancy. The prostate growth habit of wild rice is an adaptation to disturbed habitats, while the erect growth habit of rice cultivars meet the needs of compact planting, and such a plant architecture is mainly controlled by PROG1. The outcrossing habit of wild rice promotes propagation of domestication genes among different populations, while the self-pollinating habit of cultivated rice facilitates fixation of domestication genes. Currently, the researches on rice domestication mainly focus on individual genes or multiple neutral markers, and much less attention has been paid to the evolution of network controlling domestication traits. With the progress in functional genomics research, the molecular mechanism of domestication traits is emerging. Rice domestication researches based on network will be more comprehensive and better reflect rice domestica-tion process. Here, we reviewed most progresses in molecular mechanisms of rice domestication traits, in order to provide the new insights for rice domestication and molecular breeding.

  6. Isoflavone content and profile comparisons of cooked soybean-rice mixtures: electric rice cooker versus electric pressure rice cooker.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Yu, Bo-Ra; Park, Inmyoung; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2014-12-10

    This study examined the effects of heat and pressure on the isoflavone content and profiles of soybeans and rice cooked together using an electric rice cooker (ERC) and an electric pressure rice cooker (EPRC). The total isoflavone content of the soybean-rice mixture after ERC and EPRC cooking relative to that before cooking was ∼90% in soybeans and 14-15% in rice. Malonylglucosides decreased by an additional ∼20% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those cooked using the ERC, whereas glucosides increased by an additional ∼15% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those in ERC-cooked soybeans. In particular, malonylgenistin was highly susceptible to isoflavone conversion during soybean-rice cooking. Total genistein and total glycitein contents decreased in soybeans after ERC and EPRC cooking, whereas total daidzein content increased in EPRC-cooked soybeans (p < 0.05). These results may be useful for improving the content of nutraceuticals, such as isoflavones, in soybeans.

  7. 75 FR 56911 - Request for Public Comment on the United States Standards for Rough Rice, Brown Rice for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ..., Brown Rice for Processing, and Milled Rice standards were last revised in 1993 (58 FR 68015) and appear... were last revised, numerous changes have occurred in the breeding and production practices of rice;...

  8. Multi-scale modeling of microstructure dependent intergranular brittle fracture using a quantitative phase-field based method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-12-07

    In this study, the fracture behavior of brittle materials is strongly influenced by their underlying microstructure that needs explicit consideration for accurate prediction of fracture properties and the associated scatter. In this work, a hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued to model microstructure sensitive brittle fracture. A quantitative phase-field based fracture model is utilized to capture the complex crack growth behavior in the microstructure and the related parameters are calibrated from lower length scale atomistic simulations instead of engineering scale experimental data. The workability of this approach is demonstrated by performing porosity dependent intergranular fracture simulations in UO2 and comparing themore » predictions with experiments.« less

  9. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Brittle Materials with Finite Thickness Subjected to Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chio, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional, numerical analysis of slow crack growth (SCG) was performed for brittle materials with finite thickness subjected to constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") loading in flexure. The numerical solution showed that the conventional, simple, one-dimensional analytical solution can be used with a maximum error of about 5% in determining the SCG parameters of a brittle material with the conditions of a normalized thickness (a ratio of specimen thickness to initial crack size) T > 3.3 and of a SCG parameter n > 10. The change in crack shape from semicircular to elliptical configurations was significant particularly at both low stress rate and low T, attributed to predominant difference in stress intensity factor along the crack front. The numerical solution of SCG parameters was supported within the experimental range by the data obtained from constant stress-rate flexural testing for soda-lime glass microslides at ambient temperature.

  10. Auto-refrigeration/brittle fracture analysis of existing olefins plants--translation of lessons learned to other processes.

    PubMed

    King, Ralph E

    2007-04-11

    This paper describes the use of process hazards analysis (PHA) techniques and "API 579 Recommended Practice for Fitness-for-Service, Assessment of Existing Equipment for Brittle Fracture" to evaluate existing olefins plants. It also examines some of the identified transient process excursions that can result in operations below vessel minimum allowable temperature (MAT), creating the potential for brittle fracture, and the methods of the evaluation are described. The importance of identifying transient process conditions and making materials-of-construction selections based on these conditions is emphasized. Translation of the typical findings and lessons learned to other processes handling light-liquid hydrocarbon materials in carbon steel equipment is discussed, as well as the importance of operator training and response. PMID:16982139

  11. Blackbirds and the southern rice crop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meanley, Brooke

    1971-01-01

    In the 1700's and 1800's, rice was grown in the lowlands of South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina - on the major migratory route of the bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), the historic "ricebird" of that area because of its consumption of ripening rice. By the late 1800's the rice-growing industry had largely shifted to the coastal prairies of Louisiana and Texas, which are bordered by some 5 million acres of marshland-breeding habitat for the redwinged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) and the boat-tailed grackle (Cassidix mexicanus). By 1900, rice was being grown on the Grand Prairie of eastern Arkansas, which bestrides the largest blackbird flyway in the country. In recent decades, rice culture has spread to other sections of Arkansas and thence to contiguous areas in Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennesee, and Missouri. In effect, then, man has taken the rice to the blackbirds.

  12. Rice millers' syndrome: a preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, H H; Domala, Z; Joginder, S; Lee, S H; Lim, C S; Abu Bakar, C M

    1984-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the health effects of rice husk dust in Malaysian rice millers. The study population consisted of 122 male Malay workers from three rice mills, with 42 controls of similar age, sex, ethnic group, and agricultural work background. Interviews using standardised questionnaires, physical examination, total and differential white cell counts, chest radiographs, and lung function tests were performed on each of the millers and the controls. Environmental dust monitoring was also carried out in the three rice mills. Clinical, haematological, and radiological findings suggest that a distinct clinical syndrome seems to be associated with exposure to rice husk dust. The manifestations of this "rice millers' syndrome" include acute and chronic irritant effects affecting the eyes, skin, and upper respiratory tract; allergic responses such as nasal catarrh, tightness of chest, asthma, and eosinophilia; and radiological opacities in the chest, probably representing early silicosis or extrinsic allergic alveolitis. Images PMID:6498108

  13. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  14. Total and inorganic arsenic in rice and rice bran purchased in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruangwises, Suthep; Saipan, Piyawat; Tengjaroenkul, Bundit; Ruangwises, Nongluck

    2012-04-01

    Concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic were determined in 180 samples of polished and brown rice of three rice types, namely white, jasmine, and sticky, and 44 samples of rice bran from these three rice types purchased in Thailand. Concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) of inorganic arsenic in polished white, jasmine, and sticky rice were 68.3 ± 17.6 (with a range of 45.0 to 106), 68.4 ± 15.6 (41.7 to 101), and 75.9 ± 24.8 (43.5 to 156), respectively, while those in the three brown rice samples were 124 ± 34.4 (74.5 to 193), 120 ± 31.6 (73.1 to 174), and 131 ± 35.6 (78.0 to 188), respectively. Inorganic arsenic concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) in rice bran produced from the three rice types were 633 ± 182 (375 to 919), 599 ± 112 (447 to 824), and 673 ± 195 (436 to 1,071), respectively. Rice bran contained concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic approximately seven and nine times higher, respectively, than those found in the corresponding polished rice. The levels of inorganic arsenic in the three rice types of both polished and brown rice were within the only published regulatory limit of 200 ng/g.

  15. Effect of volunteer rice infestation on grain quality and yield of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volunteer rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants arise from shattered seeds of the previous crop, which could reduce the yield of cultivated rice and the commercial value of harvested grain. Volunteer rice plants from a cultivar other than the current crop produce grains that may differ in physico-chemical t...

  16. Relative competitive ability of rice with strawhull and blackhull red rice biotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed interference depends largely upon the species composition of the weed community and an ability to compete with the cultured crop. Weedy red rice is a major weed pest of rice in the southern U.S. The focus of this study was to evaluate the competitive ability of rice against common, genetically ...

  17. Total and inorganic arsenic in rice and rice bran purchased in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruangwises, Suthep; Saipan, Piyawat; Tengjaroenkul, Bundit; Ruangwises, Nongluck

    2012-04-01

    Concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic were determined in 180 samples of polished and brown rice of three rice types, namely white, jasmine, and sticky, and 44 samples of rice bran from these three rice types purchased in Thailand. Concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) of inorganic arsenic in polished white, jasmine, and sticky rice were 68.3 ± 17.6 (with a range of 45.0 to 106), 68.4 ± 15.6 (41.7 to 101), and 75.9 ± 24.8 (43.5 to 156), respectively, while those in the three brown rice samples were 124 ± 34.4 (74.5 to 193), 120 ± 31.6 (73.1 to 174), and 131 ± 35.6 (78.0 to 188), respectively. Inorganic arsenic concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) in rice bran produced from the three rice types were 633 ± 182 (375 to 919), 599 ± 112 (447 to 824), and 673 ± 195 (436 to 1,071), respectively. Rice bran contained concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic approximately seven and nine times higher, respectively, than those found in the corresponding polished rice. The levels of inorganic arsenic in the three rice types of both polished and brown rice were within the only published regulatory limit of 200 ng/g. PMID:22488070

  18. Fracture strength and elastic modulus as a function of porosity for hydroxyapatite and other brittle materials Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Case, Eldon D; Ren, Fei; Shu, Yutian; Baumann, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Porous brittle materials are used as filters, catalyst supports, solid oxide fuel cells and biomedical materials. However the literature on the Weibull modulus, m, versus volume fraction porosity, P, is extremely limited despite the importance of m as a gauge of mechanical reliability. In Part I of this study, m is determined for 441 sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) specimens fractured in biaxial flexure for 0.08 P 0.62. In this study, we analyze a combined data set collected from the literature that represents work from a total of 17 different research groups (including the present authors), eight different materials and more than 1560 oxide and non-oxide specimens, the m versus P plot is Ushaped with a wide band of m values for P < 0.1 (Region I) and P > 0.55 (Region III), and a narrower band of m values in the intermediate porosity region of 0.1 < P < 0.55 (Region II). The limited range of m ( 4 < m < 11) in Region II has important implications since Region II includes the P range for the majority of the applications of porous brittle materials. Part II of this study focuses on the P dependence of the mean fracture strength,< f >, and the Young s modulus E for the HA specimens tested in Part I along with literature data for other brittle materials. Both < f > and E are power law functions of the degree of densification, , where = 1 P/PG and PG is the green (unfired) porosity.

  19. A two-scale model for frictional cracks in 3D fractured brittle media with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Borja, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Stress concentration induced by the heterogeneity in brittle geomaterials is generally considered as the driving force in the evolution of the microstructure (such as the crack and pore microstructure). Specifically, modeling heterogeneity is key to properly predicting the nucleation, coalescence and propagation of micro-cracks in brittle solids. In this paper, we propose a two-scale model for frictional cracks in fractured brittle media. The major crack in the study domain is modeled at a macro level, while the micro-cracks are modeled at a finer scale. The macro-scale behavior is described by a standard boundary value problem. The finer-scale problem is modeled using the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) consisting of a solid volume with distributed micro-cracks. Periodic boundary condition and small strain formulation are assumed in the finer-scale analysis. The scale bridging mechanism is borrowed from the standard homogenization technique. The proposed model is implemented with the extended finite element method. The macro stress at each Gauss point in the finite element formulation is computed as the volume average of finer-scale stresses in each corresponding REV. The macro tangent operator is computed using a perturbation method. For 3D problems, six independent linear perturbation analyses are carried out for each numerical integration point. Our numerical examples capture the nucleation and coalescence of micro-cracks, which can be used to infer the potential propagation direction of the major crack.

  20. Effects of Temperature and Humidity History on Brittleness of α-Sulfonated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Salt Crystals.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Morigaki, Atsunori; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Tobori, Norio; Aramaki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    α-Sulfonated fatty acid methyl ester salts (MES), which were made from vegetable sources, are attractive candidates for eco-friendly washing detergents because they have various special features like excellent detergency, favorable biodegradability, and high stability against enzymes. To overcome some disadvantages of powder-type detergents like caking, sorting, and dusting, we studied how temperature and humidity history, as a model for long-term storage conditions, can affect crystalline structures and reduce the brittleness of MES powder. We characterized the crystalline structure of MES grains using small-angle X-ray scattering, wide-angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements and determined the yield values, which measure the brittleness of MES grains, in shear stress using dynamic viscoelasticity measurements. This study confirmed that MES crystals form three pseudo-polymorphs via thermal or humidity conditioning: metastable crystals (αsubcell), anhydrous crystals (β subcell), and dihydrate crystals (β' subcell). Further, we found that the yield value increases upon phase transition from the β subcell to the β' subcell and from the β' subcell to the αsubcell. Therefore, controlling the thermal and humidity conditioning of MES grains is an effective way to decrease the brittleness of MES powders and can be used to overcome the above mentioned disadvantages of powder-type detergents in the absence of co-surfactants.

  1. Shear deformation experiments on vesicular rhyolite: Implications for brittle fracturing, degassing, and compaction of magmas in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Satoshi; Nakamura, Michihiko; Nakano, Tsukasa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsuchiyama, Akira

    2010-06-01

    Shear-induced brittle fractures in vesicular magmas are thought to be possible pathways for open-system degassing that controls the explosivity of volcanic eruptions. To investigate the detailed processes involved in the shear-induced degassing, we performed torsional deformation experiments on columnar rhyolites with water contents and averaged vesicularities of 0.4-0.5 wt % and 20-41 vol %, respectively, at temperatures of 780-930°C and strain rates of <0.03 s-1. The experimental conditions, such as viscosity and vesicularity of the sample, strain rate, and total strain, simulated those of typical natural dehydrated rhyolites in shallow volcanic conduits. At relatively high temperatures (≥855°C), the columnar samples were homogeneously twisted and deformed. On the other hand, at temperatures of ≤830°C, the deformation was localized and finally resulted in brittle failure into a column and a disk, followed by a slip at the fractured interface. This slip prevented further brittle failure and shear-induced bubble coalescence in the remaining parts of the sample. A permeable fragmented zone was formed near the interface, while in the rest of the sample, the bubbles remained isolated and permeability did not increase. From this, we infer that a single event of magma fracturing may enhance open-system degassing locally near a fracture, but repeated fracturing and healing processes are necessary for the effective degassing of the entire magma that leads to nonexplosive eruptions.

  2. Information Commons for Rice (IC4R).

    PubMed

    Hao, Lili; Zhang, Huiyong; Zhang, Zhang; Hu, Songnian; Xue, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population and also a key model organism for plant research. Here, we present Information Commons for Rice (IC4R; http://ic4r.org), a rice knowledgebase featuring adoption of an extensible and sustainable architecture that integrates multiple omics data through community-contributed modules. Each module is developed and maintained by different committed groups, deals with data collection, processing and visualization, and delivers data on-demand via web services. In the current version, IC4R incorporates a variety of rice data through multiple committed modules, including genome-wide expression profiles derived entirely from RNA-Seq data, resequencing-based genomic variations obtained from re-sequencing data of thousands of rice varieties, plant homologous genes covering multiple diverse plant species, post-translational modifications, rice-related literatures and gene annotations contributed by the rice research community. Unlike extant related databases, IC4R is designed for scalability and sustainability and thus also features collaborative integration of rice data and low costs for database update and maintenance. Future directions of IC4R include incorporation of other omics data and association of multiple omics data with agronomically important traits, dedicating to build IC4R into a valuable knowledgebase for both basic and translational researches in rice. PMID:26519466

  3. Information Commons for Rice (IC4R)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population and also a key model organism for plant research. Here, we present Information Commons for Rice (IC4R; http://ic4r.org), a rice knowledgebase featuring adoption of an extensible and sustainable architecture that integrates multiple omics data through community-contributed modules. Each module is developed and maintained by different committed groups, deals with data collection, processing and visualization, and delivers data on-demand via web services. In the current version, IC4R incorporates a variety of rice data through multiple committed modules, including genome-wide expression profiles derived entirely from RNA-Seq data, resequencing-based genomic variations obtained from re-sequencing data of thousands of rice varieties, plant homologous genes covering multiple diverse plant species, post-translational modifications, rice-related literatures and gene annotations contributed by the rice research community. Unlike extant related databases, IC4R is designed for scalability and sustainability and thus also features collaborative integration of rice data and low costs for database update and maintenance. Future directions of IC4R include incorporation of other omics data and association of multiple omics data with agronomically important traits, dedicating to build IC4R into a valuable knowledgebase for both basic and translational researches in rice. PMID:26519466

  4. Bioethanol production from rice straw residues

    PubMed Central

    Belal, Elsayed B.

    2013-01-01

    A rice straw - cellulose utilizing mold was isolated from rotted rice straw residues. The efficient rice straw degrading microorganism was identified as Trichoderma reesei. The results showed that different carbon sources in liquid culture such as rice straw, carboxymethyl cellulose, filter paper, sugar cane bagasse, cotton stalk and banana stalk induced T. reesei cellulase production whereas glucose or Potato Dextrose repressed the synthesis of cellulase. T. reesei cellulase was produced by the solid state culture on rice straw medium. The optimal pH and temperature for T. reesei cellulase production were 6 and 25 °C, respectively. Rice straw exhibited different susceptibilities towards cellulase to their conversion to reducing sugars. The present study showed also that, the general trend of rice straw bioconversion with cellulase was more than the general trend by T. reesei. This enzyme effectively led to enzymatic conversion of acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreated cellulose from rice straw into glucose, followed by fermentation into ethanol. The combined method of acid pretreatment with ultrasound and subsequent enzyme treatment resulted the highest conversion of lignocellulose in rice straw to sugar and consequently, highest ethanol concentration after 7 days fermentation with S. cerevisae yeast. The ethanol yield in this study was about 10 and 11 g.L−1. PMID:24159309

  5. Information Commons for Rice (IC4R).

    PubMed

    Hao, Lili; Zhang, Huiyong; Zhang, Zhang; Hu, Songnian; Xue, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population and also a key model organism for plant research. Here, we present Information Commons for Rice (IC4R; http://ic4r.org), a rice knowledgebase featuring adoption of an extensible and sustainable architecture that integrates multiple omics data through community-contributed modules. Each module is developed and maintained by different committed groups, deals with data collection, processing and visualization, and delivers data on-demand via web services. In the current version, IC4R incorporates a variety of rice data through multiple committed modules, including genome-wide expression profiles derived entirely from RNA-Seq data, resequencing-based genomic variations obtained from re-sequencing data of thousands of rice varieties, plant homologous genes covering multiple diverse plant species, post-translational modifications, rice-related literatures and gene annotations contributed by the rice research community. Unlike extant related databases, IC4R is designed for scalability and sustainability and thus also features collaborative integration of rice data and low costs for database update and maintenance. Future directions of IC4R include incorporation of other omics data and association of multiple omics data with agronomically important traits, dedicating to build IC4R into a valuable knowledgebase for both basic and translational researches in rice.

  6. Wheat products as acceptable substitutes for rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, B H; Kies, C

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the acceptability to semi-trained US American and Asian palatability panelist, of four wheat products processed to be possible replacers of rice in human diets. Products evaluated using rice as the control standard of excellence were steamed whole wheat, couscous (steamed, extracted wheat flour semolina), rosamarina (rice shaped, extracted wheat flour pasta), and bulgar (steamed, pre-cooked partly debranned, cracked wheat). Using a ten point hedonic rating scale, both groups of panelists gave rosamarina closely followed by couscous, most favorable ratings although these ratings were somewhat lower than that of the positive control, steamed polished rice. Bulgar wheat was given the lowest evaluation and was, in general, found to be an unacceptable replacement for rice by both American and Asian judges because of its dark, 'greasy' color and distinctive flavor. In their personal dietaries, judges included rice from 0.25 to 18 times per week with the Asian judges consuming rice significantly more times per week than did the American judges (10.8 +/- 4.71 vs 1.75 +/- 1.65, p < 0.01). However, rice consumption patterns, nationality, race, or sex of the judges was not demonstrated to affect scoring of the wheat products as rice replacers. PMID:8332588

  7. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M.; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-05-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the ``grain size''. On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different

  8. Benchmarking the Sandbox: Quantitative Comparisons of Numerical and Analogue Models of Brittle Wedge Dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.; Schreurs, G.; Geomod2008 Team

    2010-12-01

    When numerical and analogue models are used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes in crust and lithosphere, they face specific challenges related to, among others, large contrasts in material properties, the heterogeneous character of continental lithosphere, the presence of a free surface, the occurrence of large deformations including viscous flow and offset on shear zones, and the observation that several deformation mechanisms may be active simultaneously. These pose specific demands on numerical software and laboratory models. By combining the two techniques, we can utilize the strengths of each individual method and test the model-independence of our results. We can perhaps even consider our findings to be more robust if we find similar-to-same results irrespective of the modeling method that was used. To assess the role of modeling method and to quantify the variability among models with identical setups, we have performed a direct comparison of results of 11 numerical codes and 15 analogue experiments. We present three experiments that describe shortening of brittle wedges and that resemble setups frequently used by especially analogue modelers. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain their surface slope and do not show internal deformation. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. All models show similar cross-sectional evolutions that demonstrate reproducibility to first order. However

  9. SAFOD Brittle Microstructure and Mechanics Knowledge Base (SAFOD BM2KB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, H. A.; Hadizadeh, J.; di Toro, G.; Mair, K.; Kumar, A.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a knowledge base to store and present the data collected by a group of investigators studying the microstructures and mechanics of brittle faulting using core samples from the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) project. The investigations are carried out with a variety of analytical and experimental methods primarily to better understand the physics of strain localization in fault gouge. The knowledge base instantiates an specially-designed brittle rock deformation ontology developed at Georgia State University. The inference rules embedded in the semantic web languages, such as OWL, RDF, and RDFS, which are used in our ontology, allow the Pellet reasoner used in this application to derive additional truths about the ontology and knowledge of this domain. Access to the knowledge base is via a public website, which is designed to provide the knowledge acquired by all the investigators involved in the project. The stored data will be products of studies such as: experiments (e.g., high-velocity friction experiment), analyses (e.g., microstructural, chemical, mass transfer, mineralogical, surface, image, texture), microscopy (optical, HRSEM, FESEM, HRTEM]), tomography, porosity measurement, microprobe, and cathodoluminesence. Data about laboratories, experimental conditions, methods, assumptions, equipments, and mechanical properties and lithology of the studied samples will also be presented on the website per investigation. The ontology was modeled applying the UML (Unified Modeling Language) in Rational Rose, and implemented in OWL-DL (Ontology Web Language) using the Protégé ontology editor. The UML model was converted to OWL-DL by first mapping it to Ecore (.ecore) and Generator model (.genmodel) with the help of the EMF (Eclipse Modeling Framework) plugin in Eclipse. The Ecore model was then mapped to a .uml file, which later was converted into an .owl file and subsequently imported into the Protégé ontology editing environment

  10. Brittle fault analysis from the immediate southern side of the Insubric fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleuger, Jan; Mancktelow, Neil

    2013-04-01

    The Insubric segment of the Periadriatic fault is characterised in its central part between Lago Maggiore and Valle d'Ossola by two greenschist-facies mylonitic belts which together are about 1 km thick. The northern, external belt has a north-side-up kinematics generally with a minor dextral component and the southern internal belt is dextral, locally with a considerable south-side-up component. Overprinting relations locally show that the internal belt is younger than the external one (e.g. Schmid et al., 1987). The absolute age of dextral shearing is probably given by K-Ar white mica ages ranging mostly between from c. 27 to 23 Ma (Zingg and Hunziker, 1990). We analysed fault-slip data from various locations in the Southern Alps immediately south of the Insubric Fault. From the results, two different patterns of orientations of contraction (P-axes) and extension (T-axes) axes can be distinguished. One group (group 1) of analyses is compatible with dextral transpression (i.e. both P- and T-axes are subhorizontal) and the other (group 2) with roughly orogen-perpendicular extension (i.e. subvertical P-axes and subhorizontal T-axes). The orientations of subhorizontal axes (P- and T-axes in group 1, T-axes in group 2) show a tendency to follow the curved shape of the Insubric fault, i.e. P-axes of group 1 and T-axes of group 2 change from NNW-SSE in the east where the Insubric fault trends east-west to WNW-ESE in the west where the Insubric fault trends northeast-southwest. We speculate that group 1 formed at the same time as dextral shearing on in the internal mylonite belt while none of our fault analyses reflects the north-side-up reverse faulting that is observed in the external mylonite belt. The northwest-southeast extension documented in the analyses of group 2 is not associated with a continuous mylonitic belt or brittle fault plane along the Insubric fault. Instead, an uplift of the Southern Alps with respect to the northern block was accommodated by

  11. Residual Porosity as An Explanation for Ductile-Brittle Behaviour During Dome Extrusion: Experimental Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, L.; Russell, J. K.; Nelles, E.

    2009-12-01

    Decompression of rising magmas causes gas exsolution and a concomitant increase in magma porosity. Slow ascent commonly results in cooling and crystallization of the residual melt on the same time scale. Thus, slow ascending magmas commonly produce domes that are typically at or below their Tg, or have undergone degassing-induced crystallization. These magmas can be either highly porous or nonporous. For example, high residual porosity indicates that the system had low permeability and was quenched before the porosity could be removed. This quenching of primary porosity could be induced by cooling of the melt to below Tg, or by crystallization of the melt to produce a solid framework. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the effects of porosity on the strength and failure behaviour of dacite dome rocks. Our triaxial rock deformation experiments were run at confining pressures (Pc) of 0, 25, 50, and 75MPa, at room temperature and strain rates of ~1 x 10-4 s-1. Our starting material has both low (6-8%) and high (17-24%) porosities, a uniform bulk composition (65 wt% SiO2) and is either highly crystalline or has a glassy matrix. The low porosity dacite experiments show a progressive increase in peak strength (100-700 MPa) with increasing Pc and all cores show brittle behavior, characterized by a rapid stress drop. Run products contain macroscopic fractures with deformation extremely localized around the shear fractures. Experimentally deformed dacites show extreme grain size reduction and the production of gouge. We ran two sets of experiments on low porosity rocks: one for which the gear train was stopped just at failure and one for which, after failure and creation of the fracture surface, frictional sliding continued along the fracture. Grain size from the experimentally generated gouge was measured using a grain size laser particle analyzer. The vast majority of ultra-fine grained particles (< 20 μm) are produced at fracture (ie large stress drops), and further

  12. Predicting the Relationship Between System Vibration with Rock Brittleness Indexes in Rock Sawing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaeil, Reza; Ataei, Mohammad; Ghadernejad, Saleh; Sadegheslam, Golsa

    2014-03-01

    The system vibration is a very significant measure of the sawing performance, because it indicates the amount of energy required to saw the rock. The maintenance cost of system is also dependant on system vibration. A few increases in system vibration cause a huge increase in the maintenance cost of the system. In this paper, the vibration of system in terms of RMSa was investigated and models for estimation of vibration by means of rock brittleness indexes and operational specifications were designed via statistical models and multiple curvilinear regression analysis. In this study, the relationships between rock brittleness indexes and operational specifications were investigated by regression analysis in statistical package for social science (SPSS) and the results of determination coefficients have been presented. In the second part, the diagrams show that a point lying on the line indicates an exact estimation. In the plot for model, the points are scattered uniformly about the diagonal line, suggesting that the models are good. It is very useful to evaluate the vibration of system and select the suitable operational characteristics by only some mechanical properties of rock. Drgania układu uważane są za miernik wydajności procesu urabiania, ponieważ pokazują ilość energii niezbędnej do urabiania skały. Od poziomu drgań zależą także koszty eksploatacji systemu. Nieznaczny nawet wzrost poziomu drgań prowadzi do znacznego zwiększenia kosztów eksploatacyjnych urządzenia. W pracy tej przeprowadzono analizę drgań (ich wartości skutecznych) i opracowano model estymacji poziomu drgań w oparciu o współczynnik kruchości skał i parametry eksploatacyjne urządzenia. W pracy wykorzystano modele statystyczne i wielokrotną analizę metodą regresji krzywoliniowej. W pracy obecnej związek pomiędzy współczynnikiem kruchości skał a parametrami eksploatacyjnymi urządzenia badano z wykorzystaniem analizy metodą regresji dostępnej w

  13. A visco-poroelastic damage model for modelling compaction and brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells is often used to increase heat extraction from deep geothermal reservoirs. Initiation and propagation of fractures due to pore pressure build-up increase the effective permeability of the porous medium. Understanding the processes controlling the initiation of fractures, the evolution of their geometries and the hydro-mechanical impact on transport properties of the porous medium is therefore of great interest for geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes occurring during deformation of a porous rock. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To validate and illustrate the model, simulations of the deformation behaviour of cylindrical porous Bentheimer sandstone samples under different confining pressures are compared to experiments. The first experiment under low confining pressure leads to shear failure, the second for high confining pressure leads to cataclastic compaction and the third one with intermediate confining pressure correspond to a transitional regime between the two firsts. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field

  14. Total arsenic in rice milk.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Ron; Rodriguez, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    Rice milk and its by-products were tested for total arsenic concentration. Total arsenic concentration was determined using graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.7 ± 0.3 to 17.9 ± 0.5 µg L(-1). Rice milk and its by-products are not clearly defined as food, water or milk substitute. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the European Union (EU) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have set a level of 10 µg L(-1) for total arsenic concentrations in drinking water. The EU and the US regulatory agencies do not provide any guidelines on total arsenic concentrations in foods. This study provides us with a starting point to address this issue in the State of Mississippi, USA.

  15. [Extraction and purification method of rice DNA from rice powder containing Konjak flour].

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Harikai, Naoki; Nakajima, Osamu; Kitta, Kazumi; Teshima, Reiko; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2010-01-01

    Rice powder containing Konjak flour made with tuberous roots of Amorphophallus konjac is imported as a rice-processed product from China to Japan. An improved DNA purification method for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rice in such products is necessary, since Konjak flour constituents absorb the DNA purification buffer to form a gel, and cause problems in the subsequent purification steps. Here, we present a simple preparative system for isolation of the rice and a purification method of the rice DNA from the product. The purified DNA was confirmed to be a good template for both PCR and real-time PCR. PMID:21071909

  16. Rice RCN1/OsABCG5 mutation alters accumulation of essential and nonessential minerals and causes a high Na/K ratio, resulting in a salt-sensitive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yamashiro, Nobuhiro; Yasuno, Naoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Kitazawa, Hideyuki; Takano, Sho; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Tani, Masayuki; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2014-07-01

    Mineral balance and salt stress are major factors affecting plant growth and yield. Here, we characterized the effects of rice (Oryza sativa L.) reduced culm number1 (rcn1), encoding a G subfamily ABC transporter (OsABCG5) involved in accumulation of essential and nonessential minerals, the Na/K ratio, and salt tolerance. Reduced potassium and elevated sodium in field-grown plants were evident in rcn1 compared to original line 'Shiokari' and four independent rcn mutants, rcn2, rcn4, rcn5 and rcn6. A high Na/K ratio was evident in the shoots and roots of rcn1 under K starvation and salt stress in hydroponically cultured plants. Downregulation of SKC1/OsHKT1;5 in rcn1 shoots under salt stress demonstrated that normal function of RCN1/OsABCG5 is essential for upregulation of SKC1/OsHKT1;5 under salt stress. The accumulation of various minerals in shoots and roots was also altered in the rcn1 mutant compared to 'Shiokari' under control conditions, potassium starvation, and salt and d-sorbitol treatments. The rcn1 mutation resulted in a salt-sensitive phenotype. We concluded that RCN1/OsABCG5 is a salt tolerance factor that acts via Na/K homeostasis, at least partly by regulation of SKC1/OsHKT1;5 in shoots.

  17. Preferential Association of Endophytic Bradyrhizobia with Different Rice Cultivars and Its Implications for Rice Endophyte Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Greetatorn, Teerana; Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Okubo, Takashi; Shinoda, Ryo; Nuntakij, Achara; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn

    2015-01-01

    Plant colonization by bradyrhizobia is found not only in leguminous plants but also in nonleguminous species such as rice. To understand the evolution of the endophytic symbiosis of bradyrhizobia, the effect of the ecosystems of rice plantations on their associations was investigated. Samples were collected from various rice (Oryza sativa) tissues and crop rotational systems. The rice endophytic bradyrhizobia were isolated on the basis of oligotrophic properties, selective medium, and nodulation on siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum). Six bradyrhizobial strains were obtained exclusively from rice grown in a crop rotational system. The isolates were separated into photosynthetic bradyrhizobia (PB) and nonphotosynthetic bradyrhizobia (non-PB). Thai bradyrhizobial strains promoted rice growth of Thai rice cultivars better than the Japanese bradyrhizobial strains. This implies that the rice cultivars possess characteristics that govern rice-bacterium associations. To examine whether leguminous plants in a rice plantation system support the persistence of rice endophytic bradyrhizobia, isolates were tested for legume nodulation. All PB strains formed symbioses with Aeschynomene indica and Aeschynomene evenia. On the other hand, non-PB strains were able to nodulate Aeschynomene americana, Vigna radiata, and M. atropurpureum but unable to nodulate either A. indica or A. evenia. Interestingly, the nodABC genes of all of these bradyrhizobial strains seem to exhibit low levels of similarity to those of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA110 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285. From these results, we discuss the evolution of the plant-bradyrhizobium association, including nonlegumes, in terms of photosynthetic lifestyle and nod-independent interactions. PMID:25710371

  18. Rice genomes recorded ancient pararetrovirus activities: Virus genealogy and multiple origins of endogenization during rice speciation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sunlu; Liu, Ruifang; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Kishima, Yuji

    2014-12-01

    Viral fossils in rice genomes are a best entity to understand ancient pararetrovirus activities through host plant history because of our advanced knowledge of the genomes and evolutionary history with rice and its related species. Here, we explored organization, geographic origins and genealogy of rice pararetroviruses, which were turned into endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus-like (eRTBVL) sequences. About 300 eRTBVL sequences from three representative rice genomes were clearly classified into six families. Most of the endogenization events of the eRTBVLs were initiated before differentiation of the rice progenitor (> 160,000 years ago). We successfully followed the genealogy of old relic viruses during rice speciation, and inferred the geographical origins for these viruses. Possible virus genomic sequences were explained mostly by recombinations between different virus families. Interestingly, we discovered that only a few recombination events among the numerous occasions had determined the virus genealogy. PMID:25461539

  19. 7 CFR 1412.49 - Apportionment of long and medium grain rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. 1412.49... and Peanuts 2008 through 2012 § 1412.49 Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. (a) Rice base...) Medium grain rice. Medium grain rice includes short grain rice. (c) Owners on a farm will elect rice...

  20. 7 CFR 1412.49 - Apportionment of long and medium grain rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. 1412.49... and Peanuts 2008 Through 2012 § 1412.49 Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. (a) Rice base...) Medium grain rice. Medium grain rice includes short grain rice. (c) Owners on a farm will elect rice...

  1. 7 CFR 1412.49 - Apportionment of long and medium grain rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. 1412.49... and Peanuts 2008 Through 2012 § 1412.49 Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. (a) Rice base...) Medium grain rice. Medium grain rice includes short grain rice. (c) Owners on a farm will elect rice...

  2. 7 CFR 1412.49 - Apportionment of long and medium grain rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. 1412.49... and Peanuts 2008 through 2012 § 1412.49 Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. (a) Rice base...) Medium grain rice. Medium grain rice includes short grain rice. (c) Owners on a farm will elect rice...

  3. 7 CFR 1412.49 - Apportionment of long and medium grain rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. 1412.49... and Peanuts 2008 through 2012 § 1412.49 Apportionment of long and medium grain rice. (a) Rice base...) Medium grain rice. Medium grain rice includes short grain rice. (c) Owners on a farm will elect rice...

  4. Dissecting the genetic diversity in African rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African cultivated rice, Oryza glaberrima, and its progenitor, O. barthii are excellent sources of important genes for rice improvement because they exhibit tolerance to several abiotic and biotic stresses. Development of advance backcross (ABC) populations between an unadapted donor parent and ada...

  5. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  6. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  7. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  8. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  9. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  10. Influence of intermittent irrigation, red rice biotype, and rice grain type on outcrossing between red rice and imidazolinone-resistant rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whether outcrossing rates between red rice and imazethapyr resistant rice are affected as a function of irrigation management is unclear. Potentially, differences between conventionally-flooded (CNV) and intermittently flooded (INT) systems could affect plant water deficits, as well as vegetative a...

  11. Connecting with Rice: Carolina Lowcountry and Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jerry T.; Collins, Larianne; Wise, Susan S.; Caughman, Monti

    2012-01-01

    Though lasting less than 200 years, large-scale rice production in South Carolina and Georgia "probably represented the most significant utilization of the tidewater zone for crop agriculture ever attained in the United States." Rice is a specialty crop where successful cultivation relied heavily upon "adaptation" to nature via imported…

  12. Ricecraft: Rice Is for More Than Eating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice Council of America, Houston, TX.

    Rice can be the basis for mosaics, flower arrangements, games, toys, and many things children would like to make. It can add new dimensions to making candles, coasters, and jewelry. Working with rice can aid in the development of appreciation of texture, symmetry, coordination, imagination and, at the same time, result in hand-made gifts for…

  13. Rice aroma and flavor: a literature review.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Descriptive sensory analysis has identified over a dozen different aromas and flavors in rice. Instrumental analyses have found over 200 volatile compounds present in rice. However, after over 30 years of research, little is known about the relationships between the numerous volatile compounds and a...

  14. Novel gene expression tools for rice biotechnology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotechnology is an effective and important method of improving both quality and agronomic traits in rice. We are developing novel molecular tools for genetic engineering, with a focus on developing novel transgene expression control elements (i.e. promoters) for rice. A suite of monocot grass promo...

  15. Grain Unloading Of Arsenic Species In Rice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the staple food for over half the world's population yet may represent a significant dietary source of inorganic arsenic (As), a nonthreshold, class 1 human carcinogen. Rice grain As is dominated by the inorganic species, and the organic species dim...

  16. Low oil-uptake rice batters.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice starch and flour are popular for use in foods, because they are known to be nutritious, gluten-free, and hypoallergenic – properties which make them particularly desirable for use in infant foods, and in products for people with celiac disease (gluten intolerance). One application for rice sta...

  17. RICE BREAD FOR PEOPLE WITH CELIAC DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This technical bulletin was written to describe new process to make whole rice bread (WRB) for Celiacs, a disease caused by proteins found in wheat, barley and rye. The rice is free of these proteins and hence an ideal grain to develop foods for Celiacs. Absence of these proteins, however make it ...

  18. Identification of the fragmentation of brittle particles during compaction process by the acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Hégron, Lise; Sornay, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Some nuclear fuels are currently manufactured by a powder metallurgy process that consists of three main steps, namely preparation of the powders, powder compaction, and sintering of the compact. An optimum between size, shape and cohesion of the particles of the nuclear fuels must be sought in order to obtain a compact with a sufficient mechanical strength, and to facilitate the release of helium and fission gases during irradiation through pores connected to the outside of the pellet after sintering. Being simple to adapt to nuclear-oriented purposes, the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is used to control the microstructure of the compact by monitoring the compaction of brittle Uranium Dioxide (UO2) particles of a few hundred micrometers. The objective is to identify in situ the mechanisms that occur during the UO2 compaction, and more specifically the particle fragmentation that is linked to the open porosity of the nuclear matter. Three zones of acoustic activity, strongly related to the applied stress, can be clearly defined from analysis of the continuous signals recorded during the compaction process. They correspond to particle rearrangement and/or fragmentation. The end of the noteworthy fragmentation process is clearly defined as the end of the significant process that increases the compactness of the material. Despite the fact that the wave propagation strongly evolves during the compaction process, the acoustic signature of the fragmentation of a single UO2 particle and a bed of UO2 particles under compaction is well identified. The waveform, with a short rise time and an exponential-like decay of the signal envelope, is the most reliable descriptor. The impact of the particle size and cohesion on the AE activity, and then on the fragmentation domain, is analyzed through the discrete AE signals. The maximum amplitude of the burst signals, as well as the mean stress corresponding to the end of the recorded AE, increase with increasing mean diameter of

  19. Drilling on Mars---Mathematical Model for Rotary-Ultrasonic Core Drilling of Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Mera Fayez

    The results from the Phoenix mission led scientists to believe it is possible that primitive life exists below the Martian surface. Therefore, drilling in Martian soil in search for organisms is the next logical step. Drilling on Mars is a major engineering challenge due to the drilling depth requirement. Mars lacks a thick atmosphere and a continuous magnetic field that shield the planet's surface from solar radiation and solar flares. As a result, the Martian surface is sterile and if life ever existed, it must be found below the surface. In 2001, NASA's Mars Exploration Payload Advisory Group proposed that drilling should be considered as a priority investigation on Mars in an effort of finding evidence of extinct or extant life. On August 6, 2012, the team of engineers landed the spacecraft Curiosity on the surface of Mars by using a revolutionary hovering platform. The results from the Curiosity mission suggested the next logical step, which is drilling six meters deep in the red planet in search of life. Excavation tools deployed to Mars so far have been able to drill to a maximum depth of 6.5 cm. Thus, the drilling capabilities need to be increased by a factor or approximately 100 to achieve the goal of drilling six meters deep. This requirement puts a demand on developing a new and more effective technologies to reach this goal. Previous research shows evidence of a promising drilling mechanism in rotary-ultrasonic for what it offers in terms of high surface quality, faster rate of penetration and higher material removal rate. This research addresses the need to understand the mechanics of the drill bit tip and rock interface in rotary-ultrasonic drilling of brittle materials. A mathematical model identifying all contributing independent parameters, such as drill bit design parameters, drilling process parameters, ultrasonic wave amplitude and rocks' material properties, that have effect on rate of penetration is developed. Analytical and experimental

  20. Impact cratering experiments in brittle targets with variable thickness: Implications for deep pit craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michikami, T.; Hagermann, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Miura, S.; Haruyama, J.; Lykawka, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution images reveal that numerous pit craters exist on the surface of Mars. For some pit craters, the depth-to-diameter ratios are much greater than for ordinary craters. Such deep pit craters are generally considered to be the results of material drainage into a subsurface void space, which might be formed by a lava tube, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. Morphological studies indicate that the formation of a pit crater might be triggered by the impact event, and followed by collapse of the ceiling. To test this hypothesis, we carried out laboratory experiments of impact cratering into brittle targets with variable roof thickness. In particular, the effect of the target thickness on the crater formation is studied to understand the penetration process by an impact. For this purpose, we produced mortar targets with roof thickness of 1-6 cm, and a bulk density of 1550 kg/m3 by using a mixture of cement, water and sand (0.2 mm) in the ratio of 1:1:10, by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting targets is 3.2±0.9 MPa. A spherical nylon projectile (diameter 7 mm) is shot perpendicularly into the target surface at the nominal velocity of 1.2 km/s, using a two-stage light-gas gun. Craters are formed on the opposite side of the impact even when no target penetration occurs. Penetration of the target is achieved when craters on the opposite sides of the target connect with each other. In this case, the cross section of crater somehow attains a flat hourglass-like shape. We also find that the crater diameter on the opposite side is larger than that on the impact side, and more fragments are ejected from the crater on the opposite side than from the crater on the impact side. This result gives a qualitative explanation for the observation that the Martian deep pit craters lack a raised rim and have the ejecta deposit on their floor instead. Craters are formed on the opposite impact side even when no penetration

  1. Expression of skeletogenic genes during arm regeneration in the brittle star Amphiura filiformis☆

    PubMed Central

    Czarkwiani, Anna; Dylus, David V.; Oliveri, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The brittle star Amphiura filiformis, which regenerates its arms post autotomy, is emerging as a useful model for studying the molecular underpinnings of regeneration, aided by the recent availability of some molecular resources. During regeneration a blastema initially is formed distally to the amputation site, and then a rapid rebuild is obtained by adding metameric units, which will eventually differentiate and become fully functional. In this work we first characterize the developmental process of the regenerating arms using two differentiation markers for muscle and skeletal structures – Afi-trop-1 and Afi-αcoll. Both genes are not expressed in the blastema and newly added undifferentiated metameric units. Their expression at different regenerating stages shows an early segregation of muscle and skeletal cells during the regenerating process, long before the metameric units become functional. We then studied the expression of a set of genes orthologous of the sea urchin transcription factors involved in the development of skeletal and non-skeletal mesoderm: Afi-ets1/2, Afi-alx1, Afi-tbr, Afi-foxB and Afi-gataC. We found that Afi-ets1/2, Afi-alx1, Afi-foxB and Afi-gataC are all expressed at the blastemal stage. As regeneration progresses those genes are expressed in a similar small undifferentiated domain beneath the distal growth cap, while in more advanced metameric units they become restricted to different skeletal domains. Afi-foxB becomes expressed in non-skeletal structures. This suggests that they might play a combinatorial role only in the early cell specification process and that subsequently they function independently in the differentiation of different structures. Afi-tbr is not present in the adult arm tissue at any stage of regeneration. In situ hybridization results have been confirmed with a new strategy for quantitative PCR (QPCR), using a subdivision of the three stages of regeneration into proximal (differentiated) and distal

  2. Beyond Brittle Deformation: Insights into Seismogenic Slip Processes from Natural and Experimental Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, R.; De Paola, N.; Bullock, R. J.; Collettini, C.; Viti, C.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    - and those of others - reveal a startling diversity of 'non-brittle' micro- to nano-scale deformation processes (e.g. viscous GBS, particulate flow). This has implications for our understanding of the frictional strength of faults, the recognition of past seismogenic events in natural examples and the forecasting of future earthquakes.

  3. Deformation analysis for understanding landslide-induced brittle fractures at the Super-Sauze landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmund, Sabrina; Häfner, Rolf; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    Applying passive seismic analysis techniques realized by Nanoseismic Monitoring to creeping or slow-moving, soft-rock landslides in the Alps, we observed fracture processes (M_L < 0) of slope material, also called slidequakes. Their time-frequency signature is similar to impulsive signals from local earthquakes, and indicates brittle fracturing of slope material. Slidequakes are weak signals with poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); thus neither precise depths nor moment tensor solutions could be derived. Another type of non-impulsive, very weak signals that are recorded are called tremors. These signals are visible on too few single stations and thus cannot be located, but the source can be attributed to the immediate vicinity of the seismometers. Seismic analysis tools alone do not help to understand the occurrence and the possible generation mechanisms of these seismic signals. For several years, seismic strain-rate tensors derived from earthquake observations and crustal geodetic strain-rate were combined to provide insights into the deformation process of tectonically active zones. This showed that the axes of the seismic and the geodetic strain rate tensors have similar orientation and are of similar style. We applied a deformation analysis of the temporal and spatial heterogeneous displacement fields of the Super-Sauze landslide (Southern French Alps) that were derived from multi-temporal aerial photographs, DGPS and TLS measurements. The geodetic strain rate at the surface and the shear rates in the direction of movement were determined. The strain rate fields exhibit heterogeneous patterns, reflecting the temporally and spatially variable extension and compression of subareas. In regions with a temporal strain drop a preferred occurrence of slidequakes can be expected. The areas with increased shear rates, however are presumed to be the source of tremor signals, which are infact most often encountered in the boundary regions between hard rock and slope

  4. Understanding of evolutionary genomics of invasive species of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice is an aggressive, weedy form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that infests crop fields and is a primary factor limiting rice productivity in the U.S. and worldwide. As the weedy relative of a genomic model species, red rice is a model for understanding the genetic and evolutionary mechani...

  5. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  6. The origin of weediness in U.S. red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy or red rice, a congeneric weed of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), is a significant problem throughout the world. Despite belonging to the same species complex as domesticated rice and its wild relatives, the evolutionary origins of weedy rice remain unclear. We have used genome-wide and can...

  7. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice (Oryza sativa L.) from which the hulls and...

  8. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammoniated rice hulls. 573.160 Section 573.160... Additive Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely... obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate and anhydrous ammonia at...

  9. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  10. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  11. 21 CFR 172.890 - Rice bran wax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rice bran wax. 172.890 Section 172.890 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.890 Rice bran wax. Rice bran wax may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) It is the refined wax obtained from rice bran and meets the...

  12. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice (Oryza sativa L.) from which the hulls and...

  13. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammoniated rice hulls. 573.160 Section 573.160... Additive Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely... obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate and anhydrous ammonia at...

  14. 21 CFR 172.890 - Rice bran wax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rice bran wax. 172.890 Section 172.890 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.890 Rice bran wax. Rice bran wax may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) It is the refined wax obtained from rice bran and meets the...

  15. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice (Oryza sativa L.) from which the hulls and...

  16. 7 CFR 868.301 - Definition of milled rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of milled rice. 868.301 Section 868.301... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Milled Rice Terms Defined § 868.301 Definition of milled rice. Whole or broken kernels of rice (Oryza sativa L.) from which the hulls and...

  17. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  18. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  19. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammoniated rice hulls. 573.160 Section 573.160... Additive Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely... obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate and anhydrous ammonia at...

  20. 21 CFR 573.160 - Ammoniated rice hulls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammoniated rice hulls. 573.160 Section 573.160... Additive Listing § 573.160 Ammoniated rice hulls. The food additive ammoniated rice hulls may be safely... obtained by the treatment of ground rice hulls with monocalcium phosphate and anhydrous ammonia at...