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Sample records for rice cutgrass grown

  1. Seasonal differences in relationships between nitrate concentration and denitrification rates in ditch sediments vegetated with rice cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increased application of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agricultural systems contributes to significant environmental impacts, including eutrophication of fresh and coastal waters. Rice cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides) can significantly enhance denitrification potential in agricultural ditch sediments and ...

  2. Heavy metals in Australian grown and imported rice and vegetables on sale in Australia: health hazard.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Reichman, Suzie M; Lim, Richard P; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-02-01

    Dietary exposure to heavy metals is a matter of concern for human health risk through the consumption of rice, vegetables and other major foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in Australian grown and imported rice and vegetables on sale in Australia. The mean concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in Australian grown rice were 7.5 µg kg(-1), 21 µg kg(-1), 144 µg kg(-1), 2.9 mg kg(-1), 24.4 mg kg(-1), 166 µg kg(-1), 375 µg kg(-1), and 17.1 mg kg(-1) dry weight (d. wt.), respectively. Except Cd, heavy metal concentrations in Australian grown rice were higher than Bangladeshi rice on sale in Australia. However, the concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni in Indian rice on sale in Australia were higher than Australian grown rice. The concentrations of Cu and Ni in Vietnamese rice, and that of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb in Thai rice on sale in Australia were also higher than Australian grown rice. Heavy metal concentrations in Pakistani rice on sale in Australia were substantially lower than that in Australian grown rice. In Australian grown rice varieties, the concentrations of heavy metals were considerably higher in brown rice varieties than white rice varieties, indicating Australian brown rice as a potential source of dietary heavy metals for Australian consumers. The mean concentrations of heavy metals in Australian grown and Bangladeshi vegetables on sale in Australia were also determined. Some of the Australian grown and Bangladeshi vegetables contained heavy metals higher than Australian standard maximum limits indicating them as potential sources of dietary heavy metals for Australian consumers. Further investigation is required to estimate health risks of heavy metals from rice and vegetables consumption for Australian consumers. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Glycemic index of American-grown jasmine rice classified as high.

    PubMed

    Truong, Teresa H; Yuet, Wei Cheng; Hall, Micki D

    2014-06-01

    The primary objective was to determine the glycemic index (GI) of jasmine rice grown in the United States (US). Secondary objective was to compare the GI of US grown jasmine rice to those grown in Thailand. Twelve healthy subjects were served all four brands of jasmine rice and a reference food (glucose), each containing 50 g of available carbohydrate. Fingerstick blood glucose was measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after consumption following a fasting state. The GI was calculated using the standard equation. The GI values for test foods ranged from 96 to 116 and were all classified as high GI foods. No difference in GI was found between American-grown and Thailand-grown jasmine rice. Although not statistically significant, observations show glycemic response among Asian American participants may be different. GI should be considered when planning meals with jasmine rice as the main source carbohydrate.

  4. Rice root physiological and morphological traits of diverse genotypes grown in different media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is currently grown in 200 countries and supports one-half of the human population. It is a staple food and the chief source of nutrition in developing countries of South America, Asia and Africa. Plant roots influence mineral uptake and may influence rice grain mineral composi...

  5. Mechanisms controlling arsenic uptake in rice grown in mining impacted regions in South China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhui; Dong, Fei; Lu, Ying; Yan, Qiuyan; Shim, Hojae

    2014-01-01

    Foods produced on soils impacted by Pb-Zn mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the arsenic (As) associated with such mining. A field survey was undertaken in two Pb-Zn mining-impacted paddy fields in Guangdong Province, China to assess As accumulation and translocation, as well as other factors influencing As in twelve commonly grown rice cultivars. The results showed that grain As concentrations in all the surveyed rice failed national food standards, irrespective of As speciation. Among the 12 rice cultivars, "SY-89" and "DY-162" had the least As in rice grain. No significant difference for As concentration in grain was observed between the rice grown in the two areas that differed significantly for soil As levels, suggesting that the amount of As contamination in the soil is not necessarily the overriding factor controlling the As content in the rice grain. The iron and manganese plaque on the root surface curtailed As accumulation in rice roots. Based on our results, the accumulation of As within rice plants was strongly associated with such soil properties such as silicon, phosphorus, organic matter, pH, and clay content. Understanding the factors and mechanisms controlling As uptake is important to develop mitigation measures that can reduce the amount of As accumulated in rice grains produced on contaminated soils.

  6. Mechanisms Controlling Arsenic Uptake in Rice Grown in Mining Impacted Regions in South China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Yan, Qiuyan; Shim, Hojae

    2014-01-01

    Foods produced on soils impacted by Pb-Zn mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the arsenic (As) associated with such mining. A field survey was undertaken in two Pb-Zn mining-impacted paddy fields in Guangdong Province, China to assess As accumulation and translocation, as well as other factors influencing As in twelve commonly grown rice cultivars. The results showed that grain As concentrations in all the surveyed rice failed national food standards, irrespective of As speciation. Among the 12 rice cultivars, “SY-89” and “DY-162” had the least As in rice grain. No significant difference for As concentration in grain was observed between the rice grown in the two areas that differed significantly for soil As levels, suggesting that the amount of As contamination in the soil is not necessarily the overriding factor controlling the As content in the rice grain. The iron and manganese plaque on the root surface curtailed As accumulation in rice roots. Based on our results, the accumulation of As within rice plants was strongly associated with such soil properties such as silicon, phosphorus, organic matter, pH, and clay content. Understanding the factors and mechanisms controlling As uptake is important to develop mitigation measures that can reduce the amount of As accumulated in rice grains produced on contaminated soils. PMID:25251438

  7. Arsenic speciation in Australian-grown and imported rice on sale in Australia: implications for human health risk.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Reichman, Suzie M; Lim, Richard P; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-06-25

    Rice is an important route of arsenic (As) exposure to humans, especially populations with rice-based diets. Human health risk of As varies greatly with rice variety and country of origin. The purpose of the present study was to determine total and speciated As in Australian-grown and imported rice on sale in Australia to assess their health risk to consumers. The total As (tAs) concentrations in Australian-grown organic brown, medium grain brown, and organic white rice were 438±23, 287±03, and 283±18 μg kg(-1) dry weight (d wt), respectively. In Bangladeshi, Indian, Pakistani, and Thai rice imported and on sale in Australia, tAs concentrations were 56±05, 92±10, 82±06 and 172±24 μg kg(-1), respectively. Asian rice contained mainly inorganic As (iAs; 86-99%), whereas 18-26% of the tAs in Australian-grown rice was dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Relatively higher concentrations of tAs in Australian-grown rice than that in imported rice of Asian origin suggest that Australian-grown rice may be a health risk for the consumers. It was estimated that Australian-grown organic brown rice can contribute up to 98% of the FAO/WHO recommended maximum tolerable daily intake limit of iAs (2.1 μg kg(-1) body wt day(-1)) for Asian immigrants. However, other Australian consumers including European immigrants are unlikely to be at risk to As from rice diets due to their lower rice consumption rates than that of Asian immigrants. The risk assessment showed that imported rice on sale in Australia was likely to pose a lower health risk to consumers than Australian-grown rice.

  8. Arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice grown in arsanilic acid-elevated paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Geng, Anjing; Wang, Xu; Wu, Lishu; Wang, Fuhua; Chen, Yan; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Zhan; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2017-03-01

    P-arsanilic acid (AsA) is a emerging but less concerned contaminant used in animal feeding operations, for it can be degraded to more toxic metabolites after being excreted by animals. Rice is the staple food in many parts of the world, and also more efficient in accumulating arsenic (As) compared to other cereals. However, the uptake and transformation of AsA by rice is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the potential risk of using AsA as a feed additive and using the AsA contaminated animal manure as a fertilizer. Five rice cultivars were grown in soil containing 100mg AsA/kg soil, after harvest, As species and their concentrations in different tissues were determined. Total As concentration of the hybrid rice cultivar was more than conventional rice cultivars for whole rice plant. For rice organs, the highest As concentration was found in roots. AsA could be absorbed by rice, partly degraded and converted to arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, arsenate. The number of As species and their concentrations in each cultivar were related to their genotypes. The soil containing 100mg AsA/kg or more is unsuitable for growing rice. The use of AsA and the disposal of animal manure requires detailed attention.

  9. Genomic Analysis of Xanthomonas oryzae Isolates from Rice Grown in the United States Reveals Substantial Divergence from Known X. oryzae Pathovars ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, L. R.; Hamilton, J. P.; Buell, C. R.; Tisserat, N. A.; Verdier, V.; Zink, F.; Leach, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    The species Xanthomonas oryzae is comprised of two designated pathovars, both of which cause economically significant diseases of rice in Asia and Africa. Although X. oryzae is not considered endemic in the United States, an X. oryzae-like bacterium was isolated from U.S. rice and southern cutgrass in the late 1980s. The U.S. strains were weakly pathogenic and genetically distinct from characterized X. oryzae pathovars. In the current study, a draft genome sequence from two U.S. Xanthomonas strains revealed that the U.S. strains form a novel clade within the X. oryzae species, distinct from all strains known to cause significant yield loss. Comparative genome analysis revealed several putative gene clusters specific to the U.S. strains and supported previous reports that the U.S. strains lack transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. In addition to phylogenetic and comparative analyses, the genome sequence was used for designing robust U.S. strain-specific primers, demonstrating the usefulness of a draft genome sequence in the rapid development of diagnostic tools. PMID:21515727

  10. Genomic analysis of Xanthomonas oryzae isolates from rice grown in the United States reveals substantial divergence from known X. oryzae pathovars.

    PubMed

    Triplett, L R; Hamilton, J P; Buell, C R; Tisserat, N A; Verdier, V; Zink, F; Leach, J E

    2011-06-01

    The species Xanthomonas oryzae is comprised of two designated pathovars, both of which cause economically significant diseases of rice in Asia and Africa. Although X. oryzae is not considered endemic in the United States, an X. oryzae-like bacterium was isolated from U.S. rice and southern cutgrass in the late 1980s. The U.S. strains were weakly pathogenic and genetically distinct from characterized X. oryzae pathovars. In the current study, a draft genome sequence from two U.S. Xanthomonas strains revealed that the U.S. strains form a novel clade within the X. oryzae species, distinct from all strains known to cause significant yield loss. Comparative genome analysis revealed several putative gene clusters specific to the U.S. strains and supported previous reports that the U.S. strains lack transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. In addition to phylogenetic and comparative analyses, the genome sequence was used for designing robust U.S. strain-specific primers, demonstrating the usefulness of a draft genome sequence in the rapid development of diagnostic tools.

  11. Productivity of Rice Grown on Arsenic Contaminated Soil under a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Plaganas, M.; Muehe, E. M.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Rice is the staple food for more than 50% of the global population. In South and Southeast Asia, native soil arsenic coupled with arsenic-laden irrigation water result in paddy soils having arsenic levels that decrease the quality and productivity of rice and thus compromise food security worldwide. However, it remains unknown how climate change will affect the accumulation of arsenic in rice plants, specifically grain, grown in arsenic-bearing paddy soils. We hypothesize that the bioavailability of arsenic in the paddy soil will increase with climate change leading to an even sharper decrease of rice productivity and quality than presently estimated. In order to shed light on this question, we performed greenhouse studies to simulate today's climate condition in Asian paddy soils and compare it to the conditions projected for the year 2100. We investigated climate conditions estimated in the 5th assessment report of the IPCC1, indicating up to a 5°C increase in temperature and doubled atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Under these current and future climate conditions, we examined rice physiology including plant height and biomass, leaf chlorophyll content, grain number and weight as well as contents of accumulated arsenic, and its species in the different rice tissues. We further correlate different geochemical parameters of the soil, including arsenic and other relevant metal dynamics in the soil, to plant response. In sum, our analyses will allow us to better predict the productivity of rice and its grain quality in a future climate condition, and may help to take precautions to avoid a global food crisis, particularly for South and Southeast Asia where rice is a daily staple. 1IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2013, The Physical Science Basis.

  12. Accumulation of mercury in rice grain and cabbage grown on representative Chinese soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-fa; Wu, Cheng-xian; Rafiq, Muhammad T; Aziz, Rukhsanda; Hou, Dan-di; Ding, Zhe-li; Lin, Zi-wen; Lou, Lin-jun; Feng, Yuan-yuan; Li, Ting-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e

    2013-12-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to investigate the accumulation properties of mercury (Hg) in rice grain and cabbage grown in seven soil types (Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols) spiked with different concentrations of Hg (CK, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, and 4.00 mg/kg). The results of this study showed that Hg accumulation of plants was significantly affected by soil types. Hg concentration in both rice grain and cabbage increased with soil Hg concentrations, but this increase differed among the seven soils. The stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that pH, Mn(II), particle size distribution, and cation exchange capacity have a close relationship with Hg accumulation in plants, which suggested that physicochemical characteristics of soils can affect the Hg accumulation in rice grain and cabbage. Critical Hg concentrations in seven soils were identified for rice grain and cabbage based on the maximum safe level for daily intake of Hg, dietary habits of the population, and Hg accumulation in plants grown in different soil types. Soil Hg limits for rice grain in Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols were 1.10, 2.00, 2.60, 2.78, 1.53, 0.63, and 2.17 mg/kg, respectively, and critical soil Hg levels for cabbage are 0.27, 1.35, 1.80, 1.70, 0.69, 1.68, and 2.60 mg/kg, respectively.

  13. Accumulation of mercury in rice grain and cabbage grown on representative Chinese soils*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-fa; Wu, Cheng-xian; Rafiq, Muhammad T.; Aziz, Rukhsanda; Hou, Dan-di; Ding, Zhe-li; Lin, Zi-wen; Lou, Lin-jun; Feng, Yuan-yuan; Li, Ting-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e

    2013-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to investigate the accumulation properties of mercury (Hg) in rice grain and cabbage grown in seven soil types (Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols) spiked with different concentrations of Hg (CK, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, and 4.00 mg/kg). The results of this study showed that Hg accumulation of plants was significantly affected by soil types. Hg concentration in both rice grain and cabbage increased with soil Hg concentrations, but this increase differed among the seven soils. The stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that pH, Mn(II), particle size distribution, and cation exchange capacity have a close relationship with Hg accumulation in plants, which suggested that physicochemical characteristics of soils can affect the Hg accumulation in rice grain and cabbage. Critical Hg concentrations in seven soils were identified for rice grain and cabbage based on the maximum safe level for daily intake of Hg, dietary habits of the population, and Hg accumulation in plants grown in different soil types. Soil Hg limits for rice grain in Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols were 1.10, 2.00, 2.60, 2.78, 1.53, 0.63, and 2.17 mg/kg, respectively, and critical soil Hg levels for cabbage are 0.27, 1.35, 1.80, 1.70, 0.69, 1.68, and 2.60 mg/kg, respectively. PMID:24302714

  14. Comparison between rice husk ash grown in different regions for stabilizing fly ash from a solid waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Benassi, L; Bosio, A; Dalipi, R; Borgese, L; Rodella, N; Pasquali, M; Depero, L E; Bergese, P; Bontempi, E

    2015-08-15

    The Stabilization of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash by rice husk ash (RHA) is under intense study as an effective strategy to recover and reuse industrial and agricultural waste together. We compare the metal entrapment performances of RHA from different Asian rice sources – namely from Japonica rice grown in Italy and Indica rice grown in India – Physicochemical and morphological characterization of the final stabilized material show that the same thermal treatment may result in marked structural differences in the silica contained in the two RHA. Remarkably, one of them displays a crystalline silica content, although obtained by a thermal treatment below 800 °C. We also find that the presence of an alkali metal ion (potassium) in the rice husk plays a crucial role in the attainment of the final silica phase. These physicochemical differences are mirrored by different stabilization yields by the two RHA.

  15. Production of Mozzarella Cheese Using Rennin Enzyme from Mucor miehei Grown at Rice Bran Molasses Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusdan, I. H.; Kusnadi, J.

    2017-04-01

    The research aimed to study the characteristic and yield of Mozzarella cheese produced by using rennin enzyme from Mucor miehei which is grown at rice bran and molasses medium. The popularity of Mozzarella cheese in Indonesia is increased caused by the spreading of western foods in Indonesia such as pizza and spaghetti that use Mozzarella cheese for ingredient. In Italy, Mozzarella and pizza cheeses are dominating 78% of the total Italian Cheese products. In producing Mozzarella cheese, rennin enzyme is always used as milk coagulant. Even now, Indonesia has not produced the rennin enzyme yet. The rennin enzyme from Mucor miehei growing at rice bran and molases medium which have the availability can be managed purposively within short period of time. The completly randomized design methode used to get the best crude extracts of Mucor miehei rennin enzyme, then is employed to produce mozzarella cheese. The result of Mozzarella cheese has various characteristics such as the yield’s weight is 9.1%, which consists of 50% moisture content, 36.64% peotein levels, 0.1 melting ability and 82.72% stretch ability or 0.79/N. With that characteristic it is concluded that rennin enzyme from Mucor miehei grown at rice bran molasses medium has the potential to alternatively subtitute calf rennin to produce Mozzarella cheese, and the characteristics fulfill the standart.

  16. Comparison of physical and chemical properties of medium-grain rice cultivars grown in California and Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D K; Wang, Y-J; Moldenhauer, K A

    2008-03-01

    The physical attributes, chemical composition, and physicochemical properties of 2 medium-grain rice cultivars from Arkansas (Bengal, Medark) and from California (M202, M204) were compared when grown in their respective locations and grown together in Arkansas to better understand the impacts of heredity and environment on medium-grain rice quality. Variations existed in grain dimensions, particularly length distribution, among cultivars and between crop years. When grown separately, the Arkansas cultivars tended to have higher protein and lipid contents but lower amylose contents than the California cultivars. M204 contained a significantly higher apparent amylose content (21.0%) compared with the other 3 cultivars (14.3% to 16.4%). The Arkansas rice cultivars exhibited higher pasting and gelatinization temperatures and produced harder gels and less sticky cooked rice. However, when the 4 cultivars were grown together in Arkansas, differences in protein and amylose contents, gelatinization and pasting properties, and cooked rice texture decreased. This study demonstrated that genetics, location, and crop year all contributed to variations in rice chemical and physical characteristics.

  17. Characterization of mercury species in brown and white rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown in water-saving paddies.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Sarah E; Feng, Xinbin; Dong, Bin; Shang, Lihai; Yin, Runsheng; Yuan, Xiaobo

    2011-05-01

    In China, total Hg (HgT) and methylmercury (MeHg) were quantified in rice grain grown in three sites using water-saving rice cultivation methods, and in one Hg-contaminated site, where rice was grown under flooded conditions. Polished white rice concentrations of HgT (water-saving: 3.3±1.6 ng/g; flooded: 110±9.2 ng/g) and MeHg (water-saving 1.3±0.56 ng/g; flooded: 12±2.4 ng/g) were positively correlated with root-soil HgT and MeHg contents (HgT: r2=0.97, MeHg: r2=0.87, p<0.05 for both), which suggested a portion of Hg species in rice grain was derived from the soil, and translocation of Hg species from soil to rice grain was independent of irrigation practices and Hg levels, although other factors may be important. Concentrations of HgT and other trace elements were significantly higher in unmilled brown rice (p<0.05), while MeHg content was similar (p>0.20), indicating MeHg infiltrated the endosperm (i.e., white rice) more efficiently than inorganic Hg(II).

  18. Effect of biochars and microorganisms on cadmium accumulation in rice grains grown in Cd-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Suksabye, Parinda; Pimthong, Apinya; Dhurakit, Prapai; Mekvichitsaeng, Phenjun; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contaminated in rice grains is a serious problem because most Asians consume rice on a daily basis. Rice grown in Cd-contaminated soil normally did not have high concentration of Cd. However, soil samples used in this study had high concentrations of Cd. The purpose of this study was to clearly see the effects of biochar and microorganism addition in rice growing in Cd-contaminated soil. The initial Cd concentration in Cd-contaminated soil used in this study was about 650 mg kg(-1). Cadmium concentration in rice plants grown in Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of 1% (w/w) different biochars such as sawdust fly ash (SDFA), bagasse fly ash (BGFA), and rice husk ash (RHA) was investigated. The results showed that SDFA was the best biochar in terms of reducing cadmium accumulation in rice grains when compared to BGFA and RHA under the same conditions. In addition, rice plants grown in Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of various nonpathogenic microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Beauveria bassiana were also studied. The results showed that the addition of 2% (v/v) microorganisms can reduce Cd accumulation in grains. It was found that grains obtained from Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of P. aeruginosa had the lowest cadmium concentration compared to the ones from soil amended with other strains. This was due to the fact that P. aeruginosa adsorbed more Cd itself into its cells than other strains. The rice plants grown in Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of biochars and microorganisms were also compared. The results showed that adding 2% (v/v) microorganisms seemed to reduce Cd accumulation in rice grains better than adding 1% (w/w) biochars. In addition, the amounts of calcium and magnesium in rice grains and the dry weight of plant in Cd-contaminated soil amended with P. aeruginosa were the highest in comparison to other microorganisms, biochars, and the soil without any amendments (Cd

  19. Metaproteomic identification of diazotrophic methanotrophs and their localization in root tissues of field-grown rice plants.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study by our group, CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation were simultaneously activated in the roots of wild-type rice plants in a paddy field with no N input; both processes are likely controlled by a rice gene for microbial symbiosis. The present study examined which microorganisms in rice roots were responsible for CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation under the field conditions. Metaproteomic analysis of root-associated bacteria from field-grown rice (Oryza sativa Nipponbare) revealed that nitrogenase complex-containing nitrogenase reductase (NifH) and the alpha subunit (NifD) and beta subunit (NifK) of dinitrogenase were mainly derived from type II methanotrophic bacteria of the family Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp. Minor nitrogenase proteins such as Methylocella, Bradyrhizobium, Rhodopseudomonas, and Anaeromyxobacter were also detected. Methane monooxygenase proteins (PmoCBA and MmoXYZCBG) were detected in the same bacterial group of the Methylocystaceae. Because these results indicated that Methylocystaceae members mediate both CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation, we examined their localization in rice tissues by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The methanotrophs were localized around the epidermal cells and vascular cylinder in the root tissues of the field-grown rice plants. Our metaproteomics and CARD-FISH results suggest that CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation are performed mainly by type II methanotrophs of the Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp., inhabiting the vascular bundles and epidermal cells of rice roots.

  20. Variation of grain Cd and Zn concentrations of 110 hybrid rice cultivars grown in a low-Cd paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Li, Lianqing; Pan, Genxing

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced Cd uptake and Zn depletion in rice grains and high potential for food Cd exposure by the high-yielding hybrid cultivars of China had been addressed. A field experiment was conducted in 2006 to determine the difference in grain Cd and Zn between cultivars. Total 110 cultivars including super rice and common hybrid rice cultivars were grown on a single paddy soil (Entic Haplaquept) with a neutral reaction and low total Cd content. Grain Cd and Zn concentrations were determined with graphite atomic adsorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) and flame atomic adsorption spectrophotometer (AAS) respectively. Wide variation of Cd content in grain was found in a range of 0.004-0.057 mg/kg, while the Zn content in a range of 10.25-30.06 mg/kg among the cultivars. Higher Cd but lower Zn concentration in grains of super rice cultivars was observed compared to the common hybrid ones. A highly significant positive linear correlation of grain Cd/Zn with grain Cd was found for super rice and common hybrid cultivars, meanwhile much higher slope for these hybrid cultivars than the reported non-hybrid cultivars was also observed. Using the limit value of the Chinese chemical guidelines for foods (MOHC and SSC, 2005), calculated potential risk of food Cd exposure with "Zn hungry" through diet intake was prominent with all the studied 110 hybrid rice cultivars, possessing high potential health problems for rice production in South China using the super rice cultivars. Breeding of genotypes of rice cultivars with low grain Cd and low Cd/Zn ratio is needed for rice production in acidic red soils where Cd bioavailability is prevalently high.

  1. The impact of elevated CO2 and temperature on grain quality of rice grown under open-air field conditions.

    PubMed

    Jing, Liquan; Wang, Juan; Shen, Shibo; Wang, Yunxia; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Yulong; Yang, Lianxin

    2016-08-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is accompanied by global warming. However, interactive effects of elevated CO2 and temperature have not been well studied on grain quality of rice. A japonica cultivar was grown in the field using a free-air CO2 enrichment facility in combination with a canopy air temperature increase system in 2014. The gas fumigation (200 µmol mol(-1) above ambient CO2 ) and temperature increase (1 °C above ambient air temperature) were performed from tillering until maturity. Compared with the control (ambient CO2 and air temperature), elevated CO2 increased grain length and width as well as grain chalkiness but decreased protein concentrations. In contrast, the increase in canopy air temperature had less effect on these parameters except for grain chalkiness. The starch pasting properties of rice flour and taste analysis of cooked rice indicated that the palatability of rice was improved by CO2 and/or temperature elevation, with the combination of the two treatments showing the most significant changes compared with ambient rice. It is concluded that projected CO2 in 2050 may have larger effects on rice grain quality than the projected temperature increase. Although deterioration in milling suitability, grain appearance and nutritional quality can be expected, the taste of cooked rice might be better in the future environment. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Mechanisms of Fe biofortification and mitigation of Cd accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown hydroponically with Fe chelate fertilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Tang, Ye-Tao; Zhou, Can; Xie, Shu-Ting; Xiao, Shi; Baker, Alan J M; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium contaminated rice from China has become a global food safety issue. Some research has suggested that chelate addition to substrates can affect metal speciation and plant metal content. We investigated the mitigation of Cd accumulation in hydroponically-grown rice supplied with EDTANa2Fe(II) or EDDHAFe(III). A japonica rice variety (Nipponbare) was grown in modified Kimura B solution containing three concentrations (0, 10, 100 μΜ) of the iron chelates EDTANa2Fe(II) or EDDHAFe(III) and 1 μΜ Cd. Metal speciation in solution was simulated by Geochem-EZ; growth and photosynthetic efficiency of rice were evaluated, and accumulation of Cd and Fe in plant parts was determined. Net Cd fluxes in the meristematic zone, growth zone, and maturation zone of roots were monitored by a non-invasive micro-test technology. Expression of Fe- and Cd-related genes in Fe-sufficient or Fe-deficient roots and leaves were studied by QRT-PCR. Compared to Fe deficiency, a sufficient or excess supply of Fe chelates significantly enhanced rice growth by elevating photosynthetic efficiency. Both Fe chelates increased the Fe content and decreased the Cd content of rice organs, except for the Cd content of roots treated with excess EDDHAFe(III). Compared to EDDHAFe(III), EDTANa2Fe(II) exhibited better mitigation of Cd accumulation in rice by generating the EDTANa2Cd complex in solution, decreasing net Cd influx and increasing net Cd efflux in root micro-zones. Application of EDTANa2Fe(II) and EDDHAFe(III) also reduced Cd accumulation in rice by inhibiting expression of genes involved in transport of Fe and Cd in the xylem and phloem. The 'win-win' situation of Fe biofortification and Cd mitigation in rice was achieved by application of Fe chelates. Root-to-stem xylem transport of Cd and redistribution of Cd in leaves by phloem transport can be regulated in rice through the use of Fe chelates that influence Fe availability and Fe-related gene expression. Fe fertilization decreased Cd

  3. Variations in heavy metal accumulation, growth and yield of rice plants grown at different sewage sludge amendment rates.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Agrawal, M

    2010-05-01

    Use of sewage sludge in agriculture is an alternative disposal technique for this waste. The present field study was conducted to assess the suitability of sewage sludge amendment in soil for rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Pusa sugandha 3) by evaluating the heavy metal accumulation, growth, biomass and yield responses of plants grown at 0, 3, 4.5, 6, 9, 12 kgm(-2) sewage sludge amendment (SSA) rate. Sewage sludge amendment modified the physico-chemical properties of soil, thus increasing the availability of heavy metals in soil and consequently with higher accumulation in plant parts. Root length decreased, whereas shoot length, number of leaves, leaf area and total biomass increased significantly when grown under various SSA rates. Yield of rice increased by 60%, 111%, 125%, 134% and 137% at 3, 4.5, 6, 9 and 12 kgm(-2) SSA, respectively, as compared to those grown in unamended soil. Sewage sludge amendment rates above 4.5 kgm(-2) though increased the yield of rice, but caused risk of food chain contamination as concentrations of Ni and Cd in rice grains were found to be above the Indian safe limits (1.5 mgkg(-1)) of human consumption above 4.5 kgm(-2) SSA and of Pb (2.5 mgkg(-1)) above 6 kgm(-2) SSA. Since aboveground parts of the rice also showed higher concentration than the permissible levels of Ni, Cd and Pb at 4.5 kgm(-2) SSA rate, it cannot be used as fodder. The rice husk may be used as bioresource for energy production. Efforts should be made to treat the effluents from small scale industries before discharge into the sewerage system.

  4. Growth and yield response of field-grown tropical rice to increasing carbon dioxide and air temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ziska, L.H.; Namuco, O.; Moya, T.; Quilang, J.

    1997-01-01

    Although the response of rice (Oryza sativa L.) to increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and air temperature has been examined at the greenhouse or growth chamber level, no field studies have been conducted under the tropical, irrigated conditions where the bulk of the world`s rice is grown. At the International Rice Research Institute, rice (cv. IR 72) was grown from germination until maturity for the 1994 wet and 1995 dry seasons at three different CO{sub 2} concentrations (ambient, ambient + 200, and ambient + 300 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1}) resulted in a significant increase in total plant biomass (+31%, +40%) and crop yield (+15%, + 27%) compared with the ambient control. The increase in crop yield was associated with an increase in the number of panicles per square meter and a greater percentage of filled spikelets. Simultaneous increases in CO{sub 2} and air temperature did not alter the biomass at maturity (relative to elevated CO{sub 2} alone), but plant development was accelerated at the higher growth temperature regardless of CO{sub 2} concentration. Grain yield, however, became insensitive to CO{sub 2} concentration at the higher growth temperature. Increasing both CO{sub 2} and air temperature also reduced grain quality (e.g., protein content). The combination of CO{sub 2} and temperature effects suggests that, in warmer regions (i.e., >34{degrees}C) where rice is grown, quantitative and qualitative changes in rice supply are possible if both CO{sub 2} and air temperature continue to increase. 24 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Metaproteomic Identification of Diazotrophic Methanotrophs and Their Localization in Root Tissues of Field-Grown Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study by our group, CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation were simultaneously activated in the roots of wild-type rice plants in a paddy field with no N input; both processes are likely controlled by a rice gene for microbial symbiosis. The present study examined which microorganisms in rice roots were responsible for CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation under the field conditions. Metaproteomic analysis of root-associated bacteria from field-grown rice (Oryza sativa Nipponbare) revealed that nitrogenase complex-containing nitrogenase reductase (NifH) and the alpha subunit (NifD) and beta subunit (NifK) of dinitrogenase were mainly derived from type II methanotrophic bacteria of the family Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp. Minor nitrogenase proteins such as Methylocella, Bradyrhizobium, Rhodopseudomonas, and Anaeromyxobacter were also detected. Methane monooxygenase proteins (PmoCBA and MmoXYZCBG) were detected in the same bacterial group of the Methylocystaceae. Because these results indicated that Methylocystaceae members mediate both CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation, we examined their localization in rice tissues by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The methanotrophs were localized around the epidermal cells and vascular cylinder in the root tissues of the field-grown rice plants. Our metaproteomics and CARD-FISH results suggest that CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation are performed mainly by type II methanotrophs of the Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp., inhabiting the vascular bundles and epidermal cells of rice roots. PMID:24928870

  6. Soil to rice transfer factors for (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs: a study on rice grown in India.

    PubMed

    Karunakara, N; Rao, Chetan; Ujwal, P; Yashodhara, I; Kumara, Sudeep; Ravi, P M

    2013-04-01

    India is the second largest producer of rice (Oryza sativa L.) in the world and rice is an essential component of the diet for a majority of the population in India. However, detailed studies aimed at the evaluation of radionuclide transfer factors (F(v)) for the rice grown in India are almost non-existent. This paper presents the soil to rice transfer factors for natural ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (40)K, and (210)Pb) and artificial ((137)Cs) radionuclides for rice grown in natural field conditions on the West Coast of India. A rice field was developed very close to the Kaiga nuclear power plant and the water required for this field was drawn from the cooling water discharge canal of the power plant. For a comparative study of the radionuclide transfer factors, rice samples were also collected from the rice fields of nearby villages. The study showed that the (226)Ra and (228)Ra activity concentrations were below detection levels in different organs of the rice plant. The soil to un-hulled rice grain (40)K transfer factor varied in the range of 6.5 × 10(-1) to 2.9 with a mean of 0.15 × 10(1), and of (210)Pb varied in the range of <1.2 × 10(-2) to 8.1 × 10(-1) with a mean of 1.4 × 10(-1), and of (137)Cs varied in the range of 6.6 × 10(-2) to 3.4 × 10(-1) with a mean of 2.1 × 10(-1). The mean values of un-hulled grain to white rice processing retention factors (F(r)) were 0.12 for (40)K, 0.03 for (210)Pb, and 0.14 for (137)Cs. Using these processing retention factors, the soil to white rice transfer factors were estimated and these were found to have mean values of 1.8 × 10(-1), 4.2 × 10(-3), and 3.0 × 10(-2) for (40)K, (210)Pb, and (137)Cs, respectively. The study has shown that the transfer of (40)K was higher for above the ground organs than for the root, but (210)Pb and (137)Cs were retained in the root and their transfer to above the ground organs of the rice plant is significantly lower. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. Iron and zinc isotope fractionation during uptake and translocation in rice (Oryza sativa) grown in oxic and anoxic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Tim; Markovic, Tamara; Kirk, Guy J. D.; Schönbächler, Maria; Rehkämper, Mark; Zhao, Fangjie J.; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2015-11-01

    Stable isotope fractionation is emerging quickly as a powerful novel technique to study metal uptake and translocation in plants. Fundamental to this development is a thorough understanding of the processes that lead to isotope fractionation under differing environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated Zn and Fe isotope fractionation in rice grown to maturity in anaerobic and aerobic soils under greenhouse conditions. The overall Zn isotope fractionation between the soil and above ground plant material was negligible in aerobic soil but significant in anaerobic soil with isotopically lighter Zn in the rice plant. The observed range of fractionation is in line with previously determined fractionations of Zn in rice grown in hydroponic solutions and submerged soils and emphasizes the effect of taking up different chemical forms of Zn, most likely free and organically complexed Zn. The Zn in the grain was isotopically lighter than in the rest of the above ground plant in rice grown in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. This suggests that in the course of the grain loading and during the translocation within the plant important biochemical and/or biophysical processes occur. The isotope fractionation observed in the grains would be consistent with an unidirectional controlled transport from shoot to grain with a fractionation factor of α ≈ 0.9994. Iron isotopes showed an isotopic lighter signature in shoot and grain compared to the bulk soil or the leachate in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. The negative direction of isotopic fractionation is consistent with possible changes in the redox state of Fe occurring during the uptake and translocation processes. The isotope fractionation pattern between shoots and grain material are different for Zn and Fe which finally suggests that different mechanisms operate during translocation and grain-loading in rice for these two key micronutrients.

  8. The effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dafang; Ma, Wei; Song, Xiaojing; Bao, Yanyu

    2017-03-01

    Although the role of iron plaque on rice root surface has been investigated in recent years, its effect on antibiotic uptake remains uncertain. In the study, pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin (adding 10 and 50 mg·kg(-1) treatments) in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil. Iron plaque was induced by adding different amounts of Fe(II) in soil. The results showed that the presence of norfloxacin can decrease the amount of iron plaque induced. After rice with iron plaque induced, norfloxacin was mainly accumulated in iron plaque on root surface, followed by inside root, but its translocation from root to other rice tissues is not observed. Iron plaque played the role of a barrier for norfloxacin uptake into rice roots under high norfloxacin concentration of 50 mg·kg(-1), however not that under low concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1). And the barrier function was the most strongest with adding Fe(II) of 30 mg·kg(-1) as combined action of iron plaque and rhizosphere effect. Fluorescence microscope analysis showed that norfloxacin mainly distributed in the outside of root cell, which showed its translocation as apoplastic pathway in rice. Comparing with non-rhizosphere, more norfloxacin was accumulated in rhizosphere soil. Maybe, strong root oxidization (high Eh values) induced more iron oxide formation in rhizosphere and on root surface, which led to norfloxacin's mobility towards to rhizosphere through its strong adsorption of iron oxides and then promoted its uptake by rice on root surface.

  9. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions.

  10. Suppression of Hydroxycinnamate Network Formation in Cell Walls of Rice Shoots Grown under Microgravity Conditions in Space

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Fukui, Keiji; Osada, Ikuko; Kasahara, Haruo; Kamada, Motoshi

    2015-01-01

    Network structures created by hydroxycinnamate cross-links within the cell wall architecture of gramineous plants make the cell wall resistant to the gravitational force of the earth. In this study, the effects of microgravity on the formation of cell wall-bound hydroxycinnamates were examined using etiolated rice shoots simultaneously grown under artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the International Space Station. Measurement of the mechanical properties of cell walls showed that shoot cell walls became stiff during the growth period and that microgravity suppressed this stiffening. Amounts of cell wall polysaccharides, cell wall-bound phenolic acids, and lignin in rice shoots increased as the shoot grew. Microgravity did not influence changes in the amounts of cell wall polysaccharides or phenolic acid monomers such as ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid, but it suppressed increases in diferulic acid (DFA) isomers and lignin. Activities of the enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cell wall-bound peroxidase (CW-PRX) in shoots also increased as the shoot grew. PAL activity in microgravity-grown shoots was almost comparable to that in artificial 1 g-grown shoots, while CW-PRX activity increased less in microgravity-grown shoots than in artificial 1 g-grown shoots. Furthermore, the increases in expression levels of some class III peroxidase genes were reduced under microgravity conditions. These results suggest that a microgravity environment modifies the expression levels of certain class III peroxidase genes in rice shoots, that the resultant reduction of CW-PRX activity may be involved in suppressing DFA formation and lignin polymerization, and that this suppression may cause a decrease in cross-linkages within the cell wall architecture. The reduction in intra-network structures may contribute to keeping the cell wall loose under microgravity conditions. PMID:26378793

  11. Impact of Rice Grown on Surface Energy Balance in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F.; Detto, M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Snyder, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally rice grown in California was mostly limited to the hot and dry conditions of the Sacramento Valley. Until recently, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta was thought to have water and air temperatures too low to match the production of rice in the Sacramento Valley. With the increasing interest of mitigating subsidence through the reduction of oxidation of peat soils and the development of new rice varieties for cooler climates, several Delta islands are being used to successfully grow 3000 acres of rice. Current research on Twitchell Island is investigating the western regions of the Delta for rice cultivation where water and air temperatures are the coolest and water and soil salinities begin to impact agricultural production. Included in this research is estimating water losses by evapotranspiration for land management decisions, as water becomes an increasingly valuable resource in California. Energy balance measurements of latent and sensible heat fluxes were collected at 10 Hz and averaged over thirty minutes using the eddy covariance method. Net radiation and soil heat flux terms were recorded at lower frequency and averaged for the same thirty minute period as the eddy covariance terms. Preliminary results from the 2009 growing season show that the cool water becomes a net sink for sensible heat flux, contributing more energy to latent heat flux, soil heat flux, and storage terms compared to pre-flood conditions. Latent heat flux in July reached values above 500 Wm-2 and total daily evaporation rates were close to 7.5 mm. Sensible heat flux remains negative throughout the day with the highest magnitudes occurring in the afternoon and evening when strong breezes draw cooler air from the Bay area and the Pacific Ocean. For rice grown in the Sacramento Valley, latent and sensible heat fluxes were measured using the surface renewal technique, while net radiation and soil heat fluxes were measured directly for 2007 through 2009. Results from 2007 and

  12. Root morphology, hydraulic conductivity and plant water relations of high-yielding rice grown under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yoichiro; Okami, Midori

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing physical water scarcity is a major constraint for irrigated rice (Oryza sativa) production. ‘Aerobic rice culture’ aims to maximize yield per unit water input by growing plants in aerobic soil without flooding or puddling. The objective was to determine (a) the effect of water management on root morphology and hydraulic conductance, and (b) their roles in plant–water relationships and stomatal conductance in aerobic culture. Methods Root system development, stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water potential (Ψleaf) were monitored in a high-yielding rice cultivar (‘Takanari’) under flooded and aerobic conditions at two soil moisture levels [nearly saturated (> –10 kPa) and mildly dry (> –30 kPa)] over 2 years. In an ancillary pot experiment, whole-plant hydraulic conductivity (soil-leaf hydraulic conductance; Kpa) was measured under flooded and aerobic conditions. Key Results Adventitious root emergence and lateral root proliferation were restricted even under nearly saturated conditions, resulting in a 72–85 % reduction in total root length under aerobic culture conditions. Because of their reduced rooting size, plants grown under aerobic conditions tended to have lower Kpa than plants grown under flooded conditions. Ψleaf was always significantly lower in aerobic culture than in flooded culture, while gs was unchanged when the soil moisture was at around field capacity. gs was inevitably reduced when the soil water potential at 20-cm depth reached –20 kPa. Conclusions Unstable performance of rice in water-saving cultivations is often associated with reduction in Ψleaf. Ψleaf may reduce even if Kpa is not significantly changed, but the lower Ψleaf would certainly occur in case Kpa reduces as a result of lower water-uptake capacity under aerobic conditions. Rice performance in aerobic culture might be improved through genetic manipulation that promotes lateral root branching and rhizogenesis as well as deep

  13. The effect of fertilization on cesium concentration of rice grown in a paddy field in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Kajikawa, Masataka; Nishida, Sho; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Tanoi, Keitaro; Furukawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toru

    2014-01-01

    After the accident of the Fukushima 1 nuclear power plant in March 2011, radioactive cesium was released and paddy field in a wide area of Fukushima Prefecture was contaminated. To reduce radioactive Cs uptake by rice, it is important to understand factors that affect Cs uptake in rice. Here we describe our study in 2011 and 2012 to investigate Cs concentration in two rice cultivars, Koshihikari and Hitomebore, the top two cultivars in Fukushima prefecture, grown under different fertilizer conditions in the contaminated paddy field. Our study demonstrated that high nitrogen and low potassium conditions increase Cs concentrations both in straw and brown rice.

  14. Development of an Improved Irrigation Subroutine in SWAT to Simulate the Hydrology of Rice Paddy Grown under Submerged Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraleedharan, B. V.; Kathirvel, K.; Narasimhan, B.; Nallasamy, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a basin scale, distributed hydrological model commonly used to predict the effect of management decisions on the hydrologic response of watersheds. Hydrologic response is decided by the various components of water balance. In the case of watersheds located in south India as well as in several other tropical countries around the world, paddy is one of the dominant crop controlling the hydrologic response of a watershed. Hence, the suitability of SWAT in replicating the hydrology of paddy fields needs to be verified. Rice paddy fields are subjected to flooding method of irrigation, while the irrigation subroutines in SWAT are developed to simulate crops grown under non flooding conditions. Moreover irrigation is represented well in field scale models, while it is poorly represented within watershed models like SWAT. Reliable simulation of flooding method of irrigation and hydrology of the fields will assist in effective water resources management of rice paddy fields which are one of the major consumers of surface and ground water resources. The current study attempts to modify the irrigation subroutine in SWAT so as to simulate flooded irrigation condition. A field water balance study was conducted on representative fields located within Gadana, a subbasin located in Tamil Nadu (southern part of India) and dominated by rice paddy based irrigation systems. The water balance of irrigated paddy fields simulated with SWAT was compared with the water balance derived by rice paddy based crop growth model named ORYZA. The variation in water levels along with the soil moisture variation predicted by SWAT was evaluated with respect to the estimates derived from ORYZA. The water levels were further validated with field based water balance measurements taken on a daily scale. It was observed that the modified irrigation subroutine was able to simulate irrigation of rice paddy within SWAT in a realistic way compared to the existing method.

  15. Gasified rice hull biochar is a source of phosphorus and potassium for container-grown plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biochar materials have been reported to improve the chemical, physical, and biological properties of mineral soils and soilless substrates. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of gasified rice hull biochar (GRHB) on available nutrients in a container substrate. Two experimen...

  16. Extracts of Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice suppress liver damage induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Tae Il; Hwang, Seong-Gu; Lim, Beong Ou; Park, Dong Ki

    2003-12-01

    Extracts of Phellinus linteus (EPB), grown on germinated brown rice, protected rats from liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Peroxidation products in the liver were decreased to 10% by EPB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly decreased to 55% and 39% by CCl4 administration, but EPB blocked this effect, resulting in enzyme activities at control levels. Expression of cytochromeP450 2E1 (CYP2E1) protein was significantly decreased to 88% in CCl4-treated rats but remained at control levels when EPB was also administered. EPB did not affect the altered fatty acid composition induced by CCl4. The hepatoprotective effect of EPB may be mediated by EPB's prevention of CCl4-induced CYP2E1 degradation.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of Ganoderma lucidum grown on germinated brown rice.

    PubMed

    Hasnat, Abul; Pervin, Mehnaz; Lim, Beong Ou

    2013-06-07

    In this study, the acetylcholinesterase inhibition and in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of Ganoderma lucidum grown on germinated brown rice (GLBR) were evaluated. In antioxidant assays in vitro, GLBR was found to have strong metal chelating activity, DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging activity. Cell-based antioxidant methods were used, including lipid peroxidation on brain homogenate and AAPH-induced erythrocyte haemolysis. In antioxidant assays in vivo, mice were administered with GLBR and this significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the mice sera, livers and brains. The amount of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds were 43.14 mg GAE/g and 13.36 mg CE/g dry mass, respectively. GLBR also exhibited acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. In addition, HPLC analyses of GLBR extract revealed the presence of different phenolic compounds. These findings demonstrate the remarkable potential of GLBR extract as valuable source of antioxidants which exhibit interesting acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  18. Diurnal and developmental changes in energy allocation of absorbed light at PSII in field-grown rice.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Satoshi; Uebayashi, Nozomu; Tazoe, Youshi; Ikeuchi, Masahiro; Homma, Koki; Sato, Fumihiko; Endo, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The allocation of absorbed light energy in PSII to electron transport and heat dissipation processes in rice grown under waterlogged conditions was estimated with the lake model of energy transfer. With regard to diurnal changes in energy allocation, the peak of the energy flux to electron transport, J(PSII), occurred in the morning and the peak of the energy flux to heat dissipation associated with non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence, J(NPQ), occurred in the afternoon. With regard to seasonal changes in energy allocation, J(PSII) in the rapidly growing phase was greater than that in the ripening phase, even though the leaves of rice receive less light in the growing phase than in the ripening period in Japan. This seasonal decrease in J(PSII) was accompanied by an increase in J(NPQ). One of the reasons for the lower J(PSII) in the ripening phase might be a more sever afternoon suppression of J(PSII). To estimate energy dissipation due to photoinhibition of PSII, J(NPQ) was divided into J(fast), which is associated with fast-recovering NPQ mainly due to qE, and J(slow), which is mainly due to photoinhibition. The integrated daily energy loss by photoinhibiton was calculated to be about 3-8% of light energy absorption in PSII. Strategies for the utilization of light energy adopted by rice are discussed. For example, very efficient photosynthesis under non-saturating light in the rapidly growing phase is proposed.

  19. [Effect of iron plaque formation of root surface on as uptake by rice seedlings grown on different types of soils].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Lin, Xian-yong; Cheng, Wang-da

    2010-02-01

    The objective of study was to investigate the effect of the amount of iron plaque of root surface on As uptake by rice seedlings grown on 14 types of soils. These results indicated that there were significant differences in the amounts of iron plaque (1.15-61.97 mg/g) formed on rice root surface among different soils. The amount of non-crystalloid Fe oxide in different submerged soils is one of main influencing factors. There was a significant positive correlation between As concentrations in iron plaque (0-1376 mg/kg) and the amount of iron plaque (r = 0.85, n=14, p < 0.05), but no significant correlation with the extractable As concentration of 14 types of soils. There were also significant positive correlation between As concentrations in shoot (0.400-12.98 mg/kg) and root (3.860-576.2 mg/kg) and the amounts of iron plaque respectively but not significant correlation with the extractable As concentrations of 14 types of soils (r = 0.88, n=14, p < 0.05; r = 0.91, n=14, p < 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between specific arsenic uptake (0.005-0.670 mg/g) and the amount of iron plaque (r = 0.91, n=14, p < 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between shoot-As% and the amount of iron plaque. These results showed that the iron plaque on root surface was the pool of As in rhizosphere and increased As uptake but did not affect As transportation from rice root to shoot.

  20. Identification of an anticancer compound against HT-29 cells from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Tae-Il; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Cho, Jeong-Yong; Park, Dong Ki; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2013-01-01

    Objective To isolate and identify the anticancer compound against proliferation of human colon cancer cells from ethyl acetate (EtOAC) extract of Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice (PB). Methods EtOAC extract of PB was partitioned with n-hexane, EtOAC, and water-saturated n-butanol. Anticancer compound of n-hexane layer was isolated and identified by HPLC and NMR, respectively. Cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells was tested by SRB assay. Results The n-hexane layer obtained after solvent fractionation of PB EtOAC extracts showed a potent anticancer activity against the HT-29 cell line. Atractylenolide I, a eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, a major anticancer substance of PB, was isolated from the n-hexane layer by silica gel column chromatography and preparative-HPLC. This structure was elucidated by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic data. Atractylenolide I has not been reported in mushrooms or rice as of yet. The isolated compound dose-dependently inhibited the growth of HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Conclusions Atractylenolide I might contribute to the anticancer effect of PB. PMID:24075343

  1. Uptake of cadmium by rice grown on contaminated soils and its bioavailability/toxicity in human cell lines (Caco-2/HL-7702).

    PubMed

    Aziz, Rukhsanda; Rafiq, Muhammad Tariq; Li, Tingqiang; Liu, Di; He, Zhenli; Stoffella, P J; Sun, Kewang; Xiaoe, Yang

    2015-04-08

    Cadmium (Cd) enters the food chain from polluted soils via contaminated cereals and vegetables; therefore, an understanding of Cd bioaccessibility, bioavailability, and toxicity in humans through rice grain is needed. This study assessed the Cd bioaccessibility, bioavailability, and toxicity to humans from rice grown on Cd-contaminated soils using an in vitro digestion method combined with a Caco-2/HL-7702 cell model. Cadmium bioaccessibility (18.45-30.41%) and bioavailability (4.04-8.62%) were found to be significantly higher in yellow soil (YS) rice than calcareous soil (CS) rice with the corresponding values of 6.89-11.43 and 1.77-2.25%, respectively. Toxicity assays showed an initial toxicity in YS rice at 6 mg kg(-1) Cd, whereas CS rice did not show any significant change due to low Cd concentrations. The acidic soils of Cd-contaminated areas can contribute to a higher dietary intake of Cd. Therefore, it is imperative to monitor Cd concentration in rice to minimize human health risk.

  2. Assessment of arsenic in Australian grown and imported rice varieties on sale in Australia and potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fransisca, Yunnita; Small, Darryl M; Morrison, Paul D; Spencer, Michelle J S; Ball, Andrew S; Jones, Oliver A H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic dietary exposure to arsenic, particularly the inorganic forms (defined as elemental arsenic, predominantly As(3+) and As(5+), and all its inorganic compounds except arsine), is a matter of concern for human health. Ingestion of arsenic usually occurs via contaminated water but recent studies show there is also a risk of exposure from food, particularly Asian rice (Oryza sativa). Australia is a rice growing country, contributing around 2% of the world rice trade, and a large proportion of the population consumes rice regularly. In the present study we investigated concentrations of arsenic in both Australian grown and imported rice on sale in Australia and examined the potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry. The results indicated a wide spread of arsenic levels of 0.09-0.33 mg kg(-1), with Australian grown Arborio and sushi varieties of O. sativa containing the highest mean value of ∼0.22 mg kg(-1). Arsenic levels in all samples were below the 1 mg kg(-1) limit set by Food Standards Australia New Zealand.

  3. Persistence of plant hormone levels in rice shoots grown under microgravity conditions in space: its relationship to maintenance of shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Ishioka, Noriaki; Shimazu, Toru; Kamada, Motoshi

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the effects of microgravity environment on growth and plant hormone levels in dark-grown rice shoots cultivated in artificial 1 g and microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). Growth of microgravity-grown shoots was comparable to that of 1 g-grown shoots. Endogenous levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in shoots remained constant, while those of abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), cytokinins (CKs) and gibberellins (GAs) decreased during the cultivation period under both conditions. The levels of auxin, ABA, JA, CKs and GAs in rice shoots grown under microgravity conditions were comparable to those under 1 g conditions. These results suggest microgravity environment in space had minimal impact on levels of these plant hormones in rice shoots, which may be the cause of the persistence of normal growth of shoots under microgravity conditions. Concerning ethylene, the expression level of a gene for 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase, the key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis, was reduced under microgravity conditions, suggesting that microgravity may affect the ethylene production. Therefore, ethylene production may be responsive to alterations of the gravitational force. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  4. Increasing CO2 differentially affects essential and non-essential amino acid concentration of rice grains grown in cadmium-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huibin; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Zhongqi; Tang, Shirong

    2016-09-01

    Environmental pollution by both ambient CO2 and heavy metals has been steadily increasing, but we do not know how fluctuating CO2 concentrations influence plant nutrients under high Cd pollution, especially in crops. Here, we studied the effects of elevated CO2 and Cd accumulation on proteins and amino acids in rice under Cd stress. In this pot experiment, we analyzed the amino-acid profile of 20 rice cultivars that accumulate Cd differently; the plants were grown in Cd-containing soils under ambient conditions and elevated CO2 levels. We found that although Cd concentrations appeared to be higher in most cultivars under elevated CO2 than under ambient CO2, the effect was significant only in seven cultivars. Combined exposure to Cd and elevated CO2 strongly decreased rice protein and amino acid profiles, including essential and non-essential amino acids. Under elevated CO2, the ratios of specific amino acids were either higher or lower than the optimal ratios provided by FAO/WHO, suggesting that CO2 may flatten the overall amino-acid profile, leading to an excess in some amino acids and deficiencies in others when the rice is consumed. Thus, Cd-tainted rice limits the concentration of essential amino acids in rice-based diets, and the combination with elevated CO2 further exacerbates the problem.

  5. Nitrogen Metabolism in Adaptation of Photosynthesis to Water Stress in Rice Grown under Different Nitrogen Levels.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Hu, Jijie; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Huang, Jianliang; Jin, Qianyu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the role of nitrogen (N) metabolism in the adaptation of photosynthesis to water stress in rice, a hydroponic experiment supplying with low N (0.72 mM), moderate N (2.86 mM), and high N (7.15 mM) followed by 150 g⋅L(-1) PEG-6000 induced water stress was conducted in a rainout shelter. Water stress induced stomatal limitation to photosynthesis at low N, but no significant effect was observed at moderate and high N. Non-photochemical quenching was higher at moderate and high N. In contrast, relative excessive energy at PSII level (EXC) was declined with increasing N level. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contents were in parallel with EXC. Water stress decreased catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities at low N, resulting in increased H2O2 content and severer membrane lipid peroxidation; whereas the activities of antioxidative enzymes were increased at high N. In accordance with photosynthetic rate and antioxidative enzymes, water stress decreased the activities of key enzymes involving in N metabolism such as glutamate synthase and glutamate dehydrogenase, and photorespiratory key enzyme glycolate oxidase at low N. Concurrently, water stress increased nitrate content significantly at low N, but decreased nitrate content at moderate and high N. Contrary to nitrate, water stress increased proline content at moderate and high N. Our results suggest that N metabolism appears to be associated with the tolerance of photosynthesis to water stress in rice via affecting CO2 diffusion, antioxidant capacity, and osmotic adjustment.

  6. Studies on physico-chemical and cooking characteristics of rice bean varieties grown in NE region of India.

    PubMed

    Bepary, Rejaul Hoque; Wadikar, D D; Neog, Seuji Borah; Patki, P E

    2017-03-01

    Rice bean (Vigna umbellata) is grown in South and Southeast Asia, and the bean has gained importance due to its nutritional strength in terms of dietary fiber, quality protein and minerals. In current study, the nutritional and functional components, cooking and thermo-gravimetric properties of eleven rice bean varieties from NE India were investigated. Results revealed that the major nutrients among the varieties ranged as follows: 54.21-60.49% carbohydrates, 15.64-21.60% protein, 1.22-2.3% fat, 5.53-6.56% crude fibre, 3.34-3.8% ash; while the functional, anti-nutritional factors and mineral were present as 1189.32-1645.8 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g polyphenols, 205.38-432.14 mg/100 g phytic acid, 23.14-34.12 mg/100 g oxalate, 690.7-1589.5 mg/100 g saponins, 49.90-158.17 μg/100 g hydrocyanide, 111.51-168 calcium, 5.50-10.44 zinc, 3.72-8.37 iron. Principal component analysis revealed that varieties with higher calcium, iron and ash content had lower cooking time, swelling ratio, and cooked grain hardness. It is also revealed that varieties with higher weight loss at sixth stage in thermogravimetric graph had lower carbohydrate and higher protein content. Nagadal variety had higher fat, potassium, magnesium, calcium, sodium, iron, copper and chromium content and better cooking quality as compared to the other varieties. The study revealed that Nagadal variety was superior to other varieties with respect to mineral content, cooking and thermal properties and hence have better potential in the development of value added products.

  7. Phellinus linteus Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Increases Cetuximab Sensitivity of KRAS-Mutated Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin; Park, Jeong-Bin; Lee, Sang-Jae; Song, Minjung

    2017-08-11

    Colon cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, and it has recently become a leading cause of death worldwide. Among colon cancers, the v-ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-mutated form is notorious for its non-druggable features. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor, has been introduced as an antitumor therapy; however, secondary resistance and side effects significantly limit its effective use in these cancers. In this study, we prepared Phellinuslinteus on germinated brown rice (PBR) extracts to increase the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancers to cetuximab. The combined treatment of PBR extract and cetuximab suppressed SW480 cell viability/proliferation, with the cells exhibiting altered cellular morphology and clonogenic potential. AnnexinV-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide-stained flow cytometry and Western blotting were performed, and PBR extract combined with cetuximab treatment increased apoptosis of the SW480 cells and suppressed their KRAS protein expression. The potential of PBR as a synergistic anticancer agent was further investigated in a tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor growth was significantly suppressed with PBR extract and cetuximab co-treatment. In conclusion, PBR increased the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancer cells to cetuximab, which indicates the potential use of PBR as a medical food against colon cancer.

  8. Phellinus linteus Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Increases Cetuximab Sensitivity of KRAS-Mutated Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Jin; Park, Jeong-Bin; Lee, Sang-Jae; Song, Minjung

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, and it has recently become a leading cause of death worldwide. Among colon cancers, the v-ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-mutated form is notorious for its non-druggable features. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor, has been introduced as an antitumor therapy; however, secondary resistance and side effects significantly limit its effective use in these cancers. In this study, we prepared Phellinuslinteus on germinated brown rice (PBR) extracts to increase the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancers to cetuximab. The combined treatment of PBR extract and cetuximab suppressed SW480 cell viability/proliferation, with the cells exhibiting altered cellular morphology and clonogenic potential. AnnexinV–fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide–stained flow cytometry and Western blotting were performed, and PBR extract combined with cetuximab treatment increased apoptosis of the SW480 cells and suppressed their KRAS protein expression. The potential of PBR as a synergistic anticancer agent was further investigated in a tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor growth was significantly suppressed with PBR extract and cetuximab co-treatment. In conclusion, PBR increased the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancer cells to cetuximab, which indicates the potential use of PBR as a medical food against colon cancer. PMID:28800074

  9. Antrodia camphorata Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Suppresses Melanoma Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Differentiation and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minjung; Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) was prepared to suppress melanoma development. CBR extracts were divided into hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water fractions. Among all the fractions, EtOAc fraction showed the best suppressive effect on B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation by CCK-8 assay. It also showed the increased cell death and the changed cellular morphology after CBR treatment. Annexin V-FITC/PI, flow cytometry, and western blotting were performed to elucidate anticancer activity of CBR. The results showed that CBR induced p53-mediated apoptotic cell death of B16F10. CBR EtOAc treatment increased melanin content and melanogenesis-related proteins of MITF and TRP-1 expressions, which supports its anticancer activity. Its potential as an anticancer agent was further investigated in tumor-xenografted mouse model. In melanoma-xenografted mouse model, melanoma tumor growth was significantly suppressed under CBR EtOAc fraction treatment. HPLC analysis of CBR extract showed peak of adenosine. In conclusion, CBR extracts notably inhibited B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation through the p53-mediated apoptosis induction and increased melanogenesis. These findings suggest that CBR EtOAc fraction can act as an effective anticancer agent to treat melanoma. PMID:23533475

  10. Antrodia camphorata Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Suppresses Melanoma Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Differentiation and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Minjung; Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) was prepared to suppress melanoma development. CBR extracts were divided into hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water fractions. Among all the fractions, EtOAc fraction showed the best suppressive effect on B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation by CCK-8 assay. It also showed the increased cell death and the changed cellular morphology after CBR treatment. Annexin V-FITC/PI, flow cytometry, and western blotting were performed to elucidate anticancer activity of CBR. The results showed that CBR induced p53-mediated apoptotic cell death of B16F10. CBR EtOAc treatment increased melanin content and melanogenesis-related proteins of MITF and TRP-1 expressions, which supports its anticancer activity. Its potential as an anticancer agent was further investigated in tumor-xenografted mouse model. In melanoma-xenografted mouse model, melanoma tumor growth was significantly suppressed under CBR EtOAc fraction treatment. HPLC analysis of CBR extract showed peak of adenosine. In conclusion, CBR extracts notably inhibited B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation through the p53-mediated apoptosis induction and increased melanogenesis. These findings suggest that CBR EtOAc fraction can act as an effective anticancer agent to treat melanoma.

  11. Characterization of rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes on the basis of morpho-physiological and biochemical traits grown under aerobic situation in rainfed ecosystem .

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Dwivedi, Sharad Kumar; Singh, S S; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sundaram, R K; Shivani; Mall, A K

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of aerobic situation on yield, physiological and biochemical traits of advanced breeding lines of rice. Experiment was conducted with two set of rice genotypes under two water regimes (aerobic and irrigated), during three consecutive wet seasons 2010-2012. Significant decrease in yield was observed in rice genotypes grown under aerobic situation as compared to the irrigated ones. Promising rice genotypes having the ability to maintain high plant biomass, harvest index, early vegetative vigour, improved physiological and biochemical traits in terms of relative water content (RWC), leaf area index (LAI), total soluble sugar, starch, protien and proline content help to sustain higher grain yield under aerobic situation. The yield gap between aerobic and irrigated rice ranged between 24% to 68%. Grain yield showed positive correlation with harvest index (0.434), test weight (0.647), plant biomass (0.411) and effective tiller numbers (0.473), whereas spikelet sterility was negative associated (-0.380). The current study suggested that promising genotypes viz., IR77298-14-1-2-130-2, IR84899-B-182-3-1-1-2, IR84887-B-157-38-1-1-3 and IR 84899-B-179-1-1-1-2 for aerobic situation, showing yield advantage due to better performance of physiological and biochemical traits, might be adopted in large area of rainfed ecosystem as well as in irrigated areas where water scarcity was a major problem.

  12. Origins of Host-Specific Populations of the Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae in Crop Domestication With Subsequent Expansion of Pandemic Clones on Rice and Weeds of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Brett C.; Fudal, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Tharreau, Didier; Valent, Barbara; van Kim, Pham; Nottéghem, Jean-Loup; Kohn, Linda M.

    2005-01-01

    Rice, as a widely and intensively cultivated crop, should be a target for parasite host shifts and a source for shifts to co-occurring weeds. Magnaporthe oryzae, of the M. grisea species complex, is the most important fungal pathogen of rice, with a high degree of host specificity. On the basis of 10 loci from six of its seven linkage groups, 37 multilocus haplotypes among 497 isolates of M. oryzae from rice and other grasses were identified. Phylogenetic relationships among isolates from rice (Oryza sativa), millet (Setaria spp.), cutgrass (Leersia hexandra), and torpedo grass (Panicum repens) were predominantly tree like, consistent with a lack of recombination, but from other hosts were reticulate, consistent with recombination. The single origin of rice-infecting M. oryzae followed a host shift from a Setaria millet and was closely followed by additional shifts to weeds of rice, cutgrass, and torpedo grass. Two independent estimators of divergence time indicate that these host shifts predate the Green Revolution and could be associated with rice domestication. The rice-infecting lineage is characterized by high copy number of the transposable element MGR586 (Pot3) and, except in two haplotypes, by a loss of AVR-Co39. Both mating types have been retained in ancestral, well-distributed rice-infecting haplotypes 10 (mainly temperate) and 14 (mainly tropical), but only one mating type was recovered from several derived, geographically restricted haplotypes. There is evidence of a common origin of both ACE1 virulence genotypes in haplotype 14. Host-haplotype association is evidenced by low pathogenicity on hosts associated with other haplotypes. PMID:15802503

  13. Chromium bioaccumulation in rice grown in contaminated soil and irrigated mine wastewater--a case study at South Kaliapani chromite mine area, Orissa, India.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Pattnaik, Mousumi Madhusmita; Mishra, Aruna Kumari; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The level of chromium (Cr) contamination in soils and irrigated mine wastewater at South Kaliapani chromite mine region of Orissa, (India) were investigated. Chromium bioaccumulation in rice plants (Oryza sativa L. cv. Khandagiri) irrigated with Cr+6 contaminated mine wastewater was analyzed along with its attenuation from mine wastewater. The levels of Cr+6 in irrigated mine wastewaters in successive rice grown plots were analyzed on 75 days and 100 days after transplantation of seedlings. Total chromium content in different parts of rice plants and soil samples from different plots was analyzed during harvesting stage (125 days after transplantation). Cr accumulation was significantly high in surface soils (0-20 cm) with a mean value of 11,170 mg kg(-1), but it decreased significantly after the crop harvest. About 70% to 90% reduction of Cr+6 levels was observed in irrigated mine wastewater when passed through successive rice plots. High bio-concentration of Cr in leaves with values ranging from 125-498 mg kg(-1) as compared to stem (25-400 mg kg(-1)) and grain (5-23 mg kg(-1)) was noticed. The reduction of Cr+6 levels is related to plant age, high biomass and area of water passage and was attributed to rhizofiltration technique.

  14. Variation in grain arsenic assessed in a diverse panel of rice (Oryza sativa) grown in multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Pinson, Shannon R M; Alexander, Jill; McKay, Susan; Hansen, Helle; Duan, Gui-Lan; Rafiqul Islam, M; Islam, Shofiqul; Stroud, Jacqueline L; Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Lahner, Brett; Yakubova, Elena; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Tarpley, Lee; Eizenga, Georgia C; Salt, David E; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2012-02-01

    • Inorganic arsenic (As(i) ) in rice (Oryza sativa) grains is a possible threat to human health, with risk being strongly linked to total dietary rice consumption and consumed rice As(i) content. This study aimed to identify the range and stability of genetic variation in grain arsenic (As) in rice. • Six field trials were conducted (one each in Bangladesh and China, two in Arkansas, USA over 2 yr, and two in Texas, USA comparing flooded and nonflood treatments) on a large number of common rice cultivars (c. 300) representing genetic diversity among international rice cultivars. • Within each field there was a 3-34 fold range in grain As concentration which varied between rice subpopulations. Importantly, As(i) correlated strongly with total As among a subset of 40 cultivars harvested in Bangladesh and China. • Genetic variation at all field sites was a large determining factor for grain As concentration, indicating that cultivars low in grain As could be developed through breeding. The temperate japonicas exhibited lower grain As compared with other subpopulations. Effects for year, location and flooding management were also statistically significant, suggesting that breeding strategies must take into account environmental factors.

  15. Accumulation, translocation and conversion of six arsenic species in rice plants grown near a mine impacted city.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Wang, Lin; Jia, Yuyu; Yang, Zhaoguang

    2017-09-01

    Paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) as the staple food in China was found to be efficient in accumulating arsenic (As) due to cultivated in flooded paddy soil. Uptake and translocation of As in rice plant depended on the As species. In this work, rice plant samples including roots, straws and grains as well as rhizosphere soils were collected from paddy fields near Changsha, a mine impacted city in Southern China. The total As concentrations in the collected samples were observed in the descending order as root > soil > straw > grain. The predominant As species detected in rice plants were inorganic forms: arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. Except monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA), other two organoarsenicals, arsenobetaine (AsB) and arsenocholine (AsC), were also detected in rice plants. DMA and AsB were mainly formed in rice roots with the assistance of microorganisms. MMA and AsC detected in straws might be derived from methylation and oxidation of As(III). The results of multiple linear regressions indicated that the straw As species were remarkable predictors of the corresponding grain As species. Demethylation or degradation of MMA, DMA and AsC were predicted when translocated from straw to grain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative study of endophytic and endophytic diazotrophic bacterial communities across rice landraces grown in the highlands of northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rangjaroen, Chakrapong; Rerkasem, Benjavan; Teaumroong, Neung; Sungthong, Rungroch; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2014-01-01

    Communities of bacterial endophytes within the rice landraces cultivated in the highlands of northern Thailand were studied using fingerprinting data of 16S rRNA and nifH genes profiling by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The bacterial communities' richness, diversity index, evenness, and stability were varied depending on the plant tissues, stages of growth, and rice cultivars. These indices for the endophytic diazotrophic bacteria within the landrace rice Bue Wah Bo were significantly the lowest. The endophytic bacteria revealed greater diversity by cluster analysis with seven clusters compared to the endophytic diazotrophic bacteria (three clusters). Principal component analysis suggested that the endophytic bacteria showed that the community structures across the rice landraces had a higher stability than those of the endophytic diazotrophic bacteria. Uncultured bacteria were found dominantly in both bacterial communities, while higher generic varieties were observed in the endophytic diazotrophic bacterial community. These differences in bacterial communities might be influenced either by genetic variation in the rice landraces or the rice cultivation system, where the nitrogen input affects the endophytic diazotrophic bacterial community.

  17. ON RELATION OF SOIL MOISTURE TO DEVELOPMENT OF RICE BLAST DISEASE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO INOCULATION EXPERIMENTS ON PLANTS GROWN IN SOILS DIFFERING IN MOISTURE AND AMOUNTS OF NITROGENOUS MANURE. PART A-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    humidity and amount of nitrogenous fertilizer . The results of investigation of the natural infection of the adult leaf are also discussed. Using the ash...figure technique, anatomical differences in the adult leaf were studied. Irrespective of the amount of nitrogenous fertilizer applied, rice plants...on dry soil. Plants grown on soil with double the amount of nitrogenous fertilizer but well irrigated were found to be more resistant to rice blast

  18. ON RELATION OF SOIL MOISTURE TO DEVELOPMENT OF RICE BLAST DISEASE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO RESULTS OF INOCULATION EXPERIMENTS ON LEAVES AND SPIKE PEDICELS OF PLANTS GROWN IN SOILS DIFFERING IN MOISTURE AND IN AMOUNTS OF SILICA AND FERTILIZER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    moisture content, and fertilizer and silica application. The susceptibility of the rice plant to rice blast disease varied inversely with the moisture...content of the soil irrespective of the amount of fertilizer or silica applied or of the stage of growth of the plant. Dryness of the soil tended to...fertilization were more easily infected than plants grown on irrigated soil with double the amount of fertilizer . This proves that even with double the

  19. Variations and constancy of mercury and methylmercury accumulation in rice grown at contaminated paddy field sites in three Provinces of China.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Shi, J B; Wang, X; Meng, M; Huang, L; Qi, X L; He, B; Ye, Z H

    2013-10-01

    Many paddy fields have been contaminated by mercury (Hg) in mining areas of China. In this study, twenty-six rice cultivars and three Hg contaminated paddy fields in different geographic regions were selected for field trials and aimed to investigate the variations and similarities in total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) accumulations in brown rice (seeds) across sites. Our results revealed widescale cultivar variation in THg (13-52 ng g(-1) at Wanshan) and MeHg (3.5-23 ng g(-1)) accumulation and %MeHg (17.7-89%) in seeds. The ability to translocate is an important factor in the levels of THg and MeHg in seed. Cultivar tended to stability in THg accumulation across sites. Some cultivars accumulated lower concentrations of both THg and MeHg in seeds at fields seriously contaminated by Hg. Present results suggest that appropriate cultivar selection is a possible way to reduce THg and MeHg accumulation in seeds of rice grown in Hg-contaminated regions.

  20. Nitrogen Fertilizer Deep Placement for Increased Grain Yield and Nitrogen Recovery Efficiency in Rice Grown in Subtropical China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Li, Guilong; Li, Weitao; Liu, Jia; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Chunyu; Li, Zhongpei

    2017-01-01

    Field plot experiments were conducted over 3 years (from April 2014 to November 2016) in a double-rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping system in subtropical China to evaluate the effects of N fertilizer placement on grain yield and N recovery efficiency (NRE). Different N application methods included: no N application (CK); N broadcast application (NBP); N and NPK deep placement (NDP and NPKDP, respectively). Results showed that grain yield and apparent NRE significantly increased for NDP and NPKDP as compared to NBP. The main reason was that N deep placement (NDP) increased the number of productive panicle per m(-2). To further evaluate the increase, a pot experiment was conducted to understand the N supply in different soil layers in NDP during the whole rice growing stage and a (15)N tracing technique was used in a field experiment to investigate the fate of urea-(15)N in the rice-soil system during rice growth and at maturity. The pot experiment indicated that NDP could maintain a higher N supply in deep soil layers than N broadcast for 52 days during rice growth. The (15)N tracing study showed that NDP could maintain much higher fertilizer N in the 5-20 cm soil layer during rice growth and could induce plant to absorb more N from fertilizer and soil than NBP, which led to higher NRE. One important finding was that NDP and NPKDP significantly increased fertilizer NRE but did not lead to N declined in soil compared to NBP. Compared to NPK, NPKDP induced rice plants to absorb more fertilizer N rather than soil N.

  1. Assessing the impact of ambient ozone on growth and yield of a rice (Oryza sativa L.) and a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar grown in the Yangtze Delta, China, using three rates of application of ethylenediurea (EDU).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoke; Zheng, Qiwei; Yao, Fangfang; Chen, Zhan; Feng, Zhaozhong; Manning, W J

    2007-07-01

    Foliar applications of ethylenediurea (abbreviated as EDU) were made at 0, 150, 300 or 450 ppm to field-grown rice and wheat in the Yangtze Delta in China. Rice and wheat responded differently to ambient ozone and EDU applications. For wheat, some growth characteristics, such as yield, seed number per plant, seed set rate and harvest index, increased significantly at 300 ppm EDU treatment, while for rice no parameters measured were statistically different regarding EDU application. The reason may be that the wheat cultivar used may be more sensitive to ozone than the rice cultivar. EDU was effective in demonstrating ozone effects on the wheat cultivar, but not on the rice cultivar. Cultivar sensitivity might be an important consideration when assessing the effects of ambient ozone on plants.

  2. Photosynthesis is induced in rice plants that associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and are grown under arsenate and arsenite stress.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Sara Adrian Lopez; Domingues, Adilson Pereira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    The metalloid arsenic (As) increases in agricultural soils because of anthropogenic activities and may have phytotoxic effects depending on the available concentrations. Plant performance can be improved by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) association under challenging conditions, such as those caused by excessive soil As levels. In this study, the influence of AM on CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll a fluorescence, SPAD-chlorophyll contents and plant growth was investigated in rice plants exposed to arsenate (AsV) or arsenite (AsIII) and inoculated or not with Rhizophagus irregularis. Under AsV and AsIII exposure, AM rice plants had greater biomass accumulation and relative chlorophyll content, increased water-use efficiency, higher carbon assimilation rate and higher stomatal conductance and transpiration rates than non-AM rice plants did. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis revealed significant differences in the response of AM-associated and -non-associated plants to As. Mycorrhization increased the maximum and actual quantum yields of photosystem II and the electron transport rate, maintaining higher values even under As exposure. Apart from the negative effects of AsV and AsIII on the photosynthetic rates and PSII efficiency in rice leaves, taken together, these results indicate that AM is able to sustain higher rice photosynthesis efficiency even under elevated As concentrations, especially when As is present as AsV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic diversity of amylose content and RVA pasting parameters in 20 rice accessions grown in Hainan, China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chuan; Chen, Yaling; Tang, Fufu; Xu, Feifei; Huang, Yan; Chen, Hao; Bao, Jinsong

    2014-10-15

    Starch physicochemical properties determine the eating and cooking quality of rice. The genetic diversity in the apparent amylose content (AAC) and pasting viscosity parameters of 20 geographically diverse rice accessions were investigated. It was found that AAC and pasting viscosities differed widely among different accessions, but each accession performed relatively stably across two environments. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that all traits were predominantly controlled by genotypic variance, but the genotype×environment interaction effects were also significant except for AAC and PT. Significant correlations were found for each parameter between 2years (P<0.001). Association mapping identified a total of 22 main-effect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for all traits except for CPV. This study showed that starch physicochemical properties of rice were highly stable and mainly controlled by genetic factors, and gave insight into the molecular improvement of eating quality using marker assisted breeding with the identified QTLs/genes.

  4. Nitrogen Fertilizer Deep Placement for Increased Grain Yield and Nitrogen Recovery Efficiency in Rice Grown in Subtropical China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; Li, Guilong; Li, Weitao; Liu, Jia; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Chunyu; Li, Zhongpei

    2017-01-01

    Field plot experiments were conducted over 3 years (from April 2014 to November 2016) in a double-rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping system in subtropical China to evaluate the effects of N fertilizer placement on grain yield and N recovery efficiency (NRE). Different N application methods included: no N application (CK); N broadcast application (NBP); N and NPK deep placement (NDP and NPKDP, respectively). Results showed that grain yield and apparent NRE significantly increased for NDP and NPKDP as compared to NBP. The main reason was that N deep placement (NDP) increased the number of productive panicle per m-2. To further evaluate the increase, a pot experiment was conducted to understand the N supply in different soil layers in NDP during the whole rice growing stage and a 15N tracing technique was used in a field experiment to investigate the fate of urea-15N in the rice–soil system during rice growth and at maturity. The pot experiment indicated that NDP could maintain a higher N supply in deep soil layers than N broadcast for 52 days during rice growth. The 15N tracing study showed that NDP could maintain much higher fertilizer N in the 5–20 cm soil layer during rice growth and could induce plant to absorb more N from fertilizer and soil than NBP, which led to higher NRE. One important finding was that NDP and NPKDP significantly increased fertilizer NRE but did not lead to N declined in soil compared to NBP. Compared to NPK, NPKDP induced rice plants to absorb more fertilizer N rather than soil N. PMID:28744302

  5. Seasonal changes in canopy photosynthesis and respiration, and partitioning of photosynthate, in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown under free-air CO2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Haruto; Hara, Takahiro; Ito, Satoshi; Miura, Shu; Hoque, Md Mozammel; Lieffering, Mark; Kim, Han-Yong; Okada, Masumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko

    2005-10-01

    An increase in atmospheric CO(2) concentration ( [CO(2)]) is generally expected to enhance photosynthesis and biomass. Rice plants (Oryza sativa L.) were grown in ambient CO(2) (AMB) or free-air CO(2)-enrichment (FACE), in which the target [CO(2)] was 200 micromol mol(-1) above AMB. (13)CO(2) was fed to the plants at different stages so we could examine the partitioning of photosynthates. Furthermore, canopy photosynthesis and respiration were measured at those stages. The ratio of (13)C content in the whole plant to the amount of fixed (13)C under FACE was similar to that under AMB at the vegetative stage. However, the ratio under FACE was greater than the ratio under AMB at the grain-filling stage. At the vegetative stage, plants grown under FACE had a larger biomass than those grown under AMB owing to enhancement of canopy photosynthesis by the increased [CO(2)]. On the other hand, at the grain-filling stage, CO(2) enrichment promoted the partitioning of photosynthate to ears, and plants grown under FACE had a greater weight of ears. However, enhancement of ear weight by CO(2) enrichment was not as great as that of biomass at the vegetative stage. Plants grown under FACE did not necessarily show higher canopy photosynthetic rates at the grain-filling stage. Therefore, we concluded that the ear weight did not increase as much as biomass at the vegetative stage owing to a loss of the advantage in CO(2) gain during the grain-filling period.

  6. Effects of modified biochar on rhizosphere microecology of rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown in As-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shusi; Lu, Yixin; Yang, Chen; Liu, Chuanping; Ma, Lin; Dang, Zhi

    2017-09-02

    Biochar was carbon-rich and generated by high-temperature pyrolysis of biomass under oxygen-limited conditions. Due to the limitations of surface functional groups and the weakness of surface activity in the field of environmental remediation, the raw biochar frequently was chemically modified to improve its properties with a new performance. In this study, a kind of high-efficiency and low-cost amino biochar modified by nano zero-valent iron (ABC/NZVI) was synthesized and applied to paddy soil contaminated with arsenic (As). Dynamic changes of soil properties, arsenic speciations and rhizosphere microbial communities have been investigated over the whole growth period of rice plants. Pot experiments revealed that the ABC/NZVI could decrease the arsenic concentration in rice straw by 47.9% and increase the content of nitrogen in rice straw by 47.2%. Proportion of Geobacter in soil with ABC/NZVI treatment increased by 175% in tillering period; while Nitrososphaera decreased by 61 and 20% in tillering and maturity, respectively, compared to that of control. ABC/NZVI promotes arsenic immobilization in rhizosphere soil and precipitation on root surface and reduces arsenic accumulation in rice. At the same time, ABC/NZVI would inhibit Nitrososphaera which is related to ammonia oxidation process, and it would have a promising potential as soil amendment to reduce nitrogen loss probably.

  7. Yield and size of oyster mushroom grown on rice/wheat straw basal substrate supplemented with cotton seed hull.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjie; Guo, Fengling; Wan, Zhengjie

    2013-10-01

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) was cultivated on rice straw basal substrate, wheat straw basal substrate, cotton seed hull basal substrate, and wheat straw or rice straw supplemented with different proportions (15%, 30%, and 45% in rice straw substrate, 20%, 30%, and 40% in wheat straw substrate) of cotton seed hull to find a cost effective substrate. The effect of autoclaved sterilized and non-sterilized substrate on growth and yield of oyster mushroom was also examined. Results indicated that for both sterilized substrate and non-sterilized substrate, oyster mushroom on rice straw and wheat basal substrate have faster mycelial growth rate, comparatively poor surface mycelial density, shorter total colonization period and days from bag opening to primordia formation, lower yield and biological efficiency, lower mushroom weight, longer stipe length and smaller cap diameter than that on cotton seed hull basal substrate. The addition of cotton seed hull to rice straw and wheat straw substrate slowed spawn running, primordial development and fruit body formation. However, increasing the amount of cotton seed hull can increase the uniformity and white of mycelium, yield and biological efficiency, and increase mushroom weight, enlarge cap diameter and shorten stipe length. Compared to the sterilized substrate, the non-sterilized substrate had comparatively higher mycelial growth rate, shorter total colonization period and days from bag opening to primordia formation. However, the non-sterilized substrate did not gave significantly higher mushroom yield and biological efficiency than the sterilized substrate, but some undesirable characteristics, i.e. smaller mushroom cap diameter and relatively long stipe length.

  8. Changes in the thermal dissipation and the electron flow in the water-water cycle in rice grown under conditions of physiologically low temperature.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Naoki; Makino, Amane; Ushio, Ayuko; Mae, Tadahiko

    2004-05-01

    Effects of low temperature on chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence, gas exchange rate, the amounts of xanthophyll cycle pigments (Xp) and the activities of several antioxidant enzymes were examined in the 8th leaf of two rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars (japonica and indica types) and rbcS antisense rice. All plants were grown hydroponically at 25/20 degrees C (day/night), and then exposed to 20/17 degrees C (day/night) after full expansion of the 8th leaf, or exposed to either 20/17 degrees C or 15/13 degrees C (day/night) during the expansion of the 8th leaf. All plants exposed to low temperatures showed a decrease in CO(2) assimilation rate without photoinhibition, and increases in the fraction of thermal dissipation in PSII, and in the electron flux through the water-water cycle (WWC) were observed. Although the increase of thermal dissipation was associated with increases in the ratio of carotenoids to Chl, the ratio of Xp to carotenoids and the de-epoxidation state of Xp, the increase of the electron flux of WWC was not accompanied by an increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Such photoprotective responses did not differ between during and after full expansion of the leaf, and did not differ among the three genotypes. Quantitative analyses on the dissipation of excess light energy showed that thermal dissipation makes a larger contribution than WWC. Thus, although low temperature led to a decrease in CO(2) assimilation, rice potentially coped with the excess light energy by increasing the thermal dissipation and the electron flux of WWC under low temperature irrespective of leaf development and genotypes.

  9. Photosynthetic changes of flag leaves during senescence stage in super high-yield hybrid rice LYPJ grown in field condition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwen; Zhang, Jingjing; Yu, Jing; Jiang, Xiaohan; Sun, Lingang; Wu, Min; Chen, Guoxiang; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-09-01

    Photosynthetic activities and thylakoid membrane protein patterns as well as the ultrastructure of chloroplasts in flag leaves were investigated during the senescence processes in high-yield hybrid rice LYPJ under field condition. The earlier decrease of PS I activity than PS II in LYPJ was primarily due to the significant degradation of PS I chlorophyll-protein complex. The degradation rate for each chlorophyll-protein complex was different and the order for the stability of thylakoid membrane complexes during flag leaf senescence in rice LYPJ was: LHCII > OEC > PSII core antenna > PSII core > PSI core > LHCI, which was partly supported by the BN-PAGE gel combined with immunoblot analysis. A decrease in the chlorophyll a/b ratio at the senescence stage was observed to coincide with stability of the LHCII subunits. Ultrastructural investigations revealed that the chloroplasts have large loosen stacking grana without interconnecting stroma thylakoids during the senescence processes. It was hypothesized that the stability of grana thylakoids harboring the major LHCII under high radiation condition in summer might played a key role in the dissipation of excess light energy. This alternative strategy would protect photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage and might be causally related to the high yield of this rice cultivar.

  10. Arsenic affects mineral nutrients in grains of various Indian rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes grown on arsenic-contaminated soils of West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sanjay; Tripathi, R D; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Singh, Ragini; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Preeti; Dave, Richa; Rai, U N; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, P K; Tuli, R; Adhikari, B; Bag, M K

    2010-09-01

    The exposure of paddy fields to arsenic (As) through groundwater irrigation is a serious concern that may not only lead to As accumulation to unacceptable levels but also interfere with mineral nutrients in rice grains. In the present field study, profiling of the mineral nutrients (iron (Fe), phosphorous, zinc, and selenium (Se)) was done in various rice genotypes with respect to As accumulation. A significant genotypic variation was observed in elemental retention on root Fe plaque and their accumulation in various plant parts including grains, specific As uptake (29-167 mg kg(-1) dw), as well as As transfer factor (4-45%). Grains retained the least level of As (0.7-3%) with inorganic As species being the dominant forms, while organic As species, viz., dimethylarsinic acid and monomethylarsonic acid, were non-detectable. In all tested varieties, the level of Se was low (0.05-0.12 mg kg(-1) dw), whereas that of As was high (0.4-1.68 mg kg(-1) dw), considering their safe/recommended daily intake limits, which may not warrant their human consumption. Hence, their utilization may increase the risk of arsenicosis, when grown in As-contaminated areas.

  11. Soil and water warming accelerates phenology and down-regulation of leaf photosynthesis of rice plants grown under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Adachi, Minaco; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Matsunami, Toshinori; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sameshima, Ryoji; Okada, Masumi

    2014-02-01

    To enable prediction of future rice production in a changing climate, we need to understand the interactive effects of temperature and elevated [CO2] (E[CO2]). We therefore examined if the effect of E[CO2] on the light-saturated leaf photosynthetic rate (Asat) was affected by soil and water temperature (NT, normal; ET, elevated) under open-field conditions at the rice free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Shizukuishi, Japan, in 2007 and 2008. Season-long E[CO2] (+200 µmol mol(-1)) increased Asat by 26%, when averaged over two years, temperature regimes and growth stages. The effect of ET (+2°C) on Asat was not significant at active tillering and heading, but became negative and significant at mid-grain filling; Asat in E[CO2]-ET was higher than in ambient [CO2] (A[CO2])-NT by only 4%. Photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2] also became apparent at mid-grain filling; Asat compared at the same [CO2] in the leaf cuvette was significantly lower in plants grown in E[CO2] than in those grown in A[CO2]. The additive effects of E[CO2] and ET decreased Asat by 23% compared with that of A[CO2]-NT plants. Although total crop nitrogen (N) uptake was increased by ET, N allocation to the leaves and to Rubisco was reduced under ET and E[CO2] at mid-grain filling, which resulted in a significant decrease (32%) in the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation on a leaf area basis. Because the change in N allocation was associated with the accelerated phenology in E[CO2]-ET plants, we conclude that soil and water warming accelerates photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2].

  12. Soil and Water Warming Accelerates Phenology and Down-Regulation of Leaf Photosynthesis of Rice Plants Grown Under Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE)

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Minaco; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Matsunami, Toshinori; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sameshima, Ryoji; Okada, Masumi

    2014-01-01

    To enable prediction of future rice production in a changing climate, we need to understand the interactive effects of temperature and elevated [CO2] (E[CO2]). We therefore examined if the effect of E[CO2] on the light-saturated leaf photosynthetic rate (Asat) was affected by soil and water temperature (NT, normal; ET, elevated) under open-field conditions at the rice free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Shizukuishi, Japan, in 2007 and 2008. Season-long E[CO2] (+200 µmol mol−1) increased Asat by 26%, when averaged over two years, temperature regimes and growth stages. The effect of ET (+2°C) on Asat was not significant at active tillering and heading, but became negative and significant at mid-grain filling; Asat in E[CO2]–ET was higher than in ambient [CO2] (A[CO2])–NT by only 4%. Photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2] also became apparent at mid-grain filling; Asat compared at the same [CO2] in the leaf cuvette was significantly lower in plants grown in E[CO2] than in those grown in A[CO2]. The additive effects of E[CO2] and ET decreased Asat by 23% compared with that of A[CO2]–NT plants. Although total crop nitrogen (N) uptake was increased by ET, N allocation to the leaves and to Rubisco was reduced under ET and E[CO2] at mid-grain filling, which resulted in a significant decrease (32%) in the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation on a leaf area basis. Because the change in N allocation was associated with the accelerated phenology in E[CO2]–ET plants, we conclude that soil and water warming accelerates photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2]. PMID:24406632

  13. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System.

    PubMed

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effects of Pi deficiency largely on primary root growth. Here, we report the temporal effects of Pi deficiency in rice genotype MI48 on 15 ontogenetically distinct root traits by using easy-to-assemble and economically viable modified hydroponic system. Effects of Pi deprivation became evident after 4 days- and 7 days-treatments on two and eight different root traits, respectively. The effects of Pi deprivation for 7 days were also evident on different root traits of rice genotype Nagina 22 (N22). There were genotypic differences in the responses of primary root growth along with lateral roots on it and the number and length of seminal and adventitious roots. Notably though, there were attenuating effects of Pi deficiency on the lateral roots on seminal and adventitious roots and total root length in both these genotypes. The study thus revealed both differential and comparable effects of Pi deficiency on different root traits in these genotypes. Pi deficiency also triggered reduction in Pi content and induction of several Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes in roots of MI48. Together, the analyses validated the fidelity of this modified hydroponic system for documenting Pi deficiency-mediated effects not only on different traits of RSA but also on physiological and molecular responses.

  14. Deciphering Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Temporal Effects on Different Root Traits in Rice Grown in a Modified Hydroponic System

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Manisha; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Rai, Vandna; Jain, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient for growth and development of plant, is often limiting in soils. Plants have evolved an array of adaptive strategies including modulation of root system architecture (RSA) for optimal acquisition of Pi. In rice, a major staple food, RSA is complex and comprises embryonically developed primary and seminal roots and post-embryonically developed adventitious and lateral roots. Earlier studies have used variant hydroponic systems for documenting the effects of Pi deficiency largely on primary root growth. Here, we report the temporal effects of Pi deficiency in rice genotype MI48 on 15 ontogenetically distinct root traits by using easy-to-assemble and economically viable modified hydroponic system. Effects of Pi deprivation became evident after 4 days- and 7 days-treatments on two and eight different root traits, respectively. The effects of Pi deprivation for 7 days were also evident on different root traits of rice genotype Nagina 22 (N22). There were genotypic differences in the responses of primary root growth along with lateral roots on it and the number and length of seminal and adventitious roots. Notably though, there were attenuating effects of Pi deficiency on the lateral roots on seminal and adventitious roots and total root length in both these genotypes. The study thus revealed both differential and comparable effects of Pi deficiency on different root traits in these genotypes. Pi deficiency also triggered reduction in Pi content and induction of several Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes in roots of MI48. Together, the analyses validated the fidelity of this modified hydroponic system for documenting Pi deficiency-mediated effects not only on different traits of RSA but also on physiological and molecular responses. PMID:27200025

  15. Organic Rice Production: Challenges and Opportunities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The market demand for organically produced rice has grown steadily with the majority of the acreage now being located in Texas and California. A wide range of organic products are marketed including conventional long and medium grain rice, aromatic or scented rice, rice with colored bran, and rice f...

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity on mice of extract of Ganoderma lucidum grown on rice via modulation of MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Hasnat, Md Abul; Pervin, Mehnaz; Cha, Kyu Min; Kim, Si Kwan; Lim, Beong Ou

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a popular medicinal mushroom with anti-inflammatory potential. In the present study, the aim was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mode of action of G. lucidum grown on germinated brown rice (GLBR) in a mouse model of colitis. It was shown that GLBR suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and decreased the expression of COX-2, TNF-α, iNOS, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNAs. GLBR also inhibited activation of p38, ERK, JNK, MAPKs, and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). In a mouse model of colitis, colonic mucosal injury was evaluated using macroscopic, biochemical, and histopathological testing. Disease activity index (DAI), macroscopic score, and histological score significantly decreased upon GLBR treatment. Moreover, immunofluorescence studies indicated that DSS activates nuclear translocation of NF-κB in colon tissue, which is attenuated by GLBR extract. These findings suggest that GLBR is protective against colitis via inhibition of MAPK phosphorylation and NF-κB activation.

  17. Proteomic analysis for low and high nitrogen-responsive proteins in the leaves of rice genotypes grown at three nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, Khalid Rehman; Chandna, Ruby; Ahmad, Altaf; Qureshi, Mohd Irfan; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2012-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for plants. Increase in crop production is associated with increase in N fertilizers. Excessive use of N fertilizers and the low nitrogen utilization efficiency by crop plants is a major cause for environmental damage. Therefore, to reduce the N-fertilizer pollution, there is an urgent need to improve nitrogen use efficiency. Identification and/or development of genotypes which can grow and yield well at low nitrogen levels may provide a solution. Understanding the molecular mechanism of differential nitrogen use efficiency of the genotypes may provide some clues. Keeping the above facts in mind, in this study we have identified the high N-responsive and low N-responsive contrasting rice genotypes, out of 20 genotypes that were grown at low (1 mM), moderate (10 mM), and high (25 mM) levels of N (KNO(3)). Proteome analysis of leaves revealed that the proteins involved in the energy production/regulation and metabolism in plant leaf tissues are differentially expressed under N treatments. Moreover, some disease-resistant and stress-induced proteins were found to be overexpressed at high levels of N. The present study could be useful in identifying proteins responding to different levels of nitrogen fertilization, which may open new avenues for a better understanding of N use efficiency, and for developing new strategies to enhance N efficiency in cereal crops.

  18. Ethanol Extract of Antrodia camphorata Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Mice with Acute DSS-Induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of Antrodia camphorata (AC) grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) extract was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. CBR suppressed the release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 from lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-)stimulated RAW264.7 cells. CBR inhibited the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-(COX-)2 proteins, and it activated p38-MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK), and NF- κ B in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA expression was reduced in CBR-treated RAW264.7 cells. In concert with in vitro data, CBR suppressed the levels of dextran-sulfate-sodium-(DSS-)induced iNOS and COX-2 proteins in the colon tissue. CBR treatment inhibited activated p38-MAPK, ERK, and NF- κ B proteins in the colon tissue of DSS-induced mice. TNF- α and IL-6 mRNA expression was reduced in DSS+CBR-treated mice. The disease activity index and histological scores were significantly lower in CBR-treated mice (500 mg/kg/day) than in DSS-treated mice (P < 0.05 versus DSS). This is the first report of anti-inflammatory activity of CBR in DSS-induced acute colitis. These results suggest that CBR is a promising, potential agent for preventing acute colitis through the inhibition of NF- κ B signaling and its upstream signaling molecules, including MAPKs.

  19. Ethanol Extract of Antrodia camphorata Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Mice with Acute DSS-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of Antrodia camphorata (AC) grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) extract was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. CBR suppressed the release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 from lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-)stimulated RAW264.7 cells. CBR inhibited the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-(COX-)2 proteins, and it activated p38-MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK), and NF-κB in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA expression was reduced in CBR-treated RAW264.7 cells. In concert with in vitro data, CBR suppressed the levels of dextran-sulfate-sodium-(DSS-)induced iNOS and COX-2 proteins in the colon tissue. CBR treatment inhibited activated p38-MAPK, ERK, and NF-κB proteins in the colon tissue of DSS-induced mice. TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression was reduced in DSS+CBR-treated mice. The disease activity index and histological scores were significantly lower in CBR-treated mice (500 mg/kg/day) than in DSS-treated mice (P < 0.05 versus DSS). This is the first report of anti-inflammatory activity of CBR in DSS-induced acute colitis. These results suggest that CBR is a promising, potential agent for preventing acute colitis through the inhibition of NF-κB signaling and its upstream signaling molecules, including MAPKs. PMID:23818935

  20. Comparison and heritability of major rice end-use quality traits among diverse accessions grown in both tropical and temperate USA environments and genetic marker implications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growing environment has been well-documented as playing a large role in effecting the end-use quality traits of rice. Apparent amylose content (AAC) and gelatinization temperature (GT) are considered to be the two most important end-use quality characteristics in rice, defining the major classes tha...

  1. Seed Priming Alters the Production and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates in Rice Seedlings Grown under Sub-optimal Temperature and Nutrient Supply.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saddam; Khan, Fahad; Cao, Weidong; Wu, Lishu; Geng, Mingjian

    2016-01-01

    The production and detoxification of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) play an important role in the plant response to nutrient and environmental stresses. The present study demonstrated the behavior of growth, ROIs-production and their detoxification in primed and non-primed rice seedlings under chilling stress (18°C) and nitrogen-(N), phosphorus-(P), or potassium-(K) deprivation. The results revealed that chilling stress as well as deprivation of any mineral nutrient severely hampered the seedling growth of rice, however, seed priming treatments (particularly selenium- or salicylic acid-priming), were effective in enhancing the rice growth under stress conditions. The N-deprivation caused the maximum reduction in shoot growth, while the root growth was only decreased by P- or K-deprivation. Although, N-deprivation enhanced the root length of rice, the root fresh weight was unaffected. Rate of lipid peroxidation as well as the production of ROIs, was generally increased under stress conditions; the K-deprived seedlings recorded significantly lower production of ROIs than N- or P-deprived seedlings. The responses of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in rice seedlings to chilling stress were variable with nutrient management regime. All the seed priming were found to trigger or at least maintain the antioxidant defense system of rice seedlings. Notably, the levels of ROIs were significantly reduced by seed priming treatments, which were concomitant with the activities of ROIs-producing enzymes (monoamine oxidase and xanthine oxidase), under all studied conditions. Based on these findings, we put forward the hypothesis that along with role of ROIs-scavenging enzymes, the greater tolerance of primed rice seedlings can also be due to the reduced activity of ROIs-producing enzymes.

  2. Seed Priming Alters the Production and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates in Rice Seedlings Grown under Sub-optimal Temperature and Nutrient Supply

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Saddam; Khan, Fahad; Cao, Weidong; Wu, Lishu; Geng, Mingjian

    2016-01-01

    The production and detoxification of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) play an important role in the plant response to nutrient and environmental stresses. The present study demonstrated the behavior of growth, ROIs-production and their detoxification in primed and non-primed rice seedlings under chilling stress (18°C) and nitrogen-(N), phosphorus-(P), or potassium-(K) deprivation. The results revealed that chilling stress as well as deprivation of any mineral nutrient severely hampered the seedling growth of rice, however, seed priming treatments (particularly selenium- or salicylic acid-priming), were effective in enhancing the rice growth under stress conditions. The N-deprivation caused the maximum reduction in shoot growth, while the root growth was only decreased by P- or K-deprivation. Although, N-deprivation enhanced the root length of rice, the root fresh weight was unaffected. Rate of lipid peroxidation as well as the production of ROIs, was generally increased under stress conditions; the K-deprived seedlings recorded significantly lower production of ROIs than N- or P-deprived seedlings. The responses of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in rice seedlings to chilling stress were variable with nutrient management regime. All the seed priming were found to trigger or at least maintain the antioxidant defense system of rice seedlings. Notably, the levels of ROIs were significantly reduced by seed priming treatments, which were concomitant with the activities of ROIs-producing enzymes (monoamine oxidase and xanthine oxidase), under all studied conditions. Based on these findings, we put forward the hypothesis that along with role of ROIs-scavenging enzymes, the greater tolerance of primed rice seedlings can also be due to the reduced activity of ROIs-producing enzymes. PMID:27092157

  3. Cadmium phytoavailability to rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown in representative Chinese soils. A model to improve soil environmental quality guidelines for food safety.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Muhammad T; Aziz, Rukhsanda; Yang, Xiaoe; Xiao, Wendan; Rafiq, Muhammad K; Ali, Basharat; Li, Tingqiang

    2014-05-01

    Food chain contamination by cadmium (Cd) is globally a serious health concern resulting in chronic abnormalities. Rice is a major staple food of the majority world population, therefore, it is imperative to understand the relationship between the bioavailability of Cd in soils and its accumulation in rice grain. Objectives of this study were to establish environment quality standards for seven different textured soils based on human dietary toxicity, total Cd content in soils and bioavailable portion of Cd in soil. Cadmium concentrations in polished rice grain were best related to total Cd content in Mollisols and Udic Ferrisols with threshold levels of 0.77 and 0.32mgkg(-1), respectively. Contrastingly, Mehlich-3-extractable Cd thresholds were more suitable for Calcaric Regosols, Stagnic Anthrosols, Ustic Cambosols, Typic Haplustalfs and Periudic Argosols with thresholds values of 0.36, 0.22, 0.17, 0.08 and 0.03mgkg(-1), respectively. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that phytoavailability of Cd to rice grain was strongly correlated with Mehlich-3-extractable Cd and soil pH. The empirical model developed in this study explains the combined effects of soil properties and extractable soil Cd content on the phytoavailability of Cd to polished rice grain. This study indicates that accumulation of Cd in rice is influenced greatly by soil type, which should be considered in assessment of soil safety for Cd contamination in rice. This investigation concluded that the selection of proper soil type for food crop production can help us to avoid the toxicity of Cd in our daily diet. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome Wide Association Mapping of Grain Arsenic, Copper, Molybdenum and Zinc in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Grown at Four International Field Sites

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Gareth J.; Douglas, Alex; Lahner, Brett; Yakubova, Elena; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Pinson, Shannon R. M.; Tarpley, Lee; Eizenga, Georgia C.; McGrath, Steve P.; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Islam, M. Rafiqul; Islam, Shofiqul; Duan, Guilan; Zhu, Yongguan; Salt, David E.; Meharg, Andrew A.; Price, Adam H.

    2014-01-01

    The mineral concentrations in cereals are important for human health, especially for individuals who consume a cereal subsistence diet. A number of elements, such as zinc, are required within the diet, while some elements are toxic to humans, for example arsenic. In this study we carry out genome-wide association (GWA) mapping of grain concentrations of arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc in brown rice using an established rice diversity panel of ∼300 accessions and 36.9 k single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The study was performed across five environments: one field site in Bangladesh, one in China and two in the US, with one of the US sites repeated over two years. GWA mapping on the whole dataset and on separate subpopulations of rice revealed a large number of loci significantly associated with variation in grain arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc. Seventeen of these loci were detected in data obtained from grain cultivated in more than one field location, and six co-localise with previously identified quantitative trait loci. Additionally, a number of candidate genes for the uptake or transport of these elements were located near significantly associated SNPs (within 200 kb, the estimated global linkage disequilibrium previously employed in this rice panel). This analysis highlights a number of genomic regions and candidate genes for further analysis as well as the challenges faced when mapping environmentally-variable traits in a highly genetically structured diversity panel. PMID:24586963

  5. Genome wide association mapping of grain arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown at four international field sites.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Douglas, Alex; Lahner, Brett; Yakubova, Elena; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Pinson, Shannon R M; Tarpley, Lee; Eizenga, Georgia C; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Islam, M Rafiqul; Islam, Shofiqul; Duan, Guilan; Zhu, Yongguan; Salt, David E; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2014-01-01

    The mineral concentrations in cereals are important for human health, especially for individuals who consume a cereal subsistence diet. A number of elements, such as zinc, are required within the diet, while some elements are toxic to humans, for example arsenic. In this study we carry out genome-wide association (GWA) mapping of grain concentrations of arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc in brown rice using an established rice diversity panel of ∼ 300 accessions and 36.9 k single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The study was performed across five environments: one field site in Bangladesh, one in China and two in the US, with one of the US sites repeated over two years. GWA mapping on the whole dataset and on separate subpopulations of rice revealed a large number of loci significantly associated with variation in grain arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc. Seventeen of these loci were detected in data obtained from grain cultivated in more than one field location, and six co-localise with previously identified quantitative trait loci. Additionally, a number of candidate genes for the uptake or transport of these elements were located near significantly associated SNPs (within 200 kb, the estimated global linkage disequilibrium previously employed in this rice panel). This analysis highlights a number of genomic regions and candidate genes for further analysis as well as the challenges faced when mapping environmentally-variable traits in a highly genetically structured diversity panel.

  6. Investigating the Potential for Rice Production with Sprinkler Irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Almost all rice (Oryza sativa L.) produced in the US Mid-South is grown in a flooded culture that requires considerably more irrigation water than other crops grown in the region. One approach investigated for reducing the water requirements for rice involved producing rice with sprinkler irrigation...

  7. Cost-effective enhanced iron bioavailability in rice grain grown on calcareous soil by sulfur mediation and its effect on heavy metals mineralization.

    PubMed

    Ramzani, Pia Muhammad Adnan; Khalid, Muhammad; Anjum, Shazia; Khan, Waqas-Ud-Din; Ali, Shafaqat; Hannan, Fakhir; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Calcareous soil, high pH, and low organic matter are the major factors that limit iron (Fe) availability to rice crop. The present study was planned with the aim to biofortified rice grain with Fe, by integrated use of chemical and organic amendments in pH-manipulated calcareous soil. The soil pH was reduced (pHL2) by using elemental sulfur (S) at the rate of 0.25 % (w/w). The organic amendments, biochar (BC) and poultry manure (PM) [1 % (w/w)], along with ferrous sulfate at the rate of 7.5 mg kg(-1) soil were used. The incorporation of Fe with BC in soil at pHL2 significantly improved plant biomass, photosynthetic rate, and paddy yield up to 99, 97, and 36 %, respectively, compared to control. A significant increase in grain Fe (190 %), protein (58 %), and ferritin (400 %) contents was observed while anti-nutrients, i.e., polyphenols (37 %) and phytate (21 %) were significantly decreased by the addition of Fe and BC in soil at pHL2 relative to control. Among the organic amendments, PM significantly increased Cd, Pb, Ni, and Cr concentrations in rice grain relative to control but their concentration values were below as compared to the toxic limits of hazard quotients and hazard index (HQ and HI). Hence, this study implies that Fe applied with BC in the soil at pHL2 can be considered as an effective strategy to augment Fe bioavailability and to reduce non-essential heavy metal accumulation in rice grain.

  8. Fine-mapping of qRL6.1, a major QTL for root length of rice seedlings grown under a wide range of NH4(+) concentrations in hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Obara, Mitsuhiro; Tamura, Wataru; Ebitani, Takeshi; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Tadashi; Yamaya, Tomoyuki

    2010-08-01

    Root system development is an important target for improving yield in cereal crops. Active root systems that can take up nutrients more efficiently are essential for enhancing grain yield. In this study, we attempted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in root system development by measuring root length of rice seedlings grown in hydroponic culture. Reliable growth conditions for estimating the root length were first established to renew nutrient solutions daily and supply NH4(+) as a single nitrogen source. Thirty-eight chromosome segment substitution lines derived from a cross between 'Koshihikari', a japonica variety, and 'Kasalath', an indica variety, were used to detect QTL for seminal root length of seedlings grown in 5 or 500 microM NH4(+). Eight chromosomal regions were found to be involved in root elongation. Among them, the most effective QTL was detected on a 'Kasalath' segment of SL-218, which was localized to the long-arm of chromosome 6. The 'Kasalath' allele at this QTL, qRL6.1, greatly promoted root elongation under all NH4(+) concentrations tested. The genetic effect of this QTL was confirmed by analysis of the near-isogenic line (NIL) qRL6.1. The seminal root length of the NIL was 13.5-21.1% longer than that of 'Koshihikari' under different NH4(+) concentrations. Toward our goal of applying qRL6.1 in a molecular breeding program to enhance rice yield, a candidate genomic region of qRL6.1 was delimited within a 337 kb region in the 'Nipponbare' genome by means of progeny testing of F2 plants/F3 lines derived from a cross between SL-218 and 'Koshihikari'.

  9. Non-Destructive Monitoring of Rice by Hyperspectral In-Field Spectrometry and Uav-Based Remote Sensing: Case Study of Field-Grown Rice in North Rhine-Westphalia Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willkomm, M.; Bolten, A.; Bareth, G.

    2016-06-01

    In the context of an increasing world population, the demand for agricultural crops is continuously rising. Especially rice plays a key role in food security, not only in Asia. To increase crop production of rice, either productivity of plants has to be improved or new cultivation areas have to be found. In this context, our study investigated crop growth of paddy rice (Oryza Sativa J.) in Germany. An experimental field in the vegetation period of 2014 with two nitrogen treatments was conducted using remote sensing methods. The research project focussed on two main aspects: (1) the potential of UAV-based and hyperspectral remote sensing methods to monitor selected growth parameters at different phenological stages; (2) the potential of paddy rice cultivation under the present climate condition in western Germany. We applied a low-cost UAV-system (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) to generate high resolution Crop Surface Models (CSM). These were compared with hyperspectral in-field measurements and directly measured agronomic parameters (fresh and dry aboveground biomass (AGB), leaf-area-index (LAI) and plant nitrogen concentration (PNC)). For all acquisition dates we could determine single in-field structures in the CSM (e.g. distribution of hills) and different growth characteristics between the nitrogen treatments. Especially in the second half of the growing season, the plants with higher nitrogen availability were about 25 - 30 % larger. The plant height in the CSM correlates particularly with fresh AGB and the LAI (R2 > 0.8). Thus, the conducted methods for plant growth monitoring can be a contribution for precision agriculture approaches.

  10. Restricting the above ground sink corrects the root/shoot ratio and substantially boosts the yield potential per panicle in field-grown rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Nada, Reham M; Abogadallah, Gaber M

    2016-04-01

    Rice has shallow, weak roots, but it is unknown how much increase in yield potential could be achieved if the root/shoot ratio is corrected. Removing all tillers except the main one, in a japonica (Sakha 101) and an indica (IR64) rice cultivar, instantly increased the root/shoot ratio from 0.21 to 1.16 in Sakha 101 and from 0.16 to 1.46 in IR64. Over 30 days after detillering, the root/shoot ratios of the detillered plants decreased to 0.49 in Sakha 101 and 0.46 in IR64 but remained significantly higher than in the controls. The detillered plants showed two- or fourfold increase in the main tiller fresh weight, as a consequence of more positive midday leaf relative water content (RWC), and consistently higher rates of stomatal conductance and photosynthesis, but not transpiration, compared with the controls. The enhanced photosynthesis in Sakha 101 after detillering resulted from both improved water status and higher Rubisco contents whereas in IR64, increasing the Rubisco content did not contribute to improving photosynthesis. Detillering did not increase the carbohydrate contents of leaves but prevented starch depletion at the end of grain filling. The leaf protein content during vegetative and reproductive stages, the grain filling rate, the number of filled grains per panicle were greatly improved, bringing about 38.3 and 35.9% increase in the harvested grain dry weight per panicle in Sakha 101 and IR64, respectively. We provide evidence that improving the root performance by increasing the root/shoot ratio would eliminate the current limitations to photosynthesis and growth in rice. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  11. Characterizing irrigation water requirements for rice production from the Arkansas Rice Research Verification Program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated rice irrigation water use in the University of Arkansas Rice Research Verification Program between the years of 2003 and 2011. Irrigation water use averaged 747 mm (29.4 inches) over the nine years. A significant 40% water savings was reported for rice grown under a zero gr...

  12. Effect of land preparation methods on growth, seed yields of Jasmine 105 paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) and growth of weeds, grown in Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisa-Ard, K

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was carried out on a grower's paddy field, Ban Som Hoeng Village, Kantarawichai, Mahasarakham Province, Northeast Thailand with the use of Roi-Et soil series (Oxic Paleustults) in the rainy season of the 2006 (May to November) to investigate effect of land preparation methods on rice plant heights, amounts of weeds and seed yields of Jasmine 105 aromatic paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.). The experiment was laid in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications. The results showed that plant height due to treatments was significantly highest for T3 but T3 was similar to T2, whilst T1 (control) was the least. Mean values of dry weight of narrow leaf type of weeds, in most cases, were significantly lowest with T3 followed by T2 and T3, particularly at the final two sampling periods. Broad leaf type of weeds was significantly highest with T2 throughout the experimental period, whilst T1 and T3, in most cases, were similar. Unfilled seeds were significantly highest with T3 but similar to T1 but T2 was the lowest, whilst filled seeds were significantly highest with T3, both T1 and T2 gave a similar weight. Numbers of panicles m(-2) were significantly highest with T3 but T3 was similar to T2, whilst T1 was the least. Seed size or 1000-seed weight was significantly highest with T3, whilst T2 and T1 were similar. Seed yield was highest and highly significant with T3 (1,136.25 kg ha(-1)) but T3 was similar to T2 (1,083.31 kg ha(-1)), whilst T1 was the lowest (487.50 kg ha(-1)). Land preparation method of T3 treatment may be recommended as the first choice, whilst T2 may be used as an alternative choice.

  13. Fine-mapping of qRL6.1, a major QTL for root length of rice seedlings grown under a wide range of NH4+ concentrations in hydroponic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Wataru; Ebitani, Takeshi; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Tadashi; Yamaya, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Root system development is an important target for improving yield in cereal crops. Active root systems that can take up nutrients more efficiently are essential for enhancing grain yield. In this study, we attempted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in root system development by measuring root length of rice seedlings grown in hydroponic culture. Reliable growth conditions for estimating the root length were first established to renew nutrient solutions daily and supply NH4+ as a single nitrogen source. Thirty-eight chromosome segment substitution lines derived from a cross between ‘Koshihikari’, a japonica variety, and ‘Kasalath’, an indica variety, were used to detect QTL for seminal root length of seedlings grown in 5 or 500 μM NH4+. Eight chromosomal regions were found to be involved in root elongation. Among them, the most effective QTL was detected on a ‘Kasalath’ segment of SL-218, which was localized to the long-arm of chromosome 6. The ‘Kasalath’ allele at this QTL, qRL6.1, greatly promoted root elongation under all NH4+ concentrations tested. The genetic effect of this QTL was confirmed by analysis of the near-isogenic line (NIL) qRL6.1. The seminal root length of the NIL was 13.5–21.1% longer than that of ‘Koshihikari’ under different NH4+ concentrations. Toward our goal of applying qRL6.1 in a molecular breeding program to enhance rice yield, a candidate genomic region of qRL6.1 was delimited within a 337 kb region in the ‘Nipponbare’ genome by means of progeny testing of F2 plants/F3 lines derived from a cross between SL-218 and ‘Koshihikari’. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1328-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20390245

  14. Blackbirds and the southern rice crop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meanley, Brooke

    1971-01-01

    In the 1700's and 1800's, rice was grown in the lowlands of South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina - on the major migratory route of the bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), the historic "ricebird" of that area because of its consumption of ripening rice. By the late 1800's the rice-growing industry had largely shifted to the coastal prairies of Louisiana and Texas, which are bordered by some 5 million acres of marshland-breeding habitat for the redwinged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) and the boat-tailed grackle (Cassidix mexicanus). By 1900, rice was being grown on the Grand Prairie of eastern Arkansas, which bestrides the largest blackbird flyway in the country. In recent decades, rice culture has spread to other sections of Arkansas and thence to contiguous areas in Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennesee, and Missouri. In effect, then, man has taken the rice to the blackbirds.

  15. Diagnostics of the red rice problem in the U.S.A

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice was first grown in the United States in what is now North Carolina and South Carolina at the end of the 17th century. At the beginning of the 20th century, rice was being grown in North and South Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana (LA), and Arkansas (AR). Different red rice biotypes, including “str...

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions, irrigation water use, and arsenic concentrations; a common thread in rice water management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice has historically been grown as a flooded crop in the United States. As competition for water resources has grown, there is interest in reducing water use in rice production so as to maintain a viable and sustainable rice industry into the future. An irrigation study was established in 2011 at ...

  17. Identification of rice blast resistance genes using international monogenic differentials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast disease, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases of rice that severely affects crop production in Jilin Province, Northeast China, where temperate japonica rice is primarily grown. In the present study, 44 representative local blast isolat...

  18. Evapotranspiration measurement and modeling in Mid-South irrigated rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nearly 75% of US rice is grown in the humid mid-South. Rice requires more water to produce than other crops (corn, soybean, and cotton). The identification of rice evapotranspiration and irrigation demand is paramount to understand regional water use and water allocation. Drill-seeded, commercial si...

  19. Four new rice varieties for specialty markets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although conventional long grain rice varieties are grown on over 75% of the acreage in the US, there is interest in developing rice cultivars which possess specific qualities required for certain value-added markets. USDA ARS researchers at Beaumont, TX and Stuttgart, AR, in various collaborations ...

  20. Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice inhibits HT-29 human colon carcinoma proliferation through inducing G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis by targeting the β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Ki; Lim, Yoong Ho; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-08-01

    Antrodia camphorata (AC) has been used as a traditional medicine to treat food and drug intoxication, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypertension, pruritis (skin itch), and liver cancer in East Asia. In this study, we investigated anticancer activities of AC grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We found that the inhibitory efficacy of CBR 80% ethanol (EtOH) extract on HT-29 and CT-26 cell proliferation was more effective than ordinary AC EtOH 80% extract. Next, 80% EtOH extract of CBR was further separated into four fractions; hexane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), butanol (BuOH), and water. Among them, CBR EtOAc fraction showed the strongest inhibitory activity against HT-29 cell proliferation. Therefore, CBR EtOAc fraction was chosen for further studies. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate staining data indicated that CBR EtOAc fraction induced apoptosis. Induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest on human colon carcinoma cell was observed in CBR EtOAc fraction-treated cells. We found that CBR decreased the level of proteins involved in G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. CBR EtOAc fraction inhibited the β-catenin signaling pathway, supporting its suppressive activity on the level of cyclin D1. High performance liquid chromatography analysis data indicated that CBR EtOAc fraction contained adenosine. This is the first investigation that CBR has a greater potential as a novel chemopreventive agent than AC against colon cancer. These data suggest that CBR might be useful as a chemopreventive agent against colorectal cancer.

  1. The 3,000 rice genomes project: new opportunities and challenges for future rice research.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yang; Wang, Jun; Zeigler, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Rice is the world's most important staple grown by millions of small-holder farmers. Sustaining rice production relies on the intelligent use of rice diversity. The 3,000 Rice Genomes Project is a giga-dataset of publically available genome sequences (averaging 14× depth of coverage) derived from 3,000 accessions of rice with global representation of genetic and functional diversity. The seed of these accessions is available from the International Rice Genebank Collection. Together, they are an unprecedented resource for advancing rice science and breeding technology. Our immediate challenge now is to comprehensively and systematically mine this dataset to link genotypic variation to functional variation with the ultimate goal of creating new and sustainable rice varieties that can support a future world population that will approach 9.6 billion by 2050.

  2. Origin, dispersal, cultivation and variation of rice.

    PubMed

    Khush, G S

    1997-09-01

    There are two cultivated and twenty-one wild species of genus Oryza. O. sativa, the Asian cultivated rice is grown all over the world. The African cultivated rice, O. glaberrima is grown on a small scale in West Africa. The genus Oryza probably originated about 130 million years ago in Gondwanaland and different species got distributed into different continents with the breakup of Gondwanaland. The cultivated species originated from a common ancestor with AA genome. Perennial and annual ancestors of O. sativa are O. rufipogon and O. nivara and those of O. glaberrima are O. longistaminata, O. breviligulata and O. glaberrima probably domesticated in Niger river delta. Varieties of O. sativa are classified into six groups on the basis of genetic affinity. Widely known indica rices correspond to group I and japonicas to group VI. The so called javanica rices also belong to group VI and are designated as tropical japonicas in contrast to temperate japonicas grown in temperate climate. Indica and japonica rices had a polyphyletic origin. Indicas were probably domesticated in the foothills of Himalayas in Eastern India and japonicas somewhere in South China. The indica rices dispersed throughout the tropics and subtropics from India. The japonica rices moved northward from South China and became the temperate ecotype. They also moved southward to Southeast Asia and from there to West Africa and Brazil and became tropical ecotype. Rice is now grown between 55 degrees N and 36 degrees S latitudes. It is grown under diverse growing conditions such as irrigated, rainfed lowland, rainfed upland and floodprone ecosystems. Human selection and adaptation to diverse environments has resulted in numerous cultivars. It is estimated that about 120,000 varieties of rice exist in the world. After the establishment of International Rice Research Institute in 1960, rice varietal improvement was intensified and high yielding varieties were developed. These varieties are now planted to 70

  3. Tropical Legume Crop Rotation and Nitrogen Fertilizer Effects on Agronomic and Nitrogen Efficiency of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Motior M.; Islam, Aminul M.; Azirun, Sofian M.; Boyce, Amru N.

    2014-01-01

    Bush bean, long bean, mung bean, and winged bean plants were grown with N fertilizer at rates of 0, 2, 4, and 6 g N m−2 preceding rice planting. Concurrently, rice was grown with N fertilizer at rates of 0, 4, 8, and 12 g N m−2. No chemical fertilizer was used in the 2nd year of crop to estimate the nitrogen agronomic efficiency (NAE), nitrogen recovery efficiency (NRE), N uptake, and rice yield when legume crops were grown in rotation with rice. Rice after winged bean grown with N at the rate of 4 g N m−2 achieved significantly higher NRE, NAE, and N uptake in both years. Rice after winged bean grown without N fertilizer produced 13–23% higher grain yield than rice after fallow rotation with 8 g N m−2. The results revealed that rice after winged bean without fertilizer and rice after long bean with N fertilizer at the rate of 4 g N m−2 can produce rice yield equivalent to that of rice after fallow with N fertilizer at rates of 8 g N m−2. The NAE, NRE, and harvest index values for rice after winged bean or other legume crop rotation indicated a positive response for rice production without deteriorating soil fertility. PMID:24971378

  4. Tropical legume crop rotation and nitrogen fertilizer effects on agronomic and nitrogen efficiency of rice.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Motior M; Islam, Aminul M; Azirun, Sofian M; Boyce, Amru N

    2014-01-01

    Bush bean, long bean, mung bean, and winged bean plants were grown with N fertilizer at rates of 0, 2, 4, and 6 g N m(-2) preceding rice planting. Concurrently, rice was grown with N fertilizer at rates of 0, 4, 8, and 12 g N m(-2). No chemical fertilizer was used in the 2nd year of crop to estimate the nitrogen agronomic efficiency (NAE), nitrogen recovery efficiency (NRE), N uptake, and rice yield when legume crops were grown in rotation with rice. Rice after winged bean grown with N at the rate of 4 g N m(-2) achieved significantly higher NRE, NAE, and N uptake in both years. Rice after winged bean grown without N fertilizer produced 13-23% higher grain yield than rice after fallow rotation with 8 g N m(-2). The results revealed that rice after winged bean without fertilizer and rice after long bean with N fertilizer at the rate of 4 g N m(-2) can produce rice yield equivalent to that of rice after fallow with N fertilizer at rates of 8 g N m(-2). The NAE, NRE, and harvest index values for rice after winged bean or other legume crop rotation indicated a positive response for rice production without deteriorating soil fertility.

  5. Preferential Association of Endophytic Bradyrhizobia with Different Rice Cultivars and Its Implications for Rice Endophyte Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Greetatorn, Teerana; Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Okubo, Takashi; Shinoda, Ryo; Nuntakij, Achara; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn

    2015-01-01

    Plant colonization by bradyrhizobia is found not only in leguminous plants but also in nonleguminous species such as rice. To understand the evolution of the endophytic symbiosis of bradyrhizobia, the effect of the ecosystems of rice plantations on their associations was investigated. Samples were collected from various rice (Oryza sativa) tissues and crop rotational systems. The rice endophytic bradyrhizobia were isolated on the basis of oligotrophic properties, selective medium, and nodulation on siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum). Six bradyrhizobial strains were obtained exclusively from rice grown in a crop rotational system. The isolates were separated into photosynthetic bradyrhizobia (PB) and nonphotosynthetic bradyrhizobia (non-PB). Thai bradyrhizobial strains promoted rice growth of Thai rice cultivars better than the Japanese bradyrhizobial strains. This implies that the rice cultivars possess characteristics that govern rice-bacterium associations. To examine whether leguminous plants in a rice plantation system support the persistence of rice endophytic bradyrhizobia, isolates were tested for legume nodulation. All PB strains formed symbioses with Aeschynomene indica and Aeschynomene evenia. On the other hand, non-PB strains were able to nodulate Aeschynomene americana, Vigna radiata, and M. atropurpureum but unable to nodulate either A. indica or A. evenia. Interestingly, the nodABC genes of all of these bradyrhizobial strains seem to exhibit low levels of similarity to those of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA110 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285. From these results, we discuss the evolution of the plant-bradyrhizobium association, including nonlegumes, in terms of photosynthetic lifestyle and nod-independent interactions. PMID:25710371

  6. Production of rice straw hydrolysis enzymes by the fungi Trichoderma reesei and Humicola insolens using rice straw as a carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Takashi; Yoshida, Yuki; Koganei, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2017-02-11

    Rice straw was evaluated as a carbon source for the fungi, Trichoderma reesei and Humicola insolens, to produce enzymes for rice straw hydrolysis. The enzyme activity of T. reesei and H. insolens cultivated in medium containing non-treated rice straw were almost equivalent to the enzyme of T. reesei cultivated in Avicel medium, a form of refined cellulose. The enzyme activity of T. reesei cultivated in medium containing NH4OH-treated rice straw was 4-fold higher than enzyme from cultures grown in Avicel medium. In contrast, H. insolens enzyme from cultures grown in NH4OH-treated rice straw had significantly lower activity compared with non-treated rice straw or Avicel. The combined use of T. reesei and H. insolens enzymes resulted in a significant synergistic enhancement in enzymatic activity. Our data suggest that rice straw is a promising low-cost carbon source for fungal enzyme production for rice straw hydrolysis.

  7. In vivo assessment of arsenic bioavailability in rice and its significance for human health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Juhasz, Albert L; Smith, Euan; Weber, John; Rees, Matthew; Rofe, Allan; Kuchel, Tim; Sansom, Lloyd; Naidu, Ravi

    2006-12-01

    Millions of people worldwide consume arsenic-contaminated rice; however, little is known about the uptake and bioavailability of arsenic species after arsenic-contaminated rice ingestion. In this study, we assessed arsenic speciation in greenhouse-grown and supermarket-bought rice, and determined arsenic bioavailability in cooked rice using an in vivo swine model. In supermarket-bought rice, arsenic was present entirely in the inorganic form compared to greenhouse-grown rice (using irrigation water contaminated with sodium arsenate), where most (approximately 86%) arsenic was present as dimethylarsinic acid (organic arsenic). Because of the low absolute bioavailability of dimethylarsinic acid and the high proportion of dimethylarsinic acid in greenhouse-grown rice, only 33 +/- 3% (mean +/- SD) of the total rice-bound arsenic was bioavailable. Conversely, in supermarket-bought rice cooked in water contaminated with sodium arsenate, arsenic was present entirely in the inorganic form, and bioavailability was high (89 +/- 9%). These results indicate that arsenic bioavailability in rice is highly dependent on arsenic speciation, which in turn can vary depending on rice cultivar, arsenic in irrigation water, and the presence and nature of arsenic speciation in cooking water. Arsenic speciation and bioavailability are therefore critical parameters for reducing uncertainties when estimating exposure from the consumption of rice grown and cooked using arsenic-contaminated water.

  8. Reducing water use for rice production with remote monitoring and control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice is an important food crop worldwide and farmers in the Lower Mississippi Water Resource Area of the U.S. grew 68% of the total U.S. crop. U.S.-produced rice is grown almost exclusively in a flooded culture and the water applied to rice has resulted in high energy costs and water shortages in so...

  9. Effect of irrigation and silicon fertilizer on total rice grain arsenic content and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field tests were conducted for two years with rice grown with different irrigation systems and rates of calcium silicate fertilizer to determine the effects on brown rice arsenic (As) levels and rough rice yields. Irrigation systems were sprinkler irrigation using a center pivot system, intermitten...

  10. Characterization of molecular identity and pathogenicity of rice blast fungus in Hunan province of China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characterization of molecular identity and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus benefits the deployment of effective blast resistance (R) genes. In order to identify blast resistance genes in rice producing areas where most of the hybrid rice is grown in Hunan province, 182 M. oryzae strains were ...

  11. In Vivo Assessment of Arsenic Bioavailability in Rice and Its Significance for Human Health Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, Albert L.; Smith, Euan; Weber, John; Rees, Matthew; Rofe, Allan; Kuchel, Tim; Sansom, Lloyd; Naidu, Ravi

    2006-01-01

    Background Millions of people worldwide consume arsenic-contaminated rice; however, little is known about the uptake and bioavailability of arsenic species after arsenic-contaminated rice ingestion. Objectives In this study, we assessed arsenic speciation in greenhouse-grown and supermarket-bought rice, and determined arsenic bioavailability in cooked rice using an in vivo swine model. Results In supermarket-bought rice, arsenic was present entirely in the inorganic form compared to greenhouse-grown rice (using irrigation water contaminated with sodium arsenate), where most (~ 86%) arsenic was present as dimethylarsinic acid (organic arsenic). Because of the low absolute bioavailability of dimethylarsinic acid and the high proportion of dimethylarsinic acid in greenhouse-grown rice, only 33 ± 3% (mean ± SD) of the total rice-bound arsenic was bioavailable. Conversely, in supermarket-bought rice cooked in water contaminated with sodium arsenate, arsenic was present entirely in the inorganic form, and bioavailability was high (89 ± 9%). Conclusions These results indicate that arsenic bioavailability in rice is highly dependent on arsenic speciation, which in turn can vary depending on rice cultivar, arsenic in irrigation water, and the presence and nature of arsenic speciation in cooking water. Arsenic speciation and bioavailability are therefore critical parameters for reducing uncertainties when estimating exposure from the consumption of rice grown and cooked using arsenic-contaminated water. PMID:17185270

  12. Cytoplasmic-genetic male sterility gene provides direct evidence for some hybrid rice recently evolving into weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingxu; Lu, Zuomei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Peng, Yufa; Valverde, Bernal E.; Qiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Weedy rice infests paddy fields worldwide at an alarmingly increasing rate. There is substantial evidence indicating that many weedy rice forms originated from or are closely related to cultivated rice. There is suspicion that the outbreak of weedy rice in China may be related to widely grown hybrid rice due to its heterosis and the diversity of its progeny, but this notion remains unsupported by direct evidence. We screened weedy rice accessions by both genetic and molecular marker tests for the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes (Wild abortive, WA, and Boro type, BT) most widely used in the production of indica and japonica three-line hybrid rice as a diagnostic trait of direct parenthood. Sixteen weedy rice accessions of the 358 tested (4.5%) contained the CMS-WA gene; none contained the CMS-BT gene. These 16 accessions represent weedy rices recently evolved from maternal hybrid rice derivatives, given the primarily maternal inheritance of this trait. Our results provide key direct evidence that hybrid rice can be involved in the evolution of some weedy rice accessions, but is not a primary factor in the recent outbreak of weedy rice in China. PMID:26012494

  13. Cytoplasmic-genetic male sterility gene provides direct evidence for some hybrid rice recently evolving into weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxu; Lu, Zuomei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Peng, Yufa; Valverde, Bernal E; Qiang, Sheng

    2015-05-27

    Weedy rice infests paddy fields worldwide at an alarmingly increasing rate. There is substantial evidence indicating that many weedy rice forms originated from or are closely related to cultivated rice. There is suspicion that the outbreak of weedy rice in China may be related to widely grown hybrid rice due to its heterosis and the diversity of its progeny, but this notion remains unsupported by direct evidence. We screened weedy rice accessions by both genetic and molecular marker tests for the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes (Wild abortive, WA, and Boro type, BT) most widely used in the production of indica and japonica three-line hybrid rice as a diagnostic trait of direct parenthood. Sixteen weedy rice accessions of the 358 tested (4.5%) contained the CMS-WA gene; none contained the CMS-BT gene. These 16 accessions represent weedy rices recently evolved from maternal hybrid rice derivatives, given the primarily maternal inheritance of this trait. Our results provide key direct evidence that hybrid rice can be involved in the evolution of some weedy rice accessions, but is not a primary factor in the recent outbreak of weedy rice in China.

  14. Construction and validation of a 45K rice oligonucleotide array

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have constructed and validated a 43,311 oligonucleotide (oligos, 50-70-mers) gene array (NSF 45K) based on 45,116 gene models from release 3 of The Institute for Genomic Research's rice pseudomolecules. To test the array, we generated expression profiles on light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue...

  15. Natural rice rhizospheric microbes suppress rice blast infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The natural interactions between plant roots and their rhizospheric microbiome are vital to plant fitness, modulating both growth promotion and disease suppression. In rice (Oryza sativa), a globally important food crop, as much as 30% of yields are lost due to blast disease caused by fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Capitalizing on the abilities of naturally occurring rice soil bacteria to reduce M. oryzae infections could provide a sustainable solution to reduce the amount of crops lost to blast disease. Results Naturally occurring root-associated rhizospheric bacteria were isolated from California field grown rice plants (M-104), eleven of which were taxonomically identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Bacterial isolates were tested for biocontrol activity against the devastating foliar rice fungal pathogen, M. oryzae pathovar 70–15. In vitro, a Pseudomonas isolate, EA105, displayed antibiosis through reducing appressoria formation by nearly 90% as well as directly inhibiting fungal growth by 76%. Although hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a volatile commonly produced by biocontrol pseudomonads, the activity of EA105 seems to be independent of its HCN production. During in planta experiments, EA105 reduced the number of blast lesions formed by 33% and Pantoea agglomerans isolate, EA106 by 46%. Our data also show both EA105 and EA106 trigger jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) dependent induced systemic resistance (ISR) response in rice. Conclusions Out of 11 bacteria isolated from rice soil, pseudomonad EA105 most effectively inhibited the growth and appressoria formation of M. oryzae through a mechanism that is independent of cyanide production. In addition to direct antagonism, EA105 also appears to trigger ISR in rice plants through a mechanism that is dependent on JA and ET signaling, ultimately resulting in fewer blast lesions. The application of native bacteria as biocontrol agents in combination with

  16. An overview of global rice production, supply, trade, and consumption.

    PubMed

    Muthayya, Sumithra; Sugimoto, Jonathan D; Montgomery, Scott; Maberly, Glen F

    2014-09-01

    Rice is the staple food for over half the world's population. Approximately 480 million metric tons of milled rice is produced annually. China and India alone account for ∼50% of the rice grown and consumed. Rice provides up to 50% of the dietary caloric supply for millions living in poverty in Asia and is, therefore, critical for food security. It is becoming an important food staple in both Latin America and Africa. Record increases in rice production have been observed since the start of the Green Revolution. However, rice remains one of the most protected food commodities in world trade. Rice is a poor source of vitamins and minerals, and losses occur during the milling process. Populations that subsist on rice are at high risk of vitamin and mineral deficiency. Improved technologies to fortify rice have the potential to address these deficiencies and their associated adverse health effects. With the rice industry consolidating in many countries, there are opportunities to fortify a significant share of rice for distribution or for use in government safety net programs that target those most in need, especially women and children. Multisectoral approaches are needed for the promotion and implementation of rice fortification in countries.

  17. Barnyard grass-induced rice allelopathy and momilactone B.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2011-07-01

    Here, we investigated chemical-mediated interaction between crop and weeds. Allelopathic activity of rice seedlings exhibited 5.3-6.3-fold increases when rice and barnyard grass seedlings were grown together, where there may be the competitive interference between rice and barnyard grass for nutrients. Barnyard grass is one of the most noxious weeds in rice cultivation. The momilactone B concentration in rice seedlings incubated with barnyard grass seedlings was 6.9-fold greater than that in rice seedlings incubated independently. Low nutrient growth conditions also increased allelopathic activity and momilactone B concentrations in rice seedlings. However, the increases in the low nutrient-induced allelopathic activity and momilactone B concentration were much lower than those in barnyard grass-induced allelopathic activity and momilactone B concentration. Root exudates of barnyard grass seedlings increased allelopathic activity and momilactone B concentration in rice seedlings at concentrations greater than 30 mg/L of the root exudates, and increasing the exudate concentration increased the activity and momilactone B concentration. Therefore, barnyard grass-induced allelopathic activity of rice seedlings may be caused not only by nutrient competition between two species, but also by components in barnyard grass root exudates. As momilactone B shows strong allelopathic activities, barnyard grass-induced allelopathic activity of rice may be due to the increased concentration of momilactone B in rice seedlings. The present research suggests that rice may respond to the presence of neighboring barnyard grass by sensing the components in barnyard grass root exudates and increasing allelopathic activity by production of elevated concentration of momilactone B. Thus, rice allelopathy may be one of the inducible defense mechanisms by chemical-mediated plant interaction between rice and barnyard grass, and the induced-allelopathy may provide a competitive advantage for

  18. Crop management strategies and disease resistance control the severity of false smut and kernel smut of rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    False smut and kernel smut are common diseases of rice capable of severe epidemics with dramatic yield losses. The importance of rice smuts is often overlooked in the US, and highly susceptible varieties are now being grown on the majority of production acres in the southern rice producing states. O...

  19. The impact of herbicide-resistant rice technology on phenotypic diversity and population structure of United States weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Nilda Roma; Singh, Vijay; Tseng, Te Ming; Black, Howard; Young, Nelson D; Huang, Zhongyun; Hyma, Katie E; Gealy, David R; Caicedo, Ana L

    2014-11-01

    The use of herbicide-resistant (HR) Clearfield rice (Oryza sativa) to control weedy rice has increased in the past 12 years to constitute about 60% of rice acreage in Arkansas, where most U.S. rice is grown. To assess the impact of HR cultivated rice on the herbicide resistance and population structure of weedy rice, weedy samples were collected from commercial fields with a history of Clearfield rice. Panicles from each weedy type were harvested and tested for resistance to imazethapyr. The majority of plants sampled had at least 20% resistant offspring. These resistant weeds were 97 to 199 cm tall and initiated flowering from 78 to 128 d, generally later than recorded for accessions collected prior to the widespread use of Clearfield rice (i.e. historical accessions). Whereas the majority (70%) of historical accessions had straw-colored hulls, only 30% of contemporary HR weedy rice had straw-colored hulls. Analysis of genotyping-by-sequencing data showed that HR weeds were not genetically structured according to hull color, whereas historical weedy rice was separated into straw-hull and black-hull populations. A significant portion of the local rice crop genome was introgressed into HR weedy rice, which was rare in historical weedy accessions. Admixture analyses showed that HR weeds tend to possess crop haplotypes in the portion of chromosome 2 containing the ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE gene, which confers herbicide resistance to Clearfield rice. Thus, U.S. HR weedy rice is a distinct population relative to historical weedy rice and shows modifications in morphology and phenology that are relevant to weed management. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Golden Rice is an effective source of vitamin A.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guangwen; Qin, Jian; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Russell, Robert M; Grusak, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    Genetically engineered "Golden Rice" contains up to 35 microg beta-carotene per gram of rice. It is important to determine the vitamin A equivalency of Golden Rice beta-carotene to project the potential effect of this biofortified grain in rice-consuming populations that commonly exhibit low vitamin A status. The objective was to determine the vitamin A value of intrinsically labeled dietary Golden Rice in humans. Golden Rice plants were grown hydroponically with heavy water (deuterium oxide) to generate deuterium-labeled [2H]beta-carotene in the rice grains. Golden Rice servings of 65-98 g (130-200 g cooked rice) containing 0.99-1.53 mg beta-carotene were fed to 5 healthy adult volunteers (3 women and 2 men) with 10 g butter. A reference dose of [13C10]retinyl acetate (0.4-1.0 mg) in oil was given to each volunteer 1 wk before ingestion of the Golden Rice dose. Blood samples were collected over 36 d. Our results showed that the mean (+/-SD) area under the curve for the total serum response to [2H]retinol was 39.9 +/- 20.7 microg x d after the Golden Rice dose. Compared with that of the [13C10]retinyl acetate reference dose (84.7 +/- 34.6 microg x d), Golden Rice beta-carotene provided 0.24-0.94 mg retinol. Thus, the conversion factor of Golden Rice beta-carotene to retinol is 3.8 +/- 1.7 to 1 with a range of 1.9-6.4 to 1 by weight, or 2.0 +/- 0.9 to 1 with a range of 1.0-3.4 to 1 by moles. Beta-carotene derived from Golden Rice is effectively converted to vitamin A in humans. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00680355.

  1. Abandoned Rice Fields Make Streams Go Dry in Upland Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawickreme, D.

    2015-12-01

    In South Asia, new economic realities are driving many rural rice farmers out of agriculture. With increasing neglect, abandonment, and rising conversions of centuries old rice fields into other uses, ecological and environmental consequences of these transitions are becoming progressively clear. Field observations in Sri Lanka's central highlands suggest that small shifts in rice to non-rice land uses in headwater watersheds can have a domino effect on the productivity and viability of rice fields and other ecological systems downstream by inflicting groundwater recharge reductions, lowering groundwater yields, and causing other hydrological changes. Preliminary analysis shows that although rice itself is a very water intensive crop, the presence of rain-fed upland rice-fields is hugely beneficial to the watersheds they reside. In particular, water benefits of rice appear to be derived from ponded conditions (3-5 inches of standing water) in which rice is grown, and the contribution rice fields makes to enhance water retention and storage capacity of their watersheds during the monsoon season that coincide with the cropping season. In the absence of well managed rice-fields, hilly upland landscapes produce more runoff and retain little rainwater during the wet season. Furthermore, after centuries of intensive use, much of South Asia's rice fields are nutrient poor and minimally productive without fertilizer applications and other interventions. Consequently, when abandoned, soil erosion and other impacts that affect aquatic ecosystems and watershed health also emerge. Despite these multiple concerns however, little research is currently done to better understand the environmental significance of rice cultivations that are a dominant land-use in many South Asian landscapes. The aim of this presentation is to stir interest among the scientific community to engage more broadly in rice, water, and environmental change research in the face of new economic realities in

  2. Differentiation of rice cultivar for grain arsenic content associated with soil and water management in rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reduction of arsenic (As) in rice grains play an important role in improvement of food quality and minimization of any potential risk from dietary exposure. Twenty-one worldwide cultivars including both indica and japonica subspecies were grown under two water treatments, saturated soil and consiste...

  3. Phytoremediation of metolachlor by transgenic rice plants expressing human CYP2B6.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Sakiko; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2005-11-16

    We introduced the human cytochrome P450 gene CYP2B6 into rice plants (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare), and the CYP2B6-expressing rice plants became more tolerant to various herbicides than nontransgenic Nipponbare rice plants. In particular, CYP2B6 rice plants grown in soil showed tolerance to the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor and metolachlor. We evaluated the degradation of metolachlor by CYP2B6 rice plants to confirm the metabolic activity of the introduced CYP2B6. Although both CYP2B6 and nontransgenic Nipponbare rice plants could decrease the amount of metolachlor in plant tissue and culture medium, CYP2B6 rice plants could remove much greater amounts. In a greenhouse, the ability of CYP2B6 rice plants to remove metolachlor was confirmed in large-scale experiments, in which these plants appeared able to decrease residual quantities of metolachlor in water and soil.

  4. How does contamination of rice soils with Cd and Zn cause high incidence of human Cd disease in subsistence rice farmers?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown on Zn mine waste contaminated soils has caused unequivocal Cd effects on kidney and occasional bone disease (itai-itai) in subsistence rice farmers, but high intake of Cd from other foods has not caused similar effects. Research has clarified two important topics about ...

  5. Genetic shift in local rice populations during rice breeding programs in the northern limit of rice cultivation in the world.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Kenji; Obara, Mari; Ikegaya, Tomohito; Tamura, Kenichi

    2015-09-01

    The rapid accumulation of pre-existing mutations may play major roles in the establishment and shaping of adaptability for local regions in current rice breeding programs. The cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., which originated from tropical regions, is now grown worldwide due to the concerted efforts of breeding programs. However, the process of establishing local populations and their origins remain unclear. In the present study, we characterized DNA polymorphisms in the rice variety KITAAKE from Hokkaido, one of the northern limits of rice cultivation in the world. Indel polymorphisms were attributed to transposable element-like insertions, tandem duplications, and non-TE deletions as the original mutation events in the NIPPONBARE and KITAAKE genomes. The allele frequencies of the KITAAKE alleles markedly shifted to the current variety types among the local population from Hokkaido in the last two decades. The KITAAKE alleles widely distributed throughout wild rice and cultivated rice over the world. These have accumulated in the local population from Hokkaido via Japanese landraces as the ancestral population of Hokkaido. These results strongly suggested that combinations of pre-existing mutations played a role in the establishment of adaptability. This approach using the re-sequencing of local varieties in unique environmental conditions will be useful as a genetic resource in plant breeding programs in local regions.

  6. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  7. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs.

  8. Mitigation of arsenic accumulation in rice with water management and silicon fertilization.

    PubMed

    Li, R Y; Stroud, J L; Ma, J F; McGrath, S P; Zhao, F J

    2009-05-15

    Rice represents a major route of As exposure in populations that depend on a rice diet. Practical measures are needed to mitigate the problem of excessive As accumulation in paddy rice. Two potential mitigation methods, management of the water regime and Si fertilization, were investigated under greenhouse conditions. Growing rice aerobically during the entire rice growth duration resulted in the leastAs accumulation. Maintaining aerobic conditions during either vegetative or reproductive stage of rice growth also decreased As accumulation in rice straw and grain significantly compared with rice grown under flooded conditions. The effect of water management regimes was consistent with the observed effect of flooding-induced arsenite mobilization in the soil solution. Aerobic treatments increased the percentage of inorganic As in grain, but the concentrations of inorganic As remained lower than in the flooded rice. Silicon fertilization decreased the total As concentration in straw and grain by 78 and 16%, respectively, even though Si addition increased As concentration in the soil solution. Silicon also significantly influenced As speciation in rice grain and husk by enhancing methylation. Silicon decreased the inorganic As concentration in grain by 59% while increasing the concentration of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) by 33%. There were also significant differences between two rice genotypes in grain As speciation. This study demonstrated that water management Si fertilization, and selection of rice cultivars are effective measures that can be used to reduce As accumulation in rice.

  9. Aflatoxins in Rice Artificially Contaminated with Aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus under Natural Storage in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Satoshi; Doi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Masahiko; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Ikeda, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin (AFT) contamination is frequent in foods grown in tropical regions, including rice. Although AFTs are generally not found in temperate-region foods, global warming has affected typical temperate-region climates, potentially permitting the contamination of foods with AFT-producing Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus). Here we investigated the AFT production in rice during storage under natural climate conditions in Japan. We examined AFTs in brown rice and rough rice artificially contaminated with A. flavus for 1 year in Japan, and we subjected AFTs in white rice to the same treatment in airtight containers and examined the samples in warm and cold seasons, simulating the storage of white rice in general households. In the brown rice, AFTs increased after 2 months (March) and peaked after 9 months (October). The AFT contamination in the rough rice was minimal. After the polishing and cooking of the brown rice, AFTs were undetectable. In the white rice stored in airtight containers, AFTs increased after 1 month (August) and peaked after 2 months (September). Minimal AFTs were detected in the cold season. Thus, AFT contamination in rice may occur in temperate regions following A. flavus contamination. The storage of rice as rough rice could provide be useful for avoiding AFT contamination.

  10. Effects of nighttime air temperature during kernel development on rice physicochemical and functional properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated nighttime air temperatures (NTATs) occurring during critical grain-filling stages affected rice physicochemical properties, which impacted functional quality. Six cultivars were grown at multiple field locations from northern to southern Arkansas during 2007 to 2010. Nighttime temperature...

  11. Spatially resolved elemental mapping of two U.S. rice core collection grain accessions with diverse arsenic accumulation characteristics via synchrotron x-Ray fluorescence microscopy (SXRF)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The discovery of arsenic in higher than expected concentrations in rice grown in the South Central United States and worldwide has prompted further study to ensure the safety of rice, and rice based products such as infant cereals. In the U.S. arsenic is thought to originate from former arsenical pe...

  12. A digital photography and analysis system for estimation of root and shoot development in rice weed suppression studies in the field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice germplasm with an inherent ability to suppress weeds can potentially improve the economics and sustainability of weed control in rice. We devised a simple, rapid, and inexpensive digital imaging system to quantify several shoot and root growth characteristics in field-grown rice plants that ha...

  13. Genetic and field management strategies to enhance the nutritional value of rice grains and limit accumulation of undesirable elements such as arsenic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhancing the nutritional value of rice grains is of particular interest because rice is a primary dietary component for more than half of the world’s population, and is a primary source of nutrients in many underdeveloped countries. Because rice can be grown under both flooded and unflooded field ...

  14. [Terpenoids in root exudates of different allelopathic rice varieties].

    PubMed

    He, Haibin; He, Huaqin; Lin, Wenxiong; Chen, Xiangxu; Jia, Xiaoli; Xiong, Jun; Shen, Lihua; Liang, Yiyuan

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, a strong allelopathic rice variety PI312777 and a weak allelopathic rice variety Lemont were used as test materials, and the root exudates of two rice varieties grown in the media of sand and soil were respectively collected by using circulation system approach. The terpenoids in ether-extracts were detected by GC-MS, and characterized by spectrum database. The results showed that some terpenoids such as limonene oxide, limonene dioxide, carvone oxide, carveol, and cedrol were detected in the ether-extracts. Different rice varieties had the similar kinds of terpenoids, but their existing modes and quantities were different. The differences between different various cultural methods and between rice varieties were further discussed.

  15. Accumulation of arsenic in tissues of rice plant (Oryza sativa L.) and its distribution in fractions of rice grain.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H; Rahman, M Mahfuzur; Rahman, M Arifur; Miah, M A M

    2007-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the accumulation and distribution of arsenic in different fractions of rice grain (Oryza sativa L.) collected from arsenic affected area of Bangladesh. The agricultural soil of study area has become highly contaminated with arsenic due to the excessive use of arsenic-rich underground water (0.070+/-0.006 mg l(-1), n=6) for irrigation. Arsenic content in tissues of rice plant and in fractions of rice grain of two widely cultivated rice varieties, namely BRRI dhan28 and BRRI hybrid dhan1, were determined. Regardless of rice varieties, arsenic content was about 28- and 75-folds higher in root than that of shoot and raw rice grain, respectively. In fractions of parboiled and non-parboiled rice grain of both varieties, the order of arsenic concentrations was; rice hull>bran-polish>brown rice>raw rice>polish rice. Arsenic content was higher in non-parboiled rice grain than that of parboiled rice. Arsenic concentrations in parboiled and non-parboiled brown rice of BRRI dhan28 were 0.8+/-0.1 and 0.5+/-0.0 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively while those of BRRI hybrid dhan1 were 0.8+/-0.2 and 0.6+/-0.2 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. However, parboiled and non-parboiled polish rice grain of BRRI dhan28 contained 0.4+/-0.0 and 0.3+/-0.1 mg kg(-1) dry weight of arsenic, respectively while those of BRRI hybrid dhan1 contained 0.43+/-0.01 and 0.5+/-0.0 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. Both polish and brown rice are readily cooked for human consumption. The concentration of arsenic found in the present study is much lower than the permissible limit in rice (1.0 mg kg(-1)) according to WHO recommendation. Thus, rice grown in soils of Bangladesh contaminated with arsenic of 14.5+/-0.1 mg kg(-1) could be considered safe for human consumption.

  16. Association of arsenic concentration and speciation with straighthead disease in US produced rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent reports have indicated that rice when grown under anaerobic flooded field conditions can accumulate high levels of grain arsenic (As). This is a public health concern due to the high daily consumption of rice by some populations. The As-based herbicide (monosodium methanearsonate, MSMA) has ...

  17. Developing rice mapping populations as a genetic resource for validation of GWAS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.) is divided into two major subspecies, Indica and Japonica with the temperate and tropical japonica subpopulations being part of Japonica. These two subpopulations encompass the majority of the rice grown in the USA. Recently, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) iden...

  18. Effect of rice cultivation systems on indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community structure.

    PubMed

    Watanarojanaporn, Nantida; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Longtonglang, Aphakorn; Young, J Peter W; Teaumroong, Neung

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in an agricultural ecosystem are necessary for proper management of beneficial symbiosis. Here we explored how the patterns of the AMF community in rice roots were affected by rice cultivation systems (the system of rice intensification [SRI] and the conventional rice cultivation system [CS]), and by compost application during growth stages. Rice plants harvested from SRI-managed plots exhibited considerably higher total biomass, root dry weight, and seed fill than those obtained from conventionally managed plots. Our findings revealed that all AMF sequences observed from CS plots belonged (only) to the genus Glomus, colonizing in rice roots grown under this type of cultivation, while rice roots sown in SRI showed sequences belonging to both Glomus and Acaulospora. The AMF community was compared between the different cultivation types (CS and SRI) and compost applications by principle component analysis. In all rice growth stages, AMF assemblages of CS management were not separated from those of SRI management. The distribution of AMF community composition based on T-RFLP data showed that the AMF community structure was different among four cultivation systems, and there was a gradual increase of Shannon-Weaver indices of diversity (H') of the AMF community under SRI during growth stages. The results of this research indicated that rice grown in SRI-managed plots had more diverse AMF communities than those grown in CS plots.

  19. Effect of Rice Cultivation Systems on Indigenous Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Watanarojanaporn, Nantida; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Longtonglang, Aphakorn; Young, J. Peter W.; Teaumroong, Neung

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in an agricultural ecosystem are necessary for proper management of beneficial symbiosis. Here we explored how the patterns of the AMF community in rice roots were affected by rice cultivation systems (the system of rice intensification [SRI] and the conventional rice cultivation system [CS]), and by compost application during growth stages. Rice plants harvested from SRI-managed plots exhibited considerably higher total biomass, root dry weight, and seed fill than those obtained from conventionally managed plots. Our findings revealed that all AMF sequences observed from CS plots belonged (only) to the genus Glomus, colonizing in rice roots grown under this type of cultivation, while rice roots sown in SRI showed sequences belonging to both Glomus and Acaulospora. The AMF community was compared between the different cultivation types (CS and SRI) and compost applications by principle component analysis. In all rice growth stages, AMF assemblages of CS management were not separated from those of SRI management. The distribution of AMF community composition based on T-RFLP data showed that the AMF community structure was different among four cultivation systems, and there was a gradual increase of Shannon-Weaver indices of diversity (H′) of the AMF community under SRI during growth stages. The results of this research indicated that rice grown in SRI-managed plots had more diverse AMF communities than those grown in CS plots. PMID:23719585

  20. Localization and speciation of arsenic and trace elements in rice tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Euan; Kempson, Ivan; Juhasz, Albert L.; Weber, John; Skinner, William M.; Gräfe, Markus

    2009-09-14

    The consumption of arsenic (As) contaminated rice is an important exposure route for humans in countries where rice cultivation employs As contaminated irrigation water. Arsenic toxicity and mobility are a function of its chemical-speciation. The distribution and identification of As in the rice plant are hence necessary to determine the uptake, transformation and potential risk posed by As contaminated rice. In this study we report on the distribution and chemical-speciation of As in rice (Oryza sativa Quest) by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements of rice plants grown in As contaminated paddy water. Investigations of {mu}XRF images from rice tissues found that As was present in all rice tissues, and its presence correlated with the presence of iron at the root surface and copper in the rice leaf. X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of rice tissues identified that inorganic As was the predominant form of As in all rice tissues studied, and that arsenite became increasingly dominant in the aerial portion of the rice plant.

  1. The Impact of Herbicide-Resistant Rice Technology on Phenotypic Diversity and Population Structure of United States Weedy Rice1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Nilda Roma; Singh, Vijay; Tseng, Te Ming; Black, Howard; Young, Nelson D.; Huang, Zhongyun; Hyma, Katie E.; Gealy, David R.; Caicedo, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of herbicide-resistant (HR) Clearfield rice (Oryza sativa) to control weedy rice has increased in the past 12 years to constitute about 60% of rice acreage in Arkansas, where most U.S. rice is grown. To assess the impact of HR cultivated rice on the herbicide resistance and population structure of weedy rice, weedy samples were collected from commercial fields with a history of Clearfield rice. Panicles from each weedy type were harvested and tested for resistance to imazethapyr. The majority of plants sampled had at least 20% resistant offspring. These resistant weeds were 97 to 199 cm tall and initiated flowering from 78 to 128 d, generally later than recorded for accessions collected prior to the widespread use of Clearfield rice (i.e. historical accessions). Whereas the majority (70%) of historical accessions had straw-colored hulls, only 30% of contemporary HR weedy rice had straw-colored hulls. Analysis of genotyping-by-sequencing data showed that HR weeds were not genetically structured according to hull color, whereas historical weedy rice was separated into straw-hull and black-hull populations. A significant portion of the local rice crop genome was introgressed into HR weedy rice, which was rare in historical weedy accessions. Admixture analyses showed that HR weeds tend to possess crop haplotypes in the portion of chromosome 2 containing the ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE gene, which confers herbicide resistance to Clearfield rice. Thus, U.S. HR weedy rice is a distinct population relative to historical weedy rice and shows modifications in morphology and phenology that are relevant to weed management. PMID:25122473

  2. Linkage Mapping of Stem Saccharification Digestibility in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Cangmei; Sun, Lili; Ali, Imran; Huang, Linli; Yu, Chunyan; Simister, Rachael; Steele-King, Clare; Gan, Yinbo; McQueen-Mason, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the staple food of almost half of the world population, and in excess 90% of it is grown and consumed in Asia, but the disposal of rice straw poses a problem for farmers, who often burn it in the fields, causing health and environmental problems. However, with increased focus on the development of sustainable biofuel production, rice straw has been recognized as a potential feedstock for non-food derived biofuel production. Currently, the commercial realization of rice as a biofuel feedstock is constrained by the high cost of industrial saccharification processes needed to release sugar for fermentation. This study is focused on the alteration of lignin content, and cell wall chemotypes and structures, and their effects on the saccharification potential of rice lignocellulosic biomass. A recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population derived from a cross between the lowland rice variety IR1552 and the upland rice variety Azucena with 271 molecular markers for quantitative trait SNP (QTS) analyses was used. After association analysis of 271 markers for saccharification potential, 1 locus and 4 pairs of epistatic loci were found to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility phenotype, and an inverse relationship between reducing sugar and lignin content in these recombinant inbred lines was identified. As a result of QTS analyses, several cell-wall associated candidate genes are proposed that may be useful for marker-assisted breeding and may aid breeders to produce potential high saccharification rice varieties. PMID:27415441

  3. Rice Production and Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briers, Gary; Lee, Jasper S.

    This guide contains lesson plans for use in secondary programs of agricultural education in geographical areas in which rice is produced. Six units and 13 problem areas are organized into teaching plans that cover the broad nature of rice production. The six units are: (1) determining the importance and history of rice production; (2) determining…

  4. Effects of climate change on suitable rice cropping areas, cropping systems and crop water requirements in southern China

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Qing; Yang, Xiaoguang; Dai, Shuwei; ...

    2015-06-05

    Here, we discuss that rice is one of the main crops grown in southern China. Global climate change has significantly altered the local water availability and temperature regime for rice production. In this study, we explored the influence of climate change on suitable rice cropping areas, rice cropping systems and crop water requirements (CWRs) during the growing season for historical (from 1951 to 2010) and future (from 2011 to 2100) time periods. The results indicated that the land areas suitable for rice cropping systems shifted northward and westward from 1951 to 2100 but with different amplitudes.

  5. Effects of O/sub 2/ concentration on rice seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Alpi, A.; Beevers, H.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of rice, wheat, and oat seedlings to germinate and grow as the O/sub 2/ concentration was lowered to zero was compared. The germination of rice was completely unaffected by O/sub 2/ supply, whereas that of oats and wheat was strongly retarded at levels below 5% O/sub 2/. In contrast to the coleoptiles of oats and wheat and to roots of all three species where growth was progressively diminished as the O/sub 2/ concentration was lowered, that of the rice coleoptile was progressively increased. However, the dry weight and content of protein, sugars, and cellulose were all depressed in the rice coleoptile in anoxia, and the levels of several respiratory enzymes, particularly those of mitochondria, were also much lower than those of the coleoptiles grown in air. In 1% O/sub 2/, the growth of the rice coleoptile was similar to that in air. The effect of ethanol concentration on germination and growth of rice was measured. Coleoptile growth was reduced when the ethanol concentration exceeded 40 millimolarity, and root growth was somewhat more sensitive. Coleoptiles of all three species grown in air were transferred to N/sub 2/ and ethanol accumulation was measured over 24 hours. The rate of ethanol accumulation in oats was close to that in rice, and in all three species the amounts of ethanol lost to the surrounding medium were those expected from simple diffusion from the tissue. The ability of the rice coleoptile to grow in anoxia is apparently not due to a particularly low rate of ethanol formation or to unusual ethanol tolerance. Any explanation of the success of rice in anoxia must encompass the much lower rate of ATP synthesis than that in air and account for the biochemical deficiencies of the coleoptile.

  6. Rice bran: a novel functional ingredient.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Mian Kamran; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Khan, Saima Hafiz

    2014-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and the West Indies. It provides more than one fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by the human. It is the second leading cereal crop and staple food of half of the world's population. It is grown in at least 114 countries with global production of 645 million tons; share of Asian farmers is about 90% of the total produce. Rice bran, brown outer layer of rice kernel, is mainly composed of pericarp, aleurone, subaleurone layer, and germ. It contains appreciable quantities of nutrients like protein, fat, and dietary fiber. Furthermore, it contains substantial amount of minerals like K, Ca, Mg, and Fe. Presence of antioxidants like tocopherols, tocotrienols, and γ-oryzanol also brighten prospects of rice bran utilization for humans as functional ingredient to mitigate the life-threatening disorders. Moreover, in the developing countries, budding dilemma of food crisis, arising due to lower crop yields and escalating population, needs to utilize each pent of available resources. To provide enough food to all people, there is the holistic approach of using the by-products generated during food processing and preparations. Rice is being processed in well-established industry, but the major apprehension is the utilization of its by-products; rice bran (5-8%) and polishing (2-3%) that are going as waste. Rice processing or milling produces several streams of materials including milled rice, bran, and husk. In developing countries, rice bran is considered as a by-product of the milling process and commonly used in animal feed or discarded as a waste. The potential of producing rice bran at the global level is 29.3 million tons annually, whereas the share of Pakistan is worked out to be 0.5 million tons. In present paper, attempt has been made to highlight the significance of these valuable but

  7. Morphological Study of the Relationships between Weedy Rice Accessions (Oryza sativa Complex) and Commercial Rice Varieties in Pulau Pinang Rice Granary Area

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zainudin PMD; Man, Azmi; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman

    2010-01-01

    Weedy rice (WR) is found in many direct-seeded rice fields. WR possesses morphological characteristics that are similar to cultivated rice varieties in the early stage of growth, making them more difficult to control than other weeds. A comparative morphological study was conducted by collecting WR accessions from four sites within the Pulau Pinang rice growing areas. The objective of the study was to characterise WR accessions of the Pulau Pinang rice granary by comparing their morphological characteristics to those of commercially grown rice in the area. Their morphometric relations were established by comparing 17 morphological characteristics of the WR accessions and the commercial varieties. A total of 36 WR morphotypes were identified from these 4 sites based on 17 characteristics, which included grain shattering habit and germination rate. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that 45.88% of the variation observed among the WR accessions and commercial varieties were within the first 3 axes. PB6, PP2 and SGA5 WR accessions had a higher number of tillers and longer panicle lengths, culm heights and leaf lengths compared to the commercial rice. The grain sizes of the commercial varieties were slightly longer, and the chlorophyll contents at 60–70 days after sowing (DAS) were higher than those of the WR accessions. Results from this study are useful for predicting potential WR accession growth, which might improve WR management and agriculture practices that control WR in the future. PMID:24575197

  8. Selenium speciation in soil and rice: influence of water management and Se fertilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Fen; Lombi, Enzo; Stroud, Jacqueline L; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2010-11-24

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the staple food for half of the world's population, but the selenium (Se) concentrations in rice grain are low in many rice-growing regions. This study investigated the effects of water management on the Se speciation dynamics in the soil solution and Se uptake and speciation in rice in a pot experiment. A control containing no Se or 0.5 mg kg(-1) of soil of selenite or selenate was added to the soil, and plants were grown under aerobic or flooded conditions. Flooding soil increased soluble Se concentration when no Se or selenite was added to the soil, but decreased it markedly when selenate was added. Selenate was the main species in the +selenate treatment, whereas selenite and selenomethionine selenium oxide were detected in the flooded soil solutions of the control and +selenite treatments. Grain Se concentration was 49% higher in the flooded than in the aerobic treatments without Se addition. In contrast, when selenate or selenite was added, the aerobically grown rice contained 25- and 2-fold, respectively, more Se in grain than the anaerobically grown rice. Analysis of Se in rice grain using enzymatic hydrolysis followed by HPLC-ICP-MS and in situ X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) showed selenomethionine to be the predominant Se species. The study showed that selenate addition to aerobic soil was the most effective way to increase Se concentration in rice grain.

  9. The role of irrigation techniques in arsenic bioaccumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Spanu, Antonino; Daga, Leonardo; Orlandoni, Anna Maria; Sanna, Gavino

    2012-08-07

    The bioaccumulation of arsenic compounds in rice is of great concern worldwide because rice is the staple food for billions of people and arsenic is one of the most toxic and carcinogenic elements at even trace amounts. The uptake of arsenic compounds in rice comes mainly from its interaction with system soil/water in the reducing conditions typical of paddy fields and is influenced by the irrigation used. We demonstrate that the use of sprinkler irrigation produces rice kernels with a concentration of total arsenic about fifty times lower when compared to rice grown under continuous flooding irrigation. The average total amount of arsenic, measured by a fully validated ICP-MS method, in 37 rice grain genotypes grown with sprinkler irrigation was 2.8 ± 2.5 μg kg(-1), whereas the average amount measured in the same genotypes grown under identical conditions, but using continuous flooding irrigation was 163 ± 23 μg kg(-1). In addition, we find that the average concentration of total arsenic in rice grains cultivated under sprinkler irrigation is close to the total arsenic concentration found in irrigation waters. Our results suggest that, in our experimental conditions, the natural bioaccumulation of this element in rice grains may be completely circumvented by adopting an appropriate irrigation technique.

  10. Research in rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1999, 2.4-3 million acres of rice were planted annually nationwide. Rice fields are a major component of the contemporary landscapes in the Gulf Coastal Plain, the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, and Central Valley of California. In 1998, approximately 600,000 acres of rice were planted in Louisiana. In the Louisiana plant commodities report for 1998, total value for rice was over $350 million; sugarcane was the only plant commodity that exceeded this value. Louisiana has over 2,000 rice farmers supporting over 12,000 jobs in the state. Rice fields in the United States receive high use by wildlife, especially shorebirds, wading birds, and waterfowl. Waterbirds use rice fields for food, shelter, and breeding habitat.

  11. Variation in arsenic bioavailability in rice genotypes using swine model: An animal study.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shofiqul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Duan, Luchun; Islam, M R; Kuchel, Tim; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-12-01

    An in vivo assay using swine was used to measure the absolute bioavailability (AB) of As from cooked rice of twelve genotypes commonly grown in Bangladesh. An assessment of both total As in rice and its bioavailability is crucial for estimating human exposure following dietary intake by the local community. Average As concentrations in each rice genotype ranged from 108±4μg/kg to 580±6μg/kg. Arsenic speciation shows that most of the rice genotype contains 73 to 100% inorganic As. Swine were administered with As orally and via intravenous method, i.e. injection and fed certain common Bangladeshi rice genotypes (cooked). Swine blood As levels were measured to calculate As bioavailability from rice. Pilot studies shows that for As(III) and As(V), 90.8±12.4% and 85.0±19.2% of the administered oral dose was absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract whereas organic As was poorly absorbed resulting in low bioavailability values 20.2±2.6% (MMA) to 31.2±3.4% (DMA), respectively. These studies demonstrates that rice genotypic characters influenced As bioavailability in rice grown in As-contaminated areas and the bioavailability varied between 25% and 94%. Arsenic in salt tolerant rice genotypes Binadhan-10 and BRRI dhan47 as well as brown rice genotypes Kheali Boro and Local Boro has lower bioavailability (<50%) compared to other rice genotypes. The most commonly cultivated and consumed variety (BRRI dhan28) has As bioavailability of 70%, which poses a significant risk to consumers. Calculation of maximum tolerable daily intake (MTDI) for humans due to consumption of rice based on bioavailability data was higher than those calculated based on inorganic and organic As concentration in rice genotypes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Allelopathic substance in rice root exudates: rediscovery of momilactone B as an allelochemical.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2004-03-01

    Much research on rice allelopathy has been directed toward the selection of allelopathic rice strains and the identification of allelochemicals in rice. This paper briefly summarizes recent progress in the rice allelopathy and focuses on rediscovery of momilactone B as an allelochemical. A large number of rice varieties were found to inhibit the growth of several plant species when grown together under field and/or laboratory conditions. These findings suggest that rice probably produces and releases allelochemical(s) into the environment. The putative compound causing the inhibitory effect of rice was recently isolated from rice root exudates, and the chemical structure of the inhibitor was determined by spectral data as momilactone B. In addition, it has been found that momilactone B is released from rice roots into the neighboring environment, and the release level of momilactone B from rice may be sufficient to cause growth inhibition of neighboring plants. These findings suggest that momilactone B may play an important role in rice allelopathy.

  13. Endophytic Colonization and In Planta Nitrogen Fixation by a Herbaspirillum sp. Isolated from Wild Rice Species

    PubMed Central

    Elbeltagy, Adel; Nishioka, Kiyo; Sato, Tadashi; Suzuki, Hisa; Ye, Bin; Hamada, Toru; Isawa, Tsuyoshi; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were isolated from the stems of wild and cultivated rice on a modified Rennie medium. Based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences, the diazotrophic isolates were phylogenetically close to four genera: Herbaspirillum, Ideonella, Enterobacter, and Azospirillum. Phenotypic properties and signature sequences of 16S rDNA indicated that three isolates (B65, B501, and B512) belong to the Herbaspirillum genus. To examine whether Herbaspirillum sp. strain B501 isolated from wild rice, Oryza officinalis, endophytically colonizes rice plants, the gfp gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was introduced into the bacteria. Observations by fluorescence stereomicroscopy showed that the GFP-tagged bacteria colonized shoots and seeds of aseptically grown seedlings of the original wild rice after inoculation of the seeds. Conversely, for cultivated rice Oryza sativa, no GFP fluorescence was observed for shoots and only weak signals were observed for seeds. Observations by fluorescence and electron microscopy revealed that Herbaspirillum sp. strain B501 colonized mainly intercellular spaces in the leaves of wild rice. Colony counts of surface-sterilized rice seedlings inoculated with the GFP-tagged bacteria indicated significantly more bacterial populations inside the original wild rice than in cultivated rice varieties. Moreover, after bacterial inoculation, in planta nitrogen fixation in young seedlings of wild rice, O. officinalis, was detected by the acetylene reduction and 15N2 gas incorporation assays. Therefore, we conclude that Herbaspirillum sp. strain B501 is a diazotrophic endophyte compatible with wild rice, particularly O. officinalis. PMID:11679357

  14. Rice consumption contributes to arsenic exposure in US women

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Gruber, Joann F.; Punshon, Tracy; Sayarath, Vicki; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Baker, Emily R.; Jackson, Brian P.; Folt, Carol L.; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that rice consumption may lead to potentially harmful arsenic exposure. However, few human data are available, and virtually none exist for vulnerable periods such as pregnancy. Here we document a positive association between rice consumption and urinary arsenic excretion, a biomarker of recent arsenic exposure, in 229 pregnant women. At a 6-mo prenatal visit, we collected a urine sample and 3-d dietary record for water, fish/seafood, and rice. We also tested women's home tap water for arsenic, which we combined with tap water consumption to estimate arsenic exposure through water. Women who reported rice intake (n = 73) consumed a median of 28.3 g/d, which is ∼0.5 cup of cooked rice each day. In general linear models adjusted for age and urinary dilution, both rice consumption (g, dry mass/d) and arsenic exposure through water (μg/d) were significantly associated with natural log-transformed total urinary arsenic (, , both P < 0.0001), as well as inorganic arsenic, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid (each P < 0.005). Based on total arsenic, consumption of 0.56 cup/d of cooked rice was comparable to drinking 1 L/d of 10 μg As/L water, the current US maximum contaminant limit. US rice consumption varies, averaging ∼0.5 cup/d, with Asian Americans consuming an average of >2 cups/d. Rice arsenic content and speciation also vary, with some strains predominated by dimethylarsinic acid, particularly those grown in the United States. Our findings along with others indicate that rice consumption should be considered when designing arsenic reduction strategies in the United States. PMID:22143778

  15. Cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties; impacted by rice temperature during milling.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed; Meullenet, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Rice milling plays a key factor in determining rice quality and value. Therefore accurate quality assessments are critical to the rice industry. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of exposing rice to elevated temperatures during milling, on cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties. Two long (Cybonnett and Francis) and one medium (Jupiter) rice (oryzae sativa L.) cultivars were milled using McGill laboratory mill for 30 and 40 s after warmed up the mill before milling. Four different milling temperatures per milling duration were achieved. Cooked rice texture properties were assessed using a uniaxial compression test and rice flour pasting properties measured using a TA-2000 rheometer. Results of this study showed that exposure of rice to high temperatures during milling significantly decreased cooked rice firmness. An increase in milled rice temperature after milling from 10.0 to 13.3 °C resulted in a 5.4 and 8.1 N decrease in cooked rice firmness. Although not always significant, the increase in milled rice temperature during milling resulted in an increase in cooked rice stickiness. The increase in milling temperature also showed significant increase in rice flour pasting properties. Changes in rice functional characteristics were attributed to the changes occurring to rice chemical constituents due to temperature exposure as indicated by the increase in rice protein hydrophobicity. Proteins are known to affect rice starch water holding capacity and other starch gelatinization properties.

  16. Lack of Zn inhibition of Cd accumulation by rice (Oryza sativa L.) supports non-Zn transporter uptake of Cd

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown on Cd contaminated soils has been linked to health problems in subsistence rice farmers in Japan and China. For other crops, normal geogenic Zn inhibits the increased uptake of Cd on contaminated soils. A study was conducted using a multi-chelator buffered nutrient sol...

  17. Teosinte Branched 1 modulates tillering in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Seon; Woo, Mi-Ok; Koh, Eun-Byeol; Lee, Joohyun; Ham, Tae-Ho; Seo, Hak Soo; Koh, Hee-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Tillering is an important trait of cereal crops that optimizes plant architecture for maximum yield. Teosinte Branched 1 (TB1) is a negative regulator of lateral branching and an inducer of female inflorescence formation in Zea mays (maize). Recent studies indicate that TB1 homologs in Oryza sativa (rice), Sorghum bicolor and Arabidopsis thaliana act downstream of the auxin and MORE AUXILIARY GROWTH (MAX) pathways. However, the molecular mechanism by which rice produces tillers remains unknown. In this study, transgenic rice plants were produced that overexpress the maize TB1 (mTB1) or rice TB1 (OsTB1) genes and silence the OsTB1 gene through RNAi-mediated knockdown. Because lateral branching in rice is affected by the environmental conditions, the phenotypes of transgenic plants were observed in both the greenhouse and the paddy field. Compared to wild-type plants, the number of tillers and panicles was reduced and increased in overexpressed and RNAi-mediated knockdown OsTB1 rice plants, respectively, under both environmental conditions. However, the effect was small for plants grown in paddy fields. These results demonstrate that both mTB1 and OsTB1 moderately regulate the tiller development in rice.

  18. Effects of landscape features on waterbird use of rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, S.; Elphick, C.S.; Guadagnin, D.; Taft, O.; Amano, T.

    2010-01-01

    Literature is reviewed to determine the effects of landscape features on waterbird use of fields in regions where rice (Oryza sativa) is grown. Rice-growing landscapes often consist of diverse land uses and land cover, including rice fields, irrigation ditches, other agricultural fields, grasslands, forests and natural wetlands. Numerous studies indicate that local management practices, such as water depth and timing of flooding and drawdown, can strongly influence waterbird use of a given rice field. However, the effects of size and distribution of rice fields and associated habitats at a landscape scale have received less attention. Even fewer studies have focused on local and landscape effects simultaneously. Habitat connectivity, area of rice, distance to natural wetlands, and presence and distance to unsuitable habitat can be important parameters influencing bird use of rice fields. However, responses to a given landscape vary with landscape structure, scale of analysis, among taxa and within taxa among seasons. A lack of multi-scale studies, particularly those extending beyond simple presence and abundance of a given species, and a lack of direct tests comparing the relative importance of landscape features with in-field management activities limits understanding of the importance of landscape in these systems and hampers waterbird conservation and management.

  19. Selenium Characterization in the Global Rice Supply Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul N.; Lombi, Enzo; Sun, Guo-Xin; Scheckel, Kirk; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Feng, Xinbin; Zhu, Jianming; Carey, Anne-Marie; Adomako, Eureka; Lawgali, Youseff; Deacon, Claire; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2009-08-13

    For up to 1 billion people worldwide, insufficient dietary intake of selenium (Se) is a serious health constraint. Cereals are the dominant Se source for those on low protein diets, as typified by the global malnourished population. With crop Se content constrained largely by underlying geology, regional soil Se variations are often mirrored by their locally grown staples. Despite this, the Se concentrations of much of the world's rice, the mainstay of so many, is poorly characterized, for both total Se content and Se speciation. In this study, 1092 samples of market sourced polished rice were obtained. The sampled rice encompassed dominant rice producing and exporting countries. Rice from the U.S. and India were found to be the most enriched, while mean average levels were lowest in Egyptian rice: {approx}32-fold less than their North American equivalents. By weighting country averages by contribution to either global production or export, modeled baseline values for both were produced. Based on a daily rice consumption of 300 g day{sup -1}, around 75% of the grains from the production and export pools would fail to provide 70% of daily recommended Se intakes. Furthermore, Se localization and speciation characterization using X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) techniques were investigated in a Se-rich sample. The results revealed that the large majority of Se in the endosperm was present in organic forms.

  20. Whole genome sequencing and comparative transcriptome analysis of a novel seawater adapted, salt-resistant rice cultivar - sea rice 86.

    PubMed

    Chen, Risheng; Cheng, Yunfeng; Han, Suying; Van Handel, Ben; Dong, Ling; Li, Xinmin; Xie, Xiaoqing

    2017-08-23

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is critical for human nutrition worldwide. Due to a growing population, cultivars that produce high yields in high salinity soil are of major importance. Here we describe the discovery and molecular characterization of a novel sea water adapted rice strain, Sea Rice 86 (SR86). SR86 can produce nutritious grains when grown in high salinity soil. Compared to a salt resistant rice cultivar, Yanfen 47 (YF47), SR86 grows in environments with up to 3X the salt content, and produces grains with significantly higher nutrient content in 12 measured components, including 2.9X calcium and 20X dietary fiber. Whole genome sequencing demonstrated that SR86 is a relatively ancient indica subspecies, phylogenetically close to the divergence point of the major rice varietals. SR86 has 12 chromosomes with a total genome size of 373,130,791 bps, slightly smaller than other sequenced rice genomes. Via comparison with 3000 rice genomes, we identified 42,359 putative unique, high impact variants in SR86. Transcriptome analysis of SR86 grown under normal and high saline conditions identified a large number of differentially expressed and salt-induced genes. Many of those genes fall into several gene families that have established or suggested roles in salt tolerance, while others represent potentially novel mediators of salt adaptation. Whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis of SR86 has laid a foundation for further molecular characterization of several desirable traits in this novel rice cultivar. A number of candidate genes related to salt adaptation identified in this study will be valuable for further functional investigation.

  1. [Influence of weeds in Echinochloa on growth and yield of rice].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Chang; Li, Yong-Feng; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Xia

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate effects of different barnyardgrass species on growth and yiled of rice, two rice cultivars, Xinliangyou 6 hao (an indica hybrid cultivar) and Nanjing 46 (a japonica cultivar), were co-cultured with four barnyardgrass species grown at a density of six plants · m(-2) from 10 days after transplanting to maturity. The treatments were designed as follow: weed free (control), rice with Echinochloa crusgalli var. mitis (T1), rice with E. crusgalli (T2), rice with E. crusgali var. zelayensis (T3), and rice with E. colonum (T4). The result showed that barnyardgrass-induced reductions in grain yield of rice were obviously different among the four treatments. T1, T2 and T3 treatments reduced the grain yield of indicia cultivar by 19.2%, 10.8% and 21.9%, and the respective reductions in japonica cultivar were 39.7%, 25.3% and 47.3%, re- spectively. However, no significant difference was detected for T4 treatment. During rice co-culture with barnyardgrass, T1, T2 and T3 significantly reduced rice dry matter accumulation at maturity, flag leaf photosynthetic rate, root oxidation activity and the activity of adenosine triphosphate enzyme (ATPsse) in rice grains at the filling stage, and the magnitude of decrease was in the order of T3 > T1 > T2, while no significant difference was observed between T4 and CK. In addition, all treatments had no effects on the final tiller number and plant height of rice. It indicated that the negative effect of barnyardgrass on rice growth and yield differed among the four species of barnyardgrass, in the order of T3 > T1 > T2 > T4. Barnyardgrass reduced the flag leaf photosynthetic rate of rice, both root oxidation activity and ATPsse activity in grains, which resulted in the reduction in final productivity of rice when co-cultured with barnyardgrass.

  2. Determinants for grading Malaysian rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChePa, Noraziah; Yusoff, Nooraini; Ahmad, Norhayati

    2016-08-01

    Due to un-uniformity of rice grading practices in Malaysia, zones which actively producing rice in Malaysia are using their own way of grading rice. Rice grading is important in determining rice quality and its subsequent price in the market. It is an important process applied in the rice production industry with the purpose of ensuring that the rice produced for the market meets the quality requirements of consumer. Two important aspects that need to be considered in determining rice grades are grading technique and determinants to be used for grading (usually referred as rice attributes). This article proposes the list of determinants to be used in grading Malaysian rice. Determinants were explored through combination of extensive literature review and series of interview with the domain experts and practitioners. The proposed determinants are believed to be beneficial to BERNAS in improving the current Malaysian rice grading process.

  3. Relating raw rice color and composition to cooked rice color.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traditionally, the color of milled rice is economically important. The whiter the rice the more it is preferred by consumers and the more value it has in the market place. Little attention has been given to relating raw rice color to cooked milled rice color and, specifically, to determining the i...

  4. Golden Rice is an effective source of vitamin A1234

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jian; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Russell, Robert M; Grusak, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Genetically engineered “Golden Rice” contains up to 35 μg β-carotene per gram of rice. It is important to determine the vitamin A equivalency of Golden Rice β-carotene to project the potential effect of this biofortified grain in rice-consuming populations that commonly exhibit low vitamin A status. Objective: The objective was to determine the vitamin A value of intrinsically labeled dietary Golden Rice in humans. Design: Golden Rice plants were grown hydroponically with heavy water (deuterium oxide) to generate deuterium-labeled [2H]β-carotene in the rice grains. Golden Rice servings of 65–98 g (130–200 g cooked rice) containing 0.99–1.53 mg β-carotene were fed to 5 healthy adult volunteers (3 women and 2 men) with 10 g butter. A reference dose of [13C10]retinyl acetate (0.4–1.0 mg) in oil was given to each volunteer 1 wk before ingestion of the Golden Rice dose. Blood samples were collected over 36 d. Results: Our results showed that the mean (±SD) area under the curve for the total serum response to [2H]retinol was 39.9 ± 20.7 μg·d after the Golden Rice dose. Compared with that of the [13C10]retinyl acetate reference dose (84.7 ± 34.6 μg·d), Golden Rice β-carotene provided 0.24–0.94 mg retinol. Thus, the conversion factor of Golden Rice β-carotene to retinol is 3.8 ± 1.7 to 1 with a range of 1.9–6.4 to 1 by weight, or 2.0 ± 0.9 to 1 with a range of 1.0–3.4 to 1 by moles. Conclusion: β-Carotene derived from Golden Rice is effectively converted to vitamin A in humans. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00680355. PMID:19369372

  5. Physiological and morphological responses of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (wrinkled grass) to different nitrogen rates and rice seeding rates.

    PubMed

    Awan, Tahir Hussain; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Cruz, Pompe C Sta

    2014-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum is a competitive weed in direct-seeded rice systems. Developing integrated weed management strategies that promote the suppression of weeds by crop density, cultivar selection, and nutrition requires better understanding of the extent to which rice interferes with the growth of this weed and how it responds to resource limitation due to rice interference. The growth of I. rugosum was studied when grown with four rice seeding rates (0, 25, 50, and 100 kg ha(-1)) and four nitrogen (N) rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha(-1)). Compared to the weed plants grown alone, weed tiller number was reduced by 63-80%, leaf number by 68-77%, leaf area by 69-77%, leaf biomass by 72-84%, and inflorescence biomass by 81-93% at the rice seeding rates of 25-100 kg ha(-1). All these parameters increased with increasing rates of N from 0 to 150 kg ha(-1). At weed maturity, I. rugosum plants were 100% taller than rice at 0 kg N ha(-1), whereas, with added N, the weeds were only 50% taller than rice. Weed biomass increased by 82-160%, whereas rice biomass increased by 92-229%, with the application of 50-150 kg N ha(-1). Added N favored rice biomass production more than it did the weed. Rice interference reduced the height and biomass of I. rugosum, but did not suppress its growth completely. I. rugosum showed the ability to reduce the effects of rice interference by increasing leaf area, leaf weight ratio, and specific leaf area, and by decreasing the root-shoot weight ratio in comparison to the weed plants grown alone. The results suggest that rice crop interference alone may reduce I. rugosum growth but may not provide complete control of this weed. The need for integrated weed management practices to effectively control this weed species is highlighted.

  6. Rice (Oryza) hemoglobins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a sin...

  7. Making rice even healthier!

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice is a naturally healthy food, but what if it could be made even healthier? Would Americans eat more rice if it could be advertised to be a 'New and Improved' source of calcium to promote bone growth, or iron to prevent anemia? Grocery stores are full of foods that are vitamin enhanced to attract...

  8. Soybean-Enriched Snacks Based on African Rice

    PubMed Central

    Marengo, Mauro; Akoto, Hannah F.; Zanoletti, Miriam; Carpen, Aristodemo; Buratti, Simona; Benedetti, Simona; Barbiroli, Alberto; Johnson, Paa-Nii T.; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther O.; Saalia, Firibu K.; Bonomi, Francesco; Pagani, Maria Ambrogina; Manful, John; Iametti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Snacks were produced by extruding blends of partially-defatted soybean flour with flours from milled or parboiled African-grown rice. The interplay between composition and processing in producing snacks with a satisfactory sensory profile was addressed by e-sensing, and by molecular and rheological approaches. Soybean proteins play a main role in defining the properties of the protein network in the products. At the same content in soybean flour, use of parboiled rice flour increases the snack’s hardness. Electronic nose and electronic tongue discriminated samples containing a higher amount of soybean flour from those with a lower soybean flour content. PMID:28231133

  9. Azospirillum sp. strain B510 enhances rice growth and yield.

    PubMed

    Isawa, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Michiko; Awazaki, Hirotoshi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Shinozaki, Satoshi; Nakashita, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Inoculation experiments with the endophytic bacterium Azospirillum sp. strain B510, an isolate from surface-sterilized stems of field-grown rice, were conducted in pots in a greenhouse, and in paddy fields in Hokkaido, Japan. B510 significantly enhanced the growth of newly generated leaves and shoot biomass under greenhouse conditions. When rice seedlings were treated with 1×10(8) CFU ml(-1), then transplanted to paddy fields, tiller numbers and seed yield significantly increased. Azospirillum sp. strain B510 is a promising bacterial inoculant for plant growth promotion and agricultural practices.

  10. Speciation and phytoavailability of cadmium in soil treated with cadmium-contaminated rice straw.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Huang, Dao-You; Zhu, Qi-Hong; Zhu, Han-Hua; Liu, Shou-Long; Luo, Zun-Chang; Cao, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Ji-Yu; Rao, Zhong-Xiu; Shen, Xin

    2015-02-01

    When grown on Cd-contaminated soil, rice typically accumulates considerable Cd in straw, and which may return to the soil after harvest. This work was undertaken to assess the pollution risk of Cd associated to the Cd-contaminated rice straw after incorporating into an uncontaminated soil. With the Cd-contaminated rice straw added at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % (w/w), an incubation experiment (28 days) with non-planting and a followed pot experiment sequent with two planting (rice and Chinese cabbage, transplanted after 28-day incubation) were carried out to investigate the changes of soil Cd speciation and phytoavailability. The results indicated that the Cd-contaminated rice straw addition significantly increased soil pH and dissolved organic carbon during the 28-day incubation. For the high availability of Cd in contaminated rice straw, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable Cd significantly increased, and the percentages of acetic acid extractable and reducible Cd in soil significantly enhanced after the addition of Cd-contaminated rice straw. However, the Cd-contaminated rice straw addition inhibited the rice growth and induced the decrease of Cd in rice grain and straw by 12.8 to 70.2 % and 39.3 to 57.3 %, respectively, whereas the Cd contents increased by 13.9 to 84.1 % in Chinese cabbage that planted after rice harvest. In conclusion, Cd associated with Cd-contaminated rice straw was highly available after incorporating into the soil, and thus the Cd pollution risk via the Cd-contaminated rice straw incorporation should be evaluated in the Cd-contaminated paddy region.

  11. Phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated soil by Pteris vittata L. II. Effect on arsenic uptake and rice yield.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asit; Purakayastha, T J; Patra, A K; Sanyal, S K

    2012-07-01

    A greenhouse experiment evaluated the effect of phytoextraction of arsenic from a contaminated soil by Chinese Brake Fern (Pteris vittata L.) and its subsequent effects on growth and uptake of arsenic by rice (Oryza sativa L.) crop. Pteris vittata was grown for one or two growing cycles of four months each with two phosphate sources, using single super phosphate (SSP) and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP). Rice was grown on phytoextracted soils followed by measurements of biomass yield (grain, straw, and root), arsenic concentration and, uptake by individual plant parts. The biomass yield (grain, straw and rice) of rice was highest in soil phytoextracted with Pteris vittata grown for two cycles and fertilized with diammonium phosphate (DAP). Total arsenic uptake in contaminated soil ranged from 8.2 to 16.9 mg pot(-1) in first growing cycle and 5.5 to 12.0 mg pot(-1) in second growing cycle of Pteris vittata. There was thus a mean reduction of 52% in arsenic content of rice grain after two growing cycle of Pteris vittata and 29% after the one growing cycle. The phytoextraction of arsenic contaminated soil by Pteris vittata was beneficial for growing rice resulted in decreased arsenic content in rice grain of <1 ppm. There was a mean improvement in rice grain yield 14% after two growing cycle and 8% after the one growing cycle of brake fern.

  12. Ethylene signaling in rice and Arabidopsis: conserved and diverged aspects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Lu, Xiang; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-04-01

    Ethylene as a gas phytohormone plays significant roles in the whole life cycle of plants, ranging from growth and development to stress responses. A linear ethylene signaling pathway has been established in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. However, the ethylene signaling mechanism in monocotyledonous plants such as rice is largely unclear. In this review, we compare the ethylene response phenotypes of dark-grown seedlings of Arabidopsis, rice, and other monocotyledonous plants (maize, wheat, sorghum, and Brachypodium distachyon) and pinpoint that rice has a distinct phenotype of root inhibition but coleoptile promotion in etiolated seedlings upon ethylene treatment. We further summarize the homologous genes of Arabidopsis ethylene signaling components in these monocotyledonous plants and discuss recent progress. Although conserved in most aspects, ethylene signaling in rice has evolved new features compared with that in Arabidopsis. These analyses provide novel insights into the understanding of ethylene signaling in the dicotyledonous Arabidopsis and monocotyledonous plants, particularly rice. Further characterization of rice ethylene-responsive mutants and their corresponding genes will help us better understand the whole picture of ethylene signaling mechanisms in plants.

  13. Cytological and molecular analysis of nonhost resistance in rice to wheat powdery mildew and leaf rust pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yulin; Yao, Juanni; Zhang, Hongchang; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-07-01

    Cereal powdery mildews caused by Blumeria graminis and cereal rusts caused by Puccinia spp. are constant disease threats that limit the production of almost all important cereal crops. Rice is an intensively grown agricultural cereal that is atypical because of its immunity to all powdery mildew and rust fungi. We analyzed the nonhost interactions between rice and the wheat powdery mildew fungus B. graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) and the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina (Ptr) to identify the basis of nonhost resistance (NHR) in rice against cereal powdery mildew and rust fungi at cytological and molecular levels. No visible symptoms were observed on rice leaves inoculated with Bgt or Ptr. Microscopic observations showed that both pathogens exhibited aberrant differentiation and significantly reduced penetration frequencies on rice compared to wheat. The development of Bgt and Ptr was also completely arrested at early infection stages in cases of successful penetration into rice leaves. Attempted infection of rice by Bgt and Ptr induced similar defense responses, including callose deposition, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and hypersensitive response in rice epidermal and mesophyll cells, respectively. Furthermore, a set of defense-related genes were upregulated in rice against Bgt and Ptr infection. Rice is an excellent monocot model for genetic and molecular studies. Therefore, our results demonstrate that rice is a useful model to study the mechanisms of NHR to cereal powdery mildew and rust fungi, which provides useful information for the development of novel and durable strategies to control these important pathogens.

  14. Are Symbiotic Methanotrophs Key Microbes for N Acquisition in Paddy Rice Root?

    PubMed Central

    Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Bao, Zhihua; Shinoda, Ryo; Okubo, Takashi; Ikeda, Seishi

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between biogeochemical processes and microbial functions in rice (Oryza sativa) paddies have been the focus of a large number of studies. A mechanistic understanding of methane–nitrogen (CH4–N) cycle interactions is a key unresolved issue in research on rice paddies. This minireview is an opinion paper for highlighting the mechanisms underlying the interactions between biogeochemical processes and plant-associated microbes based on recent metagenomic, metaproteomic, and isotope analyses. A rice symbiotic gene, relevant to rhizobial nodulation and mycorrhization in plants, likely accommodates diazotrophic methanotrophs or the associated bacterial community in root tissues under low-N fertilizer management, which may permit rice plants to acquire N via N2 fixation. The amount of N fixed in rice roots was previously estimated to be approximately 12% of plant N based on measurements of 15N natural abundance in a paddy field experiment. Community analyses also indicate that methanotroph populations in rice roots are susceptible to environmental conditions such as the microclimate of rice paddies. Therefore, CH4 oxidation by methanotrophs is a driving force in shaping bacterial communities in rice roots grown in CH4-rich environments. Based on these findings, we propose a hypothesis with unanswered questions to describe the interplay between rice plants, root microbiomes, and their biogeochemical functions (CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation). PMID:26960961

  15. Proposal of a growth chamber for growing Super-Dwarf Rice in Space Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Tsukamoto, Koya; Yamashita, Youichirou; Hirai, Takehiro

    Space agriculture needs to be considered to supply food for space crew who stay in space over an extended time period. So far crops such as wheat, onion, oat, pea and lettuce grew to explore the possibility of space agriculture. Although rice is a staple food for most of the world, research on rice cultivation in space has not been done much. Rice grains are nutrient-rich with carbohydrate, protein and dietary fiber. Moreover, rice is a high yield crop and harvested grains have a long shelf life. However, the plant height of standard rice cultivars is relatively long, requiring much space. In addition, rice plants require higher light intensities for greater yield. For these reasons, it is difficult to establish facilities for rice culture in a limited space with a low cost. We propose to employee a super-dwarf cultivar and a small growth chamber with a new type of LEDs. The super-dwarf rice is a short-grain japonica variety and the plant height is approximately 20 cm that is one-fifth as tall as standard cultivars. The LED light used as a light source for this study can provide full spectrum of 380 nm to 750 nm. Air temperature and humidity were controlled by a Peltier device equipped in the chamber. The characteristics of the new type of LEDs and other equipments of the chamber and the ground based performance of super-dwarf rice plants grown in the chamber will be reported.

  16. Iron absorption from brown rice/brown rice-based meal and milled rice/milled rice-based meal.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Trinidad P; Mallillin, Aida C; Sagum, Rosario S; Briones, Dave P; Encabo, Rosario R; Juliano, Bienvenido O

    2009-12-01

    Milled rice is the staple food among Filipinos and is mostly consumed three times a day. Rice as a source of iron could therefore have an important role in the existing 37% prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in the country. Previous iron absorption studies in Filipinos from rice and rice-based meals were carried out on milled rice but no research was done on brown rice of the same variety. This leads to the hypothesis that brown rice may be better than milled rice in terms of iron content. To determine iron absorption from brown rice and brown rice-based meal, and from milled rice and milled rice-based meal of the same variety. The rice variety used in the study was F(2) seeds of PSB Rc72H. Iron absorption from brown/milled rice and brown/milled rice-based meals was determined in 12 healthy human subjects from the incorporation of radioisotopes of iron into erythrocytes 14 days after administration of the labeled rice/rice-based meals. The above samples were also analyzed for nutrient content, including dietary fiber, and iron. The iron content of brown rice was significantly higher (1.1 +/- 0.1 mg/100 g) than that of milled rice (0.6 +/- 0.1 mg/100 g). Brown rice has significantly greater amounts of total dietary fiber (5.4 +/- 0.4%) than milled rice (1.7 +/- 0.2%; P < 0.05). Both tannic acid and phytic acid contents in brown rice (56.9 +/- 3.2 mg/100 g and 290.1 +/- 18.0 mg/100 g, respectively) were significantly higher than those of milled rice (21.3 +/- 2.3 mg/100 g and 84.0 +/- 12.4 mg/100 g, respectively; P<0.05). The amount of iron absorbed from brown rice (0.13 +/- 0.02 mg) did not differ significantly from that from milled rice (0.14 +/- 0.02 mg). However, the amount from brown rice-based meal (0.36 +/- 0.04 mg) differed significantly from that from brown rice (P<0.05) as well as that from milled rice-based meal (0.35 +/- 0.03 mg) from that from milled rice (P<0.05). Moreover, brown rice-based meal did not differ significantly from milled rice-based meal

  17. Pathogen effectors and plant immunity determine specialization of the blast fungus to rice subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jingjing; Huang, Huichuan; Meusnier, Isabelle; Adreit, Henri; Ducasse, Aurélie; Bonnot, François; Pan, Lei; He, Xiahong; Kroj, Thomas; Fournier, Elisabeth; Tharreau, Didier; Gladieux, Pierre; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how fungi specialize on their plant host is crucial for developing sustainable disease control. A traditional, centuries-old rice agro-system of the Yuanyang terraces was used as a model to show that virulence effectors of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzaeh play a key role in its specialization on locally grown indica or japonica local rice subspecies. Our results have indicated that major differences in several components of basal immunity and effector-triggered immunity of the japonica and indica rice varieties are associated with specialization of M. oryzae. These differences thus play a key role in determining M. oryzae host specificity and may limit the spread of the pathogen within the Yuanyang agro-system. Specifically, the AVR-Pia effector has been identified as a possible determinant of the specialization of M. oryzae to local japonica rice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19377.001 PMID:28008850

  18. Discrimination of red and white rice bran from Indonesia using HPLC fingerprint analysis combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Aryani; Rafi, Mohamad; Darusman, Latifah K

    2017-04-15

    HPLC fingerprint analysis combined with chemometrics was developed to discriminate between the red and the white rice bran grown in Indonesia. The major component in rice bran is γ-oryzanol which consisted of 4 main compounds, namely cycloartenol ferulate, cyclobranol ferulate, campesterol ferulate and β-sitosterol ferulate. Separation of these four compounds along with other compounds was performed using C18 and methanol-acetonitrile with gradient elution system. By using these intensity variations, principal component and discriminant analysis were performed to discriminate the two samples. Discriminant analysis was successfully discriminated the red from the white rice bran with predictive ability of the model showed a satisfactory classification for the test samples. The results of this study indicated that the developed method was suitable as quality control method for rice bran in terms of identification and discrimination of the red and the white rice bran. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Concentration and release level of momilactone B in the seedlings of eight rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Ino, Takeshi

    2005-09-01

    The release levels of a growth inhibitor, momilactone B, from rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings of eight cultivars were compared with the endogenous concentrations of momilactone B in their seedlings. All rice cultivars contained momilactone B in the seedlings, and their concentrations differed between the cultivars. Momilactone B was also found in all culture solutions in which these rice seedlings were grown, and the concentrations differed between the cultivars. The momilactone B concentrations in the culture solutions were reflected in the momilactone B concentrations in the seedlings. These results suggest that all rice cultivars may produce momilactone B and release momilactone B into the culture solutions. In addition, the release level of momilactone B may depend on the production level of momilactone B in the seedlings, which may affect allelopathic potential of these rice cultivars because as a growth inhibitor, momilactone B is able to act as an allelochemical.

  20. Impacts of preharvest factors during kernel development on rice quality and functionality.

    PubMed

    Siebenmorgen, Terry J; Grigg, Brandon C; Lanning, Sarah B

    2013-01-01

    Rice quality and functionality are characterized in many ways, depending largely on the industry segment using the rice. These characteristics include appearance, milling, and cooking parameters. Recently, variable quality of rice grown in the United States has been reported, but the cause was not well documented. Agronomic impacts include planting time, irrigation and fertility, cultivar selection, and harvest conditions. However, recent research suggests that ambient air temperature, specifically elevated nighttime air temperature (NTAT) during grain filling, dramatically affects the variability of rice milling quality, in terms of milled- and head-rice yields; appearance, in terms of chalkiness; and functional characteristics, including viscosity profiles, gelatinization temperatures, and proximate concentrations. Future research is needed to develop cultivars that are resistant to stress resulting from elevated NTAT during the critical period of grain filling, and, for the near term, to develop altered production management practices that mitigate elevated-temperature stress.

  1. Foliar application of two silica sols reduced cadmium accumulation in rice grains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanping; Li, Fangbai; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Xinming; Wang, Shihua; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiangdong

    2009-01-30

    In the present study, pot experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of foliar application of two silica (Si) sols on the alleviation of cadmium (Cd) toxicity in contaminated soil to rice. Results showed that the foliar application of Si sols significantly increased the dry weight of grains (without husk) and shoots in rice grown in Cd contaminated soil, whereas the Cd concentration in the grains and shoots decreased obviously. The total accumulation of Cd in rice grains also decreased with the application of both of the Si sols, but no significant effect was found on the Cd accumulation in the shoots. For the optimal effect, Si-sol-B should be foliar applied at the tillering-stage during rice growth. The mechanism of Si foliar application to alleviate the toxicity and accumulation of Cd in grains of rice may be related to the probable Cd sequestration in the shoot cell walls.

  2. Anaerobic conditions improve germination of a gibberellic acid deficient rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Dwarf plants are useful in research because multiple plants can be grown in a small area. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is especially important since its relatively simple genome has recently been sequenced. We are characterizing a gibberellic acid (GA) mutant of rice (japonica cv 'Shiokari,' line N-71) that is extremely dwarf (20 cm tall). Unfortunately, this GA mutation is associated with poor germination (70%) under aerobic conditions. Neither exogenous GA nor a dormancy-breaking heat treatment improved germination. However, 95% germination was achieved by germinating the seeds anaerobically, either in a pure N2 environment or submerged in unstirred tap water. The anaerobic conditions appear to break a mild post-harvest dormancy in this rice cultivar. Copyright 2002 Crop Science Society of America.

  3. Factors Affecting Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Rice Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, M. J.; Xiong, Z.; Khalil, M. K.

    2007-12-01

    Experiments have shown that a few factors control the emissions of methane from rice fields. Among the most significant factors are water management and soil amendments. Continuous flooding and organic fertilizers result in the highest emissions of methane while intermittent flooding and use of nitrogen fertilizers produce more nitrous oxide. We measured fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide from tubs planted with rice grown in a greenhouse at Portland State University. We used classical factorial experimental design to calculate interactions between water management, nitrogen fertilizer application, and organic matter (chopped rice straw) for emission of methane and nitrous oxide. We will discuss the results of three years of experiments. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), US Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02- 04ER63913.

  4. Anaerobic conditions improve germination of a gibberellic acid deficient rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Dwarf plants are useful in research because multiple plants can be grown in a small area. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is especially important since its relatively simple genome has recently been sequenced. We are characterizing a gibberellic acid (GA) mutant of rice (japonica cv 'Shiokari,' line N-71) that is extremely dwarf (20 cm tall). Unfortunately, this GA mutation is associated with poor germination (70%) under aerobic conditions. Neither exogenous GA nor a dormancy-breaking heat treatment improved germination. However, 95% germination was achieved by germinating the seeds anaerobically, either in a pure N2 environment or submerged in unstirred tap water. The anaerobic conditions appear to break a mild post-harvest dormancy in this rice cultivar. Copyright 2002 Crop Science Society of America.

  5. Engineering analysis of ERTS data for rice in the Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnair, A. J. (Principal Investigator); Heydt, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Rice is an important food worldwide. Worthwhile goals, particularly for developing nations, are the capability to recognize from satellite imagery: (1) areas where rice is grown, and (2) growth status (irrigation, vigor, yield). A two-step procedure to achieve this is being investigated. Ground truth, and ERTS-1 imagery (four passes) covering 80% of a rice growth cycle for some Philippine sites, have been analyzed. One-D and three-D signature extraction, and synthesis of an initial site recognition/status algorithm have been performed. Results are encouraging. but additional passes and sites must be analyzed. Good position information for extracted data is a must.

  6. Production of beta-carotene-enriched rice bran using solid-state fermentation of Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Roadjanakamolson, M; Suntornsuk, W

    2010-03-01

    This work was aimed at utilizing rice bran as a substrate for beta-carotene production by Rhodotorula glutinis DM 28 under optimized conditions of solid-state fermentation. The biomass and beta-carotene content of Rhodotorula glutinis DM 28 grown on rice bran as a sole substrate under solid-state fermentation were 54 g/kg rice bran and 1.65 mg/kg rice bran, respectively. Its biomass and beta-carotene content, however, could be improved by 60% and 30%, respectively, using the Central Composite Design for the optimization of its cultivation conditions. The optimized conditions obtained were a pH of 5, a moisture content of 70% (w/w), and a carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of 4. Under these conditions, rice bran containing R. glutinis DM 28 had nutritional values of beta-carotene, protein, and fat higher than those of rice bran alone. Yeast-grown rice bran could be suitable, therefore, to use as a beta-carotene-enriched supplement in animal feeds.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduced the ratios of inorganic/organic arsenic in rice grains.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Chen, X W; Wong, M H

    2016-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices was inoculated to rice to investigate its effects on arsenic (As) uptake, grain As speciation, and rhizospheric As concentration of six rice cultivars grown in As-amended soil (60 mg As kg(-1) soil). The AMF inoculation induced either positive, neutral or negative responses in rice grown in As contaminated soil, suggesting that functional diversity may exist in AMF symbiosis when As is taken up and transferred. The ratios of inorganic/organic As concentrations in rice grains of all cultivars were significantly reduced by AMF, that involved the transformation of inorganic As into less toxic organic form dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in rice. AMF decreased significantly total As and inorganic As concentrations in rice grains of Handao 3. Positive correlations (R(2) = 0.30-0.56, P < 0.05) between As in the rhizospheric soil solution and As in rice grain at different periods were observed. This inferred that the As survey of soil solution can be an effective measure for evaluating As in grains.

  8. Genomic patterns of nucleotide diversity in divergent populations of U.S. weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Weedy rice (red rice), a conspecific weed of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), is a significant problem throughout the world and an emerging threat in regions where it was previously absent. Despite belonging to the same species complex as domesticated rice and its wild relatives, the evolutionary origins of weedy rice remain unclear. We use genome-wide patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in a broad geographic sample of weedy, domesticated, and wild Oryza samples to infer the origin and demographic processes influencing U.S. weedy rice evolution. Results We find greater population structure than has been previously reported for U.S. weedy rice, and that the multiple, genetically divergent populations have separate origins. The two main U.S. weedy rice populations share genetic backgrounds with cultivated O. sativa varietal groups not grown commercially in the U.S., suggesting weed origins from domesticated ancestors. Hybridization between weedy groups and between weedy rice and local crops has also led to the evolution of distinct U.S. weedy rice populations. Demographic simulations indicate differences among the main weedy groups in the impact of bottlenecks on their establishment in the U.S., and in the timing of divergence from their cultivated relatives. Conclusions Unlike prior research, we did not find unambiguous evidence for U.S. weedy rice originating via hybridization between cultivated and wild Oryza species. Our results demonstrate the potential for weedy life-histories to evolve directly from within domesticated lineages. The diverse origins of U.S. weedy rice populations demonstrate the multiplicity of evolutionary forces that can influence the emergence of weeds from a single species complex. PMID:20550656

  9. Innate immunity in rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuewei; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in studies of rice innate immunity have led to the identification and characterization of host sensors encoding receptor kinases that perceive conserved microbial signatures. The non-RD domain, a newly recognized hallmark of these receptor kinases is highly expanded in rice (Oryza sativa) compared with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Researchers have also identified a diverse array of microbial effectors from bacterial and fungal pathogens that triggers immune responses upon perception. These include both, effectors that indirectly target host Nucleotide binding site/Leucine rice repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins and transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that directly bind promoters of host genes. Here we review the recognition and signaling events that govern rice innate immunity. PMID:21602092

  10. Photoperiod shift effects on yield characteristics of rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, G. M.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Edible yield must be maximized for each crop species selected for inclusion in the Controlled Ecological Life-Support System (CELSS) proposed by NASA to support long-term manned space missions. In a greenhouse study aimed at increasing biomass partitioning to rice (Oryza sativa L.) grain, plants of the high yielding semi-dwarf rice cultivar Ai-Nan-Tsao were started in pots under 8-h photoperiods at a density of 212 plants m-2. After different periods of time under 8-h photoperiods, pots were switched to continuous light for the remainder of the cropping cycle. Continuous light did not delay time to first panicle emergence (60 d) or time to harvest (83 d). There was a positive correlation between the length of continuous light treatments and nongrain biomass. Grain yield (1.6 +/- 0.2 g plant-1) did not increase in continuous light. Yield-efficiency rate (grain weight per length of cropping cycle, canopy volume, and weight of nongrain shoot biomass) was used to compare treatments. Small Ai-Nan-Tsao rice canopies grown under 8-h photoperiods were more efficient producers of grain than canopies grown under continuous light for a portion of the rice cropping cycle.

  11. Photoperiod shift effects on yield characteristics of rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, G. M.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Edible yield must be maximized for each crop species selected for inclusion in the Controlled Ecological Life-Support System (CELSS) proposed by NASA to support long-term manned space missions. In a greenhouse study aimed at increasing biomass partitioning to rice (Oryza sativa L.) grain, plants of the high yielding semi-dwarf rice cultivar Ai-Nan-Tsao were started in pots under 8-h photoperiods at a density of 212 plants m-2. After different periods of time under 8-h photoperiods, pots were switched to continuous light for the remainder of the cropping cycle. Continuous light did not delay time to first panicle emergence (60 d) or time to harvest (83 d). There was a positive correlation between the length of continuous light treatments and nongrain biomass. Grain yield (1.6 +/- 0.2 g plant-1) did not increase in continuous light. Yield-efficiency rate (grain weight per length of cropping cycle, canopy volume, and weight of nongrain shoot biomass) was used to compare treatments. Small Ai-Nan-Tsao rice canopies grown under 8-h photoperiods were more efficient producers of grain than canopies grown under continuous light for a portion of the rice cropping cycle.

  12. Graphic Grown Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ann

    2009-01-01

    It's no secret that children and YAs are clued in to graphic novels (GNs) and that comics-loving adults are positively giddy that this format is getting the recognition it deserves. Still, there is a whole swath of library card-carrying grown-up readers out there with no idea where to start. Splashy movies such as "300" and "Spider-Man" and their…

  13. Graphic Grown Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ann

    2009-01-01

    It's no secret that children and YAs are clued in to graphic novels (GNs) and that comics-loving adults are positively giddy that this format is getting the recognition it deserves. Still, there is a whole swath of library card-carrying grown-up readers out there with no idea where to start. Splashy movies such as "300" and "Spider-Man" and their…

  14. Escape to Ferality: The Endoferal Origin of Weedy Rice from Crop Rice through De-Domestication.

    PubMed

    Kanapeckas, Kimberly L; Vigueira, Cynthia C; Ortiz, Aida; Gettler, Kyle A; Burgos, Nilda R; Fischer, Albert J; Lawton-Rauh, Amy L

    Domestication is the hallmark of evolution and civilization and harnesses biodiversity through selection for specific traits. In regions where domesticated lines are grown near wild relatives, congeneric sources of aggressive weedy genotypes cause major economic losses. Thus, the origins of weedy genotypes where no congeneric species occur raise questions regarding management effectiveness and evolutionary mechanisms responsible for weedy population success. Since eradication in the 1970s, California growers avoided weedy rice through continuous flood culture and zero-tolerance guidelines, preventing the import, presence, and movement of weedy seeds. In 2003, after decades of no reported presence in California, a weedy rice population was confirmed in dry-seeded fields. Our objectives were to identify the origins and establishment of this population and pinpoint possible phenotypes involved. We show that California weedy rice is derived from a different genetic source among a broad range of AA genome Oryzas and is most recently diverged from O. sativa temperate japonica cultivated in California. In contrast, other weedy rice ecotypes in North America (Southern US) originate from weedy genotypes from China near wild Oryza, and are derived through existing crop-wild relative crosses. Analyses of morphological data show that California weedy rice subgroups have phenotypes like medium-grain or gourmet cultivars, but have colored pericarp, seed shattering, and awns like wild relatives, suggesting that reversion to non-domestic or wild-like traits can occur following domestication, despite apparent fixation of domestication alleles. Additionally, these results indicate that preventive methods focused on incoming weed sources through contamination may miss burgeoning weedy genotypes that rapidly adapt, establish, and proliferate. Investigating the common and unique evolutionary mechanisms underlying global weed origins and subsequent interactions with crop relatives sheds

  15. Escape to Ferality: The Endoferal Origin of Weedy Rice from Crop Rice through De-Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Gettler, Kyle A.; Burgos, Nilda R.; Fischer, Albert J.

    2016-01-01

    Domestication is the hallmark of evolution and civilization and harnesses biodiversity through selection for specific traits. In regions where domesticated lines are grown near wild relatives, congeneric sources of aggressive weedy genotypes cause major economic losses. Thus, the origins of weedy genotypes where no congeneric species occur raise questions regarding management effectiveness and evolutionary mechanisms responsible for weedy population success. Since eradication in the 1970s, California growers avoided weedy rice through continuous flood culture and zero-tolerance guidelines, preventing the import, presence, and movement of weedy seeds. In 2003, after decades of no reported presence in California, a weedy rice population was confirmed in dry-seeded fields. Our objectives were to identify the origins and establishment of this population and pinpoint possible phenotypes involved. We show that California weedy rice is derived from a different genetic source among a broad range of AA genome Oryzas and is most recently diverged from O. sativa temperate japonica cultivated in California. In contrast, other weedy rice ecotypes in North America (Southern US) originate from weedy genotypes from China near wild Oryza, and are derived through existing crop-wild relative crosses. Analyses of morphological data show that California weedy rice subgroups have phenotypes like medium-grain or gourmet cultivars, but have colored pericarp, seed shattering, and awns like wild relatives, suggesting that reversion to non-domestic or wild-like traits can occur following domestication, despite apparent fixation of domestication alleles. Additionally, these results indicate that preventive methods focused on incoming weed sources through contamination may miss burgeoning weedy genotypes that rapidly adapt, establish, and proliferate. Investigating the common and unique evolutionary mechanisms underlying global weed origins and subsequent interactions with crop relatives sheds

  16. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... help lower blood levels of cholesterol and related lipids. Red yeast rice products may not be safe; ... to lower blood levels of cholesterol and related lipids. Some red yeast rice products contain substances called ...

  17. Shaping a better rice plant.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan

    2010-06-01

    Two studies describe how regulatory variation at the rice gene OsSPL14 can lead to altered plant morphology and improve grain yield. These studies support the possibility of improving rice yield through changing plant architecture.

  18. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice...

  19. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice...

  20. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... Milled Rice Principles Governing Application of Standards § 868.310 Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice...

  1. Rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter while replacing white rice with brown rice.

    PubMed

    Manickavasagan, Annamalai; Al-Marhubi, Insaaf Mohd; Dev, Satyanarayan

    2014-06-01

    Rice-blackgram batter is a raw material for many traditional convenience foods in Asia. Reformulation of traditional convenience food by replacing white rice with whole rice (brown rice) is a novel method to reduce the consumption of refined grain and increase the intake of whole grain in our diet. In this study, rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter was investigated while replacing white rice with brown rice at five levels (T1--0% replacement (control), T2--25% replacement, T3--50% replacement, T4--75% replacement, and T5--100% replacement). The shear stress versus shear rate plot indicates that the rice-blackgram batter exhibited non-Newtonian fluid behavior (shear thinning property) even after 100% replacement of white rice with brown rice. The rheological characteristics of rice-blackgram batters fitted reasonably well in Cassan (r2 = 0.8521-0.9856) and power law (r2 = 0.8042-0.9823) models. Brown rice replacement at all levels did not affect the flow behavior index, yield stress, consistency coefficient, and apparent viscosity of batter at 25 degrees C. However, at higher temperature, the viscosity was greater for T4 and T5 (no difference between them) than T1, T2, and T3 (no difference between them) batters. Further research is required to determine the sensory attributes and acceptability of the cooked products with brown rice-blended batter.

  2. Dark septate endophyte decreases stress on rice plants.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvana Gomes Dos; Silva, Paula Renata Alves da; Garcia, Andres Calderin; Zilli, Jerri Édson; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    Abiotic stress is one of the major limiting factors for plant development and productivity, which makes it important to identify microorganisms capable of increasing plant tolerance to stress. Dark septate endophytes can be symbionts of plants. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of dark septate endophytes isolates to reduce the effects of water stress in the rice varieties Nipponbare and Piauí. The experiments were performed under gnotobiotic conditions, and the water stress was induced with PEG. Four dark septate endophytes were isolated from the roots of wild rice (Oryza glumaepatula) collected from the Brazilian Amazon. Plant height as well as shoot and root fresh and dry matter were measured. Leaf protein concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activity were also estimated. The dark septate endophytes were grown in vitro in Petri dishes containing culture medium; they exhibited different levels of tolerance to salinity and water stress. The two rice varieties tested responded differently to inoculation with dark septate endophytes. Endophytes promoted rice plant growth both in the presence and in the absence of a water deficit. Decreased oxidative stress in plants in response to inoculation was observed in nearly all inoculated treatments, as indicated by the decrease in antioxidant enzyme activity. Dark septate endophytes fungi were shown to increase the tolerance of rice plants to stress caused by water deficiency.

  3. UV-induced momilactone B accumulation in rice rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Kujime, Hiroya; Ino, Takeshi

    2007-11-01

    UV-irradiation increased the concentration of momilactone B in shoots and roots of rice seedlings, and increasing the irradiation increased the concentration. The concentration in 90-min UV-irradiated shoots and roots, respectively, was 31.8- and 3.6-fold higher than that in non-irradiated shoots and roots. After UV-irradiation the concentration of momilactone B in rice shoots decreased. There was, however, an accumulation of momilactone B in the medium in which UV-irradiated seedlings were grown. Five days after UV-irradiation, momilactone B in the medium was at a level 2.5 times greater than on day 0, which was 47% of momilactone B in the seedlings, suggesting that rice may actively secrete momilactone B into medium. Therefore, UV-irradiation increased not only production of momilactone B in rice seedlings but also secretion of momilactone B into rice rhizosphere. As momilactone B acts as an antimicrobial and allelopathic agent, secretion of momilactone B into the rhizosphere may provide a competitive advantage for root establishment through local suppression of soil microorganism and inhibition of the growth of competing plant species.

  4. Secretion of momilactone A from rice roots to the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Ino, Takeshi; Ota, Katsumi

    2008-05-05

    The secretion levels of momilactone A from rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings of eight cultivars into the rhizosphere were compared with the endogenous momilactone A concentrations in their shoots and roots. All rice cultivars contained momilactone A in the shoots and roots, and concentrations differed among the cultivars. Momilactone A was also found in all culture solutions in which the rice seedlings were grown, and the concentrations differed among the cultivars. The momilactone A concentrations in the culture solutions were reflected in the momilactone A concentrations in the shoots. These results suggest that all rice cultivars may produce momilactome A and secrete momilactone A into the culture solutions. The secretion levels of momilactone A may be more dependent on their capacities for momilactone A production in the shoots than on their capacities for momilactone A transportation from the shoots into the environment via the roots. As momilactone A acts as an antimicrobial and allelopathic agent, the secretion of momilactone A into the rice rhizosphere may provide a competitive advantage for root establishment through local suppression of soil microorganisms and inhibition of the growth of competing plant species.

  5. Sulfur Fertilization Changes the Community Structure of Rice Root-, and Soil- Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Sachiko; Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Seishi; Shinoda, Ryo; Anda, Mizue; Kondo, Ryuji; Mori, Yumi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-01-01

    Under paddy field conditions, biological sulfur oxidation occurs in the oxidized surface soil layer and rhizosphere, in which oxygen leaks from the aerenchyma system of rice plants. In the present study, we examined community shifts in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria associated with the oxidized surface soil layer and rice roots under different sulfur fertilization conditions based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in order to explore the existence of oligotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the paddy rice ecosystem. Rice plants were grown in pots with no fertilization (control) or CaCO3 or CaSO4 fertilization. A principal-coordinates analysis (PCoA) showed that CaSO4 fertilization markedly affected bacterial communities associated with rice roots and soil, whereas no significant differences were observed in plant growth among the fertilizer treatments examined. In rice roots, the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and TM7 was significantly higher in CaSO4-fertilized pots than in control pots. Alphaproteobacteria, Bradyrhizobiaceae, and Methylocystaceae members were significantly more abundant in CaSO4-fertilized roots than in control roots. On the other hand, the abundance of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria was lower in CaSO4-fertilized soil than in control soil. These results indicate that the bacteria associated with rice roots and soil responded to the sulfur amendment, suggesting that more diverse bacteria are involved in sulfur oxidation in the rice paddy ecosystem than previously considered. PMID:26947443

  6. Characterization of functional trait diversity among Indian cultivated and weedy rice populations

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, M.; Singh, Raghwendra; Kumar, B.; Chauhan, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Weedy rice, a menace in rice growing areas globally, is biosimilar having attributes similar to cultivated and wild rice, and therefore is difficult to manage. A study was initiated to characterize the functional traits of 76 weedy rice populations and commonly grown rice cultivars from different agro-climatic zones for nine morphological, five physiological, and three phenological parameters in a field experiment under an augmented block design. Comparison between weedy and cultivated rice revealed a difference in duration (days) from panicle emergence to heading as the most variable trait and awn length as the least variable one, as evidenced from their coefficients of variation. The results of principal component analysis revealed the first three principal components to represent 47.3% of the total variation, which indicates an important role of transpiration, conductance, leaf-air temperature difference, days to panicle emergence, days to heading, flag leaf length, SPAD (soil-plant analysis development), grain weight, plant height, and panicle length to the diversity in weedy rice populations. The variations existing in weedy rice population are a major reason for its wider adaptability to varied environmental conditions and also a problem while trying to manage it. PMID:27072282

  7. Sulfur Fertilization Changes the Community Structure of Rice Root-, and Soil- Associated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Sachiko; Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Seishi; Shinoda, Ryo; Anda, Mizue; Kondo, Ryuji; Mori, Yumi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-01-01

    Under paddy field conditions, biological sulfur oxidation occurs in the oxidized surface soil layer and rhizosphere, in which oxygen leaks from the aerenchyma system of rice plants. In the present study, we examined community shifts in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria associated with the oxidized surface soil layer and rice roots under different sulfur fertilization conditions based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in order to explore the existence of oligotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the paddy rice ecosystem. Rice plants were grown in pots with no fertilization (control) or CaCO3 or CaSO4 fertilization. A principal-coordinates analysis (PCoA) showed that CaSO4 fertilization markedly affected bacterial communities associated with rice roots and soil, whereas no significant differences were observed in plant growth among the fertilizer treatments examined. In rice roots, the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and TM7 was significantly higher in CaSO4-fertilized pots than in control pots. Alphaproteobacteria, Bradyrhizobiaceae, and Methylocystaceae members were significantly more abundant in CaSO4-fertilized roots than in control roots. On the other hand, the abundance of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria was lower in CaSO4-fertilized soil than in control soil. These results indicate that the bacteria associated with rice roots and soil responded to the sulfur amendment, suggesting that more diverse bacteria are involved in sulfur oxidation in the rice paddy ecosystem than previously considered.

  8. Isolation and identification of a potent allelopathic substance in rice root exudates.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Ino, Takeshi; Sata, Noriko; Yamamura, Shosuke

    2002-07-01

    A search for growth inhibitors in rice root exudates was undertaken in order to clarify the allelopathic system in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice seedlings inhibited the growth of cress (Lepidium sativum L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings when the cress and lettuce were grown with rice seedlings. The putative compound causing the inhibitory effect of rice seedlings was isolated from their culture solution, and the chemical structure of the inhibitor was determined by spectral data as momilactone B. Momilactone B inhibited the growth of cress and lettuce seedlings at concentrations greater than 3 and 30 microM, respectively. The concentration of momilactone B was 3.4 and 1.1 nmol per seedling in the culture solutions of husked and non-husked rice seedlings, respectively. These results suggest that rice seedlings may release momilactone B into the environment and the stress caused by the husk-treatment may increase the amount of momilactone B released. Thus, momilactone B may play an important role in rice allelopathy.

  9. Genetic structure and isolation by distance in a landrace of Thai rice

    PubMed Central

    Pusadee, Tonapha; Jamjod, Sansanee; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Rerkasem, Benjavan; Schaal, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    Rice is among the 3 most important crops worldwide. While much of the world's rice harvest is based on modern high-yield varieties, traditional varieties of rice grown by indigenous groups have great importance as a resource for future crop improvement. These local landraces represent an intermediate stage of domestication between a wild ancestor and modern varieties and they serve as reservoirs of genetic variation. Such genetic variation is influenced both by natural processes such as selection and drift, and by the agriculture practices of local farmers. How these processes interact to shape and change the population genetics of landrace rice is unknown. Here, we determine the population genetic structure of a single variety of landrace rice, Bue Chomee, cultivated by Karen people of Thailand. Microsatellite markers reveal high level of genetic variation despite predominant inbreeding in the crop. Bue Chomee rice shows slight but significant genetic differentiation among Karen villages. Moreover, genetically determined traits such as flowering time can vary significantly among villages. An unanticipated result was the overall pattern of genetic differentiation across villages which conforms to an isolation by distance model of differentiation. Isolation by distance is observed in natural plant species where the likelihood of gene flow is inversely related to distance. In Karen rice, gene flow is the result of farmers' seed sharing networks. Taken together, these data suggest that landrace rice is a dynamic genetic system that responds to evolutionary forces, both natural and those imposed by humans. PMID:19651617

  10. Modeled concentrations in rice and ingestion doses from chronic atmospheric releases of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.R.; Davis, P.A.

    2000-05-01

    The expansion of nuclear power programs in Asia has stimulated interest in the improved modeling of concentrations of tritium in rice, a staple crop grown throughout the far east. Normally, the specific activity model is used to calculate concentrations of tritium in the tissue water of edible plants to assess ingestion dose from chronic releases. However, because rice, like other grains, has much lower water content than most crops, the calculation must also account for organically bound tritium. This paper reviews ways to calculate steady-state concentrations of tritium in rice, including the methods of Canadian and US regulatory models, and the assumptions behind them. Concentrations in rice and resulting ingestion doses are compared for the various methods, and equations for calculating concentrations are recommended. The regulatory models underestimate doses received from ingestion of rice contaminated with tritium since they do not account explicitly for organically bound tritium. The importance of including organically bound tritium is illustrated in a comparison of doses from rice, leafy vegetables and milk for an Asian diet. Dose factors from tritium for these foods are estimated to be 135, 47, and 20 nSv y{sup {minus}1}/(Bq m{sup {minus}3}), respectively. Assuming known air concentrations, tritium concentrations in rice, calculated with the recommended equations, are uncertain by less than a factor 2 when tritium concentrations in the rice paddy water are known, and by less than a factor of 2.3 when concentrations in paddy water are unknown.

  11. Mapping regional risks from climate change for rainfed rice cultivation in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kuntal; McClean, Colin J; Büker, Patrick; Hartley, Sue E; Hill, Jane K

    2017-09-01

    Global warming is predicted to increase in the future, with detrimental consequences for rainfed crops that are dependent on natural rainfall (i.e. non-irrigated). Given that many crops grown under rainfed conditions support the livelihoods of low-income farmers, it is important to highlight the vulnerability of rainfed areas to climate change in order to anticipate potential risks to food security. In this paper, we focus on India, where ~ 50% of rice is grown under rainfed conditions, and we employ statistical models (climate envelope models (CEMs) and boosted regression trees (BRTs)) to map changes in climate suitability for rainfed rice cultivation at a regional level (~ 18 × 18 km cell resolution) under projected future (2050) climate change (IPCC RCPs 2.6 and 8.5, using three GCMs: BCC-CSM1.1, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, and HadGEM2-ES). We quantify the occurrence of rice (whether or not rainfed rice is commonly grown, using CEMs) and rice extent (area under cultivation, using BRTs) during the summer monsoon in relation to four climate variables that affect rice growth and yield namely ratio of precipitation to evapotranspiration (PER), maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmax and Tmin ), and total rainfall during harvesting. Our models described the occurrence and extent of rice very well (CEMs for occurrence, ensemble AUC = 0.92; BRTs for extent, Pearson's r = 0.87). PER was the most important predictor of rainfed rice occurrence, and it was positively related to rainfed rice area, but all four climate variables were important for determining the extent of rice cultivation. Our models project that 15%-40% of current rainfed rice growing areas will be at risk (i.e. decline in climate suitability or become completely unsuitable). However, our models project considerable variation across India in the impact of future climate change: eastern and northern India are the locations most at risk, but parts of central and western India may benefit from increased

  12. Arsenic hazard in Cambodian rice from a market-based survey with a case study of Preak Russey village, Kandal Province.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Peter J; Polya, David A; Cooke, David A

    2015-08-01

    This study comprises a market-based survey to assess the arsenic (As) hazard of Cambodian rice, encompassing rice from seven Cambodian provinces, comparisons with rice imported from China, Vietnam and Thailand, and assessments of 15 rice varieties. Rice samples (n = 157) were collected from four large markets in Kandal Province and analysed for As using inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The mean As concentration for Cambodian rice (0.185 µg g(-1), range 0.047-0.771 µg g(-1)) was higher than that for imported rice from Vietnam and Thailand (0.162 and 0.157 µg g(-1), respectively) with mean As concentrations highest in rice from Prey Veng Province resulting in a daily dose of 1.77 µg kg(-1) b.w. (body weight) d(-1). Between unmilled rice varieties, Cambodian-grown White Sticky Rice had the highest mean As concentration (0.234 µg g(-1)), whilst White Sticky Rice produced in Thailand had the lowest (0.125 µg g(-1)), suggesting that localised conditions have greater bearing over rice As concentrations than differences in As uptake between individual varieties themselves. A rice and water consumption survey for 15 respondents in the village of Preak Russey revealed mean consumption rates of 522 g d(-1) of rice and 1.9 L d(-1) of water. At water As concentrations >1000 µg L(-1), the relative contribution to the daily dose from rice is low. When water As concentrations are lowered to 50 µg L(-1), daily doses from rice and water are both generally below the 3.0 µg kg(-1) b.w. d(-1) benchmark daily limit for a 0.5% increase in lung cancer, yet when combined they exceeded this value in all but three respondents.

  13. Arsenic accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.): human exposure through food chain.

    PubMed

    Azizur Rahman, M; Hasegawa, H; Mahfuzur Rahman, M; Mazid Miah, M A; Tasmin, A

    2008-02-01

    Although human exposure to arsenic is thought to be caused mainly through arsenic-contaminated underground drinking water, the use of this water for irrigation enhances the possibility of arsenic uptake into crop plants. Rice is the staple food grain in Bangladesh. Arsenic content in straw, grain and husk of rice is especially important since paddy fields are extensively irrigated with underground water having high level of arsenic concentration. However, straw and husk are widely used as cattle feed. Arsenic concentration in rice grain was 0.5+/-0.02 mg kg(-1) with the highest concentrations being in grains grown on soil treated with 40 mg As kg(-1) soil. With the average rice consumption between 400 and 650 g/day by typical adults in the arsenic-affected areas of Bangladesh, the intake of arsenic through rice stood at 0.20-0.35 mg/day. With a daily consumption of 4 L drinking water, arsenic intake through drinking water stands at 0.2mg/day. Moreover, when the rice plant was grown in 60 mg of As kg(-1) soil, arsenic concentrations in rice straw were 20.6+/-0.52 at panicle initiation stage and 23.7+/-0.44 at maturity stage, whereas it was 1.6+/-0.20 mg kg(-1) in husk. Cattle drink a considerable amount of water. So alike human beings, arsenic gets deposited into cattle body through rice straw and husk as well as from drinking water which in turn finds a route into the human body. Arsenic intake in human body from rice and cattle could be potentially important and it exists in addition to that from drinking water. Therefore, a hypothesis has been put forward elucidating the possible food chain pathways through which arsenic may enter into human body.

  14. Rice: Characterizing the Environmental Response of a Gibberellic Acid-Deficient Rice for Use as a Model Crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Pinnock, Derek; Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a useful model crop plant. Rice was the first crop plant to have its complete genome sequenced. Unfortunately, even semi-dwarf rice cultivars are 60 to 90 an tail, and large plant populations cannot be grown in the confined volumes of greenhouses and growth chambers. We recently identified an extremely short (20 em tall) rice line, which is an ideal model for larger rice cultivars. We called this line "Super Dwarf rice." Here we report the response of Super Dwarf to temperature, photoperiod, photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and factors that can affect time to head emergence. Vegetative biomass increased 6% per degree Celsius, with increasing temperature from 27 to 31 C. Seed yield decreased by 2% per degree Celsius rise in temperature, and as a result, harvest index decreased from 60 to 54%. The time to heading increased by 2 d for every hour above a 12-h photoperiod. Yield increased with increasing PPF up to the highest level tested at 1800 micro-mol/sq m/s (12-h photoperiod; 77.8 mol/sq m/d). Yield efficiency (grams per mole of photons) increased to 900 micro-mol/sq m/s and then slightly decreased at 1800 micro-mol/sq m/s . Heading was delayed by addition of gibberellic acid 3 (GA,) to the root zone but was hastened under mild N stress. Overall, short stature, high yield, high harvest index, and no extraordinary environmental requirements make Super Dwarf rice an excellent model plant for yield studies in controlled environments.

  15. Rice: Characterizing the Environmental Response of a Gibberellic Acid-Deficient Rice for Use as a Model Crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Pinnock, Derek; Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a useful model crop plant. Rice was the first crop plant to have its complete genome sequenced. Unfortunately, even semi-dwarf rice cultivars are 60 to 90 an tail, and large plant populations cannot be grown in the confined volumes of greenhouses and growth chambers. We recently identified an extremely short (20 em tall) rice line, which is an ideal model for larger rice cultivars. We called this line "Super Dwarf rice." Here we report the response of Super Dwarf to temperature, photoperiod, photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and factors that can affect time to head emergence. Vegetative biomass increased 6% per degree Celsius, with increasing temperature from 27 to 31 C. Seed yield decreased by 2% per degree Celsius rise in temperature, and as a result, harvest index decreased from 60 to 54%. The time to heading increased by 2 d for every hour above a 12-h photoperiod. Yield increased with increasing PPF up to the highest level tested at 1800 micro-mol/sq m/s (12-h photoperiod; 77.8 mol/sq m/d). Yield efficiency (grams per mole of photons) increased to 900 micro-mol/sq m/s and then slightly decreased at 1800 micro-mol/sq m/s . Heading was delayed by addition of gibberellic acid 3 (GA,) to the root zone but was hastened under mild N stress. Overall, short stature, high yield, high harvest index, and no extraordinary environmental requirements make Super Dwarf rice an excellent model plant for yield studies in controlled environments.

  16. Effect of rice variety and nutrient management on rice productivity in organic rice system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Demand for organic rice has been increasing for decades. However, the information on sustainable organic rice production systems is still lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of soil amendment products, nitrogen rate, and variety on rice grain yield, yield components, ...

  17. Methane potential and biodegradability of rice straw, rice husk and rice residues from the drying process.

    PubMed

    Contreras, L M; Schelle, H; Sebrango, C R; Pereda, I

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural solid residues are a potential renewable energy source. Rice harvesting and production in Sancti Spíritus province, Cuba, currently generates residues without an environmentally sustainable disposal route. Rice residues (rice straw, rice husk and rice residues from the drying process) are potentially an important carbon source for anaerobic digestion. For this paper, rice residues were placed for 36 days retention time in anaerobic batch reactor environments at both mesophilic (37 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. Biogas and methane yield were determined as well as biogas composition. The results showed that rice straw as well as rice residues from the drying process had the highest biogas and methane yield. Temperature played an important role in determining both biogas yield and kinetics. In all cases, rice straw produced the highest yields; under mesophilic conditions the biogas yield was 0.43 m(3) kg(VS)(-1), under thermophilic conditions biogas yield reached 0.52 m(3) kg(VS)(-1). In the case of the rice husk, the biodegradability was very low. Methane content in all batches was kept above 55% vol. All digested material had a high carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio, even though significant biodegradation was recorded with the exception of rice husk. A first-order model can be used to describe the rice crop residues fermentation effectively.

  18. Effects of nitrogen form on growth, CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosynthetic electron allocation in cucumber and rice plants*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-hong; Zhang, Yi-li; Wang, Xue-min; Cui, Jin-xia; Xia, Xiao-jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-quan

    2011-01-01

    Cucumber and rice plants with varying ammonium (NH4 +) sensitivities were used to examine the effects of different nitrogen (N) sources on gas exchange, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence quenching, and photosynthetic electron allocation. Compared to nitrate (NO3 −)-grown plants, cucumber plants grown under NH4 +-nutrition showed decreased plant growth, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular carbon dioxide (CO2) level, transpiration rate, maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, and O2-independent alternative electron flux, and increased O2-dependent alternative electron flux. However, the N source had little effect on gas exchange, Chl a fluorescence parameters, and photosynthetic electron allocation in rice plants, except that NH4 +-grown plants had a higher O2-independent alternative electron flux than NO3 −-grown plants. NO3 − reduction activity was rarely detected in leaves of NH4 +-grown cucumber plants, but was high in NH4 +-grown rice plants. These results demonstrate that significant amounts of photosynthetic electron transport were coupled to NO3 − assimilation, an effect more significant in NO3 −-grown plants than in NH4 +-grown plants. Meanwhile, NH4 +-tolerant plants exhibited a higher demand for the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for NO3 − reduction, regardless of the N form supplied, while NH4 +-sensitive plants had a high water-water cycle activity when NH4 + was supplied as the sole N source. PMID:21265044

  19. Effects of nitrogen form on growth, CO₂ assimilation, chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosynthetic electron allocation in cucumber and rice plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-hong; Zhang, Yi-li; Wang, Xue-min; Cui, Jin-xia; Xia, Xiao-jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-quan

    2011-02-01

    Cucumber and rice plants with varying ammonium (NH(4)(+)) sensitivities were used to examine the effects of different nitrogen (N) sources on gas exchange, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence quenching, and photosynthetic electron allocation. Compared to nitrate (NO(3)(-))-grown plants, cucumber plants grown under NH(4)(+)-nutrition showed decreased plant growth, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular carbon dioxide (CO(2)) level, transpiration rate, maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, and O(2)-independent alternative electron flux, and increased O(2)-dependent alternative electron flux. However, the N source had little effect on gas exchange, Chl a fluorescence parameters, and photosynthetic electron allocation in rice plants, except that NH(4)(+)-grown plants had a higher O(2)-independent alternative electron flux than NO(3)(-)-grown plants. NO(3)(-) reduction activity was rarely detected in leaves of NH(4)(+)-grown cucumber plants, but was high in NH(4)(+)-grown rice plants. These results demonstrate that significant amounts of photosynthetic electron transport were coupled to NO(3)(-) assimilation, an effect more significant in NO(3)(-)-grown plants than in NH(4)(+)-grown plants. Meanwhile, NH(4)(+)-tolerant plants exhibited a higher demand for the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for NO(3)(-) reduction, regardless of the N form supplied, while NH(4)(+)-sensitive plants had a high water-water cycle activity when NH(4)(+) was supplied as the sole N source.

  20. Phytochromes are the sole photoreceptors for perceiving red/far-red light in rice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Makoto; Inagaki, Noritoshi; Xie, Xianzhi; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Baba-Kasai, Akiko; Tanabata, Takanari; Shinomura, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    Phytochromes are believed to be solely responsible for red and far-red light perception, but this has never been definitively tested. To directly address this hypothesis, a phytochrome triple mutant (phyAphyBphyC) was generated in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) and its responses to red and far-red light were monitored. Since rice only has three phytochrome genes (PHYA, PHYB and PHYC), this mutant is completely lacking any phytochrome. Rice seedlings grown in the dark develop long coleoptiles while undergoing regular circumnutation. The phytochrome triple mutants also show this characteristic skotomorphogenesis, even under continuous red or far-red light. The morphology of the triple mutant seedlings grown under red or far-red light appears completely the same as etiolated seedlings, and they show no expression of the light-induced genes. This is direct evidence demonstrating that phytochromes are the sole photoreceptors for perceiving red and far-red light, at least during rice seedling establishment. Furthermore, the shape of the triple mutant plants was dramatically altered. Most remarkably, triple mutants extend their internodes even during the vegetative growth stage, which is a time during which wild-type rice plants never elongate their internodes. The triple mutants also flowered very early under long day conditions and set very few seeds due to incomplete male sterility. These data indicate that phytochromes play an important role in maximizing photosynthetic abilities during the vegetative growth stage in rice. PMID:19706555

  1. Aroma chemistry of African Oryza glaberrima and Oryza sativa rice and their interspecific hybrids.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungeun; Nuijten, Edwin; Shewfelt, Robert L; Kays, Stanley J

    2014-03-15

    To increase rice production in Africa, considerable research has focused on creating interspecific hybrids between African (Oryza glaberrima Steud.) and Asian (O. sativa L.) rice in an attempt to obtain the positive attributes of each in new cultivars. Since flavor is a key criterion in consumer acceptance of rice, as an initial inquiry we characterized and compared the aroma chemistry of selected cultivars of African O. sativa ssp. japonica, O. sativa ssp. indica, O. glaberrima, and their interspecific hybrids grown in West Africa, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-olfactometry and descriptive sensory analysis. Of 41 volatiles identified across seven representative rice cultivars grown in West Africa, 3,5,5-trimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one, styrene, eucalyptol, linalool, myrtenal and L-α-terpineol had not been previously reported in rice. Thirty-three odor-active compounds were characterized. 4-Ethylphenol and (E,E)-2,4-heptadienal were unique to O. glaberrima, and pyridine, eucalyptol and myrtenal were described only in an interspecific hybrid. Descriptive sensory analysis indicated 'cooked grain', 'barny' and 'earthy' attributes were statistically different among the cultivars. The aroma chemistry data suggest that it should be possible to separate African cultivars into distinct flavor types thereby facilitating selection of new cultivars with superior flavor in African rice breeding programs. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. SUPPLEMENTAL ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION DOES NOT REDUCE GROWTH OR GRAIN YIELD IN RICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Negative effects of enhanced UV-B radiation have been demonstrated in plants, but impacts under realistic field conditions remain uncertain. Adverse impacts to major crops, such as rice (Oryza sativa L.), that are grown in areas with currently high ambient levels of UV-B, could h...

  3. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, water use and grain arsenic levels in rice systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agriculture is faced with the challenge of providing healthy food for a growing population while minimizing environmental consequences. Rice (Oryza sativa), the staple crop for the largest number of people on earth, is grown under flooded soil conditions and uses more water and has higher greenhous...

  4. Determining the basis of nonhost resistance in rice to cereal rusts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cereal rusts are a constant disease threat that limits the production of almost all agricultural cereals. Rice is atypical in that it is an intensively grown agricultural cereal that is immune to rust pathogens. This immunity is manifested by nonhost resistance (NHR), the mechanisms of which are poo...

  5. SUPPLEMENTAL ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION DOES NOT REDUCE GROWTH OR GRAIN YIELD IN RICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Negative effects of enhanced UV-B radiation have been demonstrated in plants, but impacts under realistic field conditions remain uncertain. Adverse impacts to major crops, such as rice (Oryza sativa L.), that are grown in areas with currently high ambient levels of UV-B, could h...

  6. Rice Water use efficiency and yield under continuous and intermittent irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, rice (Oryza sativa L.) is predominantly grown using continuous fl ood irrigation, which requires large quantities of fresh water. Due to increasing scarcity and demand for water, modern agricultural systems need to produce more food with less water. Th e ...

  7. Rice disease management under organic production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interest in organic rice production has increased because of the increased market demand for organic rice. Texas organic rice acreage has constantly increased over the last decade, reaching 32,000 acres in 2012. Texas is now the leading state in organic rice production in the U.S. Organic rice is p...

  8. Rare earth elements and (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotopic characterization of Indian Basmati rice as potential tool for its geographical authenticity.

    PubMed

    Lagad, Rupali A; Singh, Sunil K; Rai, Vinai K

    2017-02-15

    The increasing demand for premium priced Indian Basmati rice (Oryza sativa) in world commodity market causing fraudulent activities like adulteration, mislabelling. In order to develop authentication method for Indian Basmati rice, (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios and REEs composition of Basmati rice, soil and water samples were determined and evaluated their ability as geographical tracer in the present study. In addition, the possible source of Sr in rice plant has also been examined. Basmati rice samples (n=82) showed (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios in the range 0.71143-0.73448 and concentrations of 10 REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb) in ppb levels. Statistical analysis showed strong correlation between (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios of rice, silicate and carbonate fractions of soil. Good correlation and closeness of (87)Sr/(86)Sr of rice with water indicate its uptake in rice from water. Rice grown in southern Uttar Pradesh contains higher (87)Sr/(86)Sr compared to other region of Indo-Gangetic Plain due to higher (87)Sr/(86)Sr of the Ganga compared to other rivers. (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios can be used as a tracer for differentiating Indian Basmati rice from the other country originated rice samples.

  9. Phytoremediation of the herbicides atrazine and metolachlor by transgenic rice plants expressing human CYP1A1, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Sakiko; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2006-04-19

    This study evaluated the expression of human cytochrome P450 genes CYP1A1, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19 in rice plants (Oryza sativa cv. Nipponbare) introduced using the plasmid pIKBACH. The transgenic rice plants (pIKBACH rice plants) became more tolerant toward various herbicides than nontransgenic Nipponbare rice plants. Rice plants expressing pIKBACH grown in soil showed tolerance to the herbicides atrazine, metolachlor, and norflurazon and to a mixture of the three herbicides. The degradation of atrazine and metolachlor by pIKBACH rice plants was evaluated to confirm the metabolic activity of the introduced P450s. Although both pIKBACH and nontransgenic Nipponbare rice plants could decrease the amounts of the herbicides in plant tissue and culture medium, pIKBACH rice plants removed greater amounts in greenhouse experiments. The ability of pIKBACH rice plants to remove atrazine and metolachlor from soil was confirmed in large-scale experiments. The metabolism of herbicides by pIKBACH rice plants was enhanced by the introduced P450 species. Assuming that public and commercial acceptance is forthcoming, pIKBACH rice plants may become useful tools for the breeding of herbicide-tolerant crops and for phytoremediation of environmental pollution by organic chemicals.

  10. Adaptational changes in the lipids and fatty acid profile of the cell and thylakoid membrane of rice plants exposed to sunlight.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Janet F; Sharma, Prabhat Kumar

    2010-07-01

    Adaptational changes occurring in the lipids and fatty acids of the cell and the thylakoid membrane in response to high light treatment, was studied in 30 days old rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Jyothi) plants grown under low (150-200 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) or moderate (600-800 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) light conditions. Results were compared with rice plants grown in high (1200-2200 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) light conditions. Exposure of rice plants and isolated chloroplast to high light, resulted in an increase in the amount of malonaldehyde, indicating oxidation of membrane lipids. Qualitative and quantitative changes in the phosphoglycolipids and quantitative changes in neutral lipids were observed in rice plants grown under the different growth conditions. A few of the phosphoglycolipids and neutral lipids were present exclusively in plants grown at low or moderate or high light, indicating requirement of different type of lipid composition of rice plants in response to their different growth irradiances. However, no significant quantitative changes were observed in the different saturated and unsaturated fatty acid groups of total lipids in low, moderate and high light grown rice plants, as a result of exposure to high light. No qualitative changes in the fatty acid composition due to difference in growth irradiance or high light treatment were seen. The changes observed in the phosphoglycolipids and neutral lipid composition of cell and thylakoid membrane of low, moderate and high light grown rice plants in response to high light, are probably the result of physiological changes in the rice plants, to sustain optimum structure and function of the cell and thylakoid membrane to maintain active physiological functions to endure high light conditions.

  11. Impact of low-temperature, overcast and rainy weather during the reproductive growth stage on lodging resistance of rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Fei; Zhang, Wujun; Wu, Xiaoran; Xu, Xia; Ding, Yanfeng; Li, Ganghua; Liu, Zhenghui; Wang, Shaohua

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the mechanism by which the lodging resistance of the rice population during the late growth period responds to low-temperature, overcast and rainy weather during the reproductive growth stage. Field experiments were conducted using indica rice Yliangyou2 (lodging-resistance variety), IIyou084 (lodging-susceptible variety) and japonica rice Wuyunjing23 (lodging-resistance variety) and W3668 (lodging- susceptible variety) in 2013 (high temperature and strong radiation during the rice reproductive growth stage), 2012 and 2014 (low temperature and weak radiation during rice reproductive growth stage). The results showed that the length of the basal internodes and the height of the gravitational centres were greater in plants grown in 2014. Dry weight of basal culms, culm diameter, lignin content and total content of structural carbohydrates (lignin and cellulose) in basal internodes were reduced in these plants, causing a significant reduction in the bending stress and lodging resistance of the rice stems. Low-temperature, overcast and rainy weather had a greater effect on lodging resistance in indica rice compared with japonica rice. This was reflected in a greater reduction in the lignin content of the indica rice stems, which yielded a significantly lower breaking strength and bending stress.

  12. Impact of low-temperature, overcast and rainy weather during the reproductive growth stage on lodging resistance of rice

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fei; Zhang, Wujun; Wu, Xiaoran; Xu, Xia; Ding, Yanfeng; Li, Ganghua; Liu, Zhenghui; Wang, Shaohua

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the mechanism by which the lodging resistance of the rice population during the late growth period responds to low-temperature, overcast and rainy weather during the reproductive growth stage. Field experiments were conducted using indica rice Yliangyou2 (lodging-resistance variety), IIyou084 (lodging-susceptible variety) and japonica rice Wuyunjing23 (lodging-resistance variety) and W3668 (lodging- susceptible variety) in 2013 (high temperature and strong radiation during the rice reproductive growth stage), 2012 and 2014 (low temperature and weak radiation during rice reproductive growth stage). The results showed that the length of the basal internodes and the height of the gravitational centres were greater in plants grown in 2014. Dry weight of basal culms, culm diameter, lignin content and total content of structural carbohydrates (lignin and cellulose) in basal internodes were reduced in these plants, causing a significant reduction in the bending stress and lodging resistance of the rice stems. Low-temperature, overcast and rainy weather had a greater effect on lodging resistance in indica rice compared with japonica rice. This was reflected in a greater reduction in the lignin content of the indica rice stems, which yielded a significantly lower breaking strength and bending stress. PMID:28422161

  13. Genetic diversity and structure in hill rice (Oryza sativa L.) landraces from the North-Eastern Himalayas of India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somnath; Marndi, B C; Mawkhlieng, B; Banerjee, A; Yadav, R M; Misra, A K; Bansal, K C

    2016-07-13

    Hill rices (Oryza sativa L.) are direct seeded rices grown on hill slopes of different gradients. These landraces have evolved under rainfed and harsh environmental conditions and may possess genes governing adaptation traits such as tolerance to cold and moisture stress. In this study, 64 hill rice landraces were collected from the state of Arunachal Pradesh of North-Eastern region of India, and assessed by agro-morphological variability and microsatellite markers polymorphism. Our aim was to use phenotypic and genetic diversity data to understand the basis of farmers' classification of hill rice landraces into two groups: umte and tening. Another goal was to understand the genetic differentiation of hill rices into Indica or japonica subspecies. According to farmers' classification, hill rices were categorized into two groups: umte (large-grained, late maturing) and tening (small-grained, early maturing). We did not find significant difference in days to 50 % flowering between the groups. Principal component analysis revealed that two groups can be distinguished on the basis of kernel length-to-width ration (KLW), kernel length (KL), grain length (GrL), grain length-to-width ration (GrLW) and plant height (Ht). Stepwise canonical discriminant analysis identified KL and Ht as the main discriminatory characters between the cultivar groups. Genetic diversity analysis with 35 SSR markers revealed considerable genetic diversity in the hill rice germplasm (gene diversity: 0.66; polymorphism information content: 0.62). Pair-wise allelic difference between umte and tening groups was not statistically significant. The model-based population structure analysis showed that the hill rices were clustered into two broad groups corresponding to Indica and Japonica. The geographic distribution and cultivars grouping of hill rices were not congruent in genetic clusters. Both distance- and model-based approaches indicated that the hill rices were predominantly japonica or

  14. Branching in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2011-02-01

    Rice branching, including the formation of tillers and panicle branches, has been well investigated over the past several years because of its agronomic importance. A major breakthrough in elucidating rice tillering in the recent years was the discovery of strigolactones, a specific group of terpenoid lactones that can inhibit axillary bud outgrowth. Since that discovery, new tillering mutants, that is, dwarf 27 (d27) or dwarf14 (d14, also reported as d88 or htd2), have been identified with reduced strigolactone levels or strigolactone response. DWARF27 (D27) and DWARF14 (D14) probably act on strigolactone biosynthesis and signal transduction, respectively. Additionally, several genes controlling panicle branches have been identified recently. DEP1 and IPA1/WFP are essential dominant/semidominant regulators that determine rice panicle branches and thus affect the grain yields. More importantly, dep1 and ipa1 alleles have been shown to be applicable for the improvement of rice grain yields in molecular breeding. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rice: chemistry and technology.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice has taken center stage this last decade, not only as an important provider of nourishment for the world’s population, but as a grain now recognized as having many unique nutritional and functional attributes with potential to be captured in a multitude of value-added food and non-food applicati...

  16. Exploring Japan through Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtan, Linda S.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the role of rice in Japanese culture by presenting historical background and teaching activities in a variety of categories, such as language, sociology, history, and contemporary politics. Suggests teachers create cross-cultural comparisons; for example, the role of corn in the United States. Provides a list of teacher resources. (CMK)

  17. Rice bran phytonutrients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bran layer of the whole grain rice contains potential health-beneficial compounds. These include vitamin E homologs (tocopherols, tocotrienols), oryzanol fractions, simple phenolics and poly-phenolics. These are antioxidants that are believed to provide protection against diseases such as cancer...

  18. Using C4 photosynthesis to increase the yield of rice-rationale and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Julian M; Sheehy, John E; Langdale, Jane A

    2008-04-01

    90% of the world's rice is grown and consumed in Asia, with each hectare of rice-producing land providing food for 27 people. By 2050, because of population growth and increasing urbanisation, each remaining hectare will have to feed at least 43 people. This means that yields must be increased by at least 50% over the next 40 years to prevent mass malnutrition for the 700 million Asians that currently rely on rice for more than 60% of their daily calorific intake. Since predictive models suggest that yield increases of this magnitude can only be achieved by improving photosynthesis, and because evolution has increased photosynthetic efficiency by 50% in the form of the C4 pathway, one solution is to generate C4 rice. However, this is an ambitious goal that requires proof of concept before any major investment of time and money. Here, we discuss approaches that should allow proof of concept to be tested.

  19. On the Role of Abscisic Acid and Gibberellin in the Regulation of Growth in Rice 1

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Kende, Hans

    1992-01-01

    Submergence induces rapid elongation of rice coleoptiles (Oryza sativa L.) and of deepwater rice internodes. This adaptive feature helps rice to grow out of the water and to survive flooding. Earlier, we found that the growth response of submerged deepwater rice plants is mediated by ethylene and gibberellin (GA). Ethylene promotes growth, at least in part, by increasing the responsiveness of the internodal tissue to GA. In the present work, we examined the possibility that increased responsiveness to GA was based on a reduction in endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) levels. Submergence and treatment with ethylene led, within 3 hours, to a 75% reduction in the level of ABA in the intercalary meristem and the growing zone of deepwater rice internodes. The level of GA1 increased fourfold during the same time period. An interaction between GA and ABA could also be shown by application of the hormones. ABA inhibited growth of submerged internodes, and GA counteracted this inhibition. Our results indicate that the growth rate of deepwater rice internodes is determined by the ratio of an endogenous growth promoter (GA) and a growth inhibitor (ABA). We also investigated whether ABA is involved in regulating the growth of rice coleoptiles. Rice seedlings were grown on solutions containing fluridone, an inhibitor of carotenoid and, indirectly, of ABA biosynthesis. Treatment with fluridone reduced the level of ABA in coleoptiles and first leaves by more than 75% and promoted coleoptile growth by more than 60%. Little or no enhancement of growth by fluridone was observed in barley, oat, or wheat. The involvement of ABA in determining the growth rate of rice coleoptiles and deepwater rice internodes may be related to the semiaquatic growth habit of this plant. PMID:16668983

  20. Physico-chemical, structural, pasting and thermal properties of starches of fourteen Himalayan rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Gani, Adil; Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Akhter, Gazalla; Shah, Asima; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    Starch of fourteen rice cultivars grown in Himalayan region were evaluated for physico-chemical, structural, pasting and thermal properties. The rice cultivars selected showed a wide variation in apparent amylose content (AAC), ranging between 10.76%-26.87%, highest in CH-1039 and lowest in SKAU-292 starch. There were ten low, three intermediate and one high AAC rice. Resistant starch content varied significantly among the rice cultivars, ranging from 6.00% to 19.60%. Generally, high ACC starches presented high contents of resistant starch. Water absorption capacity (80.10-130.32%), swelling (5.73-9.61g/g) and solubility (0.037-0.090g/g) indices varied significantly among the rice cultivars. The rice starch granule morphology showed polyhedral or irregular shapes and granular sizes in the range of 1.8-6.7μm in different rice starches. Pasting profile of starch varied significantly among the rice cultivars, probably due to variations in their AAC. Thermal properties of the starches ranged considerably among different rice cultivars: onset temperature of gelatinization, To (58.25-72.49°C), peak temperature of gelatinization, Tp (69.93-93.26°C), conclusion temperature of gelatinization, Tc (97.28±8.28-112.16°C) and gelatinization enthalpy ΔHG (14.29-29.63J/g). The ATR-FTIR spectroscopy of rice starches identified most of the α-1→4 glucosidic linkages within the absorption bands of 1149-1023cm(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice..., but any device or method which gives equivalent results may be used. 4 These limits do not apply to...

  2. 7 CFR 868.310 - Grades and grade requirements for the classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice. (See also Â... classes Long Grain Milled Rice, Medium Grain Milled Rice, Short Grain Milled Rice, and Mixed Milled Rice..., but any device or method which gives equivalent results may be used. 4 These limits do not apply to...

  3. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  4. Growing rice aerobically markedly decreases mercury accumulation by reducing both Hg bioavailability and the production of MeHg.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Ye, Zhihong; Li, Bing; Huang, Linan; Meng, Mei; Shi, Jianbo; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Rice consumption represents a major route of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for those living in certain areas of inland China. In this study we investigated the effects of water management on bioavailable Hg, MeHg, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, abundance and community composition) in rhizosphere soil, and total Hg (THg) and MeHg in rice plants grown under glasshouse and paddy field conditions. Aerobic conditions greatly decreased the amount of THg and MeHg taken up by rice plants and affected their distribution in different plant tissues. There were positive correlations between bioavailable Hg and THg in brown rice and roots and between numbers of SRB and MeHg in brown rice, roots, and rhizosphere soil. Furthermore, the community composition of SRB was dramatically influenced by the water management regimes. Our results demonstrate that the greatly reduced bioavailability of Hg and production of MeHg are due to decreased SRB numbers and proportion of Hg methylators in the rhizosphere under aerobic conditions. These are the main reasons for the reduced Hg and MeHg accumulation in aerobically grown rice. Water management is indicated as an effective measure that can be used to reduce Hg and MeHg uptake by rice plants from Hg-contaminated paddy fields.

  5. "Tinni" Rice ( Oryza rufipogon Griff.) Production: An Integrated Sociocultural Agroecosystem in Eastern Uttar Pradesh of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ranjay K.; Turner, Nancy J.; Pandey, C. B.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports how Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and informal cultural institutions have conserved key varieties of the wildgrowing rice, ` tinni' (red rice, or brownbeard rice, Oriza rufipogon Griff.), within the Bhar community of eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. The study was conducted, using conventional and participatory methods, in 10 purposively selected Bhar villages. Two distinct varieties of tinni (` tinni patali' and ` tinni moti') with differing habitats and phenotypic characters were identified. Seven microecosystems (Kari, Badaila, Chammo, Karmol, Bhainsiki, Bhainsala and Khodailia) were found to support these varieties in differing proportions. Tinni rice can withstand more extreme weather conditions (the highest as well as lowest temperatures and rainfall regimes) than the `genetically improved' varieties of rice ( Oriza sativa L.) grown in the region. Both tinni varieties are important bioresources for the Bhar's subsistence livelihoods, and they use distinctive conservation approaches in their maintenance. Bhar women are the main custodians of tinni rice agrobiodiversity, conserving tinni through an institution called Sajha. Democratic decision-making at meetings organized by village elders determines the market price of the tinni varieties. Overall, the indigenous institutions and women's participation seem to have provided safeguards from excessive exploitation of tinni rice varieties. The maintenance of tinni through cultural knowledge and institutions serves as an example of the importance of locally maintained crop varieties in contributing to people's resilience and food security in times of rapid social and environmental change.

  6. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Dardick, Christopher; Bartley, Laura E; Cao, Peijian; Phetsom, Jirapa; Canlas, Patrick; Seo, Young-Su; Shultz, Michael; Ouyang, Shu; Yuan, Qiaoping; Frank, Bryan C; Ly, Eugene; Zheng, Li; Jia, Yi; Hsia, An-Ping; An, Kyungsook; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Rocke, David; Lee, Geun Cheol; Schnable, Patrick S; An, Gynheung; Buell, C Robin; Ronald, Pamela C

    2008-10-06

    Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa). We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org). The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics.

  7. Rice LTG1 is involved in adaptive growth and fitness under low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangwen; Wu, Fu-Qing; Wu, Weixun; Wang, Hong-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yunhui; Chen, Xiuling; Zhou, Kunneng; Jin, Mingna; Cheng, Zhijun; Li, Xueyong; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most prevalent factors limiting the productivity and geographical distribution of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the effect of LT on seed germination and reproductive development in rice, the genetic component affecting vegetative growth under LT remains poorly understood. Here, we report that rice cultivars harboring the dominant LTG1 (Low Temperature Growth 1) allele are more tolerant to LT (15-25°C, a temperature range prevalent in high-altitude, temperate zones and high-latitude areas), than those with the ltg1 allele. Using a map-based cloning strategy, we show that LTG1 encodes a casein kinase I. A functional nucleotide polymorphism was identified in the coding region of LTG1, causing a single amino acid substitution (I357K) that is associated with the growth rate, heading date and yield of rice plants grown at LT. We present evidence that LTG1 affects rice growth at LT via an auxin-dependent process(es). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of this locus suggests that the ltg1 haplotype arose before the domestication of rice in tropical climates. Together, our data demonstrate that LTG1 plays an important role in the adaptive growth and fitness of rice cultivars under conditions of low ambient temperature. © 2014 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. "Tinni" rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) production: an integrated sociocultural agroecosystem in eastern Uttar Pradesh of India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjay K; Turner, Nancy J; Pandey, C B

    2012-01-01

    This study reports how Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and informal cultural institutions have conserved key varieties of the wildgrowing rice, 'tinni' (red rice, or brownbeard rice, Oriza rufipogon Griff.), within the Bhar community of eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. The study was conducted, using conventional and participatory methods, in 10 purposively selected Bhar villages. Two distinct varieties of tinni ('tinni patali' and 'tinni moti') with differing habitats and phenotypic characters were identified. Seven microecosystems (Kari, Badaila, Chammo, Karmol, Bhainsiki, Bhainsala and Khodailia) were found to support these varieties in differing proportions. Tinni rice can withstand more extreme weather conditions (the highest as well as lowest temperatures and rainfall regimes) than the 'genetically improved' varieties of rice (Oriza sativa L.) grown in the region. Both tinni varieties are important bioresources for the Bhar's subsistence livelihoods, and they use distinctive conservation approaches in their maintenance. Bhar women are the main custodians of tinni rice agrobiodiversity, conserving tinni through an institution called Sajha. Democratic decision-making at meetings organized by village elders determines the market price of the tinni varieties. Overall, the indigenous institutions and women's participation seem to have provided safeguards from excessive exploitation of tinni rice varieties. The maintenance of tinni through cultural knowledge and institutions serves as an example of the importance of locally maintained crop varieties in contributing to people's resilience and food security in times of rapid social and environmental change.

  9. Occupational noise in rice mills.

    PubMed

    Prasanna Kumar, G V; Dewangan, K N; Sarkar, Amaresh; Kumari, Amrita; Kar, Banani

    2008-01-01

    A major occupational hazard for the workers in rice mills is the noise during the operation of various machines. A noise survey was conducted in the workrooms of eight renowned rice mills of the north-eastern region of India established during the period between 1980 and 1985. The rice mills were selected on the basis of the outcome of a walk-through noise survey involving several rice mills of the region. A noise survey map of each rice mill was drawn to identify the predominant noise sources and the causes of high noise in the workrooms of the rice mill. The sound-pressure level (SPL) in the workrooms of the rice mill varied from 78 to 92 dBA. The paddy cleaner, rubber roll sheller, compartment separator, rice cleaner, auxiliary sieve shaker and an electric motor without enclosure were found to be the predominant noise sources in the workrooms of the mill. The causes of high noise in the rice mills may be attributed to the use of a long flat belt drive, crank-and-pitman mechanism, absence of an electric motor enclosure, poor machine maintenance and inadequate acoustic design of the workroom of the rice mill. About 26% of the total labourers were found to be exposed to higher levels of noise than 85 dBA. Subjective response indicated that about 26% of the total labourers felt noise interferes in their work and about 49% labourers were of opinion that noise interferes with their conversation. Noise from machines in the rice mills was found to be the major occupational hazard for the rice mill workers. The predominant noise sources need to be identified and the causes of high noise need to be studied to undertake the appropriate measures to reduce the noise level. To identify the predominant noise sources and their distributions in rice mills, to study the causes of high levels of noise in rice mills and to examine the response of the workers towards noise. A noise survey was conducted in eight renowned rice mills of the north-eastern region of India. The mills were

  10. The Impact of Climate on the Spread of Rice to North-Eastern China: A New Look at the Data from Shandong Province

    PubMed Central

    d’Alpoim Guedes, Jade; Jin, Guiyun; Bocinsky, R. Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Moving crops outside of their original centers of domestication was sometimes a challenging process. Because of its substantial heat requirements, moving rice agriculture outside of its homelands of domestication was not an easy process for farmers in the past. Using crop niche models, we examine the constraints faced by ancient farmers and foragers as they moved rice to its most northerly extent in Ancient China: Shandong province. Contrary to previous arguments, we find that during the climatic optimum rice could have been grown in the region. Climatic cooling following this date had a clear impact on the distribution of rice, one that may have placed adaptive pressure on rice to develop a temperate phenotype. Following the development of this temperate phenotype, rice agriculture could once again become implanted in select areas of north-eastern China. PMID:26125619

  11. Soil amendments and cultivar selection can improve rice yield in salt-influenced (tsunami-affected) paddy fields in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Reichenauer, Thomas G; Panamulla, Sunil; Subasinghe, Siripala; Wimmer, Bernhard

    2009-10-01

    The tsunami disaster in the Indian Ocean in December 2004 caused devastation of agricultural soils by salt water over wide areas. Many rice fields located close to the coast were affected by the flood of seawater. Electric conductivity (EC) of soils in tsunami-affected rice fields was found to be higher compared to unaffected fields 2 years after the tsunami. Four soil amendments (gypsum, dolomite, cinnamon ash and rice-husk-charcoal) were tested for their influence on improving the yield parameters of rice grown in a tsunami-affected and a non-affected area. Yield parameters were compared with an untreated control of the same cultivar (AT362) and with a salt resistant rice variety (AT354). The salt resistant variety had the highest grain yield. The two amendments gypsum and rice-husk-charcoal led to an increase in grain yield compared to the untreated control, whereas dolomite and cinnamon ash had no significant effect on grain yield.

  12. The Impact of Climate on the Spread of Rice to North-Eastern China: A New Look at the Data from Shandong Province.

    PubMed

    d'Alpoim Guedes, Jade; Jin, Guiyun; Bocinsky, R Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Moving crops outside of their original centers of domestication was sometimes a challenging process. Because of its substantial heat requirements, moving rice agriculture outside of its homelands of domestication was not an easy process for farmers in the past. Using crop niche models, we examine the constraints faced by ancient farmers and foragers as they moved rice to its most northerly extent in Ancient China: Shandong province. Contrary to previous arguments, we find that during the climatic optimum rice could have been grown in the region. Climatic cooling following this date had a clear impact on the distribution of rice, one that may have placed adaptive pressure on rice to develop a temperate phenotype. Following the development of this temperate phenotype, rice agriculture could once again become implanted in select areas of north-eastern China.

  13. Effects of Seeding Rates and Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Density on Damage in Two Medium Grain Varieties of Rice.

    PubMed

    Aghaee, Mohammad-Amir; Espino, Luis; Goding, Kevin; Goldman, Evan; Godfrey, Larry D

    2016-04-01

    Rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel) is a common pest of rice production in the United States whose larvae cause yield loss by feeding on the roots. We conducted studies from 2011–2013 on M-202 and M-206, two commonly grown California medium grain rice varieties, to determine if M-206 demonstrated tolerance to rice water weevil damage. Observations from field studies suggested the possibility of a level of tolerance in M-206 that was more prevalent at high seeding rates. We did this study using two different experimental units, open and ring plots. In both units, we quantified grain yields across four levels, 56, 112, 168, and 224 kg/ha, of seeding rates to detect potential yield recovery by M-206. In the open plots, we used naturally occurring weevil populations compared with controls that reduced the populations with insecticides. In the ring plots, we tested three levels of weevil infestation, none, low, and high, to look at the weevil density effects on yield and scarred plants. Our studies showed that M-206 and M-202 had generally similar densities of immature weevils and yield. Compensation for yield loss did not occur at higher seeding rates. These results suggest that M-206 does not have the ability to tolerate rice water weevil damage better than M-202. There was weak evidence that the number of scarred plants increased as plant density was reduced. The results are discussed in relation to the utility of this study to grower choices of varieties for long-term rice water weevil management.

  14. Accelerated Solvent Extraction of Insecticides from Rice Hulls, Rice Bran, and Polished Rice Grains.

    PubMed

    Teló, Gustavo Mack; Senseman, Scott Allen; Marchesan, Enio; Camargo, Edinalvo Rabaioli; Carson, Katherine

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of pesticide residues in irrigated rice grains is important for food security. In this study, we analyzed accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) conditions for the extraction of thiamethoxam and chlorantraniliprole insecticides from rice hulls, rice bran, and polished rice grains. Several variables, including extraction solvent, extraction temperature, extraction pressure, cell size, static extraction time, and sample concentration, were investigated. The average recoveries of the three matrixes were between 89.7 and 109.7% at the fortification level of 0.75 mg/kg. The optimum ASE operating conditions were acetonitrile (100%) as extraction solvent, extraction temperature of 75°C for rice hulls and 100°C for rice bran and polished rice grains, extraction cell pressure of 10.3 MPa, 22 mL cell size, and two extraction cycles. The total extraction time was approximately 25 min. The extracted volume was evaporated to dryness and the residues were redissolved in 2 mL acetonitrile after 1 min of vortex-shaking. Thiamethoxam and chlorantraniliprole were analyzed by ultra-HPLC with tandem MS. In conclusion, ASE in rice hulls, rice bran, and polished rice grains offers the possibility of a fast and simple method for obtaining a quantitative extraction of the studied pesticides.

  15. Genetic diversity for mycorrhizal symbiosis and phosphate transporters in rice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kwanho; Mattes, Nicolas; Catausan, Sheryl; Chin, Joong Hyoun; Paszkowski, Uta; Heuer, Sigrid

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a major plant nutrient and developing crops with higher P-use efficiency is an important breeding goal. In this context we have conducted a comparative study of irrigated and rainfed rice varieties to assess genotypic differences in colonization with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and expression of different P transporter genes. Plants were grown in three different soil samples from a rice farm in the Philippines. The data show that AM symbiosis in all varieties was established after 4 weeks of growth under aerobic conditions and that, in soil derived from a rice paddy, natural AM populations recovered within 6 weeks. The analysis of AM marker genes (AM1, AM3, AM14) and P transporter genes for the direct Pi uptake (PT2, PT6) and AM-mediated pathway (PT11, PT13) were largely in agreement with the observed root AM colonization providing a useful tool for diversity studies. Interestingly, delayed AM colonization was observed in the aus-type rice varieties which might be due to their different root structure and might confer an advantage for weed competition in the field. The data further showed that P-starvation induced root growth and expression of the high-affinity P transporter PT6 was highest in the irrigated variety IR66 which also maintained grain yield under P-deficient field conditions.

  16. Characterization of rice starches extracted from Indian cultivars.

    PubMed

    Gani, Adil; Wani, S M; Masoodi, F A; Salim, Rehana

    2013-04-01

    Physicochemical, morphological and pasting properties of starches isolated from four rice cultivars grown in India were studied. The amylose content ranged between 4.7 and 30.2% of starch, highest in K332 starch and lowest in SR1 starch. Swelling power, water solubility and water absorption capacity of starches increased with increase in temperature from 50 to 90 °C at 10 °C intervals. Highest swelling and water absorption was found in SR1 and lowest in K332 starches but reverse was observed in case of solubility that was highest for K332 and lowest for SR1 starch. The microstructure of starch granules from different rice cultivars showed the presence of mainly polyhedral granules having average size in the range of 4.0-5.2 µm. K332 showed the presence of smallest granules, whereas SR1 starch showed the presence of largest granules. X-ray diffraction pattern of rice starch from different cultivars showed typical A-type crystallinity. Pasting properties of starches differed significantly. Pasting temperature was highest for K332 and lowest for SR1, while peak viscosity was highest for aromatic rice and lowest for K448 starches. Higher setback was observed in K332 and lowest in SR1.

  17. Studies on nutrient uptake of rice and characteristics of soil microorganisms in a long-term fertilization experiments for irrigated rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-chun; Wang, Guang-huo

    2005-02-01

    The ecosystem characteristics of soil microorganism and the nutrient uptake of irrigated rice were investigated in a split-block experiment with different fertilization treatments, including control (no fertilizer application), PK, NK, NP, NPK fertilization, in the main block, and conventional rice and hybrid rice comparison, in the sub block. Average data of five treatments in five years indicated that the indigenous N supply (INS) capacity ranged from 32.72 to 93.21 kg/ha; that indigenous P supply (IPS) capacity ranged from 7.42 to 32.25 kg/ha; and that indigenous K supply (IKS) capacity ranged from 16.24 to 140.51 kg/ha, which showed that soil available nutrient pool depletion might occur very fast and that P, K deficiency has become a constraint to increasing yields of consecutive crops grown without fertilizer application. It was found that soil nutrient deficiency and unbalanced fertilization to rice crop had negative effect on the diversity of the microbial community and total microbial biomass in the soil. The long-term fertilizer experiment (LTFE) also showed that balanced application of N, P and K promoted microbial biomass growth and improvement of community composition. Unbalanced fertilization reduced microbial N and increased C/N ratio of the microbial biomass. Compared with inbred rice, hybrid rice behavior is characterized by physiological advantage in nutrient uptake and lower internal K use efficiency.

  18. Studies on nutrient uptake of rice and characteristics of soil microorganisms in a long-term fertilization experiments for irrigated rice*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi-chun; Wang, Guang-huo

    2005-01-01

    The ecosystem characteristics of soil microorganism and the nutrient uptake of irrigated rice were investigated in a split-block experiment with different fertilization treatments, including control (no fertilizer application), PK, NK, NP, NPK fertilization, in the main block, and conventional rice and hybrid rice comparison, in the sub block. Average data of five treatments in five years indicated that the indigenous N supply (INS) capacity ranged from 32.72 to 93.21 kg/ha; that indigenous P supply (IPS) capacity ranged from 7.42 to 32.25 kg/ha; and that indigenous K supply (IKS) capacity ranged from 16.24 to 140.51 kg/ha, which showed that soil available nutrient pool depletion might occur very fast and that P, K deficiency has become a constraint to increasing yields of consecutive crops grown without fertilizer application. It was found that soil nutrient deficiency and unbalanced fertilization to rice crop had negative effect on the diversity of the microbial community and total microbial biomass in the soil. The long-term fertilizer experiment (LTFE) also showed that balanced application of N, P and K promoted microbial biomass growth and improvement of community composition. Unbalanced fertilization reduced microbial N and increased C/N ratio of the microbial biomass. Compared with inbred rice, hybrid rice behavior is characterized by physiological advantage in nutrient uptake and lower internal K use efficiency. PMID:15633252

  19. Effect of coated urea on cadmium accumulation in Oryza sativa L. grown in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wu, Zisong; Zhu, Qihong; Zhu, Hanhua; Zhang, Yangzhu; Huang, Daoyou

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of three types of coated urea on the accumulation of cadmium (Cd) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown in contaminated soil. Pot-culture experiments were conducted in a greenhouse from July to November 2012 on the rice cultivar "Hua Hang Si Miao" in Guangzhou (China). The experimental design was completely randomized with four treatments and three replications. The treatments were control (CK) (N 0 mg/kg), prilled urea (PU) (N 200 mg/kg), polymer-coated urea (PCU) (N 200 mg/kg), and sulfur-coated urea (SCU) (N 200 mg/kg). Our results indicated that applications of PCU and SCU slightly increased the dry weight of rice grains. The application of SCU significantly decreased the CaCl2 and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP)-extractable Cd concentrations by 15.4 and 56.1%, respectively. Sequential extractions showed that PCU and SCU applications led to a significant decrease in Cd in the exchangeable fraction and an increase in the bound iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) oxides fractions. Cd concentrations in grains treated with PCU were reduced by 11.7%, whereas SCU significantly reduced Cd concentrations by 29.1%. SCU reduced Cd transfer from the straws to the grain. Our results demonstrated that PCU and SCU may be effective in mitigating Cd accumulation in rice grown in acidic Cd-contaminated soil, especially in plants receiving SCU.

  20. Amended final report on the safety assessment of Oryza Sativa (rice) Bran Oil, Oryza Sativa (rice) Germ Oil, Rice Bran Acid,Oryza Sativa (rice) Bran Wax, Hydrogenated Rice Bran Wax, Oryza Sativa (rice)Bran Extract, Oryza Sativa (rice) Extract, Oryza Sativa (rice) Germ Powder, Oryza Sativa (rice) Starch, Oryza Sativa (rice) Bran, Hydrolyzed Rice Bran Extract, Hydrolyzed Rice Bran Protein, Hydrolyzed Rice Extract, and Hydrolyzed Rice Protein.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    This report addresses the safety of cosmetic ingredients derived from rice, Oryza sativa. Oils, Fatty Acids, and Waxes: Rice Bran Oil functions in cosmetics as a conditioning agent--occlusive in 39 formulations across a wide range of product types. Rice Germ Oil is a skin-conditioning agent--occlusive in six formulations in only four product categories. Rice Bran Acid is described as a surfactant-cleansing agent, but was not in current use. Rice Bran Wax is a skin-conditioning agent--occlusive in eight formulations in five product categories. Industry did not directly report any use of Rice Bran Wax. Hydrogenated Rice Bran Wax is a binder, skin-conditioning agent--occlusive, and viscosity-increasing agent--nonaqueous in 11 formulations in six product categories. Rice Bran Oil had an oral LD50 of > 5 g/kg in white rats and Rice Wax had an oral LD50 of > 24 g/kg in male mice. A three-generation oral dosing study reported no toxic or teratologic effects in albino rats fed 10% Rice Bran Oil compared to a control group fed Peanut Oil. Undiluted Rice Bran Oil, Rice Germ Oil, and Hydrogenated Rice Bran Wax were not irritants in animal skin tests. Rice Bran Oil was not a sensitizer. Rice Bran Oil, Rice Germ Oil, Rice Wax, and Hydrogenated Rice Bran Wax were negative in ocular toxicity assays. A mixture of Rice Bran Oil and Rice Germ Oil had a ultraviolet (UV) absorption maximum at 315 nm, but was not phototoxic in a dermal exposure assay. Rice Bran Oil was negative in an Ames assay, and a component, gamma-oryzanol, was negative in bacterial and mammalian mutagenicity assays. Rice oils, fatty acids, and waxes were, at most, mildly irritating in clinical studies. Extracts: Rice Bran Extract is used in six formulations in four product categories. Rice Extract is a hair-conditioning agent, but was not in current use. Hydrolyzed Rice Extract is used in four formulations and current concentration of use data were provided for other uses. Hydrolyzed Rice Bran Extract, described

  1. Effect of flaring of natural gas in oil fields of Assam on rice cultivation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K K; Hazarika, S; Kalita, B; Sharma, B

    2011-07-01

    Assam (India) is endowed with natural resources like oil, coal and natural gas. The crude oil, one of the most precious natural resources, is found in the districts of upper Assam. During the process of extraction of crude oil, low-pressure natural gas is burnt in the air. Most of the oil wells in upper Assam are located near rice fields and therefore, rice crop grown near the oil wells is exposed to light uninterruptedly causing grain sterility resulting significant loss in grain yield. To identify promising varieties for these areas, we studied the effect of flare on rice varieties with different photoperiod sensitivity. The high light intensity and increased light hours were the factors responsible for substantial loss in grain yield near the flare resulting from delay in flower initiation, reduction of panicle length, having less number of grains per panicle and more grain sterility. To prevent significant loss in yield, photoperiod-sensitive traditional and improved rice varieties should not be grown up to the distance of 80 and 100 m, respectively from the boundary wall of the flare pit. Modern weakly-photoperiod sensitive varieties like Ranjti and Mahsuri can be grown 40 m away from the wall while modern photoperiod insensitive variety like Jaya, can be cultivated 20 m away from the wall without significant loss in yield.

  2. Inspections of radiocesium concentration levels in rice from Fukushima Prefecture after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    PubMed Central

    Nihei, Naoto; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2015-01-01

    We summarize the inspections of radiocesium concentration levels in rice produced in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, for 3 years from the nuclear accident in 2011. In 2011, three types of verifications, preliminary survey, main inspection, and emergency survey, revealed that rice with radiocesium concentration levels over 500 Bq/kg (the provisional regulation level until March 2012 in Japan) was identified in the areas north and west of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The internal exposure of an average adult eating rice grown in the area north of the nuclear plant was estimated as 0.05 mSv/year. In 2012, Fukushima Prefecture authorities decided to investigate the radiocesium concentration levels in all rice using custom-made belt conveyor testers. Notably, rice with radiocesium concentration levels over 100 Bq/kg (the new standard since April 2012 in Japan) were detected in only 71 and 28 bags out of the total 10,338,000 in 2012 and 11,001,000 in 2013, respectively. We considered that there were almost no rice exceeding 100 Bq/kg produced in Fukushima Prefecture after 3 years from the nuclear accident, and the safety of Fukushima's rice were ensured because of the investigation of all rice. PMID:25731663

  3. Linking large-scale bean-rice rotation with increased rice yield in remote sensing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ling; Zhu, Zesheng

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the two different treatments are continuous rice and rice in rotation with bean, and the response is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) of rice or the rice yield. This study is to determine whether the rice in rotation with bean results in a significant effect—increasing the rice yield. In this completely randomized experiment, we randomly assigned 40 samples to the continuous rice and 40 samples to the rice in rotation with bean. Then the rice NDVIs of all 80 samples were computed. Because the statistical significance of the rice NDVI of the rotation treatment was observed in the experiment, we can be confident in the conclusion that it was the difference in treatments that resulted in the difference in the rice yield. That is, we can be confident that a cause-and-effect relationship between the rice in rotation with bean and the rice yield increase has been found.

  4. Maximum outcrossing rate and genetic compatibility between red rice (Oryza sativa) biotypes and Clearfield™ rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although red rice can be selectively controlled with imazethapyr in ClearfieldTM (CL) rice, the transfer of the imazethapyr-resistant gene from CL rice to red rice is an ecological risk. Previous experiments indicated that flowering synchronization and genetic compatibility between cultivated rice a...

  5. Outcrossing Potential between U.S. Blackhull Red Rice and Indica Rice Cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weedy red rice is a major weed pest of rice in the southern U.S. Outcrossing between red rice and commercial tropical japonica rice cultivars has resulted in new weed biotypes that further hinder the effectiveness of weed management. In recent years, indica rice has been used increasingly as a ger...

  6. Evidence for divergence of response in Indica, Japonica, and wild rice to high CO2 × temperature interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diane R; Bunce, James A; Tomecek, Martha B; Gealy, David; McClung, Anna; McCouch, Susan R; Ziska, Lewis H

    2016-07-01

    High CO2 and high temperature have an antagonistic interaction effect on rice yield potential and present a unique challenge to adapting rice to projected future climates. Understanding how the differences in response to these two abiotic variables are partitioned across rice germplasm accessions may be key to identifying potentially useful sources of resilient alleles for adapting rice to climate change. In this study, we evaluated eleven globally diverse rice accessions under controlled conditions at two carbon dioxide concentrations (400 and 600 ppm) and four temperature environments (29 °C day/21 °C night; 29 °C day/21 °C night with additional heat stress at anthesis; 34 °C day/26 °C night; and 34 °C day/26 °C night with additional heat stress at anthesis) for a suite of traits including five yield components, five growth characteristics, one phenological trait, and four photosynthesis-related measurements. Multivariate analyses of mean trait data from these eight treatments divide our rice panel into two primary groups consistent with the genetic classification of INDICA/INDICA-like and JAPONICA populations. Overall, we find that the productivity of plants grown under elevated [CO2 ] was more sensitive (negative response) to high temperature stress compared with that of plants grown under ambient [CO2 ] across this diversity panel. We report differential response to CO2 × temperature interaction for INDICA/INDICA-like and JAPONICA rice accessions and find preliminary evidence for the beneficial introduction of exotic alleles into cultivated rice genomic background. Overall, these results support the idea of using wild or currently unadapted gene pools in rice to enhance breeding efforts to secure future climate change adaptation.

  7. Bioavailability to grains of rice of aged and fresh DDD and DDE in soils.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fenxia; Yu, Guifen; Bian, Yongrong; Yang, Xinglun; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Xin

    2007-05-01

    DDT had been widely used around the world before 1980s and is still under production and use for non-agricultural purposes in China. Because of their special physicochemical properties, p,p'-DDT and its main metabolites, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE, accumulated and persisted in the environment, presenting potential menace on biota. A green-house study was conducted to determine the bioavailability of p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE to grains of rice and the influences of traditional Chinese farming practices on their bioaccumulation. Paddy rice and dry rice were grown in submerged paddy soils and non-submerged upland soils, respectively. Two types of soil, Hydragric Anthrosols (An) and Hydragric Acrisols (Ac), were employed. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) of DDE ranged from 0.67 for rice grown in non-submerged An to 0.84 in submerged An in the control group, whilst BAFs were all below 0.04 in experimental groups. BAFs of DDD varied from 1.39 for submerged An to 2.26 for submerged Ac in original soils. In contrast, BAFs were between 0.05 for non-submerged Ac and 0.08 for submerged An in DDD-contaminated soils. Flooding seemed to have two contradictory effects on the DDE/DDD accumulation by rice: on one hand, it made the pollutants more mobile and bioavailable; while on the other hand, it enhanced the degradation and binding of POPs. Adding rice straw to the soils protected DDE from being taken up yet promoted DDD accumulation by rice. Furthermore, the distinct inorganic component of the soils might also play an important role in the environmental activities of POPs.

  8. Growth and Productivity Response of Hybrid Rice to Application of Animal Manures, Plant Residues and Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Amanullah; Khan, Shams-ul-Tamraiz; Iqbal, Asif; Fahad, Shah

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the impact of organic sources (animal manures vs. plant residues at the rate of 10 t ha−1 each) on the productivity of hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) production under different levels of phosphorus (0, 30, 60, and 90 kg P ha−1) fertilization. Two separate field experiments were conducted. In experiment (1), impact of three animal manures sources (cattle, sheep, and poultry manures) and P levels were studied along with one control plot (no animal manure and P applied) was investigated. In experiment (2), three plant residues sources (peach leaves, garlic residues, and wheat straw) and P levels were studied along with one control plot (no plant residues and P applied). Both the experiments were carried out on small land farmer field at District Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (Northwest Pakistan) during summer 2015. The results revealed that in both experiments the control plot had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) less productivity than the average of all treated plots with organic sources and P level. The increase in P levels in both experiments (animal manure vs. plant residues) resulted in higher rice productivity (90 > 60 > 30 > 0 kg P ha−1). In the experiment under animal manures, application of poultry manure increased rice productivity as compared with sheep and cattle manures (poultry > sheep > cattle manures). In the experiment under plant residues, application of peach leaves or garlic residues had higher rice productivity than wheat straw (peach leaves = garlic residues > wheat straw). On average, rice grown under animal manures produced about 20% higher grain yield than rice grown under crop residues. We conclude from this study that application of 90 kg P ha−1 along with combined application of animal manures, especially poultry manure increases rice productivity. Also, the use of either garlic residues or peach leaves, never applied before as organic manures, can increase crop productivity and will help

  9. Investigating the Contribution of the Phosphate Transport Pathway to Arsenic Accumulation in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongchang; Ren, Hongyan; McGrath, Steve P.; Wu, Ping; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic (As) accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa) may pose a significant health risk to consumers. Plants take up different As species using various pathways. Here, we investigated the contribution of the phosphate (Pi) transport pathway to As accumulation in rice grown hydroponically or under flooded soil conditions. In hydroponic experiments, a rice mutant defective in OsPHF1 (for phosphate transporter traffic facilitator1) lost much of the ability to take up Pi and arsenate and to transport them from roots to shoots, whereas transgenic rice overexpressing either the Pi transporter OsPht1;8 (OsPT8) or the transcription factor OsPHR2 (for phosphate starvation response2) had enhanced abilities of Pi and arsenate uptake and translocation. OsPT8 was found to have a high affinity for both Pi and arsenate, and its overexpression increased the maximum influx by 3- to 5-fold. In arsenate-treated plants, both arsenate and arsenite were detected in the xylem sap, with the proportion of the latter increasing with the exposure time. Under the flooded soil conditions, the phf1 mutant took up less Pi whereas the overexpression lines took up more Pi. But there were no similar effects on As accumulation and distribution. Rice grain contained predominantly dimethylarsinic acid and arsenite, with arsenate being a minor species. These results suggest that the Pi transport pathway contributed little to As uptake and transport to grain in rice plants grown in flooded soil. Transgenic approaches to enhance Pi acquisition from paddy soil through the overexpression of Pi transporters may not increase As accumulation in rice grain. PMID:21715673

  10. Growth and Productivity Response of Hybrid Rice to Application of Animal Manures, Plant Residues and Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Amanullah; Khan, Shams-Ul-Tamraiz; Iqbal, Asif; Fahad, Shah

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the impact of organic sources (animal manures vs. plant residues at the rate of 10 t ha(-1) each) on the productivity of hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) production under different levels of phosphorus (0, 30, 60, and 90 kg P ha(-1)) fertilization. Two separate field experiments were conducted. In experiment (1), impact of three animal manures sources (cattle, sheep, and poultry manures) and P levels were studied along with one control plot (no animal manure and P applied) was investigated. In experiment (2), three plant residues sources (peach leaves, garlic residues, and wheat straw) and P levels were studied along with one control plot (no plant residues and P applied). Both the experiments were carried out on small land farmer field at District Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (Northwest Pakistan) during summer 2015. The results revealed that in both experiments the control plot had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) less productivity than the average of all treated plots with organic sources and P level. The increase in P levels in both experiments (animal manure vs. plant residues) resulted in higher rice productivity (90 > 60 > 30 > 0 kg P ha(-1)). In the experiment under animal manures, application of poultry manure increased rice productivity as compared with sheep and cattle manures (poultry > sheep > cattle manures). In the experiment under plant residues, application of peach leaves or garlic residues had higher rice productivity than wheat straw (peach leaves = garlic residues > wheat straw). On average, rice grown under animal manures produced about 20% higher grain yield than rice grown under crop residues. We conclude from this study that application of 90 kg P ha(-1) along with combined application of animal manures, especially poultry manure increases rice productivity. Also, the use of either garlic residues or peach leaves, never applied before as organic manures, can increase crop productivity and will help

  11. Relationship between xanthophyll cycle and non-photochemical quenching in rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants in response to light stress.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Janet; Sharma, Prabhat K

    2011-01-01

    Thirty days old rice plants grown under low and moderate light conditions were transferred to full sunlight to observe the extent of photoinhibitory damage and protective mechanism, and the relationship between xanthophyll cycle and nonphotochemical quenching (qN) under changing light environment. Control plants (low, moderate and sun grown) exhibited similar Fv/Fm ratio, indicating similar photosynthetic efficiency prior to light stress. On exposure to the high light treatment, low light grown plants exhibited faster and higher degree of photoinhibition compared to moderate and high light grown plants. Moderate and high light grown plants showed relatively less photoinhibition and also showed higher qN, indicating better capacity of energy dissipation. Increase in qN in moderate light and sun grown plants was accompanied by conversion of violaxanthin (V) to antheraxanthin (A) and zeaxanthin (Z) indicating operation of Z-dependent thermal dissipation. Rice plants fed with ascorbate (AsA), a stimulator of the de-epoxidation state of V to Z, showed higher Fv/Fm ratio and qN than the plants fed with dithiothreitol (DTT) an inhibitor of xanthophyll cycle. This indicated that an increased amount of energy reached PS II reaction centre, due to absence of A and Z formation, thereby causing greater damage to photosynthesis in DTT fed rice plants. The present data confirmed the relationship between qN and Z in dissipating the excess light energy, thereby protecting plants against photodamage.

  12. Arsenic uptake in organic rice production systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arsenic in rice is known to be a problem in some rice-producing countries that have high levels of inorganic arsenic naturally occurring in water resources. However, it was never considered an issue for USA produced rice until international market surveys were published, indicating some USA rice sam...

  13. Effect of elevated CO2 on degradation of azoxystrobin and soil microbial activity in rice soil.

    PubMed

    Manna, Suman; Singh, Neera; Singh, V P

    2013-04-01

    An experiment was conducted in open-top chambers (OTC) to study the effect of elevated CO2 (580 ± 20 μmol mol(-1)) on azoxystrobin degradation and soil microbial activities. Results indicated that elevated CO2 did not have any significant effect on the persistence of azoxystrobin in rice-planted soil. The half-life values for the azoxystrobin in rice soils were 20.3 days in control (rice grown at ambient CO2 outdoors), 19.3 days in rice grown under ambient CO2 atmosphere in OTC, and 17.5 days in rice grown under elevated CO2 atmosphere in OTC. Azoxystrobin acid was recovered as the only metabolite of azoxystrobin, but it did not accumulate in the soil/water and was further metabolized. Elevated CO2 enhanced soil microbial biomass (MBC) and alkaline phosphatase activity of soil. Compared with rice grown at ambient CO2 (both outdoors and in OTC), the soil MBC at elevated CO2 increased by twofold. Elevated CO2 did not affect dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and acid phosphatase activity. Azoxystrobin application to soils, both ambient and elevated CO2, inhibited alkaline phosphates activity, while no effect was observed on other enzymes. Slight increase (1.8-2 °C) in temperature inside OTC did not affect microbial parameters, as similar activities were recorded in rice grown outdoors and in OTC at ambient CO2. Higher MBC in soil at elevated CO2 could be attributed to increased carbon availability in the rhizosphere via plant metabolism and root secretion; however, it did not significantly increase azoxystrobin degradation, suggesting that pesticide degradation was not the result of soil MBC alone. Study suggested that increased CO2 levels following global warming might not adversely affect azoxystrobin degradation. However, global warming is a continuous and cumulative process, therefore, long-term studies are necessary to get more realistic assessment of global warming on fate of pesticide.

  14. The flexible interrelation between AOX respiratory pathway and photosynthesis in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hanqing; Li, Hongyu; Li, Xin; Duan, Jiangong; Liang, Houguo; Zhi, Dejuan; Ma, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Alternative respiratory pathway was investigated in rice seedlings grown under total darkness, light/dark cycle, or continuous light. The capacity of the alternative pathway was relatively higher in leaves that had longer light exposure. An analysis of rice AOX1 multigene family revealed that AOX1c, but not AOX1a and AOX1b, had a light-independent expression. The alternative oxidase (AOX) inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, 1mM), inhibited nearly 68% of the capacity of the alternative pathway in leaves grown under different light conditions. The plants grown under different light periods were treated with SHAM and then were exposed to illumination for 4h. The transition from dark to 4h of light stimulated the capacity of alternative pathway in etiolated rice seedlings and in those grown under light/dark cycle, whereas the capacity of the alternative pathway was constant in seedlings grown under continuous light with additional 4h of illumination. Etiolated leaves did not show any CO(2) fixation after 4h of illumination, and the increase in chlorophyll content was delayed by the SHAM pretreatment. When seedlings grown under light/dark cycle were moved from dark and exposed to 4h of light, increases in chlorophyll content and CO(2) fixation rate were reduced by SHAM. Although these parameters were stable in plants grown under continuous light, SHAM decreased CO(2) fixation rate but not the chlorophyll content. These results indicate that the role and regulation of AOX in light are determined by the developmental stage of plant photosynthetic apparatus.

  15. Phosphorus uptake, partitioning and redistribution during grain filling in rice.

    PubMed

    Julia, Cécile; Wissuwa, Matthias; Kretzschmar, Tobias; Jeong, Kwanho; Rose, Terry

    2016-11-01

    In cultivated rice, phosphorus (P) in grains originates from two possible sources, namely exogenous (post-flowering root P uptake from soil) or endogenous (P remobilization from vegetative parts) sources. This study investigates P partitioning and remobilization in rice plants throughout grain filling to resolve contributions of P sources to grain P levels in rice. Rice plants (Oryza sativa 'IR64') were grown under P-sufficient or P-deficient conditions in the field and in hydroponics. Post-flowering uptake, partitioning and re-partitioning of P was investigated by quantifying tissue P levels over the grain filling period in the field conditions, and by employing (33)P isotope as a tracer in the hydroponic study. Post-flowering P uptake represented 40-70 % of the aerial plant P accumulation at maturity. The panicle was the main P sink in all studies, and the amount of P potentially remobilized from vegetative tissues to the panicle during grain filling was around 20 % of the total aerial P measured at flowering. In hydroponics, less than 20 % of the P tracer taken up at 9 d after flowering (DAF) was found in the above-ground tissues at 14 DAF and half of it was partitioned to the panicle in both P treatments. The results demonstrate that P uptake from the soil during grain filling is a critical contributor to the P content in grains in irrigated rice. The P tracer study suggests that the mechanism of P loading into grains involves little direct transfer of post-flowering P uptake to the grain but rather substantial mobilization of P that was previously taken up and stored in vegetative tissues. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Arsenic bioavailability to rice is elevated in Bangladeshi paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Khan, K Asaduzzaman; Stroud, Jacqueline L; Zhu, Yong-Guan; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2010-11-15

    Some paddy soils in the Bengal delta are contaminated with arsenic (As) due to irrigation of As-laden groundwater, which may lead to yield losses and elevated As transfer to the food chain. Whether these soils have a higher As bioavailability than other soils containing either geogenic As or contaminated by mining activities was investigated in a pot experiment. Fourteen soils varying in the source and the degree (4-138 mg As kg 1⁻¹) of As contamination were collected, 10 from Bangladeshi paddy fields (contaminated by irrigation water) and two each from China and the UK (geogenic or mining impacted), for comparison. Bangladeshi soils had higher percentages of the total As extractable by ammonium phosphate (specifically sorbed As) than other soils and also released more As into the porewater upon flooding. Porewater As concentrations increased with increasing soil As concentrations more steeply in Bangladeshi soils, with arsenite being the dominant As species. Rice growth and grain yield decreased markedly in Bangladeshi soils containing > 13 mg As kg 1⁻¹, but not in the other soils. Phosphate-extractable or porewater As was a better indicator of As bioavailability than total soil As. Rice straw As concentrations increased with increasing soil As concentrations; however, As phytotoxicity appeared to result in lower grain As concentrations. The relative proportions of inorganic As and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in grain varied among soils, and the percentage DMA was larger in greenhouse-grown plants than grain samples collected from the paddy fields of the same soil and the same rice cultivar, indicating a strong environmental influence on As species found in rice grain. This study shows that Bangladeshi paddy soils contaminated by irrigation had a higher As bioavailability than other soils, resulting in As phytotoxicity in rice and substantial yield losses.

  17. Effects of different treatments of fly ash and mining soil on growth and antioxidant protection of Indian wild rice.

    PubMed

    Bisoi, Sidhanta Sekhar; Mishra, Swati S; Barik, Jijnasa; Panda, Debabrata

    2017-05-04

    The aim of the present study was investigation of the effects of fly ash and mining soil on growth and antioxidant protection of two cultivars of Indian wild rice (Oryza nivara and Oryza rufipogon) for possible phytoremediation and restoration of metal-contaminated site. In this study, Indian wild rice showed significant changes in germination, growth, and biochemical parameters after exposure to different ratio of fly ash and mining soil with garden soil. There was significant reduction of germination, fresh weight, dry weight, leaf chlorophyll content, leaf area, Special Analysis Device Chlorophyll (SPAD) Index, proteins, and activities of antioxidant enzymes in both cultivars of the wild rice grown in 100% fly ash and mining soil compared to the plants grown in 100% garden soil. Results from this study showed that in both cultivars of wild rice, all growth and antioxidant parameters increased when grown in 50% fly ash and mining soil. Taken together, Indian wild rice has the capacity to tolerate 50% of fly ash and mining soil, and can be considered as a good candidate for possible phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

  18. Judicious use of kinetin to improve growth and yield of rice in nickel contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Hina; Asghar, Hafiz Naeem; Zahir, Zahir Ahmad; Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Saleem, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of kinetin on growth and yield of rice in the presence and absence of nickel contamination. Rice seedlings were dipped in kinetin solution (10(-3), 10(-4) and 10 M(-5)) for 2 hours and transplanted in pots having soil contaminated with nickel sulfate @ 130 mg kg(-1). Experiment was laid out according to completely randomized design with four replications. Results revealed that kinetin significantly improved growth and yield of rice grown in nickel contamination. Kinetin @ 10(-4) M showed maximum improvement in plant height, paddy yield, 1000 grain weight, number of tillers and panicles up to 9.76, 15.72, 11.77, 11.87, and 10.90%, respectively, as compared to plants grown in contaminated soil without kinetin. Kinetin also improved the uptake of nutrients (NPK) in straw and grain of plants grown in Ni contaminated soil. Plants treated with kinetin had more concentration of Ni in shoot but less in grain compared to plants grown in Ni contaminated soil without application of kinetin. The application of kinetin can reduce stress effect on plants through improvement in the biomass of plant. This strategy could be used to increase the phytoextraction of Ni from the contaminated soil.

  19. Responses of super rice (Oryza sativa L.) to different planting methods for grain yield and nitrogen-use efficiency in the single cropping season.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Wang, Danying; Xu, Chunmei; Ji, Chenglin; Zhang, Xiaoguo; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Xiufu; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh

    2014-01-01

    To break the yield ceiling of rice production, a super rice project was developed in 1996 to breed rice varieties with super high yield. A two-year experiment was conducted to evaluate yield and nitrogen (N)-use response of super rice to different planting methods in the single cropping season. A total of 17 rice varieties, including 13 super rice and four non-super checks (CK), were grown under three N levels [0 (N0), 150 (N150), and 225 (N225) kg ha-1] and two planting methods [transplanting (TP) and direct-seeding in wet conditions (WDS)]. Grain yield under WDS (7.69 t ha-1) was generally lower than TP (8.58 t ha-1). However, grain yield under different planting methods was affected by N rates as well as variety groups. In both years, there was no difference in grain yield between super and CK varieties at N150, irrespective of planting methods. However, grain yield difference was dramatic in japonica groups at N225, that is, there was an 11.3% and 14.1% average increase in super rice than in CK varieties in WDS and TP, respectively. This suggests that high N input contributes to narrowing the yield gap in super rice varieties, which also indicates that super rice was bred for high fertility conditions. In the japonica group, more N was accumulated in super rice than in CK at N225, but no difference was found between super and CK varieties at N0 and N150. Similar results were also found for N agronomic efficiency. The results suggest that super rice varieties have an advantage for N-use efficiency when high N is applied. The response of super rice was greater under TP than under WDS. The results suggest that the need to further improve agronomic and other management practices to achieve high yield and N-use efficiency for super rice varieties in WDS.

  20. Screening for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Rice: Salt, Cold, and Drought.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Diego M; Almadanim, M Cecília; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Saibo, Nelson J M; Oliveira, M Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the primary source of food for more than half of the world population. Most rice varieties are severely injured by abiotic stresses, with strong social and economic impact. Understanding rice responses to stress may help breeding for more tolerant varieties. However, papers dealing with stress experiments often describe very different experimental designs, thus making comparisons difficult. The use of identical setups is the only way to generate comparable data. This chapter is organized into three sections, describing the experimental conditions established at the Genomics of Plant Stress (GPlantS) unit of ITQB to assess the response of rice plants to three different abiotic stresses--high salinity, cold stress, and drought. All sections include a detailed description of the materials and methodology, as well as useful notes gathered from the GPlantS team's experience. We use rice seedlings as plants at this stage show high sensitivity to abiotic stresses. For the salt and cold stress assays we use hydroponic cultures, while for the drought assay plants are grown in soil and subjected to water withholding. All setups enable visual score determination and are suitable for sample collection along the imposition of stress. The proposed methodologies are simple and affordable to implement in most labs, allowing the discrimination of several rice genotypes at the molecular and phenotypic level.

  1. Estimating high mosquito-producing rice fields using spectral and spatial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. L.; Beck, L. R.; Washino, R. K.; Hibbard, K. A.; Salute, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The cultivation of irrigated rice provides ideal larval habitat for a number of anopheline vectors of malaria throughout the world. Anopheles freeborni, a potential vector of human malaria, is associated with the nearly 240,000 hectares of irrigated rice grown annually in Northern and Central California; therefore, this species can serve as a model for the study of rice field anopheline population dynamics. Analysis of field data revealed that rice fields with early season canopy development, that are located near bloodmeal sources (i.e., pastures with livestock) were more likely to produce anopheline larvae than fields with less developed canopies located further from pastures. Remote sensing reflectance measurements of early-season canopy development and geographic information system (GIS) measurements of distanes between rice fields and pastures with livestock were combined to distinguish between high and low mosquito-producing rice fields. Using spectral and distance measures in either a discriminant or Bayesian analysis, the identification of high mosquito-producing fields was made with 85 percent accuracy nearly two months before anopheline larval populations peaked. Since omission errors were also minimized by these approaches, they could provide a new basis for directing abatement techniques for the control of malaria vectors.

  2. Progress Toward Rice Seed OMICS in Low-Level Gamma Radiation Environment in Iitate Village, Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Rakwal, Randeep; Hayashi, Gohei; Shibato, Junko; Deepak, Saligrama A; Gundimeda, Seetaramanjaneyulu; Simha, Upendra; Padmanaban, Arunkumar; Gupta, Ravi; Han, Sang-Ik; Kim, Sun Tae; Kubo, Akihiro; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Fukumoto, Manabu; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Shioda, Seiji

    2017-09-11

    Here, we present an update on the next level of experiments studying the impact of the gamma radiation environment, created post-March, 2011 nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, on rice plant and its next generation - the seed. Japonica-type rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) plant was exposed to low-level gamma radiation (~4 μSv/h) in the contaminated Iitate Farm field in Iitate village (Fukushima). Seeds were harvested from these plants at maturity, and serve as the treated group. For control group, seeds (cv. Koshihikari) were harvested from rice grown in clean soil in Soma city, adjacent to Iitate village, in Fukushima. Focusing on the multi-omics approach, we have investigated the dry mature rice seed transcriptome, proteome and metabolome following cultivation of rice in the radionuclide contaminated soil and compared it with the control group seed (non-radioactive field-soil environment). This update paper presents an overview of both the multi-omics approach/technologies and the first findings on how rice seed has changed or adapted its biology to the low-level radioactive environment. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Estimating high mosquito-producing rice fields using spectral and spatial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. L.; Beck, L. R.; Washino, R. K.; Hibbard, K. A.; Salute, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The cultivation of irrigated rice provides ideal larval habitat for a number of anopheline vectors of malaria throughout the world. Anopheles freeborni, a potential vector of human malaria, is associated with the nearly 240,000 hectares of irrigated rice grown annually in Northern and Central California; therefore, this species can serve as a model for the study of rice field anopheline population dynamics. Analysis of field data revealed that rice fields with early season canopy development, that are located near bloodmeal sources (i.e., pastures with livestock) were more likely to produce anopheline larvae than fields with less developed canopies located further from pastures. Remote sensing reflectance measurements of early-season canopy development and geographic information system (GIS) measurements of distanes between rice fields and pastures with livestock were combined to distinguish between high and low mosquito-producing rice fields. Using spectral and distance measures in either a discriminant or Bayesian analysis, the identification of high mosquito-producing fields was made with 85 percent accuracy nearly two months before anopheline larval populations peaked. Since omission errors were also minimized by these approaches, they could provide a new basis for directing abatement techniques for the control of malaria vectors.

  4. Rice-Map: a new-generation rice genome browser

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The concurrent release of rice genome sequences for two subspecies (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica and Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica) facilitates rice studies at the whole genome level. Since the advent of high-throughput analysis, huge amounts of functional genomics data have been delivered rapidly, making an integrated online genome browser indispensable for scientists to visualize and analyze these data. Based on next-generation web technologies and high-throughput experimental data, we have developed Rice-Map, a novel genome browser for researchers to navigate, analyze and annotate rice genome interactively. Description More than one hundred annotation tracks (81 for japonica and 82 for indica) have been compiled and loaded into Rice-Map. These pre-computed annotations cover gene models, transcript evidences, expression profiling, epigenetic modifications, inter-species and intra-species homologies, genetic markers and other genomic features. In addition to these pre-computed tracks, registered users can interactively add comments and research notes to Rice-Map as User-Defined Annotation entries. By smoothly scrolling, dragging and zooming, users can browse various genomic features simultaneously at multiple scales. On-the-fly analysis for selected entries could be performed through dedicated bioinformatic analysis platforms such as WebLab and Galaxy. Furthermore, a BioMart-powered data warehouse "Rice Mart" is offered for advanced users to fetch bulk datasets based on complex criteria. Conclusions Rice-Map delivers abundant up-to-date japonica and indica annotations, providing a valuable resource for both computational and bench biologists. Rice-Map is publicly accessible at http://www.ricemap.org/, with all data available for free downloading. PMID:21450055

  5. Effects of ripening temperature on starch structure and gelatinization, pasting, and cooking properties in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Chun, Areum; Lee, Ho-Jin; Hamaker, Bruce R; Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    The effect of ripening temperature on rice (Oryza sativa) grain quality was evaluated by assessing starch structure and gelatinization, pasting, and cooking properties. As the ripening temperature increased, the amylose content and number of short amylopectin chains decreased, whereas intermediate amylopectin chains increased, resulting in higher gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy in the starch. These results suggested that an increase in cooking temperature and time would be required for rice grown at higher temperatures. A high ripening temperature increased the peak, trough, and final viscosities and decreased the setback due to the reduction in amylose and the increase in long amylopectin chains. With regard to starch crystallinity and amylopectin molecular structure, the highest branches and compactness were observed at 28/20 °C. Rice that was grown at temperatures above 28/20 °C showed a deterioration of cooking quality and a tendency toward decreased palatability in sensory tests.

  6. Characterization of Grain Quality and Starch Fine Structure of Two Japonica Rice (Oryza Sativa) Cultivars with Good Sensory Properties at Different Temperatures during the Filling Stage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changquan; Zhou, Lihui; Zhu, Zhengbin; Lu, Huwen; Zhou, Xingzhong; Qian, Yiting; Li, Qianfeng; Lu, Yan; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan

    2016-05-25

    Temperature during the growing season is a critical factor affecting grain quality. High temperatures at grain filling affect kernel development, resulting in reduced yield, increased chalkiness, reduced amylose content, and poor milling quality. Here, we investigated the grain quality and starch structure of two japonica rice cultivars with good sensory properties grown at different temperatures during the filling stage under natural field conditions. Compared to those grown under normal conditions, rice grains grown under hot conditions showed significantly reduced eating and cooking qualities, including a higher percentage of grains with chalkiness, lower protein and amylose contents, and higher pasting properties. Under hot conditions, rice starch contained reduced long-chain amylose (MW 10(7.1) to 10(7.4)) and significantly fewer short-chain amylopectin (DP 5-12) but more intermediate- (DP 13-34) and long- (DP 45-60) chain amylopectin than under normal conditions, as well as higher crystallinity and gelatinization properties.

  7. Pore Mn²⁺ dynamics of the rhizosphere of flooded and non-flooded rice during a long wet and drying phase in two rice growing soils.

    PubMed

    Haque, K M Shamsul; Eberbach, Philip L; Weston, Leslie A; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Howitt, Julia A

    2015-09-01

    Flooded rice soils produce elevated concentrations of soluble manganous manganese (Mn(2+)) that could be potentially toxic to subsequent crops. To provide insight into how soil pore Mn(2+) changes its concentration in a rice and post rice drying soil, we used an artificial microcosm system to follow Mn(2+) concentrations in two different soil types (red sodosol and grey vertosol) and under two irrigation regimes (flooded and saturated). Soil pore water was collected from four different depths of soil (2.5 cm, 7.5 cm, 15 cm and 25 cm) and Mn(2+) concentrations were analysed during and after the rice phase over a one year cycle. Mn(2+) increased with the advancement of anaerobic conditions at all soil depths, but the concentration was higher in flooded soil compared to saturated soil. Initially, the highest concentration of Mn(2+) was found at a depth of 7.5 cm, while at the later stage of rice growth, more Mn(2+) was found in the deepest sampling depth (25 cm). Plants grown in saturated soils showed a delay in flowering of approximately 3 weeks compared to flooded cultures. Moreover, plants grown in flooded soil produced more tillers and leaf area than those grown in saturated soil. Peak concentrations of soil Mn(2+) were associated with the reproductive stage of rice growth. Mn(2+) concentrations decreased after drainage of water. In post rice soils, Mn(2+) remained elevated for some time (lag phase), and then rapidly declined. Regression analysis revealed that the process of oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(4+) following water drainage decreased with soil depth.

  8. Authenticity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) geographical origin based on analysis of C, N, O and S stable isotope ratios: a preliminary case report in Korea, China and Philippine.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Prabakaran, Mayakrishnan; Yang, Jin-Hee; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Although rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the third largest food crop, relatively fewer studies have been reported on rice geographical origin based on light element isotope ratios in comparison with other foods such as wine, beef, juice, oil and milk. Therefore this study tries to discriminate the geographical origin of the same rice cultivars grown in different Asian countries using the analysis of C, N, O and S stable isotope ratios and chemometrics. The δ(15) NAIR , δ(18) OVSMOW and δ(34) SVCDT values of brown rice were more markedly influenced by geographical origin than was the δ(13) CVPDB value. In particular, the combination of δ(18) OVSMOW and δ(34) SVCDT more efficiently discriminated rice geographical origin than did the remaining combinations. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a clear discrimination between different rice geographical origins but not between rice genotypes. In particular, the first components of PCA discriminated rice cultivated in the Philippines from rice cultivated in China and Korea. The present findings suggest that analysis of the light element isotope composition combined with chemometrics can be potentially applicable to discriminate rice geographical origin and also may provide a valuable insight into the control of improper or fraudulent labeling regarding the geographical origin of rice worldwide. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Evaluations of allelopathic effect of Echinochloa colona weed on rice (Oryza sativa L. 'Vandana').

    PubMed

    Swain, D; Paroha, Seema; Singh, Monika; Subudhi, H N

    2012-09-01

    Echinochloa colona (L.) Link is a very problematic weed in up land and medium land rice causing significant reduction in yield. In the present investigation, laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the nature of interaction E. colona on germination and growth of the up land rice cultivar 'Vandana'. The effects of decomposing and decomposed aqueous leachates (1-10% w/v) obtained from the dried biomass of 20, 30, 40 and 60 days old Ecolona plants were studied on rice using petridish bioassay technique with three different types of culture media like filter paper, soil, and soil + activated charcoal. The decomposing leachates of E. colona showed strong toxic effect on root and shoot growth of rice, the highest being noted with 10% leachates of 60 days old plant residue. It inhibited root and shoot growth by 100% and 43.9% respectively as compared to control. The corresponding decomposed leachates inhibited rice germination by 90% and root and shoot growth by 70 and 25% respectively. These toxic effects of leachates showed in filter paper medium were significantly reduced in soil and soil plus activated charcoal media proving their allelopathic nature. In a field experiment, E. colona and rice were grown in proportions of 1:1, 1: 2 and 1:4, the total plant density being maintained at 100 pants m(-2). The height and dry matter of rice were adversely affected with increasing in E. colona population. From another similar field trial, data on dry matter of 20, 30, 40, and 60 days old plants were taken and their plant relative yield (PRY) and relative yield total (RYT) values were calculated. The PRY and RYT values were found to be less than unit (< 1) throughout the growth period studied which suggested the presence of severe antagonistic interspecific interaction between rice and E. colona due to allelopathy.

  10. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Rice Varieties Cultivated in Temperate Regions.

    PubMed

    Reig-Valiente, Juan L; Viruel, Juan; Sales, Ester; Marqués, Luis; Terol, Javier; Gut, Marta; Derdak, Sophia; Talón, Manuel; Domingo, Concha

    2016-12-01

    After its domestication, rice cultivation expanded from tropical regions towards northern latitudes with temperate climate in a progressive process to overcome limiting photoperiod and temperature conditions. This process has originated a wide range of diversity that can be regarded as a valuable resource for crop improvement. In general, current rice breeding programs have to deal with a lack of both germplasm accessions specifically adapted to local agro-environmental conditions and adapted donors carrying desired agronomical traits. Comprehensive maps of genome variability and population structure would facilitate genome-wide association studies of complex traits, functional gene investigations and the selection of appropriate donors for breeding purposes. A collection of 217 rice varieties mainly cultivated in temperate regions was generated. The collection encompasses modern elite and old cultivars, as well as traditional landraces covering a wide genetic diversity available for rice breeders. Whole Genome Sequencing was performed on 14 cultivars representative of the collection and the genomic profiles of all cultivars were constructed using a panel of 2697 SNPs with wide coverage throughout the rice genome, obtained from the sequencing data. The population structure and genetic relationship analyses showed a strong substructure in the temperate rice population, predominantly based on grain type and the origin of the cultivars. Dendrogram also agrees population structure results. Based on SNP markers, we have elucidated the genetic relationship and the degree of genetic diversity among a collection of 217 temperate rice varieties possessing an enormous variety of agromorphological and physiological characters. Taken together, the data indicated the occurrence of relatively high gene flow and elevated rates of admixture between cultivars grown in remote regions, probably favoured by local breeding activities. The results of this study significantly expand the

  11. Transgenic rice expressing the cry2AX1 gene confers resistance to multiple lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, M; Reddy, P Sairam; Mustafa, G; Rajesh, G; Narasu, V M Laxmi; Udayasuriyan, V; Rana, Debashis

    2016-10-01

    A chimeric Bacillus thuringiensis toxin (Bt) gene, cry2AX1was cloned in a bi-selectable marker free binary vector construct. The cry2AX1 gene, driven by the Chrysanthemum rbcS1 promoter, was introduced into JK1044R, the restorer line (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Indica) of a notified commercially grown rice hybrid in India, by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Its effect against two major lepidopteran insect pests viz., yellow stem borer (YSB) Scirpophaga incertulas, rice leaf folder (RLF) Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and one minor insect pest, oriental army worm (OAW) Mythimna separata was demonstrated through bioassays of transgenic rice plants under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The rbcS1 promoter with chloroplast signal peptide was used to avoid Cry2AX1 protein expression in rice seed endosperm tissue. A total of 37 independent transformants were generated, of which after preliminary molecular characterization and YSB bioassay screening, five events were selected for their protein expression and bioefficacy against all three rice insect. One elite transgenic rice line, BtE15, was identified with Cry2AX1 expression ranging from 0.68 to 1.34 µg g(-1) leaf fresh weight and with 80-92 % levels of resistance against rice pests at the vegetative and reproductive stages. Increase in Cry2AX1 protein concentration was also observed with crop maturity. The Cry2AX1protein concentration in the de-husked seeds was negligible (as low as 2.7-3.6 ng g(-1)). These results indicate the potential application of cry2AX1 gene in rice for protection against YSB, RLF and OAW.

  12. Biological Control Activities of Rice-Associated Bacillus sp. Strains against Sheath Blight and Bacterial Panicle Blight of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bishnu K.; Karki, Hari Sharan; Groth, Donald E.; Jungkhun, Nootjarin; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Potential biological control agents for two major rice diseases, sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, were isolated from rice plants in this study. Rice-associated bacteria (RABs) isolated from rice plants grown in the field were tested for their antagonistic activities against the rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Burkholderia glumae, which cause sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, respectively. Twenty-nine RABs were initially screened based on their antagonistic activities against both R. solani and B. glumae. In follow-up retests, 26 RABs of the 29 RABs were confirmed to have antimicrobial activities, but the rest three RABs did not reproduce any observable antagonistic activity against R. solani or B. glumae. According to16S rDNA sequence identity, 12 of the 26 antagonistic RABs were closest to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, while seven RABs were to B. methylotrophicus and B, subtilis, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequences of the three non-antagonistic RABs were closest to Lysinibacillus sphaericus (RAB1 and RAB12) and Lysinibacillus macroides (RAB5). The five selected RABs showing highest antimicrobial activities (RAB6, RAB9, RAB16, RAB17S, and RAB18) were closest to B. amyloliquefaciens in DNA sequence of 16S rDNA and gyrB, but to B. subtilis in that of recA. These RABs were observed to inhibit the sclerotial germination of R. solani on potato dextrose agar and the lesion development on detached rice leaves by artificial inoculation of R. solani. These antagonistic RABs also significantly suppressed the disease development of sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight in a field condition, suggesting that they can be potential biological control agents for these rice diseases. However, these antagonistic RABs showed diminished disease suppression activities in the repeated field trial conducted in the following year probably due to their reduced antagonistic activities to the pathogens during the long-term storage in -70C, suggesting that

  13. Biological Control Activities of Rice-Associated Bacillus sp. Strains against Sheath Blight and Bacterial Panicle Blight of Rice.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bishnu K; Karki, Hari Sharan; Groth, Donald E; Jungkhun, Nootjarin; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Potential biological control agents for two major rice diseases, sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, were isolated from rice plants in this study. Rice-associated bacteria (RABs) isolated from rice plants grown in the field were tested for their antagonistic activities against the rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Burkholderia glumae, which cause sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, respectively. Twenty-nine RABs were initially screened based on their antagonistic activities against both R. solani and B. glumae. In follow-up retests, 26 RABs of the 29 RABs were confirmed to have antimicrobial activities, but the rest three RABs did not reproduce any observable antagonistic activity against R. solani or B. glumae. According to16S rDNA sequence identity, 12 of the 26 antagonistic RABs were closest to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, while seven RABs were to B. methylotrophicus and B, subtilis, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequences of the three non-antagonistic RABs were closest to Lysinibacillus sphaericus (RAB1 and RAB12) and Lysinibacillus macroides (RAB5). The five selected RABs showing highest antimicrobial activities (RAB6, RAB9, RAB16, RAB17S, and RAB18) were closest to B. amyloliquefaciens in DNA sequence of 16S rDNA and gyrB, but to B. subtilis in that of recA. These RABs were observed to inhibit the sclerotial germination of R. solani on potato dextrose agar and the lesion development on detached rice leaves by artificial inoculation of R. solani. These antagonistic RABs also significantly suppressed the disease development of sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight in a field condition, suggesting that they can be potential biological control agents for these rice diseases. However, these antagonistic RABs showed diminished disease suppression activities in the repeated field trial conducted in the following year probably due to their reduced antagonistic activities to the pathogens during the long-term storage in -70C, suggesting that

  14. Mechanism of Safening Action of Dymuron and Its Two Monomethyl Analogues against Bensulfuron-methyl Injury to Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed

    Omokawa; Wu; Hatzios

    1996-05-01

    The comparative efficacy and mechanism of action of the herbicide dymuron and its two optically active monomethyl analogues, (R)-1-(alpha-methylbenzyl)-3-(p-tolylurea) (R-MBTU) and S-MBTU, as safeners of rice against injury from bensulfuron-methyl were investigated. Bioassays using etiolated seedlings of rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Lemont), grown either in agar or in liquid media containing bensulfuron-methyl, showed that this sulfonylurea herbicide is a potent inhibitor of rice root growth (I50 = 120 nM). Similar studies with the herbicide dymuron and its two optically active monomethyl analogues (R-MTBU and S-MTBU) showed that at 10 μM, dymuron and R-MBTU reduced rice root length by 25 and 17%, respectively, whereas S-MBTU had no effect on root growth of Lemont rice. Combined treatments with bensulfuron-methyl and dymuron or each of its two analogues confirmed that S-MTBU is an excellent safener of rice against bensulfuron-methyl, far more effective than either dymuron or R-MTBU. The protective action of S-MTBU appeared to result mainly from a drastic reduction in the uptake of bensulfuron-methyl by safened rice seedlings. Dymuron and R-MTBU reduced also the uptake of bensulfuron-methyl by rice seedlings, but to a lesser extent than S-MTBU. Quantitative changes in the metabolism of bensulfuron-methyl by safened rice seedlings were also observed, but did not appear to support the involvement of enhanced herbicide metabolism in the safening action of S-MBTU, R-MBTU, and dymuron. The major metabolites of bensulfuron-methyl detected in both safened and unsafened rice seedlings were tentatively identified as methyl-(4-hydroxy-6-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl-carbamoylsulfamoyl)-o-toluate; methyl-(aminosulfonyl)-o-toluate; and 1H-2,3-benzothiazin-4-(3H)-one-2,2-dioxide.

  15. Break-down of the molluscicide N-tritylmorpholine in soil and rice*

    PubMed Central

    Beynon, K. I.; Wright, A. N.

    1967-01-01

    The molluscicide N-tritylmorpholine (Frescon, WL 8008) is likely to be applied to flowing water systems in bilharziasis control programmes. The treated water in irrigation systems will sometimes be applied to growing crops, such as rice, and the nature of the terminal residues of N-tritylmorpholine in rice has therefore been investigated. Crops were grown under greenhouse conditions in soil treated with water containing 14C-and3H-N-tritylmorpholine, using dosage levels very much greater than those that will generally be used in the field. The major radiocomponent in the rice plants was triphenylcarbinol (triphenylmethanol), together with smaller amounts of unchanged N-tritylmorpholine and o-, m-, and p-hydroxytriphenylcarbinol. The hydroxytriphenylcarbinols were present as the free hydroxy compounds and as plant conjugates. Residues of the parent molluscicide and its break-down products are not considered likely to present a toxic hazard to animals or men that eat the crops. PMID:5300055

  16. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Adomako, Eureka E; Deacon, Claire M; Carey, Anne-Marie; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Soil Incorporation of Silica-Rich Rice Husk Decreases Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Grain.

    PubMed

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Morris, Andrew H; Gill, Rattandeep; Kearns, Kelli A; Mann, Jessica N; Paukett, Michelle; Leskanic, Corey

    2016-05-18

    Arsenic decreases rice yield, and inorganic grain As threatens human health; thus, strategies to decrease rice As are critically needed. Increased plant-available silica (Si) can decrease rice As, yet the source of Si matters. Rice husk, an underutilized and Si-rich byproduct of rice production that contains less labile C and an order of magnitude less As than rice straw, may be an economically viable Si resource to decrease rice As, yet the impact of rice husk incorporation on As in the rice-soil nexus has not been reported. This proof-of-concept study shows that rice husk incorporation to soil (1% w/w) decreases inorganic grain As by 25-50% without negatively affecting grain Cd, yield, or dissolved CH4 levels. Rice husk is a critical yet perhaps overlooked resource to improve soil quality through enhanced nutrient availability and attenuate human health risks through consumption of As-laden grain.

  18. Effect of external iron and arsenic species on chelant-enhanced iron bioavailability and arsenic uptake in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Rahman, M Mamunur; Kadohashi, K; Maki, T; Hasegawa, H

    2011-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of external iron status and arsenic species on chelant-enhanced iron bioavailability and arsenic uptake. Rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) were used as model plant, and were grown in artificially contaminated sandy soils irrigated with Murashige and Skoog (MS) culture solution. Arsenate uptake in roots and shoots of rice seedlings were affected significantly (p>0.05) while dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) was not by the additional iron and chelating ligand treatments. Regardless of iron concentrations in the soil solution, HIDS increased arsenic uptake for roots more than EDTA and EDDS. Chelating ligands and arsenic species also influenced iron uptake in rice roots. Irrespective of arsenic species, HIDS was found to be more effective in the increase of iron bioavailability and uptake in rice roots compared to other chelants. There was a significant positive correlation (r=0.78, p<0.05) between arsenate and iron concentrations in the roots of rice seedlings grown with or without additional iron indicating that arsenate inhibit iron uptake. In contrast, there was no correlation between iron and DMAA uptake in roots. Poor correlation between iron and arsenic in shoots indicated that iron uptake in shoots was neither affected by additional iron nor by arsenic species. Compared to the control, chelating ligands increased iron uptake in shoots of rice seedlings significantly (p<0.05). Regardless of additional iron and arsenic species, iron uptake in rice shoots did not differed among EDTA, EDDS, and HIDS treatments.

  19. Interactive effects of different inorganic As and Se species on their uptake and translocation by rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Duan, Gui-Lan; Huang, Yi-Zong; Liu, Yun-Xia; Sun, Guo-Xin

    2014-03-01

    There is a lack of information on the interactive relationship of absorption and transformation between two inorganic arsenic (As) species and two inorganic selenium (Se) species in rice grown under hydroponic condition. Interactive effects of inorganic As (As(III)) and (As(V)) and Se (Se(IV)and Se(VI)) species on their uptake, accumulation, and translocation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings were investigated in hydroponic culture. The results clearly showed the interactive effects of inorganic As and Se on their uptake by rice. The presence of Se reduced the sum of As species in the rice shoots regardless of Se speciation. If Se is present as Se(IV), then is it is accompanied by a corresponding increase of the sum of As species, but if Se is present as Se(VI), then there is no change in the sum of As species in rice roots. These effects are observed regardless of initial As speciation. When the rice plants are exposed to Se(IV), the presence of As increases the sum of Se species in the roots, and decreases the sum of Se species in the corresponding shoots. This effect is more pronounced for As(III) than for As(V). There is no effect on Se during exposure to Se(VI). Co-existence of As also increased SeMet in rice roots.

  20. Protein Crystals Grown in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A collage of protein and virus crystals, many of which were grown on the U.S. Space Shuttle or Russian Space Station, Mir. The crystals include the proteins canavalin; mouse monoclonal antibody; a sweet protein, thaumatin; and a fungal protease. Viruses are represented here by crystals of turnip yellow mosaic virus and satellite tobacco mosaic virus. The crystals are photographed under polarized light (thus causing the colors) and range in size from a few hundred microns in edge length up to more than a millimeter. All the crystals are grown from aqueous solutions and are useful for X-ray diffraction analysis. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  1. Agriculture and the promotion of insect pests: rice cultivation in river floodplains and malaria vectors in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Jarju, Lamin B S; Fillinger, Ulrike; Green, Clare; Louca, Vasilis; Majambere, Silas; Lindsay, Steven W

    2009-07-27

    Anthropogenic modification of natural habitats can create conditions in which pest species associated with humans can thrive. In order to mitigate for these changes, it is necessary to determine which aspects of human management are associated with the promotion of those pests. Anopheles gambiae, the main Africa malaria vector, often breeds in rice fields. Here the impact of the ancient practice of 'swamp rice' cultivation, on the floodplains of the Gambia River, on the production of anopheline mosquitoes was investigated. Routine surveys were carried out along 500 m transects crossing rice fields from the landward edge of the floodplains to the river during the 2006 rainy season. Aquatic invertebrates were sampled using area samplers and emergence traps and fish sampled using nets. Semi-field experiments were used to investigate whether nutrients used for swamp rice cultivation affected mosquito larval abundance. At the beginning of the rainy season rice is grown on the landward edge of the floodplain; the first area to flood with fresh water and one rich in cattle dung. Later, rice plants are transplanted close to the river, the last area to dry out on the floodplain. Nearly all larval and adult stages of malaria vectors were collected 0-100 m from the landward edge of the floodplains, where immature rice plants were grown. These paddies contained stagnant freshwater with high quantities of cattle faeces. Semi-field studies demonstrated that cattle faeces nearly doubled the number of anopheline larvae compared with untreated water. Swamp rice cultivation creates ideal breeding sites for malaria vectors. However, only those close to the landward edge harboured vectors. These sites were productive since they were large areas of standing freshwater, rich in nutrients, protected from fish, and situated close to human habitation, where egg-laying mosquitoes from the villages had short distances to fly. The traditional practice of 'swamp rice' cultivation uses

  2. Agriculture and the promotion of insect pests: rice cultivation in river floodplains and malaria vectors in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Jarju, Lamin BS; Fillinger, Ulrike; Green, Clare; Louca, Vasilis; Majambere, Silas; Lindsay, Steven W

    2009-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic modification of natural habitats can create conditions in which pest species associated with humans can thrive. In order to mitigate for these changes, it is necessary to determine which aspects of human management are associated with the promotion of those pests. Anopheles gambiae, the main Africa malaria vector, often breeds in rice fields. Here the impact of the ancient practice of 'swamp rice' cultivation, on the floodplains of the Gambia River, on the production of anopheline mosquitoes was investigated. Methods Routine surveys were carried out along 500 m transects crossing rice fields from the landward edge of the floodplains to the river during the 2006 rainy season. Aquatic invertebrates were sampled using area samplers and emergence traps and fish sampled using nets. Semi-field experiments were used to investigate whether nutrients used for swamp rice cultivation affected mosquito larval abundance. Results At the beginning of the rainy season rice is grown on the landward edge of the floodplain; the first area to flood with fresh water and one rich in cattle dung. Later, rice plants are transplanted close to the river, the last area to dry out on the floodplain. Nearly all larval and adult stages of malaria vectors were collected 0–100 m from the landward edge of the floodplains, where immature rice plants were grown. These paddies contained stagnant freshwater with high quantities of cattle faeces. Semi-field studies demonstrated that cattle faeces nearly doubled the number of anopheline larvae compared with untreated water. Conclusion Swamp rice cultivation creates ideal breeding sites for malaria vectors. However, only those close to the landward edge harboured vectors. These sites were productive since they were large areas of standing freshwater, rich in nutrients, protected from fish, and situated close to human habitation, where egg-laying mosquitoes from the villages had short distances to fly. The traditional practice

  3. Rice-arsenate interactions in hydroponics: whole genome transcriptional analysis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Lou-Hing, Daniel E; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2008-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) varieties that are arsenate-tolerant (Bala) and -sensitive (Azucena) were used to conduct a transcriptome analysis of the response of rice seedlings to sodium arsenate (AsV) in hydroponic solution. RNA extracted from the roots of three replicate experiments of plants grown for 1 week in phosphate-free nutrient with or without 13.3 muM AsV was used to challenge the Affymetrix (52K) GeneChip Rice Genome array. A total of 576 probe sets were significantly up-regulated at least 2-fold in both varieties, whereas 622 were down-regulated. Ontological classification is presented. As expected, a large number of transcription factors, stress proteins, and transporters demonstrated differential expression. Striking is the lack of response of classic oxidative stress-responsive genes or phytochelatin synthases/synthatases. However, the large number of responses from genes involved in glutathione synthesis, metabolism, and transport suggests that glutathione conjugation and arsenate methylation may be important biochemical responses to arsenate challenge. In this report, no attempt is made to dissect differences in the response of the tolerant and sensitive variety, but analysis in a companion article will link gene expression to the known tolerance loci available in the BalaxAzucena mapping population.

  4. Comparative analysis of two emerging rice seed bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fory, P A; Triplett, L; Ballen, C; Abello, J F; Duitama, J; Aricapa, M G; Prado, G A; Correa, F; Hamilton, J; Leach, J E; Tohme, J; Mosquera, G M

    2014-05-01

    Seed sterility and grain discoloration limit rice production in Colombia and several Central American countries. In samples of discolored rice seed grown in Colombian fields, the species Burkholderia glumae and B. gladioli were isolated, and field isolates were compared phenotypically. An artificial inoculation assay was used to determine that, although both bacterial species cause symptoms on rice grains, B. glumae is a more aggressive pathogen, causing yield reduction and higher levels of grain sterility. To identify putative virulence genes differing between B. glumae and B. gladioli, four previously sequenced genomes of Asian and U.S. strains of the two pathogens were compared with each other and with two draft genomes of Colombian B. glumae and B. gladioli isolates generated for this study. Whereas previously characterized Burkholderia virulence factors are highly conserved between the two species, B. glumae and B. gladioli strains are predicted to encode distinct groups of genes encoding type VI secretion systems, transcriptional regulators, and membrane-sensing proteins. This study shows that both B. glumae and B. gladioli can threaten grain quality, although only one species affects yield. Furthermore, genotypic differences between the two strains are identified that could contribute to disease phenotypic differences.

  5. Rice photosynthetic productivity and PSII photochemistry under nonflooded irrigation.

    PubMed

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  6. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (P N), lower maximum quantum yield (F v/F m), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the P N, F v/F m, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation. PMID:24741364

  7. Reducing GHG emissions in rice systems: Opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linquist, B.

    2014-12-01

    Agriculture is faced with the challenge of providing healthy food for a growing population at minimal environmental cost. Rice (Oryza sativa), the staple crop for the largest number of people on earth, is grown under flooded soil conditions has higher greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than most crops. This is primarily due to high methane emissions. In this talk I will focus on recent work and reviews on efforts to reduce GHG emissions from rice systems while at the same time maintaining or increasing the productivity of these systems. Specifically, the role of water, straw and nutrient management will be discussed. A great deal of research has gone into evaluating alternate-wetting and drying (AWD) irrigation management. AWD has tremendous potential to reduce GHG emissions; however I will examine how it needs to be practiced to achieve these goals, as well as limitations to its use such as where it can be practiced and possible effects on soil C. Straw management is critical as it provides a key carbon source for methanogens. Straw, however, is difficult to manage and has limited alternative uses. Various forms of nutrient management have also been proposed to reduced GHG emissions in rice systems. I will provide an overview of these and discuss their potential.

  8. Alcohol dehydrogenase and an inactivator from rice seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, S.; Beevers, H.

    1983-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was measured in the various organs of rice seedlings (Oryza sativa) growing in air. In extracts from ungerminated seeds, the ADH is stable, but in extracts from seedlings more than 2 days old the enzyme initially present loses activity in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion, due to the presence of an inactivating component which increases with age in roots and shoots. The inactivation can be prevented completely by dithiothreitol, and when this is included in the extraction medium the apparent loss of total ADH in roots and shoots with age is not observed. In seedlings grown in N/sub 2/, ADA levels in coleoptile extracts are higher than those in air, the enzyme is stable, and no inactivator can be detected. When seedlings grown for 5 days in air were transferred to N/sub 2/ for 3 days, ADA levels increased and there was a decline in inactivator activity. Transfer back to air after 1 day in N/sub 2/ led to loss of the accumulated ADH and increase in inactivator. These reciprocal changes and the fact that the inactivator is absent from coleoptiles of seedlings grown in N/sub 2/ appear to suggest a regulator role for the inactivator in vivo. However, it is clear that high levels of inactivator and ADH can exist in cells of seedlings grown in air for long periods without loss of enzyme activity, and it is argued that they must normally be separately compartmented.

  9. Rice in an interdependent world.

    PubMed

    Falck, V T

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcome of the increasing need and dependence on rice as an essential food, and the potential hazards of this trajectory in an interdependent world, and to propose the need for a supranational system to guide decisions made in areas of mutual dependency among nations. All rice producing countries of the world should be responsible for assuring sufficient quantities and qualities of rice for the world's population. However, there are hazards related to emphasis on rice yields associated with the neglect of overall nutritional needs and also the potential for environmental impact given the need for sustainable development. Scientific measurement and data analyses of interdependent supranational variables are needed to guide policies and practices to insure conditions for life will be favorable for people everywhere.

  10. Interactions among rice ORC subunits.

    PubMed

    Tan, Deyong; Lv, Qundan; Chen, Xinai; Shi, Jianghua; Ren, Meiyan; Wu, Ping; Mao, Chuanzao

    2013-08-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is composed of six subunits and plays an important role in DNA replication in all eukaryotes. The ORC subunits OsORC6 as well as the other five ORC subunits in rice were experimentally isolated and sequenced. It indicated that there also exist six ORC subunits in rice. Results of RT-PCR indicated that expression of all the rice ORC genes are no significant difference under 26°C and 34°C. Yeast two hybridization indicated that OsORC2, -3, -5 interact with each other. OsORC5 can then bind OsORC4 to form the OsORC2, -3,-4,-5 core complex. It suggested that the basic interactions have been conserved through evolution. No binding of OsORC1 and OsORC6 with the other subunits were observed. A model of ORC complex in rice is proposed.

  11. Rice scene radiation research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Data requirements, tasks to be accomplished, and the technical approaches to be used in identifying the characteristics of rice for crop inventories are listed as well as methods for estimating crop development and assessing its conditions.

  12. Distribution of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidative Activities of Rice Kernel and Their Relationships with Agronomic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwani, Amit; Chiang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Shih-Shiung

    2014-01-01

    The phenolic and antioxidant activity of ethanolic extract of two Japonica rice cultivars, Taikeng no. 16 (medium and slender grain) and Kaohsiung no. 139 (short and round grain), grown under organic and conventional farming were examined. Analyses shows that Kaohsiung no. 139 contains the highest amount of secondary metabolites and continuous farming can increase its production. Results also suggest that phenolic content under different agronomic practices, has not shown significant differences but organically grown rice has proven to be better in higher accumulation of other secondary metabolites (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), flavonoid content, and ferrous chelating capacity). In nutshell, genetic traits and environment have significant effect on phenolic compounds and the least variation reported under agronomic practices. PMID:25506072

  13. Storage stability of flour-blasted brown rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brown rice was blasted with rice flour rather than sand in a sand blaster to make microscopic nicks and cuts so that water can easily penetrate into the brown rice endosperm and cook the rice in a shorter time. The flour-blasted American Basmati brown rice, long grain brown rice, and parboiled long...

  14. Differentiation of weedy traits in ALS-resistant red rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red rice is a weedy form of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) that competes aggressively with rice in the southern U.S., reduces yields and contaminates rice grains. The introduction of ClearfieldTM rice, a nontransgenic, herbicide-resistant rice cultivar a decade ago has led to increased use of imazet...

  15. Plant physiological and soil characteristics associated with methane and nitrous oxide emission from rice paddy.

    PubMed

    Baruah, K K; Gogoi, Boby; Gogoi, P

    2010-01-01

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are important greenhouse gases causing global warming and climate change. Efforts were made to analyze the CH4 and N2O flux in relation to plant and soil factors from rice (Oryza sativa L.) paddy. Ten popularly grown rice varieties namely Rashmisali, Bogajoha, Basmuthi, Lalkalamdani, Choimora (traditional varieties); Mahsuri, Moniram, Kushal, Gitesh and Profulla (high yielding varieties = HYV) were grown during monsoon season of July 2006. The CH4 and N2O emissions were measured the date of transplanting onwards at weekly interval along with soil and plant parameters. The seasonal integrated CH4 and N2O emission (Esif) from rice ranged from 8.13 g m(-2) to 13.00 g m(-2) and 121.63 mg N2O-N m(-2) to 189.46 mg N2O-N m(-2), respectively. Variety Gitesh emitted less N2O and CH4 amongst all the rice varieties. Both CH4 and N2O emission exhibited a significant positive correlation with leaf area, leaf number, tiller number and root dry weight. Soil organic carbon of the experimental field was associated with both CH4 and N2O emission whereas nitrate-N content of soil was associated with N2O emission. Methane emission showed significant positive correlations with soil temperature and crop photosynthetic rate. Traditional rice varieties with profuse vegetative growth recorded higher CH4 and N2O fluxes compared to HYVs. Gitesh and Kushal having low seasonal CH4 and N2O emission with higher yield potential can be recommended as low greenhouse gas emitting rice varieties.

  16. Increasing rice plant growth by Trichoderma sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doni, Febri; Isahak, Anizan; Zain, Che Radziah Che Mohd; Sulaiman, Norela; Fathurahman, F.; Zain, Wan Nur Syazana Wan Mohd.; Kadhimi, Ahsan A.; Alhasnawi, Arshad Naji; Anhar, Azwir; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma sp. is a plant growth promoting fungi in many crops. Initial observation on the ability to enhance rice germination and vigor have been reported. In this study, the effectiveness of a local isolate Trichoderma asprellum SL2 to enhance rice seedling growth was assessed experimentally under greenhouse condition using a completely randomized design. Results showed that inoculation of rice plants with Trichoderma asprellum SL2 significantly increase rice plants height, root length, wet weight, leaf number and biomass compared to untreated rice plants (control). The result of this study can serve as a reference for further work on the application of beneficial microorganisms to enhance rice production.

  17. Detection algorithm for multiple rice seeds images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, F.; Ying, Y. B.

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a digital image analysis algorithm for detection of multiple rice seeds images. The rice seeds used for this study involved a hybrid rice seed variety. Images of multiple rice seeds were acquired with a machine vision system for quality inspection of bulk rice seeds, which is designed to inspect rice seeds on a rotating disk with a CCD camera. Combining morphological operations and parallel processing gave improvements in accuracy, and a reduction in computation time. Using image features selected based on classification ability; a highly acceptable defects classification was achieved when the algorithm was implemented for all the samples to test the adaptability.

  18. [Rice allelopathy to barnyardgrass].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenghao; Yu, Liuqing; Zhao, Ming

    2003-05-01

    138 rice (Oryza sativa) germplasms were identified to study the allelopathy to barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crusgalli), using the relay seeding technique. The results showed that Qingkun 2 from Jiangxi Province, Xiayitiao from Jiangsu Province, Jizaoxian from Anhui Province, Ganzaoxian 37 from Jiangxi Province, Shangnuo 1, IR68465-2-3-2 from IRRI, and Shuiyuan 2 from Korea had a strongly excellent inhibition effect on barnyardgrass. Results from pot culture showed that Gumei 2 and Zhong 156 had a greater inhibitory effect than control, and allelopathic material TN1 had no significantly inhibition effect, compared to non-allelopathic material Xiushui 63. The effect of Zhong 156 was related to its plant height, and significant different from that of Xiushui 63. Gumei 2 had a stronger inhibition effect on barnyardgrass, due to its own allelopathic trait.

  19. Expansins in deepwater rice internodes.

    PubMed

    Cho, H T; Kende, H

    1997-04-01

    Cell walls of deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) internodes undergo long-term extension (creep) when placed under tension in acidic buffers. This is indicative of the action of the cell wall-loosening protein expansin. Wall extension had a pH optimum of around 4.0 and was abolished by boiling. Acid-induced extension of boiled cell walls could be reconstituted by addition of salt-extracted rice or cucumber cell wall proteins. Cucumber expansin antibody recognized a single protein band of 24.5-kD apparent molecular mass on immunoblots of rice cell wall proteins. Expansins were partially purified by concanavalin A affinity chromatography and sulfopropyl (SP) cation-exchange chromatography. The latter yielded two peaks with extension activity (SP20 and SP29), and immunoblot analysis showed that both of these active fractions contained expansin of 24.5-kD molecular mass. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP20 expansin is identical to that deduced from the rice expansin cDNA Os-EXP1. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of SP29 expansin matches that deduced from the rice expansin cDNA Os-EXP2 in six of eight amino acids. Our results show that two expansins occur in the cell walls of rice internodes and that they may mediate acid-induced wall extension.

  20. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to begained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his wirt around this globe of ours. There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountain? Why 35 years ago why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we attend to win, and the others , too.'

  1. Pullulanase from rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Susumu; Konno, Haruyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41) in non-germinating seeds was compared with that in germinating seeds. Moreover, pullulanase from the endosperm of rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Hinohikari) seeds was isolated and its properties investigated. The pI value of pullulanase from seeds after 8 days of germination was almost equal to that from non-germinating seeds, which shows that these two enzymes are the same protein. Therefore, the same pullulanase may play roles in both starch synthesis during ripening and starch degradation during germination in rice seeds. The enzyme was isolated by a procedure that included ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-cellulofine column chromatography, preparative isoelectric focusing, and preparative disc gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was homogeneous by SDS/PAGE. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 100 000 based on its mobility on SDS/PAGE and 105 000 based on gel filtration with TSKgel super SW 3000, which showed that it was composed of a single unit. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 4.7. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by beta-cyclodextrin. The enzyme was not activated by thiol reagents such as dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol or glutathione. The enzyme most preferably hydrolyzed pullulan and liberated only maltotriose. The pullulan hydrolysis was strongly inhibited by the substrate at a concentration higher than 0.1%. The degree of inhibition increased with an increase in the concentration of pullulan. However, the enzyme hydrolyzed amylopectin, soluble starch and beta-limit dextrin more rapidly as their concentrations increased. The enzyme exhibited alpha-glucosyltransfer activity and produced an alpha-1,6-linked compound of two maltotriose molecules from pullulan.

  2. Kennedy at Rice University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in the football field. The following are excerpts from his speech. ' ...We set sail on his new sea because there is a new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. ...Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war. But I do say space can be explored and mastered without feeding the fires of war, without repeating the mistakes that man has made with extending his writ around this globe of ours. ...There is no strife, no prejudice, no national conflict in outer space as yet. Its conquest deserves the best of all mankind, and its opportunity for peaceful cooperation may never come again. But why, some say the Moon? Why choose this as our goal? And they may well ask, why climb the highest mountian? Why - 35 years ago - why fly the Atlantic? Why does Rice play Texas? We choose to go to the Moon, we choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one in which we intend to win, and the others too.'

  3. Evaluation of Host-Plant Resistance of Selected Rice Genotypes to the Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Vyavhare, Suhas S; Gealy, David R; Way, Michael O; Tabien, Rodante E; Pearson, Rebecca A

    2016-08-30

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, is the most important insect pest of rice in the United States. Management of L. oryzophilus mainly depends upon the use of insecticides due to the lack of effective alternative management tactics. A 3-yr field study was conducted to determine if difference exists among rice genotypes and cultivars of inbred tropical japonica subspecies commercially grown in the southern United States [Cocodrie (PI 606331), CL171, and CL151 (PI 654463)] and the germplasm lines of indica subspecies adapted to tropical climates of Asia [WC 4644 (PI 312777), TNI (PI 495830), Rondo (PI 615022), 4612 (PI 615039), TeQing (PI 536047), and 4593 (PI 615031)] for resistance to L. oryzophilus Experiments were established as a split-plot design with cultivars as main plots and insecticide treatment as subplots. No significant differences were observed in number of L. oryzophilus larvae recovered across cultivars and genotypes, indicating no significant variation in their preference to L. oryzophilus oviposition. Insecticide treatment had a significant impact on L. oryzophilus larval density. However, grain yield did not vary significantly between treated and untreated plots for any of the cultivars and genotypes. The amount of yield loss in response to L. oryzophilus infestation did not vary significantly across genotypes and cultivars, indicating no variation among these genotypes for resistance to L. oryzophilus.

  4. Evaluation of Host-Plant Resistance of Selected Rice Genotypes to the Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Vyavhare, Suhas S; Gealy, David R; Way, Michael O; Tabien, Rodante E; Pearson, Rebecca A

    2016-12-01

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, is the most important insect pest of rice in the United States. Management of L. oryzophilus mainly depends upon the use of insecticides due to the lack of effective alternative management tactics. A 3-yr field study was conducted to determine if difference exists among rice genotypes and cultivars of inbred tropical japonica subspecies commercially grown in the southern United States [Cocodrie (PI 606331), CL171, and CL151 (PI 654463)] and the germplasm lines of indica subspecies adapted to tropical climates of Asia [WC 4644 (PI 312777), TNI (PI 495830), Rondo (PI 615022), 4612 (PI 615039), TeQing (PI 536047), and 4593 (PI 615031)] for resistance to L. oryzophilus Experiments were established as a split-plot design with cultivars as main plots and insecticide treatment as subplots. No significant differences were observed in number of L. oryzophilus larvae recovered across cultivars and genotypes, indicating no significant variation in their preference to L. oryzophilus oviposition. Insecticide treatment had a significant impact on L. oryzophilus larval density. However, grain yield did not vary significantly between treated and untreated plots for any of the cultivars and genotypes. The amount of yield loss in response to L. oryzophilus infestation did not vary significantly across genotypes and cultivars, indicating no variation among these genotypes for resistance to L. oryzophilus.

  5. Prediction of kharif rice yield at Kharagpur using disaggregated extended range rainfall forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhekale, B. S.; Nageswararao, M. M.; Nair, Archana; Mohanty, U. C.; Swain, D. K.; Singh, K. K.; Arunbabu, T.

    2017-08-01

    The Extended Range Forecasts System (ERFS) has been generating monthly and seasonal forecasts on real-time basis throughout the year over India since 2009. India is one of the major rice producer and consumer in South Asia; more than 50% of the Indian population depends on rice as staple food. Rice is mainly grown in kharif season, which contributed 84% of the total annual rice production of the country. Rice cultivation in India is rainfed, which depends largely on rains, so reliability of the rainfall forecast plays a crucial role for planning the kharif rice crop. In the present study, an attempt has been made to test the reliability of seasonal and sub-seasonal ERFS summer monsoon rainfall forecasts for kharif rice yield predictions at Kharagpur, West Bengal by using CERES-Rice (DSSATv4.5) model. These ERFS forecasts are produced as monthly and seasonal mean values and are converted into daily sequences with stochastic weather generators for use with crop growth models. The daily sequences are generated from ERFS seasonal (June-September) and sub-seasonal (July-September, August-September, and September) summer monsoon (June to September) rainfall forecasts which are considered as input in CERES-rice crop simulation model for the crop yield prediction for hindcast (1985-2008) and real-time mode (2009-2015). The yield simulated using India Meteorological Department (IMD) observed daily rainfall data is considered as baseline yield for evaluating the performance of predicted yields using the ERFS forecasts. The findings revealed that the stochastic disaggregation can be used to disaggregate the monthly/seasonal ERFS forecasts into daily sequences. The year to year variability in rice yield at Kharagpur is efficiently predicted by using the ERFS forecast products in hindcast as well as real time, and significant enhancement in the prediction skill is noticed with advancement in the season due to incorporation of observed weather data which reduces uncertainty of

  6. Pore Water Arsenic Dynamics in Rice Paddies Under Projected Future Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaganas, M.; Wang, T.; Muehe, E. M.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Rice is one of the staple crops in the world, with 50% of the global population eating rice daily. Many rice-producing regions of the world are irrigated with groundwater contaminated with arsenic (As), and in particular South and Southeast Asia, where geogenic As is leached into the groundwater. Use of groundwater pervasively high in As leads to subsequent accumulation in paddy soils. Arsenic, a toxic metalloid, also decreases rice productivity and further jeopardizes food security. Hence, rice agriculture is concerned with its productivity in a climate change impacted future and the particular impacts of arsenic on yields. However, past studies do not address the prevalence of As in paddy soils or its fate in the rhizosphere and ultimate impact on the plant. The objective of our study was to determine changes in pore water As dynamics in the rhizosphere of rice plants grown on As-contaminated paddy soil under climate conditions projected for the end of the century. In order to address this objective, we designed greenhouse chambers with today's climate and projected climate conditions for the year 2100, specifically 5°C increase in temperature and doubled concentration of atmospheric CO2. We hypothesize that the effects of climate change with these conditions will increase the mobility of As in the rhizosphere, and thus, decrease rice growth in As-bearing paddies more than, so far, expected. We examined pore water geochemistry including pH and As concentrations, and correlate that to the height of the plants. Furthermore, the dynamics of other elements in the pore water such as carbon, iron, sulfur, manganese, and silica are further evaluated for their effects on rice growth. Arsenic will have an impact on rice production and conditions induced by future climatic conditions need to be considered for food security. Considering that climate change will decrease the global agricultural output, we should urgently consider adapting our agricultural practices to aid

  7. The knockdown of OsVIT2 and MIT affects iron localization in rice seed.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Khurram; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Akhtar, Shamim; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2013-11-20

    The mechanism of iron (Fe) uptake in plants has been extensively characterized, but little is known about how Fe transport to different subcellular compartments affects Fe localization in rice seed. Here, we discuss the characterization of a rice vacuolar Fe transporter 2 (OsVIT2) T-DNA insertion line (osvit2) and report that the knockdown of OsVIT2 and mitochondrial Fe transporter (MIT) expression affects seed Fe localization. osvit2 plants accumulated less Fe in their shoots when grown under normal or excess Fe conditions, while the accumulation of Fe was comparable to that in wild-type (WT) plants under Fe-deficient conditions. The accumulation of zinc, copper, and manganese also changed significantly in the shoots of osvit2 plants. The growth of osvit2 plants was also slow compared to that of WT plants. The concentration of Fe increased in osvit2 polished seeds. Previously, we reported that the expression of OsVIT2 was higher in MIT knockdown (mit-2) plants, and in this study, the accumulation of Fe in mit-2 seeds decreased significantly. These results suggest that vacuolar Fe trafficking is important for plant Fe homeostasis and distribution, especially in plants grown in the presence of excess Fe. Moreover, changes in the expression of OsVIT2 and MIT affect the concentration and localization of metals in brown rice as well as in polished rice seeds.

  8. Enhancement of porosity and aerenchyma formation in nitrogen-deficient rice roots.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Tomomi; Obara, Mitsuhiro

    2014-02-01

    Root aerenchyma provides oxygen from plant shoots to roots. In upland crops, aerenchyma formation is induced mainly by oxygen or nutrient deficiency. Unlike upland crops, rice forms root aerenchyma constitutively and also inductively in response to oxygen deficiency. However, the effects of nitrogen deficiency on aerenchyma formation in rice remain unknown although nitrogen deficiency is common in most of the world's soils. We aimed to clarify the spatiotemporal patterns of aerenchyma formation induced in rice roots by nitrogen deficiency upon establishment of reliable growth conditions. Rice was grown hydroponically to evaluate porosity and aerenchyma formation induced by nitrogen and oxygen deficiency. Reliable growth conditions for nitrogen and oxygen deficiency were successfully established, because seedling root elongation was significantly promoted by nitrogen deficiency and inhibited by oxygen deficiency. Porosity was higher in whole roots grown under nitrogen and oxygen deficiency than in the controls. Root aerenchyma production was induced extensively by nitrogen deficiency but partially by oxygen deficiency. Thus the physiological roles of aerenchyma induced by nitrogen deficiency likely differ from those under oxygen deficiency. It indicates a possibility that inducible aerenchyma formation in nitrogen deficiency might promote adaptation to this deficiency by reducing respiration and remobilizing nitrogen, or both. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure, variation, and assembly of the root-associated microbiomes of rice.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Joseph; Johnson, Cameron; Santos-Medellín, Christian; Lurie, Eugene; Podishetty, Natraj Kumar; Bhatnagar, Srijak; Eisen, Jonathan A; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2015-02-24

    Plants depend upon beneficial interactions between roots and microbes for nutrient availability, growth promotion, and disease suppression. High-throughput sequencing approaches have provided recent insights into root microbiomes, but our current understanding is still limited relative to animal microbiomes. Here we present a detailed characterization of the root-associated microbiomes of the crop plant rice by deep sequencing, using plants grown under controlled conditions as well as field cultivation at multiple sites. The spatial resolution of the study distinguished three root-associated compartments, the endosphere (root interior), rhizoplane (root surface), and rhizosphere (soil close to the root surface), each of which was found to harbor a distinct microbiome. Under controlled greenhouse conditions, microbiome composition varied with soil source and genotype. In field conditions, geographical location and cultivation practice, namely organic vs. conventional, were factors contributing to microbiome variation. Rice cultivation is a major source of global methane emissions, and methanogenic archaea could be detected in all spatial compartments of field-grown rice. The depth and scale of this study were used to build coabundance networks that revealed potential microbial consortia, some of which were involved in methane cycling. Dynamic changes observed during microbiome acquisition, as well as steady-state compositions of spatial compartments, support a multistep model for root microbiome assembly from soil wherein the rhizoplane plays a selective gating role. Similarities in the distribution of phyla in the root microbiomes of rice and other plants suggest that conclusions derived from this study might be generally applicable to land plants.

  10. Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) emergence characteristics and influence on rice (O. sativa) yield at different planting dates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultivated rice yield losses due to red rice infestation vary by cultivar, red rice density, and duration of interference. The competition effects of red rice could be influenced further by emergence characteristics, red rice biotype, and planting time of cultivated rice. We aimed to characterize th...

  11. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. Rice straw and rice hulls may be imported into Guam without further permit, other...

  12. 7 CFR 319.55a - Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... straw and rice hulls into Guam. 319.55a Section 319.55a Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Rice Quarantine § 319.55a Administrative instructions relating to entry of rice straw and rice hulls into Guam. Rice straw and rice hulls may be imported into Guam without further permit, other...

  13. Genetic analysis of atypical U.S. red rice phenotypes: indications of prior gene flow in rice fields?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red rice is a troublesome weed problem in rice fields of the southern U.S. Outcrossing between rice and red rice occurs at low rates, resulting in a broad array of plant types. SSR markers were used to evaluate the genetic backgrounds of atypical red rice types obtained from rice farms in comparis...

  14. Outcrossing potential between U.S. red rice (Oryza sativa) and Chinese indica rice (Oryza sativa) lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red rice in southern U.S. rice fields remains a widespread, economically challenging problem despite nearly a decade of rice production systems that include true-breeding rice cultivars and indica-derived hybrid rice with resistance to imazethapyr. Both of these herbicide-resistant rice systems hav...

  15. Does growth under elevated CO₂ moderate photoacclimation in rice?

    PubMed

    Hubbart, Stella; Bird, Susannah; Lake, Janice A; Murchie, Erik H

    2013-06-01

    Acclimation of plant photosynthesis to light irradiance (photoacclimation) involves adjustments in levels of pigments and proteins and larger scale changes in leaf morphology. To investigate the impact of rising atmospheric CO₂ on crop physiology, we hypothesize that elevated CO₂ interacts with photoacclimation in rice (Oryza sativa). Rice was grown under high light (HL: 700 µmol m⁻²  s⁻¹), low light (LL: 200 µmol m⁻²  s⁻¹), ambient CO₂ (400 µl l⁻¹) and elevated CO₂ (1000 µl l⁻¹). Leaf six was measured throughout. Obscuring meristem tissue during development did not alter leaf thickness indicating that mature leaves are responsible for sensing light during photoacclimation. Elevated CO₂ raised growth chamber photosynthesis and increased tiller formation at both light levels, while it increased leaf length under LL but not under HL. Elevated CO₂ always resulted in increased leaf growth rate and tiller production. Changes in leaf thickness, leaf area, Rubisco content, stem and leaf starch, sucrose and fructose content were all dominated by irradiance and unaffected by CO₂. However, stomata responded differently; they were significantly smaller in LL grown plants compared to HL but this effect was significantly suppressed under elevated CO₂. Stomatal density was lower under LL, but this required elevated CO₂ and the magnitude was adaxial or abaxial surface-dependent. We conclude that photoacclimation in rice involves a systemic signal. Furthermore, extra carbohydrate produced under elevated CO₂ is utilized in enhancing leaf and tiller growth and does not enhance or inhibit any feature of photoacclimation with the exception of stomatal morphology.

  16. Kinetic analysis of purified recombinant rice N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase and peak melatonin production in etiolated rice shoots.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Byeon, Yeong; Kim, Young-Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2013-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (osASMT), the last enzyme in the synthesis of melatonin, was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. We then characterized its enzyme kinetics, which is the first time this has been performed in plants. Purified glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fused recombinant osASMT (GST-osASMT) and GST-free osASMT showed specific enzyme activities of 6.6 and 12.6 pmol/min per mg protein, respectively. When evaluated by the Lineweaver-Burk equation, GST-free osASMT exhibited a K(m) of 864 μm. An in vitro enzyme assay of purified osASMT showed melatonin formation to be proportional to the enzyme and substrate concentrations, as well as time. Unlike animal ASMT, high substrate concentrations did not inhibit the activity of osASMT. Finally, melatonin biosynthesis in rice seedlings was affected by light intensity, with etiolated shoots grown in continuous darkness producing more melatonin than shoots grown in continuous light. The level of melatonin in relation to the light intensity closely paralleled the mRNA level of osASMT in the shoots, suggesting that endogenous melatonin is upregulated in darkness, as is the case in animals.

  17. Processing Conditions, Rice Properties, Health and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Poritosh; Orikasa, Takahiro; Okadome, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Rice is the staple food for nearly two-thirds of the world’s population. Food components and environmental load of rice depends on the rice form that is resulted by different processing conditions. Brown rice (BR), germinated brown rice (GBR) and partially-milled rice (PMR) contains more health beneficial food components compared to the well milled rice (WMR). Although the arsenic concentration in cooked rice depends on the cooking methods, parboiled rice (PBR) seems to be relatively prone to arsenic contamination compared to that of untreated rice, if contaminated water is used for parboiling and cooking. A change in consumption patterns from PBR to untreated rice (non-parboiled), and WMR to PMR or BR may conserve about 43–54 million tons of rice and reduce the risk from arsenic contamination in the arsenic prone area. This study also reveals that a change in rice consumption patterns not only supply more food components but also reduces environmental loads. A switch in production and consumption patterns would improve food security where food grains are scarce, and provide more health beneficial food components, may prevent some diseases and ease the burden on the Earth. However, motivation and awareness of the environment and health, and even a nominal incentive may require for a method switching which may help in building a sustainable society. PMID:21776212

  18. The impact of planting date on management of the rice water weevil in Louisiana rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus, is the most destructive insect pest of rice in the United States. Early planting of rice to avoid damaging infestations of the rice water weevil has long been suggested as a management tactic. A five-year study was conducted to characterize the influ...

  19. Genetic diversity for rice grain mineral concentrations observed among genetically and geographically giverse rice accessions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With about half of the world’s people dependent on rice as their main food source, improving the nutritional value of rice could have major impact on human health. While rice in the USA is often artificially fortified, natural enhancement of the rice grain’s nutritional value, i.e. from genetic impr...

  20. Volatiles induction in rice stink bug host grasses and rice plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice stink bug (RSB), Oebalus pugnax F., is an important pest of heading rice in the United States. Little is known about plant volatiles production following herbivory by the rice stink bug. RSB feeding induced volatiles production in different RSB host grasses and rice varieties, and may help expl...

  1. Diversity of global rice markets and the science required for consumer-targeted rice breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the ever-increasing global demand for high quality rice in both local production regions and with Western consumers, we have a strong desire to understand better the importance of different quality traits that make up the rice grain and obtain a full picture of rice quality demographics. Rice ...

  2. Utilization of weedy rice for development of japonica hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Ma, Dian Rong; Xu, Zheng Jin; Deng, Hua Feng; Chen, Wen Fu; Yuan, Long Ping

    2011-05-01

    Two representative weedy rice lines, three typical japonica varieties and three typical indica varieties were used for 6 pairs of reciprocal crosses. The morphological traits of twelve F(1) hybrid lines, their parents and four elite cultivars were investigated for heterosis over mid-parent (HM), over parent (HP) and competitive heterosis (CH) analysis. Traits detected in weedy rice lines seemed larger than those in cultivars and excellent heterosis was produced in weedy rice crossing with japonica rice. Although weedy rice kept closer relationships with japonica rice compared to indica rice. But the heterosis of reciprocal crosses between weedy rice and japonica was closed to those of crosses between indica rice and japonica rice. In six of one hundred and eighteen weedy rice lines, the fertility restore gene for BT type cytoplasmic male sterility (BT-CMS) were detected. Weedy rice was very valuable germplasm resources with the abundant polymorphism. Meanwhile, the disadvantage, lodging, shattering and incompact plant type, should be modified by hybridization, backcross and multiple cross with japonica rice. Although it is difficult to use weedy rice directly, weedy rice may be available to breed both male sterile line and restorer line through improvement, developing japonica hybrid rice.

  3. Elemental composition of Malawian rice.

    PubMed

    Joy, Edward J M; Louise Ander, E; Broadley, Martin R; Young, Scott D; Chilimba, Allan D C; Hamilton, Elliott M; Watts, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Widespread potential dietary deficiencies of calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) have been identified in Malawi. Several deficiencies are likely to be compounded by high phytic acid (PA) consumption. Rice (Oryza sativa) is commonly consumed in some Malawian populations, and its mineral micronutrient content is important for food security. The considerable irrigation requirements and flooded conditions of paddy soils can also introduce or mobilise potentially toxic elements including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). The aim of this study was to determine the mineral composition of rice sampled from farmers' fields and markets in Malawi. Rice was sampled from 18 extension planning areas across Malawi with 21 white (i.e. polished) and 33 brown samples collected. Elemental composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Arsenic speciation was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-MS. Concentration of PA was determined using a PA-total phosphorus assay. Median total concentrations (mg kg(-1), dry weight) of elements important for human nutrition in brown and white rice, respectively, were: Ca = 66.5 and 37.8; Cu = 3.65 and 2.49; Fe = 22.1 and 7.2; I = 0.006 and <0.005; Mg = 1130 and 265; Mn = 18.2 and 9.6; Se = 0.025 and 0.028; and Zn = 17.0 and 14.4. In brown and white rice samples, respectively, median PA concentrations were 5438 and 1906 mg kg(-1), and median PA:Zn molar ratios were 29 and 13. Concentrations of potentially toxic elements (mg kg(-1), dry weight) in brown and white rice samples, respectively, were: As = 0.030 and 0.006; Cd  ≤ 0.002 and 0.006; Pb = 0.008 and 0.008. Approximately 95 % of As was found to be inorganic As, where this could be quantified. Malawian rice, like the more widely consumed staple grain maize, contains inadequate Ca, I, Se or Zn to meet dietary requirements. Biofortification strategies could

  4. Biogeochemical cycling of Si in a California rice cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfferth, A.; Kocar, B. D.; Lee, J.; Fendorf, S.

    2012-12-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust, but the number of studies on the biogeochemical cycling of Si does not reflect its environmental ubiquity. While not an "essential" plant nutrient, Si is important for many plants, particularly monocots, for structural integrity and protection against disease and environmental stress. For rice, Si fertilization with N and P increases yield significantly more than N and P alone. While total Si in soil is high, much of this Si is tied up in the crystal lattice of primary and secondary minerals and is only slowly released through chemical weathering. Thus, plant-available Si may be limited particularly in highly weathered soils in humid environments where long-term chemical weathering has lead to desilicification of the soils (e.g., in Southeast Asia where most rice is grown). In such Si-depleted environments, the biocycling of Si through decaying plant litter (i.e., phytoliths) and subsequent plant uptake has proven an important component of the terrestrial biogeochemical cycling of Si. Here, we investigate the dynamics of Si cycling over a two-year period in a rice paddy in Northern California where soil incorporation of harvested rice straw has impacted the terrestrial biogeochemical cycling of Si. We use Ge/Si ratios in pore-waters to infer the contribution of chemical weathering vs. dissolution of plant phytoliths on the plant-available Si pool. We found that the Ge/Si ratios change over the growing and fallow seasons reflecting different rates of Si release through phytolith dissolution and plant uptake.

  5. Proteomic analysis of rice anthers under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Sarhadi, Elham; Bazargani, Mitra Mohammadi; Sajise, Andres Godwin; Abdolahi, Shapour; Vispo, Naireen Aiza; Arceta, Marydee; Nejad, Ghasem Mohammadi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2012-09-01

    Salinity is a major factor that limits rice production worldwide. Rice is considered generally to be sensitive to salt stress during the reproductive stage. To determine the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance at the reproductive stage, anther proteomic patterns for two contrasting rice genotypes IR64 (salt sensitive) and Cheriviruppu (salt tolerant) under salt stress were compared. Plants were grown in a greenhouse and salt stress (100 mM NaCl) was imposed at the booting stage. Anther samples were collected from control and salt-treated plants at the anthesis stage. The Na(+)/K(+) ratio in IR64 anthers under salt stress was >1.7 times greater than that under control conditions, whereas no significant change was observed in Cheriviruppu. We also observed an 83% reduction in IR64 pollen viability, whereas this reduction was only 23% in Cheriviruppu. Of 454 protein spots detected reproducibly on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, 38 showed significant changes in at least one genotype in response to stress. Using Mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF) analysis, we identified 18 protein spots that were involved in several processes that might increase plant adaptation to salt stress, such as carbohydrate/energy metabolism, anther wall remodelling and metabolism, and protein synthesis and assembly. Three isoforms of fructokinase-2 were upregulated only in Cheriviruppu under salt stress. This upregulation might result in increased starch content in pollen, which would support pollen growth and development under salt stress. The results also suggested that anther and pollen wall remodelling/metabolism proteins contribute to the tolerance of rice to salt stress.

  6. A three-season field study on the in-situ remediation of Cd-contaminated paddy soil using lime, two industrial by-products, and a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar.

    PubMed

    Yan-Bing, He; Dao-You, Huang; Qi-Hong, Zhu; Shuai, Wang; Shou-Long, Liu; Hai-Bo, He; Han-Hua, Zhu; Chao, Xu

    2017-02-01

    To mitigate the serious problem of Cd-contaminated paddy soil, we investigated the remediation potential of combining in-situ immobilization with a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar. A three-season field experiment compared the soil pH, available Cd and absorption of Cd by three rice cultivars with different Cd accumulation abilities grown in Cd-contaminated paddy soil amended with lime (L), slag (S), and bagasse (B) alone or in combination. The three amendments applied alone and in combination significantly increased soil pH, reduced available Cd and absorption of Cd by rice with no effect on grain yield. Among these, the LS and LSB treatments reduced the brown rice Cd content by 38.3-69.1% and 58.3-70.9%, respectively, during the three seasons. Combined with planting of a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar (Xiang Zaoxian 32) resulted in a Cd content in brown rice that met the contaminant limit (≤0.2mgkg(-1)). However, the grain yield of the low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar was approximately 30% lower than the other two rice cultivars. Applying LS or LSB as amendments combined with planting a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar is recommended for the remediation of Cd-contaminated paddy soil. The selection and breeding of low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivars with high grain production requires further research.

  7. Thermal characteristics of ohmically heated rice starch and rice flours.

    PubMed

    An, H J; King, J M

    2007-01-01

    Thermal properties of conventionally and ohmically heated rice starch and rice flours at various frequencies and voltages were studied. There was an increase in gelatinization temperature for conventionally heated rice starches since they were pregelatinized and became more rigid due to starch-chain interactions. In addition, there was a decrease in enthalpy (energy needed) for conventionally and ohmically heated starches during gelatinization; thus, the samples required less energy for gelatinization during DSC analysis. Ohmically heated commercial starch showed the greatest decrease in enthalpy probably because of the greatest extent of pregelatinization through ohmic heating. Brown rice flour showed the greatest gelatinization temperature resulting from the delay of starch granule swelling by lipid and protein. Enthalpy of ohmically heated starches at 20 V/cm was the lowest, which was most likely due to the lower voltage resulting in a more complete pregelatinization from a longer heating time required to reach 100 degrees C. Ohmic treatment at 70 V/cm decreased onset gelatinization temperature of white flour; therefore, it produced rice flour that swelled faster, whereas the conventionally heated sample showed a better thermal resistance.

  8. Dissipation and effects of tricyclazole on soil microbial communities and rice growth as affected by amendment with alperujo compost.

    PubMed

    García-Jaramillo, M; Redondo-Gómez, S; Barcia-Piedras, J M; Aguilar, M; Jurado, V; Hermosín, M C; Cox, L

    2016-04-15

    The presence of pesticides in surface and groundwater has grown considerably in the last decades as a consequence of the intensive farming activity. Several studies have shown the benefits of using organic amendments to prevent losses of pesticides from runoff or leaching. A particular soil from the Guadalquivir valley was placed in open air ponds and amended at 1 or 2% (w/w) with alperujo compost (AC), a byproduct from the olive oil industry. Tricyclazole dissipation, rice growth and microbial diversity were monitored along an entire rice growing season. An increase in the net photosynthetic rate of Oryza sativa plants grown in the ponds with AC was observed. These plants produced between 1100 and 1300kgha(-1) more rice than plants from the unamended ponds. No significant differences were observed in tricyclazole dissipation, monitored for a month in soil, surface and drainage water, between the amended and unamended ponds. The structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities were also studied by the use of the polymerase chain reaction denaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) from DNA extracted directly from soil samples. The banding pattern was similar for all treatments, although the density of bands varied throughout the time. Apparently, tricyclazole did not affect the structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities, and this was attributed to its low bioavailability. Rice cultivation under paddy field conditions may be more efficient under the effects of this compost, due to its positive effects on soil properties, rice yield, and soil microbial diversity.

  9. Copper and zinc uptake by rice and accumulation in soil amended with municipal solid waste compost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, P.; Chakraborty, A.; Chakrabarti, K.; Tripathy, S.; Powell, M. A.

    2006-04-01

    Effect of addition of municipal solid waste compost (MSWC) on two metals viz. copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) contents of submerged rice paddies were studied. Experiments were conducted during the three consecutive wet seasons from 1997 to 1999 on rice grown under submergence, at the Experimental Farm of Calcutta University, India. A sequential extraction method was used to determine the metal (Cu and Zn) fractions in MSWC and cow dung manure (CDM). Both metals were significantly bound to the organic matter and Fe and Mn oxides in MSWC and CDM. Metal content in rice straw was higher than in rice grain. Metal bound with Fe and Mn oxides in MSWC and CDM best correlated with straw and grain metal followed by exchangeable and water soluble fractions. Carbonate, organic matter bound and residual fractions in MSWC and CDM did not significantly correlate with rice straw and grain metal. The MSWC would be a valuable resource for agriculture if it can be used safely, but long-term field experiments with MSWC are needed to assess by regular monitoring of the metal loads and accumulation in soil and plants.

  10. Integrated crop management practices for maximizing grain yield of double-season rice crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei; Ling, Xiaoxia; Cui, Kehui; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing

    2017-01-01

    Information on maximum grain yield and its attributes are limited for double-season rice crop grown under the subtropical environment. This study was conducted to examine key characteristics associated with high yielding double-season rice crop through a comparison between an integrated crop management (ICM) and farmers’ practice (FP). Field experiments were conducted in the early and late seasons in the subtropical environment of Wuxue County, Hubei Province, China in 2013 and 2014. On average, grain yield in ICM was 13.5% higher than that in FP. A maximum grain yield of 9.40 and 10.53 t ha-1 was achieved under ICM in the early- and late-season rice, respectively. Yield improvement of double-season rice with ICM was achieved with the combined effects of increased plant density and optimized nutrient management. Yield gain of ICM resulted from a combination of increases in sink size due to more panicle number per unit area and biomass production, further supported by the increased leaf area index, leaf area duration, radiation use efficiency, crop growth rate, and total nitrogen uptake compared with FP. Further enhancement in the yield potential of double-season rice should focus on increasing crop growth rate and biomass production through improved and integrated crop management practices.

  11. Different farming and water regimes in Italian rice fields affect arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal soil communities.

    PubMed

    Lumini, Erica; Vallino, Marta; Alguacil, Maria M; Romani, Marco; Bianciotto, Valeria

    2011-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) comprise one of the main components of soil microbiota in most agroecosystems. These obligate mutualistic symbionts colonize the roots of most plants, including crop plants. Many papers have indicated that different crop management practices could affect AMF communities and their root colonization. However, there is little knowledge available on the influence of conventional and low-input agriculture on root colonization and AMF molecular diversity in rice fields. Two different agroecosystems (continuous conventional high-input rice monocropping and organic farming with a five-year crop rotation) and two different water management regimes have been considered in this study. Both morphological and molecular analyses were performed. The soil mycorrhizal potential, estimated using clover trap cultures, was high and similar in the two agroecosystems. The diversity of the AMF community in the soil, calculated by means of PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) and 18S rDNA sequencing on clover trap cultures roots, was higher for the organic cultivation. The rice roots cultivated in the conventional agrosystem or under permanent flooding showed no AMF colonization, while the rice plants grown under the organic agriculture system showed typical mycorrhization patterns. Considered together, our data suggest that a high-input cropping system and conventional flooding depress AMF colonization in rice roots and that organic managements could help maintain a higher diversity of AMF communities in soil.

  12. Coupling AVHRR imagery with biogeochemical models of methane emission from rice crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliouras, Eleni Joyce

    2000-10-01

    Rice is a staple food source for much of the world and most of it is grown in paddies which remain flooded for a large part of the growing season. This anaerobic environment is ideal for the activities of methanogenic bacteria, that are responsible for the production of methane gas, some of which is released into the atmosphere. In order to better understand the role that rice cropping plays in the levels of atmospheric methane, several models have been developed to predict the methane flux from the paddies. These models generally utilize some type of nominal plant growth curve based on one or two pieces of ground truth data. Ideally, satellite data could be used instead to provide these models with an estimate of biomass change over the growing season, eliminating the need for related ground truth. A technique proposed to accomplish this is presented here, and results that demonstrate its success when applied to rice cropping areas of Texas are discussed. Also presented is a method for utilizing satellite data to map rice cropping areas that could eventually aid in a scheme for populating a GIS-type database with information on exact rice cropping areas. Such a database could then be directly tied to the methane emission models to obtain flux estimates for extensive regional areas.

  13. Integrated crop management practices for maximizing grain yield of double-season rice crop

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei; Ling, Xiaoxia; Cui, Kehui; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing

    2017-01-01

    Information on maximum grain yield and its attributes are limited for double-season rice crop grown under the subtropical environment. This study was conducted to examine key characteristics associated with high yielding double-season rice crop through a comparison between an integrated crop management (ICM) and farmers’ practice (FP). Field experiments were conducted in the early and late seasons in the subtropical environment of Wuxue County, Hubei Province, China in 2013 and 2014. On average, grain yield in ICM was 13.5% higher than that in FP. A maximum grain yield of 9.40 and 10.53 t ha−1 was achieved under ICM in the early- and late-season rice, respectively. Yield improvement of double-season rice with ICM was achieved with the combined effects of increased plant density and optimized nutrient management. Yield gain of ICM resulted from a combination of increases in sink size due to more panicle number per unit area and biomass production, further supported by the increased leaf area index, leaf area duration, radiation use efficiency, crop growth rate, and total nitrogen uptake compared with FP. Further enhancement in the yield potential of double-season rice should focus on increasing crop growth rate and biomass production through improved and integrated crop management practices. PMID:28079051

  14. Evaluating Leaf and Canopy Reflectance of Stressed Rice Plants to Monitor Arsenic Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Daughtry, Craig S.; Codling, Eton E.; Hansen, David J.; White-Hansen, Susan; Green, Carrie E.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic contamination is a serious problem in rice cultivated soils of many developing countries. Hence, it is critical to monitor and control arsenic uptake in rice plants to avoid adverse effects on human health. This study evaluated the feasibility of using reflectance spectroscopy to monitor arsenic in rice plants. Four arsenic levels were induced in hydroponically grown rice plants with application of 0, 5, 10 and 20 µmol·L−1 sodium arsenate. Reflectance spectra of upper fully expanded leaves were acquired over visible and infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Additionally, canopy reflectance for the four arsenic levels was simulated using SAIL (Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves) model for various soil moisture conditions and leaf area indices (LAI). Further, sensitivity of various vegetative indices (VIs) to arsenic levels was assessed. Results suggest that plants accumulate high arsenic amounts causing plant stress and changes in reflectance characteristics. All leaf spectra based VIs related strongly with arsenic with coefficient of determination (r2) greater than 0.6 while at canopy scale, background reflectance and LAI confounded with spectral signals of arsenic affecting the VIs’ performance. Among studied VIs, combined index, transformed chlorophyll absorption reflectance index (TCARI)/optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) exhibited higher sensitivity to arsenic levels and better resistance to soil backgrounds and LAI followed by red edge based VIs (modified chlorophyll absorption reflectance index (MCARI) and TCARI) suggesting that these VIs could prove to be valuable aids for monitoring arsenic in rice fields. PMID:27322304

  15. Identification and Functional Analysis of Light-Responsive Unique Genes and Gene Family Members in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Lee, Jinwon; Dardick, Chris; Seo, Young-Su; Cao, Peijian; Canlas, Patrick; Phetsom, Jirapa; Xu, Xia; Ouyang, Shu; An, Kyungsook; Cho, Yun-Ja; Lee, Geun-Cheol; Lee, Yoosook; An, Gynheung; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2008-01-01

    Functional redundancy limits detailed analysis of genes in many organisms. Here, we report a method to efficiently overcome this obstacle by combining gene expression data with analysis of gene-indexed mutants. Using a rice NSF45K oligo-microarray to compare 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue, we identified 365 genes that showed significant 8-fold or greater induction in the light relative to dark conditions. We then screened collections of rice T-DNA insertional mutants to identify rice lines with mutations in the strongly light-induced genes. From this analysis, we identified 74 different lines comprising two independent mutant lines for each of 37 light-induced genes. This list was further refined by mining gene expression data to exclude genes that had potential functional redundancy due to co-expressed family members (12 genes) and genes that had inconsistent light responses across other publicly available microarray datasets (five genes). We next characterized the phenotypes of rice lines carrying mutations in ten of the remaining candidate genes and then carried out co-expression analysis associated with these genes. This analysis effectively provided candidate functions for two genes of previously unknown function and for one gene not directly linked to the tested biochemical pathways. These data demonstrate the efficiency of combining gene family-based expression profiles with analyses of insertional mutants to identify novel genes and their functions, even among members of multi-gene families. PMID:18725934

  16. Integrated crop management practices for maximizing grain yield of double-season rice crop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Depeng; Huang, Jianliang; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei; Ling, Xiaoxia; Cui, Kehui; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing

    2017-01-12

    Information on maximum grain yield and its attributes are limited for double-season rice crop grown under the subtropical environment. This study was conducted to examine key characteristics associated with high yielding double-season rice crop through a comparison between an integrated crop management (ICM) and farmers' practice (FP). Field experiments were conducted in the early and late seasons in the subtropical environment of Wuxue County, Hubei Province, China in 2013 and 2014. On average, grain yield in ICM was 13.5% higher than that in FP. A maximum grain yield of 9.40 and 10.53 t ha(-1) was achieved under ICM in the early- and late-season rice, respectively. Yield improvement of double-season rice with ICM was achieved with the combined effects of increased plant density and optimized nutrient management. Yield gain of ICM resulted from a combination of increases in sink size due to more panicle number per unit area and biomass production, further supported by the increased leaf area index, leaf area duration, radiation use efficiency, crop growth rate, and total nitrogen uptake compared with FP. Further enhancement in the yield potential of double-season rice should focus on increasing crop growth rate and biomass production through improved and integrated crop management practices.

  17. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    PubMed

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities.

  18. Evaluating Leaf and Canopy Reflectance of Stressed Rice Plants to Monitor Arsenic Contamination.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Daughtry, Craig S; Codling, Eton E; Hansen, David J; White-Hansen, Susan; Green, Carrie E

    2016-06-18

    Arsenic contamination is a serious problem in rice cultivated soils of many developing countries. Hence, it is critical to monitor and control arsenic uptake in rice plants to avoid adverse effects on human health. This study evaluated the feasibility of using reflectance spectroscopy to monitor arsenic in rice plants. Four arsenic levels were induced in hydroponically grown rice plants with application of 0, 5, 10 and 20 µmol·L(-1) sodium arsenate. Reflectance spectra of upper fully expanded leaves were acquired over visible and infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Additionally, canopy reflectance for the four arsenic levels was simulated using SAIL (Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves) model for various soil moisture conditions and leaf area indices (LAI). Further, sensitivity of various vegetative indices (VIs) to arsenic levels was assessed. Results suggest that plants accumulate high arsenic amounts causing plant stress and changes in reflectance characteristics. All leaf spectra based VIs related strongly with arsenic with coefficient of determination (r²) greater than 0.6 while at canopy scale, background reflectance and LAI confounded with spectral signals of arsenic affecting the VIs' performance. Among studied VIs, combined index, transformed chlorophyll absorption reflectance index (TCARI)/optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) exhibited higher sensitivity to arsenic levels and better resistance to soil backgrounds and LAI followed by red edge based VIs (modified chlorophyll absorption reflectance index (MCARI) and TCARI) suggesting that these VIs could prove to be valuable aids for monitoring arsenic in rice fields.

  19. Arsenic Concentrations in Rice and Associated Health Risks Along the Upper Mekong Delta, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragan, L.; Seyfferth, A.; Fendorf, S.

    2011-12-01

    The consumption of arsenic contaminated food, such as rice, can be a significant portion of daily arsenic exposure, even for populations already exposed through drinking water. While arsenic contamination of rice grains has been documented in parts of Southern Asia, (e.g. Bangladesh), little research has been conducted on arsenic contamination of Cambodian-grown rice. We collected rice plant samples at various locations within the upper Mekong River Delta near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and we analyzed total arsenic concentrations in plant digests of grains, husk, and straw. In addition, we used CaCl2-, DTPA-, and oxalate-extractable arsenic to define plant-available soil pools. We found variability of arsenic concentration in the plants, with grain arsenic ranging from 0.046 to 0.214 μg g-1; other researchers have shown that concentrations higher than 0.1 μg g-1 could be a concern for human health. Although more extensive sampling is needed to assess the risk of arsenic exposure from rice consumption on a country-wide basis, our work clearly illustrates the risk within regions of the Mekong Delta.

  20. Do soil Fe transformation and secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids affect the availability of Cd to rice?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Yang, Yazhou; Liu, Danqing; Zhang, Chunhua; Ge, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) to rice may be complicated by chemical and biological factors in the rhizosphere. The aim of this work is to investigate how soil iron (Fe) redox transformations and low-molecular-weight organic acid (LMWOA) exudation from root affect Cd accumulation in rice. Two soils (a paddy soil and a saline soil) with different physicochemical properties were used in this study. Soil redox conditions were changed by flooding and addition of organic matter (OM). Two days after the soil treatments, rice seedlings were transplanted in a vermiculite-soil system and grown for 10 days. We measured pH and Eh, LMWOA, Fe and Cd contents in rice, and their fractions in the soils and vermiculite. Cadmium accumulation in rice declined in both soils upon the flooding and OM treatment. Iron dissolution in the paddy soil and its deposition in the rhizosphere significantly increased upon the OM addition, but the concentration of Fe plaque on the rice root significantly declined. Conversely, although Fe transformed into less active fractions in the saline soil, Fe accumulation on the surface and in the tissue of root was considerably enhanced. The secretion of LMWOA was remarkably induced when the OM was amended in the saline soil, but the same effect was not observed in the paddy soil. Reduction of Cd uptake by rice could be attributed to different factors in the two soils. For the paddy soil, the lowered Cd bioavailability was likely due to the competition of Fe and Cd for the binding sites on the vermiculite surface. For the saline soil, however, rice responded to the low Fe mobility through more LMWOA exudation and Fe plaque formation, and their increases could explain the decrease of rice Cd.

  1. Development and Event-specific Detection of Transgenic Glyphosate-resistant Rice Expressing the G2-EPSPS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yufeng; Jin, Xi; Tang, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Jiangtao; Liu, Xiaojing; Cai, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xujing; Wang, Zhixing

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide, due to its broad spectrum, low cost, low toxicity, high efficiency, and non-selective characteristics. Rice farmers rarely use glyphosate as a herbicide, because the crop is sensitive to this chemical. The development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant rice could greatly improve the economics of rice production. Here, we transformed the Pseudomonas fluorescens G2 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene G2-EPSPS, which conferred tolerance to glyphosate herbicide into a widely used japonica rice cultivar, Zhonghua 11 (ZH11), to develop two highly glyphosate-tolerant transgenic rice lines, G2-6 and G2-7, with one exogenous gene integration. Seed germination tests and glyphosate-tolerance assays of plants grown in a greenhouse showed that the two transgenic lines could greatly improve glyphosate-tolerance compared with the wild-type; The glyphosate-tolerance field test indicated that both transgenic lines could grow at concentrations of 20,000 ppm glyphosate, which is more than 20-times the recommended concentration in the field. Isolation of the flanking sequence of transgenic rice G2-6 indicated that the 5′-terminal of T-DNA was inserted into chromosome 8 of the rice genome. An event-specific PCR test system was established and the limit of detection of the primers reached five copies. Overall, the G2-EPSPS gene significantly improved glyphosate-tolerance in transgenic rice; furthermore, it is a useful candidate gene for the future development of commercial transgenic rice. PMID:28611804

  2. Development and Event-specific Detection of Transgenic Glyphosate-resistant Rice Expressing the G2-EPSPS Gene.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yufeng; Jin, Xi; Tang, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Jiangtao; Liu, Xiaojing; Cai, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xujing; Wang, Zhixing

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide, due to its broad spectrum, low cost, low toxicity, high efficiency, and non-selective characteristics. Rice farmers rarely use glyphosate as a herbicide, because the crop is sensitive to this chemical. The development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant rice could greatly improve the economics of rice production. Here, we transformed the Pseudomonas fluorescens G2 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene G2-EPSPS, which conferred tolerance to glyphosate herbicide into a widely used japonica rice cultivar, Zhonghua 11 (ZH11), to develop two highly glyphosate-tolerant transgenic rice lines, G2-6 and G2-7, with one exogenous gene integration. Seed germination tests and glyphosate-tolerance assays of plants grown in a greenhouse showed that the two transgenic lines could greatly improve glyphosate-tolerance compared with the wild-type; The glyphosate-tolerance field test indicated that both transgenic lines could grow at concentrations of 20,000 ppm glyphosate, which is more than 20-times the recommended concentration in the field. Isolation of the flanking sequence of transgenic rice G2-6 indicated that the 5'-terminal of T-DNA was inserted into chromosome 8 of the rice genome. An event-specific PCR test system was established and the limit of detection of the primers reached five copies. Overall, the G2-EPSPS gene significantly improved glyphosate-tolerance in transgenic rice; furthermore, it is a useful candidate gene for the future development of commercial transgenic rice.

  3. Expression of a gene encoding mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase in rice increases under submerged conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, M; Tsuji, H; Li, Y; Saisho, D; Arimura, S; Tsutsumi, N; Hirai, A

    2000-10-01

    It is known that alcoholic fermentation is important for survival of plants under anaerobic conditions. Acetaldehyde, one of the intermediates of alcoholic fermentation, is not only reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase but also can be oxidized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). To determine whether ALDH plays a role in anaerobic metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Nipponbare), we characterized a cDNA clone encoding mitochondrial ALDH from rice (Aldh2a). Analysis of sub-cellular localization of ALDH2a protein using green fluorescent protein and an in vitro ALDH assay using protein extracts from Escherichia coli cells that overexpressed ALDH2a indicated that ALDH2a functions in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in mitochondria. A Southern-blot analysis indicated that mitochondrial ALDH is encoded by at least two genes in rice. We found that the Aldh2a mRNA was present at high levels in leaves of dark-grown seedlings, mature leaf sheaths, and panicles. It is interesting that expression of the rice Aldh2a gene, unlike the expression of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Aldh2a gene, was induced in rice seedlings by submergence. Experiments with ruthenium red, which is a blocker of Ca(2+) fluxes in rice as well as maize (Zea mays), suggest that the induction of expression of Adh1 and Pdc1 by low oxygen stress is regulated by elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. However, the induction of Aldh2a gene expression may not be controlled by the cytosolic Ca(2+) level elevation. A possible involvement of ALDH2a in the submergence tolerance of rice is discussed.

  4. Refinement of Light-Responsive Transcript Lists Using Rice Oligonucleotide Arrays: Evaluation of Gene-Redundancy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Dardick, Christopher; Bartley, Laura E.; Cao, Peijian; Phetsom, Jirapa; Canlas, Patrick; Seo, Young-Su; Shultz, Michael; Ouyang, Shu; Yuan, Qiaoping; Frank, Bryan C.; Ly, Eugene; Zheng, Li; Jia, Yi; Hsia, An-Ping; An, Kyungsook; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Rocke, David; Lee, Geun Cheol; Schnable, Patrick S.; An, Gynheung; Buell, C. Robin; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa). We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org). The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics. PMID:18836531

  5. Pathways and relative contributions to arsenic volatilization from rice plants and paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Huang, Hai; Sun, Guo-Xin; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2012-08-07

    Recent studies have shown that higher plants are unable to methylate arsenic (As), but it is not known whether methylated As species taken up by plants can be volatilized. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were grown axenically or in a nonsterile soil using a two-chamber system. Arsenic transformation and volatilization were investigated. In the axenic system, uptake of As species into rice roots was in the order of arsenate (As(V)) > monomethylarsonic acid (MMAs(V)) > dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)) > trimethylarsine oxide (TMAs(V)O), but the order of the root-to-shoot transport index (Ti) was reverse. Also, volatilization of trimethylarsine (TMAs) from rice plants was detected when plants were treated with TMAs(V)O but not with As(V), DMAs(V), or MMAs(V). In the soil culture, As was volatilized mainly from the soil. Small amounts of TMAs were also volatilized from the rice plants, which took up DMAs(V), MMAs(V), and TMAs(V)O from the soil solution. The addition of dried distillers grain (DDG) to the soil enhanced As mobilization into the soil solution, As methylation and volatilization from the soil, as well as uptake of different As species and As volatilization from the rice plants. Results show that rice is able to volatilize TMAs after the uptake of TMAs(V)O but not able to convert inorganic As, MMAs(V) or DMAs(V) into TMAs and that the extent of As volatilization from rice plants was much smaller than that from the flooded soil.

  6. Effect of selenium application on arsenic uptake in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Singh, Dhanwinder; Singh, Kuldip

    2017-09-01

    Alluvial aquifers of the agrarian state of Punjab of southwestern arid zone used for irrigation of rice crops are rich in arsenic concentration. In the present study, rice (Oryza sativa L.) crops were raised in pots in a greenhouse with a purpose to study whether selenium (Se) application was effective in ameliorating As uptake. The rice crop was irrigated with arsenic laced water (0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 μM As L(-1)) throughout the growing period, without and with selenium (0.05 and 0.10 mg kg(-1)) added through mustard biomass, grown ex situ in seleniferous soil. Arsenic uptake and dry matter yield in different parts of the rice crop were assayed after application of As alone and simultaneous supplementations (As + Se). An antagonistic interaction between Se and As was observed. Addition of As through irrigation water significantly reduced yield of rice grain, straw and root. However, subsequent addition of Se helped in mitigating the harmful effect of As and countered the yield reduction caused due to As toxicity. The effect of Se on dry matter yield was more pronounced at its higher dose (0.10 mg kg(-1)) as compared to its lower dose (0.05 mg kg(-1)). The presence of Se either alone or added along with As significantly reduced the As concentration and its uptake by different parts of rice and higher reduction in As concentration was observed with addition of the highest level of applied Se (0.10 mg kg(-1)). Our observations indicated that Se supplementation might be favourable to reduce As accumulation and toxicity in rice crops.

  7. Evaluation of effectiveness of seed priming with selenium in rice during germination under arsenic stress.

    PubMed

    Moulick, Debojyoti; Ghosh, Dibakar; Chandra Santra, Subhas

    2016-12-01

    Due to extensive use of arsenic (As) contaminated ground water in rice cultivation As toxicity has become a growing concern to rice growers of south east Asian countries. The presence of As in soil and irrigation water causes impaired crop growth and development. Selenium (Se) at lower concentration (1.0 mg L(-1)) is reported to be stimulatory on crop growth and it has also an antagonistic behavior with As. With this rationale the present study was conducted to investigate into the potentiality of seed priming technology with Se to ameliorate the As stress on rice seed germination and seedling growth. The seed germination percentage, seedling growth, total phenolics, proline and malonaldehyde content as well as total As uptake pattern of rice seedlings grown under As stressed condition were measured. The As induced toxicity markedly reduced the germination percentage by 70%, whereas, Se supplementation through seed priming enhanced the rice seed germination by 9% and root and shoot length vis-a-vis seedling biomass accumulation by 1.3, 1.6 and 1.4 fold respectively. The inhibitory effect of As stress was more on root growth than that of shoot. The toxicity due to arsenite stress was higher than the arsenate stress. Seed priming with Se enhanced seed germination and seedling growth by reducing As uptake, suppressing the oxidative damage through increase in antioxidants accumulation in rice seedlings. Seed primed with 0.8 mg Se L(-1) was more effective in improving rice seed germination and seedling growth, compared to 1.0 mg Se L(-1).

  8. Rice aroma and flavor: a literature review.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aroma and flavor of cooked rice are major criteria for preference among consumers. Small variations in these sensory properties can make rice highly desired or unacceptable to consumers. Human sensory analyses have identified over a dozen different aromas and flavors in rice. Instrumental ana...

  9. Is ALL Rice Bran Created Equal?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumption of whole grain rice is increasing in the U.S. This increase is likely due to increased consumer awareness of the importance of whole grains in the diet. Whole grain rice is superior nutritionally compared to milled rice because, except for carbohyrates, it contains more phytochemicals an...

  10. Rice bran stabilization using alternative techniques (abstract)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Utilization of rice bran, a by-product of rice milling characterized with a high economic value, is severely restricted by the activity of endogenous enzymes which typically deteriorate the bran quality. There is a great need to develop alternative techniques for stabilizing rice bran and at the sam...

  11. Unraveling the secrets of rice wild species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rice wild species (Oryza spp.) genepool is a relatively untapped source of novel alleles for crop improvement. Several different accessions of rice wild species have been crossed as donor parents with several different Asian rice (O. sativa) cultivars, as the recurrent parent to develop mappi...

  12. Archeological evidence for utilizaton of wild rice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E

    1969-01-17

    The use of wild rice during the late prehistoric period is suggested by charred wild rice grains associated with fire hearths and threshing pits in historically known, specialized harvesting sites. Similar wild rice grains imbedded in the clay lining of specialized threshing pits called "jig pots" confirms the prehistoric use.

  13. New market opportunities for rice grains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Breeding efforts for rice have been focusing on increasing yield and improving quality (milling yield and grain quality), while maintaining cooked rice sensory properties to meet consumer preferences. These breeding targets will no doubt continue as the main foci for the rice industry. However, the ...

  14. Organic rice diseases and their management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of diseases is a challenge to organic rice producers. No synthetic chemicals, including fungicides and fertilizers, are allowed for use on organic rice. Instead, organic rice production relies on cultivars, animal and green manures, tillage, water, and other biological measures to maintai...

  15. Understanding rice heterosis using deep sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heterosis is a complex biological phenomenon where the offspring show better performance compared to the inbred parents. Although rice breeders have used heterosis in hybrid rice production for nearly 40 years, the genetic and molecular mechanism underlying the heterosis in rice is still poorly und...

  16. Environmental Assessment: Eagle Heights Housing Area Revitalization Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    anthus occidentalis), and herbaceous species such as rice cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides), swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata), begger-ticks (Bidens...tidal species. Butterflies were the only insects surveyed, and nine were found on base. Approximately 51 species of birds were recorded on base

  17. Chemical Control of Invasive Phragmites in a Great Lakes Marsh: A Field Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    24 0 Juncus balticus Baltic rush 16 0 Juncus brevicaudatus Narrowpanicle rush 4 0 Lactuca sp. Lettuce 4 20 Leersia oryzoides Rice cut-grass 4 4...0 8 Epilobium coloratum Purpleleaf willowherb 8 0 Galium trifidum Threepetal bedstraw 4 4 Impatiens capensis Jewelweed 24 8 Lactuca sp. Lettuce 0

  18. Hydrology and Species-Specific Effects of Bacopa monnieri and Leersia oryzoides on Soil and Water Chemistry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In an eight week greenhouse experiment, Bacopa monnieri (Water Hyssop) and Leersia oryzoides (Rice Cutgrass) were compared for nutrient assimilation as well as soil and water chemistry under variable flooding regimes using a nutrient solution rich in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Soil redox poten...

  19. Aeromonas salmonicida grown in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Garduño, R A; Thornton, J C; Kay, W W

    1993-01-01

    The virulent fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida was rapidly killed in vivo when restricted inside a diffusion chamber implanted intraperitoneally in rainbow trout. After a period of regrowth, the survivors had acquired resistance to host-mediated bacteriolysis, phagocytosis, and oxidative killing, properties which were subsequently lost by growth in vitro. Resistance to bacteriolysis and phagocytosis was associated with a newly acquired capsular layer revealed by acidic polysaccharide staining and electron microscopy. This capsular layer shielded the underlying, regular surface array (S-layer) from immunogold labeling with a primary antibody to the S-layer protein. Resistance to oxidative killing was mediated by a mechanism not associated with the presence of the capsular layer. An attenuated vaccine strain of A. salmonicida grown in vivo failed to express the capsular layer. Consequently, the in vivo-grown cells of this attenuated strain remained as sensitive to bacteriolysis, and as avidly adherent to macrophages, as the in vitro-grown cells. The importance of these new virulence determinants and their relation to the known virulence factors of A. salmonicida are discussed. Images PMID:8359906

  20. Red Yeast Rice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu; Karl, Mitchell; Santini, Antonello

    2017-01-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR), produced by the fermentation of the Monascus purpureus mold, has been used for a long time in Asian cuisine and traditional medicine. It consists of multiple bioactive substances, including monacolins, which potentially can be used as a nutraceutical. Monacolin K, which is chemically identical to lovastatin, has been recognized as responsible for the cholesterol-reducing effect of this compound. While the European Food Safety Authority maintains that the use of monacolin K from RYR preparations of at least 10 mg can produce a normal blood cholesterol level, the United States Food and Drug Administration considers monacolin K, due to its similarity with lovastatin, an unapproved drug, and therefore marketing of products that label the monacolin content is prohibited. This mini-review summarizes the benefit of RYR in hyperlipidemia, maintains RYR use as a food, and addresses the importance of regulation regarding RYR and the need for clinical data and clear label information for consumers with reference to a toxin-free, non-augmented, standardized amount of monacolins. PMID:28257063

  1. Introduction of the ZmDof1 gene into rice enhances carbon and nitrogen assimilation under low-nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurai, Tomohiro; Wakayama, Masataka; Abiko, Tomomi; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Aoki, Naohiro; Ohsugi, Ryu

    2011-10-01

    The excessive application of nitrogen fertilizer to maximize crop yields causes negative environmental effects such as pollution and ecological imbalance. To overcome this problem, researchers have attempted to improve the nitrogen assimilation capacity of crops. Maize Dof1 (ZmDof1) is a plant-specific transcription factor shown to promote nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) even under nitrogen-deficient conditions. The present study examines the effect of the introduction of the ZmDof1 gene on carbon and nitrogen assimilation in rice. ZmDof1 induced the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) genes in transgenic rice plants and transactivated the PEPC promoters in protoplast transient assays, showing similar effects in rice as in Arabidopsis. Transgenic rice expressing ZmDof1 and grown in the presence of 360 μm (nitrogen-sufficient) or 90 μm (nitrogen-deficient) of nitrogen concentrations showed modulation of metabolite content and gene expression associated with the anaplerotic pathway for the TCA cycle, suggesting an increased carbon flow towards nitrogen assimilation. Furthermore, increases in carbon and nitrogen amounts per seedling were found in Dof1 rice grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions. Nitrogen deficiency also resulted in the predominant distribution of nitrogen to roots, accompanied by significant increases in root biomass and modification of the shoot-to-root ratio. Measurement of the CO₂ gas exchange rate showed a significant increase in the net photosynthesis rate in Dof1 rice under nitrogen-deficient conditions. Taken these together, the present study displayed that ZmDof1 expression in rice could induce gene expressions such as PEPC genes, modulate carbon and nitrogen metabolites, increase nitrogen assimilation and enhance growth under low-nitrogen conditions. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell

  2. Copper and ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transport protein COPT1 alter iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Andrés-Bordería, Amparo; Andrés, Fernando; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Perea-García, Ana; Domingo, Concha; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2017-06-19

    Copper deficiency and excess differentially affect iron homeostasis in rice and overexpression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity copper transporter COPT1 slightly increases endogenous iron concentration in rice grains. Higher plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to efficiently acquire and use micronutrients such as copper and iron. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between both metals remain poorly understood. In the present work, we study the effects produced on iron homeostasis by a wide range of copper concentrations in the growth media and by altered copper transport in Oryza sativa plants. Gene expression profiles in rice seedlings grown under copper excess show an altered expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis compared to standard control conditions. Thus, ferritin OsFER2 and ferredoxin OsFd1 mRNAs are down-regulated whereas the transcriptional iron regulator OsIRO2 and the nicotianamine synthase OsNAS2 mRNAs rise under copper excess. As expected, the expression of OsCOPT1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transport protein, as well as other copper-deficiency markers are down-regulated by copper. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis COPT1 overexpression (C1 (OE) ) in rice causes root shortening in high copper conditions and under iron deficiency. C1 (OE) rice plants modify the expression of the putative iron-sensing factors OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and enhance the expression of OsIRO2 under copper excess, which suggests a role of copper transport in iron signaling. Importantly, the C1 (OE) rice plants grown on soil contain higher endogenous iron concentration than wild-type plants in both brown and white grains. Collectively, these results highlight the effects of rice copper status on iron homeostasis, which should be considered to obtain crops with optimized nutrient concentrations in edible parts.

  3. Rice bran proteins: properties and food uses.

    PubMed

    Prakash, J

    1996-07-01

    Rice bran, a good source of protein and fat, is at present underutilized as a food material. The potential of producing rice bran at the global level is 27.3 million t. The presence of enzyme lipase in rice bran causes rapid deterioration of oil to free fatty acids and glycerol. Various stabilization techniques involving heat treatment, low-temperature storage, chemical treatment, control of relative humidity during storage, and simultaneous milling and extraction were evolved to inactivate lipase. Multiple forms of rice bran lipase have been identified. Fractional classification of proteins reveals a high percentage of albumins and globulins. Proteins can be extracted from full-fat or defatted rice bran by alkaline extraction and acid or heat precipitation. Extraction procedures influence the protein content of concentrates, which ranged from 19.4 to 76.1% in concentrates from full-fat rice bran and 17.5 to 85.0% in concentrates from defatted rice bran. The PER of rice bran ranges from 1.59 to 2.04 and that of protein concentrates from 1.99 to 2.19. Available lysine contents of protein concentrates ranged from 54 to 58.8%. The essential amino acid profiles of protein concentrates indicate that threonine and isoleucine are limiting amino acids. Various functional properties of rice bran protein concentrates have also been investigated that are known to be influenced by drying technique and stabilization treatment of rice bran. Rice bran has been used in food as full-fat rice bran, defatted rice bran, and in the form of rice bran oil and protein concentrates. Full-fat and defatted rice bran have been used in bakery products, breakfast cereals, wafers, as a protein supplement, binder ingredients for meats and sausages, and as a beverage base. Incorporation of protein concentrates have been studied in bread, beverages, confections, and weaning foods.

  4. Rice, indica (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Indica varieties, which are generally recalcitrant to tissue culture and transformation, occupy 80 % of rice cultivation area in the world. Therefore, transformation method for indica rice must be improved greatly so that global rice production would take full advantage of cutting-edge biotechnology. An efficient protocol for indica transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens is hereby described. Immature embryos collected from plants in a greenhouse are cocultivated with A. tumefaciens after pretreatment with heat and centrifuging. The protocol was successfully tested in many elite indica cultivars such as IR8, IR24, IR58025B, IR64, IR72, Suweon 258, and Nanjing 11, yielding between 5 and 15 of independent transgenic plants per immature embryo. The use of immature embryos is recommended because gene transfer to them could be much more efficient and much less genotype dependent than gene transfer to callus.

  5. Rice growth adapting to deepwater.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoko; Nagai, Keisuke; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2011-02-01

    Flooding is one of the most hazardous natural disasters, and there are several levels of flooding. Recently, research on flood-tolerant rice plants revealed that some rice varieties have evolved to overcome two different flood types, 'flash flood' and 'deepwater flood', using two different mechanisms, and their molecular mechanisms were determined. During flash flooding, the tolerant plants that are fully submerged for a few weeks stop elongating and thus avoid energy consumption that will be needed to restart growth when the water recedes. On the contrary, during deepwater flooding, with water depth up to several meters for several months, the deepwater-flood-tolerant rice plants promote elongation of internodes to keep the foliage above the water surface and thus allow respiration and photosynthesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Iron biofortification of myanmar rice.

    PubMed

    Aung, May Sann; Masuda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Yamakawa, Takashi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency elevates human mortality rates, especially in developing countries. In Myanmar, the prevalence of Fe-deficient anemia in children and pregnant women are 75 and 71%, respectively. Myanmar people have one of the highest per capita rice consumption rates globally. Consequently, production of Fe-biofortified rice would likely contribute to solving the Fe-deficiency problem in this human population. To produce Fe-biofortified Myanmar rice by transgenic methods, we first analyzed callus induction and regeneration efficiencies in 15 varieties that are presently popular because of their high-yields or high-qualities. Callus formation and regeneration efficiency in each variety was strongly influenced by types of culture media containing a range of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid concentrations. The Paw San Yin variety, which has a high-Fe content in polished seeds, performed well in callus induction and regeneration trials. Thus, we transformed this variety using a gene expression cassette that enhanced Fe transport within rice plants through overexpression of the nicotianamine synthase gene HvNAS1, Fe flow to the endosperm through the Fe(II)-nicotianamine transporter gene OsYSL2, and Fe accumulation in endosperm by the Fe storage protein gene SoyferH2. A line with a transgene insertion was successfully obtained. Enhanced expressions of the introduced genes OsYSL2, HvNAS1, and SoyferH2 occurred in immature T2 seeds. The transformants accumulated 3.4-fold higher Fe concentrations, and also 1.3-fold higher zinc concentrations in T2 polished seeds compared to levels in non-transgenic rice. This Fe-biofortified rice has the potential to reduce Fe-deficiency anemia in millions of Myanmar people without changing food habits and without introducing additional costs.

  7. Iron Biofortification of Myanmar Rice

    PubMed Central

    Aung, May Sann; Masuda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Yamakawa, Takashi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency elevates human mortality rates, especially in developing countries. In Myanmar, the prevalence of Fe-deficient anemia in children and pregnant women are 75 and 71%, respectively. Myanmar people have one of the highest per capita rice consumption rates globally. Consequently, production of Fe-biofortified rice would likely contribute to solving the Fe-deficiency problem in this human population. To produce Fe-biofortified Myanmar rice by transgenic methods, we first analyzed callus induction and regeneration efficiencies in 15 varieties that are presently popular because of their high-yields or high-qualities. Callus formation and regeneration efficiency in each variety was strongly influenced by types of culture media containing a range of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid concentrations. The Paw San Yin variety, which has a high-Fe content in polished seeds, performed well in callus induction and regeneration trials. Thus, we transformed this variety using a gene expression cassette that enhanced Fe transport within rice plants through overexpression of the nicotianamine synthase gene HvNAS1, Fe flow to the endosperm through the Fe(II)-nicotianamine transporter gene OsYSL2, and Fe accumulation in endosperm by the Fe storage protein gene SoyferH2. A line with a transgene insertion was successfully obtained. Enhanced expressions of the introduced genes OsYSL2, HvNAS1, and SoyferH2 occurred in immature T2 seeds. The transformants accumulated 3.4-fold higher Fe concentrations, and also 1.3-fold higher zinc concentrations in T2 polished seeds compared to levels in non-transgenic rice. This Fe-biofortified rice has the potential to reduce Fe-deficiency anemia in millions of Myanmar people without changing food habits and without introducing additional costs. PMID:23750162

  8. Increase of As release and phytotoxicity to rice seedlings in As-contaminated paddy soils by Si fertilizer application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Hsing; Huang, Hsuan-Han; Syu, Chien-Hui; Lin, Tzu-Huei; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2014-07-15

    Silicon (Si) was shown to be able to reduce arsenic (As) uptake by rice in hydroponic culture or in low As soils using high Si application rates. However, the effect of Si application on As uptake of rice grown in As-contaminated soils using Si fertilizer recommendation rate has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of Si application using Si fertilizer recommendation rate on As release and phytotoxicity in soils with different properties and contents of As was examined. The results show that the concentrations of As in soil solutions increased after Si applications due to competitive adsorption between As and Si on soil solids and the Si concentrations in soil solutions were also elevated to beneficial levels for rice growth. The rice seedlings accumulated more As and its growth was inhibited by Si application in As contaminated/spiked soils. The results indicate that there is an initial aggravation in As toxicity before the beneficial effects of Si fertilizing to rice were revealed when Si application based on fertilizer recommendation rate to As-contaminated paddy soils. Therefore, for As-contaminated paddy soils with high levels of As, the application of Si fertilizer could result in increasing As phytotoxicity and uptake by rice.

  9. Golgi/plastid-type manganese superoxide dismutase involved in heat-stress tolerance during grain filling of rice.

    PubMed

    Shiraya, Takeshi; Mori, Taiki; Maruyama, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Maiko; Takamatsu, Takeshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Itoh, Kimiko; Kaneko, Kentaro; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is widely assumed to play a role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species caused by environmental stresses. We found a characteristic expression of manganese SOD 1 (MSD1) in a heat-stress-tolerant cultivar of rice (Oryza sativa). The deduced amino acid sequence contains a signal sequence and an N-glycosylation site. Confocal imaging analysis of rice and onion cells transiently expressing MSD1-YFP showed MSD1-YFP in the Golgi apparatus and plastids, indicating that MSD1 is a unique Golgi/plastid-type SOD. To evaluate the involvement of MSD1 in heat-stress tolerance, we generated transgenic rice plants with either constitutive high expression or suppression of MSD1. The grain quality of rice with constitutive high expression of MSD1 grown at 33/28 °C, 12/12 h, was significantly better than that of the wild type. In contrast, MSD1-knock-down rice was markedly susceptible to heat stress. Quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis indicated that the overexpression of MSD1 up-regulated reactive oxygen scavenging, chaperone and quality control systems in rice grains under heat stress. We propose that the Golgi/plastid MSD1 plays an important role in adaptation to heat stress. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Transport of Soil Halides through Rice Paddies: A Viable Mechanism for Rapid Dispersion of the Soil Halide Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redeker, K. R.; Manley, S.; Wang, N.; Cicerone, R.

    2002-05-01

    On short time scales (1-10 years) soil halide concentrations have been assumed to be primarily driven by leaching and deposition processes. Recent results however, have shown that terrestrial plants volatilize soil halides in the form of methyl halides. Emissions of methyl chloride, methyl bromide and methyl iodide represent major pathways for delivery of inorganic halogen radicals to the atmosphere. Inorganic halogen radicals destroy ozone in the stratosphere and modify the oxidative capacity of the lower atmosphere. We have previously shown that rice paddies emit methyl halides and that emissions depend on growth stage of the rice plant as well as field water management. We show here that rice grown in a greenhouse at UCI is capable of volatilizing and/or storing up to 30%, 5%, and 10% of the available chloride, bromide and iodide within the top meter of soil. The percent of plant tissue halide volatilized as methyl halide over the course of the season is calculated to be 0.05%, 0.25% and 85.0% for chloride, bromide and iodide. We compare our greenhouse soil halide concentrations to other commercial rice fields around the world and estimate the e-folding time for soil halides within each region. We suggest that rice agriculture is the driving removal mechanism for halides within rice paddies and that terrestrial plants play a larger role in global cycling of halides than previously estimated.

  11. Characterization of a disease susceptibility locus for exploring an efficient way to improve rice resistance against bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi; Mao, Weihua; Xie, Wenya; Liu, Qinsong; Cao, Jianbo; Yuan, Meng; Zhang, Qinglu; Li, Xianghua; Wang, Shiping

    2017-03-01

    Bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the most harmful bacterial disease of rice worldwide. Previously, we characterized major disease resistance (MR) gene xa25, which confers race-specific resistance to Xoo strain PXO339. The xa25 is a recessive allele of the SWEET13 locus, but SWEET13's interaction with PXO339 and how efficiently using this locus for rice breeding still need to be defined. Here we show that the SWEET13 allele from rice Zhenshan 97 is a susceptibility gene to PXO339. Using this allele's promoter to regulate xa25 resulted in disease, suggesting that the promoter is a key determinant in SWEET13 caused disease in Zhanshan 97 after PXO339 infection. PXO339 transcriptionally induces SWEET13 to cause disease. Partial suppressing SWEET13 expression leads to a high level of resistance to PXO339. Thus, the transcriptionally suppressed SWEET13 functions as xa25 in resistance to PXO339. Hybrid rice is widely grown in many countries. However, recessive MR genes have not been efficiently used for disease resistance breeding in hybrid rice production for both parents of the hybrid have to carry the same recessive gene. However, the suppressed SWEET13 functions dominantly, which will have advantage to improve the resistance of hybrid rice to xa25-incomptible Xoo.

  12. Influence of soil mercury concentration and fraction on bioaccumulation process of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Liu, Hongyan; Du, Buyun; Shang, Lihai; Yang, Junbo; Wang, Yusheng

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies showed that rice is the major pathway for methylmercury (MeHg) exposure to inhabitants in mercury (Hg) mining areas in China. There is, therefore, a concern regarding accumulation of Hg in rice grown in soils with high Hg concentrations. A soil pot experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of Hg-contaminated soil on the growth of rice and uptake and speciation of Hg in the rice. Our results imply that the growth of rice promotes residual fraction of Hg transforming to organic-bound fraction in soil and increased the potential risks of MeHg production. Bioaccumulation factors deceased for IHg but relatively stabilized for MeHg with soil total mercury (THg) increasing. IHg in soil was the major source of Hg in the root and stalk, but leaf was contributed by Hg from both atmosphere and soil. Soluble and exchangeable Hg fraction can predict the bioavailability of IHg and MeHg in soils, and that can provide quantitative description of the rate of uptake of the bioavailable Hg. Soluble and exchangeable Hg fraction in paddy soil exceeding 0.0087 mg kg(-1) may cause THg concentration in rice grain above the permissible limit standard, and MeHg concentration in paddy soil more than 0.0091 mg kg(-1) may have the health risks to humans.

  13. Objective evaluation of whiteness of cooked rice and rice cakes using a portable spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Asanome, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Keitaro; Sano, Tomoyoshi; Saito, Hiroshi; Abe, Yohei; Chuba, Masaru; Nishio, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    The whiteness of cooked rice and rice cakes was evaluated using a portable spectrophotometer with a whiteness index (WI). Also, by using boiled rice for measurement of Mido values by Mido Meter, it was possible to infer the whiteness of cooked rice without rice cooking. In the analysis of varietal differences of cooked rice, 'Tsuyahime', 'Koshihikari' and 'Koshinokaori' showed high whiteness, while 'Satonoyuki' had inferior whiteness. The whiteness of rice cakes made from 'Koyukimochi' and 'Dewanomochi' was higher than the whiteness of those made from 'Himenomochi' and 'Koganemochi'. While there was a significant correlation (r = 0.84) between WI values and whiteness scores of cooked rice by the sensory test, no correlation was detected between the whiteness scores and Mido values, indicating that the values obtained by a spectrophotometer differ from those obtained by a Mido Meter. Thus, a spectrophotometer may be a novel device for measurement of rice eating quality.

  14. Incorporating rice residues into paddy soils affects methylmercury accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huike; Zhong, Huan; Wu, Jialu

    2016-06-01

    Paddy fields are characterized by frequent organic input (e.g., fertilization and rice residue amendment), which may affect mercury biogeochemistry and bioaccumulation. To explore potential effects of rice residue amendment on methylmercury (MMHg) accumulation in rice, a mercury-contaminated paddy soil was amended with rice root (RR), rice straw (RS) or composted rice straw (CS), and planted with rice. Incorporating RS or CS increased grain MMHg concentration by 14% or 11%. The observed increases could be attributed to the elevated porewater MMHg levels and thus enhanced MMHg uptake by plants, as well as increased MMHg translocation to grain within plants. Our results indicated for the first time that rice residue amendment could significantly affect MMHg accumulation in rice grain, which should be considered in risk assessment of MMHg in contaminated areas.

  15. [Interference of allelopathic rice cultivars on barnyardgrass under different water irrigation and rice plant density].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenghao; He, Yong; Wang, Yiping; Yu, Gusong

    2004-09-01

    Pot culture experiments were conducted to examine the effects of water irrigation and rice plant density on the interference of allelopathic rice on barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli). The results showed that under water irrigations, allelopathic rice cultivars Xiayitiao, Gumei 2 and Zhong 156 significantly reduced the plant height of barnyardgrass than non-allelopathic rice cultivars Xiushui 63 and Chunjiang 11. Barnyardgrass plants grew shorter as rice plant density increased. Allelopathic rice cultivars Jizaoxian and Gumei 2 interfered with barnyardgrass, even at their densities as low as 4 plants per pot, and the interference reduced plant height of barnyardgrass significantly compared with the non-rice control. Allelopathic rice cultivars Xiayitiao, Jizaoxian, PI312777, TN1, Gumei 2 and Zhong 156 at 32 rice plants per pot inhibited the growth of barnyardgrass significantly than Chunjiang 11.

  16. The Glycemic Index of Rice and Rice Products: A Review, and Table of GI Values.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Ranawana, Viren; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the principle staple and energy source for nearly half the world's population and therefore has significant nutrition and health implications. Rice is generally considered a high glycemic index (GI) food, however, this depends on varietal, compositional, processing, and accompaniment factors. Being a major contributor to the glycemic load in rice eating populations, there is increasing concern that the rising prevalence of insulin resistance is as a result of the consumption of large amounts of rice. Devising ways and means of reducing the glycemic impact of rice is therefore imperative. This review gathers studies examining the GI of rice and rice products and provides a critical overview of the current state of the art. A table collating published GI values for rice and rice products is also included.

  17. Potential of rice stubble as a reservoir of bradyrhizobial inoculum in rice-legume crop rotation.

    PubMed

    Piromyou, Pongdet; Greetatorn, Teerana; Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung

    2017-09-15

    Bradyrhizobium encompasses a variety of bacteria that can live in symbiotic and endophytic associations with leguminous and non-leguminous plants such as rice. Therefore, it can be expected that rice endophytic bradyrhizobia can be applied in the rice-legume crop rotation system. Some endophytic bradyrhizobial strains were isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L.) tissues. The rice biomass could be enhanced when supplying KNO3, NH4NO3, or urea with bradyrhizobial strain inoculation, especially strain SUTN9-2. In contrast, the strains which suppressed rice growth were photosynthetic bradyrhizobia and also found to produce nitric oxide (NO) in the rice root. The expression of genes involved in NO production was conducted using qRT-PCR technique. The nirK gene expression level of SUT-PR48 with nitrate was higher than that of norB gene. In contrast, the inoculation of SUTN9-2 resulted in a lower expression of nirK gene when compared with norB gene. These results suggest that SUT-PR48 may accumulate NO more than SUTN9-2 does. Furthermore, the nifH expression of SUTN9-2 was induced in treatment without nitrogen supplementation in endophytic association with rice. The IAA and ACC deaminase produced in planta by SUTN9-2 were also detected. Enumeration of rice endophytic bradyrhizobia from rice tissues revealed that SUTN9-2 still persisted in rice tissues until rice-harvesting season. The mung bean (Vigna radiata) can be nodulated after rice stubbles were decomposed. Therefore, it is possible that rice stubbles can be used as inoculum in the rice-legume crop rotation system under both low- and high-organic matter soil condition.Importance This study shows that some rice endophytic bradyrhizobia could perform IAA production, and ACC deaminase activity together with nitrogen fixation ability during symbiosis inside rice tissues. These characteristics may play an important role in rice growth promotion by endophytic bradyrhizobium. However, the NO producing strains should be of

  18. Impacts of seeding rate on interactions between rice and rice water weevils.

    PubMed

    Stout, M J; Harrell, D; Tindall, K V; Bond, J

    2009-10-01

    The rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, is the most widely distributed and destructive early season insect pest of rice, Oryza sativa L., in the United States. Economic losses result primarily from feeding by the larval stage of this insect on the roots of flooded rice plants. Prior studies suggest that infestations of rice water weevil larvae are more severe at low plant densities. Moreover, because feeding by the rice water weevil reduces rice plant tillering, a process particularly important to yield at low seeding rates, infestations by weevil larvae may have a greater impact on rice yields when rice is seeded at low rates. In total, six experiments were conducted over a 3-yr period in Louisiana and Missouri to investigate the impacts of rice seeding rate on levels of infestations by, and yield losses from, the rice water weevil. An inverse relationship between seeding rate and densities of rice water weevil larvae and pupae on a per area basis was found in two of the six experiments. Furthermore, in two of the three experiments conducted with 'Bengal' (a susceptible cultivar) in Louisiana, percentages of yield loss were significantly higher at lower seeding rates than at higher seeding rates. Overall, these results indicate that rice sown at low rates is more vulnerable to infestation by rice water weevils and more susceptible to yield losses from weevil injury. The significance of these findings in light of recent trends toward the use of lower seeding rates in drill-seeded rice is discussed.

  19. Can herbicide safeners allow selective control of weedy rice infesting rice crops?

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto; Nguyen, Nghia K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Vidotto, Francesco; Tabacchi, Maurizio; Powles, Stephen B

    2017-01-01

    Rice is a major field crop of paramount importance for global food security. However, the increased adoption of more profitable and resource-efficient direct-seeded rice (DSR) systems has contributed to greater weed infestations, including weedy rice, which has become a severe problem in several Asian regions. In this study we have developed a conceptually novel method to protect rice plants at high doses of clomazone and triallate. The insecticide phorate applied to rice seeds provided a substantial level of protection against the herbicides clomazone or triallate. A quantity of 15 kg phorate ha(-1) significantly increased the LD50 values, which were more than twofold greater than for rice plants treated only with clomazone. A quantity of 20 kg phorate ha(-1) in combination with 2000 g triallate ha(-1) safened rice plants (80% survival) with LD50 >3.4-fold greater than in phorate-untreated rice. Weed control efficacy was not lowered by the presence of phorate-treated rice seeds. Weedy rice is one of the most damaging global weeds and a major threat to DSR systems. In this study we have developed a proof-of-concept method to allow selective weedy rice control in rice crops. We call for herbicide discovery programmes and research to identify candidate safener and herbicide combinations to achieve selective herbicide control of weedy rice and alleviate weed infestations in global rice crops. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Influence of bacterial strains on Oryza sativa grown under arsenic tainted soil: Accumulation and detoxification response.

    PubMed

    Hare, Vishvas; Chowdhary, Pankaj; Baghel, Vinay Singh

    2017-10-01

    The present study was conducted to study the role of bacterial inoculants in growth, accumulation and tolerance responses in rice grown in arsenic (As) contaminated soil. Results revealed that out of five isolated bacterial strains, strain BBAU/MMM1 (Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University/Mari Matamandir) exhibited resistant to As(III) to the level of 400 μM As(III) in comparison to other strain which showed toxicity. The isolated strain BBAU/MMM1 1was characterized as gram negative, rod shape, showed positive test nitrate, citrate, catalase and phosphate solubilization with high production of IAA and siderophore. Arsenic treated rice seedlings supplemented with bacterial inoculants BBAU/MMM1 showed increased growth characteristics viz., root length (35.41%), shoot length (32.8%) and fresh weight (30.31%) in comparison to rice treated with As(III) only. In addition, reduced lipid peroxidation and induces cysteine, GSH (reduced glutathione), GSSG (Oxidized glutathione) and antioxidant enzymatic activities were also observed in bacterial supplemented rice seedlings. Further, reduced metal accumulation in root (1351.46-968.67 μg g(-1)fw), shoot (488.01-378.02 μg g(-1)fw) and reduced translocation factor (0.583-0.390) in As(III) treated rice seedlings inoculated with bacterial strains clearly reflect protective response of bacterial strain against As toxicity. Thus, isolated bacterial strain could be used as bioremediator as well as growth inducer in paddy field contaminated with arsenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Impacts of temperature on rice yields of different rice cultivation systems in southern China over the past 40 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiahua; Yao, Fengmei; Hao, Cui; Boken, Vijendra

    The impact of climate change on rice yield in China remains highly uncertain. We examined the impact of the change of maximum temperature (Tmax) and minimum temperature (Tmin) on rice yields in southern China from 1967 to 2007. The rice yields were simulated by using the DSSAT3.5 (Decision Support System for Agro-technology Transfer)-Rice model. The change of Tmax and Tmin in rice growing seasons and simulated rice yields as well as their correlations were analyzed. The simulated yields of middle rice and early rice had a decreasing trend, but late rice yields showed a weak rise trend. There was significant negative correlation between Tmax and the early rice yields, as well as the late rice yields in most stations, but non-significant negative correlation for the middle rice yields. An obviously negative relationship was found between Tmin and the early and middle rice yields, and a significant positive relationship was found between Tmin and the late rice yields. It indicated that under the recent climate warming, the increased Tmax brought strong negative impacts on early rice yields and late rice yields, but a weak negative impact on the middle rice yields; the increased Tmin had a strong negative impact on the middle rice yields and the early rice yields, but a significant positive impact on the late rice yields. It suggested that it is necessary to adjust rice planting date and adapt to higher Tmin.

  2. Weedy (red) rice: An emerging constraint to global rice production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ongoing increases in the human population necessitate that rice will continue to be an essential aspect of food security for the 21st century. While production must increase in the coming decades to meet demand, such increases will be accompanied by diminished natural resources and rising productio...

  3. Insights into molecular mechanism of blast resistance in weedy rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weedy rice is a serious pest in direct-seeded rice fields in the U.S. and worldwide. Under suitable conditions, weedy rice can reduce crop yields up to 70%. However, weedy rice may carry novel disease resistance genes. Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major disease wo...

  4. Rice brans, rice bran oils, and rice hulls: composition, food and industrial uses, and bioactivities in humans, animals, and cells.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel

    2013-11-13

    Rice plants produce bioactive rice brans and hulls that have been reported to have numerous health-promoting effects in cells, animals, and humans. The main objective of this review is to consolidate and integrate the widely scattered information on the composition and the antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulating effects of rice brans from different rice cultivars, rice bran oils derived from rice brans, rice hulls, liquid rice hull smoke derived from rice hulls, and some of their bioactive compounds. As part of this effort, this paper also presents brief summaries on the preparation of health-promoting foods including bread, corn flakes, frankfurters, ice cream, noodles, pasta, tortillas, and zero-trans-fat shortening as well as industrial products such bioethanol and biodiesel fuels. Also covered are antibiotic, antiallergic, anticarcinogenic, antidiabetic, cardiovascular, allelochemical, and other beneficial effects and the mechanisms of the bioactivities. The results show that food-compatible and safe formulations with desirable nutritional and biological properties can be used to develop new multifunctional foods as well as bioethanol and biodiesel fuel. The overlapping aspects are expected to contribute to a better understanding of the potential impact of the described health-promoting potential of the rice-derived brans, oils, and hulls in food and medicine. Such an understanding will enhance nutrition and health and benefit the agricultural and industrial economies.

  5. Agriculture Education. Soybeans and Rice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural education. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) soybeans, (2) rice, and (3) orientation. Each of the 17 units of instruction follows a typical format: terminal objective, specific…

  6. Hydrothermal modification of rice starches.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice starch of long grain and waxy cultivars were annealed (ANN) in excess water at 50 oC for 4 hrs. They were also modified under heat-moisture treatment (HMT) conditions at 110 oC, and various moisture contents (20%, 30%, and 40%) for 8 hrs. These treatments altered the pasting and gelling prope...

  7. Alleviation of water stress effects on MR220 rice by application of periodical water stress and potassium fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zain, Nurul Amalina Mohd; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Mahmood, Maziah; Puteh, Adam; Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz

    2014-02-05

    The use of periodical water stress and potassium fertilization may enhance rice tolerance to drought stress and improve the crop's instantaneous water use efficiency without much yield reduction. This study was conducted to assess the effects of different periodical water stress combined with potassium fertilization regimes on growth, yield, leaf gas exchanges and biochemical changes in rice grown in pots and compare them with standard local rice grower practices. Five treatments including (1) standard local grower's practice (control, 80CF = 80 kg K2O/ha + control flooding); (2) 120PW15 = 120 kg K2O/ha + periodical water stress for 15 days; (3) 120DS15V = 120 kg K2O/ha + drought stress for 15 days during the vegetative stage; (4) 120DS25V = 120 kg K2O/ha + drought stress for 25 days and (5) 120DS15R = 120 kg K2O/ha + drought stress for 15 days during the reproductive stage, were evaluated in this experiment. Control and 120PW15 treatments were stopped at 100 DAS, and continuously saturated conditions were applied until harvest. It was found that rice under 120PW15 treatment showed tolerance to drought stress evidenced by increased water use efficiency, peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT) and proline levels, maximum efficiency of photosystem II (fv/fm) and lower minimal fluorescence (fo), compared to other treatments. Path coefficient analysis revealed that most of parameters contribute directly rather than indirectly to rice yield. In this experiment, there were four factors that are directly involved with rice yield: grain soluble sugar, photosynthesis, water use efficiency and total chlorophyll content. The residual factors affecting rice yield are observed to be quite low in the experiment (0.350), confirming that rice yield was mostly influenced by the parameters measured during the study.

  8. Methane emissions from drill-seeded, delayed-flood rice production on a silt-loam soil in arkansas.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher W; Brye, Kristofor R; Norman, Richard J; Gbur, Edward E; Mattice, John D; Parkin, Timothy B; Roberts, Trenton L

    2013-07-01

    Rice ( L.) production is unique among staple food crops because the majority of the growing season typically occurs under flooded-soil conditions. Flooding the soil leads to anaerobic conditions, which are a precursor to methane (CH) production. However, no known research has investigated CH emissions from the drill-seeded, delayed-flood rice production system common in Arkansas, the leading rice-producing state in the United States. Therefore, research was conducted in 2011 to determine the effects of vegetation (rice and bare soil), chamber location (in- and between-rice rows), and nitrogen (N) fertilization (optimal and no N) on CH emissions from a silt-loam soil. Methane fluxes measured weekly from flooding until flood release were affected by vegetation, chamber location, and sample date ( < 0.05). In-row CH fluxes were <0.7 mg CH-C m h until 20 d after flooding (DAF) and <1.0 mg CH-C m h from between-row and bare soil until 41 DAF and were unaffected by fertilization over time. The largest weekly measured CH flux (31.9 mg CH-C m h) was observed from in-row rice at 41 DAF. Post-flood-release CH fluxes were affected by vegetation, fertilization, chamber placement, and sample date ( < 0.05) and accounted for approximately 3 to 7% of the season-long CH emissions. Methane emissions averaged 195 kg CH-C ha per growing season and were unaffected by fertilization. Direct measurement of CH emissions from drill-seeded, delayed-flood rice grown on a silt-loam soil will improve the accuracy of assessments of the carbon footprint and long-term sustainability of rice.

  9. A comparative study of competitiveness between different genotypes of weedy rice (Oryza sativa) and cultivated rice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Dai, Weimin; Song, Xiaoling; Lu, Baorong; Qiang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Competition from weedy rice can cause serious yield losses to cultivated rice. However, key traits that facilitate competitiveness are still not well understood. To explore the mechanisms behind the strong growth and competitive ability, replacement series experiments were established with six genotypes of weedy rice from different regions and one cultivated rice cultivar. (1) Weedy rice from southern China had the greatest impact on growth and yield of cultivated rice throughout the entire growing season. Weedy rice from the northeast was very competitive during the early vegetative stage while the competitive effects of eastern weedy rice were more detrimental at later crop-growth stages. (2) As the proportion of weedy rice increased, plant height, tillers, above-ground biomass, and yield of cultivated rice significantly declined; the crop always being at disadvantage regardless of proportion. (3) Weedy biotypes with greater diversity as estimated by their Shannon indexes were more detrimental to the growth and yield of cultivated rice. Geographic origin (latitude) of weedy rice biotype, its mixture proportion under competition with the crop and its genetic diversity are determinant factors of the outcome of competition and the associated decline in the rice crop yield. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Rice production in relation to soil quality under different rice-based cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ba, Linh; Sleutel, Steven; Nguyen Van, Qui; Thi, Guong Vo; Le Van, Khoa; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Soil quality of shallow paddy soils may be improved by introducing upland crops and thus a more diverse crop cultivation pattern. Yet, the causal relationship between crop performance and enhanced soil traits in rice-upland crop rotations remains elusive. The objectives of this study were to (i) find correlations among soil properties under different rice-upland crop systems and link selected soil properties to rice growth and yield, (ii) present appropriate values of soil parameters for sustainable rice productivity in heavy clay soil, (iii) evaluate the effect of rotating rice with upland crops on rice yield and economic benefit in a long-term experiment. A rice-upland crop rotational field experiment in the Vietnamese Mekong delta was conducted for 10 years using a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replications. Treatments were: (i) rice-rice-rice (control - conventional system as farmers' practice), (ii) rice-maize-rice, (iii) rice-mung bean-rice, and (iv) rice-mung bean-maize. Soil and plant sampling were performed after harvest of the rice crop at the end of the final winter-spring cropping season (i.e. year 10). Results show differences in rice growth and yield, and economic benefit as an effect of the crop rotation system. These differences were linked with changes in bulk density, soil porosity, soil aggregate stability index, soil penetration resistance, soil macro-porosity, soil organic carbon, acid hydrolysable soil C and soil nutrient elements, especially at soil depth of 20-30 cm. This is evidenced by the strong correlation (P < 0.01) between rice plant parameters, rice yield and soil properties such as bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance, soil organic carbon and Chydrolysable. It turned out that good rice root growth and rice yield corresponded to bulk density values lower than 1.3 Mg m-3, soil porosity higher than 50%, penetration resistance below 1.0 MPa, and soil organic carbon above 25 g kg-1. The optimal

  11. An Innovative Modeling and Measurement Approach to Improve Rice Water Use Efficiency in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazar, A.; Little, C.; Rejmanek, H.; Tindula, G.; Snyder, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    California is amongst the top rice producing states in the USA, and more than 95 percent of California's rice is grown in the Sacramento Valley. Based on older literature, the rice water requirement (ETc), ranges between 914 and 1,100 mm. In this study, the actual rice water requirement was measured using the residual of the energy balance method over three paddy rice fields during 2011-2013 seasons in the Sacramento Valley. Net radiation and ground heat flux density were measured, and both eddy covariance (EC) and the surface renewal (SR) technique were employed to determine the sensible heat flux density. The surface renewal method uses high frequency temperature measurements from fine wire thermocouples above the canopy. Mean amplitude and duration of the ramps over half hour periods were determined using a structure function and the characteristics are employed to estimate the direction and magnitude of sensible heat flux using the ratio of the amplitude to the ramp duration as the change in temperature per unit time and the volumetric heat capacity of the air to estimate the magnitude of the heat flux. In the study, 76.2 mm diameter chromel-constantan thermocouples were used to measure high frequency temperature at 10 Hz. The results indicate that there is considerable variability in rice water use both spatially and temporally. The average three-year measured ET of the experimental fields located in Butte County was 734 and 725 mm; and in Colusa County was 771 mm. A typical crop coefficient (Kc) curve was derived from the measured ETc and reference ET (ETo) data. Spatial estimates of monthly climate data from the Sacramento Valley were used to calculate monthly mean ETo, and smooth curve fits of the monthly data gave estimates of typical daily ETo. The daily ETc was calculated as the product of ETo and Kc, and seasonal ETc was calculated by summing the daily ETc values. The results reveal that the seasonal rice ETc was less than earlier estimates. Surface

  12. Rice domestication: histories and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Briana L

    2012-09-01

    Domesticated rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the world's most important food crops, culturally, nutritionally and economically (Khush 1997). Thus, it is no surprise that there is intense curiosity about its genetic and geographical origins, its response to selection under domestication, and the genetic structure of its wild relative, Oryza rufipogon. Studies of Oryza attempting to answer these questions have accompanied each stage of the development of molecular markers, starting with allozymes and continuing to genome sequencing. While many of these studies have been restricted to small sample sizes, in terms of either the number of markers used or the number and distribution of the accessions, costs are now low enough that researchers are including large numbers of molecular markers and accessions. How will these studies relate to previous findings and long-held assumptions about rice domestication and evolution? If the paper in this issue of Molecular Ecology (Huang et al. 2012) is any indication, there will be some considerable surprises in store. In this study, a geographically and genomically thorough sampling of O. rufipogon and O. sativa revealed two genetically distinct groups of wild rice and also indicated that only one of these groups appears to be related to domesticated rice. While this fits well with previous studies indicating that there are genetic subdivisions within O. rufipogon, it stands in contrast to previous findings that the two major varieties of O. sativa (indica and japonica) were domesticated from two (or more) subpopulations of wild rice.

  13. Aerobic rice mechanization: techniques for crop establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusairy, K. M.; Ayob, H.; Chan, C. S.; Fauzi, M. I. Mohamed; Mohamad Fakhrul, Z. O.; Shahril Shah, G. S. M.; Azlan, O.; Rasad, M. A.; Hashim, A. M.; Arshad, Z.; E, E. Ibrahim; Saifulizan, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rice being the staple food crops, hundreds of land races in it makes the diversity of rice crops. Aerobic rice production was introduced which requires much less water input to safeguard and sustain the rice production and conserve water due to decreasing water resources, climatic changes and competition from urban and industrial users. Mechanization system plays an important role for the success of aerobic rice cultivation. All farming activities for aerobic rice production are run on aerobic soil conditions. Row seeder mechanization system is developed to replace conventional seeding technique on the aerobic rice field. It is targeted for small and the large scale aerobic rice farmers. The aero - seeder machine is used for the small scale aerobic rice field, while the accord - seeder is used for the large scale aerobic rice field. The use of this mechanization machine can eliminate the tedious and inaccurate seeding operations reduce labour costs and increases work rate. The machine is easy to operate and it can increase crop establishment rate. It reduce missing hill, increasing planting and crop with high yield can be produce. This machine is designed for low costs maintenance and it is easy to dismantle and assemble during maintenance and it is safe to be used.

  14. OsWRKY74, a WRKY transcription factor, modulates tolerance to phosphate starvation in rice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-02-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family has 109 members in the rice genome, and has been reported to be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress in plants. Here, we demonstrated that a rice OsWRKY74 belonging to group III of the WRKY transcription factor family was involved in tolerance to phosphate (Pi) starvation. OsWRKY74 was localized in the nucleus and mainly expressed in roots and leaves. Overexpression of OsWRKY74 significantly enhanced tolerance to Pi starvation, whereas transgenic lines with down-regulation of OsWRKY74 were sensitive to Pi starvation. Root and shoot biomass, and phosphorus (P) concentration in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants were ~16% higher than those of wild-type (WT) plants in Pi-deficient hydroponic solution. In soil pot experiments, >24% increases in tiller number, grain weight and P concentration were observed in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants compared to WT plants when grown in P-deficient medium. Furthermore, Pi starvation-induced changes in root system architecture were more profound in OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants than in WT plants. Expression patterns of a number of Pi-responsive genes were altered in the OsWRKY74-overexpressing and RNA interference lines. In addition, OsWRKY74 may also be involved in the response to deficiencies in iron (Fe) and nitrogen (N) as well as cold stress in rice. In Pi-deficient conditions, OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants exhibited greater accumulation of Fe and up-regulation of the cold-responsive genes than WT plants. These findings highlight the role of OsWRKY74 in modulation of Pi homeostasis and potential crosstalk between P starvation and Fe starvation, and cold stress in rice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Aging activity of DDE in dissimilar rice soils in a greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fen Xia; Yu, Gui Fen; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xing Lun; Jiang, Xin

    2008-04-01

    A green-house study was conducted in late 2005 to investigate the aging behavior of p,p'-DDE in two types of soil, Hydragric Anthrosols (An) and Hydragric Acrisols (Ac), according to the World Reference Base (WRB) [FAO/ISRIC/ISSS. 1998. World reference base for soil resources. World soil resources reports, Rome. p. 87]. Paddy rice and dry rice were grown in submerged paddy soils and non-submerged upland soils, respectively. The concentration of extractable p,p'-DDE in fresh DDE-spiked soils was 746.2ngg(-1). During the first few weeks of the experiment, the extractability of p,p'-DDE became increasingly low as the aging period prolonged. However, certain amount of p,p'-DDE that had been captured by soil minerals and organic matter (OM) could be released and became extractable in the later period. The extractability of p,p'-DDE in submerged soils was significantly lower than that in non-submerged soil, because flooding could increase the binding of pollutants to soil particles. The plantation of both dry rice and paddy rice slowed down the aging process of p,p'-DDE. After one month's growth of rice, p,p'-DDE bound to soil particles was released and became extractable. The OM and silt content of An are higher than that of Ac, resulting in more bound residues and relative lower extractability of p,p'-DDE in An. In addition, the extractability of p,p'-DDE could be reduced by the addition of rice straw to soils.

  16. Comparison of QTLs for rice seedling morphology under different water supply conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bingsong; Yang, Ling; Mao, Chuanzao; Huang, Youjun; Wu, Ping

    2008-08-01

    The variation of seedling characteristics under different water supply conditions is strongly associated with drought resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and a better elucidation of its genetics is helpful for improving rice drought resistance. Ninetysix doubled-haploid (DH) rice lines of an indica and japonica cross were grown in both flooding and upland conditions and QTLs for morphological traits at seedling stage were examined using 208 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and 76 microsatellite (SSR) markers. A total of 32 putative QTLs were associated with the four seedling traits: average of three adventitious root lengths (ARL), shoot height (SH), shoot biomass (SW), and root to shoot dry weight ratio (RSR). Five QTLs detected were the same under control and upland conditions. The ratio between the mean value of the seedling trait under upland and flooding conditions was used for assessing drought tolerance. A total of six QTLs for drought tolerance were detected. Comparative analysis was performed for the QTLs detected in this case and those reported from two other populations with the same upland rice variety Azucena as parent. Several identical QTLs for seedling elongation across the three populations with the positive alleles from the upland rice Azucena were detected, which suggests that the alleles of Azucena might be involved in water stress-accelerated elongation of rice under different genetic backgrounds. Five cell wall-related candidate genes for OsEXP1, OsEXP2, OsEXP4, EXT, and EGase were mapped on the intervals carrying the QTLs for seedling traits.

  17. High vapor pressure deficit drives salt-stress-induced rice yield losses in India.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jesse; Singh, Rakesh K; Nalley, Lawton L; Viraktamath, Basavaraj C; Krishnamurthy, Saraswathipura L; Lyman, Nate; Jagadish, Krishna S V

    2015-04-01

    Flooded rice is grown across wide geographic boundaries from as far north as Manchuria and as far south as Uruguay and New South Wales, primarily because of its adaptability across diverse agronomic and climatic conditions. Salt-stress damage, a common occurrence in delta and coastal rice production zones, could be heightened by the interactions between high temperature and relative humidity (vapor pressure deficit--VPD). Using temporal and spatial observations spanning 107 seasons and 19 rice-growing locations throughout India with varying electrical conductivity (EC), including coastal saline, inland saline, and alkaline soils, we quantified the proportion of VPD inducing salinity damage in rice. While controlling for time-invariant factors such as trial locations, rice cultivars, and soil types, our regression analysis indicates that EC has a nonlinear detrimental effect on paddy rice yield. Our estimates suggest these yield reductions become larger at higher VPD. A one standard deviation (SD) increase in EC from its mean value is associated with 1.68% and 4.13% yield reductions at median and maximum observed VPD levels, respectively. Yield reductions increase roughly sixfold when the one SD increase is taken from the 75th percentile of EC. In combination, high EC and VPD generate near catastrophic crop loss as predicted yield approaches zero. If higher VPD levels driven by global warming materialize in conjunction with rising sea levels or salinity incursion in groundwater, this interaction becomes an important and necessary predictor of expected yield losses and global food security. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of allelopathic rice varieties combined with cultural management options on paddy field weeds.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chui-Hua; Hu, Fei; Wang, Peng; Wu, Jing-Lun

    2008-03-01

    A number of techniques, including cultural management, allelopathy and bioherbicide, have been considered as alternatives for synthetic herbicides, but successful weed control will require the careful integration of these multiple techniques. This study was conducted to assess the use of allelopathic rice varieties in combination with cultural management options on paddy weeds, in order to develop an allelopathy-based technique to reduce herbicide use in paddies. The weed-suppressive effects of the rice varieties tested varied highly with allelopathic trait, planting pattern and cultural management including planting density, flooding depth and duration and supply of nitrogen. Allelopathic rice varieties PI312777 and Huagan-1 demonstrated much stronger weed suppression than the non-allelopathic variety Huajianxian under the same planting pattern and cultural management. Their weed-suppressive effect was increased with cultural management options. In particular, if integrated cultural management options of allelopathic rice varieties included a low-dose (bensulfuron-methyl, 25 g AI ha(-1), a third of the recommended dose) herbicide application, the emergence and growth of most weeds found in paddy fields was completely controlled. No grain yield reduction for allelopathic varieties occurred under integrated cultural management options, whereas with the non-allelopathic variety a reduction of up to 45-60% was measurable even with the low-dose herbicide application. The allelopathic potential of rice varieties will likely have a great impact on paddy weed control if integrated with cultural management options and application of low doses of herbicides. Therefore, it is feasible to reduce herbicide input in paddies if allelopathic rice is grown under integrated cultural management practices. (c) 2008 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Rice available to waterfowl in harvested fields in the Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.R.; Sharp, D.E.; Gilmer, D.S.; Mulvaney, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    Rice fields in the Sacramento Valley, California were sampled in 1985 and 1986 to determine the weight of rice seed remaining in the fields immediately after harvest and again after the fields were burned. No significant differences were found between years (P>0.05). The pooled mean was 388 kg/ha in harvested fields and 276 kg/ha in burned fields. These values are less than estimates previously available. The values for harvested fields both years were no different (P>0.05) than values obtained by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Surveys of rice fields in December both years showed that most fields were left either harvested (26-32%) or burned (37-40%) through the winter. Fields flooded for duck hunting made up 15% of the total. The proportion of fields plowed by December increased from 14% in 1985 to 22% in 1986. Sixty-three percent of all fields that had been flooded for hunting were drained within two weeks after the end of the hunting season. Harvest yield field size levee type (contour, lasered), straw status (spread, windrowed), harvest date, and rice variety did not affect the quantity of seeds remaining after harvest (P>0.05). One harvester model, the Hardy Harvester, left more rice in fields than did others we tested (P<0.001). Specific management programs are recommended to mitigate annual variation in rice seed availability to waterfowl caused by differences in total hectares grown (15% less in 1986) and in the proportion of fields burned and plowed.

  20. OsWRKY74, a WRKY transcription factor, modulates tolerance to phosphate starvation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family has 109 members in the rice genome, and has been reported to be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress in plants. Here, we demonstrated that a rice OsWRKY74 belonging to group III of the WRKY transcription factor family was involved in tolerance to phosphate (Pi) starvation. OsWRKY74 was localized in the nucleus and mainly expressed in roots and leaves. Overexpression of OsWRKY74 significantly enhanced tolerance to Pi starvation, whereas transgenic lines with down-regulation of OsWRKY74 were sensitive to Pi starvation. Root and shoot biomass, and phosphorus (P) concentration in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants were ~16% higher than those of wild-type (WT) plants in Pi-deficient hydroponic solution. In soil pot experiments, >24% increases in tiller number, grain weight and P concentration were observed in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants compared to WT plants when grown in P-deficient medium. Furthermore, Pi starvation-induced changes in root system architecture were more profound in OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants than in WT plants. Expression patterns of a number of Pi-responsive genes were altered in the OsWRKY74-overexpressing and RNA interference lines. In addition, OsWRKY74 may also be involved in the response to deficiencies in iron (Fe) and nitrogen (N) as well as cold stress in rice. In Pi-deficient conditions, OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants exhibited greater accumulation of Fe and up-regulation of the cold-responsive genes than WT plants. These findings highlight the role of OsWRKY74 in modulation of Pi homeostasis and potential crosstalk between P starvation and Fe starvation, and cold stress in rice. PMID:26663563

  1. Effects of water management on arsenic and cadmium speciation and accumulation in an upland rice cultivar.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pengjie; Ouyang, Younan; Wu, Longhua; Shen, Libo; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pot and field experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of water regimes on the speciation and accumulation of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) in Brazilian upland rice growing in soils polluted with both As and Cd. In the pot experiment constant and intermittent flooding treatments gave 3-16 times higher As concentrations in soil solution than did aerobic conditions but Cd showed the opposite trend. Compared to arsenate, there were more marked changes in the arsenite concentrations in the soil solution as water management shifted, and therefore arsenite concentrations dominated the As speciation and bioavailability in the soil. In the field experiment As concentrations in the rice grains increased from 0.14 to 0.21 mg/kg while Cd concentrations decreased from 0.21 to 0.02 mg/kg with increasing irrigation ranging from aerobic to constantly flooding conditions. Among the various water regimes the conventional irrigation treatment produced the highest rice grain yield of 6.29 tons/ha. The As speciation analysis reveals that the accumulation of dimethylarsinic acid (from 11.3% to 61.7%) made a greater contribution to the increase in total As in brown rice in the intermittent and constant flooding treatments compared to the intermittent-aerobic treatment. Thus, water management exerted opposite effects on Cd and As speciation and bioavailability in the soil and consequently on their accumulation in the upland rice. Special care is required when irrigation regime methods are employed to mitigate the accumulation of metal(loid)s in the grain of rice grown in soils polluted with both As and Cd.

  2. Isoflavone content and profile comparisons of cooked soybean-rice mixtures: electric rice cooker versus electric pressure rice cooker.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Yu, Bo-Ra; Park, Inmyoung; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2014-12-10

    This study examined the effects of heat and pressure on the isoflavone content and profiles of soybeans and rice cooked together using an electric rice cooker (ERC) and an electric pressure rice cooker (EPRC). The total isoflavone content of the soybean-rice mixture after ERC and EPRC cooking relative to that before cooking was ∼90% in soybeans and 14-15% in rice. Malonylglucosides decreased by an additional ∼20% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those cooked using the ERC, whereas glucosides increased by an additional ∼15% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those in ERC-cooked soybeans. In particular, malonylgenistin was highly susceptible to isoflavone conversion during soybean-rice cooking. Total genistein and total glycitein contents decreased in soybeans after ERC and EPRC cooking, whereas total daidzein content increased in EPRC-cooked soybeans (p < 0.05). These results may be useful for improving the content of nutraceuticals, such as isoflavones, in soybeans.

  3. Temperature modulates the cell wall mechanical properties of rice coleoptiles by altering the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism inducing the difference in the cell wall extensibility of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) coleoptiles grown under various temperature (10-50 degrees C) conditions. The growth rate and the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles exhibited the maximum value at 30-40 degrees C, and became smaller as the growth temperature rose or dropped from this temperature range. The amounts of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile increased in coleoptiles grown at 40 degrees C, but not at other temperature conditions. On the other hand, the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides was small at temperatures where the cell wall extensibility was high (30-40 degrees C). The autolytic activities of cell walls obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30 and 40 degrees C were substantially higher than those grown at 10, 20 and 50 degrees C. Furthermore, the activities of (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucanases extracted from coleoptile cell walls showed a similar tendency. When oat (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucans with high molecular mass were incubated with the cell wall enzyme preparations from coleoptiles grown at various temperature conditions, the extensive molecular mass downshifts were brought about only by the cell wall enzymes obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30-40 degrees C. There were close correlations between the cell wall extensibility and the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides or the activity of beta -glucanases. These results suggest that the environmental temperature regulates the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles by modifying mainly the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides. Modulation of the activity of beta-glucanases under various temperature conditions may be involved in the alteration of the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides.

  4. Temperature modulates the cell wall mechanical properties of rice coleoptiles by altering the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism inducing the difference in the cell wall extensibility of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) coleoptiles grown under various temperature (10-50 degrees C) conditions. The growth rate and the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles exhibited the maximum value at 30-40 degrees C, and became smaller as the growth temperature rose or dropped from this temperature range. The amounts of cell wall polysaccharides per unit length of coleoptile increased in coleoptiles grown at 40 degrees C, but not at other temperature conditions. On the other hand, the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides was small at temperatures where the cell wall extensibility was high (30-40 degrees C). The autolytic activities of cell walls obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30 and 40 degrees C were substantially higher than those grown at 10, 20 and 50 degrees C. Furthermore, the activities of (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucanases extracted from coleoptile cell walls showed a similar tendency. When oat (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-glucans with high molecular mass were incubated with the cell wall enzyme preparations from coleoptiles grown at various temperature conditions, the extensive molecular mass downshifts were brought about only by the cell wall enzymes obtained from coleoptiles grown at 30-40 degrees C. There were close correlations between the cell wall extensibility and the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides or the activity of beta -glucanases. These results suggest that the environmental temperature regulates the cell wall extensibility of rice coleoptiles by modifying mainly the molecular mass of hemicellulosic polysaccharides. Modulation of the activity of beta-glucanases under various temperature conditions may be involved in the alteration of the molecular size of hemicellulosic polysaccharides.

  5. Mutualistic fungal endophytes produce phytohormones and organic acids that promote japonica rice plant growth under prolonged heat stress*

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Ullah, Ihsan; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-01-01

    This study identifies the potential role in heat-stress mitigation of phytohormones and other secondary metabolites produced by the endophytic fungus Paecilomyces formosus LWL1 in japonica rice cultivar Dongjin. The japonica rice was grown in controlled chamber conditions with and without P. formosus LWL1 under no stress (NS) and prolonged heat stress (HS) conditions. Endophytic association under NS and HS conditions significantly improved plant growth attributes, such as plant height, fresh weight, dry weight, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, P. formosus LWL1 protected the rice plants from HS compared with controls, indicated by the lower endogenous level of stress-signaling compounds such as abscisic acid (25.71%) and jasmonic acid (34.57%) and the increase in total protein content (18.76%–33.22%). Such fungal endophytes may be helpful for sustainable crop production under high environmental temperatures. PMID:26642184

  6. Systemic Infection of Maize, Sorghum, Rice, and Beet Seedlings with Fumonisin-Producing and Nonproducing Fusarium verticillioides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, Raana; Karlovsky, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Two fumonisin-nonproducing strains of Fusarium verticillioides and their fumonisin producing progenitors were tested for aggressiveness toward maize, sorghum, rice, and beetroot seedlings grown under greenhouse conditions. None of the plants showed obvious disease symptoms after root dip inoculation. Fungal biomass was determined by species-specific real-time PCR. No significant (P = 0.05) differences in systemic colonization were detected between the wild type strains and mutants not producing fumonisins. F. verticillioides was not detected in any of the non-inoculated control plants. The fungus grew from roots to the first two internodes/leaves of maize, rice and beet regardless of fumonisin production. The systemic growth of F. verticillioides in sorghum was limited. The results showed that fumonisin production was not required for the infection of roots of maize, rice and beet by F. verticillioides. PMID:26672472

  7. Tier I Rice Model - Version 1.0 - Guidance for Estimating Pesticide Concentrations in Rice Paddies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes a Tier I Rice Model (Version 1.0) for estimating surface water exposure from the use of pesticides in rice paddies. The concentration calculated can be used for aquatic ecological risk and drinking water exposure assessments.

  8. The growth response in deepwater rice: Biophysical and ultrastructural investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Kende, H.; Kutshera, U. )

    1989-04-01

    Partial submergence induces rapid internodal elongation in deepwater rice. This response is mediated by ethylene and gibberellin and is based, in part, on enhanced cell elongation. Rapidly growing internodes exhibit increased plastic extensibility of the cell walls and tissue tension. The latter indicates that the outer epidermis is growth limiting. The ultrastructure of the cell wall/plasmalemma interface was investigated in the region where cell elongation takes place. In submerged internodes, electron-dense particles of about 100 nm diameter were found at the outer epidermal cell wall but not at the inner epidermal wall at the inner epidermal walls or the walls of interior cells. They were also not detected at the outer epidermal walls of air-grown internodes. We suggest that these particles are related to growth of the outer epidermis.

  9. Oil Production from Yarrowia lipolytica Po1g Using Rice Bran Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Tsigie, Yeshitila Asteraye; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Kasim, Novy S.; Diem, Quy-Do; Huynh, Lien-Huong; Ho, Quoc-Phong; Truong, Chi-Thanh; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce microbial oil from Yarrowia lipolytica Po1g grown in defatted rice bran hydrolysate. After removing oil from rice bran by Soxhlet extraction, the bran is subjected to acid hydrolysis with various sulfuric acid concentrations (1–4% v/v), reaction times (1–8 h), and reaction temperatures (60–120°C). The optimal conditions for maximum total sugar production from the hydrolysate were found to be 3% sulfuric acid at 90°C for 6 h. Glucose was the predominant sugar (43.20 ± 0.28 g/L) followed by xylose (4.93 ± 0.03 g/L) and arabinose (2.09 ± 0.01 g/L). The hydrolysate was subsequently detoxified by neutralization to reduce the amount of inhibitors such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural to increase its potential as a medium for culturing Y. lipolytica Po1g. Dry cell mass and lipid content of Y. lipolytica Po1g grown in detoxified defatted rice bran hydrolysate (DRBH) under optimum conditions were 10.75 g/L and 48.02%, respectively. PMID:22496604

  10. Harvesting microalgae grown on wastewater.

    PubMed

    Udom, Innocent; Zaribaf, Behnaz H; Halfhide, Trina; Gillie, Benjamin; Dalrymple, Omatoyo; Zhang, Qiong; Ergas, Sarina J

    2013-07-01

    The costs and life cycle impacts of microalgae harvesting for biofuel production were investigated. Algae were grown in semi-continuous culture in pilot-scale photobioreactors under natural light with anaerobic digester centrate as the feed source. Algae suspensions were collected and the optimal coagulant dosages for metal salts (alum, ferric chloride), cationic polymer (Zetag 8819), anionic polymer (E-38) and natural coagulants (Moringa Oleifera and Opuntia ficus-indica cactus) were determined using jar tests. The relative dewaterability of the algae cake was estimated by centrifugation. Alum, ferric chloride and cationic polymer could all achieve >91% algae recovery at optimal dosages. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis results revealed that cationic polymer had the lowest cost but the highest environmental impacts, while ferric chloride had the highest cost and lowest environmental impacts. Based on the LCA results, belt presses are the recommended algae dewatering technology prior to oil extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection and quantification of trace elements in rice and rice products using x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foran, Kelly A.; Fleming, David E. B.

    2015-12-01

    We used X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to examine the presence of arsenic (As) and other trace elements (manganese, iron, nickel, copper, and zinc) in rice and rice products. A portable XRF analyzer was used to test samples, and amplitudes for the analyzed elements were identified in the resulting data. The detection limit of the system was sufficiently low to detect As in some rice and rice product samples.

  12. High-throughput measurement of rice tillers using a conveyor equipped with x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wanneng; Xu, Xiaochun; Duan, Lingfeng; Luo, Qingming; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian

    2011-02-01

    Tillering is one of the most important agronomic traits because the number of shoots per plant determines panicle number, a key component of grain yield. The conventional method of counting tillers is still manual. Under the condition of mass measurement, the accuracy and efficiency could be gradually degraded along with fatigue of experienced staff. Thus, manual measurement, including counting and recording, is not only time consuming but also lack objectivity. To automate this process, we developed a high-throughput facility, dubbed high-throughput system for measuring automatically rice tillers (H-SMART), for measuring rice tillers based on a conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) system and industrial conveyor. Each pot-grown rice plant was delivered into the CT system for scanning via the conveyor equipment. A filtered back-projection algorithm was used to reconstruct the transverse section image of the rice culms. The number of tillers was then automatically extracted by image segmentation. To evaluate the accuracy of this system, three batches of rice at different growth stages (tillering, heading, or filling) were tested, yielding absolute mean absolute errors of 0.22, 0.36, and 0.36, respectively. Subsequently, the complete machine was used under industry conditions to estimate its efficiency, which was 4320 pots per continuous 24 h workday. Thus, the H-SMART could determine the number of tillers of pot-grown rice plants, providing three advantages over the manual tillering method: absence of human disturbance, automation, and high throughput. This facility expands the application of agricultural photonics in plant phenomics.

  13. High-throughput measurement of rice tillers using a conveyor equipped with x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanneng; Xu, Xiaochun; Duan, Lingfeng; Luo, Qingming; Chen, Shangbin; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian

    2011-02-01

    Tillering is one of the most important agronomic traits because the number of shoots per plant determines panicle number, a key component of grain yield. The conventional method of counting tillers is still manual. Under the condition of mass measurement, the accuracy and efficiency could be gradually degraded along with fatigue of experienced staff. Thus, manual measurement, including counting and recording, is not only time consuming but also lack objectivity. To automate this process, we developed a high-throughput facility, dubbed high-throughput system for measuring automatically rice tillers (H-SMART), for measuring rice tillers based on a conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) system and industrial conveyor. Each pot-grown rice plant was delivered into the CT system for scanning via the conveyor equipment. A filtered back-projection algorithm was used to reconstruct the transverse section image of the rice culms. The number of tillers was then automatically extracted by image segmentation. To evaluate the accuracy of this system, three batches of rice at different growth stages (tillering, heading, or filling) were tested, yielding absolute mean absolute errors of 0.22, 0.36, and 0.36, respectively. Subsequently, the complete machine was used under industry conditions to estimate its efficiency, which was 4320 pots per continuous 24 h workday. Thus, the H-SMART could determine the number of tillers of pot-grown rice plants, providing three advantages over the manual tillering method: absence of human disturbance, automation, and high throughput. This facility expands the application of agricultural photonics in plant phenomics.

  14. Oscillating Transcriptome during Rice-Magnaporthe Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, T R; Das, Alok; Thakur, Shallu; Devanna, B N; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Priyanka; Vijayan, Joshitha; Kumar, Shrawan

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases of rice. Deciphering molecular mechanism of host-pathogen interactions is of great importance in devising disease management strategies. Transcription being the first step for gene regulation in eukaryotes, basic understanding of the transcriptome is sine qua non for devising effective management strategy. The availability of genome sequences of rice and M. oryzae has facilitated the process to a large extent. The current review summarizes recent understanding of rice-blast pathosystem, application of transcriptomics approaches to understand the interactions employing different platforms, major determinants in the interaction and possibility of using certain candidate for conditioning enhanced disease resistance (Effector Triggered Immunity and PAMP Triggered Immunity) and downstream signalling in rice. A better understanding of the interaction elements and effective strategies hold potential to reduce yield losses in rice caused by M. oryzae.

  15. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  16. The role of momilactones in rice allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Peters, Reuben J

    2013-02-01

    Large field screening programs and laboratory experiments in many countries have indicated that rice is allelopathic and releases allelochemical(s) into its environment. A number of compounds, such as phenolic acids, fatty acids, phenylalkanoic acids, hydroxamic acids, terpenes, and indoles, have been identified as potential rice allelochemicals. However, the studies reviewed here demonstrate that the labdane-related diterpenoid momilactones are the most important, with momilactone B playing a particularly critical role. Rice plants secrete momilactone B from their roots into the neighboring environments over their entire life cycle at phytotoxic levels, and momilactone B seems to account for the majority of the observed rice allelopathy. In addition, genetic studies have shown that selective removal of the momilactones only from the complex mixture found in rice root exudates significantly reduces allelopathy, demonstrating that these serve as allelochemicals, the importance of which is reflected in the presence of a dedicated momilactone biosynthetic gene cluster in the rice genome.

  17. PIXE analyses of cesium in rice grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Keizo; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Terakawa, Atsuki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Ishizaki, Azusa; Fujishiro, Fumito; Arai, Hirotsugu; Osada, Naoyuki; Karahashi, Masahiro; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Yamauchi, Shosei; Kikuchi, Kosuke; Koshio, Shigeki; Watanabe, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident released vast amounts of radioactive material into the environment. For instance, 134Cs and 137Cs have half-lives of about 2 and 30 years, respectively, and emit many harmful gamma rays. In 2012, rice with radioactivity >100 Bq/kg was occasionally reported in Fukushima prefecture. To determine where and how cesium accumulates in rice, we grew rice in soil containing stable cesium and investigated the distribution of cesium in rice using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This study found that cesium is accumulated in bran and germ at high concentrations, and white rice contains 40% of the cesium found in brown rice.

  18. Introgression of Clearfield(TM) rice crop traits into weedy red rice outcrosses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies were conducted to determine the impact of introgression of crop alleles into weedy rice populations. Seeds of 89 weedy rice accessions collected from Arkansas fields in 11 counties, with a history of Clearfield(TM) rice production, were planted in 2011 and treated with two applications of im...

  19. Total and inorganic arsenic in rice and rice bran purchased in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruangwises, Suthep; Saipan, Piyawat; Tengjaroenkul, Bundit; Ruangwises, Nongluck

    2012-04-01

    Concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic were determined in 180 samples of polished and brown rice of three rice types, namely white, jasmine, and sticky, and 44 samples of rice bran from these three rice types purchased in Thailand. Concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) of inorganic arsenic in polished white, jasmine, and sticky rice were 68.3 ± 17.6 (with a range of 45.0 to 106), 68.4 ± 15.6 (41.7 to 101), and 75.9 ± 24.8 (43.5 to 156), respectively, while those in the three brown rice samples were 124 ± 34.4 (74.5 to 193), 120 ± 31.6 (73.1 to 174), and 131 ± 35.6 (78.0 to 188), respectively. Inorganic arsenic concentrations (expressed in nanograms per gram) in rice bran produced from the three rice types were 633 ± 182 (375 to 919), 599 ± 112 (447 to 824), and 673 ± 195 (436 to 1,071), respectively. Rice bran contained concentrations of total and inorganic arsenic approximately seven and nine times higher, respectively, than those found in the corresponding polished rice. The levels of inorganic arsenic in the three rice types of both polished and brown rice were within the only published regulatory limit of 200 ng/g.

  20. Relative competitive ability of rice with strawhull and blackhull red rice biotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed interference depends largely upon the species composition of the weed community and an ability to compete with the cultured crop. Weedy red rice is a major weed pest of rice in the southern U.S. The focus of this study was to evaluate the competitive ability of rice against common, genetically ...

  1. Screening and association mapping of rice blast disease resistance using a diverse collection of rice germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast, caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae B. Couch, is a very serious disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) worldwide. Incorporation of new blast resistance genes into breeding lines is an important objective of many rice breeding programs. A diverse collection of 409 O. sativa accessions des...

  2. Effects of rice harvest moisture on kernel damage and milled rice surface free fatty acid levels.

    PubMed

    Parker, Amanda M; Proctor, Andrew; Eason, Robert L; Jain, Vishal

    2007-01-01

    Surface free fatty acid (FFA) on milled rice is a key factor in determining rice quality and acceptability to the brewing industry. Rice FFA oxidizes, causing off-flavors and odors to develop, compromising the brewing quality of milled rice. The effect of harvest moisture (13%, 16%, and 20%), harvester type (1688 Case and 9500 John Deere), and rice variety (Cocodrie and Bengal) on harvest damaged rough rice and milled rice surface FFA after drying to 12% moisture and 6 mo rough rice storage was examined. The Case harvester produced more damaged kernels than the John Deere harvester, but this was not reflected in surface FFA development. There were no significant FFA differences in variety or harvester type. Rice harvested at a higher moisture content (20%) produced significantly greater FFA values, with a peak near 0.1%, than rice harvested at lower moisture contents (13% and 16%), which had FFA values near 0.08%. Retention of bran by damaged kernels at high harvest moisture probably was responsible for promoting surface FFA development, but if bran was lost at lower harvest moistures, surface FFA, development was limited. Harvest moisture affected milled rice FFA, although rough rice was dried to 12% immediately after harvesting.

  3. Global Gene Expression of Rice after Infections with Rice Blast and Sheath blight Pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice (Oryza sativa) production worldwide has been challenged by increased new virulent pathogens. Over the years, genetic diversity needed for fighting diseases has been decreasing in cultivated rice around the globe. This presents a real challenge for rice crop protection. In an effort to develo...

  4. Expression of Zinc Transporter Genes in Rice as Influenced by Zinc-Solubilizing Enterobacter cloacae Strain ZSB14.

    PubMed

    Krithika, Selvaraj; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in major food crops has been considered as an important factor affecting the crop production and subsequently the human health. Rice (Oryza sativa) is sensitive to Zn deficiency and thereby causes malnutrition to most of the rice-eating Asian populations. Application of zinc solubilizing bacteria (ZSB) could be a sustainable agronomic approach to increase the soil available Zn which can mitigate the yield loss and consequently the nutritional quality of rice. Understanding the molecular interactions between rice and unexplored ZSB is useful for overcoming Zn deficiency problems. In the present study, the role of zinc solubilizing bacterial strain Enterobacter cloacae strain ZSB14 on regulation of Zn-regulated transporters and iron (Fe)-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) genes in rice under iron sufficient and deficient conditions was assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The expression patterns of OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 in root and shoot of rice were altered due to the Zn availability as dictated by Zn sources and ZSB inoculation. Fe sufficiency significantly reduced the root and shoot OsZIP1 expression, but not the OsZIP4 and OsZIP5 levels. Zinc oxide in the growth medium up-regulated all the assessed ZIP genes in root and shoot of rice seedlings. When ZSB was inoculated to rice seedlings grown with insoluble zinc oxide in the growth medium, the expression of root and shoot OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 was reduced. In the absence of zinc oxide, ZSB inoculation up-regulated OsZIP1 and OsZIP5 expressions. Zinc nutrition provided to the rice seedling through ZSB-bound zinc oxide solubilization was comparable to the soluble zinc sulfate application which was evident through the ZIP genes' expression and the Zn accumulation in root and shoot of rice seedlings. These results demonstrate that ZSB could play a crucial role in zinc fertilization and fortification of rice.

  5. Expression of Zinc Transporter Genes in Rice as Influenced by Zinc-Solubilizing Enterobacter cloacae Strain ZSB14

    PubMed Central

    Krithika, Selvaraj; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in major food crops has been considered as an important factor affecting the crop production and subsequently the human health. Rice (Oryza sativa) is sensitive to Zn deficiency and thereby causes malnutrition to most of the rice-eating Asian populations. Application of zinc solubilizing bacteria (ZSB) could be a sustainable agronomic approach to increase the soil available Zn which can mitigate the yield loss and consequently the nutritional quality of rice. Understanding the molecular interactions between rice and unexplored ZSB is useful for overcoming Zn deficiency problems. In the present study, the role of zinc solubilizing bacterial strain Enterobacter cloacae strain ZSB14 on regulation of Zn-regulated transporters and iron (Fe)-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) genes in rice under iron sufficient and deficient conditions was assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The expression patterns of OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 in root and shoot of rice were altered due to the Zn availability as dictated by Zn sources and ZSB inoculation. Fe sufficiency significantly reduced the root and shoot OsZIP1 expression, but not the OsZIP4 and OsZIP5 levels. Zinc oxide in the growth medium up-regulated all the assessed ZIP genes in root and shoot of rice seedlings. When ZSB was inoculated to rice seedlings grown with insoluble zinc oxide in the growth medium, the expression of root and shoot OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 was reduced. In the absence of zinc oxide, ZSB inoculation up-regulated OsZIP1 and OsZIP5 expressions. Zinc nutrition provided to the rice seedling through ZSB-bound zinc oxide solubilization was comparable to the soluble zinc sulfate application which was evident through the ZIP genes’ expression and the Zn accumulation in root and shoot of rice seedlings. These results demonstrate that ZSB could play a crucial role in zinc fertilization and fortification of rice. PMID:27092162

  6. Salt overly sensitive pathway members are influenced by diurnal rhythm in rice.

    PubMed

    Soni, Praveen; Kumar, Gautam; Soda, Neelam; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2013-07-01

    The diurnal rhythm controls many aspects of plant physiology such as flowering, photosynthesis and growth. Rice is one of the staple foods for world's population. Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, heat and cold severely affect rice production. Under salinity stress, maintenance of ion homeostasis is a major challenge, which also defines the tolerance level of a given genotype. Salt overly sensitive (SOS) pathway is well documented to play a key role in maintaining the Na(+) homeostasis in plant cell. However, it is not reported yet whether the transcriptional regulation of genes of this pathway are influenced by diurnal rhythm. In the present work, we have studied the diurnal pattern of transcript abundance of SOS pathway genes in rice at seedling stage.To rule out the effect of temperature fluctuations on the expression patterns of these genes, the seedlings were grown under constant temperature. We found that OsSOS3 and OsSOS2 exhibited a rhythmic and diurnal expression pattern, while OsSOS1did not have any specific pattern of expression. This analysis establishes a cross-link between diurnal rhythm and SOS pathway and suggests that SOS pathway is influenced by diurnal rhythm in rice.

  7. Identification of drought-responsive genes in roots of upland rice (Oryza sativa L)

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Aline R; Guimarães, Cléber M; Rangel, Paulo HN; da Silva, Felipe R; Seixas, Daniela; de Souza, Emanuel; Brasileiro, Ana CM; Spehar, Carlos R; Ferreira, Márcio E; Mehta, Ângela

    2008-01-01

    Background Rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm represents an extraordinary source of genes that control traits of agronomic importance such as drought tolerance. This diversity is the basis for the development of new cultivars better adapted to water restriction conditions, in particular for upland rice, which is grown under rainfall. The analyses of subtractive cDNA libraries and differential protein expression of drought tolerant and susceptible genotypes can contribute to the understanding of the genetic control of water use efficiency in rice. Results Two subtractive libraries were constructed using cDNA of drought susceptible and tolerant genotypes submitted to stress against cDNA of well-watered plants. In silico analysis revealed 463 reads, which were grouped into 282 clusters. Several genes expressed exclusively in the tolerant or susceptible genotypes were identified. Additionally, proteome analysis of roots from stressed plants was performed and 22 proteins putatively associated to drought tolerance were identified by mass spectrometry. Conclusion Several genes and proteins involved in drought-response, as well as genes with no described homologs were identified. Genes exclusively expressed in the tolerant genotype were, in general, related to maintenance of turgor and cell integrity. In contrast, in the susceptible genotype, expression of genes involved in protection against cell damage was not detected. Several protein families identified in the proteomic analysis were not detected in the cDNA analysis. There is an indication that the mechanisms of susceptibility to drought in upland rice are similar to those of lowland varieties. PMID:18922162

  8. C4 Photosynthesis in the Rice Paddy: Insights from the Noxious Weed Echinochloa glabrescens1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Covshoff, Sarah; Szecowka, Marek; Hughes, Thomas E.; Kelly, Steven; Bailey, Karen J.; Sage, Tammy L.; Pachebat, Justin A.; Leegood, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The C4 pathway is a highly complex trait that increases photosynthetic efficiency in more than 60 plant lineages. Although the majority of C4 plants occupy disturbed, arid, and nutrient-poor habitats, some grow in high-nutrient, waterlogged conditions. One such example is Echinochloa glabrescens, which is an aggressive weed of rice paddies. We generated comprehensive transcriptome datasets for C4 E. glabrescens and C3 rice to identify genes associated with adaption to waterlogged, nutrient-replete conditions, but also used the data to better understand how C4 photosynthesis operates in these conditions. Leaves of E. glabrescens exhibited classical Kranz anatomy with lightly lobed mesophyll cells having low chloroplast coverage. As with rice and other hygrophytic C3 species, leaves of E. glabrescens accumulated a chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein, albeit at reduced amounts relative to rice. The arid-grown species Setaria italica (C4) and Brachypodium distachyon (C3) were also found to accumulate chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. We identified a molecular signature associated with C4 photosynthesis in nutrient-replete, waterlogged conditions that is highly similar to those previously reported from C4 plants that grow in more arid conditions. We also identified a cohort of genes that have been subjected to a selective sweep associated with growth in paddy conditions. Overall, this approach highlights the value of using wild species such as weeds to identify adaptions to specific conditions associated with high-yielding crops in agriculture. PMID:26527656

  9. Sprinkler irrigation of rice fields reduces grain arsenic but enhances cadmium.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Meharg, Andrew A; Smolders, Erik; Manzano, Rebeca; Becerra, Daniel; Sánchez-Llerena, Javier; Albarrán, Ángel; López-Piñero, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that rice cultivated under flooded conditions has higher concentrations of arsenic (As) but lower cadmium (Cd) compared to rice grown in unsaturated soils. To validate such effects over long terms under Mediterranean conditions a field experiment, conducted over 7 successive years was established in SW Spain. The impact of water management on rice production and grain arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) was measured, and As speciation was determined to inform toxicity evaluation. Sprinkler irrigation was compared to traditional flooding. Both irrigation techniques resulted in similar grain yields (~3000 kg grain ha(-1)). Successive sprinkler irrigation over 7 years decreased grain total As to one-sixth its initial concentration in the flooded system (0.55 to 0.09 mg As kg(-1)), while one cycle of sprinkler irrigation also reduced grain total As by one-third (0.20 mg kg(-1)). Grain inorganic As concentration increased up to 2 folds under flooded conditions compared to sprinkler irrigated fields while organic As was also lower in sprinkler system treatments, but to a lesser extent. This suggests that methylation is favored under water logging. However, sprinkler irrigation increased Cd transfer to grain by a factor of 10, reaching 0.05 mg Cd kg(-1) in 7 years. Sprinkler systems in paddy fields seem particularly suited for Mediterranean climates and are able to mitigate against excessive As accumulation, but our evidence shows that an increased Cd load in rice grain may result.

  10. Gravitropism of maize and rice coleoptiles: dependence on the stimulation angle.

    PubMed

    Iino, M; Tarui, Y; Uematsu, C

    1996-10-01

    Gravitropism of maize and rice coleoptiles was investigated with respect to its dependence on the angle of displacement or the initial stimulation angle (ISA). Close examination of curvature kinetics and the response to a drop in stimulation angle (SA) indicated that the gravtropic response during an early but substantial part of the curvature development is directly related to the ISA, there being no effect of the reduction of SA resulting from the curvature response itself. On the basis of this finding, the relationship between the steady SA and the curvature rate was determined. In maize, the curvature rate increased linearly with the sines of SAs up to an SA of 90 degrees. Rice coleoptiles, however, showed a saturation curve in the same range of SAs. The saturation profile was nearly identical between coleoptiles grown in air and those submerged in water, although the latter elongated much faster. Rice coleoptiles appeared to be far more sensitive to gravity than maize coleoptiles. It is concluded that the sensitivity to gravity, assessed through dependence on ISA, is a property inherent to a given gravitropic organ. Long-term measurements of curvature indicated that the coleoptiles bend back past the vertical. This overshooting was marked in submerged rice coleoptiles.

  11. Role of probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum KKL1 in the preparation of a rice based fermented beverage.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kuntal; Ray, Mousumi; Adak, Atanu; Halder, Suman K; Das, Arpan; Jana, Arijit; Parua Mondal, Saswati; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Das Mohapatra, Pradeep K; Pati, Bikas R; Mondal, Keshab C

    2015-01-01

    A dominant lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus fermentum KKL1 was isolated from an Indian rice based fermented beverage and its fermentative behavior on rice was evaluated. The isolate grown well in rice and decreased the pH, with an increase of total titratable acidity on account of high yield in lactic acid and acetic acid. The production of α-amylase and glucoamylase by the strain reached plateau on 1st and 2nd day of fermentation respectively. The accumulation of malto-oligosaccharides of different degrees of polymerization was also found highest on 4th day. Besides, phytase activity along with accumulation of free minerals also unremittingly increased throughout the fermentation. The fermented materials showed free radical scavenging activity against DPPH radicals. In-vitro characteristics revealed the suitability of the isolate as probiotic organism. The above profiling revealed that probiotic L. fermentum KKL1 have the significant impact in preparation of rice beer and improves its functional characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Growth inhibition and effect on photosystem by three imidazolium chloride ionic liquids in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huijun; Zhang, Shuxian; Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Caidong

    2015-04-09

    The effects of three imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs) including 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([OMIM]Cl), 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([DMIM]Cl) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([C12MIM]Cl) were studied in hydroponically grown rice seedlings. The growth inhibition rate increased and the Hill reaction activity of isolated rice chloroplasts decreased with increasing ILs concentrations. The IC50,5d for stem length was 0.70 mg/L of [OMIM]Cl, 0.15 mg/L of [DMIM]Cl, and 0.055 mg/L of [C12MIM]Cl, respectively. The SOD, POD and CAT activities of chloroplast exhibited initial increases followed by decreases in activity with increasing ILs concentrations. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters such as the maximum effective quantum yield of PSII(Fv/Fm), the potential activity of PSII(Fv/F0), the yield of photochemical quantum [Y(II)], the photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), the non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) and the relative electron transport ratio (rETR) were affected, showing that ILs will damage the PSII. The results demonstrated that imidazolium chloride ILs are phytotoxic to rice growth and their photosystem, the toxicity increased as the alkyl chain length increased with the following order: [OMIM]Cl<[DMIM]Cl<[C12MIM]Cl. The results will help to better understand the possible role of the defense mechanism in rice caused by ILs exposure.

  13. Foliar application with nano-silicon alleviates Cd toxicity in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihua; Wang, Fayuan; Gao, Shuangcheng

    2015-02-01

    Nanofertilizers may be more effective than regular fertilizers in improving plant nutrition, enhancing nutrition use efficiency, and protecting plants from environmental stress. A hydroponic pot experiment was conducted to study the role of foliar application with 2.5 mM nano-silicon in alleviating Cd stress in rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L. cv Youyou 128) grown in solution added with or without 20 μM CdCl2. The results showed that Cd treatment decreased the growth and the contents of Mg, Fe, Zn, chlorophyll a, and glutathione (GSH), accompanied by a significant increase in Cd accumulation. However, foliar application with nano-Si improved the growth, Mg, Fe, and Zn nutrition, and the contents of chlorophyll a of the rice seedlings under Cd stress and decreased Cd accumulation and translocation of Cd from root to shoot. Cd treatment produced oxidative stress to rice seedlings indicated by a higher lipid peroxidation level (as malondialdehyde (MDA)) and higher activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT), and a lower GSH content. However, those nano-Si-treated plants had lower MDA but higher GSH content and different antioxidant enzyme activities, indicating a higher Cd tolerance in them. The results suggested that nano-Si application alleviated Cd toxicity in rice by decreasing Cd accumulation, Cd partitioning in shoot and MDA level and by increasing content of some mineral elements (Mg, Fe, and Zn) and antioxidant capacity.

  14. C4 Photosynthesis in the Rice Paddy: Insights from the Noxious Weed Echinochloa glabrescens.

    PubMed

    Covshoff, Sarah; Szecowka, Marek; Hughes, Thomas E; Smith-Unna, Richard; Kelly, Steven; Bailey, Karen J; Sage, Tammy L; Pachebat, Justin A; Leegood, Richard; Hibberd, Julian M

    2016-01-01

    The C4 pathway is a highly complex trait that increases photosynthetic efficiency in more than 60 plant lineages. Although the majority of C4 plants occupy disturbed, arid, and nutrient-poor habitats, some grow in high-nutrient, waterlogged conditions. One such example is Echinochloa glabrescens, which is an aggressive weed of rice paddies. We generated comprehensive transcriptome datasets for C4 E. glabrescens and C3 rice to identify genes associated with adaption to waterlogged, nutrient-replete conditions, but also used the data to better understand how C4 photosynthesis operates in these conditions. Leaves of E. glabrescens exhibited classical Kranz anatomy with lightly lobed mesophyll cells having low chloroplast coverage. As with rice and other hygrophytic C3 species, leaves of E. glabrescens accumulated a chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein, albeit at reduced amounts relative to rice. The arid-grown species Setaria italica (C4) and Brachypodium distachyon (C3) were also found to accumulate chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. We identified a molecular signature associated with C4 photosynthesis in nutrient-replete, waterlogged conditions that is highly similar to those previously reported from C4 plants that grow in more arid conditions. We also identified a cohort of genes that have been subjected to a selective sweep associated with growth in paddy conditions. Overall, this approach highlights the value of using wild species such as weeds to identify adaptions to specific conditions associated with high-yielding crops in agriculture. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Eliminating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using plant growth promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Radziah, Othman; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Razi, Ismail Mohd

    2015-02-20

    Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ground magnesium limestone (GML) and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM). Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB), GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha-1 each). Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  16. Mycotoxin Contamination of Rice in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang Dong; Su, Ping; Shan, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxin contamination in rice is generally lower than in other cereals such as corn or wheat. However, over 65% of the population in China consumes rice as a staple food. Due to the diversity of the climate across China, the southern region is characterized by high temperatures and humidities, especially in rainy season. Such conditions are optimal for the growth of fungi. The accumulative and transferrable characteristics of fungi mycotoxins pose a great potential threat as confirmed by high incidences of liver cancer in the Yangtze delta region. Major mycotoxins identified in China are aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, as well as fumonisins. The contents of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ) in rice are varied among different provinces and regions and generally less than 5 μg/kg. Although high incidences of positive aflatoxins samples have widely been detected, few samples were detected as exceeding the national's maximum residue limit (10 μg/kg). Limited information is available on risk assessment of human health hazards of mycotoxins in rice, children should be paid more attention to due to their having the highest mycotoxins exposure level, although the risks are generally at low levels from rice. Mycotoxins are mainly distributed in the outer layer of the paddy rice (also called rough rice, referring to whole rice grain with the hulls), and the AFB1 content in bran is 8.4 times greater than that in brown rice (hulled rice). Further investigation should focus on isolation and identification of mycotoxins-producing fungal strains, especially unknown mycotoxigenic fungal strains determination. Infection resistant rice breeding of mycotoxigenic fungal species may be a fundamental approach to guaranteeing rice safety in China. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  17. Loss‐of‐function mutation of rice SLAC7 decreases chloroplast stability and induces a photoprotection mechanism in rice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaolei; Wu, Jiemin; Chen, Taiyu; Tie, Weiwei; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plants absorb sunlight to power the photochemical reactions of photosynthesis, which can potentially damage the photosynthetic machinery. However, the mechanism that protects chloroplasts from the damage remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that rice (Oryza sativa L.) SLAC7 is a generally expressed membrane protein. Loss‐of‐function of SLAC7 caused continuous damage to the chloroplasts of mutant leaves under normal light conditions. Ion leakage indicators related to leaf damage such as H2O2 and abscisic acid levels were significantly higher in slac7‐1 than in the wild type. Consistently, the photosynthesis efficiency and Fv/Fm ratio of slac7‐1 were significantly decreased (similar to photoinhibition). In response to chloroplast damage, slac7‐1 altered its leaf morphology (curled or fused leaf) by the synergy between plant hormones and transcriptional factors to decrease the absorption of light, suggesting that a photoprotection mechanism for chloroplast damage was activated in slac7‐1. When grown in dark conditions, slac7‐1 displayed a normal phenotype. SLAC7 under the control of the AtSLAC1 promoter could partially complement the phenotypes of Arabidopsis slac1 mutants, indicating a partial conservation of SLAC protein functions. These results suggest that SLAC7 is essential for maintaining the chloroplast stability in rice. PMID:25739330

  18. Total and inorganic arsenic in Iranian rice.

    PubMed

    Cano-Lamadrid, Marina; Munera-Picazo, Sandra; Burló, Francisco; Hojjati, Mohammad; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A

    2015-05-01

    It is well known that arsenic (As) exposure, particularly to inorganic species (i-As), has adverse effects on humans. Nowadays, the European Union (EU) has still not regulated the maximum residue limit of As in commercial samples of rice and rice-based products, although it is actively working on the topic. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is collecting data on total arsenic (t-As) and i-As from different rice-producing regions not only from EU countries but also from other parts of the world to finally set up this maximum threshold. As Iran is a rice-producing country, the aim of this work was to evaluate the contents of t-As and i-As in 15 samples of Iranian white, nonorganic, and aromatic rice collected from the most important rice-producing regions of the country. The means of t-As and i-As were 120 and 82 μg/kg, respectively. The experimental i-As mean in Iranian rice was below the Chinese standard for the i-As in rice, 150 μg/kg, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) limit, 200 μg/kg. Therefore, Iranian rice seems to have reasonable low i-As content and it is safe to be marketed in any market, including China and the EU.

  19. Bioethanol production from rice straw residues.

    PubMed

    Belal, Elsayed B

    2013-01-01

    A rice straw - cellulose utilizing mold was isolated from rotted rice straw residues. The efficient rice straw degrading microorganism was identified as Trichoderma reesei. The results showed that different carbon sources in liquid culture such as rice straw, carboxymethyl cellulose, filter paper, sugar cane bagasse, cotton stalk and banana stalk induced T. reesei cellulase production whereas glucose or Potato Dextrose repressed the synthesis of cellulase. T. reesei cellulase was produced by the solid state culture on rice straw medium. The optimal pH and temperature for T. reesei cellulase production were 6 and 25 °C, respectively. Rice straw exhibited different susceptibilities towards cellulase to their conversion to reducing sugars. The present study showed also that, the general trend of rice straw bioconversion with cellulase was more than the general trend by T. reesei. This enzyme effectively led to enzymatic conversion of acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreated cellulose from rice straw into glucose, followed by fermentation into ethanol. The combined method of acid pretreatment with ultrasound and subsequent enzyme treatment resulted the highest conversion of lignocellulose in rice straw to sugar and consequently, highest ethanol concentration after 7 days fermentation with S. cerevisae yeast. The ethanol yield in this study was about 10 and 11 g.L(-1).

  20. Arsenic in rice: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Hojsak, Iva; Braegger, Christian; Bronsky, Jiri; Campoy, Cristina; Colomb, Virginie; Decsi, Tamas; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary; Mis, Nataša Fidler; Mihatsch, Walter; Molgaard, Christian; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic intake is likely to affect long-term health. High concentrations are found in some rice-based foods and drinks widely used in infants and young children. In order to reduce exposure, we recommend avoidance of rice drinks for infants and young children. For all of the rice products, strict regulation should be enforced regarding arsenic content. Moreover, infants and young children should consume a balanced diet including a variety of grains as carbohydrate sources. Although rice protein-based infant formulas are an option for infants with cows' milk protein allergy, the inorganic arsenic content should be declared and the potential risks should be considered when using these products.

  1. Wheat products as acceptable substitutes for rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, B H; Kies, C

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the acceptability to semi-trained US American and Asian palatability panelist, of four wheat products processed to be possible replacers of rice in human diets. Products evaluated using rice as the control standard of excellence were steamed whole wheat, couscous (steamed, extracted wheat flour semolina), rosamarina (rice shaped, extracted wheat flour pasta), and bulgar (steamed, pre-cooked partly debranned, cracked wheat). Using a ten point hedonic rating scale, both groups of panelists gave rosamarina closely followed by couscous, most favorable ratings although these ratings were somewhat lower than that of the positive control, steamed polished rice. Bulgar wheat was given the lowest evaluation and was, in general, found to be an unacceptable replacement for rice by both American and Asian judges because of its dark, 'greasy' color and distinctive flavor. In their personal dietaries, judges included rice from 0.25 to 18 times per week with the Asian judges consuming rice significantly more times per week than did the American judges (10.8 +/- 4.71 vs 1.75 +/- 1.65, p < 0.01). However, rice consumption patterns, nationality, race, or sex of the judges was not demonstrated to affect scoring of the wheat products as rice replacers.

  2. [Rice breeding by space technology].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-xiang; Li, Jin-guo; Liu, Han-dong; Jiang, Xing-cun; Hua, Yu-jian; Zhou, Huo-liang; Che, Xin-ming

    2002-07-01

    In order to inquire into the influences of space conditions on rice breeding,the dry seeds of 12 rice varieties were carried by recoverable satellite. After recovery,these seeds were showed in the yield, the inheritance and variation of the characters of their progenies were observed and analysed. The results showed that the characters of the progenies mutated under space conditions segregated and varied in many aspects and directions,and the segregated and varied characters were heritable. These progenies posoessed significant transgressive inheritance, a plenty of variation types and variation was characterized by short breeding period. The results in this study indicated that space technology breeding could be developed and used as a new method of mutation breeding.

  3. Total arsenic in rice milk.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Ron; Rodriguez, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    Rice milk and its by-products were tested for total arsenic concentration. Total arsenic concentration was determined using graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.7 ± 0.3 to 17.9 ± 0.5 µg L(-1). Rice milk and its by-products are not clearly defined as food, water or milk substitute. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the European Union (EU) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have set a level of 10 µg L(-1) for total arsenic concentrations in drinking water. The EU and the US regulatory agencies do not provide any guidelines on total arsenic concentrations in foods. This study provides us with a starting point to address this issue in the State of Mississippi, USA.

  4. Nutritionally-important starch fractions of rice cultivars grown in southern United States.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary starches can be classified into three major fractions, according to in vitro digestibility: rapidly digestible (RDS), slowly digestible (SDS), and resistant starch (RS). Literature indicates that SDS and/or RS have significant implications on human health, particularly, glucose metabolism, ...

  5. Increased Fitness of Rice Plants to Abiotic Stress Via Habitat Adapted Symbiosis: A Strategy for Mitigating Impacts of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Regina S.; Kim, Yong Ok; Woodward, Claire J. D. A.; Greer, Chris; Espino, Luis; Doty, Sharon L.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients. Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions. The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20–30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization). These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands. PMID:21750695

  6. Increased fitness of rice plants to abiotic stress via habitat adapted symbiosis: A strategy for mitigating impacts of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redman, R.S.; Kim, Y.-O.; Woodward, C.J.D.A.; Greer, C.; Espino, L.; Doty, S.L.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients. Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions. The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20–30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization). These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands.

  7. Increased fitness of rice plants to abiotic stress via habitat adapted symbiosis: a strategy for mitigating impacts of climate change.

    PubMed

    Redman, Regina S; Kim, Yong Ok; Woodward, Claire J D A; Greer, Chris; Espino, Luis; Doty, Sharon L; Rodriguez, Rusty J

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and catastrophic events have contributed to rice shortages in several regions due to decreased water availability and soil salinization. Although not adapted to salt or drought stress, two commercial rice varieties achieved tolerance to these stresses by colonizing them with Class 2 fungal endophytes isolated from plants growing across moisture and salinity gradients.Plant growth and development, water usage, ROS sensitivity and osmolytes were measured with and without stress under controlled conditions.The endophytes conferred salt, drought and cold tolerance to growth chamber and greenhouse grown plants. Endophytes reduced water consumption by 20-30% and increased growth rate, reproductive yield, and biomass of greenhouse grown plants. In the absence of stress, there was no apparent cost of the endophytes to plants, however, endophyte colonization decreased from 100% at planting to 65% compared to greenhouse plants grown under continual stress (maintained 100% colonization).These findings indicate that rice plants can exhibit enhanced stress tolerance via symbiosis with Class 2 endophytes, and suggest that symbiotic technology may be useful in mitigating impacts of climate change on other crops and expanding agricultural production onto marginal lands.

  8. Silicon isotope fractionation between rice plants and nutrient solution and its significance to the study of the silicon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, T. P.; Tian, S. H.; Sun, L.; Wu, L. H.; Zhou, J. X.; Chen, Z. Y.

    2008-12-01

    The silicon isotope fractionation between rice plant and nutrient solution was studied experimentally. Rice plants were grown to maturity with the hydroponic culture in a naturally lit glasshouse. The nutrient solution was sampled for 14 times during the whole rice growth period. The rice plants were collected at various growth stages and different parts of the plants were sampled separately. The silica contents of the samples were determined by the gravimetric method and the silicon isotope compositions were measured using the SiF 4 method. In the growth process, the silicon content in the nutrient solution decreased gradually from 16 mM at starting stage to 0.1-0.2 mM at harvest and the amount of silica in single rice plant increased gradually from 0.00013 g at start to 4.329 g at harvest. Within rice plant the SiO 2 fraction in roots reduced continuously from 0.23 at the seedling stage, through 0.12 at the tiller stage, 0.05 at the jointing stage, 0.023 at the heading stage, to 0.009 at the maturity stage. Accordingly, the fraction of SiO 2 in aerial parts increased from 0.77, through 0.88, 0.95, 0.977, to 0.991 for the same stages. The silicon content in roots decreased from the jointing stage, through the heading stage, to the maturity stage, parallel to the decrease of silicon content in the nutrient solution. At the maturity stage, the silicon content increased from roots, through stem and leaves, to husks, but decreased drastically from husks to grains. These observations show that transpiration and evaporation may play an important role in silica transportation and precipitation within rice plants. It was observed that the δ30Si of the nutrient solution increased gradually from -0.1‰ at start to 1.5‰ at harvest, and the δ30Si of silicon absorbed by bulk rice plant increased gradually from -1.72‰ at start to -0.08‰ at harvest, reflecting the effect of the kinetic silicon isotope fractionation during silicon absorption by rice plants from nutrient

  9. [Extraction and purification method of rice DNA from rice powder containing Konjak flour].

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Harikai, Naoki; Nakajima, Osamu; Kitta, Kazumi; Teshima, Reiko; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2010-01-01

    Rice powder containing Konjak flour made with tuberous roots of Amorphophallus konjac is imported as a rice-processed product from China to Japan. An improved DNA purification method for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rice in such products is necessary, since Konjak flour constituents absorb the DNA purification buffer to form a gel, and cause problems in the subsequent purification steps. Here, we present a simple preparative system for isolation of the rice and a purification method of the rice DNA from the product. The purified DNA was confirmed to be a good template for both PCR and real-time PCR.

  10. Changes in CH4 emission from rice fields from 1960 to 1990s: 1. Impacts of modern rice technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gon, Hugo Denier

    2000-03-01

    Four countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, and Nepal) were taken as an example to assess the impact of changes in rice cultivation on methane emissions from rice fields since the 1960s. The change of rice area by type of culture from 1960-1990s is estimated, and its relative contribution to national harvested rice area is calculated and multiplied with an emission factor, to derive the relative methane emission per unit rice land. Relative methane emission per ha rice land has increased since 1960 for all four countries, largely due to an increase in irrigated rice area and partly due to a decrease in upland rice area. Patterns of rice area changes and related emission changes differ considerably among countries. On the basis of the rice area increases between 1960 and the 1990s, significant increases in methane emissions from rice fields due to increases in total rice cultivated area are not to be expected in the future. The impact of modern rice variety adoption is assessed by relating methane emissions to rice production. The organic matter returned to the paddy soil is largely determined by rice biomass production which, given a certain yield, is different for traditional and modern rice varieties. By calculating total organic matter returned to rice paddy soils and assuming a constant fraction to be emitted as methane, rice production and methane emission can be related. The analysis indicates that (1) up to now, rice yield increases in countries with high modern rice variety adoption have not resulted in increased methane emissions per unit of harvested area and, (2) global annual emission from rice fields may be considerably lower than generally assumed. The introduction of modern rice varieties can be regarded as a historical methane emission mitigation strategy because higher rice yields resulted in lower or equal methane emissions.

  11. Changes in CH4 emission from rice fields from 1960 to 1990s. 1. Impacts of modern rice technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Gon, Hugo Denier

    2000-03-01

    Four countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, and Nepal) were taken as an example to assess the impact of changes in rice cultivation on methane emissions from rice fields since the 1960s. The change of rice area by type of culture from 1960-1990s is estimated, and its relative contribution to national harvested rice area is calculated and multiplied with an emission factor, to derive the relative methane emission per unit rice land. Relative methane emission per ha rice land has increased since 196