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Sample records for rice functional genomics

  1. Genetic resources offer efficient tools for rice functional genomics research.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shuen-Fang; Fan, Ming-Jen; Hsing, Yue-Ie; Chen, Liang-Jwu; Chen, Shu; Wen, Ien-Chie; Liu, Yi-Lun; Chen, Ku-Ting; Jiang, Mirng-Jier; Lin, Ming-Kuang; Rao, Meng-Yen; Yu, Lin-Chih; Ho, Tuan-Hua David; Yu, Su-May

    2016-05-01

    Rice is an important crop and major model plant for monocot functional genomics studies. With the establishment of various genetic resources for rice genomics, the next challenge is to systematically assign functions to predicted genes in the rice genome. Compared with the robustness of genome sequencing and bioinformatics techniques, progress in understanding the function of rice genes has lagged, hampering the utilization of rice genes for cereal crop improvement. The use of transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertional mutagenesis offers the advantage of uniform distribution throughout the rice genome, but preferentially in gene-rich regions, resulting in direct gene knockout or activation of genes within 20-30 kb up- and downstream of the T-DNA insertion site and high gene tagging efficiency. Here, we summarize the recent progress in functional genomics using the T-DNA-tagged rice mutant population. We also discuss important features of T-DNA activation- and knockout-tagging and promoter-trapping of the rice genome in relation to mutant and candidate gene characterizations and how to more efficiently utilize rice mutant populations and datasets for high-throughput functional genomics and phenomics studies by forward and reverse genetics approaches. These studies may facilitate the translation of rice functional genomics research to improvements of rice and other cereal crops.

  2. Ascribing Functions to Genes: Journey Towards Genetic Improvement of Rice Via Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Mustafiz, Ananda; Kumari, Sumita; Karan, Ratna

    2016-01-01

    Rice, one of the most important cereal crops for mankind, feeds more than half the world population. Rice has been heralded as a model cereal owing to its small genome size, amenability to easy transformation, high synteny to other cereal crops and availability of complete genome sequence. Moreover, sequence wealth in rice is getting more refined and precise due to resequencing efforts. This humungous resource of sequence data has confronted research fraternity with a herculean challenge as well as an excellent opportunity to functionally validate expressed as well as regulatory portions of the genome. This will not only help us in understanding the genetic basis of plant architecture and physiology but would also steer us towards developing improved cultivars. No single technique can achieve such a mammoth task. Functional genomics through its diverse tools viz. loss and gain of function mutants, multifarious omics strategies like transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics provide us with the necessary handle. A paradigm shift in technological advances in functional genomics strategies has been instrumental in generating considerable amount of information w.r.t functionality of rice genome. We now have several databases and online resources for functionally validated genes but despite that we are far from reaching the desired milestone of functionally characterizing each and every rice gene. There is an urgent need for a common platform, for information already available in rice, and collaborative efforts between researchers in a concerted manner as well as healthy public-private partnership, for genetic improvement of rice crop better able to handle the pressures of climate change and exponentially increasing population. PMID:27252584

  3. Rice TOGO Browser: A platform to retrieve integrated information on rice functional and applied genomics.

    PubMed

    Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Antonio, Baltazar A; Sato, Yutaka; Miyao, Akio; Namiki, Nobukazu; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Minami, Hiroshi; Kamatsuki, Kaori; Shimura, Kan; Shimizu, Yuji; Hirochika, Hirohiko

    2011-02-01

    The Rice TOGO Browser is an online public resource designed to facilitate integration and visualization of mapping data of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)/P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) clones, genes, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)/simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and phenotype data represented as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) onto the genome sequence, and to provide a platform for more efficient utilization of genome information from the point of view of applied genomics as well as functional genomics. Three search options, namely keyword search, region search and trait search, generate various types of data in a user-friendly interface with three distinct viewers, a chromosome viewer, an integrated map viewer and a sequence viewer, thereby providing the opportunity to view the position of genes and/or QTLs at the chromosomal level and to retrieve any sequence information in a user-defined genome region. Furthermore, the gene list, marker list and genome sequence in a specified region delineated by RFLP/SSR markers and any sequences designed as primers can be viewed and downloaded to support forward genetics approaches. An additional feature of this database is the graphical viewer for BLAST search to reveal information not only for regions with significant sequence similarity but also for regions adjacent to those with similarity but with no hits between sequences. An easy to use and intuitive user interface can help a wide range of users in retrieving integrated mapping information including agronomically important traits on the rice genome sequence. The database can be accessed at http://agri-trait.dna.affrc.go.jp/.

  4. Assigning biological functions to rice genes by genome annotation, expression analysis and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2010-12-01

    Rice is the first cereal genome to be completely sequenced. Since the completion of its genome sequencing, considerable progress has been made in multiple areas including the whole genome annotation, gene expression profiling, mutant collection, etc. Here, we summarize the current status of rice genome annotation and review the methodology of assigning biological functions to hundreds of thousands of rice genes as well as discuss the major limitations and the future perspective in rice functional genomics. Available data analysis shows that the rice genome encodes around 32,000 protein-coding genes. Expression analysis revealed at least 31,000 genes with expression evidence from full-length cDNA/EST collection or other transcript profiling. In addition, we have summarized various strategies to generate mutant population including natural, physical, chemical, T-DNA, transposon/retrotransposon or gene silencing based mutagenesis. Currently, more than 1 million of mutants have been generated and 27,551 of them have their flanking sequence tags. To assign biological functions to hundreds of thousands of rice genes, global co-operations are required, various genetic resources should be more easily accessible and diverse data from transcriptomics, proteomics, epigenetics, comparative genomics and bioinformatics should be integrated to better understand the functions of these genes and their regulatory mechanisms.

  5. Development and characterization of rice mutants for functional genomic studies and breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutagenesis is a powerful tool for creating genetic materials for studying functional genomics, breeding, and understanding the molecular basis of disease resistance. Approximately 100,000 putative mutants of rice (Oryza sativa L.) have been generated with mutagens. Numerous mutant genes involved in...

  6. Rice Improvement Through Genome-Based Functional Analysis and Molecular Breeding in India.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup K; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Kapoor, Sanjay; Khurana, Paramjit; Khurana, Jitendra P; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2016-12-01

    Rice is one of the main pillars of food security in India. Its improvement for higher yield in sustainable agriculture system is also vital to provide energy and nutritional needs of growing world population, expected to reach more than 9 billion by 2050. The high quality genome sequence of rice has provided a rich resource to mine information about diversity of genes and alleles which can contribute to improvement of useful agronomic traits. Defining the function of each gene and regulatory element of rice remains a challenge for the rice community in the coming years. Subsequent to participation in IRGSP, India has continued to contribute in the areas of diversity analysis, transcriptomics, functional genomics, marker development, QTL mapping and molecular breeding, through national and multi-national research programs. These efforts have helped generate resources for rice improvement, some of which have already been deployed to mitigate loss due to environmental stress and pathogens. With renewed efforts, Indian researchers are making new strides, along with the international scientific community, in both basic research and realization of its translational impact.

  7. RPAN: rice pan-genome browser for ∼3000 rice genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Tianqing; Lu, Kuangchen; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Wensheng; Shi, Jianxin; Wang, Chunchao; Lu, Jinyuan; Zhang, Dabing; Li, Zhikang; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-01-01

    A pan-genome is the union of the gene sets of all the individuals of a clade or a species and it provides a new dimension of genome complexity with the presence/absence variations (PAVs) of genes among these genomes. With the progress of sequencing technologies, pan-genome study is becoming affordable for eukaryotes with large-sized genomes. The Asian cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., is one of the major food sources for the world and a model organism in plant biology. Recently, the 3000 Rice Genome Project (3K RGP) sequenced more than 3000 rice genomes with a mean sequencing depth of 14.3×, which provided a tremendous resource for rice research. In this paper, we present a genome browser, Rice Pan-genome Browser (RPAN), as a tool to search and visualize the rice pan-genome derived from 3K RGP. RPAN contains a database of the basic information of 3010 rice accessions, including genomic sequences, gene annotations, PAV information and gene expression data of the rice pan-genome. At least 12 000 novel genes absent in the reference genome were included. RPAN also provides multiple search and visualization functions. RPAN can be a rich resource for rice biology and rice breeding. It is available at http://cgm.sjtu.edu.cn/3kricedb/ or http://www.rmbreeding.cn/pan3k. PMID:27940610

  8. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Conserved and Novel Molecular Functions of the Stigma in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meina; Xu, Wenying; Yang, Wenqiang; Kong, Zhaosheng; Xue, Yongbiao

    2007-01-01

    In angiosperms, the stigma provides initial nutrients and guidance cues for pollen grain germination and tube growth. However, little is known about the genes that regulate these processes in rice (Oryza sativa). Here, we generate rice stigma-specific or -preferential gene expression profiles through comparing genome-wide expression patterns of hand-dissected, unpollinated stigma at anthesis with seven tissues, including seedling shoot, seedling root, mature anther, ovary at anthesis, seeds 5 d after pollination, 10-d-old embryo, 10-d-old endosperm, and suspension-cultured cells by using both 57 K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array and 10 K rice cDNA microarray. A high reproducibility of the microarray results was detected between the two different technology platforms. In total, we identified 548 genes to be expressed specifically or predominantly in the stigma papillar cells of rice. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of 34 selected genes all confirmed their stigma-specific expression. The expression of five selected genes was further validated by RNA in situ hybridization. Gene Ontology analysis shows that several auxin-signaling components, transcription, and stress-related genes are significantly overrepresented in the rice stigma gene set. Interestingly, most of them also share several cis-regulatory elements with known stress-responsive genes, supporting the notion of an overlap of genetic programs regulating pollination and stress/defense responses. We also found that genes involved in cell wall metabolism and cellular communication appear to be conserved in the stigma between rice and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the stigmas appear to have conserved and novel molecular functions between rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:17556504

  9. Genome-Wide Distribution, Organisation and Functional Characterization of Disease Resistance and Defence Response Genes across Rice Species.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sangeeta; Chand, Suresh; Singh, N K; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2015-01-01

    The resistance (R) genes and defense response (DR) genes have become very important resources for the development of disease resistant cultivars. In the present investigation, genome-wide identification, expression, phylogenetic and synteny analysis was done for R and DR-genes across three species of rice viz: Oryza sativa ssp indica cv 93-11, Oryza sativa ssp japonica and wild rice species, Oryza brachyantha. We used the in silico approach to identify and map 786 R -genes and 167 DR-genes, 672 R-genes and 142 DR-genes, 251 R-genes and 86 DR-genes in the japonica, indica and O. brachyanth a genomes, respectively. Our analysis showed that 60.5% and 55.6% of the R-genes are tandemly repeated within clusters and distributed over all the rice chromosomes in indica and japonica genomes, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis along with motif distribution shows high degree of conservation of R- and DR-genes in clusters. In silico expression analysis of R-genes and DR-genes showed more than 85% were expressed genes showing corresponding EST matches in the databases. This study gave special emphasis on mechanisms of gene evolution and duplication for R and DR genes across species. Analysis of paralogs across rice species indicated 17% and 4.38% R-genes, 29% and 11.63% DR-genes duplication in indica and Oryza brachyantha, as compared to 20% and 26% duplication of R-genes and DR-genes in japonica respectively. We found that during the course of duplication only 9.5% of R- and DR-genes changed their function and rest of the genes have maintained their identity. Syntenic relationship across three genomes inferred that more orthology is shared between indica and japonica genomes as compared to brachyantha genome. Genome wide identification of R-genes and DR-genes in the rice genome will help in allele mining and functional validation of these genes, and to understand molecular mechanism of disease resistance and their evolution in rice and related species.

  10. High occurrence of functional new chimeric genes in survey of rice chromosome 3 short arm genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengjun; Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Long, Manyuan; Wing, Rod A; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify newly evolved genes in rice, we searched the genomes of Asian-cultivated rice Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and its wild progenitors, looking for lineage-specific genes. Using genome pairwise comparison of approximately 20-Mb DNA sequences from the chromosome 3 short arm (Chr3s) in six rice species, O. sativa, O. nivara, O. rufipogon, O. glaberrima, O. barthii, and O. punctata, combined with synonymous substitution rate tests and other evidence, we were able to identify potential recently duplicated genes, which evolved within the last 1 Myr. We identified 28 functional O. sativa genes, which likely originated after O. sativa diverged from O. glaberrima. These genes account for around 1% (28/3,176) of all annotated genes on O. sativa's Chr3s. Among the 28 new genes, two recently duplicated segments contained eight genes. Fourteen of the 28 new genes consist of chimeric gene structure derived from one or multiple parental genes and flanking targeting sequences. Although the majority of these 28 new genes were formed by single or segmental DNA-based gene duplication and recombination, we found two genes that were likely originated partially through exon shuffling. Sequence divergence tests between new genes and their putative progenitors indicated that new genes were most likely evolving under natural selection. We showed all 28 new genes appeared to be functional, as suggested by Ka/Ks analysis and the presence of RNA-seq, cDNA, expressed sequence tag, massively parallel signature sequencing, and/or small RNA data. The high rate of new gene origination and of chimeric gene formation in rice may demonstrate rice's broad diversification, domestication, its environmental adaptation, and the role of new genes in rice speciation.

  11. The 3,000 rice genomes project: new opportunities and challenges for future rice research.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yang; Wang, Jun; Zeigler, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Rice is the world's most important staple grown by millions of small-holder farmers. Sustaining rice production relies on the intelligent use of rice diversity. The 3,000 Rice Genomes Project is a giga-dataset of publically available genome sequences (averaging 14× depth of coverage) derived from 3,000 accessions of rice with global representation of genetic and functional diversity. The seed of these accessions is available from the International Rice Genebank Collection. Together, they are an unprecedented resource for advancing rice science and breeding technology. Our immediate challenge now is to comprehensively and systematically mine this dataset to link genotypic variation to functional variation with the ultimate goal of creating new and sustainable rice varieties that can support a future world population that will approach 9.6 billion by 2050.

  12. Oryzabase. An integrated biological and genome information database for rice.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Nori; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2006-01-01

    The aim of Oryzabase is to create a comprehensive view of rice (Oryza sativa) as a model monocot plant by integrating biological data with molecular genomic information (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/rice/oryzabase/top/top.jsp). The database contains information about rice development and anatomy, rice mutants, and genetic resources, especially for wild varieties of rice. The anatomical description of rice development is unique and is the first known representation for rice. Developmental and anatomical descriptions include in situ gene expression data serving as stage and tissue markers. The systematic presentation of a large number of rice mutant and mutant trait genes is indispensable, as is description of research in wild strains, core collections, and their detailed characterization. Several genetic, physical, and expression maps with full genome and cDNA sequences are also combined with biological data in Oryzabase. These datasets, when pooled together, could provide a useful tool for gaining greater knowledge about the life cycle of rice, the relationship between phenotype and gene function, and rice genetic diversity. For exchanging community information, Oryzabase publishes the Rice Genetics Newsletter organized by the Rice Genetics Cooperative and provides a mailing service, rice-e-net/rice-net.

  13. Metabolomic and functional genomic analyses reveal varietal differences in bioactive compounds of cooked rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence supports that cooked brown rice (Oryza sativa L.) contains metabolites with biomedical activities, yet little is known about the genetic diversity that is responsible for metabolite variation and differences in health beneficial traits. Metabolites from cooked brown rice of ten div...

  14. Model-based structural and functional characterization of the Rice stripe tenuivirus nucleocapsid protein interacting with viral genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhou, Yijun; Zhou, Xueping; Tao, Xiaorong

    2017-03-27

    Rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV) is a filamentous, negative-strand RNA virus causing severe diseases on rice in Asian countries. The viral particle is composed predominantly of a nucleocapsid protein (NP) and genomic RNA. However, the molecular details of how the RSV NP interacts with genomic RNA during particle assembly remain largely unknown. Here, we modeled the NP-RNA complex and show that polar amino acids within a predicted groove of NP are critical for RNA binding and protecting the RNA from RNase digestion. RSV NP formed pentamers, hexamers, heptamers, and octamers. By modeling the higher-order structures, we found that oligomer formation was driven by the N-terminal amino arm of the NP. Deletion of this arm abolished oligomerization; the N-terminally truncated NP was less able to interact with RNA and protect RNA than was the wild type. These findings afford valuable new insights into molecular mechanism of RSV NPs interacting with genomic RNA.

  15. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of rice pectin methylesterases: Implication of functional roles of pectin modification in rice physiology.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho Young; Nguyen, Hong Phuong; Lee, Chanhui

    2015-07-01

    Pectin, which is enriched in primary cell walls and middle lamellae, is an essential polysaccharide in all higher plants. Homogalacturonans (HGA), a major form of pectin, are synthesized and methylesterified by enzymes localized in the Golgi apparatus and transported into the cell wall. Depending on cell type, the degree and pattern of pectin methylesterification are strictly regulated by cell wall-localized pectin methylesterases (PMEs). Despite its importance in plant development and growth, little is known about the physiological functions of pectin in rice, which contains 43 different types of PME. The presence of pectin in rice cell walls has been substantiated by uronic acid quantification and immunodetection of JIM7 monoclonal antibodies. We performed PME activity assays with cell wall proteins isolated from different rice tissues. In accordance with data from Arabidopsis, the highest activity was observed in germinating tissues, young culm, and spikelets, where cells are actively elongating. Transcriptional profiling of OsPMEs by real-time PCR and meta-analysis indicates that PMEs exhibit spatial- and stress-specific expression patterns during rice development. Based on in silico analysis, we identified subcellular compartments, isoelectric point, and cleavage sites of OsPMEs. Our findings provide an important tool for further studies seeking to unravel the functional importance of pectin modification during plant growth and abiotic and biotic responses of grass plants.

  16. Plant functional genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtorf, Hauke; Guitton, Marie-Christine; Reski, Ralf

    2002-04-01

    Functional genome analysis of plants has entered the high-throughput stage. The complete genome information from key species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is now available and will further boost the application of a range of new technologies to functional plant gene analysis. To broadly assign functions to unknown genes, different fast and multiparallel approaches are currently used and developed. These new technologies are based on known methods but are adapted and improved to accommodate for comprehensive, large-scale gene analysis, i.e. such techniques are novel in the sense that their design allows researchers to analyse many genes at the same time and at an unprecedented pace. Such methods allow analysis of the different constituents of the cell that help to deduce gene function, namely the transcripts, proteins and metabolites. Similarly the phenotypic variations of entire mutant collections can now be analysed in a much faster and more efficient way than before. The different methodologies have developed to form their own fields within the functional genomics technological platform and are termed transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics. Gene function, however, cannot solely be inferred by using only one such approach. Rather, it is only by bringing together all the information collected by different functional genomic tools that one will be able to unequivocally assign functions to unknown plant genes. This review focuses on current technical developments and their impact on the field of plant functional genomics. The lower plant Physcomitrella is introduced as a new model system for gene function analysis, owing to its high rate of homologous recombination.

  17. Signatures of adaptation in the weedy rice genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice is a common problem of by product of domestication that has evolved multiple times from cultivated and wild rice relatives. Here we use whole genome sequences to examine the origin and adaptation of the two major US weedy red rice strains, with a comparison to Chinese weedy red rice. We f...

  18. RiceGeneThresher: a web-based application for mining genes underlying QTL in rice genome.

    PubMed

    Thongjuea, Supat; Ruanjaichon, Vinitchan; Bruskiewich, Richard; Vanavichit, Apichart

    2009-01-01

    RiceGeneThresher is a public online resource for mining genes underlying genome regions of interest or quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice genome. It is a compendium of rice genomic resources consisting of genetic markers, genome annotation, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), protein domains, gene ontology, plant stress-responsive genes, metabolic pathways and prediction of protein-protein interactions. RiceGeneThresher system integrates these diverse data sources and provides powerful web-based applications, and flexible tools for delivering customized set of biological data on rice. Its system supports whole-genome gene mining for QTL by querying using DNA marker intervals or genomic loci. RiceGeneThresher provides biologically supported evidences that are essential for targeting groups or networks of genes involved in controlling traits underlying QTL. Users can use it to discover and to assign the most promising candidate genes in preparation for the further gene function validation analysis. The web-based application is freely available at http://rice.kps.ku.ac.th.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of chitinase genes and their varied functions in larval moult, pupation and eclosion in the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Su, C; Tu, G; Huang, S; Yang, Q; Shahzad, M F; Li, F

    2016-08-01

    Some insect chitinases are required to degrade chitin and ensure successful metamorphosis. Although chitinase genes have been well characterized in several model insects, no reports exist for the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, a highly destructive pest that causes huge yield losses in rice production. Here, we conducted a genome-level analysis of chitinase genes in C. suppressalis. After amplification of full-length transcripts with rapid amplification of cDNA ends, we identified 12 chitinase genes in C. suppressalis. All these genes had the conserved domains and motifs of glycoside hydrolase family 18 and grouped phylogenetically into five subgroups. C. suppressalis chitinase 1 (CsCht1) was highly expressed in late pupae, whereas CsCht3 was abundant in early pupae. Both CsCht2 and CsCht4 were highly expressed in larvae. CsCht2 was abundant specifically in the third-instar larvae and CsCht4 showed periodic high expression in 2- to 5-day-old larvae in each instar. Tissue specific expression analysis indicated that CsCht1 and CsCht3 were highly expressed in epidermis whereas CsCht2 and CsCht4 were specifically abundant in the midgut. Knockdown of CsCht1 resulted in adults with curled wings, indicating that CsCht1 might have an important role in wing expansion. Silencing of CsCht2 or CsCht4 arrested moulting, suggesting essential roles in larval development. When the expression of CsCht3 was interfered, defects in pupation occurred. Overall, we provide here the first catalogue of chitinase genes in the rice striped stem borer and have elucidated the functions of four chitinases in metamorphosis.

  20. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jiming

    2010-02-04

    The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Rice Isolate Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105

    PubMed Central

    McCully, Lucy M.; Bitzer, Adam S.; Spence, Carla A.; Bais, Harsh P.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105, a strain isolated from rice rhizosphere, has shown antagonistic activities against a rice fungal pathogen, and could be important in defense against rice blast. We report the draft genome sequence of EA105, which is an estimated size of 6.6 Mb. PMID:25540352

  2. Genome-wide study of KNOX regulatory network reveals brassinosteroid catabolic genes important for shoot meristem function in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In flowering plants, knotted1-like homeobox (KNOX) transcription factors play crucial roles in establishment and maintenance of the shoot apical meristem (SAM), from which aerial organs such as leaves, stems, and flowers initiate. We report that a rice (Oryza sativa) KNOX gene Oryza sativa homeobox1...

  3. Genomics-based precision breeding approaches to improve drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Swamy, B P Mallikarjuna; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-12-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), the major staple food crop of the world, faces a severe threat from widespread drought. The development of drought-tolerant rice varieties is considered a feasible option to counteract drought stress. The screening of rice germplasm under drought and its characterization at the morphological, genetic, and molecular levels revealed the existence of genetic variation for drought tolerance within the rice gene pool. The improvements made in managed drought screening and selection for grain yield under drought have significantly contributed to progress in drought breeding programs. The availability of rice genome sequence information, genome-wide molecular markers, and low-cost genotyping platforms now makes it possible to routinely apply marker-assisted breeding approaches to improve grain yield under drought. Grain yield QTLs with a large and consistent effect under drought have been indentified and successfully pyramided in popular rice mega-varieties. Various rice functional genomics resources, databases, tools, and recent advances in "-omics" are facilitating the characterization of genes and pathways involved in drought tolerance, providing the basis for candidate gene identification and allele mining. The transgenic approach is successful in generating drought tolerance in rice under controlled conditions, but field-level testing is necessary. Genomics-assisted drought breeding approaches hold great promise, but a well-planned integration with standardized phenotyping is highly essential to exploit their full potential.

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing of Elite Rice Cultivars as a Comprehensive Information Resource for Marker Assisted Selection

    PubMed Central

    Duitama, Jorge; Silva, Alexander; Sanabria, Yamid; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Ballen, Carolina; Lorieux, Mathias; Scheffler, Brian; Farmer, Andrew; Torres, Edgar; Oard, James; Tohme, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics revealed the genomic background of rice, a staple food for the poor people, and provided the basis to develop large genomic variation databases for thousands of cultivars. Proper analysis of this massive resource is expected to give novel insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the rice genome, and to aid the development of rice varieties through marker assisted selection or genomic selection. In this work we present sequencing and bioinformatics analyses of 104 rice varieties belonging to the major subspecies of Oryza sativa. We identified repetitive elements and recurrent copy number variation covering about 200 Mbp of the rice genome. Genotyping of over 18 million polymorphic locations within O. sativa allowed us to reconstruct the individual haplotype patterns shaping the genomic background of elite varieties used by farmers throughout the Americas. Based on a reconstruction of the alleles for the gene GBSSI, we could identify novel genetic markers for selection of varieties with high amylose content. We expect that both the analysis methods and the genomic information described here would be of great use for the rice research community and for other groups carrying on similar sequencing efforts in other crops. PMID:25923345

  5. Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB): an integrative and interactive database for rice genomics.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Lee, Sung Shin; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Numa, Hisataka; Kim, Jungsok; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Wakimoto, Hironobu; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwamoto, Masao; Abe, Takashi; Yamada, Yuko; Muto, Akira; Inokuchi, Hachiro; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuji; Itoh, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB, http://rapdb.dna.affrc.go.jp/) has been providing a comprehensive set of gene annotations for the genome sequence of rice, Oryza sativa (japonica group) cv. Nipponbare. Since the first release in 2005, RAP-DB has been updated several times along with the genome assembly updates. Here, we present our newest RAP-DB based on the latest genome assembly, Os-Nipponbare-Reference-IRGSP-1.0 (IRGSP-1.0), which was released in 2011. We detected 37,869 loci by mapping transcript and protein sequences of 150 monocot species. To provide plant researchers with highly reliable and up to date rice gene annotations, we have been incorporating literature-based manually curated data, and 1,626 loci currently incorporate literature-based annotation data, including commonly used gene names or gene symbols. Transcriptional activities are shown at the nucleotide level by mapping RNA-Seq reads derived from 27 samples. We also mapped the Illumina reads of a Japanese leading japonica cultivar, Koshihikari, and a Chinese indica cultivar, Guangluai-4, to the genome and show alignments together with the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene functional annotations through a newly developed browser, Short-Read Assembly Browser (S-RAB). We have developed two satellite databases, Plant Gene Family Database (PGFD) and Integrative Database of Cereal Gene Phylogeny (IDCGP), which display gene family and homologous gene relationships among diverse plant species. RAP-DB and the satellite databases offer simple and user-friendly web interfaces, enabling plant and genome researchers to access the data easily and facilitating a broad range of plant research topics.

  6. Genome duplication improves rice root resistance to salt stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salinity is a stressful environmental factor that limits the productivity of crop plants, and roots form the major interface between plants and various abiotic stresses. Rice is a salt-sensitive crop and its polyploid shows advantages in terms of stress resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of genome duplication on rice root resistance to salt stress. Results Both diploid rice (HN2026-2x and Nipponbare-2x) and their corresponding tetraploid rice (HN2026-4x and Nipponbare-4x) were cultured in half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium with 150 mM NaCl for 3 and 5 days. Accumulations of proline, soluble sugar, malondialdehyde (MDA), Na+ content, H+ (proton) flux at root tips, and the microstructure and ultrastructure in rice roots were examined. We found that tetraploid rice showed less root growth inhibition, accumulated higher proline content and lower MDA content, and exhibited a higher frequency of normal epidermal cells than diploid rice. In addition, a protective gap appeared between the cortex and pericycle cells in tetraploid rice. Next, ultrastructural analysis showed that genome duplication improved membrane, organelle, and nuclei stability. Furthermore, Na+ in tetraploid rice roots significantly decreased while root tip H+ efflux in tetraploid rice significantly increased. Conclusions Our results suggest that genome duplication improves root resistance to salt stress, and that enhanced proton transport to the root surface may play a role in reducing Na+ entrance into the roots. PMID:25184027

  7. Rice DB: an Oryza Information Portal linking annotation, subcellular location, function, expression, regulation, and evolutionary information for rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Narsai, Reena; Devenish, James; Castleden, Ian; Narsai, Kabir; Xu, Lin; Shou, Huixia; Whelan, James

    2013-12-01

    Omics research in Oryza sativa (rice) relies on the use of multiple databases to obtain different types of information to define gene function. We present Rice DB, an Oryza information portal that is a functional genomics database, linking gene loci to comprehensive annotations, expression data and the subcellular location of encoded proteins. Rice DB has been designed to integrate the direct comparison of rice with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), based on orthology or 'expressology', thus using and combining available information from two pre-eminent plant models. To establish Rice DB, gene identifiers (more than 40 types) and annotations from a variety of sources were compiled, functional information based on large-scale and individual studies was manually collated, hundreds of microarrays were analysed to generate expression annotations, and the occurrences of potential functional regulatory motifs in promoter regions were calculated. A range of computational subcellular localization predictions were also run for all putative proteins encoded in the rice genome, and experimentally confirmed protein localizations have been collated, curated and linked to functional studies in rice. A single search box allows anything from gene identifiers (for rice and/or Arabidopsis), motif sequences, subcellular location, to keyword searches to be entered, with the capability of Boolean searches (such as AND/OR). To demonstrate the utility of Rice DB, several examples are presented including a rice mitochondrial proteome, which draws on a variety of sources for subcellular location data within Rice DB. Comparisons of subcellular location, functional annotations, as well as transcript expression in parallel with Arabidopsis reveals examples of conservation between rice and Arabidopsis, using Rice DB (http://ricedb.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au).

  8. Rice DB: an Oryza Information Portal linking annotation, subcellular location, function, expression, regulation, and evolutionary information for rice and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Narsai, Reena; Devenish, James; Castleden, Ian; Narsai, Kabir; Xu, Lin; Shou, Huixia; Whelan, James

    2013-01-01

    Omics research in Oryza sativa (rice) relies on the use of multiple databases to obtain different types of information to define gene function. We present Rice DB, an Oryza information portal that is a functional genomics database, linking gene loci to comprehensive annotations, expression data and the subcellular location of encoded proteins. Rice DB has been designed to integrate the direct comparison of rice with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), based on orthology or ‘expressology’, thus using and combining available information from two pre-eminent plant models. To establish Rice DB, gene identifiers (more than 40 types) and annotations from a variety of sources were compiled, functional information based on large-scale and individual studies was manually collated, hundreds of microarrays were analysed to generate expression annotations, and the occurrences of potential functional regulatory motifs in promoter regions were calculated. A range of computational subcellular localization predictions were also run for all putative proteins encoded in the rice genome, and experimentally confirmed protein localizations have been collated, curated and linked to functional studies in rice. A single search box allows anything from gene identifiers (for rice and/or Arabidopsis), motif sequences, subcellular location, to keyword searches to be entered, with the capability of Boolean searches (such as AND/OR). To demonstrate the utility of Rice DB, several examples are presented including a rice mitochondrial proteome, which draws on a variety of sources for subcellular location data within Rice DB. Comparisons of subcellular location, functional annotations, as well as transcript expression in parallel with Arabidopsis reveals examples of conservation between rice and Arabidopsis, using Rice DB (http://ricedb.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au). PMID:24147765

  9. A map of rice genome variation reveals the origin of cultivated rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuehui; Kurata, Nori; Wei, Xinghua; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Wang, Ahong; Zhao, Qiang; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Kunyan; Lu, Hengyun; Li, Wenjun; Guo, Yunli; Lu, Yiqi; Zhou, Congcong; Fan, Danlin; Weng, Qijun; Zhu, Chuanrang; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yongchun; Feng, Lei; Furuumi, Hiroyasu; Kubo, Takahiko; Miyabayashi, Toshie; Yuan, Xiaoping; Xu, Qun; Dong, Guojun; Zhan, Qilin; Li, Canyang; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Lu, Tingting; Feng, Qi; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Han, Bin

    2012-10-25

    Crop domestications are long-term selection experiments that have greatly advanced human civilization. The domestication of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) ranks as one of the most important developments in history. However, its origins and domestication processes are controversial and have long been debated. Here we generate genome sequences from 446 geographically diverse accessions of the wild rice species Oryza rufipogon, the immediate ancestral progenitor of cultivated rice, and from 1,083 cultivated indica and japonica varieties to construct a comprehensive map of rice genome variation. In the search for signatures of selection, we identify 55 selective sweeps that have occurred during domestication. In-depth analyses of the domestication sweeps and genome-wide patterns reveal that Oryza sativa japonica rice was first domesticated from a specific population of O. rufipogon around the middle area of the Pearl River in southern China, and that Oryza sativa indica rice was subsequently developed from crosses between japonica rice and local wild rice as the initial cultivars spread into South East and South Asia. The domestication-associated traits are analysed through high-resolution genetic mapping. This study provides an important resource for rice breeding and an effective genomics approach for crop domestication research.

  10. Genome re-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of a nutraceutical rice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juncheng; Cheng, Zuxin; Xu, Ming; Huang, Zhiwei; Yang, Zhijian; Huang, Xinying; Zheng, Jingui; Lin, Tongxiang

    2015-06-01

    The genomes of two rice cultivars, Nipponbare and 93-11, have been well studied. However, there is little available genetic information about nutraceutical rice cultivars. To remedy this situation, the present study aimed to provide a basic genetic landscape of nutraceutical rice. The genome of Black-1, a black pericarp rice containing higher levels of anthocyanins, flavonoids, and a more potent antioxidant capacity, was sequenced at ≥30 × coverage using Solexa sequencing technology. The complete sequences of Black-1 genome shared more consensus sequences with indica cultivar 93-11 than with Nipponbare. With reference to the 93-11 genome, Black-1 contained 675,207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 43,130 insertions and deletions (1-5 bp), 1,770 copy number variations, and 10,911 presence/absence variations. These variations were observed to reside preferentially in Myb domains, NB-ARC domains and kinase domains, providing clues to the diversity of biological functions or secondary metabolisms in this cultivar. Intriguingly, 496 unique genes were identified by comparing it with the genomes of these two rice varieties; among the genes, 119 genes participate in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Furthermore, several unique genes were predicted to be involved in the anthocyanins synthesis pathway. The genome-wide landscape of Black-1 uncovered by this study represents a valuable resource for further studies and for breeding nutraceutical rice varieties.

  11. Genomic dissection of small RNAs in wild rice (Oryza rufipogon): lessons for rice domestication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Bai, Xuefei; Yan, Chenghai; Gui, Yiejie; Wei, Xinghua; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Guo, Longbiao; Fan, Longjiang

    2012-11-01

    The lack of a MIRNA set and genome sequence of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) has prevented us from determining the role of MIRNA genes in rice domestication. In this study, a genome, three small RNA populations and a degradome of O. rufipogon were sequenced by Illumina platform and the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) were investigated by miRNA chips. A de novo O. rufipogon genome was assembled using c. 55× coverage of raw sequencing data and a total of 387 MIRNAs were identified in the O. rufipogon genome based on c. 5.2 million unique small RNA reads from three different tissues of O. rufipogon. Of these, O. rufipogon MIRNAs, 259 were not found in the cultivated rice, suggesting a loss of these MIRNAs in the cultivated rice. We also found that 48 MIRNAs were novel in the cultivated rice, suggesting that they were potential targets of domestication selection. Some miRNAs showed significant expression differences between wild and cultivated rice, suggesting that expression of miRNA could also be a target of domestication, as demonstrated for the miR164 family. Our results illustrated that MIRNA genes, like protein-coding genes, might have been significantly shaped during rice domestication and could be one of the driving forces that contributed to rice domestication.

  12. Sequencing of Australian wild rice genomes reveals ancestral relationships with domesticated rice.

    PubMed

    Brozynska, Marta; Copetti, Dario; Furtado, Agnelo; Wing, Rod A; Crayn, Darren; Fox, Glen; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Henry, Robert J

    2016-11-27

    The related A genome species of the Oryza genus are the effective gene pool for rice. Here, we report draft genomes for two Australian wild A genome taxa: O. rufipogon-like population, referred to as Taxon A, and O. meridionalis-like population, referred to as Taxon B. These two taxa were sequenced and assembled by integration of short- and long-read next-generation sequencing (NGS) data to create a genomic platform for a wider rice gene pool. Here, we report that, despite the distinct chloroplast genome, the nuclear genome of the Australian Taxon A has a sequence that is much closer to that of domesticated rice (O. sativa) than to the other Australian wild populations. Analysis of 4643 genes in the A genome clade showed that the Australian annual, O. meridionalis, and related perennial taxa have the most divergent (around 3 million years) genome sequences relative to domesticated rice. A test for admixture showed possible introgression into the Australian Taxon A (diverged around 1.6 million years ago) especially from the wild indica/O. nivara clade in Asia. These results demonstrate that northern Australia may be the centre of diversity of the A genome Oryza and suggest the possibility that this might also be the centre of origin of this group and represent an important resource for rice improvement.

  13. Genome-wide transcription analyses in rice using tiling microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Stolc, Viktor; Li, Xueyong; Zhang, Dongfen; Su, Ning; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Li, Songgang; Cheng, Zhukuan; Wang, Jun; Deng, Xing Wang

    2006-01-01

    Sequencing and computational annotation revealed several features, including high gene numbers, unusual composition of the predicted genes and a large number of genes lacking homology to known genes, that distinguish the rice (Oryza sativa) genome from that of other fully sequenced model species. We report here a full-genome transcription analysis of the indica rice subspecies using high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. Our results provided expression data support for the existence of 35,970 (81.9%) annotated gene models and identified 5,464 unique transcribed intergenic regions that share similar compositional properties with the annotated exons and have significant homology to other plant proteins. Elucidating and mapping of all transcribed regions revealed an association between global transcription and cytological chromosome features, and an overall similarity of transcriptional activity between duplicated segments of the genome. Collectively, our results provide the first whole-genome transcription map useful for further understanding the rice genome.

  14. Toward a Cytological Characterization of the Rice Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhukuan; Buell, C. Robin; Wing, Rod A.; Gu, Minghong; Jiang, Jiming

    2001-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) will be the first major crop, as well as the first monocot plant species, to be completely sequenced. Integration of DNA sequence-based maps with cytological maps will be essential to fully characterize the rice genome. We have isolated a set of 24 chromosomal arm-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes to facilitate rice chromosome identification. A standardized rice karyotype was constructed using meiotic pachytene chromosomes of O. sativa spp. japonica rice var. Nipponbare. This karyotype is anchored by centromere-specific and chromosomal arm-specific cytological landmarks and is fully integrated with the most saturated rice genetic linkage maps in which Nipponbare was used as one of the mapping parents. An ideogram depicting the distribution of heterochromatin in the rice genome was developed based on the patterns of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining of the Nipponbare pachytene chromosomes. The majority of the heterochromatin is distributed in the pericentric regions with some rice chromosomes containing a significantly higher proportion of heterochromatin than other chromosomes. We showed that pachytene chromosome-based fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis is the most effective approach to integrate DNA sequences with euchromatic and heterochromatic features. PMID:11731505

  15. Genome-wide expression analysis of rice aquaporin genes and development of a functional gene network mediated by aquaporin expression in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Xuan; Moon, Sunok; Jung, Ki-Hong

    2013-10-01

    The world population continually faces challenges of water scarcity for agriculture. A common strategy called water-balance control has evolved to adapt plant growth to these challenges. Aquaporins are a family of integral membrane proteins that play a central role in water-balance control. In this study, we identified 34 members of the rice aquaporin gene family, adding a novel member to the previous list. A combination of phylogenetic tree and anatomical meta-expression profiling data consisting of 983 Affymetrix arrays and 209 Agilent 44 K arrays was used to identify tissue-preferred aquaporin genes and evaluate functional redundancy among aquaporin family members. Eight aquaporins showed root-preferred expression in the vegetative growth stage, while 4 showed leaf/shoot-preferred expression. Integrating stress-induced expression patterns into phylogenetic tree and semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that 3 rice aquaporin genes were markedly downregulated and 4 were upregulated by water deficiency in the root, suggesting that these candidate genes are key regulators of water uptake from the soil. Finally, we constructed a functional network of genes mediated by water stress and refined the network by confirming the differential expression using RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Our data will be useful to elucidate the molecular mechanism of water-balance control in rice root.

  16. Integrated metabolomics and phytochemical genomics approaches for studies on rice.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yozo; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is widely employed to monitor the cellular metabolic state and assess the quality of plant-derived foodstuffs because it can be used to manage datasets that include a wide range of metabolites in their analytical samples. In this review, we discuss metabolomics research on rice in order to elucidate the overall regulation of the metabolism as it is related to the growth and mechanisms of adaptation to genetic modifications and environmental stresses such as fungal infections, submergence, and oxidative stress. We also focus on phytochemical genomics studies based on a combination of metabolomics and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping techniques. In addition to starch, rice produces many metabolites that also serve as nutrients for human consumers. The outcomes of recent phytochemical genomics studies of diverse natural rice resources suggest there is potential for using further effective breeding strategies to improve the quality of ingredients in rice grains.

  17. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot

    PubMed Central

    Quibod, Ian Lorenzo; Grande, Genelou; Oreiro, Eula Gems; Borja, Frances Nikki; Dossa, Gerbert Sylvestre; Mauleon, Ramil; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI) and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments. PMID:26422147

  18. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot.

    PubMed

    Quibod, Ian Lorenzo; Grande, Genelou; Oreiro, Eula Gems; Borja, Frances Nikki; Dossa, Gerbert Sylvestre; Mauleon, Ramil; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI) and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments.

  19. Genomic evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-09-10

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains.

  20. Genomic Evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese Rice Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains. PMID:25212861

  1. Structural characterization of Brachypodium genome and its syntenic relationship with rice and wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) has been recently recognized as an emerging model system for both comparative and functional genomics in grass species. In this study, 55,221 repeat masked Brachypodium BAC end sequences (BES) were used for comparative analysis against the 12 rice pseudomolecul...

  2. Evaluating the microtubule cytoskeleton and its interacting proteins in monocots by mining the rice genome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Longbiao; Ho, Chin-Min Kimmy; Kong, Zhaosheng; Lee, Yuh-Ru Julie; Qian, Qian; Liu, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Background Microtubules (MTs) are assembled by heterodimers of α- and β-tubulins, which provide tracks for directional transport and frameworks for the spindle apparatus and the phragmoplast. MT nucleation and dynamics are regulated by components such as the γ-tubulin complex which are conserved among eukaryotes, and other components which are unique to plants. Following remarkable progress made in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana toward revealing key components regulating MT activities, the completed rice (Oryza sativa) genome has prompted a survey of the MT cytoskeleton in this important crop as a model for monocots. Scope The rice genome contains three α-tubulin genes, eight β-tubulin genes and a single γ-tubulin gene. A functional γ-tubulin ring complex is expected to form in rice as genes encoding all components of the complex are present. Among proteins that interact with MTs, compared with A. thaliana, rice has more genes encoding some members such as the MAP65/Ase1p/PRC1 family, but fewer for the motor kinesins, the end-binding protein EB1 and the mitotic kinase Aurora. Although most known MT-interacting factors have apparent orthologues in rice, no orthologues of arabidopsis RIC1 and MAP18 have been identified in rice. Among all proteins surveyed here, only a few have had their functions characterized by genetic means in rice. Elucidating functions of proteins of the rice MT cytoskeleton, aided by recent technical advances made in this model monocot, will greatly advance our knowledge of how monocots employ their MTs to regulate their growth and form. PMID:19106179

  3. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis of Cadmium Stress in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Oono, Youko; Yazawa, Takayuki; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Harumi; Mori, Satomi; Handa, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Rice growth is severely affected by toxic concentrations of the nonessential heavy metal cadmium (Cd). To elucidate the molecular basis of the response to Cd stress, we performed mRNA sequencing of rice following our previous study on exposure to high concentrations of Cd (Oono et al., 2014). In this study, rice plants were hydroponically treated with low concentrations of Cd and approximately 211 million sequence reads were mapped onto the IRGSP-1.0 reference rice genome sequence. Many genes, including some identified under high Cd concentration exposure in our previous study, were found to be responsive to low Cd exposure, with an average of about 11,000 transcripts from each condition. However, genes expressed constitutively across the developmental course responded only slightly to low Cd concentrations, in contrast to their clear response to high Cd concentration, which causes fatal damage to rice seedlings according to phenotypic changes. The expression of metal ion transporter genes tended to correlate with Cd concentration, suggesting the potential of the RNA-Seq strategy to reveal novel Cd-responsive transporters by analyzing gene expression under different Cd concentrations. This study could help to develop novel strategies for improving tolerance to Cd exposure in rice and other cereal crops. PMID:27034955

  4. Genome inside genome: NGS based identification and assembly of endophytic Sphingopyxis granuli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes from rice genomic reads.

    PubMed

    Battu, Latha; Reddy, Mettu Madhavi; Goud, Burragoni Sravanthi; Ulaganathan, Kayalvili; Kandasamy, Ulaganathan

    2017-02-10

    The interactions between crop plants and the endophytic bacteria colonizing them are poorly understood and experimental methods were found to be inadequate to meet the complexities associated with the interaction. Moreover, research on endophytic bacteria was focused at host plant species level and not at cultivar level which is essential for understanding the role played by them on the productivity of specific crop genotype. High throughput genomics offers valuable tools for identification, characterization of endophytic bacteria and understand their interaction with host plants. In this paper we report the use of high throughput plant genomic data for identification of endophytic bacteria colonizing rice plants. Using this novel next generation sequencing based computational method Sphingopyxis granuli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified as endophytes colonizing the elite indica rice cultivar RP Bio-226 and their draft genome sequences were assembled.

  5. Genomic architecture of heterosis for yield traits in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuehui; Yang, Shihua; Gong, Junyi; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Zhan, Qilin; Zhao, Yan; Li, Wenjun; Cheng, Benyi; Xia, Junhui; Chen, Neng; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Danlin; Chen, Jiaying; Zhou, Congcong; Lu, Yiqi; Weng, Qijun; Han, Bin

    2016-09-29

    Increasing grain yield is a long-term goal in crop breeding to meet the demand for global food security. Heterosis, when a hybrid shows higher performance for a trait than both parents, offers an important strategy for crop breeding. To examine the genetic basis of heterosis for yield in rice, here we generate, sequence and record the phenotypes of 10,074 F2 lines from 17 representative hybrid rice crosses. We classify modern hybrid rice varieties into three groups, representing different hybrid breeding systems. Although we do not find any heterosis-associated loci shared across all lines, within each group, a small number of genomic loci from female parents explain a large proportion of the yield advantage of hybrids over their male parents. For some of these loci, we find support for partial dominance of heterozygous locus for yield-related traits and better-parent heterosis for overall performance when all of the grain-yield traits are considered together. These results inform on the genomic architecture of heterosis and rice hybrid breeding.

  6. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-10-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances.

  7. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Isaac B.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. PMID:26430154

  8. Review of functional markers for improving cooking, eating, and the nutritional qualities of rice

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wendy C. P.; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Ismail, Mohd R.; Puteh, Adam; Latif, Mohammad A.; Ramli, Asfaliza

    2015-01-01

    After yield, quality is one of the most important aspects of rice breeding. Preference for rice quality varies among cultures and regions; therefore, rice breeders have to tailor the quality according to the preferences of local consumers. Rice quality assessment requires routine chemical analysis procedures. The advancement of molecular marker technology has revolutionized the strategy in breeding programs. The availability of rice genome sequences and the use of forward and reverse genetics approaches facilitate gene discovery and the deciphering of gene functions. A well-characterized gene is the basis for the development of functional markers, which play an important role in plant genotyping and, in particular, marker-assisted breeding. In addition, functional markers offer advantages that counteract the limitations of random DNA markers. Some functional markers have been applied in marker-assisted breeding programs and have successfully improved rice quality to meet local consumers’ preferences. Although functional markers offer a plethora of advantages over random genetic markers, the development and application of functional markers should be conducted with care. The decreasing cost of sequencing will enable more functional markers for rice quality improvement to be developed, and application of these markers in rice quality breeding programs is highly anticipated. PMID:26528304

  9. Mutation of a major CG methylase in rice causes genome-wide hypomethylation, dysregulated genome expression, and seedling lethality.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lanjuan; Li, Ning; Xu, Chunming; Zhong, Silin; Lin, Xiuyun; Yang, Jingjing; Zhou, Tianqi; Yuliang, Anzhi; Wu, Ying; Chen, Yun-Ru; Cao, Xiaofeng; Zemach, Assaf; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Liu, Bao

    2014-07-22

    Cytosine methylation at CG sites ((m)CG) plays critical roles in development, epigenetic inheritance, and genome stability in mammals and plants. In the dicot model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, methyltransferase 1 (MET1), a principal CG methylase, functions to maintain (m)CG during DNA replication, with its null mutation resulting in global hypomethylation and pleiotropic developmental defects. Null mutation of a critical CG methylase has not been characterized at a whole-genome level in other higher eukaryotes, leaving the generality of the Arabidopsis findings largely speculative. Rice is a model plant of monocots, to which many of our important crops belong. Here we have characterized a null mutant of OsMet1-2, the major CG methylase in rice. We found that seeds homozygous for OsMet1-2 gene mutation (OsMET1-2(-/-)), which directly segregated from normal heterozygote plants (OsMET1-2(+/-)), were seriously maldeveloped, and all germinated seedlings underwent swift necrotic death. Compared with wild type, genome-wide loss of (m)CG occurred in the mutant methylome, which was accompanied by a plethora of quantitative molecular phenotypes including dysregulated expression of diverse protein-coding genes, activation and repression of transposable elements, and altered small RNA profiles. Our results have revealed conservation but also distinct functional differences in CG methylases between rice and Arabidopsis.

  10. Rapid diversification of five Oryza AA genomes associated with rice adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-Jie; Zhu, Ting; Xia, En-Hua; Shi, Chao; Liu, Yun-Long; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yuan; Jiang, Wen-Kai; Zhao, You-Jie; Mao, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ping; Huang, Hui; Jiao, Jun-Ying; Xu, Ping-Zhen; Yao, Qiu-Yang; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Yang, Li-Li; Gao, Ju; Tao, Da-Yun; Wang, Yue-Ju; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2014-11-18

    Comparative genomic analyses among closely related species can greatly enhance our understanding of plant gene and genome evolution. We report de novo-assembled AA-genome sequences for Oryza nivara, Oryza glaberrima, Oryza barthii, Oryza glumaepatula, and Oryza meridionalis. Our analyses reveal massive levels of genomic structural variation, including segmental duplication and rapid gene family turnover, with particularly high instability in defense-related genes. We show, on a genomic scale, how lineage-specific expansion or contraction of gene families has led to their morphological and reproductive diversification, thus enlightening the evolutionary process of speciation and adaptation. Despite strong purifying selective pressures on most Oryza genes, we documented a large number of positively selected genes, especially those genes involved in flower development, reproduction, and resistance-related processes. These diversifying genes are expected to have played key roles in adaptations to their ecological niches in Asia, South America, Africa and Australia. Extensive variation in noncoding RNA gene numbers, function enrichment, and rates of sequence divergence might also help account for the different genetic adaptations of these rice species. Collectively, these resources provide new opportunities for evolutionary genomics, numerous insights into recent speciation, a valuable database of functional variation for crop improvement, and tools for efficient conservation of wild rice germplasm.

  11. Relationships of wild and domesticated rices (Oryza AA genome species) based upon whole chloroplast genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Wambugu, Peterson W; Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Waters, Daniel L; Henry, Robert J

    2015-09-10

    Rice is the most important crop in the world, acting as the staple food for over half of the world's population. The evolutionary relationships of cultivated rice and its wild relatives have remained contentious and inconclusive. Here we report on the use of whole chloroplast sequences to elucidate the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships in the AA genome Oryza species, representing the primary gene pool of rice. This is the first study that has produced a well resolved and strongly supported phylogeny of the AA genome species. The pan tropical distribution of these rice relatives was found to be explained by long distance dispersal within the last million years. The analysis resulted in a clustering pattern that showed strong geographical differentiation. The species were defined in two primary clades with a South American/African clade with two species, O glumaepatula and O longistaminata, distinguished from all other species. The largest clade was comprised of an Australian clade including newly identified taxa and the African and Asian clades. This refined knowledge of the relationships between cultivated rice and the related wild species provides a strong foundation for more targeted use of wild genetic resources in rice improvement and efforts to ensure their conservation.

  12. Relationships of wild and domesticated rices (Oryza AA genome species) based upon whole chloroplast genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wambugu, Peterson W.; Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Waters, Daniel L.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Rice is the most important crop in the world, acting as the staple food for over half of the world’s population. The evolutionary relationships of cultivated rice and its wild relatives have remained contentious and inconclusive. Here we report on the use of whole chloroplast sequences to elucidate the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships in the AA genome Oryza species, representing the primary gene pool of rice. This is the first study that has produced a well resolved and strongly supported phylogeny of the AA genome species. The pan tropical distribution of these rice relatives was found to be explained by long distance dispersal within the last million years. The analysis resulted in a clustering pattern that showed strong geographical differentiation. The species were defined in two primary clades with a South American/African clade with two species, O glumaepatula and O longistaminata, distinguished from all other species. The largest clade was comprised of an Australian clade including newly identified taxa and the African and Asian clades. This refined knowledge of the relationships between cultivated rice and the related wild species provides a strong foundation for more targeted use of wild genetic resources in rice improvement and efforts to ensure their conservation. PMID:26355750

  13. Navigating yeast genome maintenance with functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Measday, Vivien; Stirling, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is a fundamental requirement of all organisms. To address this, organisms have evolved extremely faithful modes of replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation to combat the deleterious effects of an unstable genome. Nonetheless, a small amount of genome instability is the driver of evolutionary change and adaptation, and thus a low level of instability is permitted in populations. While defects in genome maintenance almost invariably reduce fitness in the short term, they can create an environment where beneficial mutations are more likely to occur. The importance of this fact is clearest in the development of human cancer, where genome instability is a well-established enabling characteristic of carcinogenesis. This raises the crucial question: what are the cellular pathways that promote genome maintenance and what are their mechanisms? Work in model organisms, in particular the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has provided the global foundations of genome maintenance mechanisms in eukaryotes. The development of pioneering genomic tools inS. cerevisiae, such as the systematic creation of mutants in all nonessential and essential genes, has enabled whole-genome approaches to identifying genes with roles in genome maintenance. Here, we review the extensive whole-genome approaches taken in yeast, with an emphasis on functional genomic screens, to understand the genetic basis of genome instability, highlighting a range of genetic and cytological screening modalities. By revealing the biological pathways and processes regulating genome integrity, these analyses contribute to the systems-level map of the yeast cell and inform studies of human disease, especially cancer.

  14. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wei; He, Qiang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-03-03

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucleotide diversity than landrace and/or weedy, and landrace rice has higher diversity than weedy rice. Genetic distance was suggestive of a high level of breeding between landrace and weedy rice, and the landrace showing a closer association with wild rice than weedy rice. Population structure and principal component analyses showed no obvious difference in the genetic backgrounds of landrace and weedy rice in mitochondrial genome level. Phylogenetic, population split, and haplotype network evaluations were suggestive of independent origins of the indica and japonica varieties. The origin of weedy rice is supposed to be more likely from cultivated rice rather than from wild rice in mitochondrial genome level.

  15. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wei; He, Qiang; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucleotide diversity than landrace and/or weedy, and landrace rice has higher diversity than weedy rice. Genetic distance was suggestive of a high level of breeding between landrace and weedy rice, and the landrace showing a closer association with wild rice than weedy rice. Population structure and principal component analyses showed no obvious difference in the genetic backgrounds of landrace and weedy rice in mitochondrial genome level. Phylogenetic, population split, and haplotype network evaluations were suggestive of independent origins of the indica and japonica varieties. The origin of weedy rice is supposed to be more likely from cultivated rice rather than from wild rice in mitochondrial genome level. PMID:28256554

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polycistronic MicroRNAs in Cultivated and Wild Rice

    PubMed Central

    Baldrich, Patricia; Hsing, Yue-Ie Caroline; San Segundo, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that direct posttranscriptional gene silencing in eukaryotes. They are frequently clustered in the genomes of animals and can be independently transcribed or simultaneously transcribed into single polycistronic transcripts. Only a few miRNA clusters have been described in plants, and most of them are generated from independent transcriptional units. Here, we used a combination of bioinformatic tools and experimental analyses to discover new polycistronic miRNAs in rice. A genome-wide analysis of clustering patterns of MIRNA loci in the rice genome was carried out using a criterion of 3 kb as the maximal distance between two miRNAs. This analysis revealed 28 loci with the ability to form the typical hairpin structure of miRNA precursors in which 2 or more mature miRNAs mapped along the same structure. RT-PCR provided evidence for the polycistronic nature of seven miRNA precursors containing homologous or nonhomologous miRNA species. Polycistronic miRNAs and candidate polycistronic miRNAs are located across different rice chromosomes, except chromosome 12, and resided in both duplicated and nonduplicated chromosomal regions. Finally, most polycistronic and candidate polycistronic miRNAs showed a pattern of conservation in the genome of rice species with an AA genome. The diversity in the organization of MIR genes that are transcribed as polycistrons suggests a versatile mechanism for the control of gene expression in different biological processes and supports additional levels of complexity in miRNA functioning in plants. PMID:27190137

  17. Genomic Comparison of P-Type ATPase Ion Pumps in Arabidopsis and Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ivan; Tchieu, Jason; Sussman, Michael R.; Boutry, Marc; Palmgren, Michael G.; Gribskov, Michael; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Axelsen, Kristian B.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the P-type ATPase ion pump superfamily are found in all three branches of life. Forty-six P-type ATPase genes were identified in Arabidopsis, the largest number yet identified in any organism. The recent completion of two draft sequences of the rice (Oryza sativa) genome allows for comparison of the full complement of P-type ATPases in two different plant species. Here, we identify a similar number (43) in rice, despite the rice genome being more than three times the size of Arabidopsis. The similarly large families suggest that both dicots and monocots have evolved with a large preexisting repertoire of P-type ATPases. Both Arabidopsis and rice have representative members in all five major subfamilies of P-type ATPases: heavy-metal ATPases (P1B), Ca2+-ATPases (endoplasmic reticulum-type Ca2+-ATPase and autoinhibited Ca2+-ATPase, P2A and P2B), H+-ATPases (autoinhibited H+-ATPase, P3A), putative aminophospholipid ATPases (ALA, P4), and a branch with unknown specificity (P5). The close pairing of similar isoforms in rice and Arabidopsis suggests potential orthologous relationships for all 43 rice P-type ATPases. A phylogenetic comparison of protein sequences and intron positions indicates that the common angiosperm ancestor had at least 23 P-type ATPases. Although little is known about unique and common features of related pumps, clear differences between some members of the calcium pumps indicate that evolutionarily conserved clusters may distinguish pumps with either different subcellular locations or biochemical functions. PMID:12805592

  18. A genome-wide survey reveals abundant rice blast R-genes in resistant cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shengjun; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Ling; Gu, Longjiang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Pan, Qinghua; Bergelson, Joy; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plant resistance genes (R-genes) harbor tremendous allelic diversity, constituting a robust immune system effective against microbial pathogens. Nevertheless, few functional R-genes have been identified for even the best-studied pathosystems. Does this limited repertoire reflect specificity, with most R-genes having been defeated by former pests, or do plants harbor a rich diversity of functional R-genes whose composite behavior is yet to be characterized? Here, we survey 332 NBS-LRR genes cloned from 5 resistant rice cultivars for their ability to confer recognition of 12 rice blast isolates when transformed into susceptible cultivars. Our survey reveals that 48.5% of the 132 NBS-LRR loci tested contain functional rice blast R-genes, with most R-genes deriving from multi-copy clades containing especially diversified loci. Each R-gene recognized, on average, 2.42 of the 12 isolates screened. The abundant R-genes identified in resistant genomes provide extraordinary redundancy in the ability of host genotypes to recognize particular isolates. If the same is true for other pathogens, many extant NBS-LRR genes retain functionality. Our success at identifying rice blast R-genes also validates a highly efficient cloning and screening strategy. PMID:26248689

  19. A genome-wide survey reveals abundant rice blast R genes in resistant cultivars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Jiao; Jia, Yanxiao; Huang, Ju; Tan, Shengjun; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Ling; Gu, Longjiang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Pan, Qinghua; Bergelson, Joy; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-10-01

    Plant resistance genes (R genes) harbor tremendous allelic diversity, constituting a robust immune system effective against microbial pathogens. Nevertheless, few functional R genes have been identified for even the best-studied pathosystems. Does this limited repertoire reflect specificity, with most R genes having been defeated by former pests, or do plants harbor a rich diversity of functional R genes, the composite behavior of which is yet to be characterized? Here, we survey 332 NBS-LRR genes cloned from five resistant Oryza sativa (rice) cultivars for their ability to confer recognition of 12 rice blast isolates when transformed into susceptible cultivars. Our survey reveals that 48.5% of the 132 NBS-LRR loci tested contain functional rice blast R genes, with most R genes deriving from multi-copy clades containing especially diversified loci. Each R gene recognized, on average, 2.42 of the 12 isolates screened. The abundant R genes identified in resistant genomes provide extraordinary redundancy in the ability of host genotypes to recognize particular isolates. If the same is true for other pathogens, many extant NBS-LRR genes retain functionality. Our success at identifying rice blast R genes also validates a highly efficient cloning and screening strategy.

  20. Rice pseudomolecule-anchored cross-species DNA sequence alignments indicate regional genomic variation in expressed sequence conservation

    PubMed Central

    Armstead, Ian; Huang, Lin; King, Julie; Ougham, Helen; Thomas, Howard; King, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background Various methods have been developed to explore inter-genomic relationships among plant species. Here, we present a sequence similarity analysis based upon comparison of transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from five plant species and physically anchored rice coding sequences. Results A comparison of the frequency of sequence alignments, determined by MegaBLAST, between rice coding sequences in TIGR pseudomolecules and annotations vs 4.0 and comprehensive transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from Lolium perenne (ryegrass), Zea mays (maize), Hordeum vulgare (barley), Glycine max (soybean) and Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) was undertaken. Each rice pseudomolecule was divided into 10 segments, each containing 10% of the functionally annotated, expressed genes. This indicated a correlation between relative segment position in the rice genome and numbers of alignments with all the queried monocot and dicot plant databases. Colour-coded moving windows of 100 functionally annotated, expressed genes along each pseudomolecule were used to generate 'heat-maps'. These revealed consistent intra- and inter-pseudomolecule variation in the relative concentrations of significant alignments with the tested plant databases. Analysis of the annotations and derived putative expression patterns of rice genes from 'hot-spots' and 'cold-spots' within the heat maps indicated possible functional differences. A similar comparison relating to ancestral duplications of the rice genome indicated that duplications were often associated with 'hot-spots'. Conclusion Physical positions of expressed genes in the rice genome are correlated with the degree of conservation of similar sequences in the transcriptomes of other plant species. This relative conservation is associated with the distribution of different sized gene families and segmentally duplicated loci and may have functional and evolutionary implications. PMID:17708759

  1. Nongenetic functions of the genome.

    PubMed

    Bustin, Michael; Misteli, Tom

    2016-05-06

    The primary function of the genome is to store, propagate, and express the genetic information that gives rise to a cell's architectural and functional machinery. However, the genome is also a major structural component of the cell. Besides its genetic roles, the genome affects cellular functions by nongenetic means through its physical and structural properties, particularly by exerting mechanical forces and by serving as a scaffold for binding of cellular components. Major cellular processes affected by nongenetic functions of the genome include establishment of nuclear structure, signal transduction, mechanoresponses, cell migration, and vision in nocturnal animals. We discuss the concept, mechanisms, and implications of nongenetic functions of the genome.

  2. Further evidence of microcolinearity between barley and rice genomes at two orthologous regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Jin; Dixit, Anupam; Yoo, Jae-Woong; Bennetzen, Jeff

    2004-06-30

    Two genetic markers, BCD135 and RZ567 were used to select clones from genomic BAC libraries of barley and rice for sequencing and subsequent sequence comparisons. A set of two orthologous BACs each from barley and rice was selected by hybridization with BCD135 and RZ567 cDNA probes. A total of 556-kb stretch including two barley BACs (773K135 and 745C13) and two orthologous rice BACs (24K23 and 49D11) was completely sequenced. Comparative sequence analysis between orthologous BACs from the two species revealed presence of two conserved genes at BCD135 region and only one gene at the RZ567 regions. The two conserved genes were in the same order and orientation in both the species however, separated by significantly larger distance in barley. The larger distance between two barley genes was mainly due to presence of different retrotransposable elements and their derivatives (78.9% of the intergenic region) that expanded the barley BCD135 region at the rate of 9.1X. An additional gene of unknown function was also inserted along with several retrotransposable elements between two conserved genes at barley BCD135 region. More genome expansion rate (10X) around barley RZ567 locus was estimated by extremely high proportion (> 70%) of retrotransposons. Among different retrotransposons, the Sabrina elements rather than BARE were more prevalent in both the regions. Contrary to it, the BCD135 region of rice was composed of only 17.1% retrotransposable elements and no significant retrotransposons except 14 miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs) were observed in its RZ567 region. The sequence comparison between orthologous regions of rice and barley genomes was useful for gene identification and determination of individual gene structure indicating the possibility of effective utilization of rice genome sequences in understanding the large genome of barley. (The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under the accession

  3. Population genomics identifies the origin and signatures of selection of Korean weedy rice.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Kim, Kyu-Won; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-03-01

    Weedy rice is the same biological species as cultivated rice (Oryza sativa); it is also a noxious weed infesting rice fields worldwide. Its formation and population-selective or -adaptive signatures are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the phylogenetics, population structure and signatures of selection of Korean weedy rice by determining the whole genomes of 30 weedy rice, 30 landrace rice and ten wild rice samples. The phylogenetic tree and results of ancestry inference study clearly showed that the genetic distance of Korean weedy rice was far from the wild rice and near with cultivated rice. Furthermore, 537 genes showed evidence of recent positive or divergent selection, consistent with some adaptive traits. This study indicates that Korean weedy rice originated from hybridization of modern indica/indica or japonica/japonica rather than wild rice. Moreover, weedy rice is not only a notorious weed in rice fields, but also contains many untapped valuable traits or haplotypes that may be a useful genetic resource for improving cultivated rice.

  4. Genome-wide transcriptional changes and defence-related chemical profiling of rice in response to infestation by the rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Xia; Yan, Feng; Wang, Xia; Li, Ran; Cheng, Jiaan; Lou, Yonggen

    2011-09-01

    How rice defends itself against pathogen infection is well documented, but little is known about how it defends itself against herbivore attack. We measured changes in the transcriptome and chemical profile of rice when the plant is infested by the striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis. Infestation by SSBs resulted in changes in the expression levels of 4545 rice genes; this number accounts for about 8% of the genome and is made up of 18 functional groups with broad functions. The largest group comprised genes involved in metabolism, followed by cellular transport, transcription and cellular signaling. Infestation by SSBs modulated many genes responsible for the biosynthesis of plant hormones and plant signaling. Jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene were the major hormones that shaped the SSB-induced defence responses of rice. Many secondary signal transduction components, such as those involved in Ca²⁺ signaling and G-protein signaling, receptor and non-receptor protein kinases, and transcription factors were involved in the SSB-induced responses of rice. Photosynthesis and ATP synthesis from photophosphorylation were restricted by SSB feeding. In addition, SSB infestation induced the accumulation of defence compounds, including trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TrypPIs) and volatile organic compounds. These results demonstrate that SSB-induced defences required rice to reconfigure a wide variety of its metabolic, physiological and biochemical processes.

  5. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis of Wild Rice (Oryza minuta) and Its Comparison with Other Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad Aaqil; Shahzad, Raheem; Seo, Chang-Woo; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Oryza minuta (Poaceae family) is a tetraploid wild relative of cultivated rice with a BBCC genome. O. minuta has the potential to resist against various pathogenic diseases such as bacterial blight (BB), white backed planthopper (WBPH) and brown plant hopper (BPH). Here, we sequenced and annotated the complete mitochondrial genome of O. minuta. The mtDNA genome is 515,022 bp, containing 60 protein coding genes, 31 tRNA genes and two rRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome organization and the gene content at the nucleotide level are highly similar (89%) to that of O. rufipogon. Comparison with other related species revealed that most of the genes with known function are conserved among the Poaceae members. Similarly, O. minuta mt genome shared 24 protein-coding genes, 15 tRNA genes and 1 ribosomal RNA gene with other rice species (indica and japonica). The evolutionary relationship and phylogenetic analysis revealed that O. minuta is more closely related to O. rufipogon than to any other related species. Such studies are essential to understand the evolutionary divergence among species and analyze common gene pools to combat risks in the current scenario of a changing environment. PMID:27045847

  6. Rice-arsenate interactions in hydroponics: whole genome transcriptional analysis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Lou-Hing, Daniel E; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2008-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) varieties that are arsenate-tolerant (Bala) and -sensitive (Azucena) were used to conduct a transcriptome analysis of the response of rice seedlings to sodium arsenate (AsV) in hydroponic solution. RNA extracted from the roots of three replicate experiments of plants grown for 1 week in phosphate-free nutrient with or without 13.3 muM AsV was used to challenge the Affymetrix (52K) GeneChip Rice Genome array. A total of 576 probe sets were significantly up-regulated at least 2-fold in both varieties, whereas 622 were down-regulated. Ontological classification is presented. As expected, a large number of transcription factors, stress proteins, and transporters demonstrated differential expression. Striking is the lack of response of classic oxidative stress-responsive genes or phytochelatin synthases/synthatases. However, the large number of responses from genes involved in glutathione synthesis, metabolism, and transport suggests that glutathione conjugation and arsenate methylation may be important biochemical responses to arsenate challenge. In this report, no attempt is made to dissect differences in the response of the tolerant and sensitive variety, but analysis in a companion article will link gene expression to the known tolerance loci available in the BalaxAzucena mapping population.

  7. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Phenotypic Plasticity in Rice.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Bheemanahalli, Raju; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Kumagai, Etsushi; Masuya, Yusuke; Kuroda, Eiki; Raghavan, Chitra; Dingkuhn, Michael; Abe, Akira; Shimono, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-31

    Phenotypic plasticity of plants in response to environmental changes is important for adapting to changing climate. Less attention has been paid to exploring the advantages of phenotypic plasticity in resource-rich environments to enhance the productivity of agricultural crops. Here, we examined genetic variation in phenotypic plasticity in indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) across two diverse panels: (i) a Phenomics of Rice Adaptation and Yield (PRAY) population comprising 301 accessions and (ii) a Multi-parent-Advanced-Generation-Inter-Cross (MAGIC) indica population comprising 151 accessions. Altered planting density was used as a proxy for elevated atmospheric CO2 response. Low planting density significantly increased panicle weight per plant compared with normal density, and the magnitude of the increase ranged from 1.10 to 2.78 times among accessions for the PRAY population and from 1.05 to 2.45 times for the MAGIC population. Genome-wide-association studies revealed three Environmental Responsiveness (ER) candidate alleles (qER1-3) that were associated with relative response of panicle weight to low density. Two of these alleles were tested in 13 genotypes to clarify their biomass responses during vegetative growth under elevated CO2 in Japan. Our study provides evidence for polymorphisms that control rice phenotypic plasticity in environments that are rich in resources such as light and CO2 .

  8. Genome-wide classification and expression analysis of MYB transcription factor families in rice and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The MYB gene family comprises one of the richest groups of transcription factors in plants. Plant MYB proteins are characterized by a highly conserved MYB DNA-binding domain. MYB proteins are classified into four major groups namely, 1R-MYB, 2R-MYB, 3R-MYB and 4R-MYB based on the number and position of MYB repeats. MYB transcription factors are involved in plant development, secondary metabolism, hormone signal transduction, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. A comparative analysis of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis will help reveal the evolution and function of MYB genes in plants. Results A genome-wide analysis identified at least 155 and 197 MYB genes in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Gene structure analysis revealed that MYB family genes possess relatively more number of introns in the middle as compared with C- and N-terminal regions of the predicted genes. Intronless MYB-genes are highly conserved both in rice and Arabidopsis. MYB genes encoding R2R3 repeat MYB proteins retained conserved gene structure with three exons and two introns, whereas genes encoding R1R2R3 repeat containing proteins consist of six exons and five introns. The splicing pattern is similar among R1R2R3 MYB genes in Arabidopsis. In contrast, variation in splicing pattern was observed among R1R2R3 MYB members of rice. Consensus motif analysis of 1kb upstream region (5′ to translation initiation codon) of MYB gene ORFs led to the identification of conserved and over-represented cis-motifs in both rice and Arabidopsis. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that several members of MYBs are up-regulated by various abiotic stresses both in rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusion A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of chromosomal distribution, tandem repeats and phylogenetic relationship of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggested their evolution via duplication. Genome-wide comparative analysis of MYB genes and their expression analysis

  9. Identification of genome-wide variations among three elite restorer lines for hybrid-rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangcheng; Wang, Shiquan; Deng, Qiming; Zheng, Aiping; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Huainian; Wang, Lingxia; Gao, Fengyan; Zou, Ting; Huang, Bin; Cao, Xuemei; Xu, Lizhi; Yu, Chuang; Ai, Peng; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Rice restorer lines play an important role in three-line hybrid rice production. Previous research based on molecular tagging has suggested that the restorer lines used widely today have narrow genetic backgrounds. However, patterns of genetic variation at a genome-wide scale in these restorer lines remain largely unknown. The present study performed re-sequencing and genome-wide variation analysis of three important representative restorer lines, namely, IR24, MH63, and SH527, using the Solexa sequencing technology. With the genomic sequence of the Indica cultivar 9311 as the reference, the following genetic features were identified: 267,383 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 52,847 insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels), and 3,286 structural variations (SVs) in the genome of IR24; 288,764 SNPs, 59,658 InDels, and 3,226 SVs in MH63; and 259,862 SNPs, 55,500 InDels, and 3,127 SVs in SH527. Variations between samples were also determined by comparative analysis of authentic collections of SNPs, InDels, and SVs, and were functionally annotated. Furthermore, variations in several important genes were also surveyed by alignment analysis in these lines. Our results suggest that genetic variations among these lines, although far lower than those reported in the landrace population, are greater than expected, indicating a complicated genetic basis for the phenotypic diversity of the restorer lines. Identification of genome-wide variation and pattern analysis among the restorer lines will facilitate future genetic studies and the molecular improvement of hybrid rice.

  10. The ankyrin repeat gene family in rice: genome-wide identification, classification and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianyan; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yu, Huihui; Ouyang, Yidan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Qifa

    2009-10-01

    Ankyrin repeat (ANK) containing proteins comprise a large protein family. Although many members of this family have been implicated in plant growth, development and signal transduction, only a few ANK genes have been reported in rice. In this study, we analyzed the structures, phylogenetic relationship, genome localizations and expression profiles of 175 ankyrin repeat genes identified in rice (OsANK). Domain composition analysis suggested OsANK proteins can be classified into ten subfamilies. Chromosomal localizations of OsANK genes indicated nine segmental duplication events involving 17 genes and 65 OsANK genes were involved in tandem duplications. The expression profiles of 158 OsANK genes were analyzed in 24 tissues covering the whole life cycle of two rice genotypes, Minghui 63 and Zhenshan 97. Sixteen genes showed preferential expression in given tissues compared to all the other tissues in Minghui 63 and Zhenshan 97. Nine genes were preferentially expressed in stamen of 1 day before flowering, suggesting that these genes may play important roles in pollination and fertilization. Expression data of OsANK genes were also obtained with tissues of seedlings subjected to three phytohormone (NAA, GA3 and KT) and light/dark treatments. Eighteen genes showed differential expression with at least one phytohormone treatment while under light/dark treatments, 13 OsANK genes showed differential expression. Our data provided a very useful reference for cloning and functional analysis of members of this gene family in rice.

  11. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  12. Functional characterization of open chromatin in bidirectional promoters of rice

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yuan; Wang, Ximeng; Wang, Lei; Pan, Xiucai; Xiao, Jin; Wang, Xiu-e; Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    Bidirectional gene pairs tend to be highly coregulated and function in similar biological processes in eukaryotic genomes. Structural features and functional consequences of bidirectional promoters (BDPs) have received considerable attention among diverse species. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the bidirectional transcription and coexpression of BDPs remain poorly understood in plants. In this study, we integrated DNase-seq, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and MNase-seq data and investigated the effect of physical DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) positions on the transcription of rice BDPs. We found that the physical position of a DHS relative to the TSS of bidirectional gene pairs can affect the expression of the corresponding genes: the closer a DHS is to the TSS, the higher is the expression level of the genes. Most importantly, we observed that the distribution of DHSs plays a significant role in the regulation of transcription and the coexpression of gene pairs, which are possibly mediated by orchestrating the positioning of histone marks and canonical nucleosomes around BDPs. Our results demonstrate that the combined actions of chromatin structures with DHSs, which contain functional cis-elements for interaction with transcriptional machinery, may play an important role in the regulation of the bidirectional transcription or coexpression in rice BDPs. Our findings may help to enhance the understanding of DHSs in the regulation of bidirectional gene pairs. PMID:27558448

  13. Genome-wide identification and analyses of the rice calmodulin and related potential calcium sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boonburapong, Bongkoj; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2007-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli evoke rapid and transient increases in [Ca2+]cyt in plant cells which are transmitted by protein sensors that contain EF-hand motifs. Here, a group of Oryza sativa L. genes encoding calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-like (CML) proteins that do not possess functional domains other than the Ca2+-binding EF-hand motifs was analyzed. Results By functional analyses and BLAST searches of the TIGR rice database, a maximum number of 243 proteins that possibly have EF-hand motifs were identified in the rice genome. Using a neighbor-joining tree based on amino acid sequence similarity, five loci were defined as Cam genes and thirty two additional CML genes were identified. Extensive analyses of the gene structures, the chromosome locations, the EF-hand motif organization, expression characteristics including analysis by RT-PCR and a comparative analysis of Cam and CML genes in rice and Arabidopsis are presented. Conclusion Although many proteins have unknown functions, the complexity of this gene family indicates the importance of Ca2+-signals in regulating cellular responses to stimuli and this family of proteins likely plays a critical role as their transducers. PMID:17263873

  14. Rice Molecular Breeding Laboratories in the Genomics Era: Current Status and Future Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Bert C. Y.; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Virk, Parminder S.; Mackill, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Using DNA markers in plant breeding with marker-assisted selection (MAS) could greatly improve the precision and efficiency of selection, leading to the accelerated development of new crop varieties. The numerous examples of MAS in rice have prompted many breeding institutes to establish molecular breeding labs. The last decade has produced an enormous amount of genomics research in rice, including the identification of thousands of QTLs for agronomically important traits, the generation of large amounts of gene expression data, and cloning and characterization of new genes, including the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms. The pinnacle of genomics research has been the completion and annotation of genome sequences for indica and japonica rice. This information—coupled with the development of new genotyping methodologies and platforms, and the development of bioinformatics databases and software tools—provides even more exciting opportunities for rice molecular breeding in the 21st century. However, the great challenge for molecular breeders is to apply genomics data in actual breeding programs. Here, we review the current status of MAS in rice, current genomics projects and promising new genotyping methodologies, and evaluate the probable impact of genomics research. We also identify critical research areas to “bridge the application gap” between QTL identification and applied breeding that need to be addressed to realize the full potential of MAS, and propose ideas and guidelines for establishing rice molecular breeding labs in the postgenome sequence era to integrate molecular breeding within the context of overall rice breeding and research programs. PMID:18528527

  15. Fermented Brown Rice Flour as Functional Food Ingredient.

    PubMed

    Ilowefah, Muna; Chinma, Chiemela; Bakar, Jamilah; Ghazali, Hasanah M; Muhammad, Kharidah; Makeri, Mohammad

    2014-02-12

    As fermentation could reduce the negative effects of bran on final cereal products, the utilization of whole-cereal flour is recommended, such as brown rice flour as a functional food ingredient. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of fermented brown rice flour on white rice flour, white rice batter and its steamed bread qualities. Brown rice batter was fermented using commercial baker's yeast (Eagle brand) according to the optimum conditions for moderate acidity (pH 5.5) to obtain fermented brown rice flour (FBRF). The FBRF was added to white rice flour at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% levels to prepare steamed rice bread. Based on the sensory evaluation test, steamed rice bread containing 40% FBRF had the highest overall acceptability score. Thus, pasting properties of the composite rice flour, rheological properties of its batter, volume and texture properties of its steamed bread were determined. The results showed that peak viscosity of the rice flour containing 40% FBRF was significantly increased, whereas its breakdown, final viscosity and setback significantly decreased. Viscous, elastic and complex moduli of the batter having 40% FBRF were also significantly reduced. However, volume, specific volume, chewiness, resilience and cohesiveness of its steamed bread were significantly increased, while hardness and springiness significantly reduced in comparison to the control. These results established the effectiveness of yeast fermentation in reducing the detrimental effects of bran on the sensory properties of steamed white rice bread and encourage the usage of brown rice flour to enhance the quality of rice products.

  16. Fermented Brown Rice Flour as Functional Food Ingredient

    PubMed Central

    Ilowefah, Muna; Chinma, Chiemela; Bakar, Jamilah; Ghazali, Hasanah M.; Muhammad, Kharidah; Makeri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    As fermentation could reduce the negative effects of bran on final cereal products, the utilization of whole-cereal flour is recommended, such as brown rice flour as a functional food ingredient. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of fermented brown rice flour on white rice flour, white rice batter and its steamed bread qualities. Brown rice batter was fermented using commercial baker’s yeast (Eagle brand) according to the optimum conditions for moderate acidity (pH 5.5) to obtain fermented brown rice flour (FBRF). The FBRF was added to white rice flour at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% levels to prepare steamed rice bread. Based on the sensory evaluation test, steamed rice bread containing 40% FBRF had the highest overall acceptability score. Thus, pasting properties of the composite rice flour, rheological properties of its batter, volume and texture properties of its steamed bread were determined. The results showed that peak viscosity of the rice flour containing 40% FBRF was significantly increased, whereas its breakdown, final viscosity and setback significantly decreased. Viscous, elastic and complex moduli of the batter having 40% FBRF were also significantly reduced. However, volume, specific volume, chewiness, resilience and cohesiveness of its steamed bread were significantly increased, while hardness and springiness significantly reduced in comparison to the control. These results established the effectiveness of yeast fermentation in reducing the detrimental effects of bran on the sensory properties of steamed white rice bread and encourage the usage of brown rice flour to enhance the quality of rice products. PMID:28234309

  17. Isolation and Functional Characterization of Bidirectional Promoters in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Menglin; Yang, Mei; Zhou, Fei; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Bidirectional promoters, which show great application potential in genetic improvement of plants, have aroused great research interest recently. However, most bidirectional promoters were cloned individually in the studies of single genes. Here, we initiatively combined RNA-seq data and cDNA microarray data to discover the potential bidirectional promoters in rice genome. Based on the expression level and correlation of each adjacent and oppositely transcribed gene pair, we selected four candidate gene pairs. Then, the intergenic region between each pair was isolated and cloned into a dual reporter vector pDX2181 for functional identification. GUS and GFP assays of the transgenic plants indicated that all the intergenic regions showed bidirectional expression activity in various tissues. Through 5′ and 3′ deletion analysis on one of the above bidirectional promoters, we identified the enhancing region which sharply increased its bidirectional expression efficiency and the essential regions respectively responsible for its 5′ and 3′ basic expression activity. The bidirectional arrangement of the four gene pairs in six gramineous plants was also analyzed, showing the conserved characteristics of the four bidirectional promoters identified in our study. In addition, two novel cis-sequences conserved in the four bidirectional promoters were discovered by bioinformatic identification. Our study proposes a feasible method for selecting, cloning, and functionally identifying bidirectional promoters as well as for discovering their bidirectional regulatory regions and conserved sequences in rice. PMID:27303432

  18. Functional analysis of Hsp70 superfamily proteins of rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Neelam K; Kundnani, Preeti; Grover, Anil

    2013-07-01

    Heat stress results in misfolding and aggregation of cellular proteins. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) enable the cells to maintain proper folding of proteins, both in unstressed as well as stressed conditions. Hsp70 genes encode for a group of highly conserved chaperone proteins across the living systems encompassing bacteria, plants, and animals. In the cellular chaperone network, Hsp70 family proteins interconnect other chaperones and play a dominant role in various cell processes. To assess the functionality of rice Hsp70 genes, rice genome database was analyzed. Rice genome contains 32 Hsp70 genes. Rice Hsp70 superfamily genes are represented by 24 Hsp70 family and 8 Hsp110 family members. Promoter and transcript expression analysis divulges that Hsp70 superfamily genes plays important role in heat stress. Ssc1 (mitochondrial Hsp70 protein in yeast) deleted yeast show compromised growth at 37 °C. Three mitochondrial rice Hsp70 sequences (i.e., mtHsp70-1, mtHsp70-2, and mtHsp70-3) complemented the Ssc1 mutation of yeast to differential extents. The information presented in this study provides detailed understanding of the Hsp70 protein family of rice, the crop species that is the major food for the world population.

  19. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  20. Functional analysis of rice NPR1-like genes reveals that OsNPR1/NH1 is the rice orthologue conferring disease resistance with enhanced herbivore susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuexing; Zhong, Sihui; Li, Qun; Zhu, Zengrong; Lou, Yonggen; Wang, Linyou; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Muyang; Li, Qiaoli; Yang, Donglei; He, Zuhua

    2007-03-01

    The key regulator of salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance, NPR1, is functionally conserved in diverse plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Investigation in depth is needed to provide an understanding of NPR1-mediated resistance and a practical strategy for the improvement of disease resistance in the model crop rice. The rice genome contains five NPR1-like genes. In our study, three rice homologous genes, OsNPR1/NH1, OsNPR2/NH2 and OsNPR3, were found to be induced by rice bacterial blight Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and rice blast Magnaporthe grisea, and the defence molecules benzothiadiazole, methyl jasmonate and ethylene. We confirmed that OsNPR1 is the rice orthologue by complementing the Arabidopsis npr1 mutant. Over-expression of OsNPR1 conferred disease resistance to bacterial blight, but also enhanced herbivore susceptibility in transgenic plants. The OsNPR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm and moved into the nucleus after redox change. Mutations in its conserved cysteine residues led to the constitutive localization of OsNPR1(2CA)-GFP in the nucleus and also abolished herbivore hypersensitivity in transgenic rice. Different subcellular localizations of OsNPR1 antagonistically regulated SA- and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, but not SA and JA levels, indicating that OsNPR1 might mediate antagonistic cross-talk between the SA- and JA-dependent pathways in rice. This study demonstrates that rice has evolved an SA-mediated systemic acquired resistance similar to that in Arabidopsis, and also provides a practical approach for the improvement of disease resistance without the penalty of decreased herbivore resistance in rice.

  1. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas sacchari R1, a biocontrol bacterium isolated from the rice seed.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yunxia; Lin, Haiyan; Wu, Liwen; Ren, Deyong; Ye, Weijun; Dong, Guojun; Zhu, Li; Guo, Longbiao

    2015-07-20

    Xanthomonas sacchari, was first identified as a pathogenic bacterium isolated from diseased sugarcane in Guadeloupe. In this study, R1 was first isolated from rice seed samples from Philippines in 2002. The antagonistic ability against several rice pathogens raises our attention. The genomic feature of this strain was described in this paper. The total genome size of X. sacchari R1 is 5,000,479 bp with 4315 coding sequences (CDS), 59 tRNAs, 2rRNAs and one plasmid.

  2. Genome-Wide Characterization and Expression Analysis of the Germin-Like Protein Family in Rice and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Xu, Xihui; Chen, Chen; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that germin-like proteins (GLPs) are present ubiquitously in rice and Arabidopsis. However, the understanding regarding their role in development and abiotic/biotic stress resistance remains limited. In the present study, we report genome-wide identification, characterisation, subcellular localization, enzyme activity, and expression analysis of the GLP gene family in rice and Arabidopsis to study their functions. In total, 43 and 32 GLPs in the rice and Arabidopsis genome were identified based on a systematic analysis, respectively. The GLP genes were clustered into six clades based on phylogenetic analysis, and many stress and developmental-related cis-elements were detected in promoters of GLP genes. In addition, subcellular location and superoxide dismutase (SOD) analysis demonstrated that the random selected OsGLP genes on chromosomes 8 and 4 of rice were expressed in the cell wall with SOD activity. Overall, our results showed that tandem duplication events, especially the clusters of tandem duplication genes on chromosome 8 in rice, play a major role in expansion of the GLP family and thus increase our understanding of the role of the GLP family in abiotic/biotic stress and development. PMID:27669230

  3. Production of functional human vascular endothelial growth factor(165) in transgenic rice cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nguyen-Duc; Kim, Nan-Sun; Giap, Do Van; Jang, Seon-Hui; Oh, Sun-Mi; Jang, Sun-Hee; Kim, Tae-Geum; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2014-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are secreted by tumor cells and other cells exposed to hypoxia, and play a critical role in the development and differentiation of the vascular system. In this study, we investigated the production of functional recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165) in transgenic rice cell suspension culture. Complementary DNA was synthesized from human leukemia HL60 cells and cloned into expression vectors under the control of the rice α-amylase 3D (RAmy3D) promoter. The rice seed (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) was transformed with this recombinant vector by the Agrobacterium mediated method and the integration of the target gene into the plant genome was confirmed by genomic PCR. The expression of rhVEGF165 in the rice cells was determined by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. The accumulated rhVEGF165 protein in the culture medium was 19 mg/L after 18 days of culturing in a sugar-free medium. The rhVEGF165 was purified using a heparin HP column and its biological activity was tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The purified rhVEGF165 significantly increased the proliferative activity of the HUVECs. Therefore, it was demonstrated that functional rhVEGF165 could be produced using transgenic rice suspension culture vector under the control of the RAmy3D promoter.

  4. The organelle genomes of Hassawi rice (Oryza sativa L.) and its hybrid in saudi arabia: genome variation, rearrangement, and origins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tongwu; Hu, Songnian; Zhang, Guangyu; Pan, Linlin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Al-Mssallem, Ibrahim S; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Hassawi rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a landrace adapted to the climate of Saudi Arabia, characterized by its strong resistance to soil salinity and drought. Using high quality sequencing reads extracted from raw data of a whole genome sequencing project, we assembled both chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the wild-type Hassawi rice (Hassawi-1) and its dwarf hybrid (Hassawi-2). We discovered 16 InDels (insertions and deletions) but no SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) is present between the two Hassawi cp genomes. We identified 48 InDels and 26 SNPs in the two Hassawi mt genomes and a new type of sequence variation, termed reverse complementary variation (RCV) in the rice cp genomes. There are two and four RCVs identified in Hassawi-1 when compared to 93-11 (indica) and Nipponbare (japonica), respectively. Microsatellite sequence analysis showed there are more SSRs in the genic regions of both cp and mt genomes in the Hassawi rice than in the other rice varieties. There are also large repeats in the Hassawi mt genomes, with the longest length of 96,168 bp and 96,165 bp in Hassawi-1 and Hassawi-2, respectively. We believe that frequent DNA rearrangement in the Hassawi mt and cp genomes indicate ongoing dynamic processes to reach genetic stability under strong environmental pressures. Based on sequence variation analysis and the breeding history, we suggest that both Hassawi-1 and Hassawi-2 originated from the Indonesian variety Peta since genetic diversity between the two Hassawi cultivars is very low albeit an unknown historic origin of the wild-type Hassawi rice.

  5. Genome editing in rice and wheat using the CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qiwei; Wang, Yanpeng; Li, Jun; Gao, Caixia

    2014-10-01

    Targeted genome editing nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), are powerful tools for understanding gene function and for developing valuable new traits in plants. The clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system has recently emerged as an alternative nuclease-based method for efficient and versatile genome engineering. In this system, only the 20-nt targeting sequence within the single-guide RNA (sgRNA) needs to be changed to target different genes. The simplicity of the cloning strategy and the few limitations on potential target sites make the CRISPR/Cas system very appealing. Here we describe a stepwise protocol for the selection of target sites, as well as the design, construction, verification and use of sgRNAs for sequence-specific CRISPR/Cas-mediated mutagenesis and gene targeting in rice and wheat. The CRISPR/Cas system provides a straightforward method for rapid gene targeting within 1-2 weeks in protoplasts, and mutated rice plants can be generated within 13-17 weeks.

  6. The Wall-associated Kinase gene family in rice genomes.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; Christoff, Ana Paula; de Lima, Júlio Cesar; de Ross, Bruno Comparsi Feijó; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Margis, Rogerio

    2014-12-01

    The environment is a dynamic system in which life forms adapt. Wall-Associated Kinases (WAK) are a subfamily of receptor-like kinases associated with the cell wall. These genes have been suggested as sensors of the extracellular environment and triggers of intracellular signals. They belong to the ePK superfamily with or without a conserved arginine before the catalytic subdomain VIB, which characterizes RD and non-RD WAKs. WAK is a large subfamily in rice. We performed an extensive comparison of WAK genes from A. thaliana (AtWAK), O. sativa japonica and indica subspecies (OsWAK). Phylogenetic studies and WAK domain characterization allowed for the identification of two distinct groups of WAK genes in Arabidopsis and rice. One group corresponds to a cluster containing only OsWAKs that most likely expanded after the monocot-dicot separation, which evolved into a non-RD kinase class. The other group comprises classical RD-kinases with both AtWAK and OsWAK representatives. Clusterization analysis using extracellular and kinase domains demonstrated putative functional redundancy for some genes, but also highlighted genes that could recognize similar extracellular stimuli and activate different cascades. The gene expression pattern of WAKs in response to cold suggests differences in the regulation of the OsWAK genes in the indica and japonica subspecies. Our results also confirm the hypothesis of functional diversification between A. thaliana and O. sativa WAK genes. Furthermore, we propose that plant WAKs constitute two evolutionarily related but independent subfamilies: WAK-RD and WAK-nonRD. Recognition of this structural division will further provide insights to understanding WAK functions and regulations.

  7. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Rice Moth, Corcyra cephalonica

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Peng; Li, Jie; Zhao, Jin-Liang; Su, Tian-Juan; Luo, A-Rong; Fan, Ren-Jun; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wu, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Chao-Dong

    2012-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the rice moth, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was determined as a circular molecular of 15,273 bp in size. The mitogenome composition (37 genes) and gene order are the same as the other lepidopterans. Nucleotide composition of the C. cephalonica mitogenome is highly A+T biased (80.43%) like other insects. Twelve protein-coding genes start with a typical ATN codon, with the exception of coxl gene, which uses CGA as the initial codon. Nine protein-coding genes have the common stop codon TAA, and the nad2, cox1, cox2, and nad4 have single T as the incomplete stop codon. 22 tRNA genes demonstrated cloverleaf secondary structure. The mitogenome has several large intergenic spacer regions, the spacer1 between trnQ gene and nad2 gene, which is common in Lepidoptera. The spacer 3 between trnE and trnF includes microsatellite-like repeat regions (AT)18 and (TTAT)3. The spacer 4 (16 bp) between trnS2 gene and nad1 gene has a motif ATACTAT; another species, Sesamia inferens encodes ATCATAT at the same position, while other lepidopteran insects encode a similar ATACTAA motif. The spacer 6 is A+T rich region, include motif ATAGA and a 20-bp poly(T) stretch and two microsatellite (AT)9, (AT)8 elements. PMID:23413968

  8. Distribution and characterization of over 1000 T-DNA tags in rice genome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuangyan; Jin, Weizheng; Wang, Mingyi; Zhang, Fan; Zhou, Jie; Jia, Qiaojun; Wu, Yunrong; Liu, Feiyan; Wu, Ping

    2003-10-01

    We generated T-DNA insertions throughout the rice genome for saturation mutagenesis. More than 1,000 flanking sequences were mapped on 12 rice chromosomes. Our results showed that T-DNA tags were not randomly spread on rice chromosomes and were preferentially inserted in gene-rich regions. Few insertions (2.4%) were found in repetitive regions. T-DNA insertions in genic (58.1%) and intergenic regions (41.9%) showed a good correlation with the predicted size distribution of these sequences in the rice genome. Whereas, obvious biases were found for the insertions in the 5'- and 3'-regulatory regions outside the coding regions both at 500-bp size and in introns rather than in exons. Such distribution patterns and biases for T-DNA integration in rice are similar to that of the previous report in Arabidopsis, which may result from T-DNA integration mechanism itself. Rice will require approximately the same number of T-DNA insertions for saturation mutagenesis as will Arabidopsis. A database of the T-DNA insertion sites in rice is publicly available at our web site (http://www.genomics.zju.edu.cn/ricetdna).

  9. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Rice and Pineapple Contributes to Understand the Chromosome Number Reduction and Genomic Changes in Grasses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinpeng; Yu, Jiaxiang; Sun, Pengchuan; Li, Yuxian; Xia, Ruiyan; Liu, Yinzhe; Ma, Xuelian; Yu, Jigao; Yang, Nanshan; Lei, Tianyu; Wang, Zhenyi; Wang, Li; Ge, Weina; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Xiaojian; Sun, Sangrong; Liu, Tao; Jin, Dianchuan; Pan, Yuxin; Wang, Xiyin

    2016-01-01

    Rice is one of the most researched model plant, and has a genome structure most resembling that of the grass common ancestor after a grass common tetraploidization ∼100 million years ago. There has been a standing controversy whether there had been five or seven basic chromosomes, before the tetraploidization, which were tackled but could not be well solved for the lacking of a sequenced and assembled outgroup plant to have a conservative genome structure. Recently, the availability of pineapple genome, which has not been subjected to the grass-common tetraploidization, provides a precious opportunity to solve the above controversy and to research into genome changes of rice and other grasses. Here, we performed a comparative genomics analysis of pineapple and rice, and found solid evidence that grass-common ancestor had 2n = 2x = 14 basic chromosomes before the tetraploidization and duplicated to 2n = 4x = 28 after the event. Moreover, we proposed that enormous gene missing from duplicated regions in rice should be explained by an allotetraploid produced by prominently divergent parental lines, rather than gene losses after their divergence. This means that genome fractionation might have occurred before the formation of the allotetraploid grass ancestor.

  10. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Rice and Pineapple Contributes to Understand the Chromosome Number Reduction and Genomic Changes in Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinpeng; Yu, Jiaxiang; Sun, Pengchuan; Li, Yuxian; Xia, Ruiyan; Liu, Yinzhe; Ma, Xuelian; Yu, Jigao; Yang, Nanshan; Lei, Tianyu; Wang, Zhenyi; Wang, Li; Ge, Weina; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Xiaojian; Sun, Sangrong; Liu, Tao; Jin, Dianchuan; Pan, Yuxin; Wang, Xiyin

    2016-01-01

    Rice is one of the most researched model plant, and has a genome structure most resembling that of the grass common ancestor after a grass common tetraploidization ∼100 million years ago. There has been a standing controversy whether there had been five or seven basic chromosomes, before the tetraploidization, which were tackled but could not be well solved for the lacking of a sequenced and assembled outgroup plant to have a conservative genome structure. Recently, the availability of pineapple genome, which has not been subjected to the grass-common tetraploidization, provides a precious opportunity to solve the above controversy and to research into genome changes of rice and other grasses. Here, we performed a comparative genomics analysis of pineapple and rice, and found solid evidence that grass-common ancestor had 2n = 2x = 14 basic chromosomes before the tetraploidization and duplicated to 2n = 4x = 28 after the event. Moreover, we proposed that enormous gene missing from duplicated regions in rice should be explained by an allotetraploid produced by prominently divergent parental lines, rather than gene losses after their divergence. This means that genome fractionation might have occurred before the formation of the allotetraploid grass ancestor. PMID:27757123

  11. Whole genome sequencing and analysis of Swarna, a widely cultivated indica rice variety with low glycemic index

    PubMed Central

    Rathinasabapathi, Pasupathi; Purushothaman, Natarajan; VL, Ramprasad; Parani, Madasamy

    2015-01-01

    Swarna is a popular cultivated indica rice variety with low glycemic index (GI) but its genetic basis is not known. The whole genome of Swarna was sequenced using Illumina’s paired-end technology, and the reads were mapped to the Nipponbare reference genome. Overall, 65,984 non-synonymous SNPs were identified in 20,350 genes, and in silico analysis predicted that 4,847 of them in 2,214 genes may have deleterious effect on protein functions. Polymorphisms were found in all the starch biosynthesis genes, except the gene for branching enzyme IIa. It was found that T/G SNP at position 246, ‘A’ at position 2,386, and ‘C’ at position 3,378 in the granule bound starch synthase I gene, and C/T SNP at position 1,188 in the glucose-6-phosphate translocator gene may contribute to the low GI phenotype in Swarna. All these variants were also found in the genome of another low GI indica rice variety from Columbia, Fedearroz 50. The whole genome analysis of Swarna helped to understand the genetic basis of GI in rice, which is a complex trait involving multiple factors. PMID:26068787

  12. Whole genome sequencing and analysis of Swarna, a widely cultivated indica rice variety with low glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Rathinasabapathi, Pasupathi; Purushothaman, Natarajan; Ramprasad, V L; Parani, Madasamy

    2015-06-11

    Swarna is a popular cultivated indica rice variety with low glycemic index (GI) but its genetic basis is not known. The whole genome of Swarna was sequenced using Illumina's paired-end technology, and the reads were mapped to the Nipponbare reference genome. Overall, 65,984 non-synonymous SNPs were identified in 20,350 genes, and in silico analysis predicted that 4,847 of them in 2,214 genes may have deleterious effect on protein functions. Polymorphisms were found in all the starch biosynthesis genes, except the gene for branching enzyme IIa. It was found that T/G SNP at position 246, 'A' at position 2,386, and 'C' at position 3,378 in the granule bound starch synthase I gene, and C/T SNP at position 1,188 in the glucose-6-phosphate translocator gene may contribute to the low GI phenotype in Swarna. All these variants were also found in the genome of another low GI indica rice variety from Columbia, Fedearroz 50. The whole genome analysis of Swarna helped to understand the genetic basis of GI in rice, which is a complex trait involving multiple factors.

  13. Two evolutionary histories in the genome of rice: the roles of domestication genes.

    PubMed

    He, Ziwen; Zhai, Weiwei; Wen, Haijun; Tang, Tian; Wang, Yu; Lu, Xuemei; Greenberg, Anthony J; Hudson, Richard R; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua

    2011-06-01

    Genealogical patterns in different genomic regions may be different due to the joint influence of gene flow and selection. The existence of two subspecies of cultivated rice provides a unique opportunity for analyzing these effects during domestication. We chose 66 accessions from the three rice taxa (about 22 each from Oryza sativa indica, O. sativa japonica, and O. rufipogon) for whole-genome sequencing. In the search for the signature of selection, we focus on low diversity regions (LDRs) shared by both cultivars. We found that the genealogical histories of these overlapping LDRs are distinct from the genomic background. While indica and japonica genomes generally appear to be of independent origin, many overlapping LDRs may have originated only once, as a result of selection and subsequent introgression. Interestingly, many such LDRs contain only one candidate gene of rice domestication, and several known domestication genes have indeed been "rediscovered" by this approach. In summary, we identified 13 additional candidate genes of domestication.

  14. AP2/ERF Transcription Factor in Rice: Genome-Wide Canvas and Syntenic Relationships between Monocots and Eudicots.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muhammad; Guangyuan, He; Guangxiao, Yang; Hussain, Javeed; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor family intimately regulates gene expression in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic factors, symbiotic interactions, cell differentiation, and stress signalling pathways in plants. In this study, 170 AP2/ERF family genes are identified by phylogenetic analysis of the rice genome (Oryza sativa l. japonica) and they are divided into a total of 11 groups, including four major groups (AP2, ERF, DREB, and RAV), 10 subgroups, and two soloists. Gene structure analysis revealed that, at position-6, the amino acid threonine (Thr-6) is conserved in the double domain AP2 proteins compared to the amino acid arginine (Arg-6), which is preserved in the single domain of ERF proteins. In addition, the histidine (His) amino acid is found in both domains of the double domain AP2 protein, which is missing in single domain ERF proteins. Motif analysis indicates that most of the conserved motifs, apart from the AP2/ERF domain, are exclusively distributed among the specific clades in the phylogenetic tree and regulate plausible functions. Expression analysis reveals a widespread distribution of the rice AP2/ERF family genes within plant tissues. In the vegetative organs, the transcripts of these genes are found most abundant in the roots followed by the leaf and stem; whereas, in reproductive tissues, the gene expression of this family is observed high in the embryo and lemma. From chromosomal localization, it appears that repetition and tandem-duplication may contribute to the evolution of new genes in the rice genome. In this study, interspecies comparisons between rice and wheat reveal 34 rice loci and unveil the extent of collinearity between the two genomes. It was subsequently ascertained that chromosome-9 has more orthologous loci for CRT/DRE genes whereas chromosome-2 exhibits orthologs for ERF subfamily members. Maximum conserved synteny is found in chromosome-3 for AP2 double domain subfamily genes. Macrosynteny between rice and Arabidopsis, a

  15. Plant Gene and Alternatively Spliced Variant Annotator. A plant genome annotation pipeline for rice gene and alternatively spliced variant identification with cross-species expressed sequence tag conservation from seven plant species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2007-03-01

    The completion of the rice (Oryza sativa) genome draft has brought unprecedented opportunities for genomic studies of the world's most important food crop. Previous rice gene annotations have relied mainly on ab initio methods, which usually yield a high rate of false-positive predictions and give only limited information regarding alternative splicing in rice genes. Comparative approaches based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) can compensate for the drawbacks of ab initio methods because they can simultaneously identify experimental data-supported genes and alternatively spliced transcripts. Furthermore, cross-species EST information can be used to not only offset the insufficiency of same-species ESTs but also derive evolutionary implications. In this study, we used ESTs from seven plant species, rice, wheat (Triticum aestivum), maize (Zea mays), barley (Hordeum vulgare), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), soybean (Glycine max), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), to annotate the rice genome. We developed a plant genome annotation pipeline, Plant Gene and Alternatively Spliced Variant Annotator (PGAA). Using this approach, we identified 852 genes (931 isoforms) not annotated in other widely used databases (i.e. the Institute for Genomic Research, National Center for Biotechnology Information, and Rice Annotation Project) and found 87% of them supported by both rice and nonrice EST evidence. PGAA also identified more than 44,000 alternatively spliced events, of which approximately 20% are not observed in the other three annotations. These novel annotations represent rich opportunities for rice genome research, because the functions of most of our annotated genes are currently unknown. Also, in the PGAA annotation, the isoforms with non-rice-EST-supported exons are significantly enriched in transporter activity but significantly underrepresented in transcription regulator activity. We have also identified potential lineage-specific and conserved isoforms, which are

  16. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of WNK kinase gene family in rice.

    PubMed

    Manuka, Rakesh; Saddhe, Ankush Ashok; Kumar, Kundan

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases represent one of the largest gene families involved in diverse regulatory functions. WNK (With No Lysine) kinases are members of ser/thr protein kinase family, which lack conserved catalytic lysine (K) residue at protein kinase subdomain II and is replaced by either asparagine, serine or glycine residues. They are involved in regulation of flowering time, circadian rhythms and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we have identified 9 members of WNK in rice, showed resemblance to Arabidopsis and human WNK and clustered into five main clades phylogenetically. The predicted genes structure, bonafide conserved signature motif and domains strongly support their identity, as members of WNK kinase family. We have analyzed their chromosomal distribution, physio-chemical properties, subcellular localizations and cis-elements in the promoter regions in silico. Further, transcript analysis of OsWNK by qRT-PCR revealed their differential regulation in tissue specific and abiotic stresses libraries. In conclusion, the identification of nine OsWNK and transcript level expression pattern under abiotic stress using qRT-PCR in rice will significantly contribute towards the understanding of WNK genes in monocots and thus provide a set up for functional genomics studies of WNK protein kinases.

  17. The genome sequence of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and evidence for independent domestication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Muhua; Yu, Yeisoo; Haberer, Georg; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Fan, Chuanzhu; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Zuccolo, Andrea; Song, Xiang; Kudrna, Dave; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Cossu, Rosa Maria; Maldonado, Carlos; Chen, Jinfeng; Lee, Seunghee; Sisneros, Nick; de Baynast, Kristi; Golser, Wolfgang; Wissotski, Marina; Kim, Woojin; Sanchez, Paul; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noelle; Sanni, Kayode; Long, Manyuan; Carney, Judith; Panaud, Olivier; Wicker, Thomas; Machado, Carlos A; Chen, Mingsheng; Mayer, Klaus F X; Rounsley, Steve; Wing, Rod A

    2014-09-01

    The cultivation of rice in Africa dates back more than 3,000 years. Interestingly, African rice is not of the same origin as Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.) but rather is an entirely different species (i.e., Oryza glaberrima Steud.). Here we present a high-quality assembly and annotation of the O. glaberrima genome and detailed analyses of its evolutionary history of domestication and selection. Population genomics analyses of 20 O. glaberrima and 94 Oryza barthii accessions support the hypothesis that O. glaberrima was domesticated in a single region along the Niger river as opposed to noncentric domestication events across Africa. We detected evidence for artificial selection at a genome-wide scale, as well as with a set of O. glaberrima genes orthologous to O. sativa genes that are known to be associated with domestication, thus indicating convergent yet independent selection of a common set of genes during two geographically and culturally distinct domestication processes.

  18. Chloroplast genome sequence confirms distinctness of Australian and Asian wild rice.

    PubMed

    Waters, Daniel L E; Nock, Catherine J; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Rice, Nicole; Henry, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) is an AA genome Oryza species that was most likely domesticated from wild populations of O. rufipogon in Asia. O. rufipogon and O. meridionalis are the only AA genome species found within Australia and occur as widespread populations across northern Australia. The chloroplast genome sequence of O. rufipogon from Asia and Australia and O. meridionalis and O. australiensis (an Australian member of the genus very distant from O. sativa) was obtained by massively parallel sequencing and compared with the chloroplast genome sequence of domesticated O. sativa. Oryza australiensis differed in more than 850 sites single nucleotide polymorphism or indel from each of the other samples. The other wild rice species had only around 100 differences relative to cultivated rice. The chloroplast genomes of Australian O. rufipogon and O. meridionalis were closely related with only 32 differences. The Asian O. rufipogon chloroplast genome (with only 68 differences) was closer to O. sativa than the Australian taxa (both with more than 100 differences). The chloroplast sequences emphasize the genetic distinctness of the Australian populations and their potential as a source of novel rice germplasm. The Australian O. rufipogon may be a perennial form of O. meridionalis.

  19. Functional genomics of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, E R; Hood, D W; Saunders, N J; Schweda, E K H; Richards, J C

    2002-01-01

    Microbial diseases remain the commonest cause of global mortality and morbidity. Automated-DNA sequencing has revolutionized the investigation of pathogenic microbes by making the immense fund of information contained in their genomes available at reasonable cost. The challenge is how this information can be used to increase current understanding of the biology of commensal and virulence behaviour of pathogens with particular emphasis on in vivo function and novel approaches to prevention. One example of the application of whole-genome-sequence information is afforded by investigations of the pathogenic role of Haemophilus influenzae lipopolysaccharide and its candidacy as a vaccine. PMID:11839188

  20. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  1. Insights into the Musa genome: Syntenic relationships to rice and between Musa species

    PubMed Central

    Lescot, Magali; Piffanelli, Pietro; Ciampi, Ana Y; Ruiz, Manuel; Blanc, Guillaume; Leebens-Mack, Jim; da Silva, Felipe R; Santos, Candice MR; D'Hont, Angélique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Vilarinhos, Alberto D; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Ronning, Catherine M; Cheung, Foo; Haas, Brian J; Althoff, Ryan; Arbogast, Tammy; Hine, Erin; Pappas, Georgios J; Sasaki, Takuji; Souza, Manoel T; Miller, Robert NG; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe; Town, Christopher D

    2008-01-01

    Background Musa species (Zingiberaceae, Zingiberales) including bananas and plantains are collectively the fourth most important crop in developing countries. Knowledge concerning Musa genome structure and the origin of distinct cultivars has greatly increased over the last few years. Until now, however, no large-scale analyses of Musa genomic sequence have been conducted. This study compares genomic sequence in two Musa species with orthologous regions in the rice genome. Results We produced 1.4 Mb of Musa sequence from 13 BAC clones, annotated and analyzed them along with 4 previously sequenced BACs. The 443 predicted genes revealed that Zingiberales genes share GC content and distribution characteristics with eudicot and Poaceae genomes. Comparison with rice revealed microsynteny regions that have persisted since the divergence of the Commelinid orders Poales and Zingiberales at least 117 Mya. The previously hypothesized large-scale duplication event in the common ancestor of major cereal lineages within the Poaceae was verified. The divergence time distributions for Musa-Zingiber (Zingiberaceae, Zingiberales) orthologs and paralogs provide strong evidence for a large-scale duplication event in the Musa lineage after its divergence from the Zingiberaceae approximately 61 Mya. Comparisons of genomic regions from M. acuminata and M. balbisiana revealed highly conserved genome structure, and indicated that these genomes diverged circa 4.6 Mya. Conclusion These results point to the utility of comparative analyses between distantly-related monocot species such as rice and Musa for improving our understanding of monocot genome evolution. Sequencing the genome of M. acuminata would provide a strong foundation for comparative genomics in the monocots. In addition a genome sequence would aid genomic and genetic analyses of cultivated Musa polyploid genotypes in research aimed at localizing and cloning genes controlling important agronomic traits for breeding purposes

  2. Rice transposable elements are characterized by various methylation environments in the genome

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Miwako; Kiyohara, Akihiro; Takasu, Atsuko; Kishima, Yuji; Ohtsubo, Hisako; Sano, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies using high-throughput methods have revealed that transposable elements (TEs) are a comprehensive target for DNA methylation. However, the relationship between TEs and their genomic environment regarding methylation still remains unclear. The rice genome contains representatives of all known TE families with different characteristics of chromosomal distribution, structure, transposition, size, and copy number. Here we studied the DNA methylation state around 12 TEs in nine genomic DNAs from cultivated rice strains and their closely related wild strains. Results We employed a transposon display (TD) method to analyze the methylation environments in the genomes. The 12 TE families, consisting of four class I elements, seven class II elements, and one element of a different class, were differentially distributed in the rice chromosomes: some elements were concentrated in the centromeric or pericentromeric regions, but others were located in euchromatic regions. The TD analyses revealed that the TE families were embedded in flanking sequences with different methylation degrees. Each TE had flanking sequences with similar degrees of methylation among the nine rice strains. The class I elements tended to be present in highly methylated regions, while those of the class II elements showed widely varying degrees of methylation. In some TE families, the degrees of methylation were markedly lower than the average methylation state of the genome. In two families, dramatic changes of the methylation state occurred depending on the distance from the TE. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the TE families in the rice genomes can be characterized by the methylation states of their surroundings. The copy number and degree of conservation of the TE family are not likely to be correlated with the degree of methylation. We discuss possible relationships between the methylation state of TEs and their surroundings. This is the first report demonstrating

  3. QTL Mapping in Three Rice Populations Uncovers Major Genomic Regions Associated with African Rice Gall Midge Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nasser; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Semagn, Kassa; Sow, Mounirou; Nwilene, Francis; Kolade, Olufisayo; Bocco, Roland; Oyetunji, Olumoye; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    African rice gall midge (AfRGM) is one of the most destructive pests of irrigated and lowland African ecologies. This study aimed to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with AfRGM pest incidence and resistance in three independent bi-parental rice populations (ITA306xBW348-1, ITA306xTOG7106 and ITA306xTOS14519), and to conduct meta QTL (mQTL) analysis to explore whether any genomic regions are conserved across different genetic backgrounds. Composite interval mapping (CIM) conducted on the three populations independently uncovered a total of 28 QTLs associated with pest incidence (12) and pest severity (16). The number of QTLs per population associated with AfRGM resistance varied from three in the ITA306xBW348-1 population to eight in the ITA306xTOG7106 population. Each QTL individually explained 1.3 to 34.1% of the phenotypic variance. The major genomic region for AfRGM resistance had a LOD score and R2 of 60.0 and 34.1% respectively, and mapped at 111 cM on chromosome 4 (qAfrGM4) in the ITA306xTOS14519 population. The meta-analysis reduced the number of QTLs from 28 to 17 mQTLs, each explaining 1.3 to 24.5% of phenotypic variance, and narrowed the confidence intervals by 2.2 cM. There was only one minor effect mQTL on chromosome 1 that was common in the TOS14519 and TOG7106 genetic backgrounds; all other mQTLs were background specific. We are currently fine-mapping and validating the major effect genomic region on chromosome 4 (qAfRGM4). This is the first report in mapping the genomic regions associated with the AfRGM resistance, and will be highly useful for rice breeders.

  4. The rice ent-KAURENE SYNTHASE LIKE 2 encodes a functional ent-beyerene synthase.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Daisuke; Ito, Akira; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Imai, Ryozo

    2015-05-08

    The rice genome contains a family of kaurene synthase-like (OsKSL) genes that are responsible for the biosynthesis of various diterpenoids, including gibberellins and phytoalexins. While many OsKSL genes have been functionally characterized, the functionality of OsKSL2 is still unclear and it has been proposed to be a pseudogene. Here, we found that OsKSL2 is drastically induced in roots by methyl jasmonate treatment and we successfully isolated a full-length cDNA for OsKSL2. Sequence analysis of the OsKSL2 cDNA revealed that the open reading frame of OsKSL2 is mispredicted in the two major rice genome databases, IRGSP-RAP and MSU-RGAP. In vitro conversion assay indicated that recombinant OsKSL2 catalyzes the cyclization of ent-CDP into ent-beyerene as a major and ent-kaurene as a minor product. ent-Beyerene is an antimicrobial compound and OsKSL2 is induced by methyl jasmonate; these data suggest that OsKSL2 is a functional ent-beyerene synthase that is involved in defense mechanisms in rice roots.

  5. Genome sequence of Pseudomonas parafulva CRS01-1, an antagonistic bacterium isolated from rice field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qunen; Zhang, Yingxin; Yu, Ning; Bi, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Aike; Zhan, Xiaodeng; Wu, Weixun; Yu, Ping; Chen, Daibo; Cheng, Shihua; Cao, Liyong

    2015-07-20

    Pseudomonas parafulva (formerly known as Pseudomonas fulva) is an antagonistic bacterium against several rice bacterial and fungal diseases. The total genome size of P. parafulva CRS01-1 is 5,087,619 bp with 4389 coding sequences (CDSs), 77 tRNAs, and 7 rRNAs. The annotated full genome sequence of the P. parafulva CRS01-1 strain might shed light on its role as an antagonistic bacterium.

  6. Genome-wide generation and use of informative intron-spanning and intron-length polymorphism markers for high-throughput genetic analysis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Badoni, Saurabh; Das, Sweta; Sayal, Yogesh K.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Singh, Ashok K.; Rao, Atmakuri R.; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup K.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    We developed genome-wide 84634 ISM (intron-spanning marker) and 16510 InDel-fragment length polymorphism-based ILP (intron-length polymorphism) markers from genes physically mapped on 12 rice chromosomes. These genic markers revealed much higher amplification-efficiency (80%) and polymorphic-potential (66%) among rice accessions even by a cost-effective agarose gel-based assay. A wider level of functional molecular diversity (17–79%) and well-defined precise admixed genetic structure was assayed by 3052 genome-wide markers in a structured population of indica, japonica, aromatic and wild rice. Six major grain weight QTLs (11.9–21.6% phenotypic variation explained) were mapped on five rice chromosomes of a high-density (inter-marker distance: 0.98 cM) genetic linkage map (IR 64 x Sonasal) anchored with 2785 known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers. The designing of multiple ISM and ILP markers (2 to 4 markers/gene) in an individual gene will broaden the user-preference to select suitable primer combination for efficient assaying of functional allelic variation/diversity and realistic estimation of differential gene expression profiles among rice accessions. The genomic information generated in our study is made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web-resource, “Oryza ISM-ILP marker” database. The known/candidate gene-derived ISM and ILP markers can be enormously deployed to identify functionally relevant trait-associated molecular tags by optimal-resource expenses, leading towards genomics-assisted crop improvement in rice. PMID:27032371

  7. Whole genome sequencing of elite rice cultivars as a comprehensive information resource for marker assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current advances in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics allow to determine a nearly complete genomic background of rice, a staple food for the poor people. Consequently, comprehensive databases of variation among thousands of varieties is currently being assembled and released. Proper analysi...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3

    PubMed Central

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Studholme, David J.; Passos da Silva, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3. PMID:24994800

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Beneficial Rice Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Gordana; Bertani, Iris; Kojic, Milan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H; Studholme, David J; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-07-03

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 is a rhizosphere-colonizing and plant growth-promoting strain isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. This strain has, however, been shown to be pathogenic in two nonmammalian infection models. Here we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa PUPa3.

  10. A genome-wide SNP panel for genetic diversity, mapping and breeding studies in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide SNP resource was developed for rice using the GoldenGate assay and used to genotype 400 landrace accessions of O. sativa. SNPs were originally discovered using Perlegen re-sequencing technology in 20 diverse landraces of O. sativa as part of OryzaSNP project (http://irfgc.irri.org). An...

  11. Unlocking the variation hidden in rice germplasm collections with genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) was domesticated from O. rufipogon (O. nivara). The O. sativa subspecies indica and japonica diverged in ancient times, and based on DNA markers, further subdivided into the five major subpopulations, aus, indica, aromatic, tropical japonica and temperate japoni...

  12. Genomic Selection and Association Mapping in Rice (Oryza sativa): Effect of Trait Genetic Architecture, Training Population Composition, Marker Number and Statistical Model on Accuracy of Rice Genomic Selection in Elite, Tropical Rice Breeding Lines

    PubMed Central

    Spindel, Jennifer; Begum, Hasina; Akdemir, Deniz; Virk, Parminder; Collard, Bertrand; Redoña, Edilberto; Atlin, Gary; Jannink, Jean-Luc; McCouch, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic Selection (GS) is a new breeding method in which genome-wide markers are used to predict the breeding value of individuals in a breeding population. GS has been shown to improve breeding efficiency in dairy cattle and several crop plant species, and here we evaluate for the first time its efficacy for breeding inbred lines of rice. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in conjunction with five-fold GS cross-validation on a population of 363 elite breeding lines from the International Rice Research Institute's (IRRI) irrigated rice breeding program and herein report the GS results. The population was genotyped with 73,147 markers using genotyping-by-sequencing. The training population, statistical method used to build the GS model, number of markers, and trait were varied to determine their effect on prediction accuracy. For all three traits, genomic prediction models outperformed prediction based on pedigree records alone. Prediction accuracies ranged from 0.31 and 0.34 for grain yield and plant height to 0.63 for flowering time. Analyses using subsets of the full marker set suggest that using one marker every 0.2 cM is sufficient for genomic selection in this collection of rice breeding materials. RR-BLUP was the best performing statistical method for grain yield where no large effect QTL were detected by GWAS, while for flowering time, where a single very large effect QTL was detected, the non-GS multiple linear regression method outperformed GS models. For plant height, in which four mid-sized QTL were identified by GWAS, random forest produced the most consistently accurate GS models. Our results suggest that GS, informed by GWAS interpretations of genetic architecture and population structure, could become an effective tool for increasing the efficiency of rice breeding as the costs of genotyping continue to decline. PMID:25689273

  13. Genomic selection and association mapping in rice (Oryza sativa): effect of trait genetic architecture, training population composition, marker number and statistical model on accuracy of rice genomic selection in elite, tropical rice breeding lines.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Jennifer; Begum, Hasina; Akdemir, Deniz; Virk, Parminder; Collard, Bertrand; Redoña, Edilberto; Atlin, Gary; Jannink, Jean-Luc; McCouch, Susan R

    2015-02-01

    Genomic Selection (GS) is a new breeding method in which genome-wide markers are used to predict the breeding value of individuals in a breeding population. GS has been shown to improve breeding efficiency in dairy cattle and several crop plant species, and here we evaluate for the first time its efficacy for breeding inbred lines of rice. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in conjunction with five-fold GS cross-validation on a population of 363 elite breeding lines from the International Rice Research Institute's (IRRI) irrigated rice breeding program and herein report the GS results. The population was genotyped with 73,147 markers using genotyping-by-sequencing. The training population, statistical method used to build the GS model, number of markers, and trait were varied to determine their effect on prediction accuracy. For all three traits, genomic prediction models outperformed prediction based on pedigree records alone. Prediction accuracies ranged from 0.31 and 0.34 for grain yield and plant height to 0.63 for flowering time. Analyses using subsets of the full marker set suggest that using one marker every 0.2 cM is sufficient for genomic selection in this collection of rice breeding materials. RR-BLUP was the best performing statistical method for grain yield where no large effect QTL were detected by GWAS, while for flowering time, where a single very large effect QTL was detected, the non-GS multiple linear regression method outperformed GS models. For plant height, in which four mid-sized QTL were identified by GWAS, random forest produced the most consistently accurate GS models. Our results suggest that GS, informed by GWAS interpretations of genetic architecture and population structure, could become an effective tool for increasing the efficiency of rice breeding as the costs of genotyping continue to decline.

  14. Biallelic and Genome Wide Association Mapping of Germanium Tolerant Loci in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Partha; Douglas, Alex; Price, Adam H; Norton, Gareth J

    2015-01-01

    Rice plants accumulate high concentrations of silicon. Silicon has been shown to be involved in plant growth, high yield, and mitigating biotic and abiotic stresses. However, it has been demonstrated that inorganic arsenic is taken up by rice through silicon transporters under anaerobic conditions, thus the ability to efficiently take up silicon may be considered either a positive or a negative trait in rice. Germanium is an analogue of silicon that produces brown lesions in shoots and leaves, and germanium toxicity has been used to identify mutants in silicon and arsenic transport. In this study, two different genetic mapping methods were performed to determine the loci involved in germanium sensitivity in rice. Genetic mapping in the biparental cross of Bala × Azucena (an F6 population) and a genome wide association (GWA) study with 350 accessions from the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were conducted using 15 μM of germanic acid. This identified a number of germanium sensitive loci: some co-localised with previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for tissue silicon or arsenic concentration, none co-localised with Lsi1 or Lsi6, while one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was detected within 200 kb of Lsi2 (these are genes known to transport silicon, whose identity was discovered using germanium toxicity). However, examining candidate genes that are within the genomic region of the loci detected above reveals genes homologous to both Lsi1 and Lsi2, as well as a number of other candidate genes, which are discussed.

  15. Gene Chips and Functional Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadeh, Hisham; Afshari, Cynthia

    2000-11-01

    These past few years of scientific discovery will undoubtedly be remembered as the "genomics era," the period in which biologists succeeded in enumerating the sequence of nucleotides making up all, or at least most, of human DNA. And while this achievement has been heralded as a technological feat equal to the moon landing, it is only the first of many advances in DNA technology. Scientists are now faced with the task of understanding the meaning of the DNA sequence. Specifically, they want to learn how the DNA code relates to protein function. An important tool in the study of "functional genomics," is the cDNA microarray—also known as the gene chip. Inspired by computer microchips, gene chips allow scientists to monitor the expression of hundreds, even thousands, of genes in a fraction of the time it used to take to monitor the expression of a single one. By altering the conditions under which a particular tissue expresses genes—say, by exposing it to toxins or growth factors—scientists can determine the suite of genes expressed in different situations and hence start to get a handle on the function of these genes. The authors discuss this important new technology and some of its practical applications.

  16. Space environment induced mutations prefer to occur at polymorphic sites of rice genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Liu, M.; Cheng, Z.; Sun, Y.

    To explore the genomic characteristics of rice mutants induced by space environment, space-induced mutants 971-5, 972-4, and R955, which acquired new traits after space flight such as increased yield, reduced resistance to rice blast, and semi-dwarfism compared with their on-ground controls, 971ck, 972ck, and Bing95-503, respectively, together with other 8 japonica and 3 indica rice varieties, 17 in total, were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. We chose 16 AFLP primer-pairs which generated a total of 1251 sites, of which 745 (59.6%) were polymorphic over all the genotypes. With the 16 pairs of primer combinations, 54 space-induced mutation sites were observed in 971-5, 86 in 972-4, and 5 in R955 compared to their controls, and the mutation rates were 4.3%, 6.9% and 0.4%, respectively. Interestingly, 75.9%, 84.9% and 100% of the mutation sites identified in 971-5, 972-4, and R955 occurred in polymorphic sites. This result suggests that the space environment preferentially induced mutations at polymorphic sites in rice genomes and might share a common mechanism with other types of mutagens. It also implies that polymorphic sites in genomes are potential "hotspots" for mutations induced by the space environment.

  17. A simplified genomic DNA extraction protocol for pre-germination genotyping in rice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y B; Zhao, F L; Chen, H D; Li, H; Ni, D H; Wei, P C; Sheng, W; Teng, J T; Zhang, A M; Xue, J P

    2015-06-11

    Genotyping is a critical step for molecular marker-assisted selection in rice. Rice genomic DNA samples for genotyping are typically isolated from living tissues such as seedlings. This requires the germination of all candidate seeds and extraction of DNA from the seedlings. Currently, an ideal individual is selected from a very large number of plants, which is time- and labor-consuming, requiring several transplantations of materials and sampling processes. In this study, we developed a simplified genomic DNA extraction protocol in rice by using amylase to treat half-seeds. The yields of genomic DNA from a half-seed of Indica and Japonica rice were greater than 203.8 ± 32.5 and 143.2 ± 25.5 ng, respectively, and the 260/280 nm absorbance ratio was 1.75-2.10. The DNA was confirmed to be sufficient for polymerase chain reaction amplification and can be used in a marker-assisted selection program.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of glutathione reductase (GR) genes from rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Yadav, Sandep; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-02-01

    Plant cells and tissues remain always on risk under abiotic and biotic stresses due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants protect themselves against ROS induced oxidative damage by the upregulation of antioxidant machinery. Out of many components of antioxidant machinery, glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and glutathione (GSH, γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) play important role in the protection of cell against oxidative damage. In stress condition, the GR helps in maintaining the reduced glutathione pool for strengthening the antioxidative processes in plants. Present study investigates genome wide analysis of GR from rice and Arabidopsis. We were able to identify 3 rice GR genes (LOC_Os02 g56850, LOC_Os03 g06740, LOC_Os10 g28000) and 2 Arabidopsis GR genes (AT3G54660, AT3G24170) from their respective genomes on the basis of their annotation as well as the presence of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site. The evolutionary relationship of the GR genes from rice and Arabidopsis genomes was analyzed using the multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. This revealed evolutionary conserved pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site among the GR protein in rice and Arabidopsis. This study should make an important contribution to our better understanding of the GR under normal and stress condition in plants.

  19. Genome-wide association of rice blast disease resistance and yield-related components of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Robust disease resistance may require an expenditure of energy that may limit crop yield potential. In the present study, a subset of a USDA rice core collection consisting of 151 accessions was selected using a major blast resistance (R) gene Pi-ta marker, and was genotyped with 156 simple sequence...

  20. New Candidate Genes Affecting Rice Grain Appearance and Milling Quality Detected by Genome-Wide and Gene-Based Association Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqian; Pang, Yunlong; Wang, Chunchao; Chen, Kai; Zhu, Yajun; Shen, Congcong; Ali, Jauhar; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Zhikang

    2016-01-01

    Appearance and milling quality are two crucial properties of rice grains affecting its market acceptability. Understanding the genetic base of rice grain quality could considerably improve the high quality breeding. Here, we carried out an association analysis to identify QTL affecting nine rice grain appearance and milling quality traits using a diverse panel of 258 accessions selected from 3K Rice Genome Project and evaluated in two environments Sanya and Shenzhen. Genome-wide association analyses using 22,488 high quality SNPs identified 72 QTL affecting the nine traits. Combined gene-based association and haplotype analyses plus functional annotation allowed us to shortlist 19 candidate genes for seven important QTL regions affecting the grain quality traits, including two cloned genes (GS3 and TUD), two fine mapped QTL (qGRL7.1 and qPGWC7) and three newly identified QTL (qGL3.4, qGW1.1, and qGW10.2). The most likely candidate gene(s) for each important QTL were also discussed. This research demonstrated the superior power to shortlist candidate genes affecting complex phenotypes by the strategy of combined GWAS, gene-based association and haplotype analyses. The identified candidate genes provided valuable sources for future functional characterization and genetic improvement of rice appearance and milling quality.

  1. New Candidate Genes Affecting Rice Grain Appearance and Milling Quality Detected by Genome-Wide and Gene-Based Association Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqian; Pang, Yunlong; Wang, Chunchao; Chen, Kai; Zhu, Yajun; Shen, Congcong; Ali, Jauhar; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Zhikang

    2017-01-01

    Appearance and milling quality are two crucial properties of rice grains affecting its market acceptability. Understanding the genetic base of rice grain quality could considerably improve the high quality breeding. Here, we carried out an association analysis to identify QTL affecting nine rice grain appearance and milling quality traits using a diverse panel of 258 accessions selected from 3K Rice Genome Project and evaluated in two environments Sanya and Shenzhen. Genome-wide association analyses using 22,488 high quality SNPs identified 72 QTL affecting the nine traits. Combined gene-based association and haplotype analyses plus functional annotation allowed us to shortlist 19 candidate genes for seven important QTL regions affecting the grain quality traits, including two cloned genes (GS3 and TUD), two fine mapped QTL (qGRL7.1 and qPGWC7) and three newly identified QTL (qGL3.4, qGW1.1, and qGW10.2). The most likely candidate gene(s) for each important QTL were also discussed. This research demonstrated the superior power to shortlist candidate genes affecting complex phenotypes by the strategy of combined GWAS, gene-based association and haplotype analyses. The identified candidate genes provided valuable sources for future functional characterization and genetic improvement of rice appearance and milling quality. PMID:28101096

  2. Multifunctionality and diversity of GDSL esterase/lipase gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L. japonica) genome: new insights from bioinformatics analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background GDSL esterases/lipases are a newly discovered subclass of lipolytic enzymes that are very important and attractive research subjects because of their multifunctional properties, such as broad substrate specificity and regiospecificity. Compared with the current knowledge regarding these enzymes in bacteria, our understanding of the plant GDSL enzymes is very limited, although the GDSL gene family in plant species include numerous members in many fully sequenced plant genomes. Only two genes from a large rice GDSL esterase/lipase gene family were previously characterised, and the majority of the members remain unknown. In the present study, we describe the rice OsGELP (Oryza sativa GDSL esterase/lipase protein) gene family at the genomic and proteomic levels, and use this knowledge to provide insights into the multifunctionality of the rice OsGELP enzymes. Results In this study, an extensive bioinformatics analysis identified 114 genes in the rice OsGELP gene family. A complete overview of this family in rice is presented, including the chromosome locations, gene structures, phylogeny, and protein motifs. Among the OsGELPs and the plant GDSL esterase/lipase proteins of known functions, 41 motifs were found that represent the core secondary structure elements or appear specifically in different phylogenetic subclades. The specification and distribution of identified putative conserved clade-common and -specific peptide motifs, and their location on the predicted protein three dimensional structure may possibly signify their functional roles. Potentially important regions for substrate specificity are highlighted, in accordance with protein three-dimensional model and location of the phylogenetic specific conserved motifs. The differential expression of some representative genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. The phylogenetic analysis, together with protein motif architectures, and the expression profiling were analysed to predict the

  3. A BAC based physical map and genome survey of the rice false smut fungus Villosiclava virens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice false smut caused by Villosiclava virens is a devastating fungal disease that spreads in major rice-growing regions throughout the world. However, the genomic information for this fungal pathogen is limited and the pathogenic mechanism of this disease is still not clear. To facilitate genetic, molecular and genomic studies of this fungal pathogen, we constructed the first BAC-based physical map and performed the first genome survey for this species. Results High molecular weight genomic DNA was isolated from young mycelia of the Villosiclava virens strain UV-8b and a high-quality, large-insert and deep-coverage Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library was constructed with the restriction enzyme HindIII. The BAC library consisted of 5,760 clones, which covers 22.7-fold of the UV-8b genome, with an average insert size of 140 kb and an empty clone rate of lower than 1%. BAC fingerprinting generated successful fingerprints for 2,290 BAC clones. Using the fingerprints, a whole genome-wide BAC physical map was constructed that contained 194 contigs (2,035 clones) spanning 51.2 Mb in physical length. Bidirectional-end sequencing of 4,512 BAC clones generated 6,560 high quality BAC end sequences (BESs), with a total length of 3,030,658 bp, representing 8.54% of the genome sequence. Analysis of the BESs revealed general genome information, including 51.52% GC content, 22.51% repetitive sequences, 376.12/Mb simple sequence repeat (SSR) density and approximately 36.01% coding regions. Sequence comparisons to other available fungal genome sequences through BESs showed high similarities to Metarhizium anisopliae, Trichoderma reesei, Nectria haematococca and Cordyceps militaris, which were generally in agreement with the 18S rRNA gene analysis results. Conclusion This study provides the first BAC-based physical map and genome information for the important rice fungal pathogen Villosiclava virens. The BAC clones, physical map and genome information will

  4. Evolution, language and analogy in functional genomics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, S. A.; Gaucher, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Almost a century ago, Wittgenstein pointed out that theory in science is intricately connected to language. This connection is not a frequent topic in the genomics literature. But a case can be made that functional genomics is today hindered by the paradoxes that Wittgenstein identified. If this is true, until these paradoxes are recognized and addressed, functional genomics will continue to be limited in its ability to extrapolate information from genomic sequences.

  5. Evolution, language and analogy in functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Benner, S A; Gaucher, E A

    2001-07-01

    Almost a century ago, Wittgenstein pointed out that theory in science is intricately connected to language. This connection is not a frequent topic in the genomics literature. But a case can be made that functional genomics is today hindered by the paradoxes that Wittgenstein identified. If this is true, until these paradoxes are recognized and addressed, functional genomics will continue to be limited in its ability to extrapolate information from genomic sequences.

  6. Genic non-coding microsatellites in the rice genome: characterization, marker design and use in assessing genetic and evolutionary relationships among domesticated groups

    PubMed Central

    Parida, Swarup Kumar; Dalal, Vivek; Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Nagendra Kumar; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2009-01-01

    (0.006 Mya) and long-grained aromatics from subspecies indica (0.014 Mya). Conclusion Our analyses showed that GNMS markers with their high polymorphic potential would be preferred candidate functional markers in various marker-based applications in rice genetics, genomics and breeding. The CNMS markers provided encouraging implications for their use in comparative genome mapping and understanding of evolutionary complexities in rice and other members of grass family. PMID:19335879

  7. Construction and utility of 10-kb libraries for efficient clone-gap closure for rice genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae-Jin; Yu, Yeisoo; Nah, Gyoungju; Atkins, Michael; Lee, Seunghee; Frisch, David A; Wing, Rod A

    2003-08-01

    Rice is an important crop and a model system for monocot genomics, and is a target for whole genome sequencing by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP). The IRGSP is using a clone by clone approach to sequence rice based on minimum tiles of BAC or PAC clones. For chromosomes 10 and 3 we are using an integrated physical map based on two fingerprinted and end-sequenced BAC libraries to identifying a minimum tiling path of clones. In this study we constructed and tested two rice genomic libraries with an average insert size of 10 kb (10-kb library) to support the gap closure and finishing phases of the rice genome sequencing project. The HaeIII library contains 166,752 clones covering approximately 4.6x rice genome equivalents with an average insert size of 10.5 kb. The Sau3AI library contains 138,960 clones covering 4.2x genome equivalents with an average insert size of 11.6 kb. Both libraries were gridded in duplicate onto 11 high-density filters in a 5 x 5 pattern to facilitate screening by hybridization. The libraries contain an unbiased coverage of the rice genome with less than 5% contamination by clones containing organelle DNA or no insert. An efficient method was developed, consisting of pooled overgo hybridization, the selection of 10-kb gap spanning clones using end sequences, transposon sequencing and utilization of in silico draft sequence, to close relatively small gaps between sequenced BAC clones. Using this method we were able to close a majority of the gaps (up to approximately 50 kb) identified during the finishing phase of chromosome-10 sequencing. This method represents a useful way to close clone gaps and thus to complete the entire rice genome.

  8. Extensive sequence divergence between the reference genomes of two elite indica rice varieties Zhenshan 97 and Minghui 63

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Ling-Ling; Xing, Feng; Kudrna, David A.; Yao, Wen; Copetti, Dario; Mu, Ting; Li, Weiming; Song, Jia-Ming; Lee, Seunghee; Talag, Jayson; Shao, Lin; An, Yue; Zhang, Chun-Liu; Ouyang, Yidan; Sun, Shuai; Jiao, Wen-Biao; Lv, Fang; Du, Bogu; Luo, Meizhong; Maldonado, Carlos Ernesto; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Xiong, Lizhong; Wu, Changyin; Xing, Yongzhong; Zhou, Dao-Xiu; Yu, Sibin; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Gongwei; Yu, Yeisoo; Luo, Yijie; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Hurtado, Beatriz Elena Padilla; Danowitz, Ann; Wing, Rod A.; Zhang, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    Asian cultivated rice consists of two subspecies: Oryza sativa subsp. indica and O. sativa subsp. japonica. Despite the fact that indica rice accounts for over 70% of total rice production worldwide and is genetically much more diverse, a high-quality reference genome for indica rice has yet to be published. We conducted map-based sequencing of two indica rice lines, Zhenshan 97 (ZS97) and Minghui 63 (MH63), which represent the two major varietal groups of the indica subspecies and are the parents of an elite Chinese hybrid. The genome sequences were assembled into 237 (ZS97) and 181 (MH63) contigs, with an accuracy >99.99%, and covered 90.6% and 93.2% of their estimated genome sizes. Comparative analyses of these two indica genomes uncovered surprising structural differences, especially with respect to inversions, translocations, presence/absence variations, and segmental duplications. Approximately 42% of nontransposable element related genes were identical between the two genomes. Transcriptome analysis of three tissues showed that 1,059–2,217 more genes were expressed in the hybrid than in the parents and that the expressed genes in the hybrid were much more diverse due to their divergence between the parental genomes. The public availability of two high-quality reference genomes for the indica subspecies of rice will have large-ranging implications for plant biology and crop genetic improvement. PMID:27535938

  9. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning is orchestrated by genomic regions associated with DNase I hypersensitivity in rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2014-05-01

    Nucleosome positioning dictates the DNA accessibility for regulatory proteins, and thus is critical for gene expression and regulation. It has been well documented that only a subset of nucleosomes are reproducibly positioned in eukaryotic genomes. The most prominent example of phased nucleosomes is the context of genes, where phased nucleosomes flank the transcriptional starts sites (TSSs). It is unclear, however, what factors determine nucleosome positioning in regions that are not close to genes. We mapped both nucleosome positioning and DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) datasets across the rice genome. We discovered that DHSs located in a variety of contexts, both genic and intergenic, were flanked by strongly phased nucleosome arrays. Phased nucleosomes were also found to flank DHSs in the human genome. Our results suggest the barrier model may represent a general feature of nucleosome organization in eukaryote genomes. Specifically, regions bound with regulatory proteins, including intergenic regions, can serve as barriers that organize phased nucleosome arrays on both sides. Our results also suggest that rice DHSs often span a single, phased nucleosome, similar to the H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes observed in DHSs in the human genome.

  10. Genome-Wide Identification, Phylogenetic and Co-Expression Analysis of OsSET Gene Family in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhanhua; Huang, Xiaolong; Ouyang, Yidan; Yao, Jialing

    2013-01-01

    Background SET domain is responsible for the catalytic activity of histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) during developmental process. Histone lysine methylation plays a crucial and diverse regulatory function in chromatin organization and genome function. Although several SET genes have been identified and characterized in plants, the understanding of OsSET gene family in rice is still very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a systematic analysis was performed and revealed the presence of at least 43 SET genes in rice genome. Phylogenetic and structural analysis grouped SET proteins into five classes, and supposed that the domains out of SET domain were significant for the specific of histone lysine methylation, as well as the recognition of methylated histone lysine. Based on the global microarray, gene expression profile revealed that the transcripts of OsSET genes were accumulated differentially during vegetative and reproductive developmental stages and preferentially up or down-regulated in different tissues. Cis-elements identification, co-expression analysis and GO analysis of expression correlation of 12 OsSET genes suggested that OsSET genes might be involved in cell cycle regulation and feedback. Conclusions/Significance This study will facilitate further studies on OsSET family and provide useful clues for functional validation of OsSETs. PMID:23762371

  11. Promises and challenges of genomics for rice pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Publically available genome sequences of Magnaporthe oryzae, Rhizoctonia solani, and Oryza sativa are being used to study host-pathogen interactions. Comparative genomic analyses on natural alleles of major resistance (R) genes and the corresponding avirulence (AVR) genes have provided new clues for...

  12. Open access resources for genome-wide association mapping in rice

    PubMed Central

    McCouch, Susan R.; Wright, Mark H.; Tung, Chih-Wei; Maron, Lyza G.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Fitzgerald, Melissa; Singh, Namrata; DeClerck, Genevieve; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Korniliev, Pavel; Greenberg, Anthony J.; Naredo, Ma. Elizabeth B.; Mercado, Sheila Mae Q.; Harrington, Sandra E.; Shi, Yuxin; Branchini, Darcy A.; Kuser-Falcão, Paula R.; Leung, Hei; Ebana, Kowaru; Yano, Masahiro; Eizenga, Georgia; McClung, Anna; Mezey, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the demands of a growing human population, with its rising income levels and nutritional expectations. To address the demand, plant breeders seek new sources of genetic variation to enhance the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crop varieties. Here we launch a high-resolution, open-access research platform to facilitate genome-wide association mapping in rice, a staple food crop. The platform provides an immortal collection of diverse germplasm, a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism data set tailored for gene discovery, well-documented analytical strategies, and a suite of bioinformatics resources to facilitate biological interpretation. Using grain length, we demonstrate the power and resolution of our new high-density rice array, the accompanying genotypic data set, and an expanded diversity panel for detecting major and minor effect QTLs and subpopulation-specific alleles, with immediate implications for rice improvement. PMID:26842267

  13. The accumulation of deleterious mutations in rice genomes: a hypothesis on the cost of domestication.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Tang, Tian; Tang, Hua; Huang, Jianzi; Shi, Suhua; Wu, Chung-I

    2006-03-01

    The extent of molecular differentiation between domesticated animals or plants and their wild relatives is postulated to be small. The availability of the complete genome sequences of two subspecies of the Asian rice, Oryza sativa (indica and japonica) and their wild relatives have provided an unprecedented opportunity to study divergence following domestication. We observed significantly more amino acid substitutions during rice domestication than can be expected from a comparison among wild species. This excess is disproportionately larger for the more radical kinds of amino acid changes (e.g. Cys<-->Tyr). We estimate that approximately a quarter of the amino acid differences between rice cultivars are deleterious, not accountable by the relaxation of selective constraints. This excess is negatively correlated with the rate of recombination, suggesting that 'hitchhiking' has occurred. We hypothesize that during domestication artificial selection increased the frequency of many deleterious mutations.

  14. Genome-wide DNA polymorphisms in Kavuni, a traditional rice cultivar with nutritional and therapeutic properties.

    PubMed

    Rathinasabapathi, Pasupathi; Purushothaman, Natarajan; Parani, Madasamy

    2016-05-01

    Although rice genome was sequenced in the year 2002, efforts in resequencing the large number of available accessions, landraces, traditional cultivars, and improved varieties of this important food crop are limited. We have initiated resequencing of the traditional cultivars from India. Kavuni is an important traditional rice cultivar from South India that attracts premium price for its nutritional and therapeutic properties. Whole-genome sequencing of Kavuni using Illumina platform and SNPs analysis using Nipponbare reference genome identified 1 150 711 SNPs of which 377 381 SNPs were located in the genic regions. Non-synonymous SNPs (62 708) were distributed in 19 251 genes, and their number varied between 1 and 115 per gene. Large-effect DNA polymorphisms (7769) were present in 3475 genes. Pathway mapping of these polymorphisms revealed the involvement of genes related to carbohydrate metabolism, translation, protein-folding, and cell death. Analysis of the starch biosynthesis related genes revealed that the granule-bound starch synthase I gene had T/G SNPs at the first intron/exon junction and a two-nucleotide combination, which were reported to favour high amylose content and low glycemic index. The present study provided a valuable genomics resource to study the rice varieties with nutritional and medicinal properties.

  15. Relationships among Genetic, Structural, and Functional Properties of Rice Starch.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangli; Chen, Yaling; Zhu, Ping; Sui, Zhongquan; Corke, Harold; Bao, Jinsong

    2015-07-15

    We determined the relationships among the structural properties, in vitro digestibility, and genetic factors in starches of 14 rice cultivars. Weight-based chain-length distributions in amylopectin ranged from 18.07% to 24.71% (fa, DP 6-12), 45.01% to 55.67% (fb1, DP 13-24), 12.72% to 14.05% (fb2, DP 25-36), and 10.80 to 20.72% (fb3, DP > 36), respectively. The contents of rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) ranged from 78.5% to 87.5%, 1.2% to 6.0%, and 10.1% to 18.0%, respectively. AAC was negatively correlated with RDS content but positively correlated with RS content in rice starch. The proportion of short chains in amylopectin, i.e. the amount of fraction IIa (FrIIa) fractionated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), was positively correlated with RDS. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) gene controlled the degree of crystallinity, the amount of fa chains of amylopectin. SSIIIa gene controlled the amount of fb1 chains. Wx gene controlled the FrI, FrIIa, RDS, and RS. Starch debranching enzyme isoamylase II (ISA2) gene also controlled the RDS, which may suggest that RDS was also affected by amylopectin structure, although no correlation between them was found. This study indicated that genetics (i.e., starch biosynthesis related genes) controlled the structural properties of starch, and both amylose content and amylopectin fine structure determined functional properties of rice starch (i.e., the digestion), each in a different way. Understanding the "genetics-structure-function" relationships in rice starches will assist plant breeders and food processors in developing new rice varieties and functional foods.

  16. Development and Evaluation of Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines Carrying Overlapping Chromosome Segments of the Whole Wild Rice Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dewei; Ye, Xinfu; Zheng, Xianghua; Cheng, Chaoping; Ye, Ning; Huang, Fenghuang

    2016-01-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) represents an important resource for rice improvement. Genetic populations provide the basis for a wide range of genetic and genomic studies. In particular, chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) are most powerful tools for the detection and precise mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). In this study, 146 CSSLs were produced; they were derived from the crossing and back-crossing of two rice cultivars: Dongnanihui 810 (Oryza sativa L.), an indica rice cultivar as the recipient, and ZhangPu wild rice, a wild rice cultivar as the donor. First, a physical map of the 146 CSSLs was constructed using 149 molecular markers. Based on this map, the total size of the 147 substituted segments in the population was 1145.65 Mb, or 3.04 times that of the rice genome. To further facilitate gene mapping, heterozygous chromosome segment substitution lines (HCSSLs) were also produced, which were heterozygous in the target regions. Second, a physical map of the 244 HCSSLs was produced using 149 molecular markers. Based on this map, the total length of substituted segments in the HCSSLs was 1683.75 Mb, or 4.47 times the total length of the rice genome. Third, using the 146 CSSLs, two QTLs for plant height, and one major QTL for apiculus coloration were identified. Using the two populations of HCSSLs, the qPa-6-2 gene was precisely mapped to an 88 kb region. These CSSLs and HCSSLs may, therefore, provide powerful tools for future whole genome large-scale gene discovery in wild rice, providing a foundation enabling the development of new rice varieties. This research will also facilitate fine mapping and cloning of quantitative trait genes, providing for the development of superior rice varieties. PMID:27933072

  17. QTL Mapping in Three Rice Populations Uncovers Major Genomic Regions Associated with African Rice Gall Midge Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Semagn, Kassa; Sow, Mounirou; Nwilene, Francis; Kolade, Olufisayo; Bocco, Roland; Oyetunji, Olumoye; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    African rice gall midge (AfRGM) is one of the most destructive pests of irrigated and lowland African ecologies. This study aimed to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with AfRGM pest incidence and resistance in three independent bi-parental rice populations (ITA306xBW348-1, ITA306xTOG7106 and ITA306xTOS14519), and to conduct meta QTL (mQTL) analysis to explore whether any genomic regions are conserved across different genetic backgrounds. Composite interval mapping (CIM) conducted on the three populations independently uncovered a total of 28 QTLs associated with pest incidence (12) and pest severity (16). The number of QTLs per population associated with AfRGM resistance varied from three in the ITA306xBW348-1 population to eight in the ITA306xTOG7106 population. Each QTL individually explained 1.3 to 34.1% of the phenotypic variance. The major genomic region for AfRGM resistance had a LOD score and R2 of 60.0 and 34.1% respectively, and mapped at 111 cM on chromosome 4 (qAfrGM4) in the ITA306xTOS14519 population. The meta-analysis reduced the number of QTLs from 28 to 17 mQTLs, each explaining 1.3 to 24.5% of phenotypic variance, and narrowed the confidence intervals by 2.2 cM. There was only one minor effect mQTL on chromosome 1 that was common in the TOS14519 and TOG7106 genetic backgrounds; all other mQTLs were background specific. We are currently fine-mapping and validating the major effect genomic region on chromosome 4 (qAfRGM4). This is the first report in mapping the genomic regions associated with the AfRGM resistance, and will be highly useful for rice breeders. PMID:27508500

  18. Selection Under Domestication: Evidence for a Sweep in the Rice Waxy Genomic Region

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Kenneth M.; Caicedo, Ana L.; Polato, Nicholas; McClung, Anna; McCouch, Susan; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) was cultivated by Asian Neolithic farmers >11,000 years ago, and different cultures have selected for divergent starch qualities in the rice grain during and after the domestication process. An intron 1 splice donor site mutation of the Waxy gene is responsible for the absence of amylose in glutinous rice varieties. This mutation appears to have also played an important role in the origin of low amylose, nonglutinous temperate japonica rice varieties, which form a primary component of Northeast Asian cuisines. Waxy DNA sequence analyses indicate that the splice donor mutation is prevalent in temperate japonica rice varieties, but rare or absent in tropical japonica, indica, aus, and aromatic varieties. Sequence analysis across a 500-kb genomic region centered on Waxy reveals patterns consistent with a selective sweep in the temperate japonicas associated with the mutation. The size of the selective sweep (>250 kb) indicates very strong selection in this region, with an inferred selection coefficient that is higher than similar estimates from maize domestication genes or wild species. These findings demonstrate that selection pressures associated with crop domestication regimes can exceed by one to two orders of magnitude those observed for genes under even strong selection in natural systems. PMID:16547098

  19. YAC cloning and identification of rice (Oriza sativa L.) genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Wang, J; Liu, W; Huang, W; Liu, L

    1996-01-01

    Construction of the genomic library by using yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) has been an approach to a map-based gene cloning strategy. We have obtained more than 2000 YAC clones for the construction of a rice (Oriza sativa L.) genomic library through a procedure that could be summarized as follows: a fractionate by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), the rice nucleic high molecular weight (HMW) DNA which is partially digested with EcoRI, and recovered fragments larger than 200 kb; ligate the fragments to the EcoRI digested YAC vector pairs pJS97 and pJS98; transform competent spheroplasts prepared from yeast strain YPH252; and select transformants directly on Ura-Trp-double selective media. Southern hybridization results indicated that the sizes of inserts were in the range of 200-820 kb.

  20. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Wild Rice (Oryza minuta) and Its Comparison to Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul L.; Khan, Muhammad A.; Kang, Sang-Mo; Imran, Qari M.; Shahzad, Raheem; Bilal, Saqib; Yun, Byung-Wook; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Oryza minuta, a tetraploid wild relative of cultivated rice (family Poaceae), possesses a BBCC genome and contains genes that confer resistance to bacterial blight (BB) and white-backed (WBPH) and brown (BPH) plant hoppers. Based on the importance of this wild species, this study aimed to understand the phylogenetic relationships of O. minuta with other Oryza species through an in-depth analysis of the composition and diversity of the chloroplast (cp) genome. The analysis revealed a cp genome size of 135,094 bp with a typical quadripartite structure and consisting of a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, 139 representative genes, and 419 randomly distributed microsatellites. The genomic organization, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to those of typical angiosperm cp genomes. Approximately 30 forward, 28 tandem and 20 palindromic repeats were detected in the O. minuta cp genome. Comparison of the complete O. minuta cp genome with another eleven Oryza species showed a high degree of sequence similarity and relatively high divergence of intergenic spacers. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted based on the complete genome sequence, 65 shared genes and matK gene showed same topologies and O. minuta forms a single clade with parental O. punctata. Thus, the complete O. minuta cp genome provides interesting insights and valuable information that can be used to identify related species and reconstruct its phylogeny. PMID:28326093

  1. Cre/ lox site-specific recombination controls the excision of a transgene from the rice genome.

    PubMed

    Hoa, T. T. C.; Bong, B. B.; Huq, E.; Hodges, T. K.

    2002-03-01

    The Cre/ lox site-specific recombination controls the excision of a target DNA segment by recombination between two loxsites flanking it, mediated by the Cre recombinase. We have studied the functional expression of the Cre/ lox system to excise a transgene from the rice genome. We developed transgenic plants carrying the target gene, hygromycin phosphotransferase ( hpt) flanked by two lox sites and transgenic plants harboring the Cre gene. Each lox plant was crossed with each Cre plant reciprocally. In the Cre /lox hybrid plants, the Cre recombinase mediates recombination between two lox sites, resulting in excision of the hpt gene. The recombination event could be detected because it places the CaMV 35S promoter of the hpt gene adjacent to a promoterless gusA gene; as a result the gusA gene is activated and its expression could be visualized. In 73 Cre /lox hybrid plants from various crosses of T0 transgenic plants, 19 expressed GUS, and in 132 Cre /lox hybrid plants from crosses of T2 transgenic plants, 77 showed GUS expression. Molecular data proved the excision event occurred in all the GUS(+) plants. Recombination occurred with high efficiency at the early germinal stage, or randomly during somatic development stages.

  2. Physicochemical and functional properties of yeast fermented brown rice flour.

    PubMed

    Ilowefah, Muna; Bakar, Jamilah; Ghazali, Hasanah M; Mediani, Ahmed; Muhammad, Kharidah

    2015-09-01

    In the current study, effects of fermentation on physicochemical and functional properties of brown rice flour (BRF) were investigated. Fermentation conditions were optimized using response surface methodology to achieve moderate acidity (pH 5-6), specifically pH 5.5 of brown rice batter with time, temperature and yeast concentration as the independent variables. The results indicated that brown rice batter was well fermented to maintain pH 5.5 at optimum conditions of 32 °C for 6.26 h using 1 % yeast concentration. Fermentation at moderate acidity significantly increased the levels of protein, total ash, insoluble fiber, soluble fibre, minerals, phenolics, antioxidants, resistant starch, riboflavin, pyridoxine, nicotinic acid, γ-tocotrienol, and δ-tocotrienol. However, it reduced the contents of γ-oryzanol, γ-tocopherol, α-tocopherol, phytic acid, amylose and total starch. Foaming capacity, foaming stability, oil holding capacity, gelatinization temperatures, enthalpy and whiteness of BRF were increased after fermentation. In contrast, its swelling power, water solubility index, hot paste viscosity, breakdown, and setback significantly decreased. Microstructure of BRF was also influenced, where its starch granules released from its enclosed structure after fermentation. This investigation shows evidence that yeast fermentation modified the functionality of BRF and can be used as a functional food ingredient.

  3. Functional Analysis of Jasmonates in Rice through Mutant Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dhakarey, Rohit; Kodackattumannil Peethambaran, Preshobha; Riemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid, one of the major plant hormones, is, unlike other hormones, a lipid-derived compound that is synthesized from the fatty acid linolenic acid. It has been studied intensively in many plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana, in which most of the enzymes participating in its biosynthesis were characterized. In the past 15 years, mutants and transgenic plants affected in the jasmonate pathway became available in rice and facilitate studies on the functions of this hormone in an important crop. Those functions are partially conserved compared to other plant species, and include roles in fertility, response to mechanical wounding and defense against herbivores. However, new and surprising functions have also been uncovered by mutant approaches, such as a close link between light perception and the jasmonate pathway. This was not only useful to show a phenomenon that is unique to rice but also helped to establish this role in plant species where such links are less obvious. This review aims to provide an overview of currently available rice mutants and transgenic plants in the jasmonate pathway and highlights some selected roles of jasmonate in this species, such as photomorphogenesis, and abiotic and biotic stress. PMID:27135235

  4. Rice epigenomics and epigenetics: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangsong; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2013-05-01

    During recent years rice genome-wide epigenomic information such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, which are important for genome activity has been accumulated. The function of a number of rice epigenetic regulators has been studied, many of which are found to be involved in a diverse range of developmental and stress-responsive pathways. Analysis of epigenetic variations among different rice varieties indicates that epigenetic modification may lead to inheritable phenotypic variation. Characterizing phenotypic consequences of rice epigenomic variations and the underlining chromatin mechanism and identifying epialleles related to important agronomic traits may provide novel strategies to enhance agronomically favorable traits and grain productivity in rice.

  5. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  6. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees and whole-genome-based data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. D.; Baldo, A. M.; Mueller, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining datasets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data and molecular marker fragment size data. Rice research has benefited from early adoption and extensive use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers; however, the majority of rice SSR markers were developed prior to the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. Interpretation of new research using SNPs in the context of literature citing SSRs requires a common coordinate system. A new pipeline, using a stepwise relaxation of stringency, was used to map SSR primers onto the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. The SSR markers and experimentally assayed amplicon sizes are presented in a relational database with a web-based front end, and are available as a track loaded in a genome browser with links connecting the browser and database. The combined capabilities of Ricebase link genetic markers, genome context, allele states across rice germplasm and potentially user curated phenotypic interpretations as a community resource for genetic discovery and breeding in rice. PMID:27515824

  7. Genome Sequence of Burkholderia plantarii ZJ171, a Tropolone-Producing Bacterial Pathogen Responsible for Rice Seedling Blight.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuan; Matsumoto, Haruna; Li, Wenzhuo; Zhu, Guonian; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Hu, Yang; Wang, Mengcen

    2016-12-08

    Burkholderia plantarii is the causal agent of rice seedling blight. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. plantarii, which contains 8,020,831 bp, with a G+C content of 68.66% and a predicted 7,688 coding sequences. The annotated genome sequence will provide further insight into its pathogenicity.

  8. Genome wide association study (GWAS) for grain yield in rice cultivated under water deficit.

    PubMed

    Pantalião, Gabriel Feresin; Narciso, Marcelo; Guimarães, Cléber; Castro, Adriano; Colombari, José Manoel; Breseghello, Flavio; Rodrigues, Luana; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Borba, Tereza Oliveira; Brondani, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    The identification of rice drought tolerant materials is crucial for the development of best performing cultivars for the upland cultivation system. This study aimed to identify markers and candidate genes associated with drought tolerance by Genome Wide Association Study analysis, in order to develop tools for use in rice breeding programs. This analysis was made with 175 upland rice accessions (Oryza sativa), evaluated in experiments with and without water restriction, and 150,325 SNPs. Thirteen SNP markers associated with yield under drought conditions were identified. Through stepwise regression analysis, eight SNP markers were selected and validated in silico, and when tested by PCR, two out of the eight SNP markers were able to identify a group of rice genotypes with higher productivity under drought. These results are encouraging for deriving markers for the routine analysis of marker assisted selection. From the drought experiment, including the genes inherited in linkage blocks, 50 genes were identified, from which 30 were annotated, and 10 were previously related to drought and/or abiotic stress tolerance, such as the transcription factors WRKY and Apetala2, and protein kinases.

  9. Rice Bran: Production, Composition, Functionality and Food Applications, Physiological Benefits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal and human studies show cholesterol-lowering with rice bran in hypercholesterolemic individuals. Specific rice bran fractions showing hypocholesterolemic activity include rice bran oil, unsaponifiable matter, dietary fiber and protein. There is a dose response to the level of rice bran and r...

  10. A Unified and Comprehensible View of Parametric and Kernel Methods for Genomic Prediction with Application to Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jacquin, Laval; Cao, Tuong-Vi; Ahmadi, Nourollah

    2016-01-01

    One objective of this study was to provide readers with a clear and unified understanding of parametric statistical and kernel methods, used for genomic prediction, and to compare some of these in the context of rice breeding for quantitative traits. Furthermore, another objective was to provide a simple and user-friendly R package, named KRMM, which allows users to perform RKHS regression with several kernels. After introducing the concept of regularized empirical risk minimization, the connections between well-known parametric and kernel methods such as Ridge regression [i.e., genomic best linear unbiased predictor (GBLUP)] and reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) regression were reviewed. Ridge regression was then reformulated so as to show and emphasize the advantage of the kernel “trick” concept, exploited by kernel methods in the context of epistatic genetic architectures, over parametric frameworks used by conventional methods. Some parametric and kernel methods; least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), GBLUP, support vector machine regression (SVR) and RKHS regression were thereupon compared for their genomic predictive ability in the context of rice breeding using three real data sets. Among the compared methods, RKHS regression and SVR were often the most accurate methods for prediction followed by GBLUP and LASSO. An R function which allows users to perform RR-BLUP of marker effects, GBLUP and RKHS regression, with a Gaussian, Laplacian, polynomial or ANOVA kernel, in a reasonable computation time has been developed. Moreover, a modified version of this function, which allows users to tune kernels for RKHS regression, has also been developed and parallelized for HPC Linux clusters. The corresponding KRMM package and all scripts have been made publicly available. PMID:27555865

  11. A Unified and Comprehensible View of Parametric and Kernel Methods for Genomic Prediction with Application to Rice.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, Laval; Cao, Tuong-Vi; Ahmadi, Nourollah

    2016-01-01

    One objective of this study was to provide readers with a clear and unified understanding of parametric statistical and kernel methods, used for genomic prediction, and to compare some of these in the context of rice breeding for quantitative traits. Furthermore, another objective was to provide a simple and user-friendly R package, named KRMM, which allows users to perform RKHS regression with several kernels. After introducing the concept of regularized empirical risk minimization, the connections between well-known parametric and kernel methods such as Ridge regression [i.e., genomic best linear unbiased predictor (GBLUP)] and reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) regression were reviewed. Ridge regression was then reformulated so as to show and emphasize the advantage of the kernel "trick" concept, exploited by kernel methods in the context of epistatic genetic architectures, over parametric frameworks used by conventional methods. Some parametric and kernel methods; least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), GBLUP, support vector machine regression (SVR) and RKHS regression were thereupon compared for their genomic predictive ability in the context of rice breeding using three real data sets. Among the compared methods, RKHS regression and SVR were often the most accurate methods for prediction followed by GBLUP and LASSO. An R function which allows users to perform RR-BLUP of marker effects, GBLUP and RKHS regression, with a Gaussian, Laplacian, polynomial or ANOVA kernel, in a reasonable computation time has been developed. Moreover, a modified version of this function, which allows users to tune kernels for RKHS regression, has also been developed and parallelized for HPC Linux clusters. The corresponding KRMM package and all scripts have been made publicly available.

  12. Nucleotide diversity analysis highlights functionally important genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Chekalin, Evgeny; Nikolsky, Yuri; Bruskin, Sergey; Chebotarov, Dmitry; McNally, Kenneth L; Alexandrov, Nickolai

    2016-10-24

    We analyzed functionality and relative distribution of genetic variants across the complete Oryza sativa genome, using the 40 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) dataset from the 3,000 Rice Genomes Project (http://snp-seek.irri.org), the largest and highest density SNP collection for any higher plant. We have shown that the DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are the most conserved group of genes, whereas kinases and membrane-localized transporters are the most variable ones. TFs may be conserved because they belong to some of the most connected regulatory hubs that modulate transcription of vast downstream gene networks, whereas signaling kinases and transporters need to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. In general, the observed profound patterns of nucleotide variability reveal functionally important genomic regions. As expected, nucleotide diversity is much higher in intergenic regions than within gene bodies (regions spanning gene models), and protein-coding sequences are more conserved than untranslated gene regions. We have observed a sharp decline in nucleotide diversity that begins at about 250 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start and reaches minimal diversity exactly at the transcription start. We found the transcription termination sites to have remarkably symmetrical patterns of SNP density, implying presence of functional sites near transcription termination. Also, nucleotide diversity was significantly lower near 3' UTRs, the area rich with regulatory regions.

  13. Nucleotide diversity analysis highlights functionally important genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana V.; Chekalin, Evgeny; Nikolsky, Yuri; Bruskin, Sergey; Chebotarov, Dmitry; McNally, Kenneth L.; Alexandrov, Nickolai

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed functionality and relative distribution of genetic variants across the complete Oryza sativa genome, using the 40 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) dataset from the 3,000 Rice Genomes Project (http://snp-seek.irri.org), the largest and highest density SNP collection for any higher plant. We have shown that the DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are the most conserved group of genes, whereas kinases and membrane-localized transporters are the most variable ones. TFs may be conserved because they belong to some of the most connected regulatory hubs that modulate transcription of vast downstream gene networks, whereas signaling kinases and transporters need to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. In general, the observed profound patterns of nucleotide variability reveal functionally important genomic regions. As expected, nucleotide diversity is much higher in intergenic regions than within gene bodies (regions spanning gene models), and protein-coding sequences are more conserved than untranslated gene regions. We have observed a sharp decline in nucleotide diversity that begins at about 250 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start and reaches minimal diversity exactly at the transcription start. We found the transcription termination sites to have remarkably symmetrical patterns of SNP density, implying presence of functional sites near transcription termination. Also, nucleotide diversity was significantly lower near 3′ UTRs, the area rich with regulatory regions. PMID:27774999

  14. Genomewide Variation in an Introgression Line of Rice-Zizania Revealed by Whole-Genome re-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yan; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Liu, Ying; Wu, Ying; Lin, Xiu-Yun; Wen, Jia-Wei; Xu, Chun-Ming; Li, Lin-Feng; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization between genetically diverged organisms is known as an important avenue that drives plant genome evolution. The possible outcomes of hybridization would be the occurrences of genetic instabilities in the resultant hybrids. It remained under-investigated however whether pollination by alien pollens of a closely related but sexually "incompatible" species could evoke genomic changes and to what extent it may result in phenotypic novelties in the derived progenies. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have re-sequenced the genomes of Oryza sativa ssp. japonica cv. Matsumae and one of its derived introgressant RZ35 that was obtained from an introgressive hybridization between Matsumae and Zizanialatifolia Griseb. in general, 131 millions 90 base pair (bp) paired-end reads were generated which covered 13.2 and 21.9 folds of the Matsumae and RZ35 genomes, respectively. Relative to Matsumae, a total of 41,724 homozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 17,839 homozygous insertions/deletions (indels) were identified in RZ35, of which 3,797 SNPs were nonsynonymous mutations. Furthermore, rampant mobilization of transposable elements (TEs) was found in the RZ35 genome. The results of pathogen inoculation revealed that RZ35 exhibited enhanced resistance to blast relative to Matsumae. Notably, one nonsynonymous mutation was found in the known blast resistance gene Pid3/Pi25 and real-time quantitative (q) RT-PCR analysis revealed constitutive up-regulation of its expression, suggesting both altered function and expression of Pid3/Pi25 may be responsible for the enhanced resistance to rice blast by RZ35. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that introgressive hybridization by Zizania has provoked genomewide, extensive genomic changes in the rice genome, and some of which have resulted in important phenotypic novelties. These findings suggest that introgressive hybridization by alien pollens of even a sexually incompatible

  15. Predicting hybrid performance in rice using genomic best linear unbiased prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shizhong; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Qifa

    2014-08-26

    Genomic selection is an upgrading form of marker-assisted selection for quantitative traits, and it differs from the traditional marker-assisted selection in that markers in the entire genome are used to predict genetic values and the QTL detection step is skipped. Genomic selection holds the promise to be more efficient than the traditional marker-assisted selection for traits controlled by polygenes. Genomic selection for pure breed improvement is based on marker information and thus leads to cost-saving due to early selection before phenotypes are measured. When applied to hybrid breeding, genomic selection is anticipated to be even more efficient because genotypes of hybrids are predetermined by their inbred parents. Hybrid breeding has been an important tool to increase crop productivity. Here we proposed and applied an advanced method to predict hybrid performance, in which a subset of all potential hybrids is used as a training sample to predict trait values of all potential hybrids. The method is called genomic best linear unbiased prediction. The technology applied to hybrids is called genomic hybrid breeding. We used 278 randomly selected hybrids derived from 210 recombinant inbred lines of rice as a training sample and predicted all 21,945 potential hybrids. The average yield of top 100 selection shows a 16% increase compared with the average yield of all potential hybrids. The new strategy of marker-guided prediction of hybrid yields serves as a proof of concept for a new technology that may potentially revolutionize hybrid breeding.

  16. Genome-wide analysis reveals the expansion of Cytochrome P450 genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism in rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoju; Shahzad, Muhammad Faisal; Zhang, Zan; Sun, Haina; Han, Ping; Li, Fei; Han, Zhaojun

    2014-01-10

    The Cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily is a large group of ancient proteins with enzymatic activities involved in various physiological processes. The rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, is an important insect pest in rice production. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 77 CYP genes from rice striped stem borer (SSB) through genome and transcriptome sequence analyses. All these CYP genes were confirmed by RT-PCR and direct sequencing. Twenty-eight CYP transcripts have full open reading frame (ORF) and four additional transcripts have a nearly full length coding region. The SSB CYP genes were classified into four clans, the mitochondrial, CYP2, CYP3, and CYP4. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there was an apparent expansion of the CYP3 clan in insects. The CYP6AB subfamily of the CYP3 clan had nine members in SSB. Evolutionary analysis showed that this subfamily was expanded only in lepidopteran insects. In this study, we identified a new P450 subfamily, CYP321F, which is unique to SSB and located in the genome as tandem repeats. Our work provided a foundation for future studies on the functions and mechanism of P450s in the destructive rice pest.

  17. Genome-wide identification of DNA methylation provides insights into the association of gene expression in rice exposed to pesticide atrazine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi Chen; Feng, Sheng Jun; Zhang, Jing Jing; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a pesticide widely used for controlling weeds for crop production. Crop contamination with ATR negatively affects crop growth and development. This study presents the first genome-wide single-base-resolution maps of DNA methylation in ATR-exposed rice. Widespread differences were identified in CG and non-CG methylation marks between the ATR-exposed and ATR-free (control) rice. Most of DNA methyltransferases, histone methyltransferases and DNA demethylase were differentially regulated by ATR. We found more genes hypermethylated than those hypomethylated in the regions of upstream, genebody and downstream under ATR exposure. A stringent group of 674 genes (p < 0.05, two-fold change) with a strong preference of differential expression in ATR-exposed rice was identified. Some of the genes were identified in a subset of loss of function mutants defective in DNA methylation/demethylation. Provision of 5-azacytidine (AZA, inhibitor of DNA methylation) promoted the rice growth and reduced ATR content. By UPLC/Q-TOF-MS/MS, 8 degraded products and 9 conjugates of ATR in AZA-treated rice were characterized. Two of them has been newly identified in this study. Our data show that ATR-induced changes in DNA methylation marks are possibly involved in an epigenetic mechanism associated with activation of specific genes responsible for ATR degradation and detoxification. PMID:26739616

  18. Characteristics and inheritance of space flight induced mutations in rice genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhenlong; Feng, Jie; Kong, Fanding; Wang, Chunli; Zhang, Meng; Jinming Shi, Mrs; Guan, Shuanghong; Sun, Yeqing

    In order to determine the mutagenic effects of space flight and the properties of space induced mutations, the seeds of 5 japonica rice varieties, Zhenzhuhong, Lianjing-2, Yuguang, Beijinghong and Lianjing-1, were carried on-board by Shenzhou-6 spaceship for 5-day-flight. In M1 generation, 20-30 individuals were selected at random from each variety for determination of genomic changes with AFLP method. Sixteen pairs of selective amplification primers were used and 1061, 933, 1054, 749, and 673 loci were detected in each variety. Mutation rates were 3.4% 10.1%, 3.3% 8.5%, 4.0% 10.1%, 0.93% 6.54% and 1.19% 4.46%. Three individuals with significant phenotypic changes which in significant differences in height, tillering, length of spike, seeds per spike and per individual, the mutation rates were 13.7%, 12.1% and 13.1% respectively,. These results suggested that space flight induced mutations in rice genomes and the phenotypic mutants showed higher genomic mutation rates. Nineteen mutant loci were amplified for sequence analysis. BlastN program performance showed that 10 (52.6%) were matched with sequences in GenBank, 5 single copies and 5 multi-copies in rice genome. Among 5 single copy sequences, 2 were located at exons, 2 at introns. One was combined with exon and intron sequences. Three multi-copy sequences were related to transposons or retroposon, one of which was combination of two fragments in different chromosomes, indicating that chromosome recombination may be involved in spaceflight induced mutation. Inheritance of one mutation at transposon related region and another mutation at non-coding region was checked in M1, 2 and 3 generations. Results showed that mutation loci can be inherited to some but all progenies. Interestingly, mutations were detected in M3 individuals, whose M2 parents were with no mutation at corresponding loci, suggesting that space flight may induce genomic instability on rice seeds (Supported by National Natural Science Foundation No

  19. Self-similar characteristics of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the rice genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong

    2016-11-01

    With single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the 3,000 rice genome project, we investigate the mutational characteristics of the rice genome from the perspective of statistical physics. From the frequency distributions of the space between adjacent SNPs, we present evidence that SNPs are not spaced randomly, but clustered across the genome. The clustering property is related to a long-range correlation in SNP locations, suggesting that a mutation occurring in a locus may affect other mutations far away along the sequence in a chromosome. In addition, the reliability of the existence of the long-range correlation is supported by the agreement between the results of two independent analysis methods. The highly-skewed and long-tailed distribution of SNP spaces is further characterized by a multi-fractal, showing that SNP spaces possess a rich structure of a statistical self-similarity. These results can be used for an optimal design of a microarray assay and a primer, as well as for genotyping quality control.

  20. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of WOX gene family in rice, sorghum, maize, Arabidopsis and poplar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zong, Jie; Liu, Jianhua; Yin, Jinyuan; Zhang, Dabing

    2010-11-01

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) genes form a large gene family specifically expressed in plants. They are known to play important roles in regulating the development of plant tissues and organs by determining cell fate. Recent available whole genome sequences allow us to do more comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the WOX genes in plants. In the present study, we identified 11 and 21 WOXs from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and maize (Zea mays), respectively. The 72 WOX genes from rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum, maize, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) were grouped into three well supported clades with nine subgroups according to the amino acid sequences of their homodomains. Their phylogenetic relationship was also supported by the observation of the motifs outside the homodomain. We observed the variation of duplication events among the nine sub-groups between monocots and eudicots, for instance, more gene duplication events of WOXs within subgroup A for monocots, while, less for dicots in this subgroup. Furthermore, we observed the conserved intron/exon structural patterns of WOX genes in rice, sorghum and Arabidopsis. In addition, WUS (Wuschel)-box and EAR (the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression)-like motif were observed to be conserved among several WOX subgroups in these five plants. Comparative analysis of expression patterns of WOX genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggest that the WOX genes play conserved and various roles in plants. This work provides insights into the evolution of the WOX gene family and is useful for future research.

  2. Processing and functionality of rice bran protein and peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice bran comprises approximately 10% of the rough rice kernel. Its germ is a rich source of oil; while defatted bran consists of proteins, minerals, vitamins and fibers, or the indigestible carbohydrates. About 61% of the minerals are located in the bran. The rice bran proteins have shown great pot...

  3. Whole-genome analysis revealed the positively selected genes during the differentiation of indica and temperate japonica rice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinli; Jia, Qi; Guo, Yuchun; Zheng, Xiujuan; Liang, Kangjing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the selective pressures acting on the protein-coding genes during the differentiation of indica and japonica, all of the possible orthologous genes between the Nipponbare and 93-11 genomes were identified and compared with each other. Among these genes, 8,530 pairs had identical sequences, and 27,384 pairs shared more than 90% sequence identity. Only 2,678 pairs of genes displaying a Ka/Ks ratio significantly greater than one were revealed, and most of these genes contained only nonsynonymous sites. The genes without synonymous site were further analyzed with the SNP data of 1529 O. sativa and O. rufipogon accessions, and 1068 genes were identified to be under positive selection during the differentiation of indica and temperate japonica. The positively selected genes (PSGs) are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes, and the proteins encoded by the PSGs are dominant with binding, transferase and hydrolase activities, and especially enriched in the plant responses to stimuli, biological regulations, and transport processes. Meanwhile, the most PSGs of the known function and/or expression were involved in the regulation of biotic/abiotic stresses. The evidence of pervasive positive selection suggested that many factors drove the differentiation of indica and japonica, which has already started in wild rice but is much lower than in cultivated rice. Lower differentiation and less PSGs revealed between the Or-It and Or-IIIt wild rice groups implied that artificial selection provides greater contribution on the differentiation than natural selection. In addition, the phylogenetic tree constructed with positively selected sites showed that the japonica varieties exhibited more diversity than indica on differentiation, and Or-III of O. rufipogon exhibited more than Or-I.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of esterase-like genes in the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoju; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Han, Ping; Li, Fei; Han, Zhaojun

    2015-06-01

    The striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, a destructive pest of rice, has developed high levels of resistance to certain insecticides. Esterases are reported to be involved in insecticide resistance in several insects. Therefore, this study systematically analyzed esterase-like genes in C. suppressalis. Fifty-one esterase-like genes were identified in the draft genomic sequences of the species, and 20 cDNA sequences were derived which encoded full- or nearly full-length proteins. The putative esterase proteins derived from these full-length genes are overall highly diversified. However, key residues that are functionally important including the serine residue in the active site are conserved in 18 out of the 20 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of these genes have homologues in other lepidoptera insects. Genes CsuEst6, CsuEst10, CsuEst11, and CsuEst51 were induced by the insecticide triazophos, and genes CsuEst9, CsuEst11, CsuEst14, and CsuEst51 were induced by the insecticide chlorantraniliprole. Our results provide a foundation for future studies of insecticide resistance in C. suppressalis and for comparative research with esterase genes from other insect species.

  5. Genome wide identification of Dof transcription factor gene family in sorghum and its comparative phylogenetic analysis with rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Hariom; Gupta, Shubhra; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Rastogi, Smita; Yadav, Dinesh

    2011-11-01

    The Dof (DNA binding with One Finger) family represents a classic zinc-finger transcription factors involved with multifarious roles exclusively in plants. There exists great diversity in terms of number of Dof genes observed in different crops. In current study, a total of 28 putative Dof genes have been predicted in silico from the recently available whole genome shotgun sequence of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (with assigned accession numbers TPA:BK006983-BK007006 and TPA:BK007079-BK007082). The predicted SbDof genes are distributed on nine out of ten chromosomes of sorghum and most of these genes lack introns based on canonical intron/exon structure. Phylogenetic analysis of 28 SbDof proteins resulted in four subgroups constituting six clusters. The comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins along with 30 rice and 36 Arabidopsis Dof proteins revealed six major groups similar to what has been observed earlier for rice and Arabidopsis. Motif analysis revealed the presence of conserved 50-52 amino acids Dof domain uniformly distributed across all the 28 Dof proteins of sorghum. The in silico cis-regulatory elements analysis of these SbDof genes suggested its diverse functions associated with light responsiveness, endosperm specific gene expression, hormone responsiveness, meristem specific expression and stress responsiveness.

  6. Efficient targeted mutagenesis of rice and tobacco genomes using Cpf1 from Francisella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Akira; Masafumi, Mikami; Kaya, Hidetaka; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems are nowadays applied extensively to effect genome editing in various organisms including plants. CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) is a newly characterized RNA-guided endonuclease that has two distinct features as compared to Cas9. First, Cpf1 utilizes a thymidine-rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) while Cas9 prefers a guanidine-rich PAM. Cpf1 could be used as a sequence-specific nuclease to target AT-rich regions of a genome that Cas9 had difficulty accessing. Second, Cpf1 generates DNA ends with a 5′ overhang, whereas Cas9 creates blunt DNA ends after cleavage. “Sticky” DNA ends should increase the efficiency of insertion of a desired DNA fragment into the Cpf1-cleaved site using complementary DNA ends. Therefore, Cpf1 could be a potent tool for precise genome engineering. To evaluate whether Cpf1 can be applied to plant genome editing, we selected Cpf1 from Francisella novicida (FnCpf1), which recognizes a shorter PAM (TTN) within known Cpf1 proteins, and applied it to targeted mutagenesis in tobacco and rice. Our results show that targeted mutagenesis had occurred in transgenic plants expressing FnCpf1 with crRNA. Deletions of the targeted region were the most frequently observed mutations. Our results demonstrate that FnCpf1 can be applied successfully to genome engineering in plants. PMID:27905529

  7. Elucidation of rice rhizosphere metagenome in relation to methane and nitrogen metabolism under elevated carbon dioxide and temperature using whole genome metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Das, M; Ray, S; Balachandar, D; Karthikeyan, S; Nayak, A K; Mohapatra, T

    2016-01-15

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mineralization is one of the key processes of biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem in general and rice ecology in particular. Rice rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial diversity influenced by change in atmospheric temperature and concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Structural changes in microbial communities in rhizosphere influence the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were studied under ambient CO2 (a-CO2) and elevated CO2+temperature (e-CO2T) in lowland rice rhizosphere using whole genome metagenomic approach. The whole genome metagenomic sequence data of lowland rice exhibited the dominance of bacterial communities including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes. Interestingly, four genera related to methane production namely, Methanobacterium, Methanosphaera, Methanothermus and Methanothermococcus were absent in a-CO2 but noticed under e-CO2T. The acetoclastic pathway was found as the predominant pathway for methanogenesis, whereas, the serine pathway was found as the principal metabolic pathway for CH4 oxidation in lowland rice. The abundances of reads of enzymes in the acetoclastic methanogenesis pathway and serine pathways of methanotrophy were much higher in e-CO2T (328 and 182, respectively) as compared with a-CO2 (118 and 98, respectively). Rice rhizosphere showed higher structural diversities and functional activities in relation to N metabolism involving nitrogen fixation, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction and denitrification under e-CO2T than that of a-CO2. Among the three pathways of N metabolism, dissimilarity pathways were predominant in lowland rice rhizosphere and more so under e-CO2T. Consequently, under e-CO2T, CH4 emission, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and dehydrogenase activities were 45%, 20% and 35% higher than a-CO2, respectively. Holistically, a high bacterial diversity and

  8. A factor analysis model for functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Kustra, Rafal; Shioda, Romy; Zhu, Mu

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression array data are used to predict biological functions of uncharacterized genes by comparing their expression profiles to those of characterized genes. While biologically plausible, this is both statistically and computationally challenging. Typical approaches are computationally expensive and ignore correlations among expression profiles and functional categories. Results We propose a factor analysis model (FAM) for functional genomics and give a two-step algorithm, using genome-wide expression data for yeast and a subset of Gene-Ontology Biological Process functional annotations. We show that the predictive performance of our method is comparable to the current best approach while our total computation time was faster by a factor of 4000. We discuss the unique challenges in performance evaluation of algorithms used for genome-wide functions genomics. Finally, we discuss extensions to our method that can incorporate the inherent correlation structure of the functional categories to further improve predictive performance. Conclusion Our factor analysis model is a computationally efficient technique for functional genomics and provides a clear and unified statistical framework with potential for incorporating important gene ontology information to improve predictions. PMID:16630343

  9. Genomic analysis of hybrid rice varieties reveals numerous superior alleles that contribute to heterosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuehui; Yang, Shihua; Gong, Junyi; Zhao, Yan; Feng, Qi; Gong, Hao; Li, Wenjun; Zhan, Qilin; Cheng, Benyi; Xia, Junhui; Chen, Neng; Hao, Zhongna; Liu, Kunyan; Zhu, Chuanrang; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Danlin; Zhou, Congcong; Lu, Yiqi; Weng, Qijun; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Li, Jiayang; Han, Bin

    2015-02-05

    Exploitation of heterosis is one of the most important applications of genetics in agriculture. However, the genetic mechanisms of heterosis are only partly understood, and a global view of heterosis from a representative number of hybrid combinations is lacking. Here we develop an integrated genomic approach to construct a genome map for 1,495 elite hybrid rice varieties and their inbred parental lines. We investigate 38 agronomic traits and identify 130 associated loci. In-depth analyses of the effects of heterozygous genotypes reveal that there are only a few loci with strong overdominance effects in hybrids, but a strong correlation is observed between the yield and the number of superior alleles. While most parental inbred lines have only a small number of superior alleles, high-yielding hybrid varieties have several. We conclude that the accumulation of numerous rare superior alleles with positive dominance is an important contributor to the heterotic phenomena.

  10. Frequency and type of inheritable mutations induced by γ rays in rice as revealed by whole genome sequencing*#

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Zheng, Yun-chao; Cui, Hai-rui; Fu, Hao-wei; Shu, Qing-yao; Huang, Jian-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Mutation breeding is based on the induction of genetic variations; hence knowledge of the frequency and type of induced mutations is of paramount importance for the design and implementation of a mutation breeding program. Although γ ray irradiation has been widely used since the 1960s in the breeding of about 200 economically important plant species, molecular elucidation of its genetic effects has so far been achieved largely by analysis of target genes or genomic regions. In the present study, the whole genomes of six γ-irradiated M2 rice plants were sequenced; a total of 144–188 million high-quality (Q>20) reads were generated for each M2 plant, resulting in genome coverage of >45 times for each plant. Single base substitution (SBS) and short insertion/deletion (Indel) mutations were detected at the average frequency of 7.5×10−6–9.8×10−6 in the six M2 rice plants (SBS being about 4 times more frequent than Indels). Structural and copy number variations, though less frequent than SBS and Indel, were also identified and validated. The mutations were scattered in all genomic regions across 12 rice chromosomes without apparent hotspots. The present study is the first genome-wide single-nucleotide resolution study on the feature and frequency of γ irradiation-induced mutations in a seed propagated crop; the findings are of practical importance for mutation breeding of rice and other crop species. PMID:27921396

  11. Gene tree discordance of wild and cultivated Asian rice deciphered by genome-wide sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-chia; Sakai, Hiroaki; Numa, Hisataka; Itoh, Takeshi

    2011-05-15

    Although a large number of genes are expected to correctly solve a phylogenetic relationship, inconsistent gene tree topologies have been observed. This conflicting evidence in gene tree topologies, known as gene tree discordance, becomes increasingly important as advanced sequencing technologies produce an enormous amount of sequence information for phylogenomic studies among closely related species. Here, we aim to characterize the gene tree discordance of the Asian cultivated rice Oryza sativa and its progenitor, O. rufipogon, which will be an ideal case study of gene tree discordance. Using genome and cDNA sequences of O. sativa and O. rufipogon, we have conducted the first in-depth analyses of gene tree discordance in Asian rice. Our comparison of full-length cDNA sequences of O. rufipogon with the genome sequences of the japonica and indica cultivars of O. sativa revealed that 60% of the gene trees showed a topology consistent with the expected one, whereas the remaining genes supported significantly different topologies. Moreover, the proportions of the topologies deviated significantly from expectation, suggesting at least one hybridization event between the two subgroups of O. sativa, japonica and indica. In fact, a genome-wide alignment between japonica and indica indicated that significant portions of the indica genome are derived from japonica. In addition, literature concerning the pedigree of the indica cultivar strongly supported the hybridization hypothesis. Our molecular evolutionary analyses deciphered complicated evolutionary processes in closely related species. They also demonstrated the importance of gene tree discordance in the era of high-speed DNA sequencing.

  12. Site-specific gene integration in rice genome mediated by the FLP-FRT recombination system.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Soumen; Srivastava, Vibha

    2011-08-01

    Plant transformation based on random integration of foreign DNA often generates complex integration structures. Precision in the integration process is necessary to ensure the formation of full-length, single-copy integration. Site-specific recombination systems are versatile tools for precise genomic manipulations such as DNA excision, inversion or integration. The yeast FLP-FRT recombination system has been widely used for DNA excision in higher plants. Here, we report the use of FLP-FRT system for efficient targeting of foreign gene into the engineered genomic site in rice. The transgene vector containing a pair of directly oriented FRT sites was introduced by particle bombardment into the cells containing the target locus. FLP activity generated by the co-bombarded FLP gene efficiently separated the transgene construct from the vector-backbone and integrated the backbone-free construct into the target site. Strong FLP activity, derived from the enhanced FLP protein, FLPe, was important for the successful site-specific integration (SSI). The majority of the transgenic events contained a precise integration and expressed the transgene. Interestingly, each transgenic event lacked the co-bombarded FLPe gene, suggesting reversion of the integration structure in the presence of the constitutive FLPe expression. Progeny of the precise transgenic lines inherited the stable SSI locus and expressed the transgene. This work demonstrates the application of FLP-FRT system for site-specific gene integration in plants using rice as a model.

  13. Sequence and expression analyses of KIX domain proteins suggest their importance in seed development and determination of seed size in rice, and genome stability in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Jitendra Kumar; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup; Bajaj, Deepak; Pasrija, Richa

    2013-08-01

    The KIX domain, which mediates protein-protein interactions, was first discovered as a motif in the large multidomain transcriptional activator histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP. Later, the domain was also found in Mediator subunit MED15, where it interacts with many transcription factors. In both proteins, the KIX domain is a target of activation domains of diverse transcription activators. It was found to be an essential component of several specific gene-activation pathways in fungi and metazoans. Not much is known about KIX domain proteins in plants. This study aims to characterize all the KIX domain proteins encoded by the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice. All identified KIX domain proteins are presented, together with their chromosomal locations, phylogenetic analysis, expression and SNP analyses. KIX domains were found not only in p300/CBP- and MED15-like plant proteins, but also in F-box proteins in rice and DNA helicase in Arabidopsis, suggesting roles of KIX domains in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation and genome stability. Expression analysis revealed overlapping expression of OsKIX_3, OsKIX_5 and OsKIX_7 in different stages of rice seeds development. Moreover, an association analysis of 136 in silico mined SNP loci in 23 different rice genotypes with grain-length information identified three non-synonymous SNP loci in these three rice genes showing strong association with long- and short-grain differentiation. Interestingly, these SNPs were located within KIX domain encoding sequences. Overall, this study lays a foundation for functional analysis of KIX domain proteins in plants.

  14. Deciphering the Cryptic Genome: Genome-wide Analyses of the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi Reveal Complex Regulation of Secondary Metabolism and Novel Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Studt, Lena; Niehaus, Eva-Maria; Espino, Jose J.; Huß, Kathleen; Michielse, Caroline B.; Albermann, Sabine; Wagner, Dominik; Bergner, Sonja V.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Fischer, Andreas; Reuter, Gunter; Kleigrewe, Karin; Bald, Till; Wingfield, Brenda D.; Ophir, Ron; Freeman, Stanley; Hippler, Michael; Smith, Kristina M.; Brown, Daren W.; Proctor, Robert H.; Münsterkötter, Martin; Freitag, Michael; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Güldener, Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes “bakanae” disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs), but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium. Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi, suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene (PKS19) and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (NRPS31) are unique to F. fujikuroi. The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19-derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary success of F

  15. Tomato functional genomics database (TFGD): a comprehensive collection and analysis package for tomato functional genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato Functional Genomics Database (TFGD; http://ted.bti.cornell.edu) provides a comprehensive systems biology resource to store, mine, analyze, visualize and integrate large-scale tomato functional genomics datasets. The database is expanded from the previously described Tomato Expression Database...

  16. Genome-wide profiling of genetic variation in Agrobacterium-transformed rice plants*#

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-xu; Wu, San-ling; Liu, Yan-hua; Jin, Gu-lei; Zhao, Hai-jun; Fan, Long-jiang; Shu, Qing-yao

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has been widely used in producing transgenic plants, and was recently used to generate “transgene-clean” targeted genomic modifications coupled with the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas9) system. Although tremendous variation in morphological and agronomic traits, such as plant height, seed fertility, and grain size, was observed in transgenic plants, the underlying mechanisms are not yet well understood, and the types and frequency of genetic variation in transformed plants have not been fully disclosed. To reveal the genome-wide variation in transformed plants, we sequenced the genomes of five independent T0 rice plants using next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques. Bioinformatics analyses followed by experimental validation revealed the following: (1) in addition to transfer-DNA (T-DNA) insertions, three transformed plants carried heritable plasmid backbone DNA of variable sizes (855–5216 bp) and in different configurations with the T-DNA insertions (linked or apart); (2) each transgenic plant contained an estimated 338–1774 independent genetic variations (single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions); and (3) 2–6 new Tos17 insertions were detected in each transformed plant, but no other transposable elements or bacterial genomic DNA. PMID:27921404

  17. Protoplast cell death assay to study Magnaporthe oryzae AVR gene function in rice.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Kentaro; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Tamiru, Muluneh; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for transient gene expression in rice protoplasts and its application to the study of Magnaporthe oryzae avirulence (AVR) gene function. In this assay the gene encoding the firefly luciferase protein is transfected into rice protoplasts by electroporation together with the candidate AVR genes. The luminescence can then be used to assess the viability of rice protoplasts. The hypersensitive response (HR) caused by the interaction between M. oryzae AVR and rice R genes can subsequently be monitored by recording the decrease in luminescence from the transfected cells.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study for Plant Height and Grain Yield in Rice under Contrasting Moisture Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaosong; Feng, Fangjun; Wei, Haibin; Mei, Hanwei; Xu, Kai; Chen, Shoujun; Li, Tianfei; Liang, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongyan; Luo, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the vitally critical environmental stresses affecting both growth and yield potential in rice. Drought resistance is a complicated quantitative trait that is regulated by numerous small effect loci and hundreds of genes controlling various morphological and physiological responses to drought. For this study, 270 rice landraces and cultivars were analyzed for their drought resistance. This was done via determination of changes in plant height and grain yield under contrasting water regimes, followed by detailed identification of the underlying genetic architecture via genome-wide association study (GWAS). We controlled population structure by setting top two eigenvectors and combining kinship matrix for GWAS in this study. Eighteen, five, and six associated loci were identified for plant height, grain yield per plant, and drought resistant coefficient, respectively. Nine known functional genes were identified, including five for plant height (OsGA2ox3, OsGH3-2, sd-1, OsGNA1, and OsSAP11/OsDOG), two for grain yield per plant (OsCYP51G3 and OsRRMh) and two for drought resistant coefficient (OsPYL2 and OsGA2ox9), implying very reliable results. A previous study reported OsGNA1 to regulate root development, but this study reports additional controlling of both plant height and root length. Moreover, OsRLK5 is a new drought resistant candidate gene discovered in this study. OsRLK5 mutants showed faster water loss rates in detached leaves. This gene plays an important role in the positive regulation of yield-related traits under drought conditions. We furthermore discovered several new loci contributing to the three investigated traits (plant height, grain yield, and drought resistance). These associated loci and candidate genes significantly improve our knowledge of the genetic control of these traits in rice. In addition, many drought resistant cultivars screened in this study can be used as parental genotypes to improve drought resistance of rice by

  19. The rice gene OsZFP6 functions in multiple stress tolerance responses in yeast and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qing-jie; Wang, Li-feng; Bu, Qing-yun; Wang, Zhen-yu

    2014-09-01

    The role of zinc finger proteins in organismal stress conditions has been widely reported. However, little is known concerning the function of CCHC-type zinc finger proteins in rice. In this study, OsZFP6, a rice CCHC-type zinc finger protein 6 gene, was cloned from rice using RT-PCR. The OsZFP6 protein contains 305 amino acids and a conserved zinc finger domain and is localised to the nucleus. Southern blot analysis revealed that a single copy was encoded in the rice genome. OsZFP6 expression was increased by abiotic stress, including salt (NaCl), alkali (NaHCO3) and H2O2 treatment. When OsZFP6 was transformed into yeast, the transgenic yeast showed significantly increased resistance to NaHCO3 compared to the control. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants overexpressing OsZFP6 were more tolerant to both NaHCO3 and H2O2 treatments. Overall, we uncovered a role for OsZFP6 in abiotic stress responses and identified OsZFP6 as a putatively useful gene for developing crops with increased alkali and H2O2 tolerance.

  20. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees, and whole-genome-based data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining data sets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data, and mol...

  1. Identification of candidate genes in rice for resistance to sheath blight disease by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Silva, James; Scheffler, Brian; Sanabria, Yamid; De Guzman, Christian; Galam, Dominique; Farmer, Andrew; Woodward, Jimmy; May, Gregory; Oard, James

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in whole genome sequencing (WGS) have allowed identification of genes for disease susceptibility in humans. The objective of our research was to exploit whole genome sequences of 13 rice (Oryza sativa L.) inbred lines to identify non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and candidate genes for resistance to sheath blight, a disease of worldwide significance. WGS by the Illumina GA IIx platform produced an average 5× coverage with ~700 K variants detected per line when compared to the Nipponbare reference genome. Two filtering strategies were developed to identify nsSNPs between two groups of known resistant and susceptible lines. A total of 333 nsSNPs detected in the resistant lines were absent in the susceptible group. Selected variants associated with resistance were found in 11 of 12 chromosomes. More than 200 genes with selected nsSNPs were assigned to 42 categories based on gene family/gene ontology. Several candidate genes belonged to families reported in previous studies, and three new regions with novel candidates were also identified. A subset of 24 nsSNPs detected in 23 genes was selected for further study. Individual alleles of the 24 nsSNPs were evaluated by PCR whose presence or absence corresponded to known resistant or susceptible phenotypes of nine additional lines. Sanger sequencing confirmed presence of 12 selected nsSNPs in two lines. "Resistant" nsSNP alleles were detected in two accessions of O. nivara that suggests sources for resistance occur in additional Oryza sp. Results from this study provide a foundation for future basic research and marker-assisted breeding of rice for sheath blight resistance.

  2. Functional Profiling of Human Fungal Pathogen Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Goranov, Alexi I.; Madhani, Hiten D.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are challenging to diagnose and often difficult to treat, with only a handful of drug classes existing. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which pathogenic fungi cause human disease is imperative. Here, we discuss how the development and use of genome-scale genetic resources, such as whole-genome knockout collections, can address this unmet need. Using work in Saccharomcyes cerevisiae as a guide, studies of Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans have shown how the challenges of large-scale gene deletion can be overcome, and how such collections can be effectively used to obtain insights into mechanisms of pathogenesis. We conclude that, with concerted efforts, full genome-wide functional analysis of human fungal pathogen genomes is within reach. PMID:25377143

  3. Genome-wide binding analysis of the transcription activator ideal plant architecture1 reveals a complex network regulating rice plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-10-01

    Ideal plant architecture1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The Squamosa promoter binding protein-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter binding factor1 or promoter binding factor2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice teosinte branched1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate dense and erect panicle1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture.

  4. Isolation of functional components from red rice bran for evaluating their colon-specific health benefits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole-grain pigmented rice products can contribute diverse functional components to the diet to promote improved gastrointestinal health in humans. We are isolating feruloylated arabino-oligosaccharides and proanthocyanidin polymers from red-pigmented rice bran to evaluate individual and synergisti...

  5. Phenolic Phytoalexins in Rice: Biological Functions and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Sang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Phytoalexins are inducible secondary metabolites possessing antimicrobial activity against phytopathogens. Rice produces a wide array of phytoalexins in response to pathogen attacks and environmental stresses. With few exceptions, most phytoalexins identified in rice are diterpenoid compounds. Until very recently, flavonoid sakuranetin was the only known phenolic phytoalexin in rice. However, recent studies have shown that phenylamides are involved in defense against pathogen attacks in rice. Phenylamides are amine-conjugated phenolic acids that are induced by pathogen infections and abiotic stresses including ultra violet (UV) radiation in rice. Stress-induced phenylamides, such as N-trans-cinnamoyltryptamine, N-p-coumaroylserotonin and N-cinnamoyltyramine, have been reported to possess antimicrobial activities against rice bacterial and fungal pathogens, an indication of their direct inhibitory roles against invading pathogens. This finding suggests that phenylamides act as phytoalexins in rice and belong to phenolic phytoalexins along with sakuranetin. Phenylamides also have been implicated in cell wall reinforcement for disease resistance and allelopathy of rice. Synthesis of phenolic phytoalexins is stimulated by phytopathogen attacks and abiotic challenges including UV radiation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that biosynthetic pathways including the shikimate, phenylpropanoid and arylmonoamine pathways are coordinately activated for phenolic phytoalexin synthesis, and related genes are induced by biotic and abiotic stresses in rice. PMID:26690131

  6. Genome-wide analysis of spatiotemporal gene expression patterns during early embryogenesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Yutaka; Sato, Yutaka; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Shimizu-Sato, Sae; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Takehisa, Hinako; Sanguinet, Karen A; Namiki, Nobukazu; Nagamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-04-01

    Embryogenesis in rice is different from that of most dicotolydonous plants in that it shows a non-stereotypic cell division pattern, formation of dorsal-ventral polarity, and endogenous initiation of the radicle. To reveal the transcriptional features associated with developmental events during rice early embryogenesis, we used microarray analysis coupled with laser microdissection to obtain both spatial and temporal transcription profiles. Our results allowed us to determine spatial expression foci for each expressed gene in the globular embryo, which revealed the importance of phytohormone-related genes and a suite of transcription factors to early embryogenesis. Our analysis showed the polarized expression of a small number of genes along the apical-basal and dorsal-ventral axes in the globular embryo, which tended to fluctuate in later developmental stages. We also analyzed gene expression patterns in the early globular embryo and how this relates to expression in embryonic organs at later stages. We confirmed the accuracy of the expression patterns found by microarray analysis of embryo subdomains using in situ hybridization. Our study identified homologous genes from Arabidopsis thaliana with known functions in embryogenesis in addition to unique and uncharacterized genes that show polarized expression patterns during embryogenesis. The results of this study are presented in a database to provide a framework for spatiotemporal gene expression during rice embryogenesis, to serve as a resource for future functional analysis of genes, and as a basis for comparative studies of plant embryogenesis.

  7. An evolutionary classification of genomic function.

    PubMed

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Azevedo, Ricardo B R

    2015-01-28

    The pronouncements of the ENCODE Project Consortium regarding "junk DNA" exposed the need for an evolutionary classification of genomic elements according to their selected-effect function. In the classification scheme presented here, we divide the genome into "functional DNA," that is, DNA sequences that have a selected-effect function, and "rubbish DNA," that is, sequences that do not. Functional DNA is further subdivided into "literal DNA" and "indifferent DNA." In literal DNA, the order of nucleotides is under selection; in indifferent DNA, only the presence or absence of the sequence is under selection. Rubbish DNA is further subdivided into "junk DNA" and "garbage DNA." Junk DNA neither contributes to nor detracts from the fitness of the organism and, hence, evolves under selective neutrality. Garbage DNA, on the other hand, decreases the fitness of its carriers. Garbage DNA exists in the genome only because natural selection is neither omnipotent nor instantaneous. Each of these four functional categories can be 1) transcribed and translated, 2) transcribed but not translated, or 3) not transcribed. The affiliation of a DNA segment to a particular functional category may change during evolution: Functional DNA may become junk DNA, junk DNA may become garbage DNA, rubbish DNA may become functional DNA, and so on; however, determining the functionality or nonfunctionality of a genomic sequence must be based on its present status rather than on its potential to change (or not to change) in the future. Changes in functional affiliation are divided into pseudogenes, Lazarus DNA, zombie DNA, and Jekyll-to-Hyde DNA.

  8. An Evolutionary Classification of Genomic Function

    PubMed Central

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Azevedo, Ricardo B.R.

    2015-01-01

    The pronouncements of the ENCODE Project Consortium regarding “junk DNA” exposed the need for an evolutionary classification of genomic elements according to their selected-effect function. In the classification scheme presented here, we divide the genome into “functional DNA,” that is, DNA sequences that have a selected-effect function, and “rubbish DNA,” that is, sequences that do not. Functional DNA is further subdivided into “literal DNA” and “indifferent DNA.” In literal DNA, the order of nucleotides is under selection; in indifferent DNA, only the presence or absence of the sequence is under selection. Rubbish DNA is further subdivided into “junk DNA” and “garbage DNA.” Junk DNA neither contributes to nor detracts from the fitness of the organism and, hence, evolves under selective neutrality. Garbage DNA, on the other hand, decreases the fitness of its carriers. Garbage DNA exists in the genome only because natural selection is neither omnipotent nor instantaneous. Each of these four functional categories can be 1) transcribed and translated, 2) transcribed but not translated, or 3) not transcribed. The affiliation of a DNA segment to a particular functional category may change during evolution: Functional DNA may become junk DNA, junk DNA may become garbage DNA, rubbish DNA may become functional DNA, and so on; however, determining the functionality or nonfunctionality of a genomic sequence must be based on its present status rather than on its potential to change (or not to change) in the future. Changes in functional affiliation are divided into pseudogenes, Lazarus DNA, zombie DNA, and Jekyll-to-Hyde DNA. PMID:25635041

  9. Genome sequence and rapid evolution of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Steven L; Sommer, Daniel D; Schatz, Michael C; Phillippy, Adam M; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Tsuge, Seiji; Furutani, Ayako; Ochiai, Hirokazu; Delcher, Arthur L; Kelley, David; Madupu, Ramana; Puiu, Daniela; Radune, Diana; Shumway, Martin; Trapnell, Cole; Aparna, Gudlur; Jha, Gopaljee; Pandey, Alok; Patil, Prabhu B; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Meyer, Damien F; Szurek, Boris; Verdier, Valerie; Koebnik, Ralf; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P; Hirata, Hisae; Tsuyumu, Shinji; Won Lee, Sang; Ronald, Pamela C; Sonti, Ramesh V; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Leach, Jan E; White, Frank F; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2008-01-01

    Background Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major disease that constrains production of this staple crop in many parts of the world. We report here on the complete genome sequence of strain PXO99A and its comparison to two previously sequenced strains, KACC10331 and MAFF311018, which are highly similar to one another. Results The PXO99A genome is a single circular chromosome of 5,240,075 bp, considerably longer than the genomes of the other strains (4,941,439 bp and 4,940,217 bp, respectively), and it contains 5083 protein-coding genes, including 87 not found in KACC10331 or MAFF311018. PXO99A contains a greater number of virulence-associated transcription activator-like effector genes and has at least ten major chromosomal rearrangements relative to KACC10331 and MAFF311018. PXO99A contains numerous copies of diverse insertion sequence elements, members of which are associated with 7 out of 10 of the major rearrangements. A rapidly-evolving CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats) region contains evidence of dozens of phage infections unique to the PXO99A lineage. PXO99A also contains a unique, near-perfect tandem repeat of 212 kilobases close to the replication terminus. Conclusion Our results provide striking evidence of genome plasticity and rapid evolution within Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The comparisons point to sources of genomic variation and candidates for strain-specific adaptations of this pathogen that help to explain the extraordinary diversity of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae genotypes and races that have been isolated from around the world. PMID:18452608

  10. SNP in starch biosynthesis genes associated with nutritional and functional properties of rice

    PubMed Central

    Kharabian-Masouleh, Ardashir; Waters, Daniel L. E.; Reinke, Russell F.; Ward, Rachelle; Henry, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is a major component of human diets. The relative contribution of variation in the genes of starch biosynthesis to the nutritional and functional properties of the rice was evaluated in a rice breeding population. Sequencing 18 genes involved in starch synthesis in a population of 233 rice breeding lines discovered 66 functional SNPs in exonic regions. Five genes, AGPS2b, Isoamylase1, SPHOL, SSIIb and SSIVb showed no polymorphism. Association analysis found 31 of the SNP were associated with differences in pasting and cooking quality properties of the rice lines. Two genes appear to be the major loci controlling traits under human selection in rice, GBSSI (waxy gene) and SSIIa. GBSSI influenced amylose content and retrogradation. Other genes contributing to retrogradation were GPT1, SSI, BEI and SSIIIa. SSIIa explained much of the variation in cooking characteristics. Other genes had relatively small effects. PMID:22870386

  11. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every cellular process mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. As results from ENCODE show, open chromatin assays can efficiently integrate across diverse regulatory elements, revealing functional non-coding genome. In this study, we use a MNase hypersensitivity assay to discover o...

  12. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of denitrifying bacteria isolated from various rice paddy and rice-soybean rotation fields.

    PubMed

    Tago, Kanako; Ishii, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Otsuka, Shigeto; Senoo, Keishi

    2011-01-01

    Denitrifiers can produce and consume nitrous oxide (N(2)O). While little N(2)O is emitted from rice paddy soil, the same soil produces N(2)O when the land is drained and used for upland crop cultivation. In this study, we collected soils from two types of fields each at three locations in Japan; one type of field had been used for continuous cultivation of rice and the other for rotational cultivation of rice and soybean. Active denitrifiers were isolated from these soils using a functional single-cell isolation method, and their taxonomy and denitrifying properties were examined. A total of 110 denitrifiers were obtained, including those previously detected by a culture-independent analysis. Strains belonging to the genus Pseudogulbenkiania were dominant at all locations, suggesting that Pseudogulbenkiania denitrifiers are ubiquitous in various rice paddy soils. Potential denitrifying activity was similar among the strains, regardless of the differences in taxonomic position and soil of origin. However, relative amounts of N(2) in denitrification end products varied among strains isolated from different locations. Our results also showed that crop rotation had minimal impact on the functional diversity of the denitrifying strains. These results indicate that soil and other environmental factors, excluding cropping systems, could select for N(2)-producing denitrifiers.

  13. Efficiency to Discovery Transgenic Loci in GM Rice Using Next Generation Sequencing Whole Genome Re-sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Doori; Kim, Dongin; Jang, Green; Lim, Jongsung; Shin, Yun-Ji; Kim, Jina; Seo, Mi-Seong; Park, Su-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2015-01-01

    Molecular characterization technology in genetically modified organisms, in addition to how transgenic biotechnologies are developed now require full transparency to assess the risk to living modified and non-modified organisms. Next generation sequencing (NGS) methodology is suggested as an effective means in genome characterization and detection of transgenic insertion locations. In the present study, we applied NGS to insert transgenic loci, specifically the epidermal growth factor (EGF) in genetically modified rice cells. A total of 29.3 Gb (~72× coverage) was sequenced with a 2 × 150 bp paired end method by Illumina HiSeq2500, which was consecutively mapped to the rice genome and T-vector sequence. The compatible pairs of reads were successfully mapped to 10 loci on the rice chromosome and vector sequences were validated to the insertion location by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The EGF transgenic site was confirmed only on chromosome 4 by PCR. Results of this study demonstrated the success of NGS data to characterize the rice genome. Bioinformatics analyses must be developed in association with NGS data to identify highly accurate transgenic sites. PMID:26523132

  14. Functional and rheological properties of cold plasma treated rice starch.

    PubMed

    Thirumdas, Rohit; Trimukhe, A; Deshmukh, R R; Annapure, U S

    2017-02-10

    The present work deals with aimed to study the effect of cold plasma treatment on the functional and rheological properties of rice starch using two different power levels (40 and 60W). The changes in amylose content, turbidity, pH, water and fat absorption due to plasma treatment were evaluated. Where decrease in the turbidity and pH after the treatment was observed. Gel hydration properties and syneresis study revealed that there is an increase in leaching of amylose molecules after the treatment. Rapid Visco Analyzer examination showed an increase in pasting and final viscosities. From G' and G″ moduli determination we observed that there is decrease in retrogradation tendency of starch gels. XRD did not show any change in A-type pattern but decrease in the relative crystallinity was observed due to depolymerization caused by active plasma species. FTIR shows some of the additional functional groups after treatment. SEM showed formation of fissures on the surface of starch granules due to etching caused by the plasma species. Thus, plasma treatment can be one of the methods for physical modification of starch.

  15. Characterization of functional trait diversity among Indian cultivated and weedy rice populations

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, M.; Singh, Raghwendra; Kumar, B.; Chauhan, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Weedy rice, a menace in rice growing areas globally, is biosimilar having attributes similar to cultivated and wild rice, and therefore is difficult to manage. A study was initiated to characterize the functional traits of 76 weedy rice populations and commonly grown rice cultivars from different agro-climatic zones for nine morphological, five physiological, and three phenological parameters in a field experiment under an augmented block design. Comparison between weedy and cultivated rice revealed a difference in duration (days) from panicle emergence to heading as the most variable trait and awn length as the least variable one, as evidenced from their coefficients of variation. The results of principal component analysis revealed the first three principal components to represent 47.3% of the total variation, which indicates an important role of transpiration, conductance, leaf-air temperature difference, days to panicle emergence, days to heading, flag leaf length, SPAD (soil-plant analysis development), grain weight, plant height, and panicle length to the diversity in weedy rice populations. The variations existing in weedy rice population are a major reason for its wider adaptability to varied environmental conditions and also a problem while trying to manage it. PMID:27072282

  16. Heavy metals induce oxidative stress and genome-wide modulation in transcriptome of rice root.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sonali; Shri, Manju; Misra, Prashant; Lakhwani, Deepika; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Asif, Mehar H; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudro Deo; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2014-06-01

    Industrial growth, ecological disturbances and agricultural practices have contaminated the soil and water with many harmful compounds, including heavy metals. These heavy metals affect growth and development of plants as well as cause severe human health hazards through food chain contamination. In past, studies have been made to identify biochemical and molecular networks associated with heavy metal toxicity and uptake in plants. Studies suggested that most of the physiological and molecular processes affected by different heavy metals are similar to those affected by other abiotic stresses. To identify common and unique responses by different metals, we have studied biochemical and genome-wide modulation in transcriptome of rice (IR-64 cultivar) root after exposure to cadmium (Cd), arsenate [As(V)], lead (Pb) and chromium [Cr(VI)] in hydroponic condition. We observed that root tissue shows variable responses for antioxidant enzyme system for different heavy metals. Genome-wide expression analysis suggests variable number of genes differentially expressed in root in response to As(V), Cd, Pb and Cr(VI) stresses. In addition to unique genes, each heavy metal modulated expression of a large number of common genes. Study also identified cis-acting regions of the promoters which can be determinants for the modulated expression of the genes in response to different heavy metals. Our study advances understanding related to various processes and networks which might be responsible for heavy metal stresses, accumulation and detoxification.

  17. Immediate Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in F1 Hybrids Parented by Species with Divergent Genomes in the Rice Genus (Oryza)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuai; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Tingting; Cao, Shuai; Josiah, Samuel Manthi; Pang, Jinsong; Lin, Xiuyun; Liu, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Background Inter-specific hybridization occurs frequently in higher plants, and represents a driving force of evolution and speciation. Inter-specific hybridization often induces genetic and epigenetic instabilities in the resultant homoploid hybrids or allopolyploids, a phenomenon known as genome shock. Although genetic and epigenetic consequences of hybridizations between rice subspecies (e.g., japonica and indica) and closely related species sharing the same AA genome have been extensively investigated, those of inter-specific hybridizations between more remote species with different genomes in the rice genus, Oryza, remain largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the immediate chromosomal and molecular genetic/epigenetic instability of three triploid F1 hybrids produced by inter-specific crossing between species with divergent genomes of Oryza by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and molecular marker analysis. Transcriptional and transpositional activity of several transposable elements (TEs) and methylation stability of their flanking regions were also assessed. We made the following principle findings: (i) all three triploid hybrids are stable in both chromosome number and gross structure; (ii) stochastic changes in both DNA sequence and methylation occurred in individual plants of all three triploid hybrids, but in general methylation changes occurred at lower frequencies than genetic changes; (iii) alteration in DNA methylation occurred to a greater extent in genomic loci flanking potentially active TEs than in randomly sampled loci; (iv) transcriptional activation of several TEs commonly occurred in all three hybrids but transpositional events were detected in a genetic context-dependent manner. Conclusions/Significance Artificially constructed inter-specific hybrids of remotely related species with divergent genomes in genus Oryza are chromosomally stable but show immediate and highly stochastic genetic and epigenetic

  18. Functional genomics approaches in parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Hagen, J; Lee, E F; Fairlie, W D; Kalinna, B H

    2012-01-01

    As research on parasitic helminths is moving into the post-genomic era, an enormous effort is directed towards deciphering gene function and to achieve gene annotation. The sequences that are available in public databases undoubtedly hold information that can be utilized for new interventions and control but the exploitation of these resources has until recently remained difficult. Only now, with the emergence of methods to genetically manipulate and transform parasitic worms will it be possible to gain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in nutrition, metabolism, developmental switches/maturation and interaction with the host immune system. This review focuses on functional genomics approaches in parasitic helminths that are currently used, to highlight potential applications of these technologies in the areas of cell biology, systems biology and immunobiology of parasitic helminths.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study for Traits Related to Plant and Grain Morphology, and Root Architecture in Temperate Rice Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Paolo; Casella, Laura; Riccardi, Paolo; Vattari, Alessandra; Orasen, Gabriele; Perrini, Rosaria; Tacconi, Gianni; Tondelli, Alessandro; Biselli, Chiara; Cattivelli, Luigi; Spindel, Jennifer; McCouch, Susan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Valé, Giampiero; Piffanelli, Pietro; Greco, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study we carried out a genome-wide association analysis for plant and grain morphology and root architecture in a unique panel of temperate rice accessions adapted to European pedo-climatic conditions. This is the first study to assess the association of selected phenotypic traits to specific genomic regions in the narrow genetic pool of temperate japonica. A set of 391 rice accessions were GBS-genotyped yielding—after data editing—57000 polymorphic and informative SNPS, among which 54% were in genic regions. Results In total, 42 significant genotype-phenotype associations were detected: 21 for plant morphology traits, 11 for grain quality traits, 10 for root architecture traits. The FDR of detected associations ranged from 3 · 10−7 to 0.92 (median: 0.25). In most cases, the significant detected associations co-localised with QTLs and candidate genes controlling the phenotypic variation of single or multiple traits. The most significant associations were those for flag leaf width on chromosome 4 (FDR = 3 · 10−7) and for plant height on chromosome 6 (FDR = 0.011). Conclusions We demonstrate the effectiveness and resolution of the developed platform for high-throughput phenotyping, genotyping and GWAS in detecting major QTLs for relevant traits in rice. We identified strong associations that may be used for selection in temperate irrigated rice breeding: e.g. associations for flag leaf width, plant height, root volume and length, grain length, grain width and their ratio. Our findings pave the way to successfully exploit the narrow genetic pool of European temperate rice and to pinpoint the most relevant genetic components contributing to the adaptability and high yield of this germplasm. The generated data could be of direct use in genomic-assisted breeding strategies. PMID:27228161

  20. Pedigree-based analysis of derivation of genome segments of an elite rice reveals key regions during its breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Degui; Chen, Wei; Lin, Zechuan; Chen, Haodong; Wang, Chongrong; Li, Hong; Yu, Renbo; Zhang, Fengyun; Zhen, Gang; Yi, Junliang; Li, Kanghuo; Liu, Yaoguang; Terzaghi, William; Tang, Xiaoyan; He, Hang; Zhou, Shaochuan; Deng, Xing Wang

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of genome variations with high-throughput assays have improved our understanding of genetic basis of crop domestication and identified the selected genome regions, but little is known about that of modern breeding, which has limited the usefulness of massive elite cultivars in further breeding. Here we deploy pedigree-based analysis of an elite rice, Huanghuazhan, to exploit key genome regions during its breeding. The cultivars in the pedigree were resequenced with 7.6× depth on average, and 2.1 million high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were obtained. Tracing the derivation of genome blocks with pedigree and information on SNPs revealed the chromosomal recombination during breeding, which showed that 26.22% of Huanghuazhan genome are strictly conserved key regions. These major effect regions were further supported by a QTL mapping of 260 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross of Huanghuazhan and a very dissimilar cultivar, Shuanggui 36, and by the genome profile of eight cultivars and 36 elite lines derived from Huanghuazhan. Hitting these regions with the cloned genes revealed they include numbers of key genes, which were then applied to demonstrate how Huanghuazhan were bred after 30 years of effort and to dissect the deficiency of artificial selection. We concluded the regions are helpful to the further breeding based on this pedigree and performing breeding by design. Our study provides genetic dissection of modern rice breeding and sheds new light on how to perform genomewide breeding by design.

  1. From data to function: functional modeling of poultry genomics data.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, F M; Lyons, E

    2013-09-01

    One of the challenges of functional genomics is to create a better understanding of the biological system being studied so that the data produced are leveraged to provide gains for agriculture, human health, and the environment. Functional modeling enables researchers to make sense of these data as it reframes a long list of genes or gene products (mRNA, ncRNA, and proteins) by grouping based upon function, be it individual molecular functions or interactions between these molecules or broader biological processes, including metabolic and signaling pathways. However, poultry researchers have been hampered by a lack of functional annotation data, tools, and training to use these data and tools. Moreover, this lack is becoming more critical as new sequencing technologies enable us to generate data not only for an increasingly diverse range of species but also individual genomes and populations of individuals. We discuss the impact of these new sequencing technologies on poultry research, with a specific focus on what functional modeling resources are available for poultry researchers. We also describe key strategies for researchers who wish to functionally model their own data, providing background information about functional modeling approaches, the data and tools to support these approaches, and the strengths and limitations of each. Specifically, we describe methods for functional analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) functional summaries, functional enrichment analysis, and pathways and network modeling. As annotation efforts begin to provide the fundamental data that underpin poultry functional modeling (such as improved gene identification, standardized gene nomenclature, temporal and spatial expression data and gene product function), tool developers are incorporating these data into new and existing tools that are used for functional modeling, and cyberinfrastructure is being developed to provide the necessary extendibility and scalability for storing and

  2. Gene Networks and Functional Features of Gravitropic response in Rice Shoot Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liwei; Zang, Aiping; Ai, Qianru; Chen, Haiying; Li, Lin; Li, Rui; Su, Feng; Chen, Xijiang; Rong, Hui; Dou, Xianying; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara; Li, Qi; Cai, Weiming

    To delineate key genes and the corresponding physiological functions as well as the coordina-tion of genes involved in the gravitropism of rice shoot bases, we used whole-genome microarray analysis of upper and lower parts of rice shoot bases at 0.5 h and 6 h after gravistimulation. And bio-information analysis was applied including GO-analysis, expression tendency and net-work analysis. In the lower shoot bases, auxin-mediated signaling pathway and glutathione transferase activity with the biggest enrichment were activated at 0.5 h, while cytokinin stimu-lus and photosynthesis were activated at 6 h. Meanwhile, several processes were suppressed in the lower shoot bases, including: xyloglucan:xyloglucosyl transferase activity, glucan metabolic processes, and ATPase activity at 0.5 h; and tRNA isopentenyltransferase activity, and chiti-nase activity, etc. at 6 h. Gene expression profile responding to gravistimulation suggested that the asymmetrically activation of several phytohormone signaling pathways including auxin, gib-berellin and cytokinin brassinolide ethylene and cytokinin-related genes were involved in the differentially growth between the upper and lower parts of rice shoot bases, and so do cell wall-related genes. Topological analysis of the coexpression networks revealed the core statue of AY177699.1(apetala3-like protein) and AK105103.1 at 0.5 h; AK062612.1 (ethylene response factor) and AK099932.1 (lectin-like receptor kinase 72) at 6 h. All the core factors have the function "response to endogenous stimulus". Additionally, AK108057.1(similar to germin-like protein precursor) was discovered as the most important core gene in the upper shoot bases in 6h after gravistimualtion while AK067424.1(cellulose synthase-like protein), AK120101.1 (Zinc finger, B-box domain containing protein) and CR278698 (ATPase associated with various cel-lular activities cellulose synthase-like protein) contribute equally to gravitropic response in the lower shoot bases.

  3. Combining high-throughput phenotyping and genome-wide association studies to reveal natural genetic variation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Duan, Lingfeng; Chen, Guoxing; Jiang, Ni; Fang, Wei; Feng, Hui; Xie, Weibo; Lian, Xingming; Wang, Gongwei; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Qifa; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    Even as the study of plant genomics rapidly develops through the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques, traditional plant phenotyping lags far behind. Here we develop a high-throughput rice phenotyping facility (HRPF) to monitor 13 traditional agronomic traits and 2 newly defined traits during the rice growth period. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the 15 traits, we identify 141 associated loci, 25 of which contain known genes such as the Green Revolution semi-dwarf gene, SD1. Based on a performance evaluation of the HRPF and GWAS results, we demonstrate that high-throughput phenotyping has the potential to replace traditional phenotyping techniques and can provide valuable gene identification information. The combination of the multifunctional phenotyping tools HRPF and GWAS provides deep insights into the genetic architecture of important traits. PMID:25295980

  4. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Root Traits in a Japonica Rice Panel

    PubMed Central

    Courtois, Brigitte; Audebert, Alain; Dardou, Audrey; Roques, Sandrine; Ghneim- Herrera, Thaura; Droc, Gaëtan; Frouin, Julien; Rouan, Lauriane; Gozé, Eric; Kilian, Andrzej; Ahmadi, Nourollah; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rice is a crop prone to drought stress in upland and rainfed lowland ecosystems. A deep root system is recognized as the best drought avoidance mechanism. Genome-wide association mapping offers higher resolution for locating quantitative trait loci (QTLs) than QTL mapping in biparental populations. We performed an association mapping study for root traits using a panel of 167 japonica accessions, mostly of tropical origin. The panel was genotyped at an average density of one marker per 22.5 kb using genotyping by sequencing technology. The linkage disequilibrium in the panel was high (r2>0.6, on average, for 20 kb mean distances between markers). The plants were grown in transparent 50 cm × 20 cm × 2 cm Plexiglas nailboard sandwiches filled with 1.5 mm glass beads through which a nutrient solution was circulated. Root system architecture and biomass traits were measured in 30-day-old plants. The panel showed a moderate to high diversity in the various traits, particularly for deep (below 30 cm depth) root mass and the number of deep roots. Association analyses were conducted using a mixed model involving both population structure and kinship to control for false positives. Nineteen associations were significant at P<1e-05, and 78 were significant at P<1e-04. The greatest numbers of significant associations were detected for deep root mass and the number of deep roots, whereas no significant associations were found for total root biomass or deep root proportion. Because several QTLs for different traits were co-localized, 51 unique loci were detected; several co-localized with meta-QTLs for root traits, but none co-localized with rice genes known to be involved in root growth. Several likely candidate genes were found in close proximity to these loci. Additional work is necessary to assess whether these markers are relevant in other backgrounds and whether the genes identified are robust candidates. PMID:24223758

  5. DNA repair and recombination in higher plants: insights from comparative genomics of arabidopsis and rice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The DNA repair and recombination (DRR) proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, caused by environmental agents and other genotoxic agents, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to abide them. Results We identified genes potentially involved in DRR mechanisms in Arabidopsis and rice using similarity searches and conserved domain analysis against proteins known to be involved in DRR in human, yeast and E. coli. As expected, many of DRR genes are very similar to those found in other eukaryotes. Beside these eukaryotes specific genes, several prokaryotes specific genes were also found to be well conserved in plants. In Arabidopsis, several functionally important DRR gene duplications are present, which do not occur in rice. Among DRR proteins, we found that proteins belonging to the nucleotide excision repair pathway were relatively more conserved than proteins needed for the other DRR pathways. Sub-cellular localization studies of DRR gene suggests that these proteins are mostly reside in nucleus while gene drain in between nucleus and cell organelles were also found in some cases. Conclusions The similarities and dissimilarities in between plants and other organisms' DRR pathways are discussed. The observed differences broaden our knowledge about DRR in the plants world, and raises the potential question of whether differentiated functions have evolved in some cases. These results, altogether, provide a useful framework for further experimental studies in these organisms. PMID:20646326

  6. Orchidstra: an integrated orchid functional genomics database.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-lin; Chao, Ya-Ting; Yen, Shao-Hua; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chen, Wan-Chieh; Chang, Yao-Chien Alex; Shih, Ming-Che

    2013-02-01

    A specialized orchid database, named Orchidstra (URL: http://orchidstra.abrc.sinica.edu.tw), has been constructed to collect, annotate and share genomic information for orchid functional genomics studies. The Orchidaceae is a large family of Angiosperms that exhibits extraordinary biodiversity in terms of both the number of species and their distribution worldwide. Orchids exhibit many unique biological features; however, investigation of these traits is currently constrained due to the limited availability of genomic information. Transcriptome information for five orchid species and one commercial hybrid has been included in the Orchidstra database. Altogether, these comprise >380,000 non-redundant orchid transcript sequences, of which >110,000 are protein-coding genes. Sequences from the transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) were obtained either from output reads from next-generation sequencing technologies assembled into contigs, or from conventional cDNA library approaches. An annotation pipeline using Gene Ontology, KEGG and Pfam was built to assign gene descriptions and functional annotation to protein-coding genes. Deep sequencing of small RNA was also performed for Phalaenopsis aphrodite to search for microRNAs (miRNAs), extending the information archived for this species to miRNA annotation, precursors and putative target genes. The P. aphrodite transcriptome information was further used to design probes for an oligonucleotide microarray, and expression profiling analysis was carried out. The intensities of hybridized probes derived from microarray assays of various tissues were incorporated into the database as part of the functional evidence. In the future, the content of the Orchidstra database will be expanded with transcriptome data and genomic information from more orchid species.

  7. Functional genomic screening to enhance oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, D J; Stojdl, D F

    2013-02-05

    Functional genomic screening has emerged as a powerful approach for understanding complex biological phenomena. Of the available tools, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) technology is unquestionably the most incisive, as it directly probes gene function. Recent applications of RNAi screening have been impressive. Notable amongst these are its use in elucidated mechanism(s) for signal transduction, various aspects of cell biology, tumourigenesis and metastasis, resistance to cancer therapeutics, and the host's response to a pathogen. Herein we discuss how recent RNAi screening efforts have helped turn our attention to the targetability of non-oncogene support pathways for cancer treatment, with a particular focus on a recent study that identified a non-oncogene addiction to the ER stress response as a synergist target for oncolytic virus therapy (OVT). Moreover, we give our thoughts on the future of RNAi screening as a tool to enhance OVT and describe recent technical improvements that are poised to make genome-scale RNAi experiments more sensitive, less noisy, more applicable in vivo, and more easily validated in clinically relevant animal models.

  8. Experimental evolution reveals genome-wide spectrum and dynamics of mutations in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Junhyun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Gir-Won; Dean, Ralph A; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on mutation processes is central to interpreting genetic analysis data as well as understanding the underlying nature of almost all evolutionary phenomena. However, studies on genome-wide mutational spectrum and dynamics in fungal pathogens are scarce, hindering our understanding of their evolution and biology. Here, we explored changes in the phenotypes and genome sequences of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae during the forced in vitro evolution by weekly transfer of cultures on artificial media. Through combination of experimental evolution with high throughput sequencing technology, we found that mutations accumulate rapidly prior to visible phenotypic changes and that both genetic drift and selection seem to contribute to shaping mutational landscape, suggesting the buffering capacity of fungal genome against mutations. Inference of mutational effects on phenotypes through the use of T-DNA insertion mutants suggested that at least some of the DNA sequence mutations are likely associated with the observed phenotypic changes. Furthermore, our data suggest oxidative damages and UV as major sources of mutation during subcultures. Taken together, our work revealed important properties of original source of variation in the genome of the rice blast fungus. We believe that these results provide not only insights into stability of pathogenicity and genome evolution in plant pathogenic fungi but also a model in which evolution of fungal pathogens in natura can be comparatively investigated.

  9. A whole-genome analysis of a transgenic rice seed-based edible vaccine against cedar pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Taiji; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Takeshi; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-12-01

    Genetic modification (GM) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a robust and widely employed method to confer new traits to crops. In this process, a transfer DNA is delivered into the host genome, but it is still unclear how the host genome is altered by this event at single-base resolution. To decipher genomic discrepancy between GM crops and their host, we conducted whole-genome sequencing of a transgenic rice line OSCR11. This rice line expresses a seed-based edible vaccine containing two major pollen allergens, Cry j 1 and Cry j 2, against Japanese cedar pollinosis. We revealed that genetic differences between OSCR11 and its host a123 were significantly less than those between a123 and its precedent cultivar Koshihikari. The pattern of nucleotide base substitution in OSCR11, relative to a123, was consistent with somaclonal variation. Mutations in OSCR11 probably occurred during the cell culture steps. In addition, strand-specific mRNA-Seq revealed similar transcriptomes of a123 and OSCR11, supporting genomic integrity between them.

  10. Development of genome-wide PCR-based markers from insertion, deletion and single nucleotide polymorphisms for closely related Japanese rice cultivars and identification of QTLs for the appearance of cooked rice and polished rice

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Noriko; Takano, Sho; Shimoda, Naomi; Takamure, Itsuro; Sato, Takashi; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-01-01

    Appearance of rice grain is an important property, affecting its acceptance by consumers. Moreover, appearance is a complex characteristic involving many components, including glossiness and whiteness. The genetic bases for the glossiness of cooked rice and the whiteness of polished rice (WPR) were determined using 133 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between two closely related cultivars from Hokkaido, Joiku462, with high glossiness and whiteness, and Yukihikari, an ancestor of Joiku462 with low glossiness and whiteness. Analyses identified 167 genome-wide InDel markers, five cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) and eight derived CAPS markers differentiating the parental lines. The glossiness area (GLA) and glossiness strength (GLS) of cooked rice and WPR were determined for RILs in two locations, Pippu and Sapporo, Hokkaido. Four QTLs were detected. qGLA10 and qGLS9 were detected on chromosomes 10 and 9, respectively, with both being significant at both geographic locations. qWPR1 on chromosome 1 was significant at Pippu, and qWPR4 on chromosome 4 was significant at Sapporo. The Joiku462 alleles at all QTLs increased each trait. The PCR-based markers flanking these four QTLs may be useful for improvement of GLA, GLS and WPR. PMID:28163590

  11. Chlorella starch branching enzyme II (BEII) can complement the function of BEIIb in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takayuki; Francisco, Perigio B; Aihara, Satomi; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Mayumi; Oyama, Yasunori; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Satoh, Hikaru; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2009-06-01

    In monocots, starch branching enzyme II (BEII) was functionally differentiated into BEIIa and BEIIb after separation from the dicots, and in cereals BEIIb plays a distinct role in amylopectin biosynthesis in the endosperm. The present study was conducted to examine to what extent a green algal BEII has an overlapping function with BEIIb in starch biosynthesis by introducing the Chlorella BEII gene into an amylose-extender (ae) mutant of rice. Chlorella BEII was found to complement the contribution of the rice endosperm BEIIb to the structures of amylopectin and starch granules because these mutated phenotypes were recovered almost completely to those of the wild type by the expression of Chlorella BEII. When the recombinant BE enzymes were incubated with the rice ae amylopectin, the branching pattern of Chlorella BEII was much more similar to that of rice BEIIb rather than rice BEIIa. Detailed analyses of BE reaction products suggests that BEIIb and Chlorella BEII only transfer chains with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 6 and 7, whereas BEIIa preferably transfers short chains with a DP of about 6-11. These results show that the Chlorella BEII is functionally similar to rice BEIIb rather than BEIIa.

  12. Description of durum wheat linkage map and comparative sequence analysis of wheat mapped DArT markers with rice and Brachypodium genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of wheat to the world economy, together with progresses in high-throughput next-generation DNA sequencing, have accelerated initiatives of genetic research for wheat improvement. The availability of high density linkage maps is crucial to identify genotype-phenotype associations, but also for anchoring BAC contigs to genetic maps, a strategy followed for sequencing the wheat genome. Results Here we report a genetic linkage map in a durum wheat segregating population and the study of mapped DArT markers. The linkage map consists of 126 gSSR, 31 EST-SSR and 351 DArT markers distributed in 24 linkage groups for a total length of 1,272 cM. Through bioinformatic approaches we have analysed 327 DArT clones to reveal their redundancy, syntenic and functional aspects. The DNA sequences of 174 DArT markers were assembled into a non-redundant set of 60 marker clusters. This explained the generation of clusters in very small chromosome regions across genomes. Of these DArT markers, 61 showed highly significant (Expectation < E-10) BLAST similarity to gene sequences in public databases of model species such as Brachypodium and rice. Based on sequence alignments, the analysis revealed a mosaic gene conservation, with 54 and 72 genes present in rice and Brachypodium species, respectively. Conclusions In the present manuscript we provide a detailed DArT markers characterization and the basis for future efforts in durum wheat map comparing. PMID:24304553

  13. Single-wavelength based Thai jasmine rice identification with polynomial fitting function and neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwansukho, Kajpanya; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Buranasiri, Prathan

    2013-06-01

    We previously showed that a combination of image thresholding, chain coding, elliptic Fourier descriptors, and artificial neural network analysis provided a low false acceptance rate (FAR) and a false rejection rate (FRR) of 11.0% and 19.0%, respectively, in identify Thai jasmine rice from three unwanted rice varieties. In this work, we highlight that only a polynomial function fitting on the determined chain code and the neural network analysis are highly sufficient in obtaining a very low FAR of < 3.0% and a very low 0.3% FRR for the separation of Thai jasmine rice from Chainat 1 (CNT1), Prathumtani 1 (PTT1), and Hom-Pitsanulok (HPSL) rice varieties. With this proposed approach, the analytical time is tremendously suppressed from 4,250 seconds down to 2 seconds, implying extremely high potential in practical deployment.

  14. Genome-wide disruption of gene expression in allopolyploids but not hybrids of rice subspecies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunming; Bai, Yan; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhao, Na; Hu, Lanjuan; Gong, Zhiyun; Wendel, Jonathan F; Liu, Bao

    2014-05-01

    Hybridization and polyploidization are prominent processes in plant evolution. Hybrids and allopolyploids typically exhibit radically altered gene expression patterns relative to their parents, a phenomenon termed "transcriptomic shock." To distinguish the effects of hybridization from polyploidization on coregulation of divergent alleles, we analyzed expression of parental copies (homoeologs) of 11,608 genes using RNA-seq-based transcriptome profiling in reciprocal hybrids and tetraploids constructed from subspecies japonica and indica of Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.). The diploid hybrids and their derived allopolyploids differ dramatically in morphology, despite having the same suite of genes and genic proportions. Allelic and homoeolog-specific transcripts were unequivocally diagnosed in the hybrids and tetraploids based on parent-specific SNPs. Compared with the in silico hybrid (parental mix), the range of progenitor expression divergence was significantly reduced in both reciprocally generated F1 hybrids, presumably due to the ameliorating effects of a common trans environment on divergent cis-factors. In contrast, parental expression differences were greatly elaborated at the polyploid level, which we propose is a consequence of stoichiometric disruptions associated with the numerous chromosomal packaging and volumetric changes accompanying nascent polyploidy. We speculate that the emergent property of "whole genome doubling" has repercussions that reverberate throughout the transcriptome and downstream, ultimately generating altered phenotypes. This perspective may yield insight into the nature of adaptation and the origin of evolutionary novelty accompanying polyploidy.

  15. Genomic resources for gene discovery, functional genome annotation, and evolutionary studies of maize and its close relatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Xue; Liu, Lin; Li, Haiyan; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Kudrna, David A; Xiong, Wentao; Wang, Hao; Dai, Zhaozhao; Zheng, Yonglian; Lai, Jinsheng; Jin, Weiwei; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Wing, Rod A; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-11-01

    Maize is one of the most important food crops and a key model for genetics and developmental biology. A genetically anchored and high-quality draft genome sequence of maize inbred B73 has been obtained to serve as a reference sequence. To facilitate evolutionary studies in maize and its close relatives, much like the Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) (www.OMAP.org) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) resource did for the rice community, we constructed BAC libraries for maize inbred lines Zheng58, Chang7-2, and Mo17 and maize wild relatives Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and Tripsacum dactyloides. Furthermore, to extend functional genomic studies to maize and sorghum, we also constructed binary BAC (BIBAC) libraries for the maize inbred B73 and the sorghum landrace Nengsi-1. The BAC/BIBAC vectors facilitate transfer of large intact DNA inserts from BAC clones to the BIBAC vector and functional complementation of large DNA fragments. These seven Zea Map Alignment Project (ZMAP) BAC/BIBAC libraries have average insert sizes ranging from 92 to 148 kb, organellar DNA from 0.17 to 2.3%, empty vector rates between 0.35 and 5.56%, and genome equivalents of 4.7- to 8.4-fold. The usefulness of the Parviglumis and Tripsacum BAC libraries was demonstrated by mapping clones to the reference genome. Novel genes and alleles present in these ZMAP libraries can now be used for functional complementation studies and positional or homology-based cloning of genes for translational genomics.

  16. Identification and Functional Analysis of Light-Responsive Unique Genes and Gene Family Members in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Lee, Jinwon; Dardick, Chris; Seo, Young-Su; Cao, Peijian; Canlas, Patrick; Phetsom, Jirapa; Xu, Xia; Ouyang, Shu; An, Kyungsook; Cho, Yun-Ja; Lee, Geun-Cheol; Lee, Yoosook; An, Gynheung; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2008-01-01

    Functional redundancy limits detailed analysis of genes in many organisms. Here, we report a method to efficiently overcome this obstacle by combining gene expression data with analysis of gene-indexed mutants. Using a rice NSF45K oligo-microarray to compare 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue, we identified 365 genes that showed significant 8-fold or greater induction in the light relative to dark conditions. We then screened collections of rice T-DNA insertional mutants to identify rice lines with mutations in the strongly light-induced genes. From this analysis, we identified 74 different lines comprising two independent mutant lines for each of 37 light-induced genes. This list was further refined by mining gene expression data to exclude genes that had potential functional redundancy due to co-expressed family members (12 genes) and genes that had inconsistent light responses across other publicly available microarray datasets (five genes). We next characterized the phenotypes of rice lines carrying mutations in ten of the remaining candidate genes and then carried out co-expression analysis associated with these genes. This analysis effectively provided candidate functions for two genes of previously unknown function and for one gene not directly linked to the tested biochemical pathways. These data demonstrate the efficiency of combining gene family-based expression profiles with analyses of insertional mutants to identify novel genes and their functions, even among members of multi-gene families. PMID:18725934

  17. SorghumFDB: sorghum functional genomics database with multidimensional network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; You, Qi; Zhang, Liwei; Yi, Xin; Yan, Hengyu; Xu, Wenying; Su, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) has excellent agronomic traits and biological properties, such as heat and drought-tolerance. It is a C4 grass and potential bioenergy-producing plant, which makes it an important crop worldwide. With the sorghum genome sequence released, it is essential to establish a sorghum functional genomics data mining platform. We collected genomic data and some functional annotations to construct a sorghum functional genomics database (SorghumFDB). SorghumFDB integrated knowledge of sorghum gene family classifications (transcription regulators/factors, carbohydrate-active enzymes, protein kinases, ubiquitins, cytochrome P450, monolignol biosynthesis related enzymes, R-genes and organelle-genes), detailed gene annotations, miRNA and target gene information, orthologous pairs in the model plants Arabidopsis, rice and maize, gene loci conversions and a genome browser. We further constructed a dynamic network of multidimensional biological relationships, comprised of the co-expression data, protein–protein interactions and miRNA-target pairs. We took effective measures to combine the network, gene set enrichment and motif analyses to determine the key regulators that participate in related metabolic pathways, such as the lignin pathway, which is a major biological process in bioenergy-producing plants. Database URL: http://structuralbiology.cau.edu.cn/sorghum/index.html. PMID:27352859

  18. From bacterial genome to functionality; case bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Marco; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Leahy, Sinead; Moreno-Munoz, Jose Antonio; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2007-11-30

    The availability of complete bacterial genome sequences has significantly furthered our understanding of the genetics, physiology and biochemistry of the microorganisms in question, particularly those that have commercially important applications. Bifidobacteria are among such microorganisms, as they constitute mammalian commensals of biotechnological significance due to their perceived role in maintaining a balanced gastrointestinal (GIT) microflora. Bifidobacteria are therefore frequently used as health-promoting or probiotic components in functional food products. A fundamental understanding of the metabolic activities employed by these commensal bacteria, in particular their capability to utilize a wide range of complex oligosaccharides, can reveal ways to provide in vivo growth advantages relative to other competing gut bacteria or pathogens. Furthermore, an in depth analysis of adaptive responses to nutritional or environmental stresses may provide methodologies to retain viability and improve functionality during commercial preparation, storage and delivery of the probiotic organism.

  19. Genome level analysis of rice mRNA 3′-end processing signals and alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yingjia; Ji, Guoli; Haas, Brian J.; Wu, Xiaohui; Zheng, Jianti; Reese, Greg J.; Li, Qingshun Quinn

    2008-01-01

    The position of a poly(A) site of eukaryotic mRNA is determined by sequence signals in pre-mRNA and a group of polyadenylation factors. To reveal rice poly(A) signals at a genome level, we constructed a dataset of 55 742 authenticated poly(A) sites and characterized the poly(A) signals. This resulted in identifying the typical tripartite cis-elements, including FUE, NUE and CE, as previously observed in Arabidopsis. The average size of the 3′-UTR was 289 nucleotides. When mapped to the genome, however, 15% of these poly(A) sites were found to be located in the currently annotated intergenic regions. Moreover, an extensive alternative polyadenylation profile was evident where 50% of the genes analyzed had more than one unique poly(A) site (excluding microheterogeneity sites), and 13% had four or more poly(A) sites. About 4% of the analyzed genes possessed alternative poly(A) sites at their introns, 5′-UTRs, or protein coding regions. The authenticity of these alternative poly(A) sites was partially confirmed using MPSS data. Analysis of nucleotide profile and signal patterns indicated that there may be a different set of poly(A) signals for those poly(A) sites found in the coding regions. Based on the features of rice poly(A) signals, an updated algorithm termed PASS-Rice was designed to predict poly(A) sites. PMID:18411206

  20. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hansong; O’Farrell, Patrick H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection1. Contrastingly, matchups between distant genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes revealed that the non-coding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, within each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission. PMID:27270106

  1. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hansong; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection. In contrast, matchups between distantly related genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome, leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes showed that the noncoding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, in each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection, promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission.

  2. Comparison of space flight and heavy ion radiation induced genomic/epigenomic mutations in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinming; Lu, Weihong; Sun, Yeqing

    2014-04-01

    Rice seeds, after space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation treatment were cultured on ground. Leaves of the mature plants were obtained for examination of genomic/epigenomic mutations by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) method, respectively. The mutation sites were identified by fragment recovery and sequencing. The heritability of the mutations was detected in the next generation. Results showed that both space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation can induce significant alterations on rice genome and epigenome (P<0.05). For both genetic and epigenetic assays, while there was no significant difference in mutation rates and their ability to be inherited to the next generation, the site of mutations differed between the space flight and radiation treated groups. More than 50% of the mutation sites were shared by two radiation treated groups, radiated with different LET value and dose, while only about 20% of the mutation sites were shared by space flight group and radiation treated group. Moreover, in space flight group, we found that DNA methylation changes were more prone to occur on CNG sequence than CG sequence. Sequencing results proved that both space flight and heavy ion radiation induced mutations were widely spread on rice genome including coding region and repeated region. Our study described and compared the characters of space flight and low dose heavy ion radiation induced genomic/epigenomic mutations. Our data revealed the mechanisms of application of space environment for mutagenesis and crop breeding. Furthermore, this work implicated that the nature of mutations induced under space flight conditions may involve factors beyond ion radiation.

  3. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast.

  4. proGenomes: a resource for consistent functional and taxonomic annotations of prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mende, Daniel R.; Letunic, Ivica; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Li, Simone S.; Forslund, Kristoffer; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer

    2017-01-01

    The availability of microbial genomes has opened many new avenues of research within microbiology. This has been driven primarily by comparative genomics approaches, which rely on accurate and consistent characterization of genomic sequences. It is nevertheless difficult to obtain consistent taxonomic and integrated functional annotations for defined prokaryotic clades. Thus, we developed proGenomes, a resource that provides user-friendly access to currently 25 038 high-quality genomes whose sequences and consistent annotations can be retrieved individually or by taxonomic clade. These genomes are assigned to 5306 consistent and accurate taxonomic species clusters based on previously established methodology. proGenomes also contains functional information for almost 80 million protein-coding genes, including a comprehensive set of general annotations and more focused annotations for carbohydrate-active enzymes and antibiotic resistance genes. Additionally, broad habitat information is provided for many genomes. All genomes and associated information can be downloaded by user-selected clade or multiple habitat-specific sets of representative genomes. We expect that the availability of high-quality genomes with comprehensive functional annotations will promote advances in clinical microbial genomics, functional evolution and other subfields of microbiology. proGenomes is available at http://progenomes.embl.de. PMID:28053165

  5. proGenomes: a resource for consistent functional and taxonomic annotations of prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Mende, Daniel R; Letunic, Ivica; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Li, Simone S; Forslund, Kristoffer; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer

    2017-01-04

    The availability of microbial genomes has opened many new avenues of research within microbiology. This has been driven primarily by comparative genomics approaches, which rely on accurate and consistent characterization of genomic sequences. It is nevertheless difficult to obtain consistent taxonomic and integrated functional annotations for defined prokaryotic clades. Thus, we developed proGenomes, a resource that provides user-friendly access to currently 25 038 high-quality genomes whose sequences and consistent annotations can be retrieved individually or by taxonomic clade. These genomes are assigned to 5306 consistent and accurate taxonomic species clusters based on previously established methodology. proGenomes also contains functional information for almost 80 million protein-coding genes, including a comprehensive set of general annotations and more focused annotations for carbohydrate-active enzymes and antibiotic resistance genes. Additionally, broad habitat information is provided for many genomes. All genomes and associated information can be downloaded by user-selected clade or multiple habitat-specific sets of representative genomes. We expect that the availability of high-quality genomes with comprehensive functional annotations will promote advances in clinical microbial genomics, functional evolution and other subfields of microbiology. proGenomes is available at http://progenomes.embl.de.

  6. De Novo Assemblies of Three Oryza glaberrima Accessions Provide First Insights about Pan-Genome of African Rices

    PubMed Central

    Monat, Cécile; Pera, Bérengère; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noelle; Sow, Mounirou; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Bastianelli, Leila; Ghesquière, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Oryza glaberrima is one of the two cultivated species of rice, and harbors various interesting agronomic traits, especially in biotic and abiotic resistance, compared with its Asian cousin O. sativa. A previous reference genome was published but newer studies highlighted some missing parts. Moreover, global species diversity is known nowadays to be represented by more than one single individual. For that purpose, we sequenced, assembled and annotated de novo three different cultivars from O. glaberrima. After validating our assemblies, we were able to better solve complex regions than the previous assembly and to provide a first insight in pan-genomic divergence between individuals. The three assemblies shown large common regions, but almost 25% of the genome present collinearity breakpoints or are even individual specific. PMID:28173009

  7. Metabolome-genome-wide association study dissects genetic architecture for generating natural variation in rice secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Fumio; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Okazaki, Yozo; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Ebana, Kaworu; Yano, Masahiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce structurally diverse secondary (specialized) metabolites to increase their fitness for survival under adverse environments. Several bioactive compounds for new drugs have been identified through screening of plant extracts. In this study, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were conducted to investigate the genetic architecture behind the natural variation of rice secondary metabolites. GWAS using the metabolome data of 175 rice accessions successfully identified 323 associations among 143 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 89 metabolites. The data analysis highlighted that levels of many metabolites are tightly associated with a small number of strong quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The tight association may be a mechanism generating strains with distinct metabolic composition through the crossing of two different strains. The results indicate that one plant species produces more diverse phytochemicals than previously expected, and plants still contain many useful compounds for human applications. PMID:25267402

  8. The function of genomes in bioenergetic organelles.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John F

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are energy-transducing organelles of the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They originated as bacterial symbionts whose host cells acquired respiration from the precursor of the mitochondrion, and oxygenic photosynthesis from the precursor of the chloroplast. The host cells also acquired genetic information from their symbionts, eventually incorporating much of it into their own genomes. Genes of the eukaryotic cell nucleus now encode most mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins. Genes are copied and moved between cellular compartments with relative ease, and there is no obvious obstacle to successful import of any protein precursor from the cytosol. So why are any genes at all retained in cytoplasmic organelles? One proposal is that these small but functional genomes provide a location for genes that is close to, and in the same compartment as, their gene products. This co-location facilitates rapid and direct regulatory coupling. Redox control of synthesis de novo is put forward as the common property of those proteins that must be encoded and synthesized within mitochondria and chloroplasts. This testable hypothesis is termed CORR, for co-location for redox regulation. Principles, predictions and consequences of CORR are examined in the context of competing hypotheses and current evidence. PMID:12594916

  9. Genetic architecture of aluminum tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) determined through genome-wide association analysis and QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Famoso, Adam N; Zhao, Keyan; Clark, Randy T; Tung, Chih-Wei; Wright, Mark H; Bustamante, Carlos; Kochian, Leon V; McCouch, Susan R

    2011-08-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a primary limitation to crop productivity on acid soils, and rice has been demonstrated to be significantly more Al tolerant than other cereal crops. However, the mechanisms of rice Al tolerance are largely unknown, and no genes underlying natural variation have been reported. We screened 383 diverse rice accessions, conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) study, and conducted QTL mapping in two bi-parental populations using three estimates of Al tolerance based on root growth. Subpopulation structure explained 57% of the phenotypic variation, and the mean Al tolerance in Japonica was twice that of Indica. Forty-eight regions associated with Al tolerance were identified by GWA analysis, most of which were subpopulation-specific. Four of these regions co-localized with a priori candidate genes, and two highly significant regions co-localized with previously identified QTLs. Three regions corresponding to induced Al-sensitive rice mutants (ART1, STAR2, Nrat1) were identified through bi-parental QTL mapping or GWA to be involved in natural variation for Al tolerance. Haplotype analysis around the Nrat1 gene identified susceptible and tolerant haplotypes explaining 40% of the Al tolerance variation within the aus subpopulation, and sequence analysis of Nrat1 identified a trio of non-synonymous mutations predictive of Al sensitivity in our diversity panel. GWA analysis discovered more phenotype-genotype associations and provided higher resolution, but QTL mapping identified critical rare and/or subpopulation-specific alleles not detected by GWA analysis. Mapping using Indica/Japonica populations identified QTLs associated with transgressive variation where alleles from a susceptible aus or indica parent enhanced Al tolerance in a tolerant Japonica background. This work supports the hypothesis that selectively introgressing alleles across subpopulations is an efficient approach for trait enhancement in plant breeding programs and demonstrates

  10. Genetic and genomic dissection of resistance genes to the rice sheath blight pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight disease caused by the anastomosis group AG1-IA of the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most serious rice diseases in the southern US and the world. The use of fungicides is a popular but costly method to control this disease worldwide. Genetic analysis of host re...

  11. Population perspectives on functional genomic variation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Daniel A; Magwene, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing have facilitated large-scale surveys of genomic variation in the budding yeast,Saccharomyces cerevisiae These surveys have revealed extensive sequence variation between yeast strains. However, much less is known about how such variation influences the amount and nature of variation for functional genomic traits within and between yeast lineages. We review population-level studies of functional genomic variation, with a particular focus on how population functional genomic approaches can provide insights into both genome function and the evolutionary process. Although variation in functional genomics phenotypes is pervasive, our understanding of the consequences of this variation, either in physiological or evolutionary terms, is still rudimentary and thus motivates increased attention to appropriate null models. To date, much of the focus of population functional genomic studies has been on gene expression variation, but other functional genomic data types are just as likely to reveal important insights at the population level, suggesting a pressing need for more studies that go beyond transcription. Finally, we discuss how a population functional genomic perspective can be a powerful approach for developing a mechanistic understanding of the processes that link genomic variation to organismal phenotypes through gene networks.

  12. Functional characterization of the rice kaurene synthase-like gene family.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meimei; Wilderman, P Ross; Morrone, Dana; Xu, Jianjun; Roy, Arnab; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Coates, Robert M; Peters, Reuben J

    2007-02-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa) genome contains a family of kaurene synthase-like genes (OsKSL) presumably involved in diterpenoid biosynthesis. While a number of OsKSL enzymes have been functionally characterized, several have not been previously investigated, and the gene family has not been broadly analyzed. Here we report cloning of several OsKSL genes and functional characterization of the encoded enzymes. In particular, we have verified the expected production of ent-kaur-16-ene by the gibberellin phytohormone biosynthesis associated OsKS1 and demonstrated that OsKSL3 is a pseudo-gene, while OsKSL5 and OsKSL6 produce ent-(iso)kaur-15-ene. Similar to previous reports, we found that our sub-species variant of OsKSL7 produces ent-cassa-12,15-diene, OsKSL10 produces ent-(sandaraco)pimar-8(14),15-diene, and OsKSL8 largely syn-stemar-13-ene, although we also identified syn-stemod-12-ene as an alternative product formed in approximately 20% of the reactions catalyzed by OsKSL8. Along with our previous reports identifying OsKSL4 as a syn-pimara-7,15-diene synthase and OsKSL11 as a syn-stemod-13(17)-ene synthase, this essentially completes biochemical characterization of the OsKSL gene family, enabling broader analyses. For example, because several OsKSL enzymes are involved in phytoalexin biosynthesis and their gene transcription is inducible, promoter analysis was used to identify a pair of specifically conserved motifs that may be involved in transcriptional up-regulation during the rice plant defense response. Also examined is the continuing process of gene evolution in the OsKSL gene family, which is particularly interesting in the context of very recently reported data indicating that a japonica sub-species variant of OsKSL5 produces ent-pimara-8(14),15-diene, rather than the ent-(iso)kaur-15-ene produced by the indica sub-species variant analyzed here.

  13. Comparative Genomic Analysis of the GRF Genes in Chinese Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd), Poplar (Populous), Grape (Vitis vinifera), Arabidopsis and Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yunpeng; Han, Yahui; Jin, Qing; Lin, Yi; Cai, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Growth-regulating factors (GRFs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have important functions in regulating plant growth and development. Previous studies on GRF family members focused either on a single or a small set of genes. Here, a comparative genomic analysis of the GRF gene family was performed in poplar (a model tree species), Arabidopsis (a model plant for annual herbaceous dicots), grape (one model plant for perennial dicots), rice (a model plant for monocots) and Chinese pear (one of the economical fruit crops). In total, 58 GRF genes were identified, 12 genes in rice (Oryza sativa), 8 genes in grape (Vitis vinifera), 9 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, 19 genes in poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and 10 genes in Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri). The GRF genes were divided into five subfamilies based on the phylogenetic analysis, which was supported by their structural analysis. Furthermore, microsynteny analysis indicated that highly conserved regions of microsynteny were identified in all of the five species tested. And Ka/Ks analysis revealed that purifying selection plays an important role in the maintenance of GRF genes. Our results provide basic information on GRF genes in five plant species and lay the foundation for future research on the functions of these genes. PMID:27933074

  14. A genome-wide survey of HD-Zip genes in rice and analysis of drought-responsive family members.

    PubMed

    Agalou, Adamantia; Purwantomo, Sigit; Overnäs, Elin; Johannesson, Henrik; Zhu, Xiaoyi; Estiati, Amy; de Kam, Rolf J; Engström, Peter; Slamet-Loedin, Inez H; Zhu, Zhen; Wang, Mei; Xiong, Lizhong; Meijer, Annemarie H; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F

    2008-01-01

    The homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-Zip) genes encode transcription factors that have diverse functions in plant development and have often been implicated in stress adaptation. The HD-Zip genes are the most abundant group of homeobox (HB) genes in plants and do not occur in other eukaryotes. This paper describes the complete annotation of the HD-Zip families I, II and III from rice and compares these gene families with Arabidopsis in a phylogeny reconstruction. Orthologous pairs of rice and Arabidopsis HD-Zip genes were predicted based on neighbour joining and maximum parsimony (MP) trees with support of conserved intron-exon organization. Additionally, a number of HD-Zip genes appeared to be unique to rice. Searching of EST and cDNA databases and expression analysis using RT-PCR showed that 30 out of 31 predicted rice HD-Zip genes are expressed. Most HD-Zip genes were broadly expressed in mature plants and seedlings, but others showed more organ specific patterns. Like in Arabidopsis and other dicots, a subset of the rice HD-Zip I and II genes was found to be regulated by drought stress. We identified both drought-induced and drought-repressed HD-Zip genes and demonstrate that these genes are differentially regulated in drought-sensitive versus drought-tolerant rice cultivars. The drought-repressed HD-Zip family I gene, Oshox4, was selected for promoter-GUS analysis, showing that drought-responsiveness of Oshox4 is controlled by the promoter and that Oshox4 expression is predominantly vascular-specific. Loss-of-function analysis of Oshox4 revealed no specific phenotype, but overexpression analysis suggested a role for Oshox4 in elongation and maturation processes.

  15. Loss‐of‐function mutation of rice SLAC7 decreases chloroplast stability and induces a photoprotection mechanism in rice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaolei; Wu, Jiemin; Chen, Taiyu; Tie, Weiwei; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plants absorb sunlight to power the photochemical reactions of photosynthesis, which can potentially damage the photosynthetic machinery. However, the mechanism that protects chloroplasts from the damage remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that rice (Oryza sativa L.) SLAC7 is a generally expressed membrane protein. Loss‐of‐function of SLAC7 caused continuous damage to the chloroplasts of mutant leaves under normal light conditions. Ion leakage indicators related to leaf damage such as H2O2 and abscisic acid levels were significantly higher in slac7‐1 than in the wild type. Consistently, the photosynthesis efficiency and Fv/Fm ratio of slac7‐1 were significantly decreased (similar to photoinhibition). In response to chloroplast damage, slac7‐1 altered its leaf morphology (curled or fused leaf) by the synergy between plant hormones and transcriptional factors to decrease the absorption of light, suggesting that a photoprotection mechanism for chloroplast damage was activated in slac7‐1. When grown in dark conditions, slac7‐1 displayed a normal phenotype. SLAC7 under the control of the AtSLAC1 promoter could partially complement the phenotypes of Arabidopsis slac1 mutants, indicating a partial conservation of SLAC protein functions. These results suggest that SLAC7 is essential for maintaining the chloroplast stability in rice. PMID:25739330

  16. Genome-wide identification of rice class I metallothionein gene: tissue expression patterns and induction in response to heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Neelam; Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Shikha; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Adhikari, Bijan; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2012-11-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are members of a family of cysteine-rich low molecular weight polypeptides which play an important role in heavy metal detoxification and homeostasis of intracellular metal ions in plant. Though MT genes from some selected plants have been characterized with respect to their protein sequences, kinetic properties and tissue-specific localization, no detailed study has been carried out in rice. Here, we present genome-wide identification, structural and expression analyses of rice MT gene family. Our analysis suggests presence of 11 class I MT genes in rice genome (Release 7 of the MSU Rice Genome Annotation Project) which are differentially expressed during growth and development, in various tissues and during biotic and abiotic stresses. Our analyses suggest that class I MT proteins in rice differ in tissue localization as well as in heavy metal coordination chemistry. We also suggest that some MTs have a predominant role in detoxification of As (V) in arsenic-tolerant rice cultivars. Our analysis suggests that apart from transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional alternative splicing in some members of this family takes place during growth and development, in various tissues and during biotic and abiotic stresses.

  17. Rice pectin methylesterase inhibitor28 (OsPMEI28) encodes a functional PMEI and its overexpression results in a dwarf phenotype through increased pectin methylesterification levels.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong Phuong; Jeong, Ho Young; Jeon, Seung Ho; Kim, Donghyuk; Lee, Chanhui

    2017-01-01

    Pectin methylesterases (PMEs, EC 3.1.1.11) belonging to carbohydrate esterase family 8 cleave the ester bond between a galacturonic acid and an methyl group and the resulting change in methylesterification level plays an important role during the growth and development of plants. Optimal pectin methylesterification status in each cell type is determined by the balance between PME activity and post-translational PME inhibition by PME inhibitors (PMEIs). Rice contains 49 PMEIs and none of them are functionally characterized. Genomic sequence analysis led to the identification of rice PMEI28 (OsPMEI28). Recombinant OsPMEI28 exhibited inhibitory activity against commercial PME protein with the highest activities detected at pH 8.5. Overexpression of OsPMEI28 in rice resulted in an increased level of cell wall bound methylester groups and differential changes in the composition of cell wall neutral monosaccharides and lignin content in culm tissues. Consequently, transgenic plants overexpressing OsPMEI28 exhibited dwarf phenotypes and reduced culm diameter. Our data indicate that OsPMEI28 functions as a critical structural modulator by regulating the degree of pectin methylesterification and that an impaired status of pectin methylesterification affects physiochemical properties of the cell wall components and causes abnormal cell extensibility in rice culm tissues.

  18. Genome-Wide Differences in DNA Methylation Changes in Two Contrasting Rice Genotypes in Response to Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wensheng; Qin, Qiao; Sun, Fan; Wang, Yinxiao; Xu, Dandan; Li, Zhikang; Fu, Binying

    2016-01-01

    Differences in drought stress tolerance within diverse rice genotypes have been attributed to genetic diversity and epigenetic alterations. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that influences diverse biological processes, but its effects on rice drought stress tolerance are poorly understood. In this study, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing and an Affymetrix GeneChip rice genome array were used to profile the DNA methylation patterns and transcriptomes of the drought-tolerant introgression line DK151 and its drought-sensitive recurrent parent IR64 under drought and control conditions. The introgression of donor genomic DNA induced genome-wide DNA methylation changes in DK151 plants. A total of 1190 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were detected between the two genotypes under normal growth conditions, and the DMR-associated genes in DK151 plants were mainly related to stress response, programmed cell death, and nutrient reservoir activity, which are implicated to constitutive drought stress tolerance. A comparison of the DNA methylation changes in the two genotypes under drought conditions indicated that DK151 plants have a more stable methylome, with only 92 drought-induced DMRs, than IR64 plants with 506 DMRs. Gene ontology analyses of the DMR-associated genes in drought-stressed plants revealed that changes to the DNA methylation status of genotype-specific genes are associated with the epigenetic regulation of drought stress responses. Transcriptome analysis further helped to identify a set of 12 and 23 DMR-associated genes that were differentially expressed in DK151 and IR64, respectively, under drought stress compared with respective controls. Correlation analysis indicated that DNA methylation has various effects on gene expression, implying that it affects gene expression directly or indirectly through diverse regulatory pathways. Our results indicate that drought-induced alterations to DNA methylation may influence

  19. An analysis of the complete sequence of a sugarcane bacilliform virus genome infectious to banana and rice.

    PubMed

    Bouhida, M; Lockhart, B E; Olszewski, N E

    1993-01-01

    The genome of sugarcane bacilliform virus (ScBV), a badnavirus, consists of a circular dsDNA. The complete sequence of a cloned infective ScBV genome is reported here. The genome is 7568 bp in size and possesses a number of features suggesting that ScBV is a pararetrovirus. A tRNA(Met)-binding site that may serve as a primer for minus-strand synthesis is present. The plus-strand of the ScBV genome contains three open reading frames (ORFs) which are capable of encoding proteins with calculated M(r) values of 22K, 13K and 215K. The 215K protein has regions with similarity to the RNA-binding domains, aspartic proteases and replicases of retro-elements. In addition, the 215K protein also has a region with restricted similarity to the intercellular transport proteins of plant viruses. Comparisons with the other sequenced badnaviruses, Commelina yellow mottle (CoYMV) and rice tungro bacilliform (RTBV) viruses, indicate that the arrangement of the ORFs in these viruses is conserved. Located next to the putative RNA-binding domain is a cysteine-rich region that is unique to the badnaviruses. When the molecular relationships of a portion of the reverse transcriptases of plant pararetroviruses were determined, two badnaviruses, CoYMV and ScBV, form one distinct cluster, whereas three caulimoviruses, cauliflower mosaic virus, carnation etched ring virus and figwort mosaic virus, form a second cluster. The badnavirus RTBV and the caulimovirus soybean chlorotic mottle virus occupy intermediate positions between the clusters. When introduced by Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation, a construct containing 1.1 copies of the cloned ScBV genome is infectious to both rice and banana.

  20. Functional genomics down under: RNAi screening in the Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel W; Gould, Cathryn M; Handoko, Yanny; Simpson, Kaylene J

    2014-05-01

    The Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics (VCFG) is an RNAi screening facility housed at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, Australia. The Peter Mac is Australia's largest dedicated Cancer Research Institute, home to a team of over 520 scientists that focus on understanding the genetic risk of cancer, the molecular events regulating cancer growth and dissemination and improving detection through new diagnostic tools (www.petermac.org). Peter Mac is a well recognised technology leader and established the VCFG with a view to enabling researchers Australia and New Zealand-wide access to cutting edge functional genomics technology, infrastructure and expertise. This review documents the technology platforms operated within the VCFG and provides insight into the workflows and analysis pipelines currently in operation.

  1. Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    PubMed

    Giaever, Guri; Chu, Angela M; Ni, Li; Connelly, Carla; Riles, Linda; Véronneau, Steeve; Dow, Sally; Lucau-Danila, Ankuta; Anderson, Keith; André, Bruno; Arkin, Adam P; Astromoff, Anna; El-Bakkoury, Mohamed; Bangham, Rhonda; Benito, Rocio; Brachat, Sophie; Campanaro, Stefano; Curtiss, Matt; Davis, Karen; Deutschbauer, Adam; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Flaherty, Patrick; Foury, Francoise; Garfinkel, David J; Gerstein, Mark; Gotte, Deanna; Güldener, Ulrich; Hegemann, Johannes H; Hempel, Svenja; Herman, Zelek; Jaramillo, Daniel F; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L; Kötter, Peter; LaBonte, Darlene; Lamb, David C; Lan, Ning; Liang, Hong; Liao, Hong; Liu, Lucy; Luo, Chuanyun; Lussier, Marc; Mao, Rong; Menard, Patrice; Ooi, Siew Loon; Revuelta, Jose L; Roberts, Christopher J; Rose, Matthias; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Scherens, Bart; Schimmack, Greg; Shafer, Brenda; Shoemaker, Daniel D; Sookhai-Mahadeo, Sharon; Storms, Reginald K; Strathern, Jeffrey N; Valle, Giorgio; Voet, Marleen; Volckaert, Guido; Wang, Ching-yun; Ward, Teresa R; Wilhelmy, Julie; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Yang, Yonghong; Yen, Grace; Youngman, Elaine; Yu, Kexin; Bussey, Howard; Boeke, Jef D; Snyder, Michael; Philippsen, Peter; Davis, Ronald W; Johnston, Mark

    2002-07-25

    Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA sequences dubbed 'molecular bar codes' uniquely identify each strain, enabling their growth to be analysed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We show that previously known and new genes are necessary for optimal growth under six well-studied conditions: high salt, sorbitol, galactose, pH 8, minimal medium and nystatin treatment. Less than 7% of genes that exhibit a significant increase in messenger RNA expression are also required for optimal growth in four of the tested conditions. Our results validate the yeast gene-deletion collection as a valuable resource for functional genomics.

  2. Genome-wide association study of rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf traits with a high-throughput leaf scorer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Wang, Ke; Jiang, Ni; Feng, Hui; Chen, Guoxing; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Leaves are the plant’s solar panel and food factory, and leaf traits are always key issues to investigate in plant research. Traditional methods for leaf trait measurement are time-consuming. In this work, an engineering prototype has been established for high-throughput leaf scoring (HLS) of a large number of Oryza sativa accessions. The mean absolute per cent of errors in traditional measurements versus HLS were below 5% for leaf number, area, shape, and colour. Moreover, HLS can measure up to 30 leaves per minute. To demonstrate the usefulness of HLS in dissecting the genetic bases of leaf traits, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for 29 leaf traits related to leaf size, shape, and colour at three growth stages using HLS on a panel of 533 rice accessions. Nine associated loci contained known leaf-related genes, such as Nal1 for controlling the leaf width. In addition, a total of 73, 123, and 177 new loci were detected for traits associated with leaf size, colour, and shape, respectively. In summary, after evaluating the performance with a large number of rice accessions, the combination of GWAS and high-throughput leaf phenotyping (HLS) has proven a valuable strategy to identify the genetic loci controlling rice leaf traits. PMID:25796084

  3. Genome-wide association study of rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaf traits with a high-throughput leaf scorer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Wang, Ke; Jiang, Ni; Feng, Hui; Chen, Guoxing; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-09-01

    Leaves are the plant's solar panel and food factory, and leaf traits are always key issues to investigate in plant research. Traditional methods for leaf trait measurement are time-consuming. In this work, an engineering prototype has been established for high-throughput leaf scoring (HLS) of a large number of Oryza sativa accessions. The mean absolute per cent of errors in traditional measurements versus HLS were below 5% for leaf number, area, shape, and colour. Moreover, HLS can measure up to 30 leaves per minute. To demonstrate the usefulness of HLS in dissecting the genetic bases of leaf traits, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for 29 leaf traits related to leaf size, shape, and colour at three growth stages using HLS on a panel of 533 rice accessions. Nine associated loci contained known leaf-related genes, such as Nal1 for controlling the leaf width. In addition, a total of 73, 123, and 177 new loci were detected for traits associated with leaf size, colour, and shape, respectively. In summary, after evaluating the performance with a large number of rice accessions, the combination of GWAS and high-throughput leaf phenotyping (HLS) has proven a valuable strategy to identify the genetic loci controlling rice leaf traits.

  4. Loss of floral repressor function adapts rice to higher latitudes in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Galbiati, Francesca; Goretti, Daniela; Brambilla, Vittoria; Shrestha, Roshi; Pappolla, Andrea; Courtois, Brigitte; Fornara, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to discriminate variations in day length allows plants to align flowering with the most favourable season of the year. This capacity has been altered by artificial selection when cultivated varieties became adapted to environments different from those of initial domestication. Rice flowering is promoted by short days when HEADING DATE 1 (Hd1) and EARLY HEADING DATE 1 (Ehd1) induce the expression of florigenic proteins encoded by HEADING DATE 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1). Repressors of flowering antagonize such induction under long days, maintaining vegetative growth and delaying flowering. To what extent artificial selection of long day repressor loci has contributed to expand rice cultivation to Europe is currently unclear. This study demonstrates that European varieties activate both Hd3a and RFT1 expression regardless of day length and their induction is caused by loss-of-function mutations at major long day floral repressors. However, their contribution to flowering time control varies between locations. Pyramiding of mutations is frequently observed in European germplasm, but single mutations are sufficient to adapt rice to flower at higher latitudes. Expression of Ehd1 is increased in varieties showing reduced or null Hd1 expression under natural long days, as well as in single hd1 mutants in isogenic backgrounds. These data indicate that loss of repressor genes has been a key strategy to expand rice cultivation to Europe, and that Ehd1 is a central node integrating floral repressive signals. PMID:25732533

  5. Expression and functional analysis of the plant-specific histone deacetylase HDT701 in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinhui; Zhang, Jianxia; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Kunlin; Zheng, Feng; Tian, Lining; Liu, Xuncheng; Duan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Reversible histone acetylation and deacetylation at the N-terminus of histone tails play a crucial role in regulating eukaryotic gene activity. Acetylation of core histones is associated with gene activation, whereas deacetylation of histone is often correlated with gene repression. The level of histone acetylation is antagonistically catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases citation(HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). In this work, we examined the subcellular localization, expression pattern and function of HDT701, a member of the plant-specific HD2-type histone deacetylase in rice. HDT701 is localized at the subcellular level in the nucleus. Histochemical GUS-staining analysis revealed that HDT701 is constitutively expressed throughout the life cycle of rice. Overexpression of HDT701 in rice decreases ABA, salt and osmotic stress resistance during seed germination. Delayed seed germination of HDT701 overexpression lines is associated with decreased histone H4 acetylation and down-regulated expression of GA biosynthetic genes. Moreover, overexpression of HDT701 in rice enhances salt and osmotic stress resistance during the seedling stage. Taken together, our findings suggested that HDT701 may play an important role in regulating seed germination in response to abiotic stresses in rice. PMID:25653654

  6. Influence of Rice Development on the Function of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance genes most commonly used in breeding programs are single, dominant, resistance (R) genes with relative effectiveness influenced by plant developmental stage. Knowing the developmental stages at which an R gene is functional is important for disease management. In rice, resistanc...

  7. Genomic Analysis of an Ascomycete Fungus from the Rice Planthopper Reveals How It Adapts to an Endosymbiotic Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hai-Wei; Noda, Hiroaki; Xie, Hong-Qing; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Zhu, Qian-Hua; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2015-01-01

    A number of sap-sucking insects harbor endosymbionts, which are thought to play an important role in the development of their hosts. One of the most important rice pests, the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), harbors an obligatory yeast-like symbiont (YLS) that cannot be cultured in vitro. Genomic information on this YLS would be useful to better understand its evolution. In this study, we performed genome sequencing of the YLS using both 454 and Illumina approaches, generating a draft genome that shows a slightly smaller genome size and relatively higher GC content than most ascomycete fungi. A phylogenomic analysis of the YLS supported its close relationship with insect pathogens. We analyzed YLS-specific genes and the categories of genes that are likely to have changed in the YLS during its evolution. The loss of mating type locus demonstrated in the YLS sheds light on the evolution of eukaryotic symbionts. This information about the YLS genome provides a helpful guide for further understanding endosymbiotic associations in hemiptera and the symbiotic replacement of ancient bacteria with a multifunctional YLS seems to have been a successful change. PMID:26338189

  8. DNA Methylation Affects the Efficiency of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases-Mediated Genome Editing in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Hidetaka; Numa, Hisataka; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi; Habu, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing in plants becomes popular since the advent of sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) that are simple to set up and efficient in various plant species. Although transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are one of the most prevalent SSNs and have a potential to provide higher target specificity by their dimeric property, TALENs are sensitive to methylated cytosines that are present not only in transposons but also in active genes in plants. In mammalian cells, the methylation sensitivity of TALENs could be overcome by using a base-recognition module (N∗) that has a higher affinity to methylated cytosine. In contrast to mammals, plants carry DNA methylation at all cytosine contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH, where H represents A, C, or T) with various degrees and effectiveness of N∗ module in genome editing in plants has not been explored. In this study, we designed sets of TALENs with or without N∗ modules and examined their efficiency in genome editing of methylated regions in rice. Although improvement in genome editing efficiency was observed with N∗-TALENs designed to a stably methylated target, another target carrying cytosines with various levels of methylation showed resistance to both normal and N∗-TALENs. The results suggest that variability of cytosine methylation in target regions is an additional factor affecting the genome editing efficiency of TALENs. PMID:28348570

  9. Genomic diversity and introgression in O. sativa reveal the impact of domestication and breeding on the rice genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The domestication of Asian rice (Oryza sativa) was a complex process and substantial ambiguity remains regarding the timing, number, and locations of domestication events. Deep genetic divergence between the two main varietal groups (Indica and Japonica) suggests at least two independent domesticati...

  10. Whole-Genome Characteristics and Polymorphic Analysis of Vietnamese Rice Landraces as a Comprehensive Information Resource for Marker-Assisted Selection

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Hien; Nguyen, Khoa Truong; Nguyen, Lam Van; Pham, Huy Quang; Huong, Can Thu; Xuan, Tran Dang; Anh, La Hoang; Caccamo, Mario; Ayling, Sarah; Diep, Nguyen Thuy; Trung, Khuat Huu

    2017-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided numerous opportunities for application in the study of whole plant genomes. In this study, we present the sequencing and bioinformatic analyses of five typical rice landraces including three indica and two japonica with potential blast resistance. A total of 688.4 million 100 bp paired-end reads have yielded approximately 30-fold coverage to compare with the Nipponbare reference genome. Among them, a small number of reads were mapped to both chromosomes and organellar genomes. Over two million and eight hundred thousand single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions and deletions (InDels) in indica and japonica lines have been determined, which potentially have significant impacts on multiple transcripts of genes. SNP deserts, contiguous SNP-low regions, were found on chromosomes 1, 4, and 5 of all genomes of rice examined. Based on the distribution of SNPs per 100 kilobase pairs, the phylogenetic relationships among the landraces have been constructed. This is the first step towards revealing several salient features of rice genomes in Vietnam and providing significant information resources to further marker-assisted selection (MAS) in rice breeding programs. PMID:28265566

  11. [The place of functional genomics in oncological research].

    PubMed

    Bálint, Bálint L; Nagy, László

    2013-03-01

    The 1000 genomes project changed the way how we see the human genome. The rapid development of the deep sequencing technologies is raising several practical questions, and the way how we answer these questions will affect deeply the future of the oncological reseach in Hungary. In our manuscript we give a short overview of the results of the 1000 genomes project and we present the place of the functional genomic investigations between other genomic tools. Based on the recent development in the field we summarize the challenges that have to be addressed in the next couple of years.

  12. OsABCB14 functions in auxin transport and iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxia; Zhang, Saina; Guo, Haipeng; Wang, Suikang; Xu, Ligen; Li, Chuanyou; Qian, Qian; Chen, Fan; Geisler, Markus; Qi, Yanhua; Jiang, De An

    2014-07-01

    Members of the ATP Binding Cassette B/Multidrug-Resistance/P-glyco-protein (ABCB/MDR/PGP) subfamily were shown to function primarily in Oryza sativa (rice) auxin transport; however, none of the rice ABCB transporters have been functionally characterized. Here, we describe that a knock-down of OsABCB14 confers decreased auxin concentrations and polar auxin transport rates, conferring insensitivity to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). OsABCB14 displays enhanced specific auxin influx activity in yeast and protoplasts prepared from rice knock-down alleles. OsABCB14 is localized at the plasma membrane, pointing to an important directionality under physiological conditions. osabcb14 mutants were surprisingly found to be insensitive to iron deficiency treatment (-Fe). Their Fe concentration is higher and upregulation of Fe deficiency-responsive genes is lower in osabcb14 mutants than in wild-type rice (Nipponbare, NIP). Taken together, our results strongly support the role of OsABCB14 as an auxin influx transporter involved in Fe homeostasis. The functional characterization of OsABCB14 provides insights in monocot auxin transport and its relationship to Fe nutrition.

  13. Functional conservation of MIKC*-Type MADS box genes in Arabidopsis and rice pollen maturation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Shaojie; Wu, Feng; Yan, Shuo; Lin, Xuelei; Du, Xiaoqiu; Chong, Kang; Schilling, Susanne; Theißen, Günter; Meng, Zheng

    2013-04-01

    There are two groups of MADS intervening keratin-like and C-terminal (MIKC)-type MADS box genes, MIKC(C) type and MIKC* type. In seed plants, the MIKC(C) type shows considerable diversity, but the MIKC* type has only two subgroups, P- and S-clade, which show conserved expression in the gametophyte. To examine the functional conservation of MIKC*-type genes, we characterized all three rice (Oryza sativa) MIKC*-type genes. All three genes are specifically expressed late in pollen development. The single knockdown or knockout lines, respectively, of the S-clade MADS62 and MADS63 did not show a mutant phenotype, but lines in which both S-clade genes were affected showed severe defects in pollen maturation and germination, as did knockdown lines of MADS68, the only P-clade gene in rice. The rice MIKC*-type proteins form strong heterodimeric complexes solely with partners from the other subclade; these complexes specifically bind to N10-type C-A-rich-G-boxes in vitro and regulate downstream gene expression by binding to N10-type promoter motifs. The rice MIKC* genes have a much lower degree of functional redundancy than the Arabidopsis thaliana MIKC* genes. Nevertheless, our data indicate that the function of heterodimeric MIKC*-type protein complexes in pollen development has been conserved since the divergence of monocots and eudicots, roughly 150 million years ago.

  14. The role of chromosome domains in shaping the functional genome.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Tom; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2015-03-12

    The genome must be highly compacted to fit within eukaryotic nuclei but must be accessible to the transcriptional machinery to allow appropriate expression of genes in different cell types and throughout developmental pathways. A growing body of work has shown that the genome, analogously to proteins, forms an ordered, hierarchical structure that closely correlates and may even be causally linked with regulation of functions such as transcription. This review describes our current understanding of how these functional genomic "secondary and tertiary structures" form a blueprint for global nuclear architecture and the potential they hold for understanding and manipulating genomic regulation.

  15. Cancer genomics object model: an object model for multiple functional genomics data for cancer research.

    PubMed

    Park, Yu Rang; Lee, Hye Won; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Ju Han

    2007-01-01

    The development of functional genomics including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics allow us to monitor a large number of key cellular pathways simultaneously. Several technology-specific data models have been introduced for the representation of functional genomics experimental data, including the MicroArray Gene Expression-Object Model (MAGE-OM), the Proteomics Experiment Data Repository (PEDRo), and the Tissue MicroArray-Object Model (TMA-OM). Despite the increasing number of cancer studies using multiple functional genomics technologies, there is still no integrated data model for multiple functional genomics experimental and clinical data. We propose an object-oriented data model for cancer genomics research, Cancer Genomics Object Model (CaGe-OM). We reference four data models: Functional Genomic-Object Model, MAGE-OM, TMAOM and PEDRo. The clinical and histopathological information models are created by analyzing cancer management workflow and referencing the College of American Pathology Cancer Protocols and National Cancer Institute Common Data Elements. The CaGe-OM provides a comprehensive data model for integrated storage and analysis of clinical and multiple functional genomics data.

  16. Genome-wide DNA polymorphism in the indica rice varieties RGD-7S and Taifeng B as revealed by whole genome re-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chong-Yun; Liu, Wu-Ge; Liu, Di-Lin; Li, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Man-Shan; Liao, Yi-Long; Liu, Zhen-Rong; Zeng, Xue-Qin; Wang, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies provide opportunities to further understand genetic variation, even within closely related cultivars. We performed whole genome resequencing of two elite indica rice varieties, RGD-7S and Taifeng B, whose F1 progeny showed hybrid weakness and hybrid vigor when grown in the early- and late-cropping seasons, respectively. Approximately 150 million 100-bp pair-end reads were generated, which covered ∼86% of the rice (Oryza sativa L. japonica 'Nipponbare') reference genome. A total of 2,758,740 polymorphic sites including 2,408,845 SNPs and 349,895 InDels were detected in RGD-7S and Taifeng B, respectively. Applying stringent parameters, we identified 961,791 SNPs and 46,640 InDels between RGD-7S and Taifeng B (RGD-7S/Taifeng B). The density of DNA polymorphisms was 256.8 SNPs and 12.5 InDels per 100 kb for RGD-7S/Taifeng B. Copy number variations (CNVs) were also investigated. In RGD-7S, 1989 of 2727 CNVs were overlapped in 218 genes, and 1231 of 2010 CNVs were annotated in 175 genes in Taifeng B. In addition, we verified a subset of InDels in the interval of hybrid weakness genes, Hw3 and Hw4, and obtained some polymorphic InDel markers, which will provide a sound foundation for cloning hybrid weakness genes. Analysis of genomic variations will also contribute to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid weakness and heterosis.

  17. Genome-Wide Dissection of the MicroRNA Expression Profile in Rice Embryo during Early Stages of Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongli; Wang, Qiong; Wang, Kun; Yang, Pingfang

    2015-01-01

    The first 24 hours after imbibition (HAI) is pivotal for rice seed germination, during which embryo cells switch from a quiescent state to a metabolically active state rapidly. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have increasingly been shown to play important roles in rice development. Nevertheless, limited knowledge about miRNA regulation has been obtained in the early stages of rice seed germination. In this study, the small RNAs (sRNAs) from embryos of 0, 12, and 24 HAI rice seeds were sequenced to investigate the composition and expression patterns of miRNAs. The bioinformatics analysis identified 289 miRNA loci, including 59 known and 230 novel miRNAs, and 35 selected miRNAs were confirmed by stem-loop real-time RT-PCR. Expression analysis revealed that the dry and imbibed seeds have unique miRNA expression patterns compared with other tissues, particularly for the dry seeds. Using three methods, Mireap, psRNATarget and degradome analyses, 1197 potential target genes of identified miRNAs involved in various molecular functions were predicted. Among these target genes, 39 had significantly negative correlations with their corresponding miRNAs as inferred from published transcriptome data, and 6 inversely expressed miRNA-target pairs were confirmed by 5ʹ-RACE assay. Our work provides an inventory of miRNA expression profiles and miRNA-target interactions in rice embryos, and lays a foundation for further studies of miRNA-mediated regulation in initial seed germination. PMID:26681181

  18. REVIEW: Zebrafish: A Renewed Model System For Functional Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yan

    2008-01-01

    In the post genome era, a major goal in molecular biology is to determine the function of the many thousands of genes present in the vertebrate genome. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) provides an almost ideal genetic model to identify the biological roles of these novel genes, in part because their embryos are transparent and develop rapidly. The zebrafish has many advantages over mouse for genome-wide mutagenesis studies, allowing for easier, cheaper and faster functional characterization of novel genes in the vertebrate genome. Many molecular research tools such as chemical mutagenesis, transgenesis, gene trapping, gene knockdown, TILLING, gene targeting, RNAi and chemical genetic screen are now available in zebrafish. Combining all the forward, reverse, and chemical genetic tools, it is expected that zebrafish will make invaluable contribution to vertebrate functional genomics in functional annotation of the genes, modeling human diseases and drug discoveries.

  19. Impact of SNPs on Protein Phosphorylation Status in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Shoukai; Chen, Lijuan; Tao, Huan; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Li, Lin; Ma, Shiwei; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wei; Xue, Lichun; Ai, Yufang; He, Huaqin

    2016-11-11

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood. In this paper, we firstly updated rice SNP resource based on the new rice genome Ver. 7.0, then systematically analyzed the potential impact of Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on the protein phosphorylation status. There were 3,897,312 SNPs in Ver. 7.0 rice genome, among which 9.9% was nsSNPs. Whilst, a total 2,508,261 phosphorylated sites were predicted in rice proteome. Interestingly, we observed that 150,197 (39.1%) nsSNPs could influence protein phosphorylation status, among which 52.2% might induce changes of protein kinase (PK) types for adjacent phosphorylation sites. We constructed a database, SNP_rice, to deposit the updated rice SNP resource and phosSNPs information. It was freely available to academic researchers at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn. As a case study, we detected five nsSNPs that potentially influenced heterotrimeric G proteins phosphorylation status in rice, indicating that genetic polymorphisms showed impact on the signal transduction by influencing the phosphorylation status of heterotrimeric G proteins. The results in this work could be a useful resource for future experimental identification and provide interesting information for better rice breeding.

  20. Impact of SNPs on Protein Phosphorylation Status in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shoukai; Chen, Lijuan; Tao, Huan; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Li, Lin; Ma, Shiwei; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wei; Xue, Lichun; Ai, Yufang; He, Huaqin

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood. In this paper, we firstly updated rice SNP resource based on the new rice genome Ver. 7.0, then systematically analyzed the potential impact of Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on the protein phosphorylation status. There were 3,897,312 SNPs in Ver. 7.0 rice genome, among which 9.9% was nsSNPs. Whilst, a total 2,508,261 phosphorylated sites were predicted in rice proteome. Interestingly, we observed that 150,197 (39.1%) nsSNPs could influence protein phosphorylation status, among which 52.2% might induce changes of protein kinase (PK) types for adjacent phosphorylation sites. We constructed a database, SNP_rice, to deposit the updated rice SNP resource and phosSNPs information. It was freely available to academic researchers at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn. As a case study, we detected five nsSNPs that potentially influenced heterotrimeric G proteins phosphorylation status in rice, indicating that genetic polymorphisms showed impact on the signal transduction by influencing the phosphorylation status of heterotrimeric G proteins. The results in this work could be a useful resource for future experimental identification and provide interesting information for better rice breeding. PMID:27845739

  1. Genome-wide characterization of rice black streaked dwarf virus-responsive microRNAs in rice leaves and roots by small RNA and degradome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongtao; He, Yuqing; Li, Junmin; Wang, Xu; Chen, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs which typically function by guiding cleavage of target mRNAs. They play important roles in development, abiotic stress and responses to pathogens. Four small RNA libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from the leaves and roots of healthy rice and plants infected with Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV). Analysis of the deep sequencing results showed that the expression patterns of 14 miRNAs in leaves and 16 miRNAs in roots changed significantly in response to RBSDV infection. Some responses were similar in roots and leaves, but many miRNAs responded differently in different tissues. The results were confirmed for selected miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR. By using degradome sequencing, a total of 104 target transcripts for 17 conserved and 16 non-conserved miRNAs were shown to be responsive to RBSDV infection. Fifteen novel miRNAs were also identified by small RNA and degradome sequencing. The results provide new insights into the regulatory networks of miRNAs and their targets in different plant tissues in response to virus infection.

  2. Effect of advanced intercrossing on genome structure and on the power to detect linked quantitative trait loci in a multi-parent population: a simulation study in rice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In genetic analysis of agronomic traits, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control the same phenotype are often closely linked. Furthermore, many QTLs are localized in specific genomic regions (QTL clusters) that include naturally occurring allelic variations in different genes. Therefore, linkage among QTLs may complicate the detection of each individual QTL. This problem can be resolved by using populations that include many potential recombination sites. Recently, multi-parent populations have been developed and used for QTL analysis. However, their efficiency for detection of linked QTLs has not received attention. By using information on rice, we simulated the construction of a multi-parent population followed by cycles of recurrent crossing and inbreeding, and we investigated the resulting genome structure and its usefulness for detecting linked QTLs as a function of the number of cycles of recurrent crossing. Results The number of non-recombinant genome segments increased linearly with an increasing number of cycles. The mean and median lengths of the non-recombinant genome segments decreased dramatically during the first five to six cycles, then decreased more slowly during subsequent cycles. Without recurrent crossing, we found that there is a risk of missing QTLs that are linked in a repulsion phase, and a risk of identifying linked QTLs in a coupling phase as a single QTL, even when the population was derived from eight parental lines. In our simulation results, using fewer than two cycles of recurrent crossing produced results that differed little from the results with zero cycles, whereas using more than six cycles dramatically improved the power under most of the conditions that we simulated. Conclusion Our results indicated that even with a population derived from eight parental lines, fewer than two cycles of crossing does not improve the power to detect linked QTLs. However, using six cycles dramatically improved the power, suggesting

  3. Nuclear ubiquitin proteasome degradation affects WRKY45 function in the rice defense program.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Akane; Inoue, Haruhiko; Goto, Shingo; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activator WRKY45 plays a major role in the salicylic acid/benzothiadiazole-induced defense program in rice. Here, we show that the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in regulating the function of WRKY45. Proteasome inhibitors induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated WRKY45 and transient up-regulation of WRKY45 target genes in rice cells, suggesting that WRKY45 is constantly degraded by the UPS to suppress defense responses in the absence of defense signals. Mutational analysis of the nuclear localization signal indicated that UPS-dependent WRKY45 degradation occurs in the nuclei. Interestingly, the transcriptional activity of WRKY45 after salicylic acid treatment was impaired by proteasome inhibition. The same C-terminal region in WRKY45 was essential for both transcriptional activity and UPS-dependent degradation. These results suggest that UPS regulation also plays a role in the transcriptional activity of WRKY45. It has been reported that AtNPR1, the central regulator of the salicylic acid pathway in Arabidopsis, is regulated by the UPS. We found that OsNPR1/NH1, the rice counterpart of NPR1, was not stabilized by proteasome inhibition under uninfected conditions. We discuss the differences in post-translational regulation of salicylic acid pathway components between rice and Arabidopsis.

  4. Effects of Germinated Brown Rice Addition on the Flavor and Functionality of Yogurt.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hye; Ahn, Sung-Il; Lim, Chan-Mook; Jhoo, Jin-Woo; Kim, Gur-Yoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the functional and physicochemical properties of yogurt, supplemented with germinated brown rice (GBR) containing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), during storage. GBR was produced by soaking brown rice at 30℃, and saccharified germinated brown rice (SGBR) was produced by treating brown rice with α- and β-amylase for 1 h, at 80℃ and 60℃, respectively. Yogurt was manufactured using a commercial starter (YC-X11, CHR. Hansen, Denmark) at 37℃ for 12 h. The fatty acids and GABA contents were analyzed using GC and HPLC, respectively. The fatty acids in the cereal samples consisted of oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acid. The portion of oleic acid was the highest, at 35.65% in GBR, and 32.16% in SGBR. During germination, the oleic acid content increased, whereas linolenic and palmitic acid contents from GBR tended to decrease. Although the portion of saturated fatty acids, such as stearic and myristic acid, decreased significantly (p<0.05), that of unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic and linoleic acid, increased with an increase in supplementation of BR, GBR, or SGBR in the yogurt. The yogurt, supplemented with cereal samples, showed a tendency of an increase in the concentration of GABA with an increase in the supplementation of the cereal samples. However, yogurt supplemented with GBR showed the highest concentration of GABA, regardless of the supplementation of the cereal samples. These results indicated that yogurt supplemented with BR, GBR, or SGBR could be a promising dairy product.

  5. Neuroscience in the era of functional genomics and systems biology.

    PubMed

    Geschwind, Daniel H; Konopka, Genevieve

    2009-10-15

    Advances in genetics and genomics have fuelled a revolution in discovery-based, or hypothesis-generating, research that provides a powerful complement to the more directly hypothesis-driven molecular, cellular and systems neuroscience. Genetic and functional genomic studies have already yielded important insights into neuronal diversity and function, as well as disease. One of the most exciting and challenging frontiers in neuroscience involves harnessing the power of large-scale genetic, genomic and phenotypic data sets, and the development of tools for data integration and mining. Methods for network analysis and systems biology offer the promise of integrating these multiple levels of data, connecting molecular pathways to nervous system function.

  6. Partnering for functional genomics research conference: Abstracts of poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This reports contains abstracts of poster presentations presented at the Functional Genomics Research Conference held April 16--17, 1998 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Attention is focused on the following areas: mouse mutagenesis and genomics; phenotype screening; gene expression analysis; DNA analysis technology development; bioinformatics; comparative analyses of mouse, human, and yeast sequences; and pilot projects to evaluate methodologies.

  7. Registration of the "Rice Diversity Panel I' Genome-Wide Association Mapping Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rice Diversity Panel (RDP) is a collection of 409 O. sativa accessions (GSOR301001 through GSOR301422) representing the five subpopulations: aromatic (Group V) composed of 15 accessions; aus (59) and indica (90) which compose the Indica subspecies; tropical (104) and temperate (108) japonica whi...

  8. Detection and validation of single feature polymorphisms using RNA expression data from a rice genome array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large number of genetic variations have been identified in rice. Such variations must in many cases control phenotypic differences in abiotic stress tolerance and other traits. A single feature polymorphism (SFP) is an oligonucleotide array-based polymorphism which can be used for identification o...

  9. Decoding the ecological function of accessory genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 primarily resides in cattle asymptomatically, and can be transmitted to humans through food. A study by Lupolova et al applied a machine-learning approach to complex pan-genome information and predicted that only a small subset of bovine isolates have t...

  10. Comparative Genomics of Acetobacterpasteurianus Ab3, an Acetic Acid Producing Strain Isolated from Chinese Traditional Rice Vinegar Meiguichu

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kai; Li, Yudong; Sun, Jing; Liang, Xinle

    2016-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus, an acetic acid resistant bacterium belonging to alpha-proteobacteria, has been widely used to produce vinegar in the food industry. To understand the mechanism of its high tolerance to acetic acid and robust ability of oxidizing ethanol to acetic acid (> 12%, w/v), we described the 3.1 Mb complete genome sequence (including 0.28 M plasmid sequence) with a G+C content of 52.4% of A. pasteurianus Ab3, which was isolated from the traditional Chinese rice vinegar (Meiguichu) fermentation process. Automatic annotation of the complete genome revealed 2,786 protein-coding genes and 73 RNA genes. The comparative genome analysis among A. pasteurianus strains revealed that A. pasteurianus Ab3 possesses many unique genes potentially involved in acetic acid resistance mechanisms. In particular, two-component systems or toxin-antitoxin systems may be the signal pathway and modulatory network in A. pasteurianus to cope with acid stress. In addition, the large numbers of unique transport systems may also be related to its acid resistance capacity and cell fitness. Our results provide new clues to understanding the underlying mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter species and guiding industrial strain breeding for vinegar fermentation processes. PMID:27611790

  11. Genome-wide prediction models that incorporate de novo GWAS are a powerful new tool for tropical rice improvement

    PubMed Central

    Spindel, J E; Begum, H; Akdemir, D; Collard, B; Redoña, E; Jannink, J-L; McCouch, S

    2016-01-01

    To address the multiple challenges to food security posed by global climate change, population growth and rising incomes, plant breeders are developing new crop varieties that can enhance both agricultural productivity and environmental sustainability. Current breeding practices, however, are unable to keep pace with demand. Genomic selection (GS) is a new technique that helps accelerate the rate of genetic gain in breeding by using whole-genome data to predict the breeding value of offspring. Here, we describe a new GS model that combines RR-BLUP with markers fit as fixed effects selected from the results of a genome-wide-association study (GWAS) on the RR-BLUP training data. We term this model GS + de novo GWAS. In a breeding population of tropical rice, GS + de novo GWAS outperformed six other models for a variety of traits and in multiple environments. On the basis of these results, we propose an extended, two-part breeding design that can be used to efficiently integrate novel variation into elite breeding populations, thus expanding genetic diversity and enhancing the potential for sustainable productivity gains. PMID:26860200

  12. Comparative Genomics of Acetobacterpasteurianus Ab3, an Acetic Acid Producing Strain Isolated from Chinese Traditional Rice Vinegar Meiguichu.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Li, Yudong; Sun, Jing; Liang, Xinle

    2016-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus, an acetic acid resistant bacterium belonging to alpha-proteobacteria, has been widely used to produce vinegar in the food industry. To understand the mechanism of its high tolerance to acetic acid and robust ability of oxidizing ethanol to acetic acid (> 12%, w/v), we described the 3.1 Mb complete genome sequence (including 0.28 M plasmid sequence) with a G+C content of 52.4% of A. pasteurianus Ab3, which was isolated from the traditional Chinese rice vinegar (Meiguichu) fermentation process. Automatic annotation of the complete genome revealed 2,786 protein-coding genes and 73 RNA genes. The comparative genome analysis among A. pasteurianus strains revealed that A. pasteurianus Ab3 possesses many unique genes potentially involved in acetic acid resistance mechanisms. In particular, two-component systems or toxin-antitoxin systems may be the signal pathway and modulatory network in A. pasteurianus to cope with acid stress. In addition, the large numbers of unique transport systems may also be related to its acid resistance capacity and cell fitness. Our results provide new clues to understanding the underlying mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter species and guiding industrial strain breeding for vinegar fermentation processes.

  13. Structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial genome of the rice leafroller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Yin, Yonghua; Qu, Fujuan; Yang, Zhongwu; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2014-02-01

    The rice leafroller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, is one of the most important pests on rice and possesses striking flight ability. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the 15,377 bp of a C. medinalis mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). The mtDNA encodes 37 genes and shows a unique lepidopteran CR-M-I-Q arrangement. Three possible substructures were detected in C. medinalis and some other lepidopteran insects' control region. The findings might be relevant to the regulation of mtDNA replication and transcription. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed among 19 families in Lepidoptera so far. Cnaphalocrocis medinalis forms a reciprocal monophyletic group with Ostrinia in clade Crambidae instead of Pyralidae. The topology between Papilionoidea and other superfamilies showed an apparent contradiction with traditional Lepidopteran classification. As a well-known migratory insect, the molecular information contained in C. medinalis mtDNA may provide a further insight into the evolution of mitochondria genes and insect species, and may help to better understanding the energy metabolism of invertebrates.

  14. Responses to Light Intensity in a Genome-Scale Model of Rice Metabolism1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, Mark G.; Kundu, Sudip; Shaw, Rahul; Fell, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the construction and analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model representing a developing leaf cell of rice (Oryza sativa) primarily derived from the annotations in the RiceCyc database. We used flux balance analysis to determine that the model represents a network capable of producing biomass precursors (amino acids, nucleotides, lipid, starch, cellulose, and lignin) in experimentally reported proportions, using carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source. We then repeated the analysis over a range of photon flux values to examine responses in the solutions. The resulting flux distributions show that (1) redox shuttles between the chloroplast, cytosol, and mitochondrion may play a significant role at low light levels, (2) photorespiration can act to dissipate excess energy at high light levels, and (3) the role of mitochondrial metabolism is likely to vary considerably according to the balance between energy demand and availability. It is notable that these organelle interactions, consistent with many experimental observations, arise solely as a result of the need for mass and energy balancing without any explicit assumptions concerning kinetic or other regulatory mechanisms. PMID:23640755

  15. Genetic Architecture of Natural Variation in Rice Chlorophyll Content Revealed by a Genome-Wide Association Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxiu; Xie, Weibo; Xing, Hongkun; Yan, Ju; Meng, Xiangzhou; Li, Xinglei; Fu, Xiangkui; Xu, Jiuyue; Lian, Xingming; Yu, Sibin; Xing, Yongzhong; Wang, Gongwei

    2015-06-01

    Chlorophyll content is one of the most important physiological traits as it is closely related to leaf photosynthesis and crop yield potential. So far, few genes have been reported to be involved in natural variation of chlorophyll content in rice (Oryza sativa) and the extent of variations explored is very limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a diverse worldwide collection of 529 O. sativa accessions. A total of 46 significant association loci were identified. Three F2 mapping populations with parents selected from the association panel were tested for validation of GWAS signals. We clearly demonstrated that Grain number, plant height, and heading date7 (Ghd7) was a major locus for natural variation of chlorophyll content at the heading stage by combining evidence from near-isogenic lines and transgenic plants. The enhanced expression of Ghd7 decreased the chlorophyll content, mainly through down-regulating the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and chloroplast. In addition, Narrow leaf1 (NAL1) corresponded to one significant association region repeatedly detected over two years. We revealed a high degree of polymorphism in the 5' UTR and four non-synonymous SNPs in the coding region of NAL1, and observed diverse effects of the major haplotypes. The loci or candidate genes identified would help to fine-tune and optimize the antenna size of canopies in rice breeding.

  16. From Loci to Biology: Functional Genomics of Genome-Wide Association for Coronary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nurnberg, Sylvia T; Zhang, Hanrui; Hand, Nicholas J; Bauer, Robert C; Saleheen, Danish; Reilly, Muredach P; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided a rich collection of ~58 CAD loci that suggest the existence of previously unsuspected new biology relevant to atherosclerosis. However, these studies only identify genomic loci associated with CAD and many questions remain even after a genomic locus is definitively implicated, including the nature of the causal variant(s) and the causal gene(s), as well as the directionality of effect. There are a number of tools that can be employed for investigation of the functional genomics of these loci, and progress has been made on a limited number of novel CAD loci. New biology regarding atherosclerosis and CAD will be learned through the functional genomics of these loci and the hope is that at least some of these new pathways relevant to CAD pathogenesis will yield new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of CAD. PMID:26892960

  17. Chemical genomics for studying parasite gene function and interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Chin-chien; Inglese, James; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2013-01-01

    With the development of new technologies in genome sequencing, gene expression profiling, genotyping, and high-throughput screening of chemical compound libraries, small molecules are playing increasingly important roles in studying gene expression regulation, gene-gene interaction, and gene function. Here we briefly review and discuss some recent advancements in drug target identification and phenotype characterization using combinations of high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries and various genome-wide methods such as whole genome sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genome-wide expressional analysis. These approaches can be used to search for new drugs against parasitic infections, to identify drug targets or drug-resistance genes, and to infer gene function. PMID:24215777

  18. The Functional Genomics Initiative at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Dabney; Justice, Monica; Beattle, Ken; Buchanan, Michelle; Ramsey, Michael; Ramsey, Rose; Paulus, Michael; Ericson, Nance; Allison, David; Kress, Reid; Mural, Richard; Uberbacher, Ed; Mann, Reinhold

    1997-12-31

    The Functional Genomics Initiative at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrates outstanding capabilities in mouse genetics, bioinformatics, and instrumentation. The 50 year investment by the DOE in mouse genetics/mutagenesis has created a one-of-a-kind resource for generating mutations and understanding their biological consequences. It is generally accepted that, through the mouse as a surrogate for human biology, we will come to understand the function of human genes. In addition to this world class program in mammalian genetics, ORNL has also been a world leader in developing bioinformatics tools for the analysis, management and visualization of genomic data. Combining this expertise with new instrumentation technologies will provide a unique capability to understand the consequences of mutations in the mouse at both the organism and molecular levels. The goal of the Functional Genomics Initiative is to develop the technology and methodology necessary to understand gene function on a genomic scale and apply these technologies to megabase regions of the human genome. The effort is scoped so as to create an effective and powerful resource for functional genomics. ORNL is partnering with the Joint Genome Institute and other large scale sequencing centers to sequence several multimegabase regions of both human and mouse genomic DNA, to identify all the genes in these regions, and to conduct fundamental surveys to examine gene function at the molecular and organism level. The Initiative is designed to be a pilot for larger scale deployment in the post-genome era. Technologies will be applied to the examination of gene expression and regulation, metabolism, gene networks, physiology and development.

  19. Characterizing genomic alterations in cancer by complementary functional associations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Systematic efforts to sequence the cancer genome have identified large numbers of mutations and copy number alterations in human cancers. However, elucidating the functional consequences of these variants, and their interactions to drive or maintain oncogenic states, remains a challenge in cancer research. We developed REVEALER, a computational method that identifies combinations of mutually exclusive genomic alterations correlated with functional phenotypes, such as the activation or gene dependency of oncogenic pathways or sensitivity to a drug treatment.

  20. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum on the quality and functionality of Korean traditional rice wine, yakju.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Dae Hyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Choi, Shin Yang; Lee, Jong Soo

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a high value Korean traditional rice wine possessing the pharmaceutical functionality of Ganoderma lucidum. The effects of the fruiting body of G. lucidum on the alcohol fermentation of Korean traditional rice wine, yakju, were investigated. Optimal fermentation conditions for the preparation of G. lucidum-yakju consisted of the koji added at 15% and a fermentation period of 15 d at 25 degrees C. The effects of the amount of G. lucidum added on the acceptability and functionality of G. lucidum-yakju were investigated. G. lucidum GL-1 yakju brewed by adding 0.1% G. lucidum into the mash showed the best acceptability and its angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and SOD-like activity were 63% and 42%, respectively, both of which are higher than those of yakju. The high ACE inhibitory activity of G. lucidum GL-1 yakju was found to result from ganoderic acid K in G. lucidum on the basis of physical and spectral data. However, the fibrinolytic activity and antioxidant activity of G. lucidum GL-1 yakju were very low, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity was not determined. From these results, G. lucidum GL-1 yakju may become a new functional Korean traditional rice wine with antihypertensive properties.

  1. TAWAWA1, a regulator of rice inflorescence architecture, functions through the suppression of meristem phase transition.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akiko; Sasao, Masafumi; Yasuno, Naoko; Takagi, Kyoko; Daimon, Yasufumi; Chen, Ruihong; Yamazaki, Ryo; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Kitaguchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yutaka; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Ushijima, Tomokazu; Kumamaru, Toshihiro; Iida, Shigeru; Maekawa, Masahiko; Kyozuka, Junko

    2013-01-08

    Inflorescence structures result from the activities of meristems, which coordinate both the renewal of stem cells in the center and organ formation at the periphery. The fate of a meristem is specified at its initiation and changes as the plant develops. During rice inflorescence development, newly formed meristems acquire a branch meristem (BM) identity, and can generate further meristems or terminate as spikelets. Thus, the form of rice inflorescence is determined by a reiterative pattern of decisions made at the meristems. In the dominant gain-of-function mutant tawawa1-D, the activity of the inflorescence meristem (IM) is extended and spikelet specification is delayed, resulting in prolonged branch formation and increased numbers of spikelets. In contrast, reductions in TAWAWA1 (TAW1) activity cause precocious IM abortion and spikelet formation, resulting in the generation of small inflorescences. TAW1 encodes a nuclear protein of unknown function and shows high levels of expression in the shoot apical meristem, the IM, and the BMs. TAW1 expression disappears from incipient spikelet meristems (SMs). We also demonstrate that members of the SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE subfamily of MADS-box genes function downstream of TAW1. We thus propose that TAW1 is a unique regulator of meristem activity in rice and regulates inflorescence development through the promotion of IM activity and suppression of the phase change to SM identity.

  2. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P; Bernstein, Bradley E; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K; Ward, Lucas D; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L; Farnham, Peggy J; Feingold, Elise A; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C; Gilbert, David M; Gingeras, Thomas R; Green, Eric D; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D; Myers, Richard M; Pazin, Michael J; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P; Hardison, Ross C

    2014-04-29

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease.

  3. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ward, Lucas D.; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E.; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C.; Gilbert, David M.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Green, Eric D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D.; Myers, Richard M.; Pazin, Michael J.; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease. PMID:24753594

  4. Molecular progress on the mapping and cloning of functional genes for blast disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.): current status and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, S; Rafii, M Y; Shabanimofrad, M; Ghasemzadeh, A; Ravanfar, S A; Latif, M A

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast disease, which is caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is a recurring problem in all rice-growing regions of the world. The use of resistance (R) genes in rice improvement breeding programmes has been considered to be one of the best options for crop protection and blast management. Alternatively, quantitative resistance conferred by quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is also a valuable resource for the improvement of rice disease resistance. In the past, intensive efforts have been made to identify major R-genes as well as QTLs for blast disease using molecular techniques. A review of bibliographic references shows over 100 blast resistance genes and a larger number of QTLs (∼500) that were mapped to the rice genome. Of the blast resistance genes, identified in different genotypes of rice, ∼22 have been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. In this review, we have summarized the reported rice blast resistance genes and QTLs for utilization in future molecular breeding programmes to introgress high-degree resistance or to pyramid R-genes in commercial cultivars that are susceptible to M. oryzae. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the significant studies in order to update our understanding of the molecular progress on rice and M. oryzae. This information will assist rice breeders to improve the resistance to rice blast using marker-assisted selection which continues to be a priority for rice-breeding programmes.

  5. Sequence analysis of the complete genome of rice black-streaked dwarf virus isolated from maize with rough dwarf disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Fang, Shou-Guo; Xu, Jia-Ling; Sun, Li-Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Yu, Jia-Lin

    2003-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of 10 genomic segments (S1-S10) from an isolate of rice black-streaked dwarf virus causing rough dwarf disease on maize (RBSDV-Hbm) in China were determined, a total of 29,142 base pairs (bp). Each segment possessed the genus-specific termini with conserved nucleotide sequences of (+) 5'-AAGUUUUU......CAGCUNNNGUC-3' and a perfect or imperfect inverted repeat of seven to eleven nucleotides immediately adjacent to the terminal conserved sequence. While the coding strand of most RBSDV-Hbm segments contained one open reading frame (ORF), there were two non-overlapping ORFs in S7 and S9, and one small overlapping ORF downstream of the major ORF in S5. Homology comparisons suggest that S1 encodes a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), with 63.5% and 32.6% identity to the putative RdRp encoded by Fiji disease virus (FDV) and Nilaparvata lugens reovirus (NLRV), respectively. The proteins encoded by S2, S3, and S4 showed various degrees of similarity to those encoded by the corresponding segments of FDV or NLRV. In S5 and S6, low identities were found to those of FDV only, but not to NLRV. Sequence analyses showed that RBSDV-Hbm had the most similarities in the genome organizations and the coding assignments with a RBSDV isolated from rice in China, in which each pair of the corresponding segments shared sequence identities of 93.8-98.9% and 93.5-100% at nucleotide or amino acid levels, respectively. In addition, phylogenetic analyses suggested that RBSDV-Hbm had the closest evolutionary relationship to RBSDV in Fijivirus.

  6. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3-59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6-10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement.

  7. Genetic dissection of ozone tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yoshiaki; Frimpong, Felix; Qi, Yitao; Matthus, Elsa; Wu, Linbo; Höller, Stefanie; Kraska, Thorsten; Frei, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone causes various negative effects on plants and affects the yield and quality of agricultural crops. Here, we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) to determine candidate loci associated with ozone tolerance. A diversity panel consisting of 328 accessions representing all subgroups of O. sativa was exposed to ozone stress at 60 nl l–1 for 7h every day throughout the growth season, or to control conditions. Averaged over all genotypes, ozone significantly affected biomass-related traits (plant height –1.0%, shoot dry weight –15.9%, tiller number –8.3%, grain weight –9.3%, total panicle weight –19.7%, single panicle weight –5.5%) and biochemical/physiological traits (symptom formation, SPAD value –4.4%, foliar lignin content +3.4%). A wide range of genotypic variance in response to ozone stress were observed in all phenotypes. Association mapping based on more than 30 000 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers yielded 16 significant markers throughout the genome by applying a significance threshold of P<0.0001. Furthermore, by determining linkage disequilibrium blocks associated with significant SNPs, we gained a total of 195 candidate genes for these traits. The following sequence analysis revealed a number of novel polymorphisms in two candidate genes for the formation of visible leaf symptoms, a RING and an EREBP gene, both of which are involved in cell death and stress defence reactions. This study demonstrated substantial natural variation of responses to ozone in rice and the possibility of using GWAS in elucidating the genetic factors underlying ozone tolerance. PMID:25371505

  8. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3–59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6–10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement. PMID:28355306

  9. Genetic dissection of ozone tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshiaki; Frimpong, Felix; Qi, Yitao; Matthus, Elsa; Wu, Linbo; Höller, Stefanie; Kraska, Thorsten; Frei, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone causes various negative effects on plants and affects the yield and quality of agricultural crops. Here, we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) to determine candidate loci associated with ozone tolerance. A diversity panel consisting of 328 accessions representing all subgroups of O. sativa was exposed to ozone stress at 60 nl l(-1) for 7h every day throughout the growth season, or to control conditions. Averaged over all genotypes, ozone significantly affected biomass-related traits (plant height -1.0%, shoot dry weight -15.9%, tiller number -8.3%, grain weight -9.3%, total panicle weight -19.7%, single panicle weight -5.5%) and biochemical/physiological traits (symptom formation, SPAD value -4.4%, foliar lignin content +3.4%). A wide range of genotypic variance in response to ozone stress were observed in all phenotypes. Association mapping based on more than 30 000 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers yielded 16 significant markers throughout the genome by applying a significance threshold of P<0.0001. Furthermore, by determining linkage disequilibrium blocks associated with significant SNPs, we gained a total of 195 candidate genes for these traits. The following sequence analysis revealed a number of novel polymorphisms in two candidate genes for the formation of visible leaf symptoms, a RING and an EREBP gene, both of which are involved in cell death and stress defence reactions. This study demonstrated substantial natural variation of responses to ozone in rice and the possibility of using GWAS in elucidating the genetic factors underlying ozone tolerance.

  10. Genome-wide identification of microRNAs and their targets in wild type and phyB mutant provides a key link between microRNAs and the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway in rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Xu, Xiao Hui; Wu, Xiu; Wang, Yong; Lu, Xingbo; Sun, Hongwei; Xie, Xianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Phytochrome B (phyB), a member of the phytochrome family in rice, plays important roles in regulating a range of developmental processes and stress responses. However, little information about the mechanisms involved in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway has been reported in rice. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) also perform important roles in plant development and stress responses. Thus, it is intriguing to explore the role of miRNAs in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway in rice. In this study, comparative high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis were used to identify candidate miRNAs and their targets that participate in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway. A total of 720 known miRNAs, 704 novel miRNAs and 1957 target genes were identified from the fourth leaves of wild-type (WT) and phyB mutant rice at the five-leaf stage. Among them, 135 miRNAs showed differential expression, suggesting that the expression of these miRNAs is directly or indirectly under the control of phyB. In addition, 32 out of the 135 differentially expressed miRNAs were found to slice 70 genes in the rice genome. Analysis of these target genes showed that members of various transcription factor families constituted the largest proportion, indicating miRNAs are probably involved in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway mainly by regulating the expression of transcription factors. Our results provide new clues for functional characterization of miRNAs in the phyB-mediated light signaling pathway, which should be helpful in comprehensively uncovering the molecular mechanisms of phytochrome-mediated photomorphogenesis and stress responses in plants. PMID:26074936

  11. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, The Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the organization of a nascent international effort - the "Functional Annotation of ANimal Genomes" project - whose aim is to produce comprehensive maps of functional elements in the genomes of domesticated animal species....

  12. Application of Functional Genomics for Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aswathy N.; Epperson, William B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common economically important disease affecting cattle. For developing accurate diagnostics that can predict disease susceptibility/resistance and stratification, it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRD. To study the complex interactions among the bovine host and the multitude of viral and bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental factors associated with BRD etiology, genome-scale high-throughput functional genomics methods such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics are helpful. In this review, we summarize the progress made in our understanding of BRD using functional genomics approaches. We also discuss some of the available bioinformatics resources for analyzing high-throughput data, in the context of biological pathways and molecular interactions. Although resources for studying host response to infection are avail-able, the corresponding information is lacking for majority of BRD pathogens, impeding progress in identifying diagnostic signatures for BRD using functional genomics approaches. PMID:26526746

  13. Application of Functional Genomics for Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rai, Aswathy N; Epperson, William B; Nanduri, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common economically important disease affecting cattle. For developing accurate diagnostics that can predict disease susceptibility/resistance and stratification, it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRD. To study the complex interactions among the bovine host and the multitude of viral and bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental factors associated with BRD etiology, genome-scale high-throughput functional genomics methods such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics are helpful. In this review, we summarize the progress made in our understanding of BRD using functional genomics approaches. We also discuss some of the available bioinformatics resources for analyzing high-throughput data, in the context of biological pathways and molecular interactions. Although resources for studying host response to infection are avail-able, the corresponding information is lacking for majority of BRD pathogens, impeding progress in identifying diagnostic signatures for BRD using functional genomics approaches.

  14. Determining protein function and interaction from genome analysis

    DOEpatents

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Yeates, Todd O.

    2004-08-03

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  15. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    DOEpatents

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  16. Functional coverage of the human genome by existing structures, structural genomics targets, and homology models.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E

    2005-08-01

    The bias in protein structure and function space resulting from experimental limitations and targeting of particular functional classes of proteins by structural biologists has long been recognized, but never continuously quantified. Using the Enzyme Commission and the Gene Ontology classifications as a reference frame, and integrating structure data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), target sequences from the structural genomics projects, structure homology derived from the SUPERFAMILY database, and genome annotations from Ensembl and NCBI, we provide a quantified view, both at the domain and whole-protein levels, of the current and projected coverage of protein structure and function space relative to the human genome. Protein structures currently provide at least one domain that covers 37% of the functional classes identified in the genome; whole structure coverage exists for 25% of the genome. If all the structural genomics targets were solved (twice the current number of structures in the PDB), it is estimated that structures of one domain would cover 69% of the functional classes identified and complete structure coverage would be 44%. Homology models from existing experimental structures extend the 37% coverage to 56% of the genome as single domains and 25% to 31% for complete structures. Coverage from homology models is not evenly distributed by protein family, reflecting differing degrees of sequence and structure divergence within families. While these data provide coverage, conversely, they also systematically highlight functional classes of proteins for which structures should be determined. Current key functional families without structure representation are highlighted here; updated information on the "most wanted list" that should be solved is available on a weekly basis from http://function.rcsb.org:8080/pdb/function_distribution/index.html.

  17. Fast fluorescent imaging-based Thai jasmine rice identification with polynomial fitting function and neural network analysis.

    PubMed

    Suwansukho, Kajpanya; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Buranasiri, Prathan

    2014-04-01

    With our single-wavelength spectral-imaging-based Thai jasmine rice identification system, we emphasize here that a combination of an appropriate polynomial fitting function on the determined chain code and a well-trained neural network configuration is highly sufficient in achieving a low false acceptance rate (FAR) and a low false rejection rate (FRR). Experimental demonstration shows promising results in identifying our desired Thai jasmine rice from six unwanted rice varieties with FAR and FRR values of 6.2% and 7.1%, respectively. Additional key performances include a much faster identification time of 30.5 s, chemical-free analysis, robustness, and adaptive learning.

  18. Advances in functional genomics for investigating salinity stress tolerance mechanisms in cereals

    PubMed Central

    Shelden, Megan C.; Roessner, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as low water availability and high salinity are major causes of cereal crop yield losses and significantly impact on sustainability. Wheat and barley are two of the most important cereal crops (after maize and rice) and are grown in increasingly hostile environments with soil salinity and drought both expected to increase this century, reducing the availability of arable land. Barley and wheat are classified as glycophytes (salt-sensitive), yet they are more salt-tolerant than other cereal crops such as rice and so are good models for studying salt tolerance in cereals. The exploitation of genetic variation of phenotypic traits through plant breeding could significantly improve growth of cereals in salinity-affected regions, thus leading to improved crop yields. Genetic variation in phenotypic traits for abiotic stress tolerance have been identified in land races and wild germplasm but the molecular basis of these differences is often difficult to determine due to the complex genetic nature of these species. High-throughput functional genomics technologies, such as transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and ionomics are powerful tools for investigating the molecular responses of plants to abiotic stress. The advancement of these technologies has allowed for the identification and quantification of transcript/metabolites in specific cell types and/or tissues. Using these new technologies on plants will provide a powerful tool to uncovering genetic traits in more complex species such as wheat and barley and provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of salinity stress tolerance. PMID:23717314

  19. Analysis of 142 genes resolves the rapid diversification of the rice genus

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Fu-Min; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zang, Li-Li; Tang, Liang; Wang, Jun; Sang, Tao; Ge, Song

    2008-01-01

    Background The completion of rice genome sequencing has made rice and its wild relatives an attractive system for biological studies. Despite great efforts, phylogenetic relationships among genome types and species in the rice genus have not been fully resolved. To take full advantage of rice genome resources for biological research and rice breeding, we will benefit from the availability of a robust phylogeny of the rice genus. Results Through screening rice genome sequences, we sampled and sequenced 142 single-copy genes to clarify the relationships among all diploid genome types of the rice genus. The analysis identified two short internal branches around which most previous phylogenetic inconsistency emerged. These represent two episodes of rapid speciation that occurred approximately 5 and 10 million years ago (Mya) and gave rise to almost the entire diversity of the genus. The known chromosomal distribution of the sampled genes allowed the documentation of whole-genome sorting of ancestral alleles during the rapid speciation, which was responsible primarily for extensive incongruence between gene phylogenies and persisting phylogenetic ambiguity in the genus. Random sample analysis showed that 120 genes with an average length of 874 bp were needed to resolve both short branches with 95% confidence. Conclusion Our phylogenomic analysis successfully resolved the phylogeny of rice genome types, which lays a solid foundation for comparative and functional genomic studies of rice and its relatives. This study also highlights that organismal genomes might be mosaics of conflicting genealogies because of rapid speciation and demonstrates the power of phylogenomics in the reconstruction of rapid diversification. PMID:18315873

  20. Genome-wide Association Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) for Contents of Eight Elements in Brown Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Zarqa; Kakar, Kaleem U; Li, Xiao-bai; Li, Shan; Zhang, Bin; Shou, Hui-xia; Shu, Qing-yao

    2015-09-16

    An association mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) regulating the concentrations of eight elements in brown rice (Oryza sativa L.) was performed using USDA mini-core subset cultivated in two different environments. In addition, correlation between the grain elemental concentrations was also studied. A total of 60 marker loci associated with 8 grain elemental concentrations were identified, and these loci were clustered into 37 genomic regions. Twenty new QTLs were found to be associated with important elements such as Zn, Fe, and P, along with others. Fe concentration was associated with the greatest number of markers in two environments. In addition, several important elemental/metal transporter genes were identified in a few mapped regions. Positive correlation was observed within all grain elemental concentrations. In summary, the results provide insight into the genetic basis of rice grain element accumulation and may help in the identification of genes associated with the accumulation of Zn, Fe, and other essential elements in rice.

  1. Genomic selection & association mapping in rice: effect of trait genetic architecture, training population composition, marker number & statistical model on accuracy of rice genomic selection in elite, tropical rice breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic Selection (GS) is a new breeding method in which genome-wide markers are used to predict the breeding value of individuals in a breeding population. GS has been shown to improve breeding efficiency in dairy cattle and several crop plant species, and here we evaluate for the first time its ef...

  2. Assessing the impact of comparative genomic sequence data on the functional annotation of the Drosophila genome

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Casey M; Pfeiffer, Barret D; Rincón-Limas, Diego E; Hoskins, Roger A; Gnirke, Andreas; Mungall, Chris J; Wang, Adrienne M; Kronmiller, Brent; Pacleb, Joanne; Park, Soo; Stapleton, Mark; Wan, Kenneth; George, Reed A; de Jong, Pieter J; Botas, Juan; Rubin, Gerald M; Celniker, Susan E

    2002-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that comparative sequence data can aid the functional annotation of genome sequences; however, the most informative species and features of genome evolution for comparison remain to be determined. Results We analyzed conservation in eight genomic regions (apterous, even-skipped, fushi tarazu, twist, and Rhodopsins 1, 2, 3 and 4) from four Drosophila species (D. erecta, D. pseudoobscura, D. willistoni, and D. littoralis) covering more than 500 kb of the D. melanogaster genome. All D. melanogaster genes (and 78-82% of coding exons) identified in divergent species such as D. pseudoobscura show evidence of functional constraint. Addition of a third species can reveal functional constraint in otherwise non-significant pairwise exon comparisons. Microsynteny is largely conserved, with rearrangement breakpoints, novel transposable element insertions, and gene transpositions occurring in similar numbers. Rates of amino-acid substitution are higher in uncharacterized genes relative to genes that have previously been studied. Conserved non-coding sequences (CNCSs) tend to be spatially clustered with conserved spacing between CNCSs, and clusters of CNCSs can be used to predict enhancer sequences. Conclusions Our results provide the basis for choosing species whose genome sequences would be most useful in aiding the functional annotation of coding and cis-regulatory sequences in Drosophila. Furthermore, this work shows how decoding the spatial organization of conserved sequences, such as the clustering of CNCSs, can complement efforts to annotate eukaryotic genomes on the basis of sequence conservation alone. PMID:12537575

  3. In silico Comparison of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis Strains in Genomics, Phylogenetics, Phylogenomics and Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsute; Siddiqui, Huma; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    Currently, genome sequences of a total of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are available, including eight completed genomes (strains W83, ATCC 33277, TDC60, HG66, A7436, AJW4, 381, and A7A1-28) and 11 high-coverage draft sequences (JCVI SC001, F0185, F0566, F0568, F0569, F0570, SJD2, W4087, W50, Ando, and MP4-504) that are assembled into fewer than 300 contigs. The objective was to compare these genomes at both nucleotide and protein sequence levels in order to understand their phylogenetic and functional relatedness. Four copies of 16S rRNA gene sequences were identified in each of the eight complete genomes and one in the other 11 unfinished genomes. These 43 16S rRNA sequences represent only 24 unique sequences and the derived phylogenetic tree suggests a possible evolutionary history for these strains. Phylogenomic comparison based on shared proteins and whole genome nucleotide sequences consistently showed two groups with closely related members: one consisted of ATCC 33277, 381, and HG66, another of W83, W50, and A7436. At least 1,037 core/shared proteins were identified in the 19 P. gingivalis genomes based on the most stringent detecting parameters. Comparative functional genomics based on genome-wide comparisons between NCBI and RAST annotations, as well as additional approaches, revealed functions that are unique or missing in individual P. gingivalis strains, or species-specific in all P. gingivalis strains, when compared to a neighboring species P. asaccharolytica. All the comparative results of this study are available online for download at ftp://www.homd.org/publication_data/20160425/.

  4. In silico Comparison of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis Strains in Genomics, Phylogenetics, Phylogenomics and Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsute; Siddiqui, Huma; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    Currently, genome sequences of a total of 19 Porphyromonas gingivalis strains are available, including eight completed genomes (strains W83, ATCC 33277, TDC60, HG66, A7436, AJW4, 381, and A7A1-28) and 11 high-coverage draft sequences (JCVI SC001, F0185, F0566, F0568, F0569, F0570, SJD2, W4087, W50, Ando, and MP4-504) that are assembled into fewer than 300 contigs. The objective was to compare these genomes at both nucleotide and protein sequence levels in order to understand their phylogenetic and functional relatedness. Four copies of 16S rRNA gene sequences were identified in each of the eight complete genomes and one in the other 11 unfinished genomes. These 43 16S rRNA sequences represent only 24 unique sequences and the derived phylogenetic tree suggests a possible evolutionary history for these strains. Phylogenomic comparison based on shared proteins and whole genome nucleotide sequences consistently showed two groups with closely related members: one consisted of ATCC 33277, 381, and HG66, another of W83, W50, and A7436. At least 1,037 core/shared proteins were identified in the 19 P. gingivalis genomes based on the most stringent detecting parameters. Comparative functional genomics based on genome-wide comparisons between NCBI and RAST annotations, as well as additional approaches, revealed functions that are unique or missing in individual P. gingivalis strains, or species-specific in all P. gingivalis strains, when compared to a neighboring species P. asaccharolytica. All the comparative results of this study are available online for download at ftp://www.homd.org/publication_data/20160425/. PMID:28261563

  5. Human-Mediated Emergence as a Weed and Invasive Radiation in the Wild of the CD Genome Allotetraploid Rice Species (Oryza, Poaceae) in the Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    Second, Gérard; Rouhan, Germinal

    2008-01-01

    Background The genus Oryza is being used as a model in plant genomic studies although there are several issues still to be resolved regarding the spatio-temporal evolution of this ancient genus. Particularly contentious is whether undated transoceanic natural dispersal or recent human interference has been the principal agent determining its present distribution and differentiation. In this context, we studied the origin and distribution history of the allotetraploid CD rice genome. It is endemic to the Neotropics but the genus is thought to have originated in the Paleotropics, and there is relatively little genetic divergence between some orthologous sequences of the C genome component and their Old World counterparts. Methodology/Principal Findings Because of its allotetraploidy, there are several potential pitfalls in trying to date the formation of the CD genome using molecular data and this could lead to erroneous estimates. Therefore, we rather chose to rely on historical evidence to determine whether or not the CD genome was present in the Neotropics before the arrival of Columbus. We searched early collections of herbarium specimens and studied the reports of explorers of the tropical Americas for references to rice. In spite of numerous collectors traveling inland and collecting Oryza, plants determined as CD genome species were not observed away from cultivated rice fields until 1869. Various arguments suggest that they only consisted of weedy forms until that time. Conclusions/Significance The spatio-temporal distribution of herbarium collections fits a simple biogeographical scenario for the emergence in cultivated rice fields followed by radiation in the wild of the CD genome in the Neotropics during the last four centuries. This probably occurred from species introduced to the Americas by humans and we found no evidence that the CD genome pre-existed in the Old World. We therefore propose a new evolutionary hypothesis for such a recent origin of the

  6. Functional identification of a rice ent-kaurene oxidase, OsKO2, using the Pichia pastoris expression system.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwang-Wook; Lin, Fengqiu; Katsumata, Takumi; Sugai, Yoshinori; Miyazaki, Sho; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Okada, Kazunori; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2008-12-01

    Rice ent-kaurene oxidase 2 (OsKO2) perhaps functions in the early steps of gibberellin biosynthesis. We found that microsomes from the methylotropic yeast Pichia pastoris expressing both OsKO2 and a fungal cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) reductase converted ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid. This is direct evidence that OsKO2 is involved in the sequential oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid in gibberellin biosynthesis in rice.

  7. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health. PMID:25186768

  8. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health.

    PubMed

    Douillard, François P; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-08-29

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health.

  9. Exploring the post-genomic world: differing explanatory and manipulatory functions of post-genomic sciences.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christina; Carlson, Siobhan M; McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Graham, Janice

    2016-01-02

    Richard Lewontin proposed that the ability of a scientific field to create a narrative for public understanding garners it social relevance. This article applies Lewontin's conceptual framework of the functions of science (manipulatory and explanatory) to compare and explain the current differences in perceived societal relevance of genetics/genomics and proteomics. We provide three examples to illustrate the social relevance and strong cultural narrative of genetics/genomics for which no counterpart exists for proteomics. We argue that the major difference between genetics/genomics and proteomics is that genomics has a strong explanatory function, due to the strong cultural narrative of heredity. Based on qualitative interviews and observations of proteomics conferences, we suggest that the nature of proteins, lack of public understanding, and theoretical complexity exacerbates this difference for proteomics. Lewontin's framework suggests that social scientists may find that omics sciences affect social relations in different ways than past analyses of genetics.

  10. Exploring the post-genomic world: differing explanatory and manipulatory functions of post-genomic sciences

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Christina; Carlson, Siobhan M.; McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Graham, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Richard Lewontin proposed that the ability of a scientific field to create a narrative for public understanding garners it social relevance. This article applies Lewontin's conceptual framework of the functions of science (manipulatory and explanatory) to compare and explain the current differences in perceived societal relevance of genetics/genomics and proteomics. We provide three examples to illustrate the social relevance and strong cultural narrative of genetics/genomics for which no counterpart exists for proteomics. We argue that the major difference between genetics/genomics and proteomics is that genomics has a strong explanatory function, due to the strong cultural narrative of heredity. Based on qualitative interviews and observations of proteomics conferences, we suggest that the nature of proteins, lack of public understanding, and theoretical complexity exacerbates this difference for proteomics. Lewontin's framework suggests that social scientists may find that omics sciences affect social relations in different ways than past analyses of genetics. PMID:27134568

  11. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  12. Genome of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Granulovirus, the First Crambidae-Infecting Betabaculovirus Isolated from Rice Leaffolder to Sequenced

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangjie; Xu, Jian; Liu, Qin; Li, Chuanming; Xu, Hongxing; Lu, Zhongxian

    2016-01-01

    Cnaphalocrocis medinalis is a major pest of rice in South and South-East Asia. Insecticides are the major means farmers use for management. A naturally occurring baculovirus, C. medinalis granulovirus (CnmeGV), has been isolated from the larvae and this has the potential for use as microbial agent. Here, we described the complete genome sequence of CnmeGV and compared it to other baculovirus genomes. The genome of CnmeGV is 112,060 base pairs in length, has a G+C content of 35.2%. It contains 133 putative open reading frames (ORFs) of at least 150 nucleotides. A hundred and one (101) of these ORFs are homologous to other baculovirus genes including 37 baculovirus core genes. Thirty-two (32) ORFs are unique to CnmeGV with no homologues detected in the GeneBank and 53 tandem repeats (TRs) with sequence length from 25 to 551 nt intersperse throughout the genome of CnmeGV. Six (6) homologous regions (hrs) were identified interspersed throughout the genome. Hr2 contains 11 imperfect palindromes and a high content of AT sequence (about 73%). The unique ORF28 contains a coiled-coil region and a zinc finger-like domain of 4–50 residues specialized by two C2C2 zinc finger motifs that putatively bound two atoms of zinc. ORF21 encoding a chit-1 protein suggesting a horizontal gene transfer from alphabaculovirus. The putative protein presents two carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM_14) domains rather than other homologues detected from betabaculovirus that only contains one chit-binding region. Gene synteny maps showed the colinearity of sequenced betabaculovirus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CnmeGV grouped in the betabaculovirus, with a close relation to AdorGV. The cladogram obtained in this work grouped the 17 complete GV genomes in one monophyletic clade. CnmeGV represents a new crambidae host-isolated virus species from the genus Betabaculovirus and is most closely relative of AdorGV. The analyses and information derived from this study will provide a

  13. A genome scale metabolic network for rice and accompanying analysis of tryptophan, auxin and serotonin biosynthesis regulation under biotic stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional annotations of large plant genome projects mostly provide information on gene function and gene families based on the presence of protein domains and gene homology, but not necessarily in association with gene expression or metabolic and regulatory networks. These additional annotations a...

  14. A segmental genomic duplication generates a functional intron

    PubMed Central

    Hellsten, Uffe; Aspden, Julie L.; Rio, Donald C.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    An intron is an extended genomic feature whose function requires multiple constrained positions—donor and acceptor splice sites, a branch point, a polypyrimidine tract and suitable splicing enhancers—that may be distributed over hundreds or thousands of nucleotides. New introns are therefore unlikely to emerge by incremental accumulation of functional sub-elements. Here we demonstrate that a functional intron can be created de novo in a single step by a segmental genomic duplication. This experiment recapitulates in vivo the birth of an intron that arose in the ancestral jawed vertebrate lineage nearly half-a-billion years ago. PMID:21878908

  15. Effects of Germinated Brown Rice Addition on the Flavor and Functionality of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the functional and physicochemical properties of yogurt, supplemented with germinated brown rice (GBR) containing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), during storage. GBR was produced by soaking brown rice at 30℃, and saccharified germinated brown rice (SGBR) was produced by treating brown rice with α- and β-amylase for 1 h, at 80℃ and 60℃, respectively. Yogurt was manufactured using a commercial starter (YC-X11, CHR. Hansen, Denmark) at 37℃ for 12 h. The fatty acids and GABA contents were analyzed using GC and HPLC, respectively. The fatty acids in the cereal samples consisted of oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acid. The portion of oleic acid was the highest, at 35.65% in GBR, and 32.16% in SGBR. During germination, the oleic acid content increased, whereas linolenic and palmitic acid contents from GBR tended to decrease. Although the portion of saturated fatty acids, such as stearic and myristic acid, decreased significantly (p<0.05), that of unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic and linoleic acid, increased with an increase in supplementation of BR, GBR, or SGBR in the yogurt. The yogurt, supplemented with cereal samples, showed a tendency of an increase in the concentration of GABA with an increase in the supplementation of the cereal samples. However, yogurt supplemented with GBR showed the highest concentration of GABA, regardless of the supplementation of the cereal samples. These results indicated that yogurt supplemented with BR, GBR, or SGBR could be a promising dairy product. PMID:27621692

  16. Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing and Re-Examination of a Cytoplasmic Male Sterility-Associated Gene in Boro-Taichung-Type Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Rice

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Tomohiko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genome substitutions between subspecies can lead to cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) through incompatibility between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Boro-Taichung (BT)-type CMS rice was obtained by substituting the nuclear genome of Oryza sativa subsp. indica cultivar Chinsurah Boro II with that of Oryza sativa subsp. japonica cultivar Taichung 65. In BT-type CMS rice, the mitochondrial gene orf79 is associated with male sterility. A complete sequence of the Boro-type mitochondrial genome responsible for BT-type CMS has not been determined to date. Here, we used pyrosequencing to construct the Boro-type mitochondrial genome. The contiguous sequences were assembled into five circular DNA molecules, four of which could be connected into a single circle. The two resulting subgenomic circles were unable to form a reliable master circle, as recombination between them was scarcely detected. We also found an unequal abundance of DNA molecules for the two loci of atp6. These results indicate the presence of multi-partite DNA molecules in the Boro-type mitochondrial genome. Expression patterns were investigated for Boro-type mitochondria-specific orfs, which were not found in the mitochondria from the standard japonica cultivar Nipponbare. Restorer of fertility 1 (RF1)-dependent RNA processing has been observed in orf79-containing RNA but was not detected in other Boro-type mitochondria-specific orfs, supporting the conclusion that orf79 is a unique CMS-associated gene in Boro-type mitochondria. PMID:27414645

  17. High-throughput TILLING for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Colbert, Trenton; Tompa, Rachel; Enns, Linda C; Codomo, Christine A; Johnson, Jessica E; Reynolds, Steven H; Henikoff, Jorja G; Greene, Elizabeth A; Steine, Michael N; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Targeting-induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) is a general strategy for identifying induced point mutations that can be applied to almost any organism. Here, we describe the basic methodology for high-throughput TILLING. Gene segments are amplified using fluorescently tagged primers, and products are denatured and reannealed to form heteroduplexes between the mutated sequence and its wild-type counterpart. These heteroduplexes are substrates for cleavage by the endonuclease CEL I. Following cleavage, products are analyzed on denaturing polyacrylamide gels using the LI-COR DNA analyzer system. High-throughput TILLING has been adopted by the Arabidopsis TILLING Project (ATP) to provide allelic series of point mutations for the general Arabidopsis community.

  18. Genome Wide Association Mapping of Grain Arsenic, Copper, Molybdenum and Zinc in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Grown at Four International Field Sites

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Gareth J.; Douglas, Alex; Lahner, Brett; Yakubova, Elena; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Pinson, Shannon R. M.; Tarpley, Lee; Eizenga, Georgia C.; McGrath, Steve P.; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Islam, M. Rafiqul; Islam, Shofiqul; Duan, Guilan; Zhu, Yongguan; Salt, David E.; Meharg, Andrew A.; Price, Adam H.

    2014-01-01

    The mineral concentrations in cereals are important for human health, especially for individuals who consume a cereal subsistence diet. A number of elements, such as zinc, are required within the diet, while some elements are toxic to humans, for example arsenic. In this study we carry out genome-wide association (GWA) mapping of grain concentrations of arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc in brown rice using an established rice diversity panel of ∼300 accessions and 36.9 k single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The study was performed across five environments: one field site in Bangladesh, one in China and two in the US, with one of the US sites repeated over two years. GWA mapping on the whole dataset and on separate subpopulations of rice revealed a large number of loci significantly associated with variation in grain arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc. Seventeen of these loci were detected in data obtained from grain cultivated in more than one field location, and six co-localise with previously identified quantitative trait loci. Additionally, a number of candidate genes for the uptake or transport of these elements were located near significantly associated SNPs (within 200 kb, the estimated global linkage disequilibrium previously employed in this rice panel). This analysis highlights a number of genomic regions and candidate genes for further analysis as well as the challenges faced when mapping environmentally-variable traits in a highly genetically structured diversity panel. PMID:24586963

  19. Genome wide association mapping of grain arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown at four international field sites.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Douglas, Alex; Lahner, Brett; Yakubova, Elena; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Pinson, Shannon R M; Tarpley, Lee; Eizenga, Georgia C; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Islam, M Rafiqul; Islam, Shofiqul; Duan, Guilan; Zhu, Yongguan; Salt, David E; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2014-01-01

    The mineral concentrations in cereals are important for human health, especially for individuals who consume a cereal subsistence diet. A number of elements, such as zinc, are required within the diet, while some elements are toxic to humans, for example arsenic. In this study we carry out genome-wide association (GWA) mapping of grain concentrations of arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc in brown rice using an established rice diversity panel of ∼ 300 accessions and 36.9 k single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The study was performed across five environments: one field site in Bangladesh, one in China and two in the US, with one of the US sites repeated over two years. GWA mapping on the whole dataset and on separate subpopulations of rice revealed a large number of loci significantly associated with variation in grain arsenic, copper, molybdenum and zinc. Seventeen of these loci were detected in data obtained from grain cultivated in more than one field location, and six co-localise with previously identified quantitative trait loci. Additionally, a number of candidate genes for the uptake or transport of these elements were located near significantly associated SNPs (within 200 kb, the estimated global linkage disequilibrium previously employed in this rice panel). This analysis highlights a number of genomic regions and candidate genes for further analysis as well as the challenges faced when mapping environmentally-variable traits in a highly genetically structured diversity panel.

  20. Deductive genomics: a functional approach to identify innovative drug targets in the post-genome era.

    PubMed

    Stumm, Gabriele; Russ, Andreas; Nehls, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has generated a drug discovery process that is based on sequence analysis and hypothesis-driven (inductive) prediction of gene function. This approach, which we term inductive genomics, is currently dominating the efforts of the pharmaceutical industry to identify new drug targets. According to recent studies, this sequence-driven discovery process is paradoxically increasing the average cost of drug development, thus falling short of the promise of the Human Genome Project to simplify the creation of much needed novel therapeutics. In the early stages of discovery, the flurry of new gene sequences makes it difficult to pick and prioritize the most promising product candidates for product development, as with existing technologies important decisions have to be based on circumstantial evidence that does not strongly predict therapeutic potential. This is because the physiological function of a potential target cannot be predicted by gene sequence analysis and in vitro technologies alone. In contrast, deductive genomics, or large-scale forward genetics, bridges the gap between sequence and function by providing a function-driven in vivo screen of a highly orthologous mammalian model genome for medically relevant physiological functions and drug targets. This approach allows drug discovery to move beyond the focus on sequence-driven identification of new members of classical drug-able protein families towards the biology-driven identification of innovative targets and biological pathways.

  1. Identification and characterization of genomic regions on chromosomes 4 and 8 that control the rate of photosynthesis in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Nito, Naoko; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ebitani, Takeshi; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2011-03-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection appears to be a promising strategy for improving rates of leaf photosynthesis in rice. The rate of leaf photosynthesis was significantly higher in a high-yielding indica variety, Habataki, than in the most popular Japanese variety, Koshihikari, at the full heading stage as a result of the higher level of leaf nitrogen at the same rate of application of nitrogen and the higher stomatal conductance even when the respective levels of leaf nitrogen were the same. The higher leaf nitrogen content of Habataki was caused by the greater accumulation of nitrogen by plants. The higher stomatal conductance of Habataki was caused by the higher hydraulic conductance. Using progeny populations and selected lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Habataki, it was possible to identify the genomic regions responsible for the rate of photosynthesis within a 2.1 Mb region between RM17459 and RM17552 and within a 1.2 Mb region between RM6999 and RM22529 on the long arm of chromosome 4 and on the short arm of chromosome 8, respectively. The designated region on chromosome 4 of Habataki was responsible for both the increase in the nitrogen content of leaves and hydraulic conductance in the plant by increasing the root surface area. The designated region on chromosome 8 of Habataki was responsible for the increase in hydraulic conductance by increasing the root hydraulic conductivity. The results suggest that it may be possible to improve photosynthesis in rice leaves by marker-assisted selection that focuses on these regions of chromosomes 4 and 8.

  2. Genetic architecture of cold tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) determined through high resolution genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Ehsan; Edwards, Jeremy D.; Jodari, Farman; Duke, Sara E.; Baldo, Angela M.; Korniliev, Pavel; McCouch, Susan R.; Eizenga, Georgia C.

    2017-01-01

    Cold temperature is an important abiotic stress which negatively affects morphological development and seed production in rice (Oryza sativa L.). At the seedling stage, cold stress causes poor germination, seedling injury and poor stand establishment; and at the reproductive stage cold decreases seed yield. The Rice Diversity Panel 1 (RDP1) is a global collection of over 400 O. sativa accessions representing the five major subpopulations from the INDICA and JAPONICA varietal groups, with a genotypic dataset consisting of 700,000 SNP markers. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the RDP1 accessions for the complex, quantitatively inherited cold tolerance traits at the germination and reproductive stages, and to conduct genome-wide association (GWA) mapping to identify SNPs and candidate genes associated with cold stress at these stages. GWA mapping of the germination index (calculated as percent germination in cold divided by warm treatment) revealed 42 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cold tolerance at the seedling stage, including 18 in the panel as a whole, seven in temperate japonica, six in tropical japonica, 14 in JAPONICA, and nine in INDICA, with five shared across all subpopulations. Twenty-two of these QTLs co-localized with 32 previously reported cold tolerance QTLs. GWA mapping of cold tolerance at the reproductive stage detected 29 QTLs, including seven associated with percent sterility, ten with seed weight per panicle, 14 with seed weight per plant and one region overlapping for two traits. Fifteen co-localized with previously reported QTLs for cold tolerance or yield components. Candidate gene ontology searches revealed these QTLs were associated with significant enrichment for genes related to with lipid metabolism, response to stimuli, response to biotic stimuli (suggesting cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stresses), and oxygen binding. Overall the JAPONICA accessions were more tolerant to cold stress than INDICA

  3. Conifer genomics and adaptation: at the crossroads of genetic diversity and genome function.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Julien; Verta, Jukka-Pekka; MacKay, John J

    2016-01-01

    Conifers have been understudied at the genomic level despite their worldwide ecological and economic importance but the situation is rapidly changing with the development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. With NGS, genomics research has simultaneously gained in speed, magnitude and scope. In just a few years, genomes of 20-24 gigabases have been sequenced for several conifers, with several others expected in the near future. Biological insights have resulted from recent sequencing initiatives as well as genetic mapping, gene expression profiling and gene discovery research over nearly two decades. We review the knowledge arising from conifer genomics research emphasizing genome evolution and the genomic basis of adaptation, and outline emerging questions and knowledge gaps. We discuss future directions in three areas with potential inputs from NGS technologies: the evolutionary impacts of adaptation in conifers based on the adaptation-by-speciation model; the contributions of genetic variability of gene expression in adaptation; and the development of a broader understanding of genetic diversity and its impacts on genome function. These research directions promise to sustain research aimed at addressing the emerging challenges of adaptation that face conifer trees.

  4. Environmental Response and Genomic Regions Correlated with Rice Root Growth and Yield under Drought in the OryzaSNP Panel across Multiple Study Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Len J.; Bartolome, Violeta; Mauleon, Ramil; Vasant, Vivek Deshmuck; Prabakar, Sumeet Mankar; Chelliah, Muthukumar; Kameoka, Emi; Nagendra, K.; Reddy, K. R. Kamalnath; Varma, C. Mohan Kumar; Patil, Kalmeshwar Gouda; Shrestha, Roshi; Al-Shugeairy, Zaniab; Al-Ogaidi, Faez; Munasinghe, Mayuri; Gowda, Veeresh; Semon, Mande; Suralta, Roel R.; Shenoy, Vinay; Vadez, Vincent; Serraj, Rachid; Shashidhar, H. E.; Yamauchi, Akira; Babu, Ranganathan Chandra; Price, Adam; McNally, Kenneth L.; Henry, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in rice genotyping must be matched by advances in phenotyping. A better understanding of genetic variation in rice for drought response, root traits, and practical methods for studying them are needed. In this study, the OryzaSNP set (20 diverse genotypes that have been genotyped for SNP markers) was phenotyped in a range of field and container studies to study the diversity of rice root growth and response to drought. Of the root traits measured across more than 20 root experiments, root dry weight showed the most stable genotypic performance across studies. The environment (E) component had the strongest effect on yield and root traits. We identified genomic regions correlated with root dry weight, percent deep roots, maximum root depth, and grain yield based on a correlation analysis with the phenotypes and aus, indica, or japonica introgression regions using the SNP data. Two genomic regions were identified as hot spots in which root traits and grain yield were co-located; on chromosome 1 (39.7–40.7 Mb) and on chromosome 8 (20.3–21.9 Mb). Across experiments, the soil type/ growth medium showed more correlations with plant growth than the container dimensions. Although the correlations among studies and genetic co-location of root traits from a range of study systems points to their potential utility to represent responses in field studies, the best correlations were observed when the two setups had some similar properties. Due to the co-location of the identified genomic regions (from introgression block analysis) with QTL for a number of previously reported root and drought traits, these regions are good candidates for detailed characterization to contribute to understanding rice improvement for response to drought. This study also highlights the utility of characterizing a small set of 20 genotypes for root growth, drought response, and related genomic regions. PMID:25909711

  5. FuGE: Functional Genomics Experiment Object Model.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R; Pizarro, Angel; Spellman, Paul; Miller, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This is an interim report on the Functional Genomics Experiment (FuGE) Object Model. FuGE is a framework for creating data standards for high-throughput biological experiments, developed by a consortium of researchers from academia and industry. FuGE supports rich annotation of samples, protocols, instruments, and software, as well as providing extension points for technology specific details. It has been adopted by microarray and proteomics standards bodies as a basis for forthcoming standards. It is hoped that standards developers for other omics techniques will join this collaborative effort; widespread adoption will allow uniform annotation of common parts of functional genomics workflows, reduce standard development and learning times through the sharing of consistent practice, and ease the construction of software for accessing and integrating functional genomics data.

  6. Budding off: bringing functional genomics to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew Z; Bennett, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Candida species are the most prevalent human fungal pathogens, with Candida albicans being the most clinically relevant species. Candida albicans resides as a commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract but is a frequent cause of opportunistic mucosal and systemic infections. Investigation of C. albicans virulence has traditionally relied on candidate gene approaches, but recent advances in functional genomics have now facilitated global, unbiased studies of gene function. Such studies include comparative genomics (both between and within Candida species), analysis of total RNA expression, and regulation and delineation of protein-DNA interactions. Additionally, large collections of mutant strains have begun to aid systematic screening of clinically relevant phenotypes. Here, we will highlight the development of functional genomics in C. albicans and discuss the use of these approaches to addressing both commensalism and pathogenesis in this species.

  7. Functional characterization of a rice de novo DNA methyltransferase, OsDRM2, expressed in Escherichia coli and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Jinsong; Dong, Mingyue; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yanli; Liu, Bao

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► A rice de novo DNA methyltransferase OsDRM2 was cloned. ► In vitro methylation activity of OsDRM2 was characterized with Escherichia coli. ► Assays of OsDRM2 in vivo methylation were done with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ► OsDRM2 methylation activity is not preferential to any type of cytosine context. ► The activity of OsDRM2 is independent of RdDM pathway. - Abstract: DNA methylation of cytosine nucleotides is an important epigenetic modification that occurs in most eukaryotic organisms and is established and maintained by various DNA methyltransferases together with their co-factors. There are two major categories of DNA methyltransferases: de novo and maintenance. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a de novo methyltransferase, named OsDRM2, from rice (Oryza sativa L.). The full-length coding region of OsDRM2 was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both of these organisms expressed the OsDRM2 protein, which exhibited stochastic de novo methylation activity in vitro at CG, CHG, and CHH di- and tri-nucleotide patterns. Two lines of evidence demonstrated the de novo activity of OsDRM2: (1) a 5′-CCGG-3′ containing DNA fragment that had been pre-treated with OsDRM2 protein expressed in E. coli was protected from digestion by the CG-methylation-sensitive isoschizomer HpaII; (2) methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis of S. cerevisiae genomic DNA from transformants that had been introduced with OsDRM2 revealed CG and CHG methylation levels of 3.92–9.12%, and 2.88–6.93%, respectively, whereas the mock control S. cerevisiae DNA did not exhibit cytosine methylation. These results were further supported by bisulfite sequencing of the 18S rRNA and EAF5 genes of the transformed S. cerevisiae, which exhibited different DNA methylation patterns, which were observed in the genomic DNA. Our findings establish that OsDRM2 is an active de novo DNA

  8. Functional food red yeast rice (RYR) for metabolic syndrome amelioration: a review on pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2016-05-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR), the fermentation product of mold Monascus purpureus has been an integral part of Oriental food and traditional Chinese medicine, long before the discovery of their medicinal roles. With the identification of bioactive components as polyketide pigments (statins), and unsaturated fatty acids, RYR has gained a nutraceutical status. Hypercholesterolemic effect of this fermented compound has been validated and monacolin K has been recognized as the pivotal component in cholesterol alleviation. Functional similarity with commercial drug lovastatin sans the side effects has catapulted its popularity in other parts of the world as well. Apart from the hypotensive role, ameliorative benefits of RYR as anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, anticancer and osteogenic agent have emerged, fueling intense research on it. Mechanistic studies have revealed their interaction with functional agents like coenzyme Q10, astaxanthin, vitamin D, folic acid, policosanol, and berberine. On the other hand, concurrence of mycotoxin citrinin and variable content of statin has marred its integration in mainstream medication. In this disputable scenario, evaluation of the scopes and lacunae to overcome seems to contribute to an eminent area of healthcare. Red yeast rice (RYR), the rice-based fermentation product of mold Monascus purpureus is a functional food. Its bioactive component monacolin K acts like synthetic drug lovastatin, without the severe side effects of the latter. RYR has been validated to lower cholesterol, control high blood pressure; confer anti-flammation, hypoglycaemic, anticancer and osteogenic properties. However, dose inconsistency and co-occurrence of toxin citrinin hampers its dietary supplementation prospect. Further research might facilitate development of RYR as a nutraceutical.

  9. Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue-2 Virus Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AD STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL STUDIES ON DENGUE -2 VIRUS GENOME FINAL Report Lfl C’) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan, Ph.D. 0) March 1, 1986 Supported by U.S...and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Virus Genome 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF...3’-end of Dengue RNA in order to facilitate cDNA synthesis by oligo d(T) priming as proposed in the original research project. 2. We also showed that

  10. WWOX: its genomics, partners, and functions.

    PubMed

    Del Mare, Sara; Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2009-11-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) spans one of the most active common fragile sites (CFSs) involved in cancer, FRA16D. WWOX encodes a 46-kDa protein that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) domain. Through its WW domain, Wwox interacts with its partners and modulates their functions. Our data indicate that Wwox suppresses the transactivation function of several transcription factors implied in neoplasia by sequestering them in the cytoplasm. Work from our laboratory and other research groups have demonstrated that Wwox participates in a number of cellular processes including growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and tumor suppression. Targeted deletion of the Wwox gene in mice causes increased spontaneous and chemically induced tumor incidence supporting bona fide tumor suppressor function of WWOX. Moreover, generation of the Wwox-deficient mice uncovers, at least in part, some of the physiological in vivo functions of the WWOX gene. This review focuses on recent progress that elucidates Wwox functions in biology and pathology.

  11. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P.; Lovell, John T.; Moyers, Brook T.; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R.; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution. PMID:28220807

  12. Genomic Prediction of Biological Shape: Elliptic Fourier Analysis and Kernel Partial Least Squares (PLS) Regression Applied to Grain Shape Prediction in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Ebana, Kaworu; Uga, Yusaku; Hayashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Shape is an important morphological characteristic both in animals and plants. In the present study, we examined a method for predicting biological contour shapes based on genome-wide marker polymorphisms. The method is expected to contribute to the acceleration of genetic improvement of biological shape via genomic selection. Grain shape variation observed in rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasms was delineated using elliptic Fourier descriptors (EFDs), and was predicted based on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes. We applied four methods including kernel PLS (KPLS) regression for building a prediction model of grain shape, and compared the accuracy of the methods via cross-validation. We analyzed multiple datasets that differed in marker density and sample size. Datasets with larger sample size and higher marker density showed higher accuracy. Among the four methods, KPLS showed the highest accuracy. Although KPLS and ridge regression (RR) had equivalent accuracy in a single dataset, the result suggested the potential of KPLS for the prediction of high-dimensional EFDs. Ordinary PLS, however, was less accurate than RR in all datasets, suggesting that the use of a non-linear kernel was necessary for accurate prediction using the PLS method. Rice grain shape can be predicted accurately based on genome-wide SNP genotypes. The proposed method is expected to be useful for genomic selection in biological shape. PMID:25825876

  13. Identification of Genomic Regions and the Isoamylase Gene for Reduced Grain Chalkiness in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenqian; Zhou, Qiaoling; Yao, Yue; Qiu, Xianjin; Xie, Kun; Yu, Sibin

    2015-01-01

    Grain chalkiness is an important grain quality related to starch granules in the endosperm. A high percentage of grain chalkiness is a major problem because it diminishes grain quality in rice. Here, we report quantitative trait loci identification for grain chalkiness using high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of a chromosomal segment substitution line population in which each line carried one or a few introduced japonica cultivar Nipponbare segments in the genetic background of the indica cultivar ZS97. Ten quantitative trait loci regions were commonly identified for the percentage of grain chalkiness and the degree of endosperm chalkiness. The allelic effects at nine of these quantitative trait loci reduced grain chalkiness. Furthermore, a quantitative trait locus (qPGC8-2) on chromosome 8 was validated in a chromosomal segment substitution line–derived segregation population, and had a stable effect on chalkiness in a multiple-environment evaluation of the near-isogenic lines. Residing on the qPGC8-2 region, the isoamylase gene (ISA1) was preferentially expressed in the endosperm and revealed some nucleotide polymorphisms between two varieties, Nipponbare and ZS97. Transgenic lines with suppression of ISA1 by RNA interference produced grains with 20% more chalkiness than the control. The results support that the gene may underlie qPGC8-2 for grain chalkiness. The multiple-environment trials of the near-isogenic lines also show that combination of the favorable alleles such as the ISA1 gene for low chalkiness and the GS3 gene for long grains considerably improved grain quality of ZS97, which proves useful for grain quality improvement in rice breeding programs. PMID:25790260

  14. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs. PMID:25653837

  15. Rice ( Oryza) hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Arredondo-Peter, Raúl; Moran, Jose F; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobins (Hbs) corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb) and truncated (tHb) Hbs have been identified in rice ( Oryza). This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O 2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O 2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O 2-transport, O 2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs.

  16. Integrative genomics to dissect retinoid functions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Retinoids and rexinoids, as all other ligands of the nuclear receptor (NR) family, act as ligand-regulated trans-acting transcription factors that bind to cis-acting DNA regulatory elements in the promoter regions of target genes (for reviews see [12, 22, 23, 26, 36]). Ligand binding modulates the communication functions of the receptor with the intracellular environment, which essentially entails receptor-protein and receptor-DNA or receptor-chromatin interactions. In this communication network, the receptor simultaneously serves as both intracellular sensor and regulator of cell/organ functions. Receptors are "intelligent" mediators of the information encoded in the chemical structure of a nuclear receptor ligand, as they interpret this information in the context of cellular identity and cell-physiological status and convert it into a dynamic chain of receptor-protein and receptor-DNA interactions. To process input and output information, they are composed of a modular structure with several domains that have evolved to exert particular molecular recognition functions. As detailed in other chapters in this volume, the main functional domains are the DNA-binding (DBD) and ligand-binding (LBD) [5-7, 38, 56, 71]. The LBD serves as a dual input-output information processor. Inputs, such as ligand binding or receptor phosphorylations, induce allosteric changes in receptor surfaces that serve as docking sites for outputs, such as subunits of transcription and epigenetic machineries or enzyme complexes. The complexity of input and output signals and their interdependencies is far from being understood.

  17. Effect of low temperature plasma on the functional properties of basmati rice flour.

    PubMed

    Thirumdas, Rohit; Deshmukh, R R; Annapure, U S

    2016-06-01

    The present study deals with the application of low temperature plasma on basmati rice flour and its effect on functional properties such as gel hydrations properties, flour hydration properties, gelatinization temperatures and antioxidant properties. The water holding capacity and water binding capacity were observed to be increased with increase in plasma power and time of treatment as the air plasma is known to make the surface more hydrophilic. XRD analysis revealed there is no significance difference in the crystalline structure after the plasma treatment. DSC shows a decrease in peak temperatures (Tp) after the treatment. Hot paste viscosities were observed to be decease from 692 to 591 BU was corresponded to decrease in peak temperature. The total polyphenolic content and reducing power was observed to be increased. The effects of plasma treatment on functional groups of polyphenols were observed by changes in absorption intensities using FTIR. This study demonstrates that the low temperature plasma treatmentis capable of improving the functional properties of basmati rice.

  18. Structural and functional properties of alkali-treated high-amylose rice starch.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinwen; Yang, Yang; Man, Jianmin; Huang, Jun; Wang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Changquan; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan; Wei, Cunxu

    2014-02-15

    Native starches were isolated from mature grains of high-amylose transgenic rice TRS and its wild-type rice TQ and treated with 0.1% and 0.4% NaOH for 7 and 14 days at 35 °C. Alkali-treated starches were characterised for structural and functional properties using various physical methods. The 0.1% NaOH treatment had no significant effect on structural and functional properties of starches except that it markedly increased the hydrolysis of starch by amylolytic enzymes. The 0.4% NaOH treatment resulted in some changes in structural and functional properties of starches. The alkali treatment affected granule morphology and decreased the electron density between crystalline and amorphous lamellae of starch. The effect of alkali on the crystalline structure including long- and short-range ordered structure was not pronounced. Compared with control starch, alkali-treated TRS starches had lower amylose content, higher onset and peak gelatinisation temperatures, and faster hydrolysis of starch by HCl and amylolytic enzymes.

  19. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    DOE PAGES

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; ...

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to usemore » in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.« less

  20. Low nitrogen fertilization adapts rice root microbiome to low nutrient environment by changing biogeochemical functions.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Seishi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Okubo, Takashi; Yamashita, Akifumu; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Bao, Zhihua; Liu, Dongyan; Watanabe, Takeshi; Murase, Jun; Asakawa, Susumu; Eda, Shima; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sato, Tadashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-01-01

    Reduced fertilizer usage is one of the objectives of field management in the pursuit of sustainable agriculture. Here, we report on shifts of bacterial communities in paddy rice ecosystems with low (LN), standard (SN), and high (HN) levels of N fertilizer application (0, 30, and 300 kg N ha(-1), respectively). The LN field had received no N fertilizer for 5 years prior to the experiment. The LN and HN plants showed a 50% decrease and a 60% increase in biomass compared with the SN plant biomass, respectively. Analyses of 16S rRNA genes suggested shifts of bacterial communities between the LN and SN root microbiomes, which were statistically confirmed by metagenome analyses. The relative abundances of Burkholderia, Bradyrhizobium and Methylosinus were significantly increased in root microbiome of the LN field relative to the SN field. Conversely, the abundance of methanogenic archaea was reduced in the LN field relative to the SN field. The functional genes for methane oxidation (pmo and mmo) and plant association (acdS and iaaMH) were significantly abundant in the LN root microbiome. Quantitative PCR of pmoA/mcrA genes and a (13)C methane experiment provided evidence of more active methane oxidation in the rice roots of the LN field. In addition, functional genes for the metabolism of N, S, Fe, and aromatic compounds were more abundant in the LN root microbiome. These results suggest that low-N-fertilizer management is an important factor in shaping the microbial community structure containing key microbes for plant associations and biogeochemical processes in paddy rice ecosystems.

  1. Genomic Functionalization: The Next Revolution In Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Peter; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Imbro, Paula M.

    2014-07-01

    We have implemented a ligand-alignment algorithm into our developed computational pipeline for identifying specificity-determining features (SDFs) in protein-ligand complexes. Given a set of protein-ligand complex structures, the algorithm aligns the complexes by ligand rather than by the C -RMSD or standard approach, providing a single reference frame for extracting SDFs. We anticipate that this ligand-alignment capability will be highly useful for protein function prediction. We already have a database containing > 20 K ligand-protein complex crystal structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. By aligning these proteins to single reference frames using ligand alignment, we can submit the complexes to our pipeline for SDF extraction. The SDFs derived from this training procedure can be used as thumbprints that are hallmarks of individual enzyme classes. These SDF thumbprints may then serve as guides to the prediction of function of new unknown proteins.

  2. Genetic and genomic approaches to understanding macrophage identity and function.

    PubMed

    Glass, Christopher K

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of our laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and functions of diverse macrophage phenotypes in health and disease. Recent studies using genetic and genomic approaches suggest a relatively simple model of collaborative and hierarchical interactions between lineage-determining and signal-dependent transcription factors that enable selection and activation of transcriptional enhancers that specify macrophage identity and function. In addition, we have found that it is possible to use natural genetic variation as a powerful tool for advancing our understanding of how the macrophage deciphers the information encoded by the genome to attain specific phenotypes in a context-dependent manner. Here, I will describe our recent efforts to extend genetic and genomic approaches to investigate the roles of distinct tissue environments in determining the phenotypes of different resident populations of macrophages.

  3. Genome wide search for variation associated with micronutrient density of developing rice grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    "Omic" tools are rapidly being employed to delineate the biological framework controlling phenotypes of interest in crop species. An advanced understanding of the genetic basis for quantitative trait variation has been made possible through genome wide association studies (GWAS) that make use of gen...

  4. Cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties; impacted by rice temperature during milling.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed; Meullenet, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Rice milling plays a key factor in determining rice quality and value. Therefore accurate quality assessments are critical to the rice industry. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of exposing rice to elevated temperatures during milling, on cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties. Two long (Cybonnett and Francis) and one medium (Jupiter) rice (oryzae sativa L.) cultivars were milled using McGill laboratory mill for 30 and 40 s after warmed up the mill before milling. Four different milling temperatures per milling duration were achieved. Cooked rice texture properties were assessed using a uniaxial compression test and rice flour pasting properties measured using a TA-2000 rheometer. Results of this study showed that exposure of rice to high temperatures during milling significantly decreased cooked rice firmness. An increase in milled rice temperature after milling from 10.0 to 13.3 °C resulted in a 5.4 and 8.1 N decrease in cooked rice firmness. Although not always significant, the increase in milled rice temperature during milling resulted in an increase in cooked rice stickiness. The increase in milling temperature also showed significant increase in rice flour pasting properties. Changes in rice functional characteristics were attributed to the changes occurring to rice chemical constituents due to temperature exposure as indicated by the increase in rice protein hydrophobicity. Proteins are known to affect rice starch water holding capacity and other starch gelatinization properties.

  5. Molecular biology of rice tungro viruses.

    PubMed

    Hull, R

    1996-01-01

    Rice tungro, the most important virus disease of rice in South and Southeast Asia, is caused by a complex of two viruses, rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV). RTBV is a plant pararetrovirus with bacilliform particles, the structure of which is based on T = 3 icosahedral symmetry cut across the threefold axis.The particles encapsidate a circular double-stranded DNA of 8 kbp that encodes four proteins. The current information on the properties, functions, and expression of these proteins is discussed, as is the evidence for replication by reverse transcription. Two major strains of RTBV have been recognized, one from the Indian subcontinent and the other from Southeast Asia. RTSV particles contain a single-stranded RNA genome of 12 kb that encodes a large polyprotein and possibly one or two smaller proteins. The properties and processing of the polyprotein are described and the resemblance to picornaviruses noted.

  6. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology.

  7. The Human Functional Genomics Project: Understanding Generation of Diversity.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Jenna L; Hafler, David A

    2016-11-03

    Generation of biologic diversity is a cornerstone of immunity, yet the tools to investigate the causal influence of genetic and environmental factors have been greatly limited. Studies from the Human Functional Genomics Project, presented in Cell and other Cell Press journals, integrate environmental and genetic factors with the direction and magnitude of immune responses to decipher inflammatory disease pathogenesis.

  8. Functional foods and the biomedicalisation of everyday life: a case of germinated brown rice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyomin

    2013-07-01

    Germinated brown rice (GBR) is a functional food, whose benefits for chronic diseases have been demonstrated by scientific research on a single constituent of GBR, gamma aminobutyric acid. This article examines the processes through which the emphasis on biomedical rationality made during the production and consumption of functional foods is embedded in the complicated social contexts of the post-1990s. In the case of GBR, the Korean government, food scientists, mass media and consumers have added cultural accounts to the biomedical understanding of foods. In particular, consumers have transformed their households and online communities into a place for surveillance medicine. Functional foods are embedded in multiple actors' perspectives on what healthy foods mean and how and where the risks of chronic diseases should be managed.

  9. Genome-wide study of an elite rice pedigree reveals a complex history of genetic architecture for breeding improvement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaoxia; Lin, Zechuan; Zhou, Degui; Wang, Chongrong; Li, Hong; Yu, Renbo; Deng, Hanchao; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Shaochuan; Wang Deng, Xing; He, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Improving breeding has been widely utilized in crop breeding and contributed to yield and quality improvement, yet few researches have been done to analyze genetic architecture underlying breeding improvement comprehensively. Here, we collected genotype and phenotype data of 99 cultivars from the complete pedigree including Huanghuazhan, an elite, high-quality, conventional indica rice that has been grown over 4.5 million hectares in southern China and from which more than 20 excellent cultivars have been derived. We identified 1,313 selective sweeps (SSWs) revealing four stage-specific selection patterns corresponding to improvement preference during 65 years, and 1113 conserved Huanghuazhan traceable blocks (cHTBs) introduced from different donors and conserved in >3 breeding generations were the core genomic regions for superior performance of Huanghuazhan. Based on 151 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) identified for 13 improved traits in the pedigree, we reproduced their improvement process in silico, highlighting improving breeding works well for traits controlled by major/major + minor effect QTLs, but was inefficient for traits controlled by QTLs with complex interactions or explaining low levels of phenotypic variation. These results indicate long-term breeding improvement is efficient to construct superior genetic architecture for elite performance, yet molecular breeding with designed genotype of QTLs can facilitate complex traits improvement. PMID:28374863

  10. Resurrection of DNA Function In Vivo from an Extinct Genome

    PubMed Central

    Pask, Andrew J.; Behringer, Richard R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.

    2008-01-01

    There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine), obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity. PMID:18493600

  11. Mercator: a fast and simple web server for genome scale functional annotation of plant sequence data.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Marc; Nagel, Axel; Herter, Thomas; May, Patrick; Schroda, Michael; Zrenner, Rita; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Usadel, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Next-generation technologies generate an overwhelming amount of gene sequence data. Efficient annotation tools are required to make these data amenable to functional genomics analyses. The Mercator pipeline automatically assigns functional terms to protein or nucleotide sequences. It uses the MapMan 'BIN' ontology, which is tailored for functional annotation of plant 'omics' data. The classification procedure performs parallel sequence searches against reference databases, compiles the results and computes the most likely MapMan BINs for each query. In the current version, the pipeline relies on manually curated reference classifications originating from the three reference organisms (Arabidopsis, Chlamydomonas, rice), various other plant species that have a reviewed SwissProt annotation, and more than 2000 protein domain and family profiles at InterPro, CDD and KOG. Functional annotations predicted by Mercator achieve accuracies above 90% when benchmarked against manual annotation. In addition to mapping files for direct use in the visualization software MapMan, Mercator provides graphical overview charts, detailed annotation information in a convenient web browser interface and a MapMan-to-GO translation table to export results as GO terms. Mercator is available free of charge via http://mapman.gabipd.org/web/guest/app/Mercator.

  12. Functional and physiological properties of total, soluble, and insoluble dietary fibres derived from defatted rice bran.

    PubMed

    Daou, Cheickna; Zhang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Enzymatic- gravimetric method was used to obtain three fractions of dietary from defatted rice bran. The functional and physiological properties such as viscosity, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and glucose dialysis retardation index (GDRI), cholesterol and bile salt adsorption capacity of the resultant fractions were evaluated. Insoluble dietary fibre (IDF) and soluble dietary fibre (SDF) when compared showed that SDF exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) higher viscosity (2.35 mPa.s), greater GDRI value (17.65 %) at 60 min and significantly lowered concentration of cholesterol at pH 7 (29.90 %, p < 0.05). However IDF showed the highest CEC and its adsorption capacity of bile salt was higher than SDF (18.20 % vs. 13.76 %; p < 0.05), while CEC and cholesterol absorption capacity of TDF were similar to SDF. These properties indicate that rice bran soluble, insoluble and total fibres are functional ingredients which can be added to various food products and dietetic, low-calorie high-fiber foods to enhance their nutraceutical properties and health benefits.

  13. 'PACLIMS': A component LIM system for high-throughput functional genomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Donofrio, Nicole; Rajagopalon, Ravi; Brown, Douglas; Diener, Stephen; Windham, Donald; Nolin, Shelly; Floyd, Anna; Mitchell, Thomas; Galadima, Natalia; Tucker, Sara; Orbach, Marc J; Patel, Gayatri; Farman, Mark; Pampanwar, Vishal; Soderlund, Cari; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Dean, Ralph A

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing techniques leading to cost reduction have resulted in the generation of a growing number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. Computational tools greatly assist in defining open reading frames and assigning tentative annotations. However, gene functions cannot be asserted without biological support through, among other things, mutational analysis. In taking a genome-wide approach to functionally annotate an entire organism, in this application the ~11,000 predicted genes in the rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea), an effective platform for tracking and storing both the biological materials created and the data produced across several participating institutions was required. Results The platform designed, named PACLIMS, was built to support our high throughput pipeline for generating 50,000 random insertion mutants of Magnaporthe grisea. To be a useful tool for materials and data tracking and storage, PACLIMS was designed to be simple to use, modifiable to accommodate refinement of research protocols, and cost-efficient. Data entry into PACLIMS was simplified through the use of barcodes and scanners, thus reducing the potential human error, time constraints, and labor. This platform was designed in concert with our experimental protocol so that it leads the researchers through each step of the process from mutant generation through phenotypic assays, thus ensuring that every mutant produced is handled in an identical manner and all necessary data is captured. Conclusion Many sequenced eukaryotes have reached the point where computational analyses are no longer sufficient and require biological support for their predicted genes. Consequently, there is an increasing need for platforms that support high throughput genome-wide mutational analyses. While PACLIMS was designed specifically for this project, the source and ideas present in its implementation can be used as a model for other high throughput mutational endeavors. PMID

  14. Functional annotation from the genome sequence of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Huo, Tong; Zhang, Yinjie; Lin, Jianping

    2012-08-01

    The giant panda is one of the most critically endangered species due to the fragmentation and loss of its habitat. Studying the functions of proteins in this animal, especially specific trait-related proteins, is therefore necessary to protect the species. In this work, the functions of these proteins were investigated using the genome sequence of the giant panda. Data on 21,001 proteins and their functions were stored in the Giant Panda Protein Database, in which the proteins were divided into two groups: 20,179 proteins whose functions can be predicted by GeneScan formed the known-function group, whereas 822 proteins whose functions cannot be predicted by GeneScan comprised the unknown-function group. For the known-function group, we further classified the proteins by molecular function, biological process, cellular component, and tissue specificity. For the unknown-function group, we developed a strategy in which the proteins were filtered by cross-Blast to identify panda-specific proteins under the assumption that proteins related to the panda-specific traits in the unknown-function group exist. After this filtering procedure, we identified 32 proteins (2 of which are membrane proteins) specific to the giant panda genome as compared against the dog and horse genomes. Based on their amino acid sequences, these 32 proteins were further analyzed by functional classification using SVM-Prot, motif prediction using MyHits, and interacting protein prediction using the Database of Interacting Proteins. Nineteen proteins were predicted to be zinc-binding proteins, thus affecting the activities of nucleic acids. The 32 panda-specific proteins will be further investigated by structural and functional analysis.

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Core DNA Replication Machinery in the Higher Plants Arabidopsis and Rice1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Randall W.; Tatineni, Vinaya M.; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda; Thompson, William F.

    2007-01-01

    Core DNA replication proteins mediate the initiation, elongation, and Okazaki fragment maturation functions of DNA replication. Although this process is generally conserved in eukaryotes, important differences in the molecular architecture of the DNA replication machine and the function of individual subunits have been reported in various model systems. We have combined genome-wide bioinformatic analyses of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) with published experimental data to provide a comprehensive view of the core DNA replication machinery in plants. Many components identified in this analysis have not been studied previously in plant systems, including the GINS (go ichi ni san) complex (PSF1, PSF2, PSF3, and SLD5), MCM8, MCM9, MCM10, NOC3, POLA2, POLA3, POLA4, POLD3, POLD4, and RNASEH2. Our results indicate that the core DNA replication machinery from plants is more similar to vertebrates than single-celled yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), suggesting that animal models may be more relevant to plant systems. However, we also uncovered some important differences between plants and vertebrate machinery. For example, we did not identify geminin or RNASEH1 genes in plants. Our analyses also indicate that plants may be unique among eukaryotes in that they have multiple copies of numerous core DNA replication genes. This finding raises the question of whether specialized functions have evolved in some cases. This analysis establishes that the core DNA replication machinery is highly conserved across plant species and displays many features in common with other eukaryotes and some characteristics that are unique to plants. PMID:17556508

  16. Identification of candidate network hubs involved in metabolic adjustments of rice under drought stress by integrating transcriptome data and genome-scale metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Kitazumi, Ai; Cheung, C Y Maurice; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; de los Reyes, Benildo G; Jang, In-Cheol; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have integrated a rice genome-scale metabolic network and the transcriptome of a drought-tolerant rice line, DK151, to identify the major transcriptional regulators involved in metabolic adjustments necessary for adaptation to drought. This was achieved by examining the differential expressions of transcription factors and metabolic genes in leaf, root and young panicle of rice plants subjected to drought stress during tillering, booting and panicle elongation stages. Critical transcription factors such as AP2/ERF, bZIP, MYB and NAC that control the important nodes in the gene regulatory pathway were identified through correlative analysis of the patterns of spatio-temporal expression and cis-element enrichment. We showed that many of the candidate transcription factors involved in metabolic adjustments were previously linked to phenotypic variation for drought tolerance. This approach represents the first attempt to integrate models of transcriptional regulation and metabolic pathways for the identification of candidate regulatory genes for targeted selection in rice breeding.

  17. A genome-wide association study of a global rice panel reveals resistance in Oryza sativa to root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Dimkpa, Stanley O N; Lahari, Zobaida; Shrestha, Roshi; Douglas, Alex; Gheysen, Godelieve; Price, Adam H

    2016-02-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola is one of the most serious nematode pests worldwide and represents a major constraint on rice production. While variation in the susceptibility of Asian rice (Oryza sativa) exists, so far no strong and reliable resistance has been reported. Quantitative trait loci for partial resistance have been reported but no underlying genes have been tagged or cloned. Here, 332 accessions of the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were assessed for gall formation, revealing large variation across all subpopulations of rice and higher susceptibility in temperate japonica accessions. Accessions Khao Pahk Maw and LD 24 appeared to be resistant, which was confirmed in large pot experiments where no galls were observed. Detailed observations on these two accessions revealed no nematodes inside the roots 2 days after inoculation and very few females after 17 days (5 in Khao Pahk Maw and <1 in LD 24, in comparison with >100 in the susceptible controls). These two cultivars appear ideal donors for breeding root-knot nematode resistance. A genome-wide association study revealed 11 quantitative trait loci, two of which are close to epistatic loci detected in the Bala x Azucena population. The discussion highlights a small number of candidate genes worth exploring further, in particular many genes with lectin domains and genes on chromosome 11 with homology to the Hordeum Mla locus.

  18. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae Genome Reveals a Fungal Effector, Which Is Able to Induce Resistance Response in Transgenic Rice Line Containing Resistance Gene, Pi54

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Soham; Singh, Pankaj K.; Gupta, Deepak K.; Mahato, Ajay K.; Sarkar, Chiranjib; Rathour, Rajeev; Singh, Nagendra K.; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with blast resistance gene Pi54 in rice. PMID:27551285

  19. Analysis of Magnaporthe oryzae Genome Reveals a Fungal Effector, Which Is Able to Induce Resistance Response in Transgenic Rice Line Containing Resistance Gene, Pi54.

    PubMed

    Ray, Soham; Singh, Pankaj K; Gupta, Deepak K; Mahato, Ajay K; Sarkar, Chiranjib; Rathour, Rajeev; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak R

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most important diseases of rice. Pi54, a rice gene that imparts resistance to M. oryzae isolates prevalent in India, was already cloned but its avirulent counterpart in the pathogen was not known. After decoding the whole genome of an avirulent isolate of M. oryzae, we predicted 11440 protein coding genes and then identified four candidate effector proteins which are exclusively expressed in the infectious structure, appresoria. In silico protein modeling followed by interaction analysis between Pi54 protein model and selected four candidate effector proteins models revealed that Mo-01947_9 protein model encoded by a gene located at chromosome 4 of M. oryzae, interacted best at the Leucine Rich Repeat domain of Pi54 protein model. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis showed that Mo-01947_9 protein physically interacts with Pi54 protein. Nicotiana benthamiana leaf infiltration assay confirmed induction of hypersensitive response in the presence of Pi54 gene in a heterologous system. Genetic complementation test also proved that Mo-01947_9 protein induces avirulence response in the pathogen in presence of Pi54 gene. Here, we report identification and cloning of a new fungal effector gene which interacts with blast resistance gene Pi54 in rice.

  20. A genome-wide association study of a global rice panel reveals resistance in Oryza sativa to root-knot nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Dimkpa, Stanley O. N.; Lahari, Zobaida; Shrestha, Roshi; Douglas, Alex; Gheysen, Godelieve; Price, Adam H.

    2016-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola is one of the most serious nematode pests worldwide and represents a major constraint on rice production. While variation in the susceptibility of Asian rice (Oryza sativa) exists, so far no strong and reliable resistance has been reported. Quantitative trait loci for partial resistance have been reported but no underlying genes have been tagged or cloned. Here, 332 accessions of the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were assessed for gall formation, revealing large variation across all subpopulations of rice and higher susceptibility in temperate japonica accessions. Accessions Khao Pahk Maw and LD 24 appeared to be resistant, which was confirmed in large pot experiments where no galls were observed. Detailed observations on these two accessions revealed no nematodes inside the roots 2 days after inoculation and very few females after 17 days (5 in Khao Pahk Maw and <1 in LD 24, in comparison with >100 in the susceptible controls). These two cultivars appear ideal donors for breeding root-knot nematode resistance. A genome-wide association study revealed 11 quantitative trait loci, two of which are close to epistatic loci detected in the Bala x Azucena population. The discussion highlights a small number of candidate genes worth exploring further, in particular many genes with lectin domains and genes on chromosome 11 with homology to the Hordeum Mla locus. PMID:26552884

  1. Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue-2 Virus Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AD_ _ _ Lfl oSTRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL STUDIES ON DENGUE -2 VIRUS GENOME 0Annual Report Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan, Ph.D. March 1, 1986 Supported by...Studies on Dengue -2 Virus Genome 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha Krishnan Padmanabhan 13a TYPE OF REPORT 1 3b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day...analysis of these clones totalling 06 01 14,586 nucleotides: Deduced amino acid sequences of dengue virI 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse of

  2. Knocking down the obstacles to functional genomics data sharing

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kaylene J.; Smith, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    This week, Scientific Data published a collection of eight papers that describe datasets from high-throughput functional genomics screens, primarily utilizing RNA interference (RNAi). The publications explore host-pathogen dependencies, innate immune response, disease pathways, and cell morphology and motility at the genome-level. All data, including raw images from the high content screens, are publically available in PubChem BioAssay, figshare, Harvard Dataverse or the Image Data Resource (IDR). Detailed data descriptors enable use of these data for analysis algorithm design, machine learning, data comparisons, as well as generating new scientific hypotheses. PMID:28248922

  3. Knocking down the obstacles to functional genomics data sharing.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kaylene J; Smith, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    This week, Scientific Data published a collection of eight papers that describe datasets from high-throughput functional genomics screens, primarily utilizing RNA interference (RNAi). The publications explore host-pathogen dependencies, innate immune response, disease pathways, and cell morphology and motility at the genome-level. All data, including raw images from the high content screens, are publically available in PubChem BioAssay, figshare, Harvard Dataverse or the Image Data Resource (IDR). Detailed data descriptors enable use of these data for analysis algorithm design, machine learning, data comparisons, as well as generating new scientific hypotheses.

  4. Genomic analysis of Xanthomonas oryzae isolates from rice grown in the United States reveals substantial divergence from known X. oryzae pathovars.

    PubMed

    Triplett, L R; Hamilton, J P; Buell, C R; Tisserat, N A; Verdier, V; Zink, F; Leach, J E

    2011-06-01

    The species Xanthomonas oryzae is comprised of two designated pathovars, both of which cause economically significant diseases of rice in Asia and Africa. Although X. oryzae is not considered endemic in the United States, an X. oryzae-like bacterium was isolated from U.S. rice and southern cutgrass in the late 1980s. The U.S. strains were weakly pathogenic and genetically distinct from characterized X. oryzae pathovars. In the current study, a draft genome sequence from two U.S. Xanthomonas strains revealed that the U.S. strains form a novel clade within the X. oryzae species, distinct from all strains known to cause significant yield loss. Comparative genome analysis revealed several putative gene clusters specific to the U.S. strains and supported previous reports that the U.S. strains lack transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. In addition to phylogenetic and comparative analyses, the genome sequence was used for designing robust U.S. strain-specific primers, demonstrating the usefulness of a draft genome sequence in the rapid development of diagnostic tools.

  5. A New System for Comparative Functional Genomics of Saccharomyces Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Caudy, Amy A.; Guan, Yuanfang; Jia, Yue; Hansen, Christina; DeSevo, Chris; Hayes, Alicia P.; Agee, Joy; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R.; Arellano, Hugo; Barrett, Daniel; Bauerle, Cynthia; Bisaria, Namita; Bradley, Patrick H.; Breunig, J. Scott; Bush, Erin; Cappel, David; Capra, Emily; Chen, Walter; Clore, John; Combs, Peter A.; Doucette, Christopher; Demuren, Olukunle; Fellowes, Peter; Freeman, Sam; Frenkel, Evgeni; Gadala-Maria, Daniel; Gawande, Richa; Glass, David; Grossberg, Samuel; Gupta, Anita; Hammonds-Odie, Latanya; Hoisos, Aaron; Hsi, Jenny; Hsu, Yu-Han Huang; Inukai, Sachi; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Ke, Xiaobo; Kojima, Mina; Leachman, Samuel; Lieber, Danny; Liebowitz, Anna; Liu, Julia; Liu, Yufei; Martin, Trevor; Mena, Jose; Mendoza, Rosa; Myhrvold, Cameron; Millian, Christian; Pfau, Sarah; Raj, Sandeep; Rich, Matt; Rokicki, Joe; Rounds, William; Salazar, Michael; Salesi, Matthew; Sharma, Rajani; Silverman, Sanford; Singer, Cara; Sinha, Sandhya; Staller, Max; Stern, Philip; Tang, Hanlin; Weeks, Sharon; Weidmann, Maxwell; Wolf, Ashley; Young, Carmen; Yuan, Jie; Crutchfield, Christopher; McClean, Megan; Murphy, Coleen T.; Llinás, Manuel; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Dunham, Maitreya J.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing, particularly in fungi, has progressed at a tremendous rate. More difficult, however, is experimental testing of the inferences about gene function that can be drawn from comparative sequence analysis alone. We present a genome-wide functional characterization of a sequenced but experimentally understudied budding yeast, Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum (henceforth referred to as S. bayanus), allowing us to map changes over the 20 million years that separate this organism from S. cerevisiae. We first created a suite of genetic tools to facilitate work in S. bayanus. Next, we measured the gene-expression response of S. bayanus to a diverse set of perturbations optimized using a computational approach to cover a diverse array of functionally relevant biological responses. The resulting data set reveals that gene-expression patterns are largely conserved, but significant changes may exist in regulatory networks such as carbohydrate utilization and meiosis. In addition to regulatory changes, our approach identified gene functions that have diverged. The functions of genes in core pathways are highly conserved, but we observed many changes in which genes are involved in osmotic stress, peroxisome biogenesis, and autophagy. A surprising number of genes specific to S. bayanus respond to oxidative stress, suggesting the organism may have evolved under different selection pressures than S. cerevisiae. This work expands the scope of genome-scale evolutionary studies from sequence-based analysis to rapid experimental characterization and could be adopted for functional mapping in any lineage of interest. Furthermore, our detailed characterization of S. bayanus provides a valuable resource for comparative functional genomics studies in yeast. PMID:23852385

  6. A new system for comparative functional genomics of Saccharomyces yeasts.

    PubMed

    Caudy, Amy A; Guan, Yuanfang; Jia, Yue; Hansen, Christina; DeSevo, Chris; Hayes, Alicia P; Agee, Joy; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Arellano, Hugo; Barrett, Daniel; Bauerle, Cynthia; Bisaria, Namita; Bradley, Patrick H; Breunig, J Scott; Bush, Erin; Cappel, David; Capra, Emily; Chen, Walter; Clore, John; Combs, Peter A; Doucette, Christopher; Demuren, Olukunle; Fellowes, Peter; Freeman, Sam; Frenkel, Evgeni; Gadala-Maria, Daniel; Gawande, Richa; Glass, David; Grossberg, Samuel; Gupta, Anita; Hammonds-Odie, Latanya; Hoisos, Aaron; Hsi, Jenny; Hsu, Yu-Han Huang; Inukai, Sachi; Karczewski, Konrad J; Ke, Xiaobo; Kojima, Mina; Leachman, Samuel; Lieber, Danny; Liebowitz, Anna; Liu, Julia; Liu, Yufei; Martin, Trevor; Mena, Jose; Mendoza, Rosa; Myhrvold, Cameron; Millian, Christian; Pfau, Sarah; Raj, Sandeep; Rich, Matt; Rokicki, Joe; Rounds, William; Salazar, Michael; Salesi, Matthew; Sharma, Rajani; Silverman, Sanford; Singer, Cara; Sinha, Sandhya; Staller, Max; Stern, Philip; Tang, Hanlin; Weeks, Sharon; Weidmann, Maxwell; Wolf, Ashley; Young, Carmen; Yuan, Jie; Crutchfield, Christopher; McClean, Megan; Murphy, Coleen T; Llinás, Manuel; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2013-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing, particularly in fungi, has progressed at a tremendous rate. More difficult, however, is experimental testing of the inferences about gene function that can be drawn from comparative sequence analysis alone. We present a genome-wide functional characterization of a sequenced but experimentally understudied budding yeast, Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum (henceforth referred to as S. bayanus), allowing us to map changes over the 20 million years that separate this organism from S. cerevisiae. We first created a suite of genetic tools to facilitate work in S. bayanus. Next, we measured the gene-expression response of S. bayanus to a diverse set of perturbations optimized using a computational approach to cover a diverse array of functionally relevant biological responses. The resulting data set reveals that gene-expression patterns are largely conserved, but significant changes may exist in regulatory networks such as carbohydrate utilization and meiosis. In addition to regulatory changes, our approach identified gene functions that have diverged. The functions of genes in core pathways are highly conserved, but we observed many changes in which genes are involved in osmotic stress, peroxisome biogenesis, and autophagy. A surprising number of genes specific to S. bayanus respond to oxidative stress, suggesting the organism may have evolved under different selection pressures than S. cerevisiae. This work expands the scope of genome-scale evolutionary studies from sequence-based analysis to rapid experimental characterization and could be adopted for functional mapping in any lineage of interest. Furthermore, our detailed characterization of S. bayanus provides a valuable resource for comparative functional genomics studies in yeast.

  7. Global genome expression analysis of rice in response to drought and high-salinity stresses in shoot, flag leaf, and panicle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junli; Wang, Xiangfeng; Jiao, Yuling; Qin, Yonghua; Liu, Xigang; He, Kun; Chen, Chen; Ma, Ligeng; Wang, Jian; Xiong, Lizhong; Zhang, Qifa; Fan, Liumin

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate genome-level responses to drought and high-salinity stress in rice, a 70mer oligomer microarray covering 36,926 unique genes or gene models was used to profile genome expression changes in rice shoot, flag leaf and panicle under drought or high-salinity conditions. While patterns of gene expression in response to drought or high-salinity stress within a particular organ type showed significant overlap, comparison of expression profiles among different organs showed largely organ-specific patterns of regulation. Moreover, both stresses appear to alter the expression patterns of a significant number of genes involved in transcription and cell signaling in a largely organ-specific manner. The promoter regions of genes induced by both stresses or induced by one stress in more than one organ types possess relative enrichment of two cis-elements (ABRE core and DRE core) known to be associated with water stress. An initial computational analysis indicated that novel promoter motifs are present in the promoters of genes involved in rehydration after drought. This analysis suggested that rice might possess a mechanism that actively detects rehydration and facilitates rapid recovery. Overall, our data supports a notion that organ-specific gene regulation in response to the two abiotic stresses may primarily be mediated by organ-specific transcription responses. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11103-006-9111-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17225073

  8. Beyond Drosophila: RNAi in vivo and functional genomics in insects.

    PubMed

    Bellés, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability of insect genomes has revealed a large number of genes with unknown functions and the resulting problem of how to discover these functions. The RNA interference (RNAi) technique, which generates loss-of-function phenotypes by depletion of a chosen transcript, can help to overcome this challenge. RNAi can unveil the functions of new genes, lead to the discovery of new functions for old genes, and find the genes for old functions. Moreover, the possibility of studying the functions of homologous genes in different species can allow comparisons of the genetic networks regulating a given function in different insect groups, thereby facilitating an evolutionary insight into developmental processes. RNAi also has drawbacks and obscure points, however, such as those related to differences in species sensitivity. Disentangling these differences is one of the main challenges in the RNAi field.

  9. Applying functional genomics research to the study of pig reproduction.

    PubMed

    Pomp, D; Caetano, A R; Bertani, G R; Gladney, C D; Johnson, R K

    2001-01-01

    Functional genomics is an experimental approach that incorporates genome-wide or system-wide experimentation, expanding the scope of biological investigation from studying single genes to studying potentially all genes at once in a systematic manner. This technology is highly appealing because of its high throughput and relatively low cost. Furthermore, analysis of gene expression using microarrays is likely to be more biologically relevant than the conventional paradigm of reductionism, because it has the potential to uncover new biological connections between genes and biochemical pathways. However, functional genomics is still in its infancy, especially with regard to the study of pig reproduction. Currently, efforts are centred on developing the necessary resources to enable high throughput evaluation and comparison of gene expression. However, it is clear that in the near future functional genomics will be applied on a large scale to study the biology and physiology of reproduction in pigs, and to understand better the complex nature of genetic control over polygenic characteristics, such as ovulation rate and litter size. We can look forward to generating a significant amount of new data on differences in gene expression between genotypes, treatments, or at various temporal and spatial coordinates within a variety of reproductively relevant systems. Along with this capability will be the challenge of collating, analysing and interpreting datasets that are orders of magnitude more extensive and complex than those currently used. Furthermore, integration of functional genomics with traditional genetic approaches and with detailed analysis of the proteome and relevant whole animal phenotypes will be required to make full use of this powerful new experimental paradigm as a beneficial research tool.

  10. Genomic islands predict functional adaptation in marine actinobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, Kevin; Jenkins, Caroline; Nett, Markus; Udwary, Daniel; Gontang, Erin; McGlinchey, Ryan; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Podell, Sheila; Allen, Eric; Moore, Bradley; Jensen, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Linking functional traits to bacterial phylogeny remains a fundamental but elusive goal of microbial ecology 1. Without this information, it becomes impossible to resolve meaningful units of diversity and the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other and adapt to environmental change. Ecological adaptations among bacterial populations have been linked to genomic islands, strain-specific regions of DNA that house functionally adaptive traits 2. In the case of environmental bacteria, these traits are largely inferred from bioinformatic or gene expression analyses 2, thus leaving few examples in which the functions of island genes have been experimentally characterized. Here we report the complete genome sequences of Salinispora tropica and S. arenicola, the first cultured, obligate marine Actinobacteria 3. These two species inhabit benthic marine environments and dedicate 8-10percent of their genomes to the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Despite a close phylogenetic relationship, 25 of 37 secondary metabolic pathways are species-specific and located within 21 genomic islands, thus providing new evidence linking secondary metabolism to ecological adaptation. Species-specific differences are also observed in CRISPR sequences, suggesting that variations in phage immunity provide fitness advantages that contribute to the cosmopolitan distribution of S. arenicola 4. The two Salinispora genomes have evolved by complex processes that include the duplication and acquisition of secondary metabolite genes, the products of which provide immediate opportunities for molecular diversification and ecological adaptation. Evidence that secondary metabolic pathways are exchanged by Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) yet are fixed among globally distributed populations 5 supports a functional role for their products and suggests that pathway acquisition represents a previously unrecognized force driving bacterial diversification

  11. Cloning of TPS gene from eelgrass species Zostera marina and its functional identification by genetic transformation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Li, Qiuying; Weng, Manli; Wang, Xiuliang; Guo, Baotai; Wang, Li; Wang, Wei; Duan, Delin; Wang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence (2613 bp) of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) gene of eelgrass Zostera marina (ZmTPS) was identified and cloned. Z. marina is a kind of seed-plant growing in sea water during its whole life history. The open reading frame (ORF) region of ZmTPS gene encodes a protein of 870 amino acid residues and a stop codon. The corresponding genomic DNA sequence is 3770 bp in length, which contains 3 exons and 2 introns. The ZmTPS gene was transformed into rice variety ZH11 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. After antibiotic screening, molecular characterization, salt-tolerance and trehalose content determinations, two transgenic lines resistant to 150 mM NaCL solutions were screened. Our study results indicated that the ZmTPS gene was integrated into the genomic DNA of the two transgenic rice lines and could be expressed well. Moreover, the detection of the transformed ZmTPS gene in the progenies of the two transgenic lines was performed from T1 to T4 generations; and results suggested that the transformed ZmTPS gene can be transmitted from parent to the progeny in transgenic rice.

  12. Neocaridina denticulata: A Decapod Crustacean Model for Functional Genomics.

    PubMed

    Mykles, Donald L; Hui, Jerome H L

    2015-11-01

    A decapod crustacean model is needed for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying physiological processes, such as reproduction, sex determination, molting and growth, immunity, regeneration, and response to stress. Criteria for selection are: life-history traits, adult size, availability and ease of culture, and genomics and genetic manipulation. Three freshwater species are considered: cherry shrimp, Neocaridina denticulata; red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii; and redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus. All three are readily available, reproduce year round, and grow rapidly. The crayfish species require more space for culture than does N. denticulata. The transparent cuticle of cherry shrimp provides for direct assessment of reproductive status, stage of molt, and tissue-specific expression of reporter genes, and facilitates screening of mutations affecting phenotype. Moreover, a preliminary genome of N. denticulata is available and efforts toward complete genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing have been initiated. Neocaridina denticulata possesses the best combination of traits that make it most suitable as a model for functional genomics. The next step is to obtain the complete genome sequence and to develop molecular technologies for the screening of mutants and for manipulating tissue-specific gene expression.

  13. Marine invertebrate lipases: Comparative and functional genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra

    2015-09-01

    Lipases are key enzymes involved in lipid digestion, storage and mobilization of reserves during fasting or heightened metabolic demand. This is a highly conserved process, essential for survival. The genomes of five marine invertebrate species with distinctive digestive system were screened for the six major lipase families. The two most common families in marine invertebrates, the neutral an acid lipases, are also the main families in mammals and insects. The number of lipases varies two-fold across analyzed genomes. A high degree of orthology with mammalian lipases was observed. Interestingly, 19% of the marine invertebrate lipases have lost motifs required for catalysis. Analysis of the lid and loop regions of the neutral lipases suggests that many marine invertebrates have a functional triacylglycerol hydrolytic activity as well as some acid lipases. A revision of the expression profiles and functional activity on sequences in databases and scientific literature provided information regarding the function of these families of enzymes in marine invertebrates.

  14. Recent advances in tomato functional genomics: utilization of VIGS.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Puranik, Swati; Khan, Moinuddin; Prasad, Manoj

    2012-10-01

    Tomato unquestionably occupies a significant position in world vegetable production owing to its world-wide consumption. The tomato genome sequencing efforts being recently concluded, it becomes more imperative to recognize important functional genes from this treasure of generated information for improving tomato yield. While much progress has been made in conventional tomato breeding, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) offers an alternative approach for advancement of tomato functional genomics. In particular, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is increasingly being used as rapid, reliable, and lucrative screening strategy to elucidate gene function. In this review, we focus on the recent advancement made through exploiting the potential of this technique for manipulating different agronomically important traits in tomato by discussing several case studies.

  15. A Rice Ca2+ Binding Protein Is Required for Tapetum Function and Pollen Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Meng, Zhaolu; Liang, Wanqi; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Kudla, Jörg; Tucker, Matthew R; Luo, Zhijing; Chen, Mingjiao; Xu, Dawei; Zhao, Guochao; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Siyi; Kim, Yu-Jin; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-11-01

    In flowering plants, successful male reproduction requires the sophisticated interaction between somatic anther wall layers and reproductive cells. Timely degradation of the innermost tissue of the anther wall layer, the tapetal layer, is critical for pollen development. Ca(2+) is a well-known stimulus for plant development, but whether it plays a role in affecting male reproduction remains elusive. Here we report a role of Defective in Exine Formation 1 (OsDEX1) in rice (Oryza sativa), a Ca(2+) binding protein, in regulating rice tapetal cell degradation and pollen formation. In osdex1 anthers, tapetal cell degeneration is delayed and degradation of the callose wall surrounding the microspores is compromised, leading to aborted pollen formation and complete male sterility. OsDEX1 is expressed in tapetal cells and microspores during early anther development. Recombinant OsDEX1 is able to bind Ca(2+) and regulate Ca(2+) homeostasis in vitro, and osdex1 exhibited disturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis in tapetal cells. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that OsDEX1 may have a conserved function in binding Ca(2+) in flowering plants, and genetic complementation of pollen wall defects of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) dex1 mutant confirmed its evolutionary conservation in pollen development. Collectively, these findings suggest that OsDEX1 plays a fundamental role in the development of tapetal cells and pollen formation, possibly via modulating the Ca(2+) homeostasis during pollen development.

  16. A Rice Ca2+ Binding Protein Is Required for Tapetum Function and Pollen Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Meng, Zhaolu; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Kudla, Jörg; Luo, Zhijing; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Siyi

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, successful male reproduction requires the sophisticated interaction between somatic anther wall layers and reproductive cells. Timely degradation of the innermost tissue of the anther wall layer, the tapetal layer, is critical for pollen development. Ca2+ is a well-known stimulus for plant development, but whether it plays a role in affecting male reproduction remains elusive. Here we report a role of Defective in Exine Formation 1 (OsDEX1) in rice (Oryza sativa), a Ca2+ binding protein, in regulating rice tapetal cell degradation and pollen formation. In osdex1 anthers, tapetal cell degeneration is delayed and degradation of the callose wall surrounding the microspores is compromised, leading to aborted pollen formation and complete male sterility. OsDEX1 is expressed in tapetal cells and microspores during early anther development. Recombinant OsDEX1 is able to bind Ca2+ and regulate Ca2+ homeostasis in vitro, and osdex1 exhibited disturbed Ca2+ homeostasis in tapetal cells. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that OsDEX1 may have a conserved function in binding Ca2+ in flowering plants, and genetic complementation of pollen wall defects of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) dex1 mutant confirmed its evolutionary conservation in pollen development. Collectively, these findings suggest that OsDEX1 plays a fundamental role in the development of tapetal cells and pollen formation, possibly via modulating the Ca2+ homeostasis during pollen development. PMID:27663411

  17. Brachypodium distachyon. A New Model System for Functional Genomics in Grasses1

    PubMed Central

    Draper, John; Mur, Luis A.J.; Jenkins, Glyn; Ghosh-Biswas, Gadab C.; Bablak, Pauline; Hasterok, Robert; Routledge, Andrew P.M.

    2001-01-01

    A new model for grass functional genomics is described based on Brachypodium distachyon, which in the evolution of the Pooideae diverged just prior to the clade of “core pooid” genera that contain the majority of important temperate cereals and forage grasses. Diploid ecotypes of B. distachyon (2n = 10) have five easily distinguishable chromosomes that display high levels of chiasma formation at meiosis. The B. distachyon nuclear genome was indistinguishable in size from that of Arabidopsis, making it the simplest genome described in grasses to date. B. distachyon is a self-fertile, inbreeding annual with a life cycle of less than 4 months. These features, coupled with its small size (approximately 20 cm at maturity), lack of seed-head shatter, and undemanding growth requirements should make it amenable to high-throughput genetics and mutant screens. Immature embryos exhibited a high capacity for plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis. Regenerated plants display very low levels of albinism and have normal fertility. A simple transformation system has been developed based on microprojectile bombardment of embryogenic callus and hygromycin selection. Selected B. distachyon ecotypes were resistant to all tested cereal-adapted Blumeria graminis species and cereal brown rusts (Puccinia reconditia). In contrast, different ecotypes displayed resistance or disease symptoms following challenge with the rice blast pathogen (Magnaporthe grisea) and wheat/barley yellow stripe rusts (Puccinia striformis). Despite its small stature, B. distachyon has large seeds that should prove useful for studies on grain filling. Such biological characteristics represent important traits for study in temperate cereals. PMID:11743099

  18. Cloning and functional validation of early inducible Magnaporthe oryzae responsive CYP76M7 promoter from rice

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Joshitha; Devanna, B. N.; Singh, Nagendra K.; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2015-01-01

    Cloning and functional characterization of plant pathogen inducible promoters is of great significance for their use in the effective management of plant diseases. The rice gene CYP76M7 was up regulated at 24, 48, and 72 hours post inoculation (hpi) with two isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae Mo-ei-11 and Mo-ni-25. In this study, the promoter of CYP76M7 gene was cloned from rice cultivar HR-12, characterized and functionally validated. The Transcription Start Site of CYP76M7 was mapped at 45 bases upstream of the initiation codon. To functionally validate the promoter, 5′ deletion analysis of the promoter sequences was performed and the deletion fragments fused with the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were used for generating stable transgenic Arabidopsis plants as well as for transient expression in rice. The spatial and temporal expression pattern of GUS in transgenic Arabidopsis plants and also in transiently expressed rice leaves revealed that the promoter of CYP76M7 gene was induced by M. oryzae. The induction of CYP76M7 promoter was observed at 24 hpi with M. oryzae. We report that, sequences spanning -222 bp to -520 bp, with the cluster of three W-boxes, two ASF1 motifs and a single GT-1 element may contribute to the M. oryzae inducible nature of CYP76M7 promoter. The promoter characterized in this study would be an ideal candidate for the overexpression of defense genes in rice for developing durable blast resistance rice lines. PMID:26052337

  19. Functional genomics of Lactobacillus casei establishment in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Licandro-Seraut, Hélène; Scornec, Hélène; Pédron, Thierry; Cavin, Jean-François; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the composition of the gut microbiota and its symbiotic contribution to key host physiological functions are well established, little is known as yet about the bacterial factors that account for this symbiosis. We selected Lactobacillus casei as a model microorganism to proceed to genomewide identification of the functions required for a symbiont to establish colonization in the gut. As a result of our recent development of a transposon-mutagenesis tool that overcomes the barrier that had prevented L. casei random mutagenesis, we developed a signature-tagged mutagenesis approach combining whole-genome reverse genetics using a set of tagged transposons and in vivo screening using the rabbit ligated ileal loop model. After sequencing transposon insertion sites in 9,250 random mutants, we assembled a library of 1,110 independent mutants, all disrupted in a different gene, that provides a representative view of the L. casei genome. By determining the relative quantity of each of the 1,110 mutants before and after the in vivo challenge, we identified a core of 47 L. casei genes necessary for its establishment in the gut. They are involved in housekeeping functions, metabolism (sugar, amino acids), cell wall biogenesis, and adaptation to environment. Hence we provide what is, to our knowledge, the first global functional genomics analysis of L. casei symbiosis. PMID:25024222

  20. Biochemical characterization of rice trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatases supports distinctive functions of these plant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Shima, Shuhei; Matsui, Hirokazu; Tahara, Satoshi; Imai, Ryozo

    2007-03-01

    Substantial levels of trehalose accumulate in bacteria, fungi, and invertebrates, where it serves as a storage carbohydrate or as a protectant against environmental stresses. In higher plants, trehalose is detected at fairly low levels; therefore, a regulatory or signaling function has been proposed for this molecule. In many organisms, trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase is the enzyme governing the final step of trehalose biosynthesis. Here we report that OsTPP1 and OsTPP2 are the two major trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase genes expressed in vegetative tissues of rice. Similar to results obtained from our previous OsTPP1 study, complementation analysis of a yeast trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase mutant and activity measurement of the recombinant protein demonstrated that OsTPP2 encodes a functional trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase enzyme. OsTPP2 expression is transiently induced in response to chilling and other abiotic stresses. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant OsTPP1 and OsTPP2 revealed stringent substrate specificity for trehalose 6-phosphate and about 10 times lower K(m) values for trehalose 6-phosphate as compared with trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase enzymes from microorganisms. OsTPP1 and OsTPP2 also clearly contrasted with microbial enzymes, in that they are generally unstable, almost completely losing activity when subjected to heat treatment at 50 degrees C for 4 min. These characteristics of rice trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase enzymes are consistent with very low cellular substrate concentration and tightly regulated gene expression. These data also support a plant-specific function of trehalose biosynthesis in response to environmental stresses.

  1. Functional diversification of FD transcription factors in rice, components of florigen activation complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2013-03-01

    Florigen, a protein encoded by the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis and Heading date 3a (Hd3a) in rice, is the universal flowering hormone in plants. Florigen is transported from leaves to the shoot apical meristem and initiates floral evocation. In shoot apical cells, conserved cytoplasmic 14-3-3 proteins act as florigen receptors. A hexameric florigen activation complex (FAC) composed of Hd3a, 14-3-3 proteins, and OsFD1, a transcription factor, activates OsMADS15, a rice homolog of Arabidopsis APETALA1, leading to flowering. Because FD is a key component of the FAC, we characterized the FD gene family and their functions. Phylogenetic analysis of FD genes indicated that this family is divided into two groups: (i) canonical FD genes that are conserved among eudicots and non-Poaceae monocots; and (ii) Poaceae-specific FD genes that are organized into three subgroups: Poaceae FD1, FD2 and FD3. The Poaceae FD1 group shares a small sequence motif, T(A/V)LSLNS, with FDs of eudicots and non-Poaceae monocots. Overexpression of OsFD2, a member of the Poaceae FD2 group, produced smaller leaves with shorter plastochrons, suggesting that OsFD2 controls leaf development. In vivo subcellular localization of Hd3a, 14-3-3 and OsFD2 suggested that in contrast to OsFD1, OsFD2 is restricted to the cytoplasm through its interaction with the cytoplasmic 14-3-3 proteins, and interaction of Hd3a with 14-3-3 facilitates nuclear translocation of the FAC containing OsFD2. These results suggest that FD function has diverged between OsFD1 and OsFD2, but formation of a FAC is essential for their function.

  2. Functional Diversification of FD Transcription Factors in Rice, Components of Florigen Activation Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2013-01-01

    Florigen, a protein encoded by the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis and Heading date 3a (Hd3a) in rice, is the universal flowering hormone in plants. Florigen is transported from leaves to the shoot apical meristem and initiates floral evocation. In shoot apical cells, conserved cytoplasmic 14-3-3 proteins act as florigen receptors. A hexameric florigen activation complex (FAC) composed of Hd3a, 14-3-3 proteins, and OsFD1, a transcription factor, activates OsMADS15, a rice homolog of Arabidopsis APETALA1, leading to flowering. Because FD is a key component of the FAC, we characterized the FD gene family and their functions. Phylogenetic analysis of FD genes indicated that this family is divided into two groups: (i) canonical FD genes that are conserved among eudicots and non-Poaceae monocots; and (ii) Poaceae-specific FD genes that are organized into three subgroups: Poaceae FD1, FD2 and FD3. The Poaceae FD1 group shares a small sequence motif, T(A/V)LSLNS, with FDs of eudicots and non-Poaceae monocots. Overexpression of OsFD2, a member of the Poaceae FD2 group, produced smaller leaves with shorter plastochrons, suggesting that OsFD2 controls leaf development. In vivo subcellular localization of Hd3a, 14-3-3 and OsFD2 suggested that in contrast to OsFD1, OsFD2 is restricted to the cytoplasm through its interaction with the cytoplasmic 14-3-3 proteins, and interaction of Hd3a with 14-3-3 facilitates nuclear translocation of the FAC containing OsFD2. These results suggest that FD function has diverged between OsFD1 and OsFD2, but formation of a FAC is essential for their function. PMID:23324168

  3. Effects of the brown rice diet on visceral obesity and endothelial function: the BRAVO study.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Michio; Higa, Moritake; Kinjo, Rie; Yamakawa, Ken; Tanaka, Hideaki; Kozuka, Chisayo; Yabiku, Kouichi; Taira, Shin-Ichiro; Sata, Masataka; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2014-01-28

    Brown rice (BR) and white rice (WR) produce different glycaemic responses and their consumption may affect the dietary management of obesity. In the present study, the effects of BR and WR on abdominal fat distribution, metabolic parameters and endothelial function were evaluated in subjects with the metabolic syndrome in a randomised cross-over fashion. In study 1, acute postprandial metabolic parameters and flow- and nitroglycerine-mediated dilation (FMD and NMD) of the brachial artery were determined in male volunteers with or without the metabolic syndrome after ingestion of either BR or WR. The increases in glucose and insulin AUC were lower after ingestion of BR than after ingestion of WR (P= 0·041 and P= 0·045, respectively). FMD values were decreased 60 min after ingestion of WR (P= 0·037 v. baseline), but the decrease was protected after ingestion of BR. In study 2, a separate cohort of male volunteers (n 27) with the metabolic syndrome was randomised into two groups with different BR and WR consumption patterns. The values of weight-based parameters were decreased after consumption of BR for 8 weeks, but returned to baseline values after a WR consumption period. Insulin resistance and total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were reduced after consumption of BR. In conclusion, consumption of BR may be beneficial, partly owing to the lowering of glycaemic response, and may protect postprandial endothelial function in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. Long-term beneficial effects of BR on metabolic parameters and endothelial function were also observed.

  4. Genetic architecture of cold tolerance in rice at the seedling stage and heading determined through genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold stress at the seedling stage limits rice (Oryza sativa L.) production in temperate regions or at high elevations in the tropics due to poor plant stand establishment and delayed maturity. At the heading stage, cold temperature causes sterility, thus decreasing grain yield. Initially, the Rice D...

  5. Genome-wide functional analysis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Motaung, Thabiso E; Ells, Ruan; Pohl, Carolina H; Albertyn, Jacobus; Tsilo, Toi J

    2017-02-08

    Candida albicans is an important etiological agent of superficial and life-threatening infections in individuals with compromised immune systems. To date, we know of several overlapping genetic networks that govern virulence attributes in this fungal pathogen. Classical use of deletion mutants has led to the discovery of numerous virulence factors over the years, and genome-wide functional analysis has propelled gene discovery at an even faster pace. Indeed, a number of recent studies using large-scale genetic screens followed by genome-wide functional analysis has allowed for the unbiased discovery of many new genes involved in C. albicans biology. Here we share our perspectives on the role of these studies in analyzing fundamental aspects of C. albicans virulence properties.

  6. Relaxation of yeast mitochondrial functions after whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huifeng; Guan, Wenjun; Pinney, David; Wang, Wen; Gu, Zhenglong

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for cellular energy production in most eukaryotic organisms. However, when glucose is abundant, yeast species that underwent whole-genome duplication (WGD) mostly conduct fermentation even under aerobic conditions, and most can survive without a functional mitochondrial genome. In this study, we show that the rate of evolution for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes was greater in post-WGD species than pre-WGD species. Furthermore, codon usage bias was relaxed for these genes in post-WGD yeast species. The codon usage pattern and the distribution of a particular transcription regulatory element suggest that the change to an efficient aerobic fermentation lifestyle in this lineage might have emerged after WGD between the divergence of Kluyveromyces polysporus and Saccharomyces castellii from their common ancestor. This new energy production strategy could have led to the relaxation of mitochondrial function in the relevant yeast species. PMID:18669479

  7. The ethics of functional genomics: same, same, but different?

    PubMed

    Hoeyer, Klaus; Koch, Lene

    2006-09-01

    Respect for human life--a notion of worth uniting all members of the human race--constitutes a sense of anthropocentrism that has long been the justification for the enrollment of animals in experimentation executed to develop therapies to alleviate human suffering. Currently, however, advances in functional genomics are causing a qualitative transformation of the rationale for medical research performed on animals. The notion of human distinctness is being fundamentally challenged when gene sequences similar to those found in humans are identified in different species. In this Opinion article, we would like to highlight an inherent tension brought about by the current developments in functional genomics: a tension between the scientific and the ethical status of gene sequences. Is it reasonable to argue that they are the same for all practical purposes but different in ethical status?

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on physicochemical, functional and pasting properties of some locally-produced rice (Oryza spp) cultivars in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocloo, Fidelis C. K.; Owureku-Asare, Mavis; Agyei-Amponsah, Joyce; Agbemavor, Wisdom S. K.; Egblewogbe, Martin N. Y. H.; Apea-Bah, Franklin B.; Sarfo, Adjoa; Apatey, John; Doku, Henry; Ofori-Appiah, Dora; Ayeh, Ernestina

    2017-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a staple crop in Ghana and much of West Africa, where it serves as an important convenience food for urban consumers. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of gamma irradiation as insect disinfestation technique on some physicochemical, functional and pasting properties of selected locally-produced rice cultivars in Ghana. Four local rice cultivars and an imported (commercial) type were purchased, cleaned and irradiated at doses of 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy. The irradiated rice cultivars were milled and their physicochemical, functional and pasting properties determined. There were reductions in pH and swelling power, as well as increase in solubility of rice cultivars after gamma irradiation. Gamma irradiation did not change the XRD pattern of the rice cultivars. Gamma irradiation significantly (P<0.05) decreased peak time for BAL and VNT rice cultivars. Gamma irradiation significantly (P<0.05) decreased PV, HPV, BDV, FV and SBV for all the rice cultivars. This study shows that flours from gamma irradiated rice cultivars have potential in food formulations that require low viscosity.

  9. Functional Genomics for Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    leads for therapeutic targeting in breast cancer. We are employing the high throughput functional genomic screens using epithelial mesenchymal...of sequencing from in vitro and in vivo hits in stream. We anticipate completion in the coming year. Body Task 1: To identify gene products...focus on Vim induction at the invasive edge of formed tumors generated by shRNA transduction. Task 2: To identify gene products that may

  10. Unlocking Holocentric Chromosomes: New Perspectives from Comparative and Functional Genomics?

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Mauro; Manicardi, Gian Carlo

    2012-01-01

    The presence of chromosomes with diffuse centromeres (holocentric chromosomes) has been reported in several taxa since more than fifty years, but a full understanding of their origin is still lacking. Comparative and functional genomics are nowadays furnishing new data to better understand holocentric chromosome evolution thus opening new perspectives to analyse karyotype rearrangements in species with holocentric chromosomes in particular evidencing unusual common features, such as the uniform GC content and gene distribution along chromosomes. PMID:23372420

  11. Comparative Genomics of Rice and Arabidopsis. Analysis of 727 Cytochrome P450 Genes and Pseudogenes from a Monocot and a Dicot1[w

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David R.; Schuler, Mary A.; Paquette, Suzanne M.; Werck-Reichhart, Daniele; Bak, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Data mining methods have been used to identify 356 Cyt P450 genes and 99 related pseudogenes in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome using sequence information available from both the indica and japonica strains. Because neither of these genomes is completely available, some genes have been identified in only one strain, and 28 genes remain incomplete. Comparison of these rice genes with the 246 P450 genes and 26 pseudogenes in the Arabidopsis genome has indicated that most of the known plant P450 families existed before the monocot-dicot divergence that occurred approximately 200 million years ago. Comparative analysis of P450s in the Pinus expressed sequence tag collections has identified P450 families that predated the separation of gymnosperms and flowering plants. Complete mapping of all available plant P450s onto the Deep Green consensus plant phylogeny highlights certain lineage-specific families maintained (CYP80 in Ranunculales) and lineage-specific families lost (CYP92 in Arabidopsis) in the course of evolution. PMID:15208422

  12. Function and Interaction of the Coupled Genes Responsible for Pik-h Encoded Rice Blast Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nan; Lin, Fei; Liu, Zhe; Dong, Zhongqiu; Wang, Ling; Pan, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Pik-h, an allele of Pik, confers resistance against the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Its positional cloning has shown that it comprises a pair of NBS-LRR genes, Pikh-1 and Pikh-2. While Pikh-1 appears to be constitutively transcribed, the transcript abundance of Pikh-2 responds to pathogen challenge. The Pikh-1 CC (coiled coil) domain interacts directly with both AvrPik-h and Pikh-2. Transient expression assays demonstrated that Pikh-2 mediates the initiation of the host defence response. Nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of both Pikh-1 and Pikh-2 is required for their functionalities. In a proposed mechanistic model of Pik-h resistance, it is suggested that Pikh-1 acts as an adaptor between AvrPik-h and Pikh-2, while Pikh-2 transduces the signal to trigger Pik-h-specific resistance. PMID:24896089

  13. The complete genome sequence of a south Indian isolate of Rice tungro spherical virus reveals evidence of genetic recombination between distinct isolates.

    PubMed

    Sailaja, B; Anjum, Najreen; Patil, Yogesh K; Agarwal, Surekha; Malathi, P; Krishnaveni, D; Balachandran, S M; Viraktamath, B C; Mangrauthia, Satendra K

    2013-12-01

    In this study, complete genome of a south Indian isolate of Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) from Andhra Pradesh (AP) was sequenced, and the predicted amino acid sequence was analysed. The RTSV RNA genome consists of 12,171 nt without the poly(A) tail, encoding a putative typical polyprotein of 3,470 amino acids. Furthermore, cleavage sites and sequence motifs of the polyprotein were predicted. Multiple alignment with other RTSV isolates showed a nucleotide sequence identity of 95% to east Indian isolates and 90% to Philippines isolates. A phylogenetic tree based on complete genome sequence showed that Indian isolates clustered together, while Vt6 and PhilA isolates of Philippines formed two separate clusters. Twelve recombination events were detected in RNA genome of RTSV using the Recombination Detection Program version 3. Recombination analysis suggested significant role of 5' end and central region of genome in virus evolution. Further, AP and Odisha isolates appeared as important RTSV isolates involved in diversification of this virus in India through recombination phenomenon. The new addition of complete genome of first south Indian isolate provided an opportunity to establish the molecular evolution of RTSV through recombination analysis and phylogenetic relationship.

  14. Functional Genomics in the Study of Mind-Body Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Halsey; Mehta, Darshan H.; Corrigan, Alexandra A.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Denninger, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mind-body therapies (MBTs) are used throughout the world in treatment, disease prevention, and health promotion. However, the mechanisms by which MBTs exert their positive effects are not well understood. Investigations into MBTs using functional genomics have revolutionized the understanding of MBT mechanisms and their effects on human physiology. Methods We searched the literature for the effects of MBTs on functional genomics determinants using MEDLINE, supplemented by a manual search of additional journals and a reference list review. Results We reviewed 15 trials that measured global or targeted transcriptomic, epigenomic, or proteomic changes in peripheral blood. Sample sizes ranged from small pilot studies (n=2) to large trials (n=500). While the reliability of individual genes from trial to trial was often inconsistent, genes related to inflammatory response, particularly those involved in the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, were consistently downregulated across most studies. Conclusion In general, existing trials focusing on gene expression changes brought about by MBTs have revealed intriguing connections to the immune system through the NF-κB cascade, to telomere maintenance, and to apoptotic regulation. However, these findings are limited to a small number of trials and relatively small sample sizes. More rigorous randomized controlled trials of healthy subjects and specific disease states are warranted. Future research should investigate functional genomics areas both upstream and downstream of MBT-related gene expression changes—from epigenomics to proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:25598735

  15. Resources for Functional Genomics Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Stephanie E.; Hu, Yanhui; Kim, Kevin; Housden, Benjamin E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has become a system of choice for functional genomic studies. Many resources, including online databases and software tools, are now available to support design or identification of relevant fly stocks and reagents or analysis and mining of existing functional genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, etc. datasets. These include large community collections of fly stocks and plasmid clones, “meta” information sites like FlyBase and FlyMine, and an increasing number of more specialized reagents, databases, and online tools. Here, we introduce key resources useful to plan large-scale functional genomics studies in Drosophila and to analyze, integrate, and mine the results of those studies in ways that facilitate identification of highest-confidence results and generation of new hypotheses. We also discuss ways in which existing resources can be used and might be improved and suggest a few areas of future development that would further support large- and small-scale studies in Drosophila and facilitate use of Drosophila information by the research community more generally. PMID:24653003

  16. Functional Profiling Using the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project Collections.

    PubMed

    Nislow, Corey; Wong, Lai Hong; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Giaever, Guri

    2016-09-01

    The ability to measure and quantify the fitness of an entire organism requires considerably more complex approaches than simply using traditional "omic" methods that examine, for example, the abundance of RNA transcripts, proteins, or metabolites. The yeast deletion collections represent the only systematic, comprehensive set of null alleles for any organism in which such fitness measurements can be assayed. Generated by the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project, these collections allow the systematic and parallel analysis of gene functions using any measurable phenotype. The unique 20-bp molecular barcodes engineered into the genome of each deletion strain facilitate the massively parallel analysis of individual fitness. Here, we present functional genomic protocols for use with the yeast deletion collections. We describe how to maintain, propagate, and store the deletion collections and how to perform growth fitness assays on single and parallel screening platforms. Phenotypic fitness analyses of the yeast mutants, described in brief here, provide important insights into biological functions, mechanisms of drug action, and response to environmental stresses. It is important to bear in mind that the specific assays described in this protocol represent some of the many ways in which these collections can be assayed, and in this description particular attention is paid to maximizing throughput using growth as the phenotypic measure.

  17. Beyond the genome: functional studies of phototrophic sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Thomas E; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Chan, Leong-Keat; Hiras, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability of complete genomic sequences for cultured phototrophic bacteria and assembled metagenomes from environments dominated by phototrophs has reinforced the need for a "post-genomic" analytical effort to test models of cellular structure and function proposed from genomic data. Comparative genomics has produced a testable model for pathways of sulfur compound oxidation in the phototrophic bacteria. In the case of sulfide, two enzymes are predicted to oxidize sulfide: sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase and flavocytochrome c sulfide dehydrogenase. However, these models do not predict which enzyme is important under what conditions. In Chlorobaculum tepidum, a model green sulfur bacterium, a combination of genetics and physiological analysis of mutant strains has led to the realization that this organism contains at least two active sulfide:quinone oxidoreductases and that there is significant interaction between sulfide oxidation and light harvesting. In the case of elemental sulfur, an organothiol intermediate of unknown structure has been proposed to activate elemental sulfur for transport into the cytoplasm where it can be oxidized or assimilated, and recent approaches using classical metabolite analysis have begun to shed light on this issue both in C. tepidum and the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

  18. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hengfu; Chen, Rick; Yang, Jun; Weston, David; Chen, Jay; Muchero, Wellington; Ye, Ning; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan

    2014-01-01

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  19. Combining Image Analysis, Genome Wide Association Studies and Different Field Trials to Reveal Stable Genetic Regions Related to Panicle Architecture and the Number of Spikelets per Panicle in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Maria C.; Peña, Alexandra L.; Duitama, Jorge; Cruz, Daniel F.; Dingkuhn, Michael; Grenier, Cecile; Tohme, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Number of spikelets per panicle (NSP) is a key trait to increase yield potential in rice (O. sativa). The architecture of the rice inflorescence which is mainly determined by the length and number of primary (PBL and PBN) and secondary (SBL and SBN) branches can influence NSP. Although several genes controlling panicle architecture and NSP in rice have been identified, there is little evidence of (i) the genetic control of panicle architecture and NSP in different environments and (ii) the presence of stable genetic associations with panicle architecture across environments. This study combines image phenotyping of 225 accessions belonging to a genetic diversity array of indica rice grown under irrigated field condition in two different environments and Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) based on the genotyping of the diversity panel, providing 83,374 SNPs. Accessions sown under direct seeding in one environement had reduced Panicle Length (PL), NSP, PBN, PBL, SBN, and SBL compared to those established under transplanting in the second environment. Across environments, NSP was significantly and positively correlated with PBN, SBN and PBL. However, the length of branches (PBL and SBL) was not significantly correlated with variables related to number of branches (PBN and SBN), suggesting independent genetic control. Twenty- three GWAS sites were detected with P ≤ 1.0E-04 and 27 GWAS sites with p ≤ 5.9E−04. We found 17 GWAS sites related to NSP, 10 for PBN and 11 for SBN, 7 for PBL and 11 for SBL. This study revealed new regions related to NSP, but only three associations were related to both branching number (PBN and SBN) and NSP. Two GWAS sites associated with SBL and SBN were stable across contrasting environments and were not related to genes previously reported. The new regions reported in this study can help improving NSP in rice for both direct seeded and transplanted conditions. The integrated approach of high-throughput phenotyping, multi

  20. Functions of OsBZR1 and 14-3-3 proteins in brassinosteroid signaling in rice

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming-Yi; Zhang, Li-Ying; Gampala, Srinivas S.; Zhu, Sheng-Wei; Song, Wen-Yuan; Chong, Kang; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2007-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) are essential growth hormones found throughout the plant kingdom. BR bind to the receptor kinase BRI1 on the cell surface to activate a signal transduction pathway that regulates nuclear gene expression and plant growth. To understand the downstream BR signaling mechanism in rice, we studied the function of OsBZR1 using reverse genetic approaches and identified OsBZR1-interacting proteins. Suppressing OsBZR1 expression by RNAi resulted in dwarfism, erect leaves, reduced BR sensitivity, and altered BR-responsive gene expression in transgenic rice plants, demonstrating an essential role of OsBZR1 in BR responses in rice. Moreover, a yeast two-hybrid screen identified 14-3-3 proteins as OsBZR1-interacting proteins. Mutation of a putative 14-3-3-binding site of OsBZR1 abolished its interaction with the 14-3-3 proteins in yeast and in vivo. Such mutant OsBZR1 proteins suppressed the phenotypes of the Arabidopsis bri1–5 mutant and showed an increased nuclear distribution compared with the wild-type protein, suggesting that 14-3-3 proteins directly inhibit OsBZR1 function at least in part by reducing its nuclear localization. These results demonstrate a conserved function of OsBZR1 and an important role of 14-3-3 proteins in brassinosteroid signal transduction in rice. PMID:17699623

  1. Event-based text mining for biology and functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul; Nawaz, Raheel; McNaught, John; Kell, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of genome function requires a mapping between genome-derived entities and biochemical reactions, and the biomedical literature represents a rich source of information about reactions between biological components. However, the increasingly rapid growth in the volume of literature provides both a challenge and an opportunity for researchers to isolate information about reactions of interest in a timely and efficient manner. In response, recent text mining research in the biology domain has been largely focused on the identification and extraction of ‘events’, i.e. categorised, structured representations of relationships between biochemical entities, from the literature. Functional genomics analyses necessarily encompass events as so defined. Automatic event extraction systems facilitate the development of sophisticated semantic search applications, allowing researchers to formulate structured queries over extracted events, so as to specify the exact types of reactions to be retrieved. This article provides an overview of recent research into event extraction. We cover annotated corpora on which systems are trained, systems that achieve state-of-the-art performance and details of the community shared tasks that have been instrumental in increasing the quality, coverage and scalability of recent systems. Finally, several concrete applications of event extraction are covered, together with emerging directions of research. PMID:24907365

  2. Whole-genome sequence-based analysis of thyroid function

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter N.; Porcu, Eleonora; Chew, Shelby; Campbell, Purdey J.; Traglia, Michela; Brown, Suzanne J.; Mullin, Benjamin H.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Min, Josine; Walter, Klaudia; Memari, Yasin; Huang, Jie; Barnes, Michael R.; Beilby, John P.; Charoen, Pimphen; Danecek, Petr; Dudbridge, Frank; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Greenwood, Celia; Grundberg, Elin; Johnson, Andrew D.; Hui, Jennie; Lim, Ee M.; McCarthy, Shane; Muddyman, Dawn; Panicker, Vijay; Perry, John R.B.; Bell, Jordana T.; Yuan, Wei; Relton, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Goncalo; Cucca, Francesco; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Woltersdorf, Wolfram; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Toniolo, Daniela; Dayan, Colin M.; Naitza, Silvia; Walsh, John P.; Spector, Tim; Davey Smith, George; Durbin, Richard; Brent Richards, J.; Sanna, Serena; Soranzo, Nicole; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Wilson, Scott G.; Turki, Saeed Al; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Artigas, Maria Soler; Ayub, Muhammad; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Barroso, Inês; Beales, Phil; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Birney, Ewan; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Bounds, Rebecca; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Ciampi, Antonio; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Curtis, David; Daly, Allan; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian N.M.; Down, Thomas; Du, Yuanping; Dunham, Ian; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Faroogi, Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Flicek, Paul; Flyod, James; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Christopher S.; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Geihs, Matthias; Geschwind, Daniel; Griffin, Heather; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xueqin; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Howie, Bryan; Huang, Liren; Hubbard, Tim; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David K.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jing, Tian; Joyce, Chris; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Keogh, Julia; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lawson, Daniel; Lee, Irene; Lek, Monkol; Liang, Jieqin; Lin, Hong; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Liu, Ryan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; Lotchkova, Valentina; MacArthur, Daniel; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; Massimo, Mangino; Mathieson, Iain; Marenne, Gaëlle; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew G.; McQuillin, Andrew; Metrustry, Sarah; Mitchison, Hannah; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donnovan, Michael; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quaye, Lydia; Quai, Michael A.; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Richards, Brent; Ring, Susan; Ritchie, Graham R.S.; Roberts, Nicola; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter; Schiffels, Stephen; Schmidts, Miriam; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Sharp, Sally I.; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Southam, Lorraine; Spasic-Boskovic, Olivera; Clair, David St; Stalker, Jim; Stevens, Elizabeth; Pourcian, Beate St; Sun, Jianping; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ionna; Tobin, Martin D.; Valdes, Ana; Kogelenberg, Margriet Van; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Visscher, Peter M.; Wain, Louise V.; Walters, James T.R.; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yu; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Elanor; Whyte, Tamieka; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathleen A.; Wilson, Crispian; Wong, Kim; Xu, ChangJiang; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Fend; Zhang, Pingbo

    2015-01-01

    Normal thyroid function is essential for health, but its genetic architecture remains poorly understood. Here, for the heritable thyroid traits thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4), we analyse whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K project (N=2,287). Using additional whole-genome sequence and deeply imputed data sets, we report meta-analysis results for common variants (MAF≥1%) associated with TSH and FT4 (N=16,335). For TSH, we identify a novel variant in SYN2 (MAF=23.5%, P=6.15 × 10−9) and a new independent variant in PDE8B (MAF=10.4%, P=5.94 × 10−14). For FT4, we report a low-frequency variant near B4GALT6/SLC25A52 (MAF=3.2%, P=1.27 × 10−9) tagging a rare TTR variant (MAF=0.4%, P=2.14 × 10−11). All common variants explain ≥20% of the variance in TSH and FT4. Analysis of rare variants (MAF<1%) using sequence kernel association testing reveals a novel association with FT4 in NRG1. Our results demonstrate that increased coverage in whole-genome sequence association studies identifies novel variants associated with thyroid function. PMID:25743335

  3. Whole-genome sequence-based analysis of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter N; Porcu, Eleonora; Chew, Shelby; Campbell, Purdey J; Traglia, Michela; Brown, Suzanne J; Mullin, Benjamin H; Shihab, Hashem A; Min, Josine; Walter, Klaudia; Memari, Yasin; Huang, Jie; Barnes, Michael R; Beilby, John P; Charoen, Pimphen; Danecek, Petr; Dudbridge, Frank; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Greenwood, Celia; Grundberg, Elin; Johnson, Andrew D; Hui, Jennie; Lim, Ee M; McCarthy, Shane; Muddyman, Dawn; Panicker, Vijay; Perry, John R B; Bell, Jordana T; Yuan, Wei; Relton, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Goncalo; Cucca, Francesco; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Woltersdorf, Wolfram; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Toniolo, Daniela; Dayan, Colin M; Naitza, Silvia; Walsh, John P; Spector, Tim; Davey Smith, George; Durbin, Richard; Richards, J Brent; Sanna, Serena; Soranzo, Nicole; Timpson, Nicholas J; Wilson, Scott G

    2015-03-06

    Normal thyroid function is essential for health, but its genetic architecture remains poorly understood. Here, for the heritable thyroid traits thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4), we analyse whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K project (N=2,287). Using additional whole-genome sequence and deeply imputed data sets, we report meta-analysis results for common variants (MAF≥1%) associated with TSH and FT4 (N=16,335). For TSH, we identify a novel variant in SYN2 (MAF=23.5%, P=6.15 × 10(-9)) and a new independent variant in PDE8B (MAF=10.4%, P=5.94 × 10(-14)). For FT4, we report a low-frequency variant near B4GALT6/SLC25A52 (MAF=3.2%, P=1.27 × 10(-9)) tagging a rare TTR variant (MAF=0.4%, P=2.14 × 10(-11)). All common variants explain ≥20% of the variance in TSH and FT4. Analysis of rare variants (MAF<1%) using sequence kernel association testing reveals a novel association with FT4 in NRG1. Our results demonstrate that increased coverage in whole-genome sequence association studies identifies novel variants associated with thyroid function.

  4. A salivary EF-hand calcium-binding protein of the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens functions as an effector for defense responses in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenfeng; Yu, Haixin; Jian, Yukun; Zeng, Jiamei; Ji, Rui; Chen, Hongdan; Lou, Yonggen

    2017-01-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), a major pest of rice in Asia, is able to successfully puncture sieve tubes in rice with its piercing stylet and then to ingest phloem sap. How BPH manages to continuously feed on rice remains unclear. Here, we cloned the gene NlSEF1, which is highly expressed in the salivary glands of BPH. The NlSEF1 protein has EF-hand Ca2+-binding activity and can be secreted into rice plants when BPH feed. Infestation of rice by BPH nymphs whose NlSEF1 was knocked down elicited higher levels of Ca2+ and H2O2 but not jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) and SA in rice than did infestation by control nymphs; Consistently, wounding plus the recombination protein NlSEF1 suppressed the production of H2O2 in rice. Bioassays revealed that NlSEF1-knockdown BPH nymphs had a higher mortality rate and lower feeding capacity on rice than control nymphs. These results indicate that the salivary protein in BPH, NlSEF1, functions as an effector and plays important roles in interactions between BPH and rice by mediating the plant’s defense responses. PMID:28098179

  5. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Dardick, Christopher; Bartley, Laura E; Cao, Peijian; Phetsom, Jirapa; Canlas, Patrick; Seo, Young-Su; Shultz, Michael; Ouyang, Shu; Yuan, Qiaoping; Frank, Bryan C; Ly, Eugene; Zheng, Li; Jia, Yi; Hsia, An-Ping; An, Kyungsook; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Rocke, David; Lee, Geun Cheol; Schnable, Patrick S; An, Gynheung; Buell, C Robin; Ronald, Pamela C

    2008-10-06

    Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa). We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org). The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics.

  6. Cajal body function in genome organization and transcriptome diversity.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Iain A; Sturgill, David; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hager, Gordon L; Dundr, Miroslav

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear bodies contribute to non-random organization of the human genome and nuclear function. Using a major prototypical nuclear body, the Cajal body, as an example, we suggest that these structures assemble at specific gene loci located across the genome as a result of high transcriptional activity. Subsequently, target genes are physically clustered in close proximity in Cajal body-containing cells. However, Cajal bodies are observed in only a limited number of human cell types, including neuronal and cancer cells. Ultimately, Cajal body depletion perturbs splicing kinetics by reducing target small nuclear RNA (snRNA) transcription and limiting the levels of spliceosomal snRNPs, including their modification and turnover following each round of RNA splicing. As such, Cajal bodies are capable of shaping the chromatin interaction landscape and the transcriptome by influencing spliceosome kinetics. Future studies should concentrate on characterizing the direct influence of Cajal bodies upon snRNA gene transcriptional dynamics. Also see the video abstract here.

  7. Adapting CRISPR/Cas9 for functional genomics screens.

    PubMed

    Malina, Abba; Katigbak, Alexandra; Cencic, Regina; Maïga, Rayelle Itoua; Robert, Francis; Miura, Hisashi; Pelletier, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The use of CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein) for targeted genome editing has been widely adopted and is considered a "game changing" technology. The ease and rapidity by which this approach can be used to modify endogenous loci in a wide spectrum of cell types and organisms makes it a powerful tool for customizable genetic modifications as well as for large-scale functional genomics. The development of retrovirus-based expression platforms to simultaneously deliver the Cas9 nuclease and single guide (sg) RNAs provides unique opportunities by which to ensure stable and reproducible expression of the editing tools and a broad cell targeting spectrum, while remaining compatible with in vivo genetic screens. Here, we describe methods and highlight considerations for designing and generating sgRNA libraries in all-in-one retroviral vectors for such applications.

  8. Functional genomics in osteoarthritis: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Julia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common complex disease of high public health burden. OA is characterized by the degeneration of affected joints leading to pain and reduced mobility. Over the last few years, several studies have focused on the genomic changes underpinning OA. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of genome‐wide, non‐hypothesis‐driven functional genomics (methylation, gene, and protein expression) studies of knee and hip OA in humans. Individual studies have generally been limited in sample size and hence power, and have differed in their approaches; nonetheless, some common themes have started to emerge, notably the role played by biological processes related to the extracellular matrix, immune response, the WNT pathway, angiogenesis, and skeletal development. Larger‐scale studies and streamlined, robust methodologies will be needed to further elucidate the biological etiology of OA going forward. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1105–1110, 2016. PMID:27176659

  9. Research into the functional components and antioxidant activities of North China rice wine (Ji Mo Lao Jiu)

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuai; Mao, Xiangzhao; Liu, Pei; Lin, Hong; Du, Zuyuan; Lv, Ning; Han, Jichen; Qiu, Cuifang

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, considerable experimental evidence has supported the view that grape wine and South China rice wine are rich in diverse nutrients and have powerful antioxidant activity. However, little research has been carried out for North China rice wine, of which Ji Mo Lao Jiu (JMLJ) is the outstanding representative. In this study, the functional components and antioxidant activity of JMLJ were investigated. Twenty-eight free amino acids were found in JMLJ, much more than that previously reported in other Chinese rice wines (16–21). Functional oligosaccharides (5290.222 mg/L), total phenols (722.431 ± 10.970 mg/L), and mineral elements (9) were rich in JMLJ. When compared with synthetic antioxidants, such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), JMLJ showed effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and reducing capacity. The results of this study lay the foundation for promoting the utilization of JMLJ and the development of North China rice wine in the food industry. PMID:24804035

  10. Updated rice kinase database RKD 2.0: enabling transcriptome and functional analysis of rice kinase genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of a phosphate moiety from a phosphate donor to the substrate molecule, thus, playing critical roles in cell signaling and metabolism. Although plant genomes contain more than 1,000 genes that encode kinases, knowledge is limited about the precise roles for the...

  11. Integrative pathway genomics of lung function and airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Sina A; Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Birkland, Timothy P; Wilk, Jemma B; Wain, Louise V; Brody, Jennifer A; Obeidat, Ma'en; Hancock, Dana B; Tang, Wenbo; Rawal, Rajesh; Boezen, H Marike; Imboden, Medea; Huffman, Jennifer E; Lahousse, Lies; Alves, Alexessander C; Manichaikul, Ani; Hui, Jennie; Morrison, Alanna C; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Evans, David M; Strachan, David P; Deary, Ian J; Hofman, Albert; Gläser, Sven; Wilson, James F; North, Kari E; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heckbert, Susan R; Jarvis, Deborah L; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schulz, Holger; Barr, R Graham; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Connor, George T; Kähönen, Mika; Cassano, Patricia A; Hysi, Pirro G; Dupuis, Josée; Hayward, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Hall, Ian P; Parks, William C; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2015-12-01

    Chronic respiratory disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of lung function measures have identified several trait-associated loci, but explain only a modest portion of the phenotypic variability. We postulated that integrating pathway-based methods with GWASs of pulmonary function and airflow obstruction would identify a broader repertoire of genes and processes influencing these traits. We performed two independent GWASs of lung function and applied gene set enrichment analysis to one of the studies and validated the results using the second GWAS. We identified 131 significantly enriched gene sets associated with lung function and clustered them into larger biological modules involved in diverse processes including development, immunity, cell signaling, proliferation and arachidonic acid. We found that enrichment of gene sets was not driven by GWAS-significant variants or loci, but instead by those with less stringent association P-values. Next, we applied pathway enrichment analysis to a meta-analyzed GWAS of airflow obstruction. We identified several biologic modules that functionally overlapped with those associated with pulmonary function. However, differences were also noted, including enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) processes specifically in the airflow obstruction study. Network analysis of the ECM module implicated a candidate gene, matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10), as a putative disease target. We used a knockout mouse model to functionally validate MMP10's role in influencing lung's susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. By integrating pathway analysis with population-based genomics, we unraveled biologic processes underlying pulmonary function traits and identified a candidate gene for obstructive lung disease.

  12. Integrative pathway genomics of lung function and airflow obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Loth, Daan W.; Soler Artigas, María; Birkland, Timothy P.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Wain, Louise V.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Obeidat, Ma'en; Hancock, Dana B.; Tang, Wenbo; Rawal, Rajesh; Boezen, H. Marike; Imboden, Medea; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Lahousse, Lies; Alves, Alexessander C.; Manichaikul, Ani; Hui, Jennie; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Evans, David M.; Strachan, David P.; Deary, Ian J.; Hofman, Albert; Gläser, Sven; Wilson, James F.; North, Kari E.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heckbert, Susan R.; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schulz, Holger; Barr, R. Graham; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Connor, George T.; Kähönen, Mika; Cassano, Patricia A.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Dupuis, Josée; Hayward, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M.; Hall, Ian P.; Parks, William C.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic respiratory disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of lung function measures have identified several trait-associated loci, but explain only a modest portion of the phenotypic variability. We postulated that integrating pathway-based methods with GWASs of pulmonary function and airflow obstruction would identify a broader repertoire of genes and processes influencing these traits. We performed two independent GWASs of lung function and applied gene set enrichment analysis to one of the studies and validated the results using the second GWAS. We identified 131 significantly enriched gene sets associated with lung function and clustered them into larger biological modules involved in diverse processes including development, immunity, cell signaling, proliferation and arachidonic acid. We found that enrichment of gene sets was not driven by GWAS-significant variants or loci, but instead by those with less stringent association P-values. Next, we applied pathway enrichment analysis to a meta-analyzed GWAS of airflow obstruction. We identified several biologic modules that functionally overlapped with those associated with pulmonary function. However, differences were also noted, including enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) processes specifically in the airflow obstruction study. Network analysis of the ECM module implicated a candidate gene, matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10), as a putative disease target. We used a knockout mouse model to functionally validate MMP10's role in influencing lung's susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. By integrating pathway analysis with population-based genomics, we unraveled biologic processes underlying pulmonary function traits and identified a candidate gene for obstructive lung disease. PMID:26395457

  13. Multiple Functions of Rice Dwarf Phytoreovirus Pns10 in Suppressing Systemic RNA Silencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bo; Guo, Yuanyuan; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Wu, Feng; Meng, Zheng; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2010-01-01

    RNA silencing is a potent mechanism of antiviral defense response in plants and other organisms. For counterdefense, viruses have evolved a variety of suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) that can inhibit distinct steps of a silencing pathway. We previously identified Pns10 encoded by Rice dwarf phytoreovirus (RDV) as a VSR, the first of its kind from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. In this study we investigated the mechanisms of Pns10 function in suppressing systemic RNA silencing in the widely used Nicotiana benthamiana model plant. We report that Pns10 suppresses local and systemic RNA silencing triggered by sense mRNA, enhances viral replication and/or viral RNA stability in inoculated leaves, accelerates the systemic spread of viral infection, and enables viral invasion of shoot apices. Mechanistically, Pns10 interferes with the perception of silencing signals in recipient tissues, binds double-stranded small interfering RNA (siRNAs) with two-nucleotide 3′ overhangs, and causes the downregulated expression of RDR6. These results significantly deepen our mechanistic understanding of the VSR functions encoded by a dsRNA virus and contribute additional evidence that binding siRNAs and interfering with RDR6 expression are broad mechanisms of VSR functions encoded by diverse groups of viruses. PMID:20926568

  14. Integrated analysis of phenome, genome, and transcriptome of hybrid rice uncovered multiple heterosis-related loci for yield increase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dayong; Huang, Zhiyuan; Song, Shuhui; Xin, Yeyun; Mao, Donghai; Lv, Qiming; Zhou, Ming; Tian, Dongmei; Tang, Mingfeng; Wu, Qi; Liu, Xue; Chen, Tingting; Song, Xianwei; Fu, Xiqin; Zhao, Bingran; Liang, Chengzhi; Li, Aihong; Liu, Guozhen; Li, Shigui; Hu, Songnian; Cao, Xiaofeng; Yu, Jun; Yuan, Longping; Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Lihuang

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice is the dominant form of rice planted in China, and its use has extended worldwide since the 1970s. It offers great yield advantages and has contributed greatly to the world’s food security. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis have remained a mystery. In this study we integrated genetics and omics analyses to determine the candidate genes for yield heterosis in a model two-line rice hybrid system, Liang-you-pei 9 (LYP9) and its parents. Phenomics study revealed that the better parent heterosis (BPH) of yield in hybrid is not ascribed to BPH of all the yield components but is specific to the BPH of spikelet number per panicle (SPP) and paternal parent heterosis (PPH) of effective panicle number (EPN). Genetic analyses then identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these two components. Moreover, a number of differentially expressed genes and alleles in the hybrid were mapped by transcriptome profiling to the QTL regions as possible candidate genes. In parallel, a major QTL for yield heterosis, rice heterosis 8 (RH8), was found to be the DTH8/Ghd8/LHD1 gene. Based on the shared allelic heterozygosity of RH8 in many hybrid rice cultivars, a common mechanism for yield heterosis in the present commercial hybrid rice is proposed. PMID:27663737

  15. Integrated analysis of phenome, genome, and transcriptome of hybrid rice uncovered multiple heterosis-related loci for yield increase.

    PubMed

    Li, Dayong; Huang, Zhiyuan; Song, Shuhui; Xin, Yeyun; Mao, Donghai; Lv, Qiming; Zhou, Ming; Tian, Dongmei; Tang, Mingfeng; Wu, Qi; Liu, Xue; Chen, Tingting; Song, Xianwei; Fu, Xiqin; Zhao, Bingran; Liang, Chengzhi; Li, Aihong; Liu, Guozhen; Li, Shigui; Hu, Songnian; Cao, Xiaofeng; Yu, Jun; Yuan, Longping; Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Lihuang

    2016-10-11

    Hybrid rice is the dominant form of rice planted in China, and its use has extended worldwide since the 1970s. It offers great yield advantages and has contributed greatly to the world's food security. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis have remained a mystery. In this study we integrated genetics and omics analyses to determine the candidate genes for yield heterosis in a model two-line rice hybrid system, Liang-you-pei 9 (LYP9) and its parents. Phenomics study revealed that the better parent heterosis (BPH) of yield in hybrid is not ascribed to BPH of all the yield components but is specific to the BPH of spikelet number per panicle (SPP) and paternal parent heterosis (PPH) of effective panicle number (EPN). Genetic analyses then identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these two components. Moreover, a number of differentially expressed genes and alleles in the hybrid were mapped by transcriptome profiling to the QTL regions as possible candidate genes. In parallel, a major QTL for yield heterosis, rice heterosis 8 (RH8), was found to be the DTH8/Ghd8/LHD1 gene. Based on the shared allelic heterozygosity of RH8 in many hybrid rice cultivars, a common mechanism for yield heterosis in the present commercial hybrid rice is proposed.

  16. Enhancer function: mechanistic and genome-wide insights come together.

    PubMed

    Plank, Jennifer L; Dean, Ann

    2014-07-03

    Enhancers establish spatial or temporal patterns of gene expression that are critical for development, yet our understanding of how these DNA cis-regulatory elements function from a distance to increase transcription of their target genes and shape the cellular transcriptome has been gleaned primarily from studies of individual genes or gene families. High-throughput sequencing studies place enhancer-gene interactions within the 3D context of chromosome folding, inviting a new look at enhancer function and stimulating provocative new questions. Here, we integrate these whole-genome studies with recent mechanistic studies to illuminate how enhancers physically interact with target genes, how enhancer activity is regulated during development, and the role of noncoding RNAs transcribed from enhancers in their function.

  17. Evolutionary insights into the origins of weediness in U.S. red rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy red rice is a widespread, economically challenging problem in Southern U.S. rice fields. The two major U.S. red rice types, strawhull and blackhull, are thought to have arisen independently from Asian rice populations in the distant past. Red rice is a weedy relative of rice, a genomic model...

  18. The Xenopus ORFeome: A resource that enables functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Ian M.; Balcha, Dawit; Hao, Tong; Shen, Yun; Trivedi, Prasad; Patrushev, Ilya; Fortriede, Joshua D.; Karpinka, John B.; Liu, Limin; Zorn, Aaron M.; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Hill, David E.; Gilchrist, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Functional characterisation of proteins and large-scale, systems-level studies are enabled by extensive sets of cloned open reading frames (ORFs) in an easily-accessible format that enables many different applications. Here we report the release of the first stage of the Xenopus ORFeome, which contains 8673 ORFs from the Xenopus Gene Collection (XGC) for Xenopus laevis, cloned into a Gateway® donor vector enabling rapid in-frame transfer of the ORFs to expression vectors. This resource represents an estimated 7871 unique genes, approximately 40% of the non-redundant X. laevis gene complement, and includes 2724 genes where the human ortholog has an association with disease. Transfer into the Gateway system was validated by 5′ and 3′ end sequencing of the entire collection and protein expression of a set of test clones. In a parallel process, the underlying ORF predictions from the original XGC collection were re-analysed to verify quality and full-length status, identifying those proteins likely to exhibit truncations when translated. These data are integrated into Xenbase, the Xenopus community database, which associates genomic, expression, function and human disease model metadata to each ORF, enabling end-users to search for ORFeome clones with links to commercial distributors of the collection. When coupled with the experimental advantages of Xenopus eggs and embryos, the ORFeome collection represents a valuable resource for functional genomics and disease modelling. PMID:26391338

  19. Structure and Functional Studies of DEN-2 Virus Genome.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Structure and Functional Studies on Dengue -2 Progress Report Virus Genome 1 Mar 82 - I Sep 82 6. PERFORMING ORO. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) 8. CONTRACT OR...Identify by block number) Complementdry DNA synthesis of Dengue -2 RNA by avian reverse transcriptase in vitro. The size of the DNA copy of Dengue RNA is in...Unannounced 0 Justification ............ By........... Di.A b-Aio: i Availability Codes S Avail and (or 2 Abstract 1. Dengue -2 RNA (DEN-2 RNA) was extracted

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of MicroRNAs and Their Target Genes Related to Leaf Senescence of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaoping; Chen, Eryong; Chen, Qifeng; Zhuang, Jieyun; Shen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Grain production of rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a top priority in ensuring food security for human beings. One of the approaches to increase yield is to delay leaf senescence and to extend the available time for photosynthesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of aging and cellular senescence in eukaryotes. Here, to help understand their biological role in rice leaf senescence, we report identification of miRNAs and their putative target genes by deep sequencing of six small RNA libraries, six RNA-seq libraries and two degradome libraries from the leaves of two super hybrid rice, Nei-2-You 6 (N2Y6, age-resistant rice) and Liang-You-Pei 9 (LYP9, age-sensitive rice). In total 372 known miRNAs, 162 miRNA candidates and 1145 targets were identified. Compared with the expression of miRNAs in the leaves of LYP9, the numbers of miRNAs up-regulated and down-regulated in the leaves of N2Y6 were 47 and 30 at early stage of grain-filling, 21 and 17 at the middle stage, and 11 and 37 at the late stage, respectively. Six miRNA families, osa-miR159, osa-miR160 osa-miR164, osa-miR167, osa-miR172 and osa-miR1848, targeting the genes encoding APETALA2 (AP2), zinc finger proteins, salicylic acid-induced protein 19 (SIP19), auxin response factors (ARF) and NAC transcription factors, respectively, were found to be involved in leaf senescence through phytohormone signaling pathways. These results provided valuable information for understanding the miRNA-mediated leaf senescence of rice, and offered an important foundation for rice breeding. PMID:25479006

  1. Transfer function control strategy of Subak rice field land and agricultural development in Denpasar city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanya, Indayati; Netera Subadiyasa, N.; Sardiana, Ketut; Putu Ratna Adi, Gst.

    2017-01-01

    The success of tourism development in Bali gave a negative impact on Subak rice fields, especially on land convertion over 2579 ha year-1 (2002-2013) to the area awakened. Denpasar city has lost rice fields 185 ha year-1 and six Subak, as well as potentially losing 10 Subak, as a result of the allocation of space in the region in the Spatial Planing. UNESCO, in 2012 the establishment of Subak as a cultural heritage. Most Subak rice fields designated as an Urban Green Open Space ( UGOS). Satellite image Iconos 2002, World 2015 View Coverage of Denpasar, and ArcGIS 10.3 software used for mapping the balance of rice field and violation of land use in the area of UGOS. The control strategy over the convertion of spatial land-based environment is done through zoning map. Land conversion of rice fields for 13 years (2002-2015) in Denpasar (572.76 ha), comes standard acreage of rice fields in 2015. Denpasar city has experienced of food deficits, even in the UGOS has awakened 96.04 ha (24.04 ha year-1). A period of 50 years into the future, rice fields which needs to be protected 872.83 ha, buffer area 984.77 ha, and can be converted 499.81 ha.

  2. An efficient TALEN mutagenesis system in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunling; Shan, Qiwei; Gao, Caixia

    2014-08-15

    Targeted gene mutagenesis is a powerful tool for elucidating gene function and facilitating genetic improvement in rice. TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases), consisting of a custom TALE DNA binding domain fused to a nonspecific FokI cleavage domain, are one of the most efficient genome engineering methods developed to date. The technology of TALENs allows DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced into predetermined chromosomal loci. DSBs trigger DNA repair mechanisms and can result in loss of gene function by error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), or they can be exploited to modify gene function or activity by precise homologous recombination (HR). In this paper, we describe a detailed protocol for constructing TALEN expression vectors, assessing nuclease activities in vivo using rice protoplast-based assays, generating and introducing TALEN DNAs into embryogenic calluses of rice and identifying TALEN-generated mutations at targeted genomic sites. Using these methods, T0 rice plants resulting from TALEN mutagenesis can be produced within 4-5 months.

  3. Functional analysis of the rice rubisco activase promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Chen, Fan; Lu, Congming

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice rubisco activase promoter was analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Region conferring tissue specific and light inducible expression of Rca was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -58 to +43 bp region mediates tissue-specific expression of rice Rca. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light inducible expression of rice Rca is mediated by -297 to -58 bp region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the light inducible region. -- Abstract: To gain a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the rice rubisco activase (Rca) gene, variants of the Rca gene promoter (one full-length and four deletion mutants) fused to the coding region of the bacterial reporter gene {beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) were introduced into Arabidopsis via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Our results show that a 340 bp fragment spanning from -297 to +43 bp relative to the transcription initiation site is enough to promote tissue-specific and light-inducible expression of the rice Rca gene as done by the full-length promoter (-1428 to +43 bp). Further deletion analysis indicated that the region conferring tissue-specificity of Rca expression is localized within a 105 bp fragment from -58 to +43 bp, while light-inducible expression of Rca is mediated by the region from -297 to -58 bp. Gel shift assays and competition experiments demonstrated that rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the fragment conferring light responsiveness at more than one binding site. This implies that multiple cis-elements may be involved in light-induced expression of the rice Rca gene. These works provide a useful reference for understanding transcriptional regulation mechanism of the rice Rca gene, and lay a strong foundation for further detection of related cis-elements and trans-factors.

  4. Wheat EST resources for functional genomics of abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Mario; Belcaid, Mahdi; Ouellet, François; Danyluk, Jean; Monroy, Antonio F; Dryanova, Ani; Gulick, Patrick; Bergeron, Anne; Laroche, André; Links, Matthew G; MacCarthy, Luke; Crosby, William L; Sarhan, Fathey

    2006-01-01

    Background Wheat is an excellent species to study freezing tolerance and other abiotic stresses. However, the sequence of the wheat genome has not been completely characterized due to its complexity and large size. To circumvent this obstacle and identify genes involved in cold acclimation and associated stresses, a large scale EST sequencing approach was undertaken by the Functional Genomics of Abiotic Stress (FGAS) project. Results We generated 73,521 quality-filtered ESTs from eleven cDNA libraries constructed from wheat plants exposed to various abiotic stresses and at different developmental stages. In addition, 196,041 ESTs for which tracefiles were available from the National Science Foundation wheat EST sequencing program and DuPont were also quality-filtered and used in the analysis. Clustering of the combined ESTs with d2_cluster and TGICL yielded a few large clusters containing several thousand ESTs that were refractory to routine clustering techniques. To resolve this problem, the sequence proximity and "bridges" were identified by an e-value distance graph to manually break clusters into smaller groups. Assembly of the resolved ESTs generated a 75,488 unique sequence set (31,580 contigs and 43,908 singletons/singlets). Digital expression analyses indicated that the FGAS dataset is enriched in stress-regulated genes compared to the other public datasets. Over 43% of the unique sequence set was annotated and classified into functional categories according to Gene Ontology. Conclusion We have annotated 29,556 different sequences, an almost 5-fold increase in annotated sequences compared to the available wheat public databases. Digital expression analysis combined with gene annotation helped in the identification of several pathways associated with abiotic stress. The genomic resources and knowledge developed by this project will contribute to a better understanding of the different mechanisms that govern stress tolerance in wheat and other cereals. PMID

  5. The FUN of identifying gene function in bacterial pathogens; insights from Salmonella functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Hammarlöf, Disa L; Canals, Rocío; Hinton, Jay C D

    2013-10-01

    The availability of thousands of genome sequences of bacterial pathogens poses a particular challenge because each genome contains hundreds of genes of unknown function (FUN). How can we easily discover which FUN genes encode important virulence factors? One solution is to combine two different functional genomic approaches. First, transcriptomics identifies bacterial FUN genes that show differential expression during the process of mammalian infection. Second, global mutagenesis identifies individual FUN genes that the pathogen requires to cause disease. The intersection of these datasets can reveal a small set of candidate genes most likely to encode novel virulence attributes. We demonstrate this approach with the Salmonella infection model, and propose that a similar strategy could be used for other bacterial pathogens.

  6. Cadmium accumulation retard activity of functional components of photo assimilation and growth of rice cultivars amended with vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abin; Prasad, M N V

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) uptake mediated alterations in functional components of photo assimilation during conversion of cow dung and poultry cast to vermicompost were studied in two Indian rice cultivars; MO 16 and MTU 7029. It was found that higher amount of Cd accumulate in plants grown in soil amended with vermicompost which in turn damaged functional components in photo assimilation. Enhancement of root growth was recognized as reason for Cd accumulation. Metabolic alterations noticed among plants were not taken place during application of raw materials used for vermicomposting such as cow dung and poultry cast amendment. Rice varieties accumulated Cd differentially where MTU 7029 accumulated more Cd compare to MO 16. It was also noticed that existence of negative correlation between zinc status of the plant and Cd accumulation.

  7. Genome-wide association mapping for yield and other agronomic traits in an elite breeding population of tropical rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Spindel, Jennifer E; Lalusin, Antonio; Borromeo, Teresita; Gregorio, Glenn; Hernandez, Jose; Virk, Parminder; Collard, Bertrand; McCouch, Susan R

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association mapping studies (GWAS) are frequently used to detect QTL in diverse collections of crop germplasm, based on historic recombination events and linkage disequilibrium across the genome. Generally, diversity panels genotyped with high density SNP panels are utilized in order to assay a wide range of alleles and haplotypes and to monitor recombination breakpoints across the genome. By contrast, GWAS have not generally been performed in breeding populations. In this study we performed association mapping for 19 agronomic traits including yield and yield components in a breeding population of elite irrigated tropical rice breeding lines so that the results would be more directly applicable to breeding than those from a diversity panel. The population was genotyped with 71,710 SNPs using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), and GWAS performed with the explicit goal of expediting selection in the breeding program. Using this breeding panel we identified 52 QTL for 11 agronomic traits, including large effect QTLs for flowering time and grain length/grain width/grain-length-breadth ratio. We also identified haplotypes that can be used to select plants in our population for short stature (plant height), early flowering time, and high yield, and thus demonstrate the utility of association mapping in breeding populations for informing breeding decisions. We conclude by exploring how the newly identified significant SNPs and insights into the genetic architecture of these quantitative traits can be leveraged to build genomic-assisted selection models.

  8. Cubozoan genome illuminates functional diversification of opsins and photoreceptor evolution.

    PubMed

    Liegertová, Michaela; Pergner, Jiří; Kozmiková, Iryna; Fabian, Peter; Pombinho, Antonio R; Strnad, Hynek; Pačes, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Bartůněk, Petr; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-07-08

    Animals sense light primarily by an opsin-based photopigment present in a photoreceptor cell. Cnidaria are arguably the most basal phylum containing a well-developed visual system. The evolutionary history of opsins in the animal kingdom has not yet been resolved. Here, we study the evolution of animal opsins by genome-wide analysis of the cubozoan jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora, a cnidarian possessing complex lens-containing eyes and minor photoreceptors. A large number of opsin genes with distinct tissue- and stage-specific expression were identified. Our phylogenetic analysis unequivocally classifies cubozoan opsins as a sister group to c-opsins and documents lineage-specific expansion of the opsin gene repertoire in the cubozoan genome. Functional analyses provided evidence for the use of the Gs-cAMP signaling pathway in a small set of cubozoan opsins, indicating the possibility that the majority of other cubozoan opsins signal via distinct pathways. Additionally, these tests uncovered subtle differences among individual opsins, suggesting possible fine-tuning for specific photoreceptor tasks. Based on phylogenetic, expression and biochemical analysis we propose that rapid lineage- and species-specific duplications of the intron-less opsin genes and their subsequent functional diversification promoted evolution of a large repertoire of both visual and extraocular photoreceptors in cubozoans.

  9. Phylogenetic Portrait of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Functional Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, Patrick A.; Hickman, Mark J.; Bradley, Patrick H.; Matese, John C.; Botstein, David

    2013-01-01

    The genome of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) contains approximately 5800 protein-encoding genes, the majority of which are associated with some known biological function. Yet the extent of amino acid sequence conservation of these genes over all phyla has only been partially examined. Here we provide a more comprehensive overview and visualization of the conservation of yeast genes and a means for browsing and exploring the data in detail, down to the individual yeast gene, at http://yeast-phylogroups.princeton.edu. We used data from the OrthoMCL database, which has defined orthologs from approximately 150 completely sequenced genomes, including diverse representatives of the archeal, bacterial, and eukaryotic domains. By clustering genes based on similar patterns of conservation, we organized and visualized all the protein-encoding genes in yeast as a single heat map. Most genes fall into one of eight major clusters, called “phylogroups.” Gene ontology analysis of the phylogroups revealed that they were associated with specific, distinct trends in gene function, generalizations likely to be of interest to a wide range of biologists. PMID:23749449

  10. Cubozoan genome illuminates functional diversification of opsins and photoreceptor evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liegertová, Michaela; Pergner, Jiří; Kozmiková, Iryna; Fabian, Peter; Pombinho, Antonio R.; Strnad, Hynek; Pačes, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Bartůněk, Petr; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Animals sense light primarily by an opsin-based photopigment present in a photoreceptor cell. Cnidaria are arguably the most basal phylum containing a well-developed visual system. The evolutionary history of opsins in the animal kingdom has not yet been resolved. Here, we study the evolution of animal opsins by genome-wide analysis of the cubozoan jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora, a cnidarian possessing complex lens-containing eyes and minor photoreceptors. A large number of opsin genes with distinct tissue- and stage-specific expression were identified. Our phylogenetic analysis unequivocally classifies cubozoan opsins as a sister group to c-opsins and documents lineage-specific expansion of the opsin gene repertoire in the cubozoan genome. Functional analyses provided evidence for the use of the Gs-cAMP signaling pathway in a small set of cubozoan opsins, indicating the possibility that the majority of other cubozoan opsins signal via distinct pathways. Additionally, these tests uncovered subtle differences among individual opsins, suggesting possible fine-tuning for specific photoreceptor tasks. Based on phylogenetic, expression and biochemical analysis we propose that rapid lineage- and species-specific duplications of the intron-less opsin genes and their subsequent functional diversification promoted evolution of a large repertoire of both visual and extraocular photoreceptors in cubozoans. PMID:26154478

  11. Target selection and determination of function in structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Watson, James D; Todd, Annabel E; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A; Thornton, Janet M

    2003-01-01

    The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of rice flowering and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinlei; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Current understanding of the epigenetic regulator roles in plant growth and development has largely derived from studies in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important food crops in the world and has more recently becoming a monocotyledonous model plant in functional genomics research. During the past few years, an increasing number of studies have reported the impact of DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and histone modifications on transcription regulation, flowering time control, and reproduction in rice. Here, we review these studies to provide an updated complete view about chromatin modifiers characterized in rice and in particular on their roles in epigenetic regulation of flowering time, reproduction, and seed development. PMID:25674094

  13. Genetic variation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm in Myanmar based on genomic compositions of DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    Wunna; Watanabe, Kazuo N.; Ohsawa, Ryo; Obara, Mitsuhiro; Yanagihara, Seiji; Aung, Pa Pa; Fukuta, Yoshimichi

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 175 rice accessions from Myanmar, including landraces and improved types from upland and lowland ecosystems in five different areas—Western (hilly), Northern (mountainous), North and South-eastern (plateau), and Southern (plain)—was evaluated on the basis of polymorphism data for 65 DNA markers and phenol reactions. On the basis of the DNA polymorphism data, high genetic diversity was confirmed to conserve in the accessions from each ecosystem and area. And the accessions were classified into two cluster groups I and II, which corresponded to Indica Group and Japonica Group, respectively. Cluster group I accessions were distributed mainly in upland ecosystems; group II were distributed in lowland in the Southern area, and the distributions of dominant groups differed among areas. Rice germplasm in Myanmar has maintained high genetic diversity among ecosystems and areas. This information will be used for advanced studies in germplasm and rice breeding in Myanmar. PMID:28163592

  14. Diversity of the Ty-1 copia retrotransposon Tos17 in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and the AA genome of the Oryza genus.

    PubMed

    Petit, Julie; Bourgeois, Emmanuelle; Stenger, Wilfried; Bès, Martine; Droc, Gaétan; Meynard, Donaldo; Courtois, Brigitte; Ghesquière, Alain; Sabot, François; Panaud, Olivier; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel

    2009-12-01

    Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements, ubiquitous in Eukaryotic genomes, which have proven to be major genetic tools in determining phylogeny and structuring genetic diversity, notably in plants. We investigate here the diversity of the Ty1-copia retrotransposon Tos17 in the cultivated rice of Asian origin (Oryza sativa L.) and related AA genome species of the Oryza genus, to contribute understanding of the complex evolutionary history in this group of species through that of the element in the lineages. In that aim, we used a combination of Southern hybridization with a reverse transcriptase (RT) probe and an adapter-PCR mediated amplification, which allowed the sequencing of the genomic regions flanking Tos17 insertions. This analysis was carried out in a collection of 47 A-genome Oryza species accessions and 202 accessions of a core collection of Oryza sativa L. representative of the diversity of the species. Our Southern hybridization results show that Tos17 is present in all the accessions of the A-genome Oryza species, except for the South American species O. glumaepatula and the African species O. glaberrima and O. breviligulata. In O. sativa, the number of putative copies of Tos17 per accession ranged from 1 to 11 and multivariate analysis based on presence/absence of putative copies yielded a varietal clustering which is consistent with the isozyme classification of rice. Adapter PCR amplification and sequencing of flanking regions of Tos17 insertions in A-genome species other than O. sativa, followed by anchoring on the Nipponbare genome sequence, revealed 13 insertion sites of Tos17 in the surveyed O. rufipogon and O. longistaminata accessions, including one shared by both species. In O. sativa, the same approach revealed 25 insertions in the 6 varietal groups. Four insertion sites located on chromosomes 1, 2, 10, and 11 were found orthologous in O. rufipogon and O. sativa. The chromosome 1 insertion was also shared between O. rufipogon and O

  15. A novel Azotobacter vinellandii (SRIAz3) functions in salinity stress tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Ansari, Mohammad Wahid; Pradhan, Madhusmita; Dangar, Tushar K; Mohanty, Santanu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    The plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPRs) as a biofertilizer provide agricultural benefits to advance various crops productivity. Recently, we discovered a novel Azotobacter vinellandii (SRIAz3) from rice rhizosphere, which is well competent to improve rice productivity. In this study, we investigated a role of A. vinellandii to confer salinity tolerance in rice (var. IR64). A. vinellandii inoculated rice plants showed higher proline and malondialdehyde content under 200 mM NaCl stress as compared with uninoculated one. The endogenous level of plant hormones viz., indole-3 acetic acid (IAA), gibberellins (GA3), zeatint (Zt) was higher in A. vinellandii inoculated plants under high salinity. The fresh biomass of root and shoot were relatively elevated in A. vinellandii inoculated rice. Further, the macronutrient profile was superior in A. vinellandii inoculated plants under salinity as compared with non-inoculated plants. The present findings further suggest that A. vinellandii, a potent biofertilzer, potentially confer salinity stress tolerance in rice via sustaining growth and improving compatible solutes and nutrients profile and thereby crop improvement.

  16. Biocatalysis for the production of industrial products and functional foods from rice and other agricultural produce.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Casimir C; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2008-11-26

    Many industrial products and functional foods can be obtained from cheap and renewable raw agricultural materials. For example, starch can be converted to bioethanol as biofuel to reduce the current demand for petroleum or fossil fuel energy. On the other hand, starch can also be converted to useful functional ingredients, such as high fructose and high maltose syrups, wine, glucose, and trehalose. The conversion process involves fermentation by microorganisms and use of biocatalysts such as hydrolases of the amylase superfamily. Amylases catalyze the process of liquefaction and saccharification of starch. It is possible to perform complete hydrolysis of starch by using the fusion product of both linear and debranching thermostable enzymes. This will result in saving energy otherwise needed for cooling before the next enzyme can act on the substrate, if a sequential process is utilized. Recombinant enzyme technology, protein engineering, and enzyme immobilization are powerful tools available to enhance the activity of enzymes, lower the cost of enzyme through large scale production in a heterologous host, increase their thermostability, improve pH stability, enhance their productivity, and hence making it competitive with the chemical processes involved in starch hydrolysis and conversions. This review emphasizes the potential of using biocatalysis for the production of useful industrial products and functional foods from cheap agricultural produce and transgenic plants. Rice was selected as a typical example to illustrate many applications of biocatalysis in converting low-value agricultural produce to high-value commercial food and industrial products. The greatest advantages of using enzymes for food processing and for industrial production of biobased products are their environmental friendliness and consumer acceptance as being a natural process.

  17. Functional Classification, Genomic Organization, Putatively cis-Acting Regulatory Elements, and Relationship to Quantitative Trait Loci, of Sorghum Genes with Rhizome-Enriched Expression1[W

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Cheol Seong; Kamps, Terry L.; Skinner, D. Neil; Schulze, Stefan R.; Vencill, William K.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    Rhizomes are organs of fundamental importance to plant competitiveness and invasiveness. We have identified genes expressed at substantially higher levels in rhizomes than other plant parts, and explored their functional categorization, genomic organization, regulatory motifs, and association with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring rhizomatousness. The finding that genes with rhizome-enriched expression are distributed across a wide range of functional categories suggests some degree of specialization of individual members of many gene families in rhizomatous plants. A disproportionate share of genes with rhizome-enriched expression was implicated in secondary and hormone metabolism, and abiotic stimuli and development. A high frequency of unknown-function genes reflects our still limited knowledge of this plant organ. A putative oligosaccharyl transferase showed the highest degree of rhizome-specific expression, with several transcriptional or regulatory protein complex factors also showing high (but lesser) degrees of specificity. Inferred by the upstream sequences of their putative rice (Oryza sativa) homologs, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genes that were relatively highly expressed in rhizome tip tissues were enriched for cis-element motifs, including the pyrimidine box, TATCCA box, and CAREs box, implicating the gibberellins in regulation of many rhizome-specific genes. From cDNA clones showing rhizome-enriched expression, expressed sequence tags forming 455 contigs were plotted on the rice genome and aligned to QTL likelihood intervals for ratooning and rhizomatous traits in rice and sorghum. Highly expressed rhizome genes were somewhat enriched in QTL likelihood intervals for rhizomatousness or ratooning, with specific candidates including some of the most rhizome-specific genes. Some rhizomatousness and ratooning QTLs were shown to be potentially related to one another as a result of ancient duplication, suggesting long-term functional conservation of

  18. NCBI GEO: archive for high-throughput functional genomic data.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Soboleva, Alexandra; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Muertter, Rolf N; Edgar, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is the largest public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. Additionally, GEO hosts other categories of high-throughput functional genomic data, including those that examine genome copy number variations, chromatin structure, methylation status and transcription factor binding. These data are generated by the research community using high-throughput technologies like microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing. The database has a flexible infrastructure that can capture fully annotated raw and processed data, enabling compliance with major community-derived scientific reporting standards such as 'Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment' (MIAME). In addition to serving as a centralized data storage hub, GEO offers many tools and features that allow users to effectively explore, analyze and download expression data from both gene-centric and experiment-centric perspectives. This article summarizes the GEO repository structure, content and operating procedures, as well as recently introduced data mining features. GEO is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  19. Sugarcane Functional Genomics: Gene Discovery for Agronomic Trait Development

    PubMed Central

    Menossi, M.; Silva-Filho, M. C.; Vincentz, M.; Van-Sluys, M.-A.; Souza, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Sugarcane is a highly productive crop used for centuries as the main source of sugar and recently to produce ethanol, a renewable bio-fuel energy source. There is increased interest in this crop due to the impending need to decrease fossil fuel usage. Sugarcane has a highly polyploid genome. Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing has significantly contributed to gene discovery and expression studies used to associate function with sugarcane genes. A significant amount of data exists on regulatory events controlling responses to herbivory, drought, and phosphate deficiency, which cause important constraints on yield and on endophytic bacteria, which are highly beneficial. The means to reduce drought, phosphate deficiency, and herbivory by the sugarcane borer have a negative impact on the environment. Improved tolerance for these constraints is being sought. Sugarcane's ability to accumulate sucrose up to 16% of its culm dry weight is a challenge for genetic manipulation. Genome-based technology such as cDNA microarray data indicates genes associated with sugar content that may be used to develop new varieties improved for sucrose content or for traits that restrict the expansion of the cultivated land. The genes can also be used as molecular markers of agronomic traits in traditional breeding programs. PMID:18273390

  20. Integrating functional genomics to accelerate mechanistic personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of deep sequencing technologies has resulted in the deciphering of tremendous amounts of genetic information. These data have led to major discoveries, and many anecdotes now exist of individual patients whose clinical outcomes have benefited from novel, genetically guided therapeutic strategies. However, the majority of genetic events in cancer are currently undrugged, leading to a biological gap between understanding of tumor genetic etiology and translation to improved clinical approaches. Functional screening has made tremendous strides in recent years with the development of new experimental approaches to studying ex vivo and in vivo drug sensitivity. Numerous discoveries and anecdotes also exist for translation of functional screening into novel clinical strategies; however, the current clinical application of functional screening remains largely confined to small clinical trials at specific academic centers. The intersection between genomic and functional approaches represents an ideal modality to accelerate our understanding of drug sensitivities as they relate to specific genetic events and further understand the full mechanisms underlying drug sensitivity patterns. PMID:28299357

  1. Integrating functional genomics to accelerate mechanistic personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2017-03-01

    The advent of deep sequencing technologies has resulted in the deciphering of tremendous amounts of genetic information. These data have led to major discoveries, and many anecdotes now exist of individual patients whose clinical outcomes have benefited from novel, genetically guided therapeutic strategies. However, the majority of genetic events in cancer are currently undrugged, leading to a biological gap between understanding of tumor genetic etiology and translation to improved clinical approaches. Functional screening has made tremendous strides in recent years with the development of new experimental approaches to studying ex vivo and in vivo drug sensitivity. Numerous discoveries and anecdotes also exist for translation of functional screening into novel clinical strategies; however, the current clinical application of functional screening remains largely confined to small clinical trials at specific academic centers. The intersection between genomic and functional approaches represents an ideal modality to accelerate our understanding of drug sensitivities as they relate to specific genetic events and further understand the full mechanisms underlying drug sensitivity patterns.

  2. Genetic Architecture of Cold Tolerance in Rice (Oryza sativa) Determined through High Resolution Genome-Wide Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold temperature is an important abiotic stress which negatively affects morphological development and seed production in rice (Oryza sativa L.). At the seedling stage, cold stress causes poor germination, seedling injury and poor stand establishment; and at the reproductive stage cold decreases se...

  3. Screening of Functional Rhizopus stolonifer for Alcohol Fermentation and Production of High Quality Korean Traditional Rice Wine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2010-06-01

    Different strains of mold were screened for the production of high quality Korean traditional rice wine with anti-hypertension and good acceptability. We isolated 867 nuruk mold strains and selected 24 for further study based on measurement of amylase activity. Among them, mold No. 17 showed high ethanol production upon fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as anti-hypertensive properties. The No. 17 strain was therefore selected as the functional mold and later identified as Rhizopus stolonifer based on molecular biological characteristics. Optimal fermentation conditions for the brewing of anti-hypertensive traditional rice wine comprised the addition of R. stolonifer No. 17 koji at a concentration of 35 sp/g and a fermentation period of 10 days at 25℃ using S. cerevisiae.

  4. Screening of Functional Rhizopus stolonifer for Alcohol Fermentation and Production of High Quality Korean Traditional Rice Wine

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak

    2010-01-01

    Different strains of mold were screened for the production of high quality Korean traditional rice wine with anti-hypertension and good acceptability. We isolated 867 nuruk mold strains and selected 24 for further study based on measurement of amylase activity. Among them, mold No. 17 showed high ethanol production upon fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as anti-hypertensive properties. The No. 17 strain was therefore selected as the functional mold and later identified as Rhizopus stolonifer based on molecular biological characteristics. Optimal fermentation conditions for the brewing of anti-hypertensive traditional rice wine comprised the addition of R. stolonifer No. 17 koji at a concentration of 35 sp/g and a fermentation period of 10 days at 25℃ using S. cerevisiae. PMID:23956639

  5. Function and characterization of starch synthase I using mutants in rice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoko; Yoshida, Mayumi; Asakura, Noriko; Ohdan, Takashi; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2006-03-01

    Four starch synthase I (SSI)-deficient rice (Oryza sativa) mutant lines were generated using retrotransposon Tos17 insertion. The mutants exhibited different levels of SSI activities and produced significantly lower amounts of SSI protein ranging from 0% to 20% of the wild type. The mutant endosperm amylopectin showed a decrease in chains with degree of polymerization (DP) 8 to 12 and an increase in chains with DP 6 to 7 and DP 16 to 19. The degree of change in amylopectin chain-length distribution was positively correlated with the extent of decrease in SSI activity in the mutants. The structural changes in the amylopectin increased the gelatinization temperature of endosperm starch. Chain-length analysis of amylopectin in the SSI band excised from native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/SS activity staining gel showed that SSI preferentially synthesized DP 7 to 11 chains by elongating DP 4 to 7 short chains of glycogen or amylopectin. These results show that SSI distinctly generates DP 8 to 12 chains from short DP 6 to 7 chains emerging from the branch point in the A or B(1) chain of amylopectin. SSI seemingly functions from the very early through the late stage of endosperm development. Yet, the complete absence of SSI, despite being a major SS isozyme in the developing endosperm, had no effect on the size and shape of seeds and starch granules and the crystallinity of endosperm starch, suggesting that other SS enzymes are probably capable of partly compensating SSI function. In summary, this study strongly suggested that amylopectin chains are synthesized by the coordinated actions of SSI, SSIIa, and SSIIIa isoforms.

  6. Identification of novel biomass-degrading enzymes from genomic dark matter: Populating genomic sequence space with functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hailan; Froula, Jeff; Du, Changbin; Kim, Tae-Wan; Hawley, Erik R; Bauer, Stefan; Wang, Zhong; Ivanova, Nathalia; Clark, Douglas S; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    Although recent nucleotide sequencing technologies have significantly enhanced our understanding of microbial genomes, the function of ∼35% of genes identified in a genome currently remains unknown. To improve the understanding of microbial genomes and consequently of microbial processes it will be crucial to assign a function to this "genomic dark matter." Due to the urgent need for additional carbohydrate-active enzymes for improved production of transportation fuels from lignocellulosic biomass, we screened the genomes of more than 5,500 microorganisms for hypothetical proteins that are located in the proximity of already known cellulases. We identified, synthesized and expressed a total of 17 putative cellulase genes with insufficient sequence similarity to currently known cellulases to be identified as such using traditional sequence annotation techniques that rely on significant sequence similarity. The recombinant proteins of the newly identified putative cellulases were subjected to enzymatic activity assays to verify their hydrolytic activity towards cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass. Eleven (65%) of the tested enzymes had significant activity towards at least one of the substrates. This high success rate highlights that a gene context-based approach can be used to assign function to genes that are otherwise categorized as "genomic dark matter" and to identify biomass-degrading enzymes that have little sequence similarity to already known cellulases. The ability to assign function to genes that have no related sequence representatives with functional annotation will be important to enhance our understanding of microbial processes and to identify microbial proteins for a wide range of applications.

  7. Comparative genomics of pectinacetylesterases: Insight on function and biology

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Amancio José; Pauly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Pectin acetylation influences the gelling ability of this important plant polysaccharide for the food industry. Plant apoplastic pectinacetylesterases (PAEs) play a key role in regulating the degree of pectin acetylation and modifying their expression thus represents one way to engineer plant polysaccharides for food applications. Identifying the major active enzymes within the PAE gene family will aid in our understanding of this biological phenomena as well as provide the tools for direct trait manipulation. Using comparative genomics we propose that there is a minimal set of 4 distinct PAEs in plants. Possible functional diversification of the PAE family in the grasses is also explored with the identification of 3 groups of PAE genes specific to grasses. PMID:26237162

  8. NCBI GEO: archive for functional genomics data sets--update.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tanya; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Holko, Michelle; Yefanov, Andrey; Lee, Hyeseung; Zhang, Naigong; Robertson, Cynthia L; Serova, Nadezhda; Davis, Sean; Soboleva, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) is an international public repository for high-throughput microarray and next-generation sequence functional genomic data sets submitted by the research community. The resource supports archiving of raw data, processed data and metadata which are indexed, cross-linked and searchable. All data are freely available for download in a variety of formats. GEO also provides several web-based tools and strategies to assist users to query, analyse and visualize data. This article reports current status and recent database developments, including the release of GEO2R, an R-based web application that helps users analyse GEO data.

  9. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  10. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-01

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Flavobacteriumpsychrophilum Strain OSU THCO2-90, Used for Functional Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Tatiana; Barbier, Paul; Nicolas, Pierre; Loux, Valentin; Pérez-Pascual, David; Guijarro, José A; Bernardet, Jean-François; Duchaud, Eric

    2017-02-23

    We report here the complete annotated genome sequence of Flavobacterium psychrophilum OSU THCO2-90, isolated from Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon. The genome consists of a circular chromosome with 2,343 predicted open reading frames. This strain has proved to be a valuable tool for functional genomics.

  12. Identification of precursor transcripts for 6 novel miRNAs expands the diversity on the genomic organisation and expression of miRNA genes in rice

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, Séverine; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Santi, Carole; Duval, David; Piégu, Benoît; Bangratz, Martine; Breitler, Jean-Christophe; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Brugidou, Christophe; Hirsch, Judith; Cao, Xiaofeng; Brice, Claire; Panaud, Olivier; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Sato, Yutaka; Echeverria, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background The plant miRNAs represent an important class of endogenous small RNAs that guide cleavage of an mRNA target or repress its translation to control development and adaptation to stresses. MiRNAs are nuclear-encoded genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, producing a primary precursor that is subsequently processed by DCL1 an RNase III Dicer-like protein. In rice hundreds of miRNAs have been described or predicted, but little is known on their genes and precursors which are important criteria to distinguish them from siRNAs. Here we develop a combination of experimental approaches to detect novel miRNAs in rice, identify their precursor transcripts and genes and predict or validate their mRNA targets. Results We produced four cDNA libraries from small RNA fractions extracted from distinct rice tissues. By in silico analysis we selected 6 potential novel miRNAs, and confirmed that their expression requires OsDCL1. We predicted their targets and used 5'RACE to validate cleavage for three of them, targeting a PPR, an SPX domain protein and a GT-like transcription factor respectively. In addition, we identified precursor transcripts for the 6 miRNAs expressed in rice, showing that these precursors can be efficiently processed using a transient expression assay in transfected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Most interestingly, we describe two precursors producing tandem miRNAs, but in distinct arrays. We focus on one of them encoding osa-miR159a.2, a novel miRNA produced from the same stem-loop structure encoding the conserved osa-miR159a.1. We show that this dual osa-miR159a.2-osa-miR159a.1 structure is conserved in distant rice species and maize. Finally we show that the predicted mRNA target of osa-miR159a.2 encoding a GT-like transcription factor is cleaved in vivo at the expected site. Conclusion The combination of approaches developed here identified six novel miRNAs expressed in rice which can be clearly distinguished from siRNAs. Importantly, we show that

  13. Isolation of the endosperm-specific LPAAT gene promoter from coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) and its functional analysis in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Ye, Rongjian; Zheng, Yusheng; Wang, Zhekui; Zhou, Peng; Lin, Yongjun; Li, Dongdong

    2010-09-01

    As one of the key tropical crops, coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is a member of the monocotyledonous family Aracaceae (Palmaceae). In this study, we amplified the upstream region of an endosperm-specific expression gene, Lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase (LPAAT), from the coconut genomic DNA by chromosome walking. In this sequence, we found several types of promoter-related elements including TATA-box, CAAT-box and Skn1-motif. In order to further examine its function, three different 5'-deletion fragments were inserted into pBI101.3, a plant expression vector harboring the LPAAT upstream sequence, leading to pBI101.3-L1, pBI101.3-L2 and pBI101.3-L3, respectively. We obtained transgenic plants of rice by Agrobacterium-mediated callus transformation and plant regeneration and detected the expression of gus gene by histochemical staining and fluorometric determination. We found that gus gene driven by the three deletion fragments was specifically expressed in the endosperm of rice seeds, but not in the empty vector of pBI101.3 and other tissues. The highest expression level of GUS was at 15 DAF in pBI101.3-L3 and pBI101.3-L2 transgenic lines, while the same level was detected at 10 DAF in pBI101.3-L1. The expression driven by the whole fragment was up to 1.76- and 2.8-fold higher than those driven by the -817 bp and -453 bp upstream fragments, and 10.7-fold higher than that driven by the vector without the promoter. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that these promoter fragments from coconut have a significant potential in genetically improving endosperm in main crops.

  14. Functional genomics of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus, 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) is one of the most important ectoparasites of pastured cattle. Horn flies infestations reduce cattle weight gain and milk production. Additionally, horn flies are mechanical vectors of different pathogens that cause disease in cattle. The aim of this study was to conduct a functional genomics study in female horn flies using Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) analysis and RNA interference (RNAi). Results A cDNA library was made from whole abdominal tissues collected from partially fed adult female horn flies. High quality horn fly ESTs (2,160) were sequenced and assembled into 992 unigenes (178 contigs and 814 singlets) representing molecular functions such as serine proteases, cell metabolism, mitochondrial function, transcription and translation, transport, chromatin structure, vitellogenesis, cytoskeleton, DNA replication, cell response to stress and infection, cell proliferation and cell-cell interactions, intracellular trafficking and secretion, and development. Functional analyses were conducted using RNAi for the first time in horn flies. Gene knockdown by RNAi resulted in higher horn fly mortality (protease inhibitor functional group), reduced oviposition (vitellogenin, ferritin and vATPase groups) or both (immune response and 5'-NUC groups) when compared to controls. Silencing of ubiquitination ESTs did not affect horn fly mortality and ovisposition while gene knockdown in the ferritin and vATPse functional groups reduced mortality when compared to controls. Conclusions These results advanced the molecular characterization of this important ectoparasite and suggested candidate protective antigens for the development of vaccines for the control of horn fly infestations. PMID:21310032

  15. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Serres, Margrethe H.

    2009-05-15

    The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the

  16. Identification of “safe harbor” loci in indica rice genome by harnessing the property of zinc-finger nucleases to induce DNA damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Cantos, Christian; Francisco, Perigio; Trijatmiko, Kurniawan R.; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Chadha-Mohanty, Prabhjit K.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have proved to be successful tools for targeted genome manipulation in several organisms. Their main property is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at specific sites, which are further repaired through homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, for the appropriate integration of genes at specific chromosomal locations, proper sites for gene integration need to be identified. These regions, hereby named safe harbor loci, must be localized in non-coding regions and possess high gene expression. In the present study, three different ZFN constructs (pZFN1, pZFN2, pZFN3), harboring β-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene, were used to identify safe harbor loci on rice chromosomes. The constructs were delivered into IR64 rice by using an improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol, based on the use of immature embryos. Gene expression was measured by histochemical GUS activity and the flanking regions were determined through thermal-asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL PCR). Following sequencing, 28 regions were identified as putative sites for safe integration, but only one was localized in a non-coding region and also possessed high GUS expression. These findings have significant applicability to create crops with new and valuable traits, since the site can be subsequently used to stably introduce one or more genes in a targeted manner. PMID:25018764

  17. A functional gene cluster for toxoflavin biosynthesis in the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoflavin is a broad-spectrum toxin best known for its role in virulence of Burkholderia glumae, which causes panicle blight of rice. A gene cluster containing homologs of toxoflavin biosynthesis genes (toxA-E) of B. glumae is present in the genome of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, a biological contr...

  18. Plant Ion Channels: Gene Families, Physiology, and Functional Genomics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John M.; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Distinct potassium, anion, and calcium channels in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of plant cells have been identified and characterized by patch clamping. Primarily owing to advances in Arabidopsis genetics and genomics, and yeast functional complementation, many of the corresponding genes have been identified. Recent advances in our understanding of ion channel genes that mediate signal transduction and ion transport are discussed here. Some plant ion channels, for example, ALMT and SLAC anion channel subunits, are unique. The majority of plant ion channel families exhibit homology to animal genes; such families include both hyperpolarization-and depolarization-activated Shaker-type potassium channels, CLC chloride transporters/channels, cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptor homologs. These plant ion channels offer unique opportunities to analyze the structural mechanisms and functions of ion channels. Here we review gene families of selected plant ion channel classes and discuss unique structure-function aspects and their physiological roles in plant cell signaling and transport. PMID:18842100

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Expansin Gene Superfamily Reveals Grapevine-Specific Structural and Functional Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Fasoli, Marianna; Venturini, Luca; Pezzotti, Mario; Zenoni, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP) comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA), expansin B (EXPB), expansin-like A (EXLA) and expansin-like B (EXLB). There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon–intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa), compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. Conclusion Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the functional

  20. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. PMID:28049701

  1. Comparative transcriptional profiling of three super-hybrid rice combinations.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yonggang; Wei, Gang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Guozhen; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhu, Zhen

    2014-03-03

    Utilization of heterosis has significantly increased rice yields. However, its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptional profiles of three super-hybrid rice combinations, LY2163, LY2186 and LYP9, at the flowering and filling stages, were created using rice whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray. The LY2163, LY2186 and LYP9 hybrids yielded 1193, 1630 and 1046 differentially expressed genes (DGs), accounting for 3.2%, 4.4% and 2.8% of the total number of genes (36,926), respectively, after using the z-test (p < 0.01). Functional category analysis showed that the DGs in each hybrid combination were mainly classified into the carbohydrate metabolism and energy metabolism categories. Further analysis of the metabolic pathways showed that DGs were significantly enriched in the carbon fixation pathway (p < 0.01) for all three combinations. Over 80% of the DGs were located in rice quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of the Gramene database, of which more than 90% were located in the yield related QTLs in all three combinations, which suggested that there was a correlation between DGs and rice heterosis. Pathway Studio analysis showed the presence of DGs in the circadian regulatory network of all three hybrid combinations, which suggested that the circadian clock had a role in rice heterosis. Our results provide information that can help to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying rice heterosis.

  2. Function of the HD-Zip I gene Oshox22 in ABA-mediated drought and salt tolerances in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuxin; Haider, Imran; Kohlen, Wouter; Jiang, Li; Bouwmeester, Harro; Meijer, Annemarie H; Schluepmann, Henriette; Liu, Chun-Ming; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F

    2012-12-01

    Oshox22 belongs to the homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) family I of transcription factors, most of which have unknown functions. Here we show that the expression of Oshox22 is strongly induced by salt stress, abscisic acid (ABA), and polyethylene glycol treatment (PEG), and weakly by cold stress. Trans-activation assays in yeast and transient expression analyses in rice protoplasts demonstrated that Oshox22 is able to bind the CAAT(G/C)ATTG element and acts as a transcriptional activator that requires both the HD and Zip domains. Rice plants homozygous for a T-DNA insertion in the promoter region of Oshox22 showed reduced Oshox22 expression and ABA content, decreased sensitivity to ABA, and enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stresses at the seedling stage. In contrast, transgenic rice over-expressing Oshox22 showed increased sensitivity to ABA, increased ABA content, and decreased drought and salt tolerances. Based on these results, we conclude that Oshox22 affects ABA biosynthesis and regulates drought and salt responses through ABA-mediated signal transduction pathways.

  3. OsAAP6 functions as an important regulator of grain protein content and nutritional quality in rice

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Kong, Huili; Li, Yibo; Wang, Lingqiang; Zhong, Ming; Sun, Liang; Gao, Guanjun; Zhang, Qinglu; Luo, Lijun; Wang, Gongwei; Xie, Weibo; Chen, Junxiao; Yao, Wen; Peng, Yong; Lei, Lei; Lian, Xingmin; Xiao, Jinghua; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; He, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    Grains from cereals contribute an important source of protein to human food, and grain protein content (GPC) is an important determinant of nutritional quality in cereals. Here we show that the quantitative trait locus (QTL) qPC1 in rice controls GPC by regulating the synthesis and accumulation of glutelins, prolamins, globulins, albumins and starch. qPC1 encodes a putative amino acid transporter OsAAP6, which functions as a positive regulator of GPC in rice, such that higher exp