Science.gov

Sample records for ridge x-ray emission

  1. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R.

    2014-07-01

    We make a new determination of the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of relative low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources based on a source sample derived from the XMM Slew Survey (XSS). The source population is comprised of coronally-active late-type stars and binaries with hard-band X-ray luminosities in the range 10^{28-32} erg s^{-1} and cataclysmic variables (magnetic and non-magnetic) with X-ray luminosities spanning the range 10^{30-34} erg s^{-1}. We use this new estimate of the XLF, to predict the 2-10 keV X-ray source counts on the Galactic Plane at faint fluxes and show that the result is fully consistent with the available observational constraints. Similarly the predicted surface brightness, both in the full 2-10 keV band and in a restricted 6-10 keV bandpass, due to the integrated emission of faint unresolved Galactic sources, is well matched to the observed intensity of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We find that the coronally-active sources make the dominant contribution to both the faint Galactic X-ray source counts and the GRXE.

  2. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Yoshida, Tessei

    2013-03-20

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  3. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  4. Fe Line Diagnostics of Cataclysmic Variables and Galactic Ridge X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-jie; Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-02-01

    The properties of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) observed in the 2-10 keV band place fundamental constraints on various types of X-ray sources in the Milky Way. Although the primarily discrete origin of the emission is now well established, the responsible populations of these sources remain uncertain, especially at relatively low fluxes. To provide insights into this issue, we systematically characterize the Fe emission line properties of the candidate types of the sources in the solar neighborhood and compare them with those measured for the GRXE. Our source sample includes 6 symbiotic stars, 16 intermediate polars (IPs), 3 polars, 16 quiescent dwarf novae, and 4 active binaries (ABs); they are all observed with the Suzaku X-ray Observatory. The data of about one-fourth of these sources are analyzed for the first time. We find that the mean equivalent width (EW6.7) of the 6.7 keV line and the mean 7.0/6.7 keV line ratio are 107 ± 16.0 eV and 0.71 ± 0.04 for IPs and 221 ± 135 eV and 0.44 ± 0.14 for polars, respectively, which are all substantially different from those (490 ± 15 eV and 0.2 ± 0.08) for the GRXE. Instead, the GRXE values are better agreed by the EW6.7 (438 ± 84.6 eV) and the ratio (0.27 ± 0.06) observed for the DNe. We further find that the EW6.7 is strongly correlated with the 2-10 keV luminosity of the DNe, which can be characterized by the relation {{EW}}6.7={(438+/- 95{{eV}})(L/{10}31{erg}{{{s}}}-1)}(-0.31+/- 0.15). Accounting for this correlation, the agreement can be improved further, especially when the contributions from other class sources to the GRXE are considered, which all have low EW6.7 values. We conclude that the GRXE mostly consists of typically faint but numerous DNe, plus ABs, while magnetic cataclysmic variables are probably mainly the high-flux representatives of the responsible populations and dominate the GRXE only in harder energy bands.

  5. Inverse Compton Origin of the Hard X-ray and Soft gamma-ray Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Orlando, Elena; Bouchet, Laurent

    2008-09-30

    A recent re-determination of the non-thermal component of the hard X-ray to soft {gamma}-ray emission from the Galactic ridge, using the SPI instrument on the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Observatory, is shown to be well reproduced as inverse-Compton emission from the interstellar medium. Both cosmic-ray primary electrons and secondary electrons and positrons contribute to the emission. The prediction uses the GALPROP model and includes a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field. This may solve a long-standing mystery of the origin of this emission, and potentially opens a new window on Galactic cosmic rays.

  6. Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project is to study the hard x-ray emission from x-ray bursters. One target of opportunity observation was made for this investigation during 1997. We obtained 38ks of data on the source 4UI705-44. The project is closely related to "Monitoring x-ray emission from x-ray bursters", and "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters."

  7. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  8. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  9. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  10. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The main results from this investigation were serendipitous. The long observation approved for the study of the hard X-ray emission of X-ray bursters lead, instead, to one of the largest early samples of the behavior of fast quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOS) in an atoll sources. Our analysis of this data set lead to the several important discoveries including the existence of a robust correlation between QPO frequency and the flux of a soft blackbody component of the X-ray spectrum in the atoll source 4U 0614+091.

  11. On stellar X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar X-ray astronomy represents an entirely new astronomical discipline which has emerged during the past five years. It lies at the crossroads of solar physics, stellar physics, and general astrophysics. The present review is concerned with the main physical problems which arise in connection with a study of the stellar X-ray data. A central issue is the extent to which the extrapolation from solar physics is justified and the definition (if possible) of the limits to such extrapolation. The observational properties of X-ray emission from stars are considered along with the solar analogy and the modeling of X-ray emission from late-type stars, the modeling of X-ray emission from early-type stars, the physics of stellar X-ray emission, stellar X-ray emission in the more general astrophysical context, and future prospects.

  12. X-Ray Emissions from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Crary, F. J.; Elsner, R. F.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Lewis, W. S.; Jahn, J.-M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Clarke, J. T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20 years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at low-latitudes as identified by past Einstein and ROSAT observations. Enhanced auroral x-rays were also observed to be associated with the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. The high-latitude x-ray emissions are best explained by energetic sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation from the Jovian magnetosphere, a suggestion that has been confirmed by recent Chandra ACIS observations. Exciting new information about Jovian x-ray emissions has been made possible with Chandra's High Resolution Camera. We report here for the first time the detection of a forty minute oscillation associated with the Jovian x-ray aurora. With the help of ultraviolet auroral observations from Hubble Space Telescope, we pinpoint the auroral mapping of the x-rays and provide new information on the x-ray source mechanism.

  13. THE CHANDRA CARINA COMPLEX PROJECT: DECIPHERING THE ENIGMA OF CARINA'S DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Gagne, Marc; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Montmerle, Thierry; Naze, Yael; Oey, M. S.; Park, Sangwook; Petre, Robert; Pittard, Julian M.

    2011-05-01

    We present a 1.42 deg{sup 2} mosaic of diffuse X-ray emission in the Great Nebula in Carina from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer camera. After removing >14,000 X-ray point sources from the field, we smooth the remaining unresolved emission, tessellate it into segments of similar apparent surface brightness, and perform X-ray spectral fitting on those tessellates to infer the intrinsic properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. By modeling faint resolved point sources, we estimate the contribution to the extended X-ray emission from unresolved point sources and show that the vast majority of Carina's unresolved X-ray emission is truly diffuse. Line-like correlated residuals in the X-ray spectral fits suggest that substantial X-ray emission is generated by charge exchange at the interfaces between Carina's hot, rarefied plasma and its many cold neutral pillars, ridges, and clumps.

  14. X-ray emission from normal stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The paper addresses the potential for future X-ray missions to determine the fundamental cause of stellar X-ray emissions based on available results and existing analyses. The determinants of stellar X-ray emission are listed, and the relation of stellar X-ray emissions to the 'universal' activity-rotation connection is discussed. The specific rotation-activity connection for evolved stars is mentioned, and the 'decay' of stellar activity at the low-mass end of the main sequence is related to observational data. The data from Einstein and EXOSAT missions that correspond to these issues are found to be sparse, and more observational work is found to be necessary. Also, it is concluded that some issues need to be addressed, such as the X-ray dividing line in evolved stars and the absence of X-ray emission from dA stars. The related observational requirements and instrumental capabilities are given for each significant research focus.

  15. X-ray emission from Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.

    1998-09-01

    The Trifid Nebula is one of the best-studied astrophysical objects, a classical nebula of ionized gas from an O6V star glowing red light, and it is trisected by obscuring dust lanes. Our ROSAT/PSPC image for the first time reveals that the Trifid Nebula emits X-rays and its emitting region is ~ 7' diameter--as large as the HII region itself. %The only previously reported X-ray emission Three main X-ray peaks appear within ~ 4 pc diameter of diffuse emission, roughly spherical. The strongest peak has 2' size near the O star, but the centroid of the X-ray peak appears 25'' away from HD 164492. % which is larger than the PSPC point spread function. Thus the emission may be a shell surrounding the O star as observed in eta Carina, originating from the interaction of a stellar wind with a circumstellar shell. There are a few other X-ray peaks: along the northeastern dust lane and in the east, none of which coincide with any identified optical stars. The PSPC spectrum extracted from the entire Trifid nebula does not clearly distinguish between thermal, bremsstrahlung, and power-law models, due to lack of counts. However, all of these models imply the X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 2.4 keV) is greater than 0.2 - 3*E(34) ergs s(-1) . The diffuse emission is possibly thermal with a temperature of 0.3-1 keV, as in the other HII regions eta Carina and RCW 49. The strong stellar wind from an O star alone can inject an energy of ~ 10(36) ergs s(-1) into ISM; this energy can be converted to heat the ionized gas to X-ray temperature. While the global diffuse X-ray emitting region is similar to the optical HII region, the bright X-ray peaks coincide with the structures in the infrared, suggesting possible embedded stars and their interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  16. Strong X-ray emission from electrified insulators.

    PubMed

    Inada, Nobuya; Maeda, Kuniko; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    Terasawa reported strong X-ray emission from charged-up insulators, and proposed an X-ray production device only using the electrification. We constructed a similar device and studied the conditions of X-ray emission. It was shown that X-rays could be produced without supplying electrons from a filament. PMID:16038514

  17. Origin of the hard x-ray emission from the Galactic plane.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, K; Maeda, Y; Kaneda, H; Yamauchi, S

    2001-08-31

    The Galactic plane is a strong emitter of hard x-rays (2 to 10 kiloelectron volts), and the emission forms a narrow continuous ridge. The currently known hard x-ray sources are far too few to explain the ridge x-ray emission, and the fundamental question of whether the ridge emission is ultimately resolved into numerous dimmer discrete sources or truly diffuse emission has not yet been settled. In order to obtain a decisive answer, using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we carried out the deepest hard x-ray survey of a Galactic plane region that is devoid of known x-ray point sources. We detected at least 36 new hard x-ray point sources in addition to strong diffuse emission within a 17' by 17' field of view. The surface density of the point sources is comparable to that at high Galactic latitudes after the effects of Galactic absorption are considered. Therefore, most of these point sources are probably extragalactic, presumably active galaxies seen through the Galactic disk. The Galactic ridge hard x-ray emission is diffuse, which indicates omnipresence within the Galactic plane of a hot plasma, the energy density of which is more than one order of magnitude higher than any other substance in the interstellar space. PMID:11498545

  18. X-ray emission from core excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, R. D.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1987-07-01

    We have observed soft x-ray emission from core excitons in several semiconductors and insulators and find that the exciton intensity is related to its binding energy. We propose an explanation for these excitons and this relationship using a Wannier model. The validity of the Wannier model is further tested by comparing our measured exciton binding energies with predicted values. We conclude that this model appears to be a good starting point in the understanding of core excitons.

  19. New soft x-ray emission spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, R. D.; Franck, C. P.; Schnatterly, S.; Zutavern, F.

    1984-12-01

    We have built a new soft x-ray emission spectrograph covering the photon energy range 20-800 eV. It incorporates toroidal holographic grazing incidence diffraction gratings and a position-sensitive photodiode array as a detector. The detector electronics are remote from the array which is under vacuum at nitrogen temperature, and features a double-correlated sampling scheme. The sample is excited with a Pierce-type electron gun using a quadrupole focusing lens. The performance of the instrument is described.

  20. X-Ray Emission from "Uranium" Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Eric; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The project aims to secure XMM observations of two targets with extremely low abundances of the majority of heavy elements (e.g., log[Fe/H] $\\sim$-4), but that show absorption lines of uranium. The presence of an r-process element such as uranium requires a binary star system in which the companion underwent a supernova explosion. A binary star system raises the distinct possibility of the existence of a compact object, most likely a neutron star, in the binary, assuming it survived the supernova blast. The presence of a compact object then suggests X-ray emission if sufficient matter accretes to the compact object. The observations were completed less than one year ago following a series of reobservations to correct for significant flaring that occurred during the original observations. The ROSAT all-sky survey was used to report on the initial assessment of X-ray emission from these objects; only upper limits were reported. These upper limits were used to justify the XMM observing time, but with the expectation that upper limits would merely be pushed lower. The data analysis hinges critically on the quality and degree of precision with which the background is handled. During the past year, I have spent some time learning the ins and outs of XMM data analysis. In the coming year, I can apply that learning to the analysis of the 'uranium' stars.

  1. Resonant X-ray emission with a standing wave excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Collins, Stephen P.; Monaco, Giulio; Moretti Sala, Marco; Krisch, Michael; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    The Borrmann effect is the anomalous transmission of x-rays in perfect crystals under diffraction conditions. It arises from the interference of the incident and diffracted waves, which creates a standing wave with nodes at strongly absorbing atoms. Dipolar absorption of x-rays is thus diminished, which makes the crystal nearly transparent for certain x-ray wave vectors. Indeed, a relative enhancement of electric quadrupole absorption via the Borrmann effect has been demonstrated recently. Here we show that the Borrmann effect has a significantly larger impact on resonant x-ray emission than is observable in x-ray absorption. Emission from a dipole forbidden intermediate state may even dominate the corresponding x-ray spectra. Our work extends the domain of x-ray standing wave methods to resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and provides means for novel spectroscopic experiments in d- and f-electron systems. PMID:26935531

  2. Resonant X-ray emission with a standing wave excitation.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Kari O; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Collins, Stephen P; Monaco, Giulio; Moretti Sala, Marco; Krisch, Michael; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    The Borrmann effect is the anomalous transmission of x-rays in perfect crystals under diffraction conditions. It arises from the interference of the incident and diffracted waves, which creates a standing wave with nodes at strongly absorbing atoms. Dipolar absorption of x-rays is thus diminished, which makes the crystal nearly transparent for certain x-ray wave vectors. Indeed, a relative enhancement of electric quadrupole absorption via the Borrmann effect has been demonstrated recently. Here we show that the Borrmann effect has a significantly larger impact on resonant x-ray emission than is observable in x-ray absorption. Emission from a dipole forbidden intermediate state may even dominate the corresponding x-ray spectra. Our work extends the domain of x-ray standing wave methods to resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and provides means for novel spectroscopic experiments in d- and f-electron systems.

  3. X-Ray Emission from Protostellar Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Jon A.; McCray, Dick; Bally, John; Devine, David

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this program were to identify the termination shocks in several parsec-scale protostellar jets through the thermal soft X-rays emitted by the high-velocity terminal shock waves, and to assess the impact these outflows have on the surrounding interstellar and intercloud medium. The terminal shock waves that plow into the undisturbed interstellar medium may have shock velocities commensurate with the observed space motions of several hundred km s(exp -1). Such shocks will heat and ionize the interstellar medium, perhaps creating large ovoid bubbles of hot gas. Identifying the location of the terminal shocks in these outflows would also allow us to place constraints on the ages of these outflows, and hence the duration of the mass-loss phase that accompanies the formation of a star. We targeted four outflows where the outer optical shock waves are projected against low-extinction backgrounds. From the two dozen or so parsec-scale flows known, we chose those that have the highest velocities, brightest optical counterparts, and/or the richest concentration of shock waves in a small area on the sky. Four giant HH flows have been observed with the ROSAT HRI at Priority A for 30 ksec each. Results: Unfortunately, we failed to detect X-ray emission from the terminal bow shocks of the giant HH flows using the ROSAT HRI. The reasons are likely to be: (1) The shock velocities may be too low to emit in the soft X-rays. (2) The sensitivity of the HRI is too low to detect the diffuse emission. The fields that we observed were chosen to be low extinction sight-lines, with the consequence that the tenuous media into which the outer bow shocks are propagating produce low fluxes. Despite the failure to achieve the primary science goals, we have identified in each image a half a dozen or so point-source young stellar objects. The HRI images have been very useful for discerning potential outflow sources and are being combined with optical, near-IR, and radio imaging data

  4. Modeling X-ray emission around galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2014-04-10

    Extended X-ray emission can be studied by spatial surface brightness measurements or by spectral analysis, but the two methods can disagree at low intensity levels. Here we present an improved method for spatial analysis that can be extended to include spectral information simultaneously. We construct a model for the entire image in a given energy band and generate a likelihood function to compare the model to the data. A critical goal is disentangling vignetted and unvignetted backgrounds through their different spatial distributions. Employing either maximum likelihood or Markov Chain Monte Carlo, we can derive probability distributions for the source and background parameters together, or we can fit and subtract the background, leaving the description of the source non-parametric. We calibrate this method against a variety of simulated images, and apply it to Chandra observations of the hot gaseous halo around the elliptical galaxy NGC 720. We follow the emission below a tenth of the background and infer a hot gas mass within 35 kpc of 4-5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with some indication that the profile continues to at least 50 kpc and that it steepens. We derive stronger constraints on the surface brightness profile than previous studies that employed the spectral method, and we show that the density profiles inferred from these studies are in conflict with the observed surface brightness profile. Contrary to a previous claim, we find that the X-ray halo does not contain the full complement of missing baryons within the virial radius.

  5. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in the existing experimental and theoretical data and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the Galactic Ridge, solar and stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae.

  6. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUNS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hainich, R.; Sun, W.; Chen, Y.; Evans, C. J.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gallagher, J. S. III; Guerrero, M. A.; Silich, S.; Naze, Y.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602a in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the H II region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the newborn stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NGC 602a are comparable to their Galactic counterparts, then the detected spatial distribution, spectral properties, and level of X-ray emission are largely consistent with those expected from low- and solar-mass PMS stars and young stellar objects (YSOs). This is the first discovery of X-ray emission attributable to PMS stars and YSOs in the SMC, which suggests that the accretion and dynamo processes in young, low-mass objects in the SMC resemble those in the Galaxy.

  7. Investigating the X-ray Emission from some of the Oldest Known X-ray Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, Vikram; Holmes, Danika

    2016-04-01

    The core-collapse of a massive star results in a supernova (SN) explosion, and a shock wave that expands outwards. The evolution of the shock wave, and the radius and morphology of the resulting remnant, depends on the density structure of the SN ejecta and surrounding medium. As the SN evolves, it sweeps up more material. The shock velocity, and therefore post-shock temperature (proportional to the square of the shock velocity), will consequently decrease. Thus we would expect a gradual evolution in the X-ray properties of the SN. While theoretical models anticipate this, very few SNe have observations over several decades that allow us to probe the time evolution of the X-ray emission and SN shocks.We have compiled a database of most observed X-ray SNe. In this talk we will summarize the X-ray data on some of the oldest detected X-ray SNe. These observations bridge the gap between old SNe and young supernova remnants, and shed light on the transition of a supernova to a remnant. We will show lightcurves for those which have multiple detections, outline the variation in their X-ray luminosity with time, compare their X-ray emission to that of younger supernovae, and discuss the evolution of the shock parameters as the supernova continues on its journey towards becoming a remnant.

  8. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  9. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  10. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were investigated with particular emphasis on X-ray emission. Topics discussed include: trajectories of high energy electrons; detection of ion trajectories; spatial distribution of neutron emission; space and time resolved emission of hard X-rays from a plasma focus; the staged plasma focus as a variation of the hypocloidal pinch; formation of current sheets in a staged plasma focus; and X-ray and neutron emission from a staged plasma focus. The possibility of operating dense plasma-focus type devices in multiple arrays beyond the scaling law for a single gun is discussed.

  11. X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is often held that the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) arises from a region close to the central energy source. Thus X-ray observations may provide the best constraints on the central engine. In particular, the shape of the X-ray continuum gives information about the mechanism for photon generation, X-ray time variability data can constrain the size and mass of the continuum source, and X-ray occultation data give constraints on the relative sizes of the continuum source and the intervening absorbing material (often assumed to be the broad line clouds). In addition, since a fair fraction of the total energy of an AGN is emitted at X-ray wavelengths, direct measurement of the amount and spectral form of this radiation is important for modeling of the optically emitting clouds.

  12. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    X-rays from a 25-hJ plasma focus apparatus were observed with pinhole cameras. The cameras consist of 0.4 mm diameter pinholes in 2 cm thick lead housing enclosing an X-ray intensifying screen at the image plane. Pictures recorded through thin aluminum foils or plastic sheets for X-ray energies sub gamma smaller than 15 keV show distributed X-ray emissions from the focussed plasma and from the anode surface. However, when thick absorbers are used, radial filamentary structure in the X-ray emission from the anode surface is revealed. Occasionally larger structures are observed in addition to the filaments. Possible mechanisms for the filamentary structure are discussed.

  13. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  14. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Krystal; Quillen, A. C.; LaPage, Amanda; Rieke, George H.

    2004-07-01

    We compare the soft diffuse X-ray emission from Chandra images of 12 nearby intermediate-inclination spiral galaxies to the morphology seen in Hα, molecular gas, and mid-infrared emission. We find that diffuse X-ray emission is often located along spiral arms in the outer parts of spiral galaxies but tends to be distributed in a more nearly radially symmetric morphology in the center. The X-ray morphology in the spiral arms matches that seen in the mid-infrared or Hα and thus implies that the X-ray emission is associated with recent active star formation. In the spiral arms there is a good correlation between the level of diffuse X-ray emission and that in the mid-infrared in different regions. The correlation between X-ray and mid-IR flux in the galaxy centers is less strong. We also find that the central X-ray emission tends to be more luminous in galaxies with brighter bulges, suggesting that more than one process is contributing to the level of central diffuse X-ray emission. We see no strong evidence for X-ray emission trailing the location of high-mass star formation in spiral arms. However, population synthesis models predict a high mechanical energy output rate from supernovae for a time period that is about 10 times longer than the lifetime of massive ionizing stars, conflicting with the narrow appearance of the arms in X-rays. The fraction of supernova energy that goes into heating the interstellar medium must depend on environment and is probably higher near sites of active star formation. The X-ray estimated emission measures suggest that the volume filling factors and scale heights are low in the outer parts of these galaxies but higher in the galaxy centers. The differences between the X-ray properties and morphology in the centers and outer parts of these galaxies suggest that galactic fountains operate in outer galaxy disks but that winds are primarily driven from galaxy centers.

  15. X-Ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula trailing the high-velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the "Guitar Nebula"). This X-ray flux gives evidence of gamma approximately 10(exp 7) eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the postshock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near-equipartition values.

  16. The correlation of solar flare hard X-ray bursts with Doppler blueshifted soft X-ray flare emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. D.; Doschek, G. A.; Simnett, G. M.; Rilee, M. L.; Mariska, J. T.; Culhane, J. L.; Kosugi, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the temporal correlation between hard X-ray bursts and the intensity of Doppler blueshifted soft X-ray spectral line emission. We find a strong correlation for many events that have intense blueshifted spectral signatures and some correlation in events with modest blueshifts. The onset of hard X-rays frequently coincides to within a few seconds with the onset of blueshifted emission. The peak intensity of blueshifted emission is frequently close in time to the peak of the hard X-ray emission. Decay rates of the blueshifted and hard X-ray emission are similar, with the decay of the blueshifted emission tending to lag behind the hard X-ray emission in some cases. There are, however, exceptions to these conclusions, and, therefore, the results should not be generalized to all flares. Most of the data for this work were obtained from instruments flown on the Japanese Yohkoh solar spacecraft.

  17. Shakeup in soft-x-ray emission. II. Plasmon satellites and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livins, Peteris; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-04-01

    We report the first observation of a plasmon satellite in the K emission spectrum of diamond. The previously identified plasmon satellites of Al and graphite are also presented, and data is compared with an oscillator model applicable to soft-x-ray emission and photoemission. The graphite satellite is shown to exhibit an anomalous location with respect to the parent emission. We report for the Al LI-LII,III core-core transitions a spin-orbit splitting of 0.42+/-0.02 eV with a Lorentzian width of 0.67+/-0.02 eV. The oscillator model applied to x-ray photoemission predicts a shift of the plasmon satellite with respect to the zero loss line as the final-electron kinetic energy is varied.

  18. Spectral Analysis of Cometary X-Rays Emission Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snios, B. T.; Kharchenko, V. A.; Lewkow, N.

    2014-12-01

    To establish contributions from different emission mechanisms within a cometary atmosphere, we perform a theoretical analysis of cometary X-ray emission spectra. We develop a model that generates updated spectra of solar wind charge-exchange emissions together with accurate scattering and fluorescence spectra of solar X-rays by atoms, molecules, and ice/dust particles. Our model also explores scattering and fluorescence spectra for different solar conditions, including spectra induced by solar X-ray flares of different classes and durations. Utilizing our results, the major emission mechanism is determined for both the 0.3-1.0 keV and 1.0-3.0 keV photon energy ranges. Additionally, we compare the modeled spectra of cometary X-rays with cometary observations from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. These comparisons establish upper limits on ice/dust mass production rates, with an emphasis on nanoparticles, for several comets. We conclude with a discussion of the impact of of ice/dust particles in the formation of cometary X-ray emission spectra.

  19. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  20. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe; Bordage, Amélie; Cammarata, Marco; Canton, Sophie E; Dohn, Asmus O; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Fritz, David M; Galler, Andreas; Glatzel, Pieter; Harlang, Tobias; Kjær, Kasper S; Lemke, Henrik T; Møller, Klaus B; Németh, Zoltán; Pápai, Mátyás; Sas, Norbert; Uhlig, Jens; Zhu, Diling; Vankó, György; Sundström, Villy; Nielsen, Martin M; Bressler, Christian

    2016-02-18

    In liquid phase chemistry dynamic solute-solvent interactions often govern the path, ultimate outcome, and efficiency of chemical reactions. These steps involve many-body movements on subpicosecond time scales and thus ultrafast structural tools capable of capturing both intramolecular electronic and structural changes, and local solvent structural changes are desired. We have studied the intra- and intermolecular dynamics of a model chromophore, aqueous [Fe(bpy)3](2+), with complementary X-ray tools in a single experiment exploiting intense XFEL radiation as a probe. We monitored the ultrafast structural rearrangement of the solute with X-ray emission spectroscopy, thus establishing time zero for the ensuing X-ray diffuse scattering analysis. The simultaneously recorded X-ray diffuse scattering patterns reveal slower subpicosecond dynamics triggered by the intramolecular structural dynamics of the photoexcited solute. By simultaneous combination of both methods only, we can extract new information about the solvation dynamic processes unfolding during the first picosecond (ps). The measured bulk solvent density increase of 0.2% indicates a dramatic change of the solvation shell around each photoexcited solute, confirming previous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Structural changes in the aqueous solvent associated with density and temperature changes occur with ∼1 ps time constants, characteristic for structural dynamics in water. This slower time scale of the solvent response allows us to directly observe the structure of the excited solute molecules well before the solvent contributions become dominant. PMID:26783685

  1. DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C. Y.; Cheng, K. S.; Taam, Ronald E.

    2009-08-01

    The unresolved X-ray emission in the cores of 10 globular clusters hosting millisecond pulsars is investigated. Subtraction of the known resolved point sources leads to detectable levels of unresolved emission in the core region of M28, NGC 6440, M62, and NGC 6752. The X-ray luminosities in the 0.3-8 keV energy band of this emission component were found to lie in the range {approx}1.5 x 10{sup 31}erg s{sup -1} (NGC 6752) to {approx}2.2 x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} (M28). The lowest limiting luminosity for X-ray source detections amongst these four clusters was 1.1 x 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1} for NGC 6752. The spectrum of the unresolved emission can be fit equally well by a power law, a thermal bremsstrahlung model, a blackbody plus power law, or a thermal bremsstrahlung model plus blackbody component. The unresolved emission is considered to arise from the cumulative contribution of active binaries, cataclysmic variables, and faint millisecond pulsars with their associated pulsar wind nebulae. In examining the available X-ray data, no evidence for any pulsar wind nebular emission in globular clusters is found. It is shown that the X-ray luminosity contribution of a faint source population based on an extrapolation of the luminosity function of detected point sources is compatible with the unresolved X-ray emission in the cores of NGC 6440 and NGC 6752. Adopting the same slope for the luminosity function for M62 as for NGC 6440 and NGC 6752 leads to a similar result for M62. For M28, the contribution from faint sources in the core can attain a level comparable with the observed value if a steeper slope is adopted. The characteristics on the faint source population as constrained by the properties of the unresolved X-ray emission are briefly discussed.

  2. ANS hard X-ray experiment development program. [emission from X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsignault, D.; Gursky, H.; Frank, R.; Kubierschky, K.; Austin, G.; Paganetti, R.; Bawdekar, V.

    1974-01-01

    The hard X-ray (HXX) experiment is one of three experiments included in the Dutch Astronomical Netherlands Satellite, which was launched into orbit on 30 August 1974. The overall objective of the HXX experiment is the detailed study of the emission from known X-ray sources over the energy range 1.5-30keV. The instrument is capable of the following measurements: (1) spectral content over the full energy range with an energy resolution of approximately 20% and time resolution down to 4 seconds; (2) source time variability down to 4 milliseconds; (3) silicon emission lines at 1.86 and 2.00keV; (4) source location to a limit of one arc minute in ecliptic latitude; and (5) spatial structure with angular resolution of the arc minutes. Scientific aspects of experiment, engineering design and implementation of the experiment, and program history are included.

  3. Enhanced X-ray Emission from Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip; Prestwich, Andrea H.; Mirabel, I. Felix; Feng, Hua

    2016-04-01

    X-rays from binaries containing compact objects may have played an important role in heating the early Universe. Here we discuss our findings from X-ray studies of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), Lyman break analogs (LBAs), and Green Pea galaxies (GP), all of which are considered local analogs to high redshift galaxies. We find enhanced X-ray emission per unit star-formation rate which strongly correlates with decreasing metallicity. We find evidence for the existence of a L_X-SFR-Metallicity plane for star-forming galaxies. The exact properties of X-ray emission in the early Universe affects the timing and morphology of reionization, both being observable properties of current and future radio observations of the redshifted 21cm signal from neutral hydrogen.

  4. X-ray emission of hot massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L.

    2014-07-01

    Massive hot stars are important cosmic engines that severely influence their environment by powerful stellar wind and strong ionizing radiation. Modern observations of X-ray emission from massive stars provide deep insight into the structure and dynamics of their winds and allow to study the very hot gas in wind blown bubbles. I will review the recent findings on X-ray emission from OB and Wolf-Rayet stars and massive star clusters. While our knowledge about the X-ray emission from massive stars is increasing, a small fraction of massive stars that have strong magnetic fields are often unusual in their X-ray light. Massive star clusters provide an excellent opportunity to study stellar feedback and the hot gas filling the intracluster medium. The most massive stars are often binaries where the stellar winds collide and produce X-ray or even gamma-ray radiation. Finally, I will discuss the progress towards an unified view of stellar winds in single stars and in high mass X-ray binaries.

  5. Auroral X ray emission at Jupiter: Depth effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ozak, Nataly; Schultz, David Robert; Cravens, Thomas E. E.; Kharchenko, V.; Hui, Yawei

    2010-01-01

    Auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter with a total power of about 1 GW have been observed by the Einstein Observatory, Roentgen satellite, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton. Previous theoretical studies have shown that precipitating energetic sulfur and oxygen ions can produce the observed X-rays. This study presents the results of a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) model for sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation at high latitudes, looks at differences with the continuous slow-down model, and compares the results to synthetic spectra fitted to observations. We concentrate on the effects of altitude on the observed spectrum. The opacity of the atmosphere to the outgoing X-ray photons is found to be important for incident ion energies greater than about 1.2 MeV per nucleon for both sulfur and oxygen. Model spectra are calculated for intensities with and without any opacity effects. These synthetic spectra were compared with the results shown by Hui et al. (2010) which fit Chandra X-ray Observatory observations for the north and south Jovian auroral emissions. Quenching of long-lived excited states of the oxygen ions is found to be important. Opacity considerably diminishes the outgoing X-ray intensity calculated, particularly when the viewing geometry is not favorable.

  6. Extended X-Ray Emission around Quasars at Intermediate Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio

    1998-01-01

    We compare the optical to soft X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) of a sample of bright low-redshift (0.048 less than z less than 0.155), radio-quiet quasars, with a range of thermal models which have been proposed to explain the optical/UV/soft X-ray quasar emission: (a) optically thin emission from an ionized plasma, (b) optically thick emission from the innermost regions of an accretion disk in Schwarzschild and Kerr geometries. We presented ROSAT PSPC observations of these quasars in an earlier paper. Here our goals are to search for the signature of thermal emission in the quasar SED, and to investigate whether a single component is dominating at different frequencies. We find that isothermal optically thin plasma models can explain the observed soft X-ray color and the mean OUV color. However, they predict an ultraviolet (1325 Angstrom) luminosity a factor of 3 to 10 times lower than observed. Pure disk models, even in a Kerr geometry, do not have the necessary flexibility to account for the observed OUV and soft X-ray luminosities. Additional components are needed both in the optical and in the soft X-rays (e.g. a hot corona can explain the soft X-ray color). The most constrained modification of pure disk models, is the assumption of an underlying power law component extending from the infrared (3 micrometers) to the X-ray. This can explain both the OUV and soft X-ray colors and luminosities and does not exceed the 3 micrometers luminosity, where a contribution from hot dust is likely to be important. We also discuss the possibility that the observed soft X-ray color and luminosity are dominated by reflection from the ionized surface of the accretion disk. While modifications of both optically thin plasma models and pure disk models might account for the observed SED, we do not find any strong evidence that the OUV bump and soft X-ray emission are one and the same component. Likewise, we do not find any strong argument which definitely argues in favor

  7. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  8. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2015-11-01

    Exotic x-ray emission from dense matter is identified as the complex high intensity satellite emission from autoionizing states of highly charged ions. Among a vast amount of possible transitions, double K-hole hollow ion (HI) x-ray emission K0L X → K1L X-1 + hν hollow is of exceptional interest due to its advanced diagnostic potential for matter under extreme conditions where opacity and radiation fields play important roles. Transient ab initio simulations identify intense short pulse radiation fields (e.g., those emitted by x-ray free electron lasers) as possible driving mechanisms of HI x-ray emission via two distinct channels: first, successive photoionization of K-shell electrons, second, photoionization followed by resonant photoexciation among various ionic charge states that are simultaneously present in high density matter. We demonstrated that charge exchange of intermixing inhomogenous plasmas as well as collisions driven by suprathermal electrons are possible mechanisms to populate HIs to observable levels in dense plasmas, particularly in high current Z-pinch plasmas and high intensity field-ionized laser produced plasmas. Although the HI x-ray transitions were repeatedly identified in many other cases of dense optical laser produced plasmas on the basis of atomic structure calculations, their origin is far from being understood and remains one of the last holy grails of high intensity laser-matter interaction.

  9. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  10. Discovery of Diffuse Hard X-ray Emission Around Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Miyoshi, Y.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Our discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter is reported. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations revealed several types of X-rays in the vicinity of Jupiter such as auroral and disk emission from Jupiter and faint diffuse X-rays from the Io Plasma Torus (see Bhardwaj et al. 2007 for review). To investigate possible diffuse hard X-ray emission around Jupiter with the highest sensitivity, we conducted data analysis of Suzaku XIS observations of Jupiter on Feb 2006. After removing satellite and planetary orbital motions, we detected a significant diffuse X-ray emission extending to 6 x 3 arcmin with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of 3e15 erg/s. The emitting region very well coincided with the Jupiter's radiation belts and the bright spot seemed to move according to the Io's motion. The 1-5 keV X-ray spectrum was represented by a simple power law model with a photon index of 1.4. Such a flat continuum strongly suggests non-thermal origin. We hence examined three mechanisms: bremsstrahlung by keV electrons, synchrotron emission by TeV electrons, and inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by MeV electrons. The former two can be rejected because of the X-ray spectral shape and implausible existence of TeV electrons around Jupiter, respectively. The last possibility was found to be possible because tens MeV electrons, which have been confirmed in inner radiation belts (Bolton et al. 2002), can kick solar photons to the keV energy range and provide a simple power-law continuum. We estimated an average electron density from the X-ray luminosity assuming the oblate spheroid shaped emitting region with 8 x 8 x 4 Jovian radii. The necessary density was 0.02 1/cm3 for 50 MeV electrons. Hence, our results may suggest a new particle acceleration phenomenon related to Io.

  11. Diffuse X-ray emission from the Dumbbell Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kwitter, Karen B.; Kaler, James B.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter pointed observations of the Dumbbell Nebula and find that the previously reported 'extended' X-ray emission is an instrumental electronic ghost image at the softest energy band. At slightly higher energy bands, the image of the Dumbbell is not very different from that of the white dwarf HZ43. We conclude that the X-ray emission of the Dumbbell Nebula comes from its central star. A blackbody model is fitted to the spectrum and the best-fit temperature of not greater than 136,000 +/- 10,000 K is in excellent agreement with the Zanstra temperatures.

  12. Detecting X-ray Emission from Cometary Atmospheres Using the Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Bodewits, D; Porter, F S; Ezoe, Y; Hamaguchi, K; Hanya, M; Itoh, M; Kilbourne, C A; Kohmura, T; Maeda, Y; Negoro, H; Tsuboi, Y; Tsunemi, H; Urata, Y

    2009-11-16

    The Suzaku X-ray imaging spectrometer has been used to observe the X-ray emission from comets 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C and 8P/Tuttle. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C was observed during May and June of 2006, while it was near perihelion and passed within 0.1 AU of the Earth. Comet 8P/Tuttle was observed during January of 2008 when it was at its closest approach to the Earth at 0.25 AU, and again near perihelion at a distance of 0.5 Au from Earth. In the case of comet 73P/Schwassmann Wachmann 3C, the XIS spectra show line emission from highly charged oxygen and carbon ions as well as emission from what is most likely L-shell transitions from Mg, Si, and S ions. This line emission is caused by charge exchange recombination between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals, and can be used as a diagnostic of the solar wind. Here we present some of the results of the observation of the comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3C.

  13. Study of Diffuse X-ray Emission in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1997-01-01

    This grant supported our analysis of ROSAT x-ray data on globular clusters. Although the grant title referred to our original ROSAT proposal (cycle 1) to study diffuse soft x-ray emission in three globulars (for which time was only granted in that original observing cycle for one cluster, 47 Tuc), the grant has also been maintained through several renewals and funding supplements to support our later ROSAT observations of point sources in globulars. The primary emphasis has been on the study of the dim sources, or low liuminosity globular cluster x-ray sources, which we had originally discovered with the Einstein Observatory and for which ROSAT provided the logical followup. In this Final Report, we summarize the Scientific Objectives of this investigation of both diffuse emission and dim sources in globular clusters and the Results Achieved; and finally the Papers Published.

  14. An upper limit to X-ray emission from Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, D. A.; Hurley, K. C.; Seward, F. D.; Schnopper, H. W.; Sullivan, J. D.; Metzger, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    X-rays are produced in auroral discharges, and their measurement can serve to characterize the interaction processes responsible for the aurora itself. The existence of auroral activity on Saturn was suggested by the observation of a magnetosphere by Pioneer 11 and confirmed by UV measurements during the Voyager encounters. The detection of X-rays from Jupiter with the Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2) satellite provided the impetus for a subsequent observation of Saturn. No emission was detected. This article presents the upper limit established by the observation and derives an expected emission level assuming X-ray production to be the result of bremsstrahlung from keV electrons precipitating into Saturn's atmosphere. The difference is a factor of 100.

  15. Stellar X-ray Emission From Magnetically Funneled Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Hans

    Stars and planets form in giant molecular clouds, so they are deeply embedded in their early stages. When they become optically visible, the young stars are still surrounded by a proto-planetary disk, where planets evolve. These stars are called classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). A key, yet poorly constrained, parameter for the disk evolution is the stellar high-energy emission. It can ionize the outer layers of the disk, change its chemistry and even drive photoevaporation of the disk. Thus the spectral shape and the temporal variability of the stellar X-ray and UV emission shapes the gas and dust properties in some regions of the disk. It sets the photoevaporation timescale which provides an upper limit for planet formation. CTTS still actively accrete mass from their disk. The infalling matter is funneled by the stellar magnetic field and impacts on the star close to free fall velocity. A hot accretion shock develops, which emits X-rays which are distinct from any coronal X-rays. Eventually the disk disperses and bulk planet formation comes to an end. X-ray emitting shocks can still occur at a later stage in stellar evolution, if e.g. the magnetic field is strong enough to funnel the stellar wind to collide in the disk midplane. This so-called magnetically confined wind shock model was originally developed for the A0p star IQ Aur. The magnetically funneled accretion model has been successfully tested for CTTS in a small mass range only; the magnetically confined wind shock model lacks a comparison for high-resolution X-ray grating spectra for all but the most massive stars. In this proposal we request funding to analyze three XMM-Newton observations, which will probe X-ray emitting shocks in stars with magnetic fields: DN Tau (observed as category C target in cycle 8), a CTTS with much lower mass than previous CTTS with X- ray grating spectroscopy; MN Lup (to be observed in cycle 9), a prime candidate for simultaneous X-ray/Doppler-imaging studies; and IQ Aur (to

  16. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the diffuse X-ray emission from the Milky Way has evolved. extensively with time from when it was first observed in the 1960's, and its origin is still the subject of debate as much now as ever. This presentation will provide an overview of that evolution, the various emission components, emission mechanisms, an assessment of the current state of the field, and implications for eROSITA.

  17. EUV and x-ray emission of nonmagnetic catacysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1997-09-01

    Recent results are presented and discussed regarding the EUV and X-ray emission of nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables. Emphasis is given to high accretion rate systems (novalike variables and dwarf novae in outburst), and to a number of apparent discrepancies between observations and the theory of the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf. Discussed are EUV and X-ray light curves, dwarf nova oscillations, and spectra, with new and previously unpublished results on SS Cyg and OY Car.

  18. X-ray emission from hybrid-chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Drake, Stephen A.; Van Steenberg, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    The observations of hybrid stars made by the Exosat X-ray satellite are considered, and emphasis is placed on the hybrid star alpha TrA. Attention is focused on the determination of the column density of IS hydrogen toward the stars in order to interpret X-ray observations of stellar coronal emission. The coronal properties of alpha TrA are discussed as well as implications of the general coronal properties of hybrid stars. An analysis of the X-ray data, in conjunction with transition region properties of the star, shows that the X-ray emitting plasma is likely to have a temperature of at least 10 to the 6th K. The X-ray luminosity of the star is calculated to be about 5 x 10 to the 29th ergs/s over the 1-300 A spectral region and 7 x 10 to the 28th ergs/s in the 0.2-4 keV energy range for N(H) = 5 x 10 to the 19th /sq cm and a temperature of 10 to the 6th K.

  19. X-ray emission from hybrid-chromosphere stars

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.; Linsky, J.L.; Drake, S.A.; Van steenberg, M.E. NIST, Boulder, CO ST Systems Corp., Lanham, MD NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1991-06-01

    The observations of hybrid stars made by the Exosat X-ray satellite are considered, and emphasis is placed on the hybrid star alpha TrA. Attention is focused on the determination of the column density of IS hydrogen toward the stars in order to interpret X-ray observations of stellar coronal emission. The coronal properties of alpha TrA are discussed as well as implications of the general coronal properties of hybrid stars. An analysis of the X-ray data, in conjunction with transition region properties of the star, shows that the X-ray emitting plasma is likely to have a temperature of at least 10 to the 6th K. The X-ray luminosity of the star is calculated to be about 5 {times} 10 to the 29th ergs/s over the 1-300 A spectral region and 7 {times} 10 to the 28th ergs/s in the 0.2-4 keV energy range for N(H) = 5 {times} 10 to the 19th /sq cm and a temperature of 10 to the 6th K. 41 refs.

  20. Enhanced hard x-ray emission from microdroplet preplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Kahaly, S.; Ravindra Kumar, G.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Sandhu, A.S.; Gibbon, P.

    2006-05-01

    We perform a comparative study of hard x-ray emission from femtosecond laser plasmas in 15 {mu}m methanol microdroplets and Perspex target. The hard x-ray yield from droplet plasmas is {approx_equal}68 times more than that obtained from solid plasmas at 2x10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. A 10 ns prepulse at about 5% of the main pulse appears to be essential for hard x-ray generation from droplets. Hot electron temperature of 36 keV is measured from the droplets at 8x10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}, whereas a three times higher intensity is needed to obtain similar hot electron temperatures from Perspex plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations with very long scale-length density profiles support experimental observations.

  1. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  2. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidler, G. T.; Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ˜5 keV to ˜10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 106-107 photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  3. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    ScienceCinema

    Dwyer, Joseph [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida, United States

    2016-07-12

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences.  Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons.  This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning.  This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes.  During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields.  These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air.  Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away.  As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited. 

  4. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Joseph

    2009-07-08

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences.  Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons.  This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning.  This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes.  During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields.  These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air.  Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away.  As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited. 

  5. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Joseph

    2009-08-08

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences. Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons. This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning. This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes. During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields. These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air. Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away. As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited.

  6. "X-Ray Transients in Star-Forming Regions" and "Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    This grant funded work on the analysis of data obtained with the Burst and Transient Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The goal of the work was to search for hard x-ray transients in star forming regions using the all-sky hard x-ray monitoring capability of BATSE. Our initial work lead to the discovery of a hard x-ray transient, GRO J1849-03. Follow-up observations of this source made with the Wide Field Camera on BeppoSAX showed that the source should be identified with the previously known x-ray pulsar GS 1843-02 which itself is identified with the x-ray source X1845-024 originally discovered with the SAS-3 satellite. Our identification of the source and measurement of the outburst recurrence time, lead to the identification of the source as a Be/X-ray binary with a spin period of 94.8 s and an orbital period of 241 days. The funding was used primarily for partial salary and travel support for John Tomsick, then a graduate student at Columbia University. John Tomsick, now Dr. Tomsick, received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in July 1999, based partially on results obtained under this investigation. He is now a postdoctoral research scientist at the University of California, San Diego.

  7. K alpha line emission during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Neupert, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of K alpha line emission from S, Ar, Ca and Fe are presented. It is reported that on the basis of data for hard X-ray bursts, the flux during most impulsive, non-thermal events is likely to be weak, though for a few strong bursts, a flux of approximately 100 photons/cm/s may be expected. The amount of S K alpha emission particularly is sensitively dependent on the value of the lower energy bound of the non-thermal electron distribution, offering a possible means of determining this. Thermal K alpha emission is only significant for Fe ions. The calculated thermal K alpha radiation is much less than that observed during an intense soft X-ray burst. It is concluded that a detailed temperature structure for the emission source is required in order to explain the discrepancy.

  8. The X-ray emission of the γ Cassiopeiae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Motch, C.

    2016-09-01

    Long considered as the "odd man out" among X-ray emitting Be stars, γ Cas (B0.5e IV) is now recognized as the prototype of a class of stars that emit hard thermal X-rays. Our classification differs from the historical use of the term " γ Cas stars" defined from optical properties alone. The luminosity output of this class contributes significantly to the hard X-ray production of massive stars in the Galaxy. The γ Cas stars have light curves showing variability on a few broadly-defined timescales and spectra indicative of an optically thin plasma consisting of one or more hot thermal components. By now 9-13 Galactic ≈ B0-1.5e main sequence stars are judged to be members or candidate members of the γ Cas class. Conservative criteria for this designation are for a ≈ B0-1.5e III-V star to have an X-ray luminosity of 1032-1033 ergs s-1, a hot thermal spectrum containing the short wavelength Lyα Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines and the fluorescence FeK feature all in emission. If thermality cannot be demonstrated, for example from either the presence of these Lyα lines or curvature of the hard continuum of the spectrum of an X-ray active Be star, we call them γ Cas candidates. We discuss the history of the discovery of the complicated characteristics of the variability in the optical, UV, and X-ray domains, leading to suggestions for the physical cause of the production of hard X-rays. These include scenarios in which matter from the Be star accretes onto a degenerate secondary star and interactions between magnetic fields on the Be star and its decretion disk. The greatest aid to the choice of the causal mechanism is the temporal correlations of X-ray light curves and spectra with diagnostics in the optical and UV wavebands. We show why the magnetic star-disk interaction scenario is the most tenable explanation for the creation of hard X-rays on these stars.

  9. Formation and X-ray Emission from Hot bubbles in Planetary Nebulae II. Hot bubble X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Arthur, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the X-ray emission from numerical simulations of hot bubbles in planetary nebulae (PNe). High-resolution, two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the formation and evolution of hot bubbles in PNe, with and without thermal conduction, are used to calculate the X-ray emission and study its time-dependence and relationship to the changing stellar parameters. Instabilities in the wind-wind interaction zone produce clumps and filaments in the swept-up shell of nebular material. Turbulent mixing and thermal conduction at the corrugated interface can produce quantities of intermediate temperature and density gas between the hot, shocked wind bubble and the swept-up photoionized nebular material, which can emit in soft, diffuse X-rays. We use the CHIANTI software to compute synthetic spectra for the models and calculate their luminosities. We find that models both with conduction and those without can produce the X-ray temperatures and luminosities that are in the ranges reported in observations, although the models including thermal conduction are an order of magnitude more luminous than those without. Our results show that at early times the diffuse X-ray emission should be dominated by the contribution from the hot, shocked stellar wind, whereas at later times the nebular gas will dominate the spectrum. We analyse the effect of sampling on the resultant spectra and conclude that a minimum of 200 counts is required to reliably reproduce the spectral shape. Likewise, heavily smoothed surface-brightness profiles obtained from low-count detections of PNe do not provide a reliable description of the spatial distribution of the X-ray emitting gas.

  10. Synchrotron X-ray emission from old pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Tanaka, Shuta J.

    2014-09-01

    We study the synchrotron radiation as the observed non-thermal emission by the X-ray satellites from old pulsars (≳1-10 Myr) to investigate the particle acceleration in their magnetospheres. We assume that the power-law component of the observed X-ray spectra is caused by the synchrotron radiation from electrons and positrons in the magnetosphere. We consider two pair-production mechanisms of X-ray emitting particles, the magnetic and the photon-photon pair productions. High-energy photons, which ignite the pair production, are emitted via the curvature radiation of the accelerated particles. We use the analytical description for the radiative transfer and estimate the luminosity of the synchrotron radiation. We find that for pulsars with the spin-down luminosity Lsd ≲ 1033 erg s-1, the locations of the particle acceleration and the non-thermal X-ray emission are within ≲107 cm from the centre of the neutron star, where the magnetic pair production occurs. For pulsars with the spin-down luminosity Lsd ≲ 1031 erg s-1 such as J0108-1431, the synchrotron radiation is difficult to explain the observed non-thermal component even if we consider the existence of the strong and small-scale surface magnetic field structures.

  11. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  12. Observing soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium with X-ray calorimeter on a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Mccammon, D.; Skinner, M.; Kelley, R.; Moseley, H.; Schoelkopf, R.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    For an X-ray calorimeter working at 0.1 K, the energy resolution ideally can be as good as one eV for a practical detector. A detector with a resolution of 17 eV FWHM at 6 keV has been constructed. It is expected that this can be improved by a factor of two or more. With X-ray calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket, it should be possible to observe soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium over the energy range 0.07 to 1 keV. Here, a preliminary design for an X-ray calorimeter rocket experiment and the spectrum which might be observed from an equilibrium plasma are presented. For later X-ray calorimeter sounding rocket experiments, it is planned to add an aluminum foil mirror with collecting area of about 400 sq cm to observe line features from bright supernova remnants.

  13. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bremsstrahlung X-rays from a plasma focus device were investigated with emphasis on the emission versus position, time, energy, and angle of emission. It is shown that low energy X-rays come from the plasma focus region, but that the higher energy components come from the anode. The emission is anisotropic, the low energy polar diagram resembling a cardioid, while the high energy emission is a lobe into the anode. The plasma parameters were considered indicating that even in the dense focus, the plasma is collisionless near the axis. By considering the radiation patterns of relativistic electrons a qualitative picture is obtained, which explains the measured polar diagrams, assuming the electrons that produce the X-rays have velocity vectors lying roughly in a cone between the point of focus and the anode. The average electron energy is about 3keV at the focus and about 10 keV on the anode surface. Results are consistent with the converging beam model of neutron production.

  14. Models for X-Ray Emission from Isolated Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. Y.-H.; Ruderman, M.; Halpern, Jules P.; Zhu, T.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for the observed combination of power-law and thermal X-rays from rotationally powered pulsars. For gamma-ray pulsars with accelerators very many stellar radii above the neutron star surface, 100 MeV curvature gamma-rays from e(-) or e(+) flowing starward out of such accelerators are converted to e1 pairs on closed field lines all around the star. These pairs strongly affect X-ray emission from near the star in two ways. (1) The pairs are a source of synchrotron emission immediately following their creation in regions where B approx. 10(exp 10) G. This emission, in the photon energy range 0.1 keV less than E(sub X) less than 5 MeV, has a power-law spectrum with energy index 0.5 and X-ray luminosity that depends on the back-flow current, and is typically approx. 10(exp 33) ergs/ s. (2) The pairs ultimately a cyclotron resonance "blanket" surrounding the star except for two holes along the open field line bundles which pass through it. In such a blanket the gravitational pull on e(+,-) pairs toward the star is balanced by the hugely amplified push of outflowing surface emitted X-rays wherever cyclotron resonance occurs. Because of it the neutron star is surrounded by a leaky "hohlraum" of hot blackbody radiation with two small holes, which prevents direct X-ray observation of a heated polar cap of a gamma-ray pulsar. Weakly spin modulated radiation from the blanket together with more strongly spin-modulated radiation from the holes through it would then dominate observed low energy (0.1-10 keV) emission. For non-y-ray pulsars, in which no such accelerators with their accompanying extreme relativistic back-flow toward the star are expected, optically thick e1 resonance blankets should not form (except in special cases very close to the open field line bundle). From such pulsars blackbody radiation from both the warm stellar surface and the heated polar caps should be directly observable. In these pulsars, details of the surface magnetic field

  15. Charge exchange x-ray emission: Astrophysical observations and potential diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, K.; Andrianarijaona, V.; Draganic, I. N.; Defay, X.; Fogle, M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Guillen, C. I.; Havener, C. C.; Hokin, M.; McCammon, D.; Nader, D. J.; Romano, S. L.; Carcoba, F. Salces; Sauter, P.; Seely, D.; Stancil, P. C.; Vane, C. R.; Vassantachart, A. K.; Wulf, D.

    2013-04-01

    Interest in astrophysical sources of charge exchange X-rays has been growing steadily since the discovery of X-ray emission from the comet Hyakutake with ROSAT in 1996. Since then, charge exchange has been observed between solar wind ions and neutrals in the geocorona and in the atmospheres of Mars and Jupiter. Charge exchange with interstellar neutrals within the heliosphere between solar wind ions and neutral hydrogen and helium from the interstellar medium is now acknowledged as contributing a considerable (although currently unknown) fraction of the soft X-ray background. We make a brief survey of the heliospheric, Galactic, and extragalactic systems in which charge exchange has been observed or is predicted to take place. Experiments measuring velocity dependent cross-section and line ratios for Lyman-series lines and He-like triplets are needed to check current theoretical models of charge exchange emission and aid interpretation of observations. We point out a number of systems that are of astrophysical interest that could be the subject of future laboratory investigations, particularly velocity dependent line ratios of the X-ray emission produced by charge exchange between highly ionized common elements (such as O, C, Ne, and Fe) and atomic hydrogen and helium. To begin to address the need for laboratory data we have measured velocity dependent Ly-series line ratios for C6+ ions interacting with H2, He, and Kr gas targets at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Ion-Atom Merged-Beams Apparatus.

  16. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  17. Diffuse X-ray Emission from M101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.; Pence, W. D.; Mukai, K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The total 0.45-2.0 keV luminosity of M101 is 3.1 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, of which 2.2 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s is due to diffuse emission. Of the diffuse emission, no more than 6% can be due to unresolved point sources such as X-ray binaries, and approx. 11% is due to dwarf stars. The diffuse emission traces the spiral arms and is roughly correlated with the H alpha and FUV (far ultraviolet) emission. The radial distribution closely follows the optical profile. The bulk of the diffuse emission is characterized by a two thermal component spectrum with kT = 0.20,0.75 keV, and the ratios of the emission measures of the two components is roughly constant as a function of both radius and surface brightness. The softer component has a sufficiently large covering factor that the bulk of the emission is likely extra-planar. We find no evidence of an extended axisymmetric X-ray halo, suggesting that any such halo has a strength much smaller than current predictions.

  18. Measurement of coronal X-ray emission lines from Capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedder, P. W.; Canizares, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Einstein Observatory's Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer has detected X-ray emission lines due to O VIII, Fe XVII, and Fe XX, from the binary star system Capella. Line luminosities are well fitted by an emitting plasma at a single temperature of 6.29 + or - 0.01 - 0.03 million K, and a volume emission measure of about 8.6 x 10 to the 52nd/cu cm, corresponding to the low temperature component previously observed. A high temperature component is undetectable, since the observed lines are not produced in plasma at temperatures above about 20 million K. Nearly isothermal plasma would be expected if many of the magnetically confined coronal loops have similar sizes and pressures, and a second population of longer loops would be required to account for the hotter component. An alternative interpretation of the observed X-ray line emission and upper limit is that the plasma contains a continuous distribution of emission measure versus temperature that rises sharply to 3 million K and then falls by nearly a decade to 16 million. An extrapolation of the loop sizes suggested by this alternative to hotter, longer loops may also account for the higher temperature emission.

  19. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  20. Chandra ACIS Observations of Jovian X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, Gordon; Elsner, Ronald; Feigelson, Eric; Ford, Peter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Hurley, Kevin; Metzger, Albert; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    On November 25 and 26, 1999, the Chandra X-ray spacecraft conducted a set of four 19,000 sec observations of Jupiter. The ACIS-S instrument configuration was used for its good low energy efficiency and spatial resolution. An anomalous response was obtained which was subsequently attributed to strong jovian infrared radiation penetrating the detector and piling up spurious events across the entire X-ray range. However, the pre-observation establishment of an offsetting bias field has allowed the recovery of data from that portion of Jupiter's disc which remained within the elevated portion of the bias field during the observation. This ranges from fewer than 3000 sec to the entire observing time for about 10% of the planet. Auroral emission is seen near both poles in each observation. The northern aurora ia overall more intense than the southern, consistent with prior Einstein and ROSAT Observatory results. The southern aurora shows more modulation with Jupiter's rotation than the northern. Spatial resolution has been improved by at least a factor of two over prior measurements but convincing evidence of structure has not been seen. Lower latitude emission, first observed by ROSAT, is confirmed with flux levels averaging more than a factor of five below peak auroral values. Pronounced variation in the observed emission has occurred over the observing period. The spectral response extends from 0.24 keV, below which noise dominates, to about 1.2 keV. For all four observations the spectrum is clearly enhanced between 0.45 and 0.85 keV. This is apparently unequivocal evidence that Jupiter's X-ray emission is the result of oxygen and perhaps sulfur ions precipitating into the planet's atmosphere, where they undergo charge exchange interactions. The identification of specific transitions lines in the spectrum is among the ongoing efforts. A bremsstrahlung component has not yet been identified.

  1. Rotation and X-Ray Emission from Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montmerle, Thierry; Grosso, Nicolas; Tsuboi, Yohko; Koyama, Katsuji

    2000-04-01

    The ASCA satellite has recently detected variable hard X-ray emission from two class I protostars in the ρ Oph cloud, YLW 15 (IRS 43) and WL 6, with a characteristic timescale of ~20 hr. In YLW 15, the X-ray emission is in the form of quasi-periodic energetic flares, which we explain in terms of strong magnetic shearing and reconnection between the central star and the accretion disk. The flare modeling, based on the solar analogy, gives us access to the size of the magnetic structures, which in turn allows us to calculate the rotation parameters of the star and the disk. In WL 6, X-ray flaring is rotationally modulated and appears to be more like the solar-type magnetic activity ubiquitous on T Tauri stars. On the basis of these observations, we find that YLW 15 is a fast rotator (near break-up), while WL 6 rotates with a significantly longer period. We thus use X-ray flaring as a ``clock'' to measure the rotation of protostars. With the help of the mass-radius relation on the stellar ``birthline,'' we derive masses of M*~2 Msolar and <~0.4 Msolar for the central stars of YLW 15 and WL 6, respectively. YLW 15 thus appears to be a future A star. In the long term, the magnetic interactions between the star and the disk result in magnetic braking and angular momentum loss of the star. A comparison of the rotation behavior of YLW 15 and WL 6 confirms that for solar-mass stars magnetic braking takes place on timescales tbr~a fewx105 yr, i.e., of the same order as the estimated duration of the class I protostar stage. The main parameter determining tbr turns out to be the stellar mass, so that close to the birthline there must be a mass-rotation relation, tbr~~M*, such that stars with M*>~1-2 Msolar are fast rotators, while their lower mass counterparts have had the time to spin down and reach synchronous rotation with the inner surrounding accretion disk. The rapid rotation and strong star-disk magnetic interactions of YLW 15 also naturally explain the

  2. X-ray emission in manganese compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabua, Malkhaz; Gotta, Detlev; Strauch, Thomas; Weidemann, Christian; Fricke, Burkhard; Rashid, Khalid

    2016-07-01

    X-ray emission spectra of manganese compounds have been measured using an ultimate-resolution Bragg spectrometer optimised for long-term high-statistics measurements. Energies corresponding to the peak positions of the Kα lines were measured to a precision of 10-20 meV. Total line widths of the Kα1 and Kα2 components and their asymmetry have been determined to about 50 meV. A model-free parametrisation of the line pattern corrected for the spectrometer response may serve as testing ground for detailed theoretical considerations.

  3. Surface X-ray emission from lanthanide metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübinger, F.; Shulakov, A. S.; Starke, K.; Grigoriev, A.; Kaindl, G.

    2003-02-01

    O 3 X-ray emission (XE) upon 5p 3/2 electron-impact ionization of La(0 0 0 1) and Sm(0 0 0 1) metal surfaces exhibits up to 30% spectral intensity from the topmost atomic surface layer. The energy separation of surface and bulk XE peaks is explained by the surface core-level shift of La and the surface valence transition of Sm. While the bulk XE spectra are in reasonable agreement with theoretical sd partial density of states (DOS), the experimental access to the partial surface-layer DOS opens new opportunities in studying surface phenomena in lanthanide metals and compounds.

  4. X-ray emission from galaxies and the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabian, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    The study of X-ray emission from normal galaxies began with the launch of the Einstein Observatory in 1978. Galaxies of all Hubble types and point sources are discussed. It is concluded that statistical studies of bright Galactic sources, which relate to their evolution, are reliant upon the discovery of sources in many galaxies. It is also concluded that a substantial future increase (the Virgo cluster galaxies) requires a telescope system with better than arcminute resolution and a sensitivity better than 10 x that of Einstein.

  5. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K.

    2016-03-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 using a 137 ks long and another 13 ks short XMM-Newton observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing 76.9 ± 4.9 per cent in 2012 and 58.8 ± 10.2 per cent in 2001 in the 0.3-2 keV band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of ˜20 ks reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the power-law components. The fractional variability amplitude Fvar derived from EPIC-pn light curves at different energy bands is nearly constant (Fvar ˜ 20 per cent). This is in contrast to other active galactic nuclei where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the `lamppost' model. Thus, the variations in power-law emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due to the changes of height of compact corona. The variable UV emission (Fvar ˜ 1 per cent) is uncorrelated to any of the X-ray components on short time-scales suggesting that the UV emission is not dominated by the reprocessed emission. The gradual observed decline in the UV emission in 2012 may be related to the secular decline due to the changes in the accretion rate. In this case, the short term X-ray variability is not due to the changes in the seed photons but intrinsic to the hot corona.

  6. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P.; Stern, D.; Teng, S. H.; Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Farrah, D.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Ogle, P.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.; and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  7. X-Ray, UV, and Optical Observations of Supernova 2006bp with Swift: Detection of Early X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Milne, P.; Dessart, L.; Mazzali, P. A.; Landsman, W.; Gehrels, N.; Petre, R.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Chevalier, R. A.; Williams, C. L.; Koss, M.; Stockdale, C. J.; Kelley, M. T.; Weiler, K. W.; Holland, S. T.; Pian, E.; Roming, P. W. A.; Pooley, D.; Nomoto, K.; Greiner, J.; Campana, S.; Soderberg, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present results on the X-ray and optical/UV emission from the Type IIP supernova (SN) 2006bp and the interaction of the SW shock with its environment, obtained with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on-board the Swift observatory. SN 2006bp is detected in X-rays at a 4.5 sigmalevel of significance in the merged XRT data from days 1 to 12 after the explosion. If the (0.2-10 keV band) X-ray luminosity of L(sub 0.2-10) = (1.8 plus or minus 0.4) x l0(exp 39 ergs s(exp -1) is caused by interaction of the SN shock with circumstellar material (CSM), deposited by a stellar wind from the progenitor's companion star, a mass-loss rate of M is approximately 2x10(exp -6) solar mass yr(exp -1) (v(sub w)/10 km s(exp -l) is inferred. The mass-loss rate is one of the lowest ever recorded for a core-collapse SN and consistent with the non-detection in the radio with the VLA on days 2, 9, and 11 after the explosion. The Swift data further show a fading of the X-ray emission starting around day 12 after the explosion. In combination with a follow-up XMM-Newton observation obtained on day 21 after the explosion, an X-ray rate of decline Lx, varies as t(exp -n) with index n = 1.2 plus or minus 0.6 is inferred. Since no other SN has been detected in X-rays prior to the optical peak and since Type IIP SNe have an extended 'plateau' phase in the optical, we discuss the scenario that the X-rays might be due to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric optical photons off relativistic electrons produced in circumstellar shocks. However, due to the high required value of the Lorentz factor (approximately 10-100), inconsistent with the ejecta velocity inferred from optical line widths, we conclude that Inverse Compton scattering is an unlikely explanation for the observed X-ray emission. The fast evolution of the optical/ultraviolet (1900-5500A) spectral energy distribution and the spectral changes observed with Swift reveal the onset of metal line-blanketing and

  8. Variable X-ray Emission from FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Guedel, M.; Briggs, K. R.; Lamzin, S. A.; Sokal, K. R.

    2009-05-01

    FU Orionis is the prototype of a small but remarkable class of pre-main sequence stars ('FUors') that have undergone large optical outbursts thought to be linked to episodic accretion. FU Ori increased in optical brightness by about 6 mag in 1936-37 and is still in slow decline. Because of their high accretion rates, FUors are good candidates for exploring potential effects of accretion on X-ray emission. A recently completed survey of FUors with XMM-Newton detected X-rays from FU Ori and V1735 Cyg. We present new results from a sensitive 99 ksec (1.15 day) follow-up X-ray observation of FU Ori with Chandra. The Chandra ACIS-S CCD spectrum confirms the presence of a cool plasma component (kT < 1 keV) viewed under moderate absorption and a much hotter component (kT > 3 keV), viewed under high absorption, in accord with previous XMM results. The uninterrupted Chandra light curve shows that the hot component is slowly variable on a timescale of one day, but no variability is detected in the cool component. The slow variability and high plasma temperature point to a magnetic origin for the hot component, but other mechanisms (including accretion) may be responsible for the cool non-variable component. We will discuss these new results in the context of what is known about FU Ori from previous observations, including XMM (Skinner et al. 2006, ApJ, 643, 995) and HST (Kravtsova et al. 2007, Ast. Ltrs., 33, 755).

  9. Upper limits for X-ray emission from Jupiter as measured from the Copernicus satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Culhane, J. L.; Hawkins, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    X-ray telescopic observations are made by the Copernicus satellite for detecting X-ray emission from Jupiter analogous to X-rays from terrestrial aurorae. Values of X-ray fluxes recorded by three Copernicus detectors covering the 0.6 to 7.5 keV energy range are reported. The detectors employed are described and the times at which the observations were made are given. Resulting upper-limit spectra are compared with previous X-ray observations of Jupiter. The upper-limit X-ray fluxes are discussed in terms of magnetospheric activity on Jupiter.

  10. X-ray Emission from Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip; Prestwich, Andrea H.; Mirabel, I. Felix; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Around 300,000 years after the Big Bang, the Universe had cooled enough to combine and form neutral atoms. This signified the beginning of a time known as the Dark Ages. Neutral matter began to fall into the dark matter gravitational wells that were seeded after the initial moments of the Big Bang. As the first stars and galaxies formed within these gravitational wells, the surrounding baryonic matter was heated and started to ionize. The source of energetic photons that heated and reionized the early Universe remains uncertain. Early galaxies had low metallicity and recent population synthesis calculations suggest that the number and luminosity of high-mass X-ray binaries are enhanced in star-forming galaxies with low metallicity, offering a potentially important and previously overlooked source of heating and reionization. Here we examine two types of local galaxies that have been shown to be good analogs to the early galaxies in the Universe: Blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs).A BCD is defined by its blue optical colors, low metallicities, and physically small size. This makes BCDs the best available local analogs for early star formation. We analyzed data from a sample of 25 metal-poor BCDs and compared our results with those of near-solar metallicity galaxies. Using a Bayesian approach, we showed that the X-ray luminosity function for the low-metallicity BCDs is significantly elevated relative to the XLF for near-solar metallicity galaxies.Larger, gas-rich galaxies may have formed shortly after these first galaxies. These larger galaxies would be similar in their properties to the high-redshift Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). LBAs provide the best local comparison to the LBGs. We studied a sample of 10 LBAs in order to measure the relation between star formation rate and X-ray luminosity for these galaxies. We found that for LBAs with intermediate sub-solar metallicities, there is enhanced X-ray emission relative to the expected

  11. EUV and Soft X-Ray Emissions From Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.

    2001-05-01

    We analyzed 8 observations of comets with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). A soft X-ray camera in the range of 97-165 eV FWHM with a peak effective area of 28 cm2 and three spectrometers at 80-180, 170-360, and 300-720 Å with peak effective areas of 2.1, 0.5, and 0.8 cm2, respectively, were used for those observations. The detection limit of the X-ray camera corresponds to the X-ray luminosity of 1.9x 1014 Δ 2 erg s-1 for photon energy ɛ > 100 eV. (Δ is the geocentric distance in AU.) Five comets were detected with the X-ray camera: Hyakutake, Borrelly, d'Arrest, pre- and postperihelion Hale-Bopp. Their images reveal a crescent-like structure with peak brightness offsets from the nuclei between the sunward and comet orbital velocity directions. X-ray luminosities and their spatial distributions were determined from the observations. The measured luminosities are in excellent correlation with gas production rates in comets, resulting in the efficiency of (6.4 +/- 0.9)x 10-5 AU3/2 in the range of 97-165 eV. Correlation with dust production rates is poor, and this favor a gas-related excitation process. The peak brightnesses scaled to r2 are constant and equal to 26+/- 9 millirayleighs. This means that comae are optically or collisionally thick near the brightness centers. Of a few suggested excitation mechanisms, only charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary neutrals agrees with both these facts. The EUVE spectra of comets Hale-Bopp and Hyakutake have been analyzed. Due to the close flyby of Hyakutake at 0.1 AU, its spectra are of exceptionally high quality and exceed the currently published spectra of comets by a factor of 3 in resolving power and by two orders of magnitude in photon statistics. The spectra reveal for the first time the emission lines of multiple charged ions which are brought to the comet by the solar wind and excited in charge exchange with cometary neutral species. The most prominent lines are O4+ 215 Å, C4+ 249

  12. Emission lines from X-ray-heated accretion disks in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Kallman, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the structure of accretion disks illuminated by X-rays from a central compact object in a binary system. X-rays can photoionize the upper atmosphere of the disk and form an accretion disk corona (ADC) where emission lines can form. We construct a model to calculate the vertical structure and the emission spectrum of the ADC with parameters appropriate to low-mass X-ray binaries. These models are made by nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of ion and level populations and include a large number of atomic processes for 10 cosmically abundant elements. Transfer of radiation is treated by using the escape probability formalism. The vertical temperature profile of the ADC consists of a Compton-heated region and a mid-T zone where the temperature is approximately 10(exp 6) K. A thermal instability occurs close to the disk photosphere and causes the temperature of the ADC to drop abruptly from 10(exp 6) K to several times 10(exp 4) K. The emission spectrum in the optical, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, and X-ray range is discussed and compared with the observations.

  13. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the Origin of the Galactic Center Hard X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin; Canipe, Alicia M.; Hong, Jaesub; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Nynka, Melania; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, unresolved hard (20-40 keV) X-ray emission has been discovered within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements in the surrounding ˜50 pc imply a much lighter population of IPs with < {M}{{WD}}> ≈ 0.5{M}⊙ . Here we use broadband NuSTAR observations of two IPs: TV Columbae, which has a fairly typical but widely varying reported mass of {M}{{WD}}≈ 0.5-1.0{M}⊙ , and IGR J17303-0601, with a heavy reported mass of {M}{{WD}}≈ 1.0-1.2{M}⊙ . We investigate how varying spectral models and observed energy ranges influences estimated white dwarf mass. Observations of the inner 10 pc can be accounted for by IPs with < {M}{{WD}}> ≈ 0.9{M}⊙ , consistent with that of the CV population in general and the X-ray observed field IPs in particular. The lower mass derived by Chandra and XMM-Newton appears to be an artifact of narrow energy-band fitting. To explain the (unresolved) central hard X-ray emission (CHXE) by IPs requires an X-ray (2-8 keV) luminosity function (XLF) extending down to at least 5 × 1031 erg s-1. The CHXE XLF, if extended to the surrounding ˜50 pc observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton, requires that at least ˜20%-40% of the ˜9000 point sources are IPs. If the XLF extends just a factor of a few lower in luminosity, then the vast majority of these sources are IPs. This is in contrast to recent observations of the Galactic ridge, where the bulk of the 2-8 keV emission is ascribed to non-magnetic CVs.

  14. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the Origin of the Galactic Center Hard X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin; Canipe, Alicia M.; Hong, Jaesub; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Nynka, Melania; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, unresolved hard (20–40 keV) X-ray emission has been discovered within the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, possibly indicating a large population of intermediate polars (IPs). Chandra and XMM-Newton measurements in the surrounding ˜50 pc imply a much lighter population of IPs with < {M}{{WD}}> ≈ 0.5{M}ȯ . Here we use broadband NuSTAR observations of two IPs: TV Columbae, which has a fairly typical but widely varying reported mass of {M}{{WD}}≈ 0.5–1.0{M}ȯ , and IGR J17303–0601, with a heavy reported mass of {M}{{WD}}≈ 1.0–1.2{M}ȯ . We investigate how varying spectral models and observed energy ranges influences estimated white dwarf mass. Observations of the inner 10 pc can be accounted for by IPs with < {M}{{WD}}> ≈ 0.9{M}ȯ , consistent with that of the CV population in general and the X-ray observed field IPs in particular. The lower mass derived by Chandra and XMM-Newton appears to be an artifact of narrow energy-band fitting. To explain the (unresolved) central hard X-ray emission (CHXE) by IPs requires an X-ray (2–8 keV) luminosity function (XLF) extending down to at least 5 × 1031 erg s‑1. The CHXE XLF, if extended to the surrounding ˜50 pc observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton, requires that at least ˜20%–40% of the ˜9000 point sources are IPs. If the XLF extends just a factor of a few lower in luminosity, then the vast majority of these sources are IPs. This is in contrast to recent observations of the Galactic ridge, where the bulk of the 2–8 keV emission is ascribed to non-magnetic CVs.

  15. First Detection of Phase-dependent Colliding Wind X-ray Emission outside the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naze, Yael; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2007-01-01

    After having reported the detection of X-rays emitted by the peculiar system HD 5980, we assess here the origin of this high-energy emission from additional X-ray observations obtained with XMM-Newton. This research provides the first detection of apparently periodic X-ray emission from hot gas produced by the collision of winds in an evolved massive binary outside the Milky Way. It also provides the first X-ray monitoring of a Luminous Blue Variable only years after its eruption and shows that the source of the X-rays is not associated with the ejecta.

  16. The cosmic X-ray background-IRAS galaxy correlation and the local X-ray volume emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyaji, Takamitsu; Lahav, Ofer; Jahoda, Keith; Boldt, Elihu

    1994-01-01

    We have cross-correlated the galaxies from the IRAS 2 Jy redshift survey sample and the 0.7 Jy projected sample with the all-sky cosmic X-ray background (CXB) map obtained from the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 1 A-2 experiment. We have detected a significant correlation signal between surface density of IRAS galaxies and the X-ray background intensity, with W(sub xg) = (mean value of ((delta I)(delta N)))/(mean value of I)(mean value of N)) of several times 10(exp -3). While this correlation signal has a significant implication for the contribution of the local universe to the hard (E greater than 2 keV) X-ray background, its interpretation is model-dependent. We have developed a formulation to model the cross-correlation between CXB surface brightness and galaxy counts. This includes the effects of source clustering and the X-ray-far-infrared luminosity correlation. Using an X-ray flux-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which has IRAS 60 micrometer measurements, we have estimated the contribution of the AGN component to the observed CXB-IRAS galaxy count correlations in order to see whether there is an excess component, i.e., contribution from low X-ray luminosity sources. We have applied both the analytical approach and Monte Carlo simulations for the estimations. Our estimate of the local X-ray volume emissivity in the 2-10 keV band is rho(sub x) approximately = (4.3 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc, consistent with the value expected from the luminosity function of AGNs alone. This sets a limit to the local volume emissivity from lower luminosity sources (e.g., star-forming galaxies, low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs)) to rho(sub x) less than or approximately = 2 x 10(exp 38) h(sub 50) ergs/s/cu Mpc.

  17. Effect of insulator sleeve material on the x-ray emission from a plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Badar, M. A.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of insulator sleeve material on x-ray emission from a 2.3 kJ Mather type plasma focus device operated in argon-hydrogen mixture is investigated. The time and space resolved x-ray emission characteristics are studied by using a three channel p-i-n diode x-ray spectrometer and a multipinhole camera. The x-ray emission depends on the volumetric ratio of argon-hydrogen mixture as well as the filling pressure and the highest x-ray emission is observed for a volumetric ratio 40% Ar to 60%H{sub 2} at 2.5 mbar filling pressure. The fused silica insulator sleeve produces the highest x-ray emission whereas nonceramic insulator sleeves such as nylon, Perspex, or Teflon does not produce focus or x-rays. The pinhole images of the x-ray emitting zones reveal that the contribution of the Cu K{alpha} line is weak and plasma x-rays are intense. The highest plasma electron temperature is estimated to be 3.3 and 3.6 keV for Pyrex glass and fused silica insulator sleeves, respectively. It is speculated that the higher surface resistivity of fused silica is responsible for enhanced x-ray emission and plasma electron temperature.

  18. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  19. X-ray Emission from Megamaser Galaxy IC 2560

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Greg; Done, Chris; Zycki, Piotr; Greenhill, Lincoln; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2005-09-12

    Observation of the H{sub 2}O megamaser galaxy IC 2560 with the Chandra Observatory reveals a complex spectrum composed of soft X-ray emission due to multi-temperature thermal plasma, and a hard continuum with strong emission lines. The continuum is most likely a Compton reflection (reprocessing) of primary emission that is completely absorbed at least up to 7 keV. The lines can be identified with fluorescence from Si, S and Fe in the lowest ionization stages. The equivalent widths of the Si and S lines are broadly compatible with those anticipated for reprocessing by optically thick cold plasma of Solar abundances, while the large equivalent width of the Fe line requires some overabundance of iron. A contribution to the line from a transmitted component cannot be ruled out, but the limits on the strength of the Compton shoulder make it less likely. From the bolometric luminosity of the nuclear region, we infer that the source radiates at 1-10% of its Eddington luminosity, for an adopted central mass of 3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The overall spectrum is consistent with the hypotheses that the central engines powering the detected megamsers in accretion disks are obscured from direct view by the associated accretion disk material itself, and that there is a correlation between the occurrence of megamaser emission and Compton-thick absorption columns. For the 11 known galaxies with both column density measurements and maser emission believed to arise from accretion disks, eight AGN are Compton thick.

  20. Out on a Limb: Updates on the Search for X-ray Emission from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo; Ramstedt, Sofia; Santiago-Boyd, Andrea; Kastner, Joel; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    X-rays from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are rarely detected, however, few modern X-ray observatories have targeted AGB stars. In 2012, we searched a list of 480 galactic AGB stars and found a total of 13 targeted or serendipitous observations with few detections (Ramstedt et al. 2012). Since this initial search new programs have successfully targeted and detected X-ray emission from a handful of AGB stars. The X-ray emission, when detected, reveals high temperature plasma (>= 10 MK). This plasma might be heated by a large-scale magnetic field or indicate the presence of accretion onto a compact companion. In this poster, we update our search for X-ray emission from AGB stars with a review of their characteristics, potential origins, and impact of X-ray emission in this late stage of stellar evolution.

  1. X-ray emission from the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleach, R. D.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A search was made of a diffuse component of X-rays 1.5 keV associated with an interarm region of the galaxy at galactic longitudes in the vicinity of 60 deg. A statistically significant excess associated with a narrow disk component was detected. The angular extent of this component has a most probable value of 2 deg and may be as large as 7 deg at 90% confidence. The best fit spectrum yields an intensity of 2.9 photons 1/(cm2-sec-ster) over the 2 to 10 keV range. The 3 sigma upper limit to any emission (e.g. iron line) in a 1.5 keV band centered at 7 keV from galactic latitudes h or = 3.5 deg is .3 photons 1/(cm2-sec-ster). Several possible emission models are discussed, with the most likely candidate being a population of unresolvable low luminosity discrete sources.

  2. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Cravens, T. E.; Howell, R. R.; Metzger, A. E.; Ostgaard, N.; Maurellis, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of solar system planetary bodies are now known to radiate in the soft x-ray energy (<5 keV) regime. These include planets (Earth, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn): bodies having thick atmosphere and with/without intrinsic magnetic field; planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, Ganymede): bodies with no/thin atmosphere; and comets and Io plasma torus: bodies having extended tenuous atmosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of soft x-rays from these objects. whereas in the hard x-ray energy range (>10 keV) x-rays mainly result from electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the x-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms.

  3. Theoretical study of the X-ray emission from astrophysical shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, J.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical X-ray emission spectra are needed to interpret the X-ray emission observed by many low and moderate resolution X-ray instruments, and to provide diagnosis of physical conditions for high resolution spectra. Over the past decade, a set of model codes which compute the X-ray and XUV emission for a wide set of physical conditions, including high or low densities, photoionized gas, and time-dependent ionization balance was developed. In the past year, the atomic rate coefficients in the code was improved. Further capabilities were added, and applied to several astrophysical problems.

  4. Direct and bulk-scattered forward-shock emissions: sources of X-ray afterglow diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.

    2008-05-22

    I describe the modifications to the standard forward-shock model required to account for the X-ray light-curve features discovered by Swift in the early afterglow emission and propose that a delayed, pair-enriched, and highly relativistic outflow, which bulk-scatters the forward-shock synchrotron emission, yields sometimes a brighter X-ray emission, producing short-lived X-ray flares, X-ray light-curve plateaus ending with chromatic breaks, and fast post-plateau decays.

  5. Analysis and interpretation of diffuse x-ray emission using data from the Einstein satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1991-01-01

    An ambitious program to create a powerful and accessible archive of the HEAO-2 Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) database was outlined. The scientific utility of that database for studies of diffuse x ray emissions was explored. Technical and scientific accomplishments are reviewed. Three papers were presented which have major new scientific findings relevant to the global structure of the interstellar medium and the origin of the cosmic x ray background. An all-sky map of diffuse x ray emission was constructed.

  6. High Resolution Temporal and Spectral Monitoring of Eta Carinae's X-Ray Emission the June Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henley, D.; Pittard, J. M.; Gull, T. R.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The supermassive and luminous star Eta Carinae undergoes strong X-ray variations every 5.5 years when its 2-10 keV X-ray emission brightens rapidly with wild fluctuations before dropping by a factor of 100 to a minimum lasting 3 months. The most recent X-ray "eclipse" began in June 2003 and during this time Eta Carinae was intensely observed throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. Here we report the first results of frequent monitoring of the 2-10 keV band X-ray emission by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer along wit high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the transmission gratings on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We compare these observations to those results obtained during the previous X-ray eclipse in 1998, and interpret the variations in the X-ray brightness, in the amount of absorption, in the X-ray emission measure and in the K-shell emission lines in terms of a colliding wind binary model.

  7. Evidence of Bulk Acceleration of the GRB X-Ray Flare Emission Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    Applying our recently developed generalized version of the high-latitude emission theory to the observations of X-ray flares in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), here we present clear observational evidence that the X-ray flare emission region is undergoing rapid bulk acceleration as the photons are emitted. We show that both the observed X-ray flare light curves and the photon index evolution curves can be simultaneously reproduced within a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation in an accelerating emission region far from the GRB central engine. Such an acceleration process demands an additional energy dissipation source other than kinetic energy, which points toward a significant Poynting flux in the emission region of X-ray flares. As the X-ray flares are believed to share a similar physical mechanism as the GRB prompt emission, our finding here hints that the GRB prompt emission jets may also carry a significant Poynting flux in their emitting region.

  8. Charge Exchange of Ne^9+ for X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, David

    2016-01-01

    Using the molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method, single electron capture (SEC) cross sections were computed for Ne^9+ colliding with H.Potential energies and nonadiabatic couplings were calculated and used to obtain the MOCC cross sections which are final-quantum-state-resolved including a separation of singlet and triplet states. Atomic-orbital close-coupling, classical trajectory Monte Carlo, and multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) calculations are also performed. Cross sections for more complicated targets including He, H2, N2, H2O, CO, and CO2, were obtained with the MCLZ method. The SEC results are compared with experimental and other theoretical data, where available. The SEC cross sections are being used in cascade models to predict X-ray emission spectra relevant to solar systemand astrophysical environments.D. Lyons, R. S. Cumbee, P. D. Mullen, P. C. Stancil (UGA), D. R. Schultz (UNT), P. Liebermann (Wuppertal Univ.),R. Buenker (NCSU).This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  9. Determination of 198Au X-rays emission probabilities.

    PubMed

    Moreira, D S; Koskinas, M F; Dias, M S; Yamazaki, I M

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the measurements of the K X-ray and gamma-ray emission probabilities per decay of (198)Au performed at the Nuclear Metrology Laboratory (LMN) at the IPEN, São Paulo. The radioactive sample was obtained by means of (197)Au(n, gamma)(198)Au reaction irradiating an Au foil in a thermal neutron flux near the core of the IPEN 3.5 MW research reactor. The activity of samples was determined in a 4pibeta-gamma coincidence system, setting the gamma window at the 411.80 keV total energy absorption peak. The same samples were measured in two different spectrometers: a HPGe planar spectrometer with Be window, suitable for measurements in the low energy range and a coaxial REGe spectrometer. Both spectrometers were previously calibrated in a well defined geometry by means of standard sources calibrated in a 4pibeta-gamma coincidence system. MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used for simulating the REGe spectrometer calibration curve, and a new version of code ESQUEMA was adopted for simulating the detection processes in the coincidence system, in order to predict the efficiency extrapolation curve.

  10. Visualization of asymmetric wetting ridges on soft solids with X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Ji; Weon, Byung Mook; Lee, Ji San; Lee, Junho; Kim, Jinkyung; Je, Jung Ho

    2014-01-01

    One of the most questionable issues in wetting is the force balance that includes the vertical component of liquid surface tension. On soft solids, the vertical component leads to a microscopic protrusion of the contact line, that is, a ‘wetting ridge’. The wetting principle determining the tip geometry of the ridge is at the heart of the issues over the past half century. Here we reveal a universal wetting principle from the ridge tips directly visualized with high spatio-temporal resolution of X-ray microscopy. We find that the cusp of the ridge is bent with an asymmetric tip, whose geometry is invariant during ridge growth or by surface softness. This singular asymmetry is deduced by linking the macroscopic and microscopic contact angles to Young and Neuman laws, respectively. Our finding shows that this dual-scale approach would be contributable to a general framework in elastowetting, and give hints to issues in cell-substrate interaction and elasto-capillary problems. PMID:25007777

  11. Eclipse and Collapse of the Colliding Wind X-ray Emission from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray emission from the massive stellar binary system, Eta Carinae, drops strongly around periastron passage; the event is called the X-ray minimum. We launched a focused observing campaign in early 2009 to understand the mechanism of causing the X-ray minimum. During the campaign, hard X-ray emission (<10 keV) from Eta Carinae declined as in the previous minimum, though it recovered a month earlier. Extremely hard X-ray emission between 15-25 keV, closely monitored for the first time with the Suzaku HXD/PIN, decreased similarly to the hard X-rays, but it reached minimum only after hard X-ray emission from the star had already began to recover. This indicates that the X-ray minimum is produced by two composite mechanisms: the thick primary wind first obscured the hard, 2-10 keV thermal X-ray emission from the wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma; the WWC activity then decays as the two stars reach periastron.

  12. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  13. Modeling X-ray emission line profiles from massive star winds - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes have led to numerous advances in the study and understanding of astrophysical X-ray sources. Particularly important has been the much increased spectral resolution of modern X-ray instrumentation. Wind-broadened emission lines have been spectroscopically resolved for many massive stars. This contribution reviews approaches to the modeling of X-ray emission line profile shapes from single stars, including smooth winds, winds with clumping, optically thin versus thick lines, and the effect of a radius-dependent photoabsorption coefficient.

  14. X-ray Tube Using a Graphene Flower Cloth Field Emission Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Tsuboi, Shougo; Jyouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated a filament-less X-ray tube using a graphene flower cloth (GFC) field emission cathode. The GFC has numerous nanoprotrusions formed by self-standing graphene structures. The field emission current and the field enhancement factor β were 500 µA and 5600, respectively. The stability of voltage defined as a variance coefficient (σ/mean) of voltage was calculated to be 0.04% while maintaining the X-ray tube current of 300 µA. We applied our X-ray tube with the GFC field emitter to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of stainless steel.

  15. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were studied. These devices produce dense high temperature plasmas, which emit X rays of hundreds of KeV energy and one to ten billion neutrons per pulse. The processes in the devices seem related to solar flare phenomena, and would also be of interest for controlled thermonuclear fusion applications. The high intensity, short duration bursts of X rays and neutrons could also possibly be used for pumping nuclear lasers.

  16. Long-duration X-ray emissions observed in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eack, Kenneth B.; Beasley, William H.

    2015-07-01

    In 1995, a series of four balloon flights with an X-ray spectrometer and an electric field meter were conducted to examine if strong electric fields could accelerate, and perhaps multiply, cosmic ray secondary electrons and produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. X-ray intensities between 10 and 1000 times that of normal background were observed in conjunction with strong electric fields. Both negative and positive polarity electric fields (as referenced to the vertical field) produced X-rays, which lasted for time scales on the order of tens of seconds. It was also observed that the increased X-ray intensity would return to near background levels after lightning reduced the local electric field. The observations indicate that X-rays observed above background are most likely produced by a runaway electron process occurring in the strong static electric field present in thunderstorms. The production of runaway electrons can occur over long periods of time without causing an electrical breakdown. This may provide a leakage current that limits the large scale electric field to values near the runaway threshold, especially in regions where the thunderstorm charging rate is low.

  17. Cascade L-shell soft x-ray emission as incident x-ray photons are tuned across 1s ionization threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Kochur, Andrei; Mueller, Matthias; Kolbe, Michael; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Mantler, Michael; Zarkadas, Charalambos; Andrianis, Miltiadis; Lagoyannis, Anastasios; Karydas, Andreas-Germanos

    2011-05-01

    The cascade L-shell x-ray emission as an incident polarized and unpolarized monochromatic radiation overpass the 1s ionization threshold is investigated for the metallic Fe by means of moderate resolution, quantitative x-ray spectrometry. A full ab initio theoretical investigation of the L-shell x-ray emission processes is performed based on a detailed straightforward construction of the cascade decay trees within the Pauli-Fock approximation. The agreement obtained between experiments and the presented theory is indicated and discussed with respect to the accuracy of advanced atomic models as well as its significance for the characterisation capabilities of X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis.

  18. Cascade L-shell soft-x-ray emission as incident x-ray photons are tuned across the 1s ionization threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokaras, D.; Kochur, A. G.; Müller, M.; Kolbe, M.; Beckhoff, B.; Mantler, M.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Andrianis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Karydas, A. G.

    2011-05-01

    The cascade L-shell x-ray emission as an incident polarized and unpolarized monochromatic radiation overpass the 1s ionization threshold is investigated for the metallic Fe by means of moderate resolution, quantitative x-ray spectrometry. A full ab initio theoretical investigation of the L-shell x-ray emission processes is performed based on a detailed straightforward construction of the cascade decay trees within the Pauli-Fock approximation. The agreement obtained between experiments and the presented theory is indicated and discussed with respect to the accuracy of advanced atomic models as well as its significance for the characterization capabilities of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis.

  19. Dynamic radiography using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Dike, S.; Lin, W.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2004-10-01

    We report a dynamic radiography system with a carbon nanotube based field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution as short as nanoseconds. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging are demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for noninvasive imaging in biomedical research and industrial inspection.

  20. Electronic Structure of In2O3 from Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, L.; DeMasi, A; Cho, S; Smith, K; Fuchs, F; Bechstedt, F; Korber, C; Klein, A; Payne, D; Egdell, R

    2009-01-01

    The valence and conduction band structures of In2O3 have been measured using a combination of valence band x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is noted between the experimental spectra and O 2p partial density of states calculated within hybrid density functional theory. Our data are consistent with a direct band gap for In2O3.

  1. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nazé, Yaël; Petit, Véronique; Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan; Cohen, David; Ud-Doula, Asif; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ∼60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres.

  2. Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis with distributed field emission x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, F.; Calderon, X.; Gidcumb, E.; Lu, J.; Qian, X.; Spronk, D.; Tucker, A.; Yang, G.; Zhou, O.

    2011-03-01

    Tomosynthesis requires projection images from different viewing angles. Using a distributed x-ray source this can be achieved without mechanical motion of the source with the potential for faster image acquisition speed. A distributed xray tube has been designed and manufactured specifically for breast tomosynthesis. The x-ray tube consists of 31 field emission x-ray sources with an angular range of 30°. The total dose is up to 100mAs with an energy range between 27 and 45 kVp. We discuss the source geometry and results from the characterization of the first prototype. The x-ray tube uses field emission cathodes based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) as electron source. Prior to the manufacturing of the sealed x-ray tube extensive testing on the field emission cathodes has been performed to verify the requirements for commercial tomosynthesis systems in terms of emission current, focal spot size and tube lifetime.

  3. Preface: X-ray emission from hot stars and their winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of highly sensitive X-ray observatories, X-ray astrophysics has become a versatile tool to study highly energetic processes in a wide variety of astrophysical contexts. Hot stars are no exception to this rule. Indeed, X-rays provide an important observational window for studies of such stars. Observations obtained with modern X-ray telescopes over the last decade and a half have revolutionized our understanding of hot stars and their winds. X-ray spectroscopy, time monitoring, and imaging allow us to probe stellar atmospheres, magnetospheres, stellar winds and give us new insight into their impact on the interstellar medium and the galactic ecology. While some questions about X-ray emission from massive stars have been answered, many unexpected findings point out that our picture of stellar winds is not yet complete. The new theories and models of X-ray emission from hot stars were developed in parallel or, sometimes, ahead of the arrival of the new data. This special issue is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge of X-ray emission from hot stars as well as at opening new avenues for investigation in anticipation of the next generation of X-ray telescopes.

  4. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    SciTech Connect

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Sikora, Marek; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bechtold, Jill; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  5. Removing Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charged Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, Brad

    2004-01-01

    Our research uses the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study X-ray emission from the charge exchange (CX) of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data help to fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center and Galactic Ridge, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Appreciation of the astrophysical relevance of our work continues to grow with the publication of roughly a dozen papers in the past four years describing Chandra and XMM observations of geocoronal and heliospheric CX emission, the temporal variation of such emission and correlation with X-ray emission enhancements observed by ROSAT, the theoretical spatial distribution of that emission, and CX emission around other stars. A similar number of papers were also published during that time describing CX emission from planets and comets. We expect that the launch of ASTRSE2, with its second-generation XRS microcalo- (with 6-eV resolution), will reveal even more clearly the contributions of CX to astrophysical emission. In our EBIT work we collected CX spectra from such ions as H-like and He-like Ne, Ar, and Fe. Our early measurements were made with a high-purity Ge detector, but during the second year we began operation of the first-generation XRS microcalorimeter (a twin of the XRS on ASTRO-E) and greatly improved the resolution of our measurements from roughly 150 eV (FWHM) with the Ge detectors to 10 eV with the XRS. We found that saturation of the XRS counting apparatus, which we described in our proposal as a potential concern, is not a problem for studying CX. During the course of our research, we expanded the number of injection gases permitted by the LLNL safety team, purchased and eventually operated an atomic H source, and clearly demonstrated the

  6. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    SciTech Connect

    López-Santiago, J.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  7. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ˜(0.002-0.2) L⊙ and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ˜(35-160) × 106 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  8. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-Ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A.; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ˜ 1.3-2.3 up to ˜50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (˜1023 cm-2), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ˜ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to LX ≳ 1038 erg s-1. Above ˜20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95-0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses MWD ˜ 0.9 M⊙. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95-0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745-290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  9. Observation of soft X-ray emission from the supernova remnant HB9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuohy, I. R.; Clark, D. H.; Garmire, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    The number of known X-ray emitting supernova remnants in our galaxy has significantly grown as a result of the soft X-ray survey by the HEAO-1 spacecraft. The HEAO-1 A-2 experiment has observed soft X-ray emission from the old supernova remnant HB9 which lies close to the previously identified X-ray source, Capella. Spectral data and the low optical obscuration in the direction of the remnant suggest that HB9 is a good candidate for detecting Fe XIV coronal forbidden-line emission. Mapping of the coronal line emission in association with the imaging X-ray data expected from HEAO-2 would allow the temperature profile of the emitting shell to be determined in a manner similar to that used by Tuohy, Nousek, and Garmire (1979) for the Cygnus Loop, which is in a similar evolutionary phase to HB9.

  10. The spatial distribution of 6 centimeter gyroresonance emission from a flaring X-ray loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Webb, D. F.; Davis, J. M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous high resolution soft X-ray, and 6-cm images of the decay phase of an M3 X-ray flare in Hale Region 16413 have been compared. The X-ray images were obtained with a sounding rocket flown on November 7, 1979 and the 6-cm observations were made with the VLA. A large loop system approximately 1.3 arc min in length, with an average temperature of about 8,000,000 K made up the X-ray flare structure. The peak 6-cm emission seemed to originate from a region below the X-ray loop, and its predicted flux due to thermal bremsstrahlung was approximately one order of magnitude less than observed. The expected gyroresonance absorption is examined through a loop geometry model, and it is found that thermal gyroresonance emission requiring large azimuthal or radial field components, or non-thermal gyrosynchrotron emission which involves continuous electron acceleration, may explain the observations.

  11. A Study of Nonthermal X-Ray and Radio Emission from the O Star 9 Sgr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Drake, Stephen A.

    1999-01-01

    The observed X-ray and highly variable nonthermal radio emission from OB stars has eluded explanation for more than 18 years. The most favorable model of X-ray production in these stars (shocks) predicts both nonthermal radio and X-ray emission. The nonthermal X-ray emission should occur above 2 keV and the variability of this X-ray component should also be comparable to the observed radio variability. To test this scenario, we proposed an ASC/VLA monitoring program to observe the OB star, 9 Sgr, a well known nonthermal, variable radio source and a strong X-ray source. We requested 625 ks ASCA observations with a temporal spacing of approximately 4 days which corresponds to the time required for a density disturbance to propagate to the 6 cm radio free-free photosphere. The X-ray observations were coordinated with 5 multi-wavelength VLA observations. These observations represent the first systematic attempt to investigate the relationship between the X-ray and radio emission in OB stars.

  12. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s-1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  13. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.; Holmström, M.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  14. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s‑1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  15. A NEW CORRELATION BETWEEN GRB X-RAY FLARES AND THE PROMPT EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Sonbas, E.; MacLachlan, G. A.; Shenoy, A.; Dhuga, K. S.; Parke, W. C.

    2013-04-20

    From a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi and Swift missions, we have extracted the minimum variability timescales for temporal structures in the light curves associated with the prompt emission and X-ray flares. A comparison of this variability timescale with pulse parameters such as rise times, determined via pulse-fitting procedures, and spectral lags, extracted via the cross-correlation function, indicates a tight correlation between these temporal features for both the X-ray flares and the prompt emission. These correlations suggest a common origin for the production of X-ray flares and the prompt emission in GRBs.

  16. A Comparison of X-Ray and Optical Emission in Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2014-07-01

    Broadband optical and narrowband Si XIII X-ray images of the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) obtained over several decades are used to investigate spatial and temporal emission correlations on both large and small angular scales. The data examined consist of optical and near-infrared ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope images taken between 1951 and 2011, and of X-ray images from Einstein, ROSAT, and Chandra taken between 1979 and 2013. We find weak spatial correlations between the remnant's X-ray and optical emission features on large scales, but several cases of good optical/X-ray correlations on small scales for features which have brightened due to recent interactions with the reverse shock. We also find instances (1) where a time delay is observed between the appearance of a feature's optical and X-ray emissions, (2) of displacements of several arcseconds between a feature's X-ray and optical emission peaks, and (3) of regions showing no corresponding X-ray or optical emissions. To explain this behavior, we propose a highly inhomogeneous density model for Cas A's ejecta consisting of small, dense optically emitting knots (n ~102-3 cm-3) and a much lower density (n ~0.1-1 cm-3) diffuse X-ray emitting component often spatially associated with optical emission knots. The X-ray emitting component is sometimes linked to optical clumps through shock-induced mass ablation generating trailing material leading to spatially offset X-ray/optical emissions. A range of ejecta densities can also explain the observed X-ray/optical time delays since the remnant's ≈5000 km s-1 reverse shock heats dense ejecta clumps to temperatures around 3 × 104 K relatively quickly, which then become optically bright while more diffuse ejecta become X-ray bright on longer timescales. Highly inhomogeneous ejecta as proposed here for Cas A may help explain some of the X-ray/optical emission features seen in other young core-collapse supernova remnants.

  17. A comparison of X-ray and optical emission in Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2014-07-10

    Broadband optical and narrowband Si XIII X-ray images of the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) obtained over several decades are used to investigate spatial and temporal emission correlations on both large and small angular scales. The data examined consist of optical and near-infrared ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope images taken between 1951 and 2011, and of X-ray images from Einstein, ROSAT, and Chandra taken between 1979 and 2013. We find weak spatial correlations between the remnant's X-ray and optical emission features on large scales, but several cases of good optical/X-ray correlations on small scales for features which have brightened due to recent interactions with the reverse shock. We also find instances (1) where a time delay is observed between the appearance of a feature's optical and X-ray emissions, (2) of displacements of several arcseconds between a feature's X-ray and optical emission peaks, and (3) of regions showing no corresponding X-ray or optical emissions. To explain this behavior, we propose a highly inhomogeneous density model for Cas A's ejecta consisting of small, dense optically emitting knots (n ∼10{sup 2-3} cm{sup –3}) and a much lower density (n ∼0.1-1 cm{sup –3}) diffuse X-ray emitting component often spatially associated with optical emission knots. The X-ray emitting component is sometimes linked to optical clumps through shock-induced mass ablation generating trailing material leading to spatially offset X-ray/optical emissions. A range of ejecta densities can also explain the observed X-ray/optical time delays since the remnant's ≈5000 km s{sup –1} reverse shock heats dense ejecta clumps to temperatures around 3 × 10{sup 4} K relatively quickly, which then become optically bright while more diffuse ejecta become X-ray bright on longer timescales. Highly inhomogeneous ejecta as proposed here for Cas A may help explain some of the X-ray/optical emission features seen in other young core

  18. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission Outside Vela X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W.; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3 deg x 2 deg, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma approximates 2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.

  19. Carbon nanotube based microfocus field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zejian; Yang Guang; Lee, Yueh Z.; Bordelon, David; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2006-09-04

    Microcomputed tomography is now widely used for in vivo small animal imaging for cancer studies. Achieving high imaging quality of live objects requires the x-ray source to have both high spatial and temporal resolutions. Preliminary studies have shown that carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source has significant intrinsic advantages over the conventional thermionic x-ray tube including better temporal resolution and programmability. Here we report the design and characterization of a CNT based field emission x-ray source that also affords a high spatial resolution. The device uses modified asymmetric Einzel lenses for electron focusing and an elliptical shaped CNT cathode patterned by photolithography. Stable and small isotropic x-ray focal spot sizes were obtained.

  20. X-Ray Emission from Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies and Lyman Break Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann; Ptak, A. F.; Salim, S.; Heckman, T. P.; Overzier, R.; Mallery, R.; Rich, M.; Strickland, D.; Grimes, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present results from an XMM mini-survey of GALEX-selected Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs) that appear to include an interesting subset that are analogs to the distant (3X-ray emission of LBGs appear to be broadly similar to that of galaxies in the local Universe, possibly indicating similarity in the production of accreting binaries over large evolutionary timescales in the Universe. We have detected luminous X-ray emission from one UVLG that permits basic X-ray spectroscopic analysis, and have direct X-ray constraints on a total of 6 UVLGs. We find evidence for likely large scatter in the assumed X-ray/star-formation rate relation for LBGs.

  1. X-ray emission from interacting wind massive binaries: A review of 15 years of progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, Gregor; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-09-01

    Previous generations of X-ray observatories revealed a group of massive binaries that were relatively bright X-ray emitters. This was attributed to emission of shock-heated plasma in the wind-wind interaction zone located between the stars. With the advent of the current generation of X-ray observatories, the phenomenon could be studied in much more detail. In this review, we highlight the progress that has been achieved in our understanding of the phenomenon over the last 15 years, both on theoretical and observational grounds. All these studies have paved the way for future investigations using the next generation of X-ray satellites that will provide crucial information on the X-ray emission formed in the innermost part of the wind-wind interaction.

  2. The coevolution of decimetric millisecond spikes and hard X-ray emission during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Guedel, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of a comprehensive data set of 27 solar flares with decimetric millisecond spikes between 1980 and 1989, simultaneously observed with the Zuerich radio spectrometers and the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer on the SMM spacecraft. Two contradictory relationships of the coevolution of hard X-ray and spiky radio emissions during flares are found: the temporal evolution of both emissions reveals a close functional dependence, but there is a substantial time delay between the two emissions. Five possible scenarios for the hard-X-ray-associated radio spike emission which may account for both their detailed coevolution and their substantial intervening time delay are discussed. All five scenarios are able to explain both the close coevolution of hard X-ray and radio emission as well as their mutual delay to some degree, but none of them can explain all observational aspects in a simple way.

  3. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X-rays

  4. Alpha Particle Induced X-ray Emission in the Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Jorge A.; Borunda, Mario F.; Morales, Jaime

    2003-08-26

    We report on an experimental demonstration in an introductory modern physics course to elucidate the X-ray line spectra, and how they arise from transitions of electrons to inner shells. We seek to determine the effect of limited use of an interactive component as a supplement to a traditional lecture, and how it would improve the student achievement. In this preliminary study the students were exposed to traditional lectures on X-ray production and Bohr's model, they then were given a homework on the abc of X-ray spectra, after which they were given a pre-test on the materials, followed by an in-class demonstration, and a final post-exam. The gain, as measured from pre- to post-exams appears to remark the differences in how students approached the subject before and after the use of the demonstration. This initial study shows the validity of in-class demonstrations as teaching tools and opens a wide new area of research in modern physics teaching.

  5. HI Emission in Nearby X-ray Detected Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Erin; Winter, L. M.; Zauderer, B.; Darling, J.; Koss, M.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured HI profiles in 96 nearby, active galaxies using the 100-meter Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Our sources contain active galactic nuclei (AGN) detected in the hard X-ray (14-195 keV) from Swift Gamma-ray Burst satellite’s Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) 22-month survey. This survey is unique because the sources were detected in the hard X-ray, allowing us to include galaxies that are otherwise obscured in other bands. The HI profiles we gathered are combined with the published optical, infrared, and X-ray data. We present the systemic velocities, outflow velocities, and cold gas mass in the sources. The mass of the cold gas is compared to the luminous mass in stars in order to find clues to unlock the nature of the host galaxies. A comparison of HI with the bolometric luminosity of the AGN is made. Our observations examine how the reservoir of cold gas is correlated with luminosity, as well. Through these data, we look for evolutionary differences in host galaxy types in order to understand how super massive black holes are fueled.

  6. X-RAY POLARIZATION FROM ACCRETING BLACK HOLES: CORONAL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.ed

    2010-04-01

    We present new calculations of X-ray polarization from accreting black holes (BHs), using a Monte Carlo ray-tracing code in full general relativity. In our model, an optically thick disk in the BH equatorial plane produces thermal seed photons with polarization oriented parallel to the disk surface. These seed photons are then inverse-Compton scattered through a hot (but thermal) corona, producing a hard X-ray power-law spectrum. We consider three different models for the corona geometry: a wedge 'sandwich' with aspect ratio H/R and vertically integrated optical depth tau{sub 0} constant throughout the disk; an inhomogeneous 'clumpy' corona with a finite number of hot clouds distributed randomly above the disk within a wedge geometry; and a spherical corona of uniform density, centered on the BH and surrounded by a truncated thermal disk with inner radius R{sub edge}. In all cases, we find a characteristic transition from horizontal polarization at low energies to vertical polarization above the thermal peak; the vertical direction is defined as the projection of the BH spin axis on the plane of the sky. We show how the details of the spectropolarization signal can be used to distinguish between these models and infer various properties of the corona and BH. Although the bulk of this paper focuses on stellar-mass BHs, we also consider the effects of coronal scattering on the X-ray polarization signal from supermassive BHs in active galactic nuclei.

  7. An XMM-Newton Survey of the Soft X-Ray Background. III. The Galactic Halo X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2013-08-01

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on ~4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22 × 106 K, interquartile range = 0.63 × 106 K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude (~(0.4-7) × 10-3 cm-6 pc and ~(0.5-7) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 deg-2, respectively, with median detections of 1.9 × 10-3 cm-6 pc and 1.5 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 deg-2, respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, and spatial distributions of the gas can be used to place constraints on models for the dominant heating sources of the halo. We provide some discussion of such heating sources, but defer comparisons between the observations and detailed models to a later paper.

  8. Deciphering the X-ray Emission of the Nearest Herbig Ae Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    In this research program, we obtained and analyzed an X-ray observation of the young nearby intermediate mass pre-main sequence star HD 104237 using the XMM-Newton space-based observatory. The observation was obtained on 17 Feb. 2002. This observation yielded high-quality X-ray images, spectra, and timing data which provided valuable information on the physical processes responsible for the X-ray emission. This star is a member of the group of so-called Herbig Ae/Be stars, which are young intermediate mass (approx. 2 - 4 solar masses) pre-main sequence (PMS) stars a few million years old that have not yet begun core hydrogen burning. The objective of the XMM-Newton observation was to obtain higher quality data than previously available in order to constrain possible X-ray emission mechanisms. The origin of the X-ray emission from Herbig Ae/Be stars is not yet known. These intermediate mass PMS stars lie on radiative tracks and are not expected to emit X-rays via solar-like magnetic processes, nor are their winds powerful enough to produce X-rays by radiative wind shocks as in more massive O-type stars. The emission could originate in unseen low-mass companions, or it may be intrinsic to the Herbig stars themselves if they still have primordial magnetic fields or can sustain magnetic activity via a nonsolar dynamo.

  9. Extended X-ray emission from a quasar-driven superbubble

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Sun, Ai-Lei; Pooley, David; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Comerford, Julia M.

    2014-06-10

    We present observations of extended, 20 kpc scale soft X-ray gas around a luminous obscured quasar hosted by an ultraluminous infrared galaxy caught in the midst of a major merger. The extended X-ray emission is well fit as a thermal gas with a temperature of kT ≈280 eV and a luminosity of L {sub X} ≈ 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} and is spatially coincident with a known ionized gas outflow. Based on the X-ray luminosity, a factor of ∼10 fainter than the [O III] emission, we conclude that the X-ray emission is either dominated by photoionization, or by shocked emission from cloud surfaces in a hot quasar-driven wind.

  10. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-01

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  11. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Progress made during the first year of the grant is described, as is work planned for the second year.

  12. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-01

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. PMID:12791989

  13. Soft X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Rui; Vilmer, Nicole; Brun, Allan Sacha

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in simulated kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. The magnetic flux-rope reconnects with the background flux after the triggering of the kink instability and is then allowed to relax to a lower energy state. Strong ohmic heating leads to strong and quick heating (up to more than 15 MK), to a strong peak of X-ray emission and to the hardening of the thermal X-ray spectrum. The emission pattern is often filamentary and the amount of twist deduced from the X-ray emission alone is considerably lower than the maximum twist in the simulated flux-ropes. The flux-rope plasma becomes strongly multi-thermal during the flaring episode. The emission measure evolves into a bi-modal distribution as a function of temperature during the saturation phase, and later converges to the power-law distribution mathrm{EM}~ T(-4.2) (during the relaxation/cooling) phase. These soft X-ray emission properties are maintained for a large range of coronal magnetic field strength, plasma density and flux-rope twist values.

  14. X-ray Imaging and preliminary studies of the X-ray self-emission from an innovative plasma-trap based on the Bernstein waves heating mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliri, C.; Romano, F. P.; Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Musumarra, A.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Neri, L.; Altana, C.

    2013-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are based on ECR heated plasmas emitting high fluxes of X-rays. Here we illustrate a pilot study of the X-ray emission from a compact plasma-trap in which an off-resonance microwave-plasma interaction has been attempted, highlighting a possible Bernstein-Waves based heating mechanism. EBWs-heating is obtained via the inner plasma EM-to-ES wave conversion and enables to reach densities much larger than the cut-off ones. At LNS-INFN, an innovative diagnostic technique based on the design of a Pinhole Camera (PHC) coupled to a CCD device for X-ray Imaging of the plasma (XRI) has been developed, in order to integrate X-ray traditional diagnostics (XRS). The complementary use of electrostatic probes measurements and X-ray diagnostics enabled us to gain knowledge about the high energy electrons density and temperature and about the spatial structure of the source. The combination of the experimental data with appropriate modeling of the plasma-source allowed to estimate the X-ray emission intensity in different energy domains (ranging from EUV up to Hard X-rays). The use of ECRIS as X-ray source for multidisciplinary applications, is now a concrete perspective due to the intense fluxes produced by the new plasma heating mechanism.

  15. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-ray Region 20 - 75 Angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EDIT-II, emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region were studied. Observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 Angstrom are presented to illustrate our work.

  16. X-Ray Emission in Non-AGN Galaxies at z &8771 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Suchetana; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Jeltema, Tesla; Myers, Adam D.; Aird, James; Bundy, Kevin; Conselice, Christopher; Cooper, Michael; Laird, Elise; Nandra, Kirpal; Willmer, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Using data from the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey and the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey we obtain stacked X-ray maps of galaxies at 0.7≤slant z≤slant 1.0 as a function of stellar mass. We compute the total X-ray counts of these galaxies and show that in the soft band (0.5-2 kev) there exists a significant correlation between galaxy X-ray counts and stellar mass at these redshifts. The best-fit relation between X-ray counts and stellar mass can be characterized by a power law with a slope of 0.58 ± 0.1. We do not find any correlation between stellar mass and X-ray luminosities in the hard (2-7 kev) and ultra-hard (4-7 kev) bands. The derived hardness ratios of our galaxies suggest that the X-ray emission is degenerate between two spectral models, namely point-like power-law emission and extended plasma emission in the interstellar medium. This is similar to what has been observed in low redshift galaxies. Using a simple spectral model where half of the emission comes from power-law sources and the other half from the extended hot halo we derive the X-ray luminosities of our galaxies. The soft X-ray luminosities of our galaxies lie in the range 1039-8× {{10}40} erg s-1. Dividing our galaxy sample by the criteria U-B\\gt 1, we find no evidence that our results for X-ray scaling relations depend on optical color.

  17. Generation Mechanisms UV and X-ray Emissions During SL9 Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to study the ultraviolet and X-ray emissions associated with the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. The University of Michigan task was primarily focused on theoretical calculations. The NAGW-4788 subtask was to be largely devoted to determining the constraints placed by the X-ray observations on the physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of the X-rays. Author summarized below the ROSAT observations and suggest a physical mechanism that can plausibly account for the observed emissions. It is hoped that the full set of activities can be completed at a later date. Further analysis of the ROSAT data acquired at the time of the impact was necessary to define the observational constraints on the magnetospheric-ionospheric processes involved in the excitation of the X-ray emissions associated with the fragment impacts. This analysis centered around improvements in the pointing accuracy and improvements in the timing information. Additional pointing information was made possible by the identification of the optical counterparts to the X-ray sources in the ROSAT field-of-view. Due to the large number of worldwide observers of the impacts, a serendipitous visible plate image from an observer in Venezuela provided a very accurate location of the present position of the X-ray source, virtually eliminating pointing errors in the data. Once refined, the pointing indicated that the two observed X-ray brightenings that were highly correlated in time with the K and P2 events were brightenings of the X-ray aurora (as identified in images prior to the impact).Appendix A "ROSAT observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter during the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9' also included.

  18. A Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf beamline.

    PubMed

    Kvashnina, Kristina O; Scheinost, Andreas C

    2016-05-01

    This paper gives a detailed description, including equations, of the Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer which has been recently installed and tested at the Rossendorf beamline (ROBL) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle of 1 m diameter. The hard X-ray emission spectrometer (∼3.5-25 keV) operates at atmospheric pressure and covers the Bragg angles of 65°-89°. The instrument has been tested at high and intermediate incident energies, i.e. at the Zr K-edge and at the Au L3-edge, in the second experimental hutch of ROBL. The spectrometer is dedicated for studying actinides in materials and environmental samples by high-energy-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. PMID:27140166

  19. A Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer at the Rossendorf beamline.

    PubMed

    Kvashnina, Kristina O; Scheinost, Andreas C

    2016-05-01

    This paper gives a detailed description, including equations, of the Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer which has been recently installed and tested at the Rossendorf beamline (ROBL) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The spectrometer consists of a single spherically bent crystal analyzer and an avalanche photodiode detector positioned on the vertical Rowland cycle of 1 m diameter. The hard X-ray emission spectrometer (∼3.5-25 keV) operates at atmospheric pressure and covers the Bragg angles of 65°-89°. The instrument has been tested at high and intermediate incident energies, i.e. at the Zr K-edge and at the Au L3-edge, in the second experimental hutch of ROBL. The spectrometer is dedicated for studying actinides in materials and environmental samples by high-energy-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies.

  20. Waiting in the Wings: Reflected X-ray Emission from the Homunculus Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Davidson, K.; Petre, R.; Hillier, D. J.; Smith, N.; Damineli, A.; Morse, J. A.; Walborn, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Homunculus Nebula which surrounds the supermassive star eta Carinae. The emission is characterized by a temperature in excess of 100 MK, and is consistent with scattering of the time-delayed X-ray flux associated with the star. The nebular emission is bright in the northwestern lobe and near the central regions of the Homunculus, and fainter in the southeastern lobe. We also report the detection of an unusually broad Fe K fluorescent line, which may indicate fluorescent scattering off the wind of a companion star or some other high velocity outflow. The X-ray Homunculus is the nearest member of the small class of Galactic X-ray reflection nebulae, and the only one in which both the emitting and reflecting sources are distinguishable.

  1. Recurrent X-ray Emission Variations of Eta Carinae and the Binary Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Corcoran, M. F.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Drake, S. A.; Damineki, A.; White, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that, the super-massive star eta Carinae may have a massive stellar companion (Damineli, Conti, and Lopes 1997), although the dense ejecta surrounding the star make this claim hard to test using conventional methods. Settling this question is critical for determining the current evolutionary state and future evolution of the star. We address this problem by an unconventional method: If eta Carinae is a binary, X-ray emission should be produced in shock waves generated by wind-wind collisions in the region between eta Carinae and its companion. Detailed X-ray monitoring of eta Carinae for more that) 2 years shows that the observed emission generally resembles colliding-wind X-ray emission, but with some significant discrepancies. Furthermore, periodic X-ray "flaring" may provide an additional clue to determine the presence of a companion star and for atmospheric pulsation in eta Carinae.

  2. Contour shape analysis of hollow ion x-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmej, F. B.; Angelo, P.; Aouad, Y.

    2008-10-22

    Hollow ion x-ray transitions originating from the configurations K{sup 0}L{sup N} have been studied via relativistic atomic structure and Stark broadening calculations. The broadening of the total contour is largely influenced by the oscillator strengths distribution over wavelengths rather than by Stark broadening alone. Interference effects between the upper and lower levels are shown to result in a considerable contour narrowing as well as in a shift of the total contour which could be either red or blue.

  3. Catalytic action of β source on x-ray emission from plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Sadiq, Mehboob; Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Waheed, A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of preionization around the insulator sleeve by a mesh-type β source (Ni6328) for the x-ray emission from a (2.3-3.9 kJ) plasma focus device is investigated. Quantrad Si p-i-n diodes along with suitable filters are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors and a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray emission in 4π geometry is measured as a function of argon and hydrogen gas filling pressures with and without β source at different charging voltages. It is found that the pressure range for the x-ray emission is broadened, x-ray emission is enhanced, and shot to shot reproducibility is improved with the β source. With argon, the CuKα emission is estimated to be 27.14 J with an efficiency of 0.7% for β source and 21.5 J with an efficiency of 0.55% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be about 68.90 J with an efficiency of 1.8% for β source and 54.58 J with an efficiency of 1.4% without β source. With hydrogen, CuKα emission is 11.82 J with an efficiency of 0.32% for β source and 10.07 J with an efficiency of 0.27% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be 30.20 J with an efficiency of 0.77% for β source and 25.58 J with an efficiency of 0.6% without β source. The x-ray emission with Pb insert at the anode tip without β source is also investigated and found to be reproducible and significantly high. The maximum x-ray yield is estimated to be 46.6 J in 4π geometry with an efficiency of 1.4% at 23 kV charging voltage. However, degradation of x-ray yield is observed when charging voltage exceeds 23 kV for Pb insert. From pinhole images it is observed that the x-ray emission due to the bombardment of electrons at the anode tip is dominant in both with and without β source.

  4. SphinX Measurements of the 2009 Solar Minimum X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bakała, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 × 1047 cm-3 and 1.1 × 1048 cm-3. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  5. A Study of the X-Ray Emission from Three Radio Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The subject grant is for work on a study of x-ray emission from isolated pulsars. The purpose of the study was to: determine whether the pulsars were x-ray sources; and, if so, search for evidence of pulsations at the known radio period; and study the nature of the x-ray emission. Observation of the pulsar PSR 0355+54 were obtained, and the analysis of these data is complete. These results were reported at the 183rd AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'X-Ray Emission from PSR 0355+54' which as published in the The Astrophysical Journal. Also obtained an approx. 3 ks PSPC observations of PSR 1642-03. A summary of the results from these data were reported in a Conference Proceedings for the 'New Horizon of X-ray Astronomy' symposium. In addition, as part of a study with a student from the SAO Summer Intern Program, I incorporated ROSAT archival data in an extended study of pulsar emission. These results were reported at the 185th AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'Soft X-ray Emission from Selected Isolated Pulsars' which was published in The Astrophysical Journal (Letters).

  6. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} cm{sup -3} and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} cm{sup -3}. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  7. Laboratory Measurements of Solar-Wind/Comet X-Ray Emission and Charge Exchange Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Cadez, I.; Greenwood, J. B.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The detection of X-rays from comets such as Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, d Arrest, and Linear as they approach the Sun has been unexpected and exciting. This phenomenon, moreover, should be quite general, occurring wherever a fast solar or stellar wind interacts with neutrals in a comet, a planetary atmosphere, or a circumstellar cloud. The process is, O(+8) + H2O --> O(+7*) + H2O(+), where the excited O(+7*) ions are the source of the X-ray emissions. Detailed modeling has been carried out of X-ray emissions in charge-transfer collisions of heavy solar-wind Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) and interstellar/interplanetary neutral clouds. In the interplanetary medium the solar wind ions, including protons, can charge exchange with interstellar H and He. This can give rise to a soft X-ray background that could be correlated with the long-term enhancements seen in the low-energy X-ray spectrum of ROSAT. Approximately 40% of the soft X-ray background detected by Exosat, ROSAT, Chandra, etc. is due to Charge Exchange (CXE): our whole heliosphere is glowing in the soft X-ray due to CXE.

  8. Charge Exchange-induced X-Ray Emission of Fe xxv and Fe xxvI via a Streamlined Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, P. D.; Cumbee, R. S.; Lyons, D.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-06-01

    Charge exchange (CX) is an important process for the modeling of X-ray spectra obtained by the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku X-ray observatories, as well as the anticipated Astro-H mission. The understanding of the observed X-ray spectra produced by many astrophysical environments is hindered by the current incompleteness of available atomic and molecular data—especially for CX. Here, we implement a streamlined program set that applies quantum defect methods and the Landau-Zener theory to generate total, n-resolved, and n{\\ell }S-resolved cross sections for any given projectile ion/target CX collision. By using these data in a cascade model for X-ray emission, theoretical spectra for such systems can be predicted. With these techniques, Fe25+ and Fe26+ CX collisions with H, He, H2, N2, H2O, and CO are studied for single-electron capture (SEC). These systems have been selected because they illustrate computational difficulties for high projectile charges. Furthermore, Fe xxv and Fe xxvi emission lines have been detected in the Galactic center and Galactic ridge. Theoretical X-ray spectra for these collision systems are compared to experimental data generated by an electron-beam ion trap study. Several ℓ-distribution models have been tested for Fe25+ and Fe26+ SEC. Such analyses suggests that commonly used ℓ-distribution models struggle to accurately reflect the true distribution of electron capture as understood by more advanced theoretical methods.

  9. Framed, 16-Image, Kirkpatrick-Baez Microscope for Laser-Plasma X-Ray Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F.J.; Oertel, J.A.; Walsh, P.J.

    2004-10-19

    A framed, 16-image Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) type x-ray microscope has been designed for use in imaging laser-plasma x-ray emission. The reflecting elements are 16 pairs of concave mirrors arranged to reflect and focus x rays emanating from a laser-produced plasma. The resolution of the elements is 3 mm at best focus and is better than 5 mm within a 500-mm diam region. A framing camera will be used in combination with the KB optic to produce 16 gated images over a typical interval of 1.5 ns. The system is designed for use on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser facility.

  10. All the X-ray binaries in the Universe: X-ray Emission from Normal and Starburst Galaxies Near and Far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann; Basu-Zych, Antara; Lehmer, Bret

    2015-08-01

    There has recently been quite a bit of excitement on the role of X-ray emission from galaxies in early heating of the IGM, demonstrating that understanding of X-ray emission from normal and starburst galaxies may have significant impact on structure formation in the Universe. The X-ray output from X-ray binaries and hot gas are both important and may rival the ionizing output of AGN at z>5, particularly for Hydrogen reionization. Here we present our research on constraining the X-ray SED of galaxies across cosmic time via several complementary approaches. In the very local universe (d <~ 30 Mpc including the Local Group) we are using NuSTAR to understand the accretion states and total output of black hole and neutron star binaries using the important lever arm of 0.5-30 keV emission. At intermediate distances (10-100 Mpc), we are comparing the X-ray output of galaxies with star formation histories and population synthesis model predictions using both Chandra and XMM data. In the slightly more distant universe (z~0.1-0.2) we can find rare analogs to primordial starbursts via wide-field optical/UV surveys that may be studied with Chandra. We will finish with a discussion of starburst galaxies emitting X-rays at z>4, which thanks to the extremely deep Chandra Deep Field-South 7 Ms survey, are better constrained than ever before. We discuss survey strategy and how the various pieces of the puzzle fit together regarding the X-ray output of galaxies and their X-ray binary populations over cosmic time. We discuss implications for next-generation missions and instruments, including those with wide-field survey capabilities and high throughput, especially the Athena mission.

  11. On the Thermal Line Emission from the Outflows in Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ya-Di; Cao, Xinwu

    2016-08-01

    The atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) may be associated with the outflow, which may provide a way to explore the physics of the ULXs. We construct a conical outflow model and calculate the thermal X-ray Fe emission lines from the outflows. Our results show that thermal line luminosity decreases with increasing outflow velocity and/or opening angle of the outflow for a fixed kinetic power of the outflows. Assuming the kinetic power of the outflows to be comparable with the accretion power in the ULXs, we find that the equivalent width can be several eV for the thermal X-ray Fe emission line from the outflows in the ULXs with stellar-mass black holes. The thermal line luminosity is proportional to 1/M bh (M bh is the black hole mass of the ULX). The equivalent width decreases with the black hole mass, which implies that the Fe line emission from the outflows can hardly be detected if the ULXs contain intermediate-mass black holes. Our results suggest that the thermal X-ray Fe line emission should be preferentially be detected in the ULXs with high kinetic power slowly moving outflows from the accretion disks surrounding stellar-mass black holes/neutron stars. The recently observed X-ray atomic features of the outflows in a ULX may imply that it contains a stellar-mass black hole.

  12. AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. III. THE GALACTIC HALO X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2013-08-20

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on {approx}4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K, interquartile range = 0.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude ({approx}(0.4-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup -6} pc and {approx}(0.5-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, respectively, with median detections of 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup -6} pc and 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, and spatial distributions of the gas can be used to place constraints on models for the dominant heating sources of the halo. We provide some discussion of such heating sources, but defer comparisons between the observations and detailed models to a later paper.

  13. Association between gradual hard X-ray emission and metric continua during large flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, L.; Pick, M.; Trottet, G.; Vilmer, N.; Anderson, K.; Kane, S.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray radiation is used to study coronal phenomena in conjunction with meter wave observations during some large solar flares. It is found that metric flare continua and moving type IV bursts are associated with gradual and long lasting (a few tens of minutes) microwave and hard X-ray emissions. The detailed temporal analysis reveals that although metric and hard X-ray sources are located at very different heights, both kinds of emission result from a common and continuous/repetitive injection of electrons in the corona. The late part of the metric event (stationary type IV burst) is only associated with soft X-ray radiation. This indicates that the mean energy of the radiating electrons is lower during stationary type IV bursts than during the earlier parts of the event.

  14. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES for time-resolved experiments. We discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique. PMID:26568779

  15. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy∕min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result. PMID:21691440

  16. Time-Resolved Imaging of Cryogenic Target X-Ray Emission at Peak Compression on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Michel, D. T.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-10-01

    This talk will describe the measurements of cryogenic target region size and time history inferred from the combination of a high-speed x-ray framing camera and two time-integrating x-ray microscopes. The high-speed framing camera infers the time of peak stagnation from pinhole images taken at 30-ps time intervals with 30-ps frame times and with ~15 μm resolution. The two Kirkpatrick-Baez-type x-ray microscopes have spatial resolutions of ~5 μm and ~7 μm respectively, and are currently time integrating. The inferred x-ray core size and emission time interval will be compared to the measured neutron emission time and to simulations of the experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. X-ray Spectroscopy of the most extreme Balmer-line disk-emission AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eracleous, Michael

    2005-10-01

    We propose to obtain simultaneous X-ray and UV observations of the most extreme AGN with double-peaked Balmer emission lines (FWHM > 19000km/s). We will use the XMM-Newton data to measure their X-ray spectral shapes and construct spectral energy distributions. We will combine these with measurements of the optical emission line profiles (from simultaneous HET observations) and luminosities to (a) test models for illumination of the outer disk by the central X-ray source, (b) test models for the structure of the inner accretion disk (radiatively inefficient accretion vs. standard disk), and (c) compare the X-ray-to-optical properties of these broadest Balmer-line objects to those of broad and narrow line AGN to test models for the origin of the low-ionization broad lines.

  18. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-23

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  19. Can Charge Exchange Explain Anomalous Soft X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this "anomalously" enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O8 +, O7 +, N7 +, N6 +, C6 +, and C5 + with H with an energy of 1 keV u-1 (438 km s-1). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O7 + + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  20. Feasibility tests of transmission x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy of wet samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Nelson, T.; Hansen, R.; Wallace, J.; Mercanti, D.; Capozi, M.; Baudat, P. A.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Tonner, B. P.

    2000-01-01

    We performed feasibility tests of photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy of wet samples in the water window (285-532 eV) soft x-ray spectral region. Water was successfully confined in an ultrahigh vacuum compatible compartment with x-ray transparent sides. This water cell was placed in the MEPHISTO spectromicroscope in a transmission geometry, and complete x-ray absorption spectra of the water window region were acquired. We also show micrographs of test samples, mounted outside of the compartment, and imaged through the water. This technique can be used to study liquid chemistry and, at least to the micron level, the microstructure of wet samples. Possibilities include cells in water or buffer, proteins in solution, oils of tribological interest, liquid crystals, and other samples not presently accessible to the powerful x-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy technique.

  1. XMM Observations of X-Ray Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Of the six proposed targets, only one observation was performed. The observation resulted in a 28ks observation of SN 1998S. At the time of writing the proposal, our target list only contained previously unknown X-ray supernovae. Between submission of the proposal and the actual observation, a Chandra DDT observation resulted in the detection of SN 1998S. Since SN 1998S was observed with Chandra five times before the XMM-Newton observation was made, the data did not yield enough new information to warrant a separate SN 1998S publication. The key science results of that observation were presented in a review article (by Immler and Lewin); the results were also presented at two conferences.

  2. Studies of x-ray emission properties of photoionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feilu; Han, Bo; Jin, Rui; Salzmann, David; Liang, Guiyun; Wei, Huigang; Zhong, Jiayong; Zhao, Gang; Li, Jia-ming

    2016-03-01

    In this paper three aspects of photoionized plasmas are discussed in both laboratory and astrophysical contexts. First, the importance of accurate atomic/ionic data for the analysis of photoionized plasmas is shown. Second, an overview of present computer codes for the analysis of photoionized plasmas is given. We introduce our computer model, radiative-collisional code based on the flexible atomic code (RCF), for calculations of the properties of such plasmas. RCF uses database generated by the flexible atomic code. Using RCF it is shown that incorporating the satellite lines from doubly excited Li-like ions into the He{}α triplet lines is necessary for reliable analysis of observational spectra from astrophysical objects. Finally, we introduce a proposal to generate photoionized plasmas by x-ray free electron laser, which may facilitate the simulation in lab of astrophysical plasmas in photoionization equilibrium.

  3. X-ray Emission from Pre-Main-Sequence Stars - Testing the Solar Analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2000-01-01

    This LTSA award funded my research on the origin of stellar X-ray emission and the validity of the solar-stellar analogy. This research broadly addresses the relevance of our current understanding of solar X-ray physics to the interpretation of X-ray emission from stars in general. During the past five years the emphasis has been on space-based X-ray observations of very young stars in star-forming regions (T Tauri stars and protostars), cool solar-like G stars, and evolved high-mass Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. These observations were carried out primarily with the ASCA and ROSAT space-based observatories (and most recently with Chandra), supplemented by ground-based observations. This research has focused on the identification of physical processes that are responsible for the high levels of X-ray emission seen in pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, active cool stars, and WR stars. A related issue is how the X-ray emission of such stars changes over time, both on short timescales of days to years and on evolutionary timescales of millions of years. In the case of the Sun it is known that magnetic fields play a key role in the production of X-rays by confining the coronal plasma in loop-like structures where it is heated to temperatures of several million K. The extent to which the magnetically-confined corona interpretation can be applied to other X-ray emitting stars is the key issue that drives the research summarized here.

  4. X-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, G. C.; Mathur, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Rao, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present a systematic X-ray study of eight active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intermediate-mass black holes (MBH ~ 8-95 × 104 M⊙) based on 12 XMM-Newton observations. The sample includes the two prototype AGNs in this class—NGC 4395 and POX 52 and six other AGNs discovered with the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. These AGNs show some of the strongest X-ray variability, with the normalized excess variances being the largest and the power density break timescales being the shortest observed among radio-quiet AGNs. The excess-variance-luminosity correlation appears to depend on both the BH mass and the Eddington luminosity ratio. The break timescale-black hole mass relations for AGN with IMBHs are consistent with that observed for massive AGNs. We find that the FWHM of the Hβ/Hα line is uncorrelated with the BH mass, but shows strong anticorrelation with the Eddington luminosity ratio. Four AGNs show clear evidence for soft X-ray excess emission (kTin ~ 150-200 eV). X-ray spectra of three other AGNs are consistent with the presence of the soft excess emission. NGC 4395 with lowest L/LEdd lacks the soft excess emission. Evidently small black mass is not the primary driver of strong soft X-ray excess emission from AGNs. The X-ray spectral properties and optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions of these AGNs are similar to those of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The observed X-ray/UV properties of AGNs with IMBHs are consistent with these AGNs being low-mass extensions of more massive AGNs, those with high Eddington luminosity ratio looking more like narrow-line Seyfert 1 s and those with low L/LEdd looking more like broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  5. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  6. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  7. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keY from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  8. Linking jet emission and X-ray properties in the peculiar neutron star X-ray binary Circinus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleri, Paolo; Tudose, Valeriu; Fender, Rob; van der Klis, Michiel; Jonker, Peter G.

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the peculiar Z-type neutron star X-ray binary Cir X-1, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite and the Australia Telescope Compact Array in 2000 October and 2002 December. We identify typical Z-source behaviour in the power density spectra as well as characteristic Z patterns drawn in an X-ray hardness-intensity diagram. Power spectra typical of bright atoll sources have also been identified at orbital phases after the periastron passage, while orbital phases before the periastron passage are characterized by power spectra that are typical neither of Z nor of atoll sources. We investigate the coupling between the X-ray and the radio properties, focusing on three orbital phases when an enhancement of the radio flux density has been detected, to test the link between the inflow (X-ray) and the outflow (radio jet) to/from the compact object. In two out of three cases, we associate the presence of the radio jet to a spectral transition in the X-rays, although the transition does not precede the radio flare, as detected in other Z sources. An analogous behaviour has recently been found in the black hole candidate GX 339-4. In the third case, the radio light curve shows a similar shape to the X-ray light curve. We discuss our results in the context of jet models, considering also black hole candidates.

  9. X-ray Scanner for ODP Leg 204: Drilling Gas Hydrates on Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry; Kneafsey, Tim; Pruess, Jacob; Reiter, Paul; Tomutsa, Liviu

    2002-08-08

    An x-ray scanner was designed and fabricated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide high speed acquisition of x-ray images of sediment cores collected on the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204: Drilling Gas Hydrates On Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin. This report discusses the design and fabrication of the instrument, detailing novel features that help reduce the weight and increase the portability of the instrument. Sample x-ray images are included. The x-ray scanner was transferred to scientific drilling vessel, the JOIDES Resolution, by the resupply ship Mauna Loa, out of Coos Bay, Oregon on July 25. ODP technicians were trained in the instruments operation. The availability of the x-ray scanner at the drilling site allows real-time imaging of cores containing methane hydrate immediately after retrieval. Thus, imaging experiments on cores can yield information on the distribution and quantity of methane hydrates. Performing these measurements at the location of core collection eliminates the need for high pressures or low temperature core handling while the cores are stored and transported to a remote imaging laboratory.

  10. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J; Bauer, Franz E; Krivonos, Roman A; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barrière, Nicolas M; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Wik, Daniel R; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-04-30

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10 kiloelectronvolts) emission in the inner 10 parsecs, however, have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution of previous instruments. Here we report the presence of a distinct hard-X-ray component within the central 4 × 8 parsecs, as revealed by subarcminute-resolution images in the 20-40 kiloelectronvolt range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle outflows interacting with the surrounding radiation field, dense molecular material or magnetic fields. However, all these interpretations pose significant challenges to our understanding of stellar evolution, binary formation, and cosmic-ray production in the Galactic Centre. PMID:25925477

  11. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J; Bauer, Franz E; Krivonos, Roman A; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barrière, Nicolas M; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Wik, Daniel R; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-04-30

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10 kiloelectronvolts) emission in the inner 10 parsecs, however, have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution of previous instruments. Here we report the presence of a distinct hard-X-ray component within the central 4 × 8 parsecs, as revealed by subarcminute-resolution images in the 20-40 kiloelectronvolt range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle outflows interacting with the surrounding radiation field, dense molecular material or magnetic fields. However, all these interpretations pose significant challenges to our understanding of stellar evolution, binary formation, and cosmic-ray production in the Galactic Centre.

  12. NuSTAR HARD X-RAY SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION. I. HARD X-RAY MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Canipe, Alicia M.; Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Christensen, Finn E.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; and others

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456–2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ∼ 1.3–2.3 up to ∼50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (∼10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ∼ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L{sub X} ≳ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. Above ∼20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95–0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M{sub WD} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95–0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745–290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  13. Recent Advances in Computational Studies of Charge Exchange X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2016-06-01

    Interest in astrophysical sources of charge exchange (CX) has grown since X-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was first observed, the origin of which is primarily due to CX processes between neutral species in the comet’s atmosphere and highly charged ions from the solar wind. More recent observations have shown that CX may have a significant contribution to the X-ray emission spectra of a wide variety of environments within our solar system including solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with neutral gases in the heliosphere and in planetary atmospheres, as well as beyond the solar system in galaxy clusters, supernova remnants, and star forming galaxies.While the basic process of CX has been studied for many decades, the reliability of the existing data is not uniform, and the coverage of the astrophysically important projectile and target combinations and collisional velocities is insufficient. The need for reliable and robust CX X-ray emission models will only be amplified with the with the high resolution X-ray spectra expected from the soft X-ray imaging calorimeter spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi X-ray observatory. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in theoretical CX cross sections and X-ray modeling with a focus on CX diagnostics. The need for experimental X-ray spectra and cross sections for benchmarking current theory will also be highlighted. This work was performed in collaboration with David Lyons, Patrick Mullen, David Schultz, Phillip Stancil, and Robin Shelton. Work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  14. A study of X-ray and infrared emissions from dusty nonradiative shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancura, Olaf; Raymond, John C.; Dwek, Eli; Blair, William P; Long, Knox S.; Foster, Scott

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed models that predict the dynamic evolution and infrared (IR) emission of grains behind nonradiative shock waves. We present a self-consistent treatment of the effect of grain destruction and heating on the ionization structure and X-ray emission of the postshock gas. Incorporating thermal sputtering, collisional heating, and deceleration of grains in the postshock flow, we predict the IR and X-ray fluxes from the dusty plasma as a function of swept-up column density. Heavy elements such as C, O, Mg, S, Si and Fe are initially depleted from the gas phase but are gradually returned as the grains are destroyed. The injected neutral atoms require some time to 'catch up' with the ionization state of the ambient gas. The nonequilibrium ionization state and gradient in elemental abundances in the postshock flow produces characteristic X-ray signatures that can be related to the age of the shock and amount of grain destruction. We study the effects of preshock density and shock velocity on the X-ray and IR emission from the shock. We show that the effects of graindestruction on the X-ray spectra of shock waves are substantial. In particular, temperatures derived from X-ray spectra of middle-aged remnants are likely to be overestimated by approximately 15% if cosmic abundances are assumed. Due to the long timescales for grain destruction in X-ray gases over a wide range of temperatures, we suggest that future X-ray spectra studies of supernova remnants be based on depleted abundances instead of cosmic abundances. Our model predictions agree reasonably well with IRAS and Einstein IPC observations of the Cygnus Loop.

  15. Infrared Line Emission from Molecular Gas Heated by X-Rays and Energetic Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    "I propose to carry out a detailed study using infrared observations (and in some cases, optical and ultraviolet observations) of dense interstellar gas exposed to intense fluxes of X-rays and/or energetic electrons. This is undoubtedly the dominant source of line emission for clouds exposed to X-rays from active galactic nuclei, supernova shocks, or embedded X-ray sources (e.g., X-ray binaries), or to high-temperature or relativistic electrons in galaxy clusters, near powerful radio sources, or supernova remnants. Detailed physical and chemical models of such clouds will be used to analyze infrared observations of the Great Annihilator X-ray source in the Galactic Center, cD galaxies in massive cooling flows, and the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies which will be obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), UV and optical observations of the Crab Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based near-infrared observations of Seyfert nuclei. Results from this work will also be of great relevance to observations obtained with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomical Satellite (SWAS). In the first year of funding of this proposal, my chief collaborators (D.J. Hollenbach and A.G.G.M. Tielens, both of NASA Ames Research Center) and I concentrated on completing our models of the physical conditions in, and the resulting line emission from, dense gas irradiated by X-rays. As noted in the original proposal, some important physical processes were not yet thoroughly incorporated into our models at the time of submission. We completed our modeling of the physical conditions and line emission for essentially the entire range of parameter space (five orders of magnitude in X-ray flux to gas density ratio) occupied by typical dense interstellar clouds in which the gas is mostly neutral and X-rays are important for the ionization, chemistry, and thermal balance.

  16. Prior Emission Model for X-ray Plateau Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo

    2009-01-01

    The two-component emission model to explain the plateau phase of the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is proposed. One component, which is responsible for the plateau and subsequent normal decay phase of the X-ray afterglow, is the prior emission via outflow ejected from the central engine before the main burst. The other is the main outflow, which causes the prompt GRB emission and the initial steep decay phase of the X-ray afterglow. In this model, the transition from the plateau to the subsequent normal decay phase is an artifact of the choice of the zero of time. For events with distinct plateau phase, the central engine is active 103-104 s before the launch of the main outflow. According to this model, a prior emission in the X-ray and/or optical bands 103-104 s before the prompt GRB emission is possibly seen, which will be tested by near-future instruments such as Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI), WIDe-field telescope for GRB Early Timing (WIDGET), and so on.

  17. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  18. Scale heights and equivalent widths of the iron K-shell lines in the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Hideki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the analysis of the X-ray spectra of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission (GDXE) in the Suzaku archive. The fluxes of the Fe I Kα (6.4 keV), Fe XXV Heα (6.7 keV), and Fe XXVI Lyα (6.97 keV) lines are separately determined. From the latitude distributions, we confirm that the GDXE is decomposed into the Galactic center (GCXE), the Galactic bulge (GBXE) and the Galactic ridge (GRXE) X-ray emissions. The scale heights (SHs) of the Fe XXV Heα line of the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE are determined to be ˜40, ˜310, and ˜140 pc, while those of the Fe I Kα line are ˜30, ˜160, and ˜70 pc, respectively. The mean equivalent widths (EWs) of the sum of the Fe XXV Heα and Fe XXVI Lyα lines are ˜750 eV, ˜600 eV, and ˜550 eV, while those of the Fe I Kα line are ˜150 eV, ˜60 eV, and ˜100 eV for the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE, respectively. The origin of the GBXE, GRXE, and GCXE is separately discussed based on the new results of the SHs and EWs, in comparison with those of the cataclysmic variables, active binaries and coronal active stars.

  19. Soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy study of the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithianandam, V. Jeyasingh; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1987-07-01

    Soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride samples of different compositions. The Si L23 x-ray emission spectra from these samples are presented and interpreted using a two-phase linear superposition model for the valence-band region. We assumed a model for the valence-band edge and for the emission in the gap region due to trap states and the Si 2p core exciton. The results obtained from these fits are compared with relevant models and other experiments.

  20. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE FU ORIONIS STAR V1735 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Guedel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.

    2009-05-01

    The variable star V1735 Cyg (=Elias 1-12) lies in the IC 5146 dark cloud and is a member of the class of FU Orionis objects whose dramatic optical brightenings are thought to be linked to episodic accretion. We report the first X-ray detections of V1735 Cyg and a deeply embedded class I protostar lying 24'' to its northeast. X-ray spectra obtained with EPIC on XMM-Newton reveal very high-temperature plasma (kT > 5 keV) in both objects, but no large flares. Such hard X-ray emission is not anticipated from accretion shocks and is a signature of magnetic processes. We place these new results into the context of what is presently known about the X-ray properties of FU Orionis stars and other accreting young stellar objects.

  1. Framed, 16-image, Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope for laser-plasma x-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F.J.; Oertel, J.A.; Walsh, P.J.

    2004-10-01

    A framed, 16-image, Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB)-type x-ray microscope has been designed for use in imaging laser-plasma x-ray emission. The reflecting elements are 16 pairs of concave mirrors arranged to reflect and focus x rays emanating from a laser-produced plasma. The resolution of the elements is 3 {mu}m at best focus and is better than 5 {mu}m within a 400-{mu}m-diam region. A framing camera will be used in combination with the KB optic to produce 16 gated x-ray images in the energy range from 1.5 to 7 keV over a typical interval of 1.5 ns. This system is designed for use on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  2. Specific features of thermocouple calorimeter application for measurements of pulsed X-ray emission from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V. V.; Fasakhov, I. K.

    2012-01-15

    It is shown that the accuracy of time-integrated measurements of pulsed X-ray emission from hot plasma with calibrated thermocouple calorimeters is mainly determined by two factors. The first and the most important factor is heating of the filter by the absorbed X-rays; as a result, the calorimeter measures the thermal radiation of the filter, which causes appreciable distortion of the temporal profile and amplitude of the recorded signal. The second factor is the dependence of the effective depth of X-ray absorption in the dielectric that covers the entrance window of the calorimeter on the energy of X-ray photons, i.e., on the recorded radiation spectrum. The results of model calculations of the calorimeter signal are compared with the experimental data.

  3. X-ray emission from the supernova remnant G287.8-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The GSFC Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment on OSO-8 observed a weak galactic X-ray source near theta 2 at 288 deg, b2 at -1 deg. The spectrum for this source between 2-20 keV is well represented by a thermal spectrum of kT = 7.34(+3.6), sub -2.6 keV with an intense iron emission line centered at 6.5 + or - .2 keV. The error box of the Uhuru source 4U1043-59, the only known X-ray source in our field of view, contains the radio supernova remnant G287.8-0.5. The possible association of the X-ray source with this supernova remnant is discussed.

  4. Ultrafast secondary emission X-ray imaging detectors: A possible application to TRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkerman, A.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Elkind, V.; Gibrekhterman, A.; Majewski, S.

    1992-05-01

    Fist high accuracy, X-ray imaging at high photon flux can be achieved when coupling thin solid convertors to gaseous electron multipliers, operating at low gas pressures. Secondary electrons emitted from the convertor foil are multiplied in several successive amplification elements. The obvious advantages of solid X-ray convertors, as compared to gaseous conversion, are the production of parallax-free images and the fast (subnanosecond) response. These X-ray detectors have many potential applications in basic and applied research. Of particular interest is the possibility of an efficient and ultrafast high resolution imaging of transition radiation (TR), with a reduced d E/d x background. We present experimental results on the operation of secondary emission X-ray (SEX) detectors, their detection efficiency, localization and time resolution. The experimental work is accompanied by mathematical modelling and computer simulation of transition radiation detectors (TRDs) based on CsI TR convertors.

  5. Interrelation of soft and hard X-ray emissions during solar flares. I - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Zarro, D. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Lemen, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The interrelation between the acceleration and heating of electrons and ions during impulsive solar flares is determined on the basis of simulataneous observations of hard and soft X-ray emission from the Solar Maximum Mission at high time resolution (6 s). For all the flares, the hard X-rays are found to have a power-law spectrum which breaks down during the rise phase and beginning of the decay phase. After that, the spectrum changes to either a single power law or a power law that breaks up at high energies. The characteristics of the soft X-ray are found to depend on the flare position. It is suggested that small-scale quasi-static electric fields are important for determining the acceleration of the X-ray-producing electrons and the outflowing chromospheric ions.

  6. Study of X-ray emission from plasma focus device using vacuum photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, N.; Borthakur, T. K.; Neog, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    A newly fabricated vacuum photodiode (VPD) is used to measure time resolved X-ray emission and electron temperature from plasma focus device operated in hydrogen medium. The VPD signals are compared with the PIN diode signal and observed to be of similar in nature. The acquired signals from VPD are deduced to measure electron temperature and X-ray radiated power for four different anode tips (cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging). The electron temperatures are found to be 0.64, 1.5, 0.60 and 0.55 keV for cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips respectively in hydrogen plasma. The X-ray radiated powers are observed to be varying with respect to the shape of the anode tips and it is found highest in case of converging tip and lowest for the diverging one. Results indicate that VPD could efficiently be employed as an X-ray diagnostics in plasma focus device.

  7. Numerical Simulations of a Prompt Hard X-ray Emission During its Bright Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, Ekaterina V.; Revnivtsev, M.; Lutovinov, A.

    2007-08-01

    We present a simple numerical model of the X-ray emission of the system XTE J0421+560/CI Cam during its bright outburst on 31 March 1998. Basing on the spectral and timing behavior of the object we argue that this outburst is a prompt X-ray/hard X-ray emission of a classical nova-type explosion (thermonuclear runaway on the surface of the white dwarf) unlike many other outbursts of X-ray binary systems. The thermonuclear runaway on the surface of the white dwarf leads to the formation of fast ejecta which moves through the dense stellar wind of the optical companion (B giant). Shock waves, which are formed in the material of the wind and that of the ejecta heats the matter up to X-ray temperatures. We use the spherically symmetric Lagrangian hydro- simulation to follow the evolution of the explosion. Up to now we have extensively simulated early phases of the outburst and showed that using of physically motivated simulations one can put constrains on the velocity of the ejecta and the stellar companion mass loss rate. In order to follow X-ray evolution throughout the whole outburst we develop a fully adaptive code.

  8. Time Variabilities of Solar Wind Ion Fluxes and of X-ray and EUV Emissions from Comet Hyakutake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Cravens, T.; Lisse, C.; Ipavich, F.; von Steiger, R.; Shah, P.; Armstrong, T.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emissions from comet C/Hyakutake 1996 B2 made by the Rontgen X-ray satellite (ROSAT) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) revealed a total X-ray luminosity of about 500 MW.

  9. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  10. A HARD AND VARIABLE X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE MASSIVE EMISSION-LINE STAR HD 157832

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Motch, C.

    2011-04-10

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of a hard-thermal (T {approx} 130 MK) and variable X-ray emission from the Be star HD 157832, a new member of the puzzling class of {gamma}-Cas-like Be/X-ray systems. Recent optical spectroscopy reveals the presence of a large/dense circumstellar disk seen at intermediate/high inclination. With a B1.5V spectral type, HD 157832 is the coolest {gamma}-Cas analog known. In addition, its non-detection in the ROSAT all-sky survey shows that its average soft X-ray luminosity varied by a factor larger than {approx}3 over a time interval of 14 yr. These two remarkable features, 'low' effective temperature, and likely high X-ray variability turn HD 157832 into a promising object for understanding the origin of the unusually high-temperature X-ray emission in these systems.

  11. Discovery of Diffuse Hard X-ray Emission associated with Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Uchiyama, Y.; Negoro, H.

    2009-12-01

    Our discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter is reported. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations revealed several types of X-rays in the vicinity of Jupiter such as auroral and disk emission from Jupiter and faint diffuse X-rays from the Io Plasma Torus (see Bhardwaj et al. 2007 for review). To investigate possible diffuse hard X-ray emission around Jupiter with the highest sensitivity, we conducted data analysis of Suzaku XIS observations of Jupiter on Feb 2006. After removing satellite and planetary orbital motions, we detected a significant diffuse X-ray emission extending to ~6 x 3 arcmin with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of ~3e15 erg/s. The emitting region very well coincided with the Jupiter's radiation belts. The 1-5 keV X-ray spectrum was represented by a simple power law model with a photon index of 1.4. Such a flat continuum strongly suggests non-thermal origin. Although such an emission can be originated from multiple background point sources, its possibility is quite low. We hence examined three mechanisms, assuming that the emission is truly diffuse: bremsstrahlung by keV electrons, synchrotron emission by TeV electrons, and inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by MeV electrons. The former two can be rejected because of the X-ray spectral shape and implausible existence of TeV electrons around Jupiter, respectively. The last possibility was found to be possible because tens MeV electrons, which have been confirmed in inner radiation belts (Bolton et al. 2002), can kick solar photons to the keV energy range and provide a simple power-law continuum. We estimated an average electron density from the X-ray luminosity assuming the oblate spheroid shaped emitting region with 8 x 8 x 4 Jovian radii. The necessary density was 0.02 1/cm3 for 50 MeV electrons. Hence, our results may suggest a new particle acceleration phenomenon around Jupiter.

  12. RT Crucis: a look into the X-ray emission of a peculiar symbiotic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducci, L.; Doroshenko, V.; Suleimanov, V.; Nikołajuk, M.; Santangelo, A.; Ferrigno, C.

    2016-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are a heterogeneous class of interacting binaries. Among them, RT Cru has been classified as prototype of a subclass that is characterised by hard X-ray spectra that extend past ~20 keV. We analyse ~8.6 Ms of archival INTEGRAL data collected during the period 2003-2014, ~ 140 ks of Swift/XRT data, and a Suzaku observation of 39 ks, to study the spectral X-ray emission and investigate the nature of the compact object. Based on the 2MASS photometry, we estimate the distance to the source of 1.2-2.4 kpc. The X-ray spectrum obtained with Swift/XRT, JEM-X, IBIS/ISGRI, and Suzaku data is well fitted by a cooling flow model modified by an absorber that fully covers the source and two partially covering absorbers. Assuming that the hard X-ray emission of RT Cru originates from an optically thin boundary layer around a non-magnetic white dwarf, we estimated a mass of the white dwarf of MWD ≈ 1.2M⊙. The mass accretion rate obtained for this source might be too high for the optically thin boundary layer scenario. Therefore we investigate other plausible scenarios to model its hard X-ray emission. We show that, alternatively, the observed X-ray spectrum can be explained with the X-ray emission from the post-shock region above the polar caps of a magnetised white dwarf with mass MWD ≈ 0.9-1.1M⊙.

  13. CHANDRA REVEALS VARIABLE MULTI-COMPONENT X-RAY EMISSION FROM FU ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Guedel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.; Lamzin, Sergei A.

    2010-10-20

    FU Orionis is the prototype of a class of eruptive young stars ('FUors') characterized by strong optical outbursts. We recently completed an exploratory survey of FUors using XMM-Newton to determine their X-ray properties, about which little was previously known. The prototype FU Ori and V1735 Cyg were detected. The X-ray spectrum of FU Ori was found to be unusual, consisting of a cool moderately absorbed component plus a hotter component viewed through an absorption column density that is an order of magnitude higher. We present here a sensitive (99 ks) follow-up X-ray observation of FU Ori obtained at higher angular resolution with Chandra ACIS-S. The unusual multi-component spectrum is confirmed. The hot component is centered on FU Ori and dominates the emission above 2 keV. It is variable (a signature of magnetic activity) and is probably coronal emission originating close to FU Ori's surface viewed through cool gas in FU Ori's strong wind or accretion stream. In contrast, the X-ray centroid of the soft emission below 2 keV is offset 0.''20 to the southeast of FU Ori, toward the near-IR companion (FU Ori S). This offset amounts to slightly less than half the separation between the two stars. The most likely explanation for the offset is that the companion contributes significantly to the softer X-ray emission below 2 keV (and weakly above 2 keV). The superimposed X-ray contributions from FU Ori and the companion resolve the paradox posed by XMM-Newton of an apparently single X-ray source viewed through two different absorption columns.

  14. Chandra Reveals Variable Multi-component X-ray Emission From FU Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R.; Lamzin, Sergei A.

    2010-10-01

    FU Orionis is the prototype of a class of eruptive young stars ("FUors") characterized by strong optical outbursts. We recently completed an exploratory survey of FUors using XMM-Newton to determine their X-ray properties, about which little was previously known. The prototype FU Ori and V1735 Cyg were detected. The X-ray spectrum of FU Ori was found to be unusual, consisting of a cool moderately absorbed component plus a hotter component viewed through an absorption column density that is an order of magnitude higher. We present here a sensitive (99 ks) follow-up X-ray observation of FU Ori obtained at higher angular resolution with Chandra ACIS-S. The unusual multi-component spectrum is confirmed. The hot component is centered on FU Ori and dominates the emission above 2 keV. It is variable (a signature of magnetic activity) and is probably coronal emission originating close to FU Ori's surface viewed through cool gas in FU Ori's strong wind or accretion stream. In contrast, the X-ray centroid of the soft emission below 2 keV is offset 0farcs20 to the southeast of FU Ori, toward the near-IR companion (FU Ori S). This offset amounts to slightly less than half the separation between the two stars. The most likely explanation for the offset is that the companion contributes significantly to the softer X-ray emission below 2 keV (and weakly above 2 keV). The superimposed X-ray contributions from FU Ori and the companion resolve the paradox posed by XMM-Newton of an apparently single X-ray source viewed through two different absorption columns.

  15. Observation and modeling of geocoronal charge exchange X-ray emission during solar wind gusts

    SciTech Connect

    Wargelin, B. J.; Kornbleuth, M.; Juda, M.; Martin, P. L.

    2014-11-20

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O{sup 7{sup +}} collide with neutral gas, including the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere (exosphere or geocorona) and hydrogen and helium from the local interstellar medium drifting through the heliosphere. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises a significant and varying fraction of the soft X-ray background (SXRB) and is seen in every X-ray observation, with the intensity dependent on solar wind conditions and observation geometry. Under the right conditions, geocoronal emission can increase the apparent SXRB by roughly an order of magnitude for an hour or more. In this work, we study a dozen occasions when the near-Earth solar wind flux was exceptionally high. These gusts of wind lead to abrupt changes in SWCX X-ray emission around Earth, which may or may not be seen by X-ray observatories depending on their line of sight. Using detailed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the solar wind's interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere, and element abundances and ionization states measured by ACE, we model the time-dependent brightness of major geocoronal SWCX emission lines during those gusts and compare with changes in the X-ray background measured by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find reasonably good agreement between model and observation, with measured geocoronal line brightnesses averaged over 1 hr of up to 136 photons s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1} in the O VII Kα triplet around 564 eV.

  16. Low- to Middle-Latitude X-Ray Emission from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Cravens, Thomas E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observed Jupiter during the period 24-26 February 2003 for approx. 40 hours (4 Jupiter rotations), using both the spectroscopy array of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) and the imaging array of the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I). Two ACIS-S exposures, each -8.5 hours long, were separated by an HRC-I exposure of approx. 20 hours. The low- to middle-latitude nonauroral disk X-ray emission is much more spatially uniform than the auroral emission. However, the low- to middle-latitude X-ray count rate shows a small but statistically significant hour angle dependence and depends on surface magnetic field strength. In addition, the X-ray spectra from regions corresponding to 3-5 gauss and 5-7 gauss surface fields show significant differences in the energy band 1.26-1.38 keV, perhaps partly due to line emission occurring in the 3-5 gauss region but not the 5-7 gauss region. A similar correlation of surface magnetic field strength with count rate is found for the 18 December 2000 HRC-I data, at a time when solar activity was high. The low- to middle-latitude disk X-ray count rate observed by the HRC-I in the February 2003 observation is about 50% of that observed in December 2000, roughly consistent with a decrease in the solar activity index (F10.7 cm flux) by a similar amount over the same time period. The low- to middle-latitude X-ray emission does not show any oscillations similar to the approx. 45 min oscillations sometimes seen from the northern auroral zone. The temporal variation in Jupiter's nonauroral X-ray emission exhibits similarities to variations in solar X-ray flux observed by GOES and TIMED/SEE. The two ACIS-S 0.3-2.0 keV low- to middle-latitude X-ray spectra are harder than the auroral spectrum and are different from each other at energies above 0.7 keV, showing variability in Jupiter's nonauroral X-ray emission on a timescale of a day. The 0.3-2.0 keV X-ray power emitted at low to middle latitudes is 0

  17. X-RAY EMISSION FROM SN 2004dj: A TALE OF TWO SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Smith, Randall; Chandra, Poonam; Pooley, David

    2012-12-20

    Type IIP (Plateau) supernovae are the most commonly observed variety of core-collapse events. They have been detected in a wide range of wavelengths from radio, through optical to X-rays. The standard picture of a Type IIP supernova has the blastwave interacting with the progenitor's circumstellar matter to produce a hot region bounded by a forward and a reverse shock. This region is thought to be responsible for most of the X-ray and radio emission from these objects. Yet the origin of X-rays from these supernovae is not well understood quantitatively. The relative contributions of particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification in generating the X-ray and radio emission need to be determined. In this work, we analyze archival Chandra observations of SN 2004dj, one of the nearest supernovae since SN 1987A, along with published radio and optical information. We determine the pre-explosion mass-loss rate, blastwave velocity, electron acceleration, and magnetic field amplification efficiencies. We find that a greater fraction of the thermal energy goes into accelerating electrons than into amplifying magnetic fields. We conclude that the X-ray emission arises out of a combination of inverse Compton scattering by non-thermal electrons accelerated in the forward shock and thermal emission from supernova ejecta heated by the reverse shock.

  18. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struminsky, A.; Gan, W.

    2015-08-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV γ-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these γ-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and π0-decay γ-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X- ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard y-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and subsequently trapped by some magnetic structure. In-situ energetic particle measurements by GOES and STEREO (High Energy Telescope, HET) shows that five of these y-events were not accompanied by SEP events at 1 AU, even when multi-point measurements including STEREO are taken into account. Therefore accelerated protons are not always released into the heliosphere. A longer delay between the maximum temperature and the maximum emission measure characterises flares with prolonged high energy γ-emission and solar proton events.

  19. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  20. Soft X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Vilmer, N.; Brun, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink-unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy that can be released impulsively and may account for the heating of the plasma in flares. Aims: We investigate the temporal, spectral, and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal continuum X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to solar flare observations. Methods: We computed the temporal evolution of the thermal X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops based on a series of magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations. The numerical setup consisted of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, computed the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) without accounting for mass exchange with the chromosphere. We then deduced the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. Results: During the initial (linear) phase of the instability, plasma heating is mostly adiabatic (as a result of compression). Ohmic diffusion takes over as the instability saturates, leading to strong and impulsive heating (up to more than 20 MK), to a quick enhancement of X-ray emission, and to the hardening of the thermal X-ray spectrum. The temperature distribution of the plasma becomes broad, with the emission measure depending strongly on temperature. Significant emission measures arise for plasma at temperatures higher than 9 MK. The magnetic flux-rope then relaxes progressively towards a lower energy state as it reconnects with the background flux. The loop plasma suffers smaller sporadic heating events, but cools down globally by thermal conduction. The total thermal X-ray emission slowly fades away during this phase, and the high

  1. Is NGC 3199 the Third Wolf-Rayet Nebula with Diffuse X-ray emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toala, J. a.

    2013-10-01

    X-ray emission from Wolf-Rayet (WR) nebulae is thought to be produced by the powerful winds from their central stars slamming into the circumstellar medium. Only 4 WR nebulae have been observed with the latest generation of X-ray satellites: S 308 (WR6), RCW58 (WR40), NGC6888 (WR136), and the nebula of WR16, but only S 308 and NGC6888 have been detected. ROSAT observations toward the WR nebula NGC3199 hinted at the presence of soft X-ray emission associated with this nebula, but the low angular resolution does not allow us to disentangle the different contributions to this emission. We request a 40 ks XMM-Newton EPIC-pn observation to help us study the distribution of the diffuse hot gas within the WR nebula NGC3199 around WR18.

  2. HARD X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION DURING THE 2011 JUNE 7 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, A. R.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between X-ray and UV emission during flares, particularly in the context of quasi-periodic pulsations, remains unclear. To address this, we study the impulsive X-ray and UV emission during an eruptive flare on 2011 June 7 utilizing X-ray imaging from RHESSI and UV 1700 Å imaging from SDO/AIA. This event is associated with quasi-periodic pulsations in X-ray and possibly UV emission, as well as substantial parallel and perpendicular motion in the hard X-ray footpoints. The motion of the footpoints parallel to the flare ribbons is unusual; it reverses direction on at least two occasions. However, there is no associated short timescale motion of the UV bright regions. Over the same time interval, the footpoints also gradually move apart at v ≈ 12 km s{sup –1}, consistent with the gradual outward expansion of the UV ribbons and the standard flare model. Additionally, we find that the locations of the brightest X-ray and UV regions are different, particularly during the early portion of the flare impulsive phase, despite their integrated emission being strongly correlated in time. Correlation analysis of measured flare properties, such as the footpoint separation, flare shear, photospheric magnetic field, and coronal reconnection rate, reveals that—in the impulsive phase—the 25-50 keV hard X-ray flux is only weakly correlated with these properties, in contrast with previous studies. We characterize this event in terms of long-term behavior, where the X-ray non-thermal, thermal, and UV emission sources appear temporally and spatially consistent, and short-term behavior, where the emission sources are inconsistent and quasi-periodic pulsations are a dominant feature requiring explanation. We suggest that the short timescale behavior of hard X-ray footpoints and the nature of the observed quasi-periodic pulsations are determined by fundamental, as yet unobserved properties of the reconnection region and particle acceleration sites. This presents a

  3. Search of X-ray emission from roAp stars: the case of γ Equulei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, B.; Hummel, C. A.; Schöller, M.; Hubrig, S.; Cowley, C.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars represent a subclass of magnetic, chemically peculiar stars. The explanation for their pulsations includes suppressed convection due to the strong magnetic field. These stars rotate slowly such that a solar-like dynamo and ensuing magnetic activity is unlikely to be present. On the other hand, magnetic activity could provide the particle acceleration suspected to be responsible for the presence of short-lived radionuclides on some roAp stars. Aims: The detection of X-ray emission from Ap stars can be an indicator for the presence of magnetic activity and dynamo action, provided different origins for the emission, such as wind shocks and close late-type companions, can be excluded. Here we report on results for γ Equ, the only roAp star for which an X-ray detection is reported in ROSAT catalogs. Methods: We use high resolution imaging in X-rays with Chandra and in the near-infrared with NACO/VLT that allow us to spatially resolve companions down to ≤ 1'' and ~0.06'' separations, respectively. Results: The bulk of the X-ray emission is associated with a companion of γ Equ identified in our NACO image. Assuming coevality with the primary roAp star (~900 Myr), the available photometry for the companion points at a K-type star with ~0.6 M⊙. Its X-ray properties are in agreement with the predictions for its age and mass. An excess of photons with respect to the expected background and contribution from the nearby companion is observed near the optical position of γ Equ. We estimate an X-ray luminosity of log Lx [erg/s] = 26.6 and log (Lx/Lbol) = -7.9 for this emission. A small offset between the optical and the X-ray image leaves some doubt on its association with the roAp star. Conclusions: The faint X-ray emission that we tentatively ascribe to the roAp star is difficult to explain as a solar-like stellar corona due to its very low Lx/Lbol level and the very long rotation period of γ Equ. It could be produced in

  4. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, Sebastian; Harris, D.E.; Marshall, H.L.; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  5. REBIRTH OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BORN-AGAIN PLANETARY NEBULA A30

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, M. A.; Ruiz, N.; Toala, J. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Schoenberner, D.; Steffen, M.; Blair, W. P.

    2012-08-20

    The planetary nebula A30 is believed to have undergone a very late thermal pulse resulting in the ejection of knots of hydrogen-poor material. Using multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope images, we have detected the angular expansion of these knots and derived an age of 850{sup +280}{sub -150} yr. To investigate the spectral and spatial properties of the soft X-ray emission detected by ROSAT, we have obtained Chandra and XMM-Newton deep observations of A30. The X-ray emission from A30 can be separated into two components: a point source at the central star and diffuse emission associated with the hydrogen-poor knots and the cloverleaf structure inside the nebular shell. To help us assess the role of the current stellar wind in powering this X-ray emission, we have determined the stellar parameters and wind properties of the central star of A30 using a non-LTE model fit to its optical and UV spectra. The spatial distribution and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission are highly suggestive that it is generated by the post-born-again and present fast stellar winds interacting with the hydrogen-poor ejecta of the born-again event. This emission can be attributed to shock-heated plasma, as the hydrogen-poor knots are ablated by the stellar winds, under which circumstances the efficient mass loading of the present fast stellar wind raises its density and damps its velocity to produce the observed diffuse soft X-rays. Charge transfer reactions between the ions of the stellar winds and material of the born-again ejecta have also been considered as a possible mechanism for the production of diffuse X-ray emission, and upper limits on the expected X-ray production by this mechanism have been derived. The origin of the X-ray emission from the central star of A30 is puzzling: shocks in the present fast stellar wind and photospheric emission can be ruled out, while the development of a new, compact hot bubble confining the fast stellar wind seems implausible.

  6. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Benz, A. O.; Christe, S.; Fárník, F.; Kundu, M. R.; Mann, G.; Ning, Z.; Raulin, J.-P.; Silva-Válio, A. V. R.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Vilmer, N.; Warmuth, A.

    2011-09-01

    This review discusses the complementary relationship between radio and hard X-ray observations of the Sun using primarily results from the era of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite. A primary focus of joint radio and hard X-ray studies of solar flares uses observations of nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission at radio wavelengths and bremsstrahlung hard X-rays to study the properties of electrons accelerated in the main flare site, since it is well established that these two emissions show very similar temporal behavior. A quantitative prescription is given for comparing the electron energy distributions derived separately from the two wavelength ranges: this is an important application with the potential for measuring the magnetic field strength in the flaring region, and reveals significant differences between the electrons in different energy ranges. Examples of the use of simultaneous data from the two wavelength ranges to derive physical conditions are then discussed, including the case of microflares, and the comparison of images at radio and hard X-ray wavelengths is presented. There have been puzzling results obtained from observations of solar flares at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, and the comparison of these results with corresponding hard X-ray data is presented. Finally, the review discusses the association of hard X-ray releases with radio emission at decimeter and meter wavelengths, which is dominated by plasma emission (at lower frequencies) and electron cyclotron maser emission (at higher frequencies), both coherent emission mechanisms that require small numbers of energetic electrons. These comparisons show broad general associations but detailed correspondence remains more elusive.

  7. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  8. X-Ray Emission from the Wolf-Rayet Bubble S 308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.; Snowden, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its Northwest quadrant (Chu et al. 2003), map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a 22' in size central cavity and a shell thickness of approx. 8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at approx.0.43 keV and O VII at approx.0.5 keV, and declines towards high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T1 approx.1.1 x 10(exp 6) K, T2 approx.13 x 10(exp 6) K), with a total X-ray luminosity approx.3 x 10(exp 33) erg/s at the assumed distance of 1.8 kpc. Qualitative comparison of the X-ray morphology of S 308 with the results of numerical simulations of wind-blown WR bubbles suggests a progenitor mass of 40 Stellar mass and an age in the WR phase approx.20,000 yrs. The X-ray luminosity predicted by simulatioms including the effects of heat conduction is in agreement with the observations, however, the simulated X-ray spectrum indicates generally hotter gas than is derived from the observations. We suggest that non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) may provide an explanation for this discrepancy.

  9. Hard X-Ray Emission and the Ionizing Source in LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terashima, Yuichi; Ho, Luis C.; Ptak, Andrew F.

    2000-01-01

    We report X-ray fluxes in the 2-10 keV band from LINERs (low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions) and low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies obtained with the ASCA satellite. Observed X-ray luminosities are in the range between 4 x 10(exp 39) and 5 x 10(exp 41) ergs/s, which are significantly smaller than that of the "classical" low-luminosity Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051. We found that X-ray luminosities in 2-10 keV of LINERs with broad H.alpha emission in their optical spectra (LINER 1s) are proportional to their Ha luminosities. This correlation strongly supports the hypothesis that the dominant ionizing source in LINER 1s is photoionization by hard photons from low-luminosity AGNs. On the other hand, the X-ray luminosities of most LINERs without broad H.alpha emission (LINER 2s) in our sample are lower than LINER 1s at a given H.alpha luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities in these objects are insufficient to power their H.alpha luminosities, suggesting that their primary ionizing source is other than an AGN, or that an AGN, if present, is obscured even at energies above 2 keV.

  10. Exceptional X-ray Weak Quasars: Implications for Accretion Flows and Emission-Line Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. Niel; Luo, Bin; Hall, Patrick B.; Wu, Jianfeng; Anderson, Scott F.; Garmire, Gordon; Gibson, Robert; Plotkin, Richard; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Shen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Actively accreting supermassive black holes are found, nearly universally, to create luminous X-ray emission, and this point underlies the utility of X-ray surveys for finding active galactic nuclei throughout the Universe. However, there are apparent X-ray weak exceptions to this rule that are now providing novel insights, including weak-line quasars (WLQs) and especially analogs of the extreme WLQ, PHL 1811. We have been systematically studying such X-ray weak quasars with Chandra and near-infrared spectroscopy, and I will report results on their remarkable properties and describe implications for models of the accretion disk/corona and emission-line formation. We have found evidence that many of these quasars may have geometrically thick inner accretion disks, likely due to high accretion rates, that shield the high-ionization broad line region from the relevant ionizing continuum. This model can explain, in a simple and unified manner, their weak lines and diverse X-ray properties. Such shielding may, more generally, play a role in shaping the broad distributions of quasar emission-line equivalent widths and blueshifts.

  11. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert. galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, and Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubifiski, and Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above approximately 50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  12. Electronic structure of alkali-intercalated graphite studied by soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Ritsko, J. J.

    1987-02-01

    Carbon K soft-x-ray emission spectra of LiC6, KC8, and CsC8 are presented. An absolute value for the charge transfer from the alkali metal to the carbon π band is obtained. A model fit to the data reveals similar effects on both spectral shape and threshold energy, independent of the choice of the alkali-metal intercalant, and provides a measure of departures from the rigid-band approximation. An enhancement of the soft-x-ray emission spectrum near EF is reported.

  13. Long-term X-ray studies of Sco X-1. [emission spectra of constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Kaluzienski, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    No modulation of the 3-6 keV X-ray intensity of Sco X-1 at a level of excess of 1% was observed at the optical period of .787313d. Evidence is found for shot-noise character in a large fraction of the X-ray emission. Almost all of the Sco X-1 emission can be synthesized in terms of approximately 200 shots per day, each with a duration of approximately 1/3 day. A pinhole camera was used to obtain data and the data were statistically analyzed.

  14. Temperature Gradients In The X-ray Emission Of Edge-on Spirals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durke, David; Schlegel, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse X-ray emission above the plane of edge-on spiral galaxies has long been detected. The intensity distribution of that gas has been measured as well as crude measures of the temperature distribution. Speculation centers on supernovae and star clusters as the sources for the energy that propels that material out of the plane. We describe here an exercise to investigate whether star clusters specifically impact this diffuse emission using several edge-on spirals observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  15. Low- to Mid-Latitude X-Ray Emission from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Cravens, Thomas E.; Ford, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observed Jupiter during the period 2003 February 24-26 for approx.40 hours (4 Jupiter rotations), using both the spectroscopy array of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) and the imaging array of the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I). Two ACIS-S exposures, each approx.8.5 hr long, were separated by an HRC-I exposure of approx.20 hr. The low- to mid-latitude non-auroral disk X-ray emission is much more spatially uniform than the auroral emission. However, the low- to mid-latitude X-ray count rate shows a small but statistically significant hour angle dependence, and is higher in regions of relatively low surface magnetic field strength, confirming ROSAT results. In addition, the spectrum from the low surface field region shows an enhancement in the energy band 1.14- 1.38 keV, perhaps partly due to line emission from that region. Correlation of surface magnetic field strength with count rate is not found for the 2000 December HRC-I data, at a time when solar activity was high. The low- to mid-latitude disk X-ray count rate observed by the HRC-I in the 2003 February observation is about 50% of that observed in 2000 December, roughly consistent with a decrease in the solar activity index (F10.7 cm flux) by a similar amount over the same time period. The low- to mid-latitude X-ray emission does not show any oscillations similar to the -45 minute oscillations sometimes seen from the northern auroral zone. The temporal variation in Jupiter's non-auroral X-ray emission exhibits similarities to variations in solar X-ray flux observed by GOES and TIMED/SEE. The two ACIS-S 0.3-2 keV low- to mid-latitude X-ray spectra are harder than the auroral spectrum, and are different from each other at energies above 0.7 keV, showing variability in Jupiter s non-auroral X-ray emission on a time scale of a day. The 0.3-2.0 keV X-ray power emitted at low- to mid-latitudes is 0.21 GW and 0.39 GW for the first and second ACIS-S exposures

  16. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Hickox, R.; Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; and others

    2013-08-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain Almost-Equal-To 400-600 hard X-ray ({approx}> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe K{alpha} line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  17. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  18. X-ray emission mechanism for the gamma-ray binary LS 5039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masaki

    2012-07-01

    We address an unsolved issue in the model of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039, which consists of an O star and a compact object not yet identified. In previous studies, the X-ray emission observed with Suzaku has been assumed to be due to the synchrotron emission from high energy electrons, and the inverse Compton (IC) emission from low energy electrons has been neglected. However, this IC emission can affect the X-ray emission. In this study, we calculate the IC emission from low energy electrons (γ < 10^4) accelerated near the compact object, including those created by the radiative cooling. We find that the IC emission of the low energy electrons can be responsible for the Suzaku band if the minimum Lorentz factor of injected electrons γ_{min} is around 10^3. In addition, we show that the Suzaku light curve is well reproduced if γ_{min} varies in proportion to the Fermi flux.

  19. X-ray Emission From Eta Carinae near Periastron in 2009 I: A Two State Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Russell, Christopher; Pollock, Andrew M. T.; Gull, Theodore R.; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Thomas I.; Damineli, Augusto; Pittard, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae declines sharply around periastron. This X-ray minimum has two distinct phases the lowest flux phase in the first 3 weeks and a brighter phase thereafter. In 2009, the Chandra X-ray Observatory monitored the first phase five times and found the lowest observed flux at 1.91012 ergs/sq cm/s (38 keV). The spectral shape changed such that the hard band above 4 keV dropped quickly at the beginning and the soft band flux gradually decreased to its lowest observed value in 2 weeks. The hard band spectrum had begun to recover by that time. This spectral variation suggests that the shocked gas producing the hottest X-ray gas near the apex of the wind-wind collision (WWC) is blocked behind the dense inner wind of the primary star, which later occults slightly cooler gas down-stream. Shocked gas previously produced by the system at earlier orbital phases is suggested to produce the faint residual X-ray emission seen when the emission near the apex is completely blocked by the primary wind. The brighter phase is probably caused by the re-appearance of the WWC plasma, whose emissivity significantly declined during the occultation. We interpret this to mean that the X-ray minimum is produced by a hybrid mechanism of an occultation and a decline in emissivity of the WWC shock. We constrain timings of superior conjunction and periastron based on these results.

  20. Femtosecond laser induced X-ray emission from metal alloys, polymers and color filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Koji; Yomogihata, Ken-ichiro; Ono, Hiroshi; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2005-07-01

    Various material surfaces were irradiated on a moving stage with focused laser pulses from a conventional 1 kHz femtosecond laser system, and X-ray emission spectra were measured during the laser ablation of the materials. Sharp K or L characteristic X-ray lines from the elements contained in the materials were clearly observed in a range of 2-15 keV. Signals due to copper and zinc were recognizable within a few minutes when a brass surface was irradiated. Poly(vinyl chloride) gave a marked emission originating from chlorine. When a color glass filter was irradiated, the detection of cobalt and arsenic was possible even though the amounts of these components were estimated to be less than 1 wt.% by using an electron probe microanalyzer. Time-integrated emission spectra in the visible region were also monitored during the femtosecond laser ablation of these materials. The emission spectra in the visible region were complicated owing to peaks originating from air components and white continuum emissions. Thus, the elemental analysis by femtoseond laser induced X-ray is considered to be useful for some samples. The etched trenches left at the surfaces after the laser ablation were examined with an optical microscope. The trench width varied with the materials, which may be attributed to changes in the irradiation area giving maximum counts of X-ray emission.

  1. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  2. Jovian Auroral X-ray Emission Coinciding with an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, W.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Elsner, R.; Vogt, M.; Lamy, L.; Ford, P. G.; Coates, A. J.; Gladstone, R.; Jackman, C. M.; Nichols, J. D.; Rae, J.; Varsani, A.; Kimura, T.; Hansen, K. C.; Jasinski, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The extent of the Solar Wind influence on Jupiter's X-ray aurora is yet to be understood. To probe this relationship, we compare two Chandra X-ray observations of Jupiter: one coinciding with the predicted arrival of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) and another observation two days later. During the observation coincident with the ICME, we observe a bright auroral enhancement of a factor of 8 in a region normally absent of X-rays. This enhancement occurs ~1 hour before a burst of non-Io Decametric radio emission, believed to be associated with solar wind forward shocks [Hess et al. 2012, 2014]. We also find variation in X-ray auroral periodic behaviour, spatial and spectral distributions. We use magnetosphere-ionosphere mapping [Vogt et al. 2011] to identify the source of ions generating the X-rays and find that they originate from 10:30-18:00 magnetospheric local time (MLT) in regions of the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause. The model also maps some precipitation to open field lines. This suggests that X-rays may provide an excellent tool for analysing the Jovian outer magnetosphere and the processes occurring between the Jovian magnetopause and the solar wind. As discovered by Gladstone et al. [2002] discovery, we find an X-ray hot spot that pulses with quasi-periodicity. Measurements of this periodicity suggest 2 distinct ion populations generate the Jovian X-ray aurora: a sulphur/carbon dominated population from the middle to outer magnetosphere with a period of 26 minutes, and a combined oxygen and carbon/sulphur population from close to the magnetopause with a period of 12 minutes. The source region and periodicity support findings by Bunce et al. [2004] that pulsed dayside reconnection could energise the outer magnetosphere and drive X-ray emission To better understand the persistence of these features and/or their relationship to the ICME, we compare these 2011 observations with preliminary analysis of Chandra X-ray observations

  3. Optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wanli; Yu, Ruizhen; Zhang, Wenhai; Yang, Jiamin

    2016-08-01

    Under-critical CH foam coated gold targets benefit laser-to-x-ray emission because CH plasma inhibits gold plasma expansion, which leads to higher gold plasma density and temperature. Conversely, the CH foam partially absorbs the incident laser energy, which lowers laser absorption into the gold plasma. An analytical model is built to solve the laser collisional deposition fraction in the CH foam layer. The optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation is obtained numerically with different CH foam densities and thicknesses. The plasma and x-ray emission properties are investigated. It is found that different CH thicknesses lead to different increase mechanisms for x-ray emission. The x-ray spectrum distributions show that most of the x-ray emission increases occur with photon energy less than 2000 eV.

  4. Anisotropy of BN and Be x-ray-emission bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1987-12-01

    We present measurements of the K emission spectra of hexagonal Be and BN (h-Be and h-BN). The anisotropy of the emission allows us to separate the bands into their σ and π components, enabling us to demonstrate the unambiguous π character of the B core exciton. We find that the exciton presents a double-peaked structure which we attribute to phonon ringing. For the first time we are able to separate into π and σ components the doubly ionized K emission bands of B and N in h-BN and of Be in h-Be, revealing the effect of the spectator core hole on the shape of the density of states. Such an effect is in qualitative agreement with the final-state rule, although the local p density of states is distorted more than has previously been reported.

  5. X-RAY EMISSION FROM NITROGEN-TYPE WOLF-RAYET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Guedel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner

    2010-03-15

    We summarize new X-ray detections of four nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars obtained in a limited survey aimed at establishing the X-ray properties of WN stars across their full range of spectral subtypes. None of the detected stars is so far known to be a close binary. We report Chandra detections of WR 2 (WN2), WR 18 (WN4), and WR 134 (WN6), and an XMM-Newton detection of WR79a (WN9ha). These observations clearly demonstrate that both WNE and WNL stars are X-ray sources. We also discuss Chandra archive detections of the WN6h stars WR 20b, WR 24, and WR 136 and ROSAT non-detections of WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). The X-ray spectra of all WN detections show prominent emission lines and an admixture of cool (kT < 1 keV) and hot (kT > 2 keV) plasma. The hotter plasma is not predicted by radiative wind shock models and other as yet unidentified mechanisms are at work. Most stars show X-ray absorption in excess of that expected from visual extinction (A {sub V}), likely due to their strong winds or cold circumstellar gas. Existing data suggest a falloff in X-ray luminosity toward later WN7-9 subtypes, which have higher L {sub bol} but slower, denser winds than WN2-6 stars. This provides a clue that wind properties may be a more crucial factor in determining emergent X-ray emission levels than bolometric luminosity.

  6. K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra in MnF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.; Parlebas, J. C.; Uozumi, T.; Kotani, A.; Kao, C.-C.

    2000-01-15

    We report experimental and theoretical results on Mn K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra (K{beta} RXES) at the pre-edge region of K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy in a powdered MnF{sub 2} sample. The experimental results are studied theoretically in terms of coherent second-order optical process, using a MnF{sub 6}{sup -4} cluster model with the effects of intra-atomic multiplet coupling and interatomic hybridization in the space of three configurations and taking into account both the Mn 1s-3d quadrupole excitation and the Mn 1s-4p dipole excitation. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. Moreover, we show that if the sample is a single crystal the resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy caused by the quadrupole excitation has a strong sensitivity to the angle of the incident photon. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. θ Car: X-ray Emission from Low Density Radiation-Driven Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle (Mizusawa), Trisha; Petit, Veronique; Held Cohen, David; Fullerton, Alexander W.; Gagne, Marc; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Li, Zequn; Owocki, Stanley P.; Sundqvist, Jon; Wade, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray grating spectroscopy (and IUE spectroscopy) of the B0.2 V star, θ Carina. θ Car is in a critical transition region between the earliest B stars and the latest O stars, where the density of the wind is observed to decrease more than theoretically expected. In general, X-ray emission in this low-density wind regime should be less prominent, but observations have shown that there is a higher than expected production of X-ray emission from the winds of these stars; this severely challenges predictions of radiatively driven wind theory. We measure the f/i ratio, widths, and velocities of several Helium-like lines in the X-ray spectrum. The f/i ratio is a diagnostic of the radial location of the X-ray emitting plasma, which is sensitive to the specific transition of each He-like ion. We use θ Car to study the radiatively-driven mass-loss of early B-type stars.

  8. Unique X-ray emission characteristics from volumetrically heated nanowire array plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, J. J.; Bargsten, C.; Hollinger, R.; Shlyaptsev, V.; Pukhov, A.; Kaymak, V.; Capeluto, G.; Keiss, D.; Townsend, A.; Rockwood, A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, S.

    2015-11-01

    Highly anisotropic emission of hard X-ray radiation (h ν >10 keV) is observed when arrays of ordered nanowires (50 nm diameter wires of Au or Ni) are volumetrically heated by normal incidence irradiation with high contrast 50-60 fs laser pulses of relativistic intensity. The annular emission is in contrast with angular distribution of softer X-rays (h ν >1 KeV) from these targets and with the X-ray radiation emitted by polished flat targets, both of which are nearly isotropic. Model computations that make use the electron energy distribution computed by particle-in-cell simulations show that the unexpected annular distribution of the hard x-rays is the result of bremsstrahlung from fast electrons. Volumetric heating of Au nanowire arrays irradiated with an intensity of 2 x 10 19 W cm-2 is measured to convert laser energy into h ν>1KeV photons with a record efficiency of >8 percent into 2 π, creating a bright picosecond X-ray source for applications. Work supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science of the U.S Department of Energy, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. A.P was supported by DFG project TR18.

  9. Accretion Shocks in Young Stars: the Role of Local Absorption on the X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Peres, G.; Matsakos, T.; Stehle, C.; Ibgui, L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars, due to the infalling material impacting the stellar surface. Several aspects in both observations and models of the accretion process are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity of the post-shock plasma is below the predicted value, the density vs temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, is opposite of what expected from simple accretion shock models. To address these issues we performed numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations describing the impact of an accretion stream onto the stellar surface and considered the local absorption due to the surrounding medium. We explored the effects of absorption for different viewing angles and for the He-like line triplets commonly used for density diagnostic. From the model results we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock, producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthetic spectra, and we directly compare our results with the observations. Our model shows that the X-ray fluxes detected are lower than expected because of the local absorption. The emerging spectra suggest a complex density vs temperature distribution proving that a detailed model accounting for a realistic treatment of the local absorption is needed to interpret the observations of X-ray emitting accretion shocks.

  10. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  11. Development of an X-ray tube for irradiation experiments using a field emission electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hidetoshi; O`Rourke, Brian E.; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Wang, Jiayu; Ooi, Takashi; Nakajima, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    A new X-ray tube using a ring-shaped emitter as a field emission electron source has been developed. By using a ring shaped cathode, X-rays can be extracted along the axial direction through the central hole. This cylindrically symmetrical design allows for the tube to be arranged in the axial direction with the high voltage target at one end and the X-ray beam at the other. The newly developed X-ray tube can operate at a tube voltage of more than 100 kV and at a tube current of more than 4 mA, and can be used for irradiation experiments with an irradiation dose range from mGy up to kGy. The X-ray tube can be used immediately after turning on (i.e. there is no stand-by time). In the experimental model, we demonstrated stable electron emission at a tube voltage of 100 kV and at a tube current of 4 mA during a 560 h continuous test.

  12. DISCOVERY OF DIFFUSE HARD X-RAY EMISSION AROUND JUPITER WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Ezoe, Y.; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Terada, N.; Uchiyama, Y.; Negoro, H.

    2010-02-01

    We report the discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter in a deep 160 ks Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer data. The emission is distributed over {approx}16 x 8 Jovian radius and spatially associated with the radiation belts and the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). It shows a flat power-law spectrum with a photon index of 1.4 {+-} 0.2 with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of (3.3 {+-} 0.5)x10{sup 15} erg s{sup -1}. We discussed its origin and concluded that it seems to be truly diffuse, although a possibility of multiple background point sources cannot be completely rejected with a limited angular resolution. If it is diffuse, the flat continuum indicates that X-rays arise by the nonthermal electrons in the radiation belts and/or the IPT. The synchrotron and bremsstrahlung models can be rejected from the necessary electron energy and X-ray spectral shape, respectively. The inverse-Compton scattering off solar photons by ultra-relativistic (several tens MeV) electrons can explain the energy and the spectrum but the necessary electron density is {approx}>10 times larger than the value estimated from the empirical model of Jovian charge particles.

  13. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  14. Charge-exchange X-ray emission of nearby star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiren; Wang, Q. Daniel; Mao, Shude

    2012-03-01

    Properties of hot gas outflows from galaxies are generally measured from associated X-ray line emission assuming that it represents atomic transitions in thermally excited hot gas. X-ray line emission, however, can also arise from the charge exchange between highly ionized ions and neutral species. The Kα triplet of He-like ions can be used as a powerful diagnostic, because the charge-exchange X-ray emission (CXE) favours the intercombination and forbidden lines, while the thermal emission favours the resonance line. We analyse the O VII triplet of a sample of nine nearby star-forming galaxies observed by the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometers. For most galaxies, the forbidden lines are comparable to or stronger than the resonance lines, which is in contrast to the thermal prediction. For NGC 253, M51, M83, M61, NGC 4631, and the Antennae (Arp 244), the observed line ratios are consistent with the ratio of CXE; for M94 and NGC 2903, the observed ratios indicate multiple origins; for M82, different regions show different line ratios, also indicating multiple origins. We discuss other possible mechanisms that can produce a relatively strong forbidden line, such as a collisional non-equilibrium-ionization recombining/ionizing plasma, which are not favoured. These results suggest that the CXE may be a common phenomenon and contribute a significant fraction of the soft X-ray line emission for galaxies with massive star formation.

  15. The Cygnus loop - A detailed comparison of X-ray and optical emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.; Hester, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison at a resolution of 17 arcsec is presented between optical emission from forbidden O III and forbidden S II and the thermal X-ray emission for a field on the southeast edge of the Cygnus Loop SNR. The relationship between optical and X-ray emission in the field is described, generalizing to the Loop as a whole when possible. Several possible explanations for the presence of bright X-ray emission in the vicinity of optical emission are presented and evaluated based on the data. These mechanisms involve evaporation, gradual variations and gradients in the density of the preshock intercloud medium, and additional compression of material which has already been heated to X-ray temperatures by the adiabatic blast wave. The additional compression could result from rapid deceleration of the blast wave itself or from reshocking by reflected or bow shocks around dense clouds. Implications of the observations for models of SNR evolution and the interstellar medium are discussed.

  16. Determination of the texture of arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes from the angular dependence of the X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Okotrub, A. V. Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Gusel'nikov, A. V.; Kudashov, A. G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    The properties of materials containing carbon nanotubes depend on the degree of alignment and the internal structure of nanotubes. It is shown that the degree of misorientation of carbon nanotubes in samples can be evaluated from the measurements of the angular dependences of the carbon X-ray emission and carbon X-ray absorption spectra. The CK{sub {alpha}} emission and CK X-ray absorption spectra of the array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic thermolysis of a mixture of fullerene and ferrocene are measured. A comparison of the calculated model dependences of the relative intensities of the {pi} and {sigma} bands in the spectra with the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate the degree of misorientation of nanotubes in the sample and their internal texture.

  17. X-ray continuum and iron K emission line from the radio galaxy 3C 390.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inda, M.; Makishima, K.; Kohmura, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Ohashi, T.; Barr, P.; Hayashida, K.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Trinchieri, G.; Elvis, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray properties of the radio galaxy 3C 390.3 were investigated using the European X-ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) and Ginga satellites. Long-term, large-amplitude X-ray intensity changes were detected over a period extending from 1984 through 1991, and high-quality X-ray spectra were obtained especially with Ginga. The X-ray continuum spectra were described with power-law model with photon slope in the range 1.5-1.8, and the slope flattened as the 2-20 keV luminosity decreased by 40%. There was a first detection of the iron emission line from this source at the 90% confidence level. An upper limit was derived on the thermal X-ray component. X-ray emission mechanisms and possible origins of the long-term variation are discussed.

  18. 10 micron detection of the hard X-ray transient GRO J0422+32: Free-free emission from an X-ray-driven accretion disk wind?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paradijs, Van J.; Telesco, C. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We report the detection of 10 micrometer emission from the transient low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) and optical nova GRO J0422+32 near the maximum of its outburst. We discuss this result in terms of (1) a 'standard' model according to which low-energy radiation of LMXB is caused by reprocessing of X-rays in an accretion disk; (2) emission from a cool secondary star; (3) emission from dust grains heated by the transient X-rays, and (4) free-free emission from an X-ray-driven wind from the accretion disk. Only the fourth alternative provides a viable explanation for the observed 10 micrometer emission, with a mass-loss rate in the disk wind that may be substantially higher than the rate of accretion onto the compact star. The presence of such a wind may have a profound effect on the evolution of the binary, and contribute to the solution of the 'birthrate problem' of millisecond ratio pulsars.

  19. X-ray Emission from Hot Bubbles in nebulae around Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá Sánz, Jesús Alberto

    This thesis presents an observational and numerical study on the X-ray emission related to the formation and evolution from hot bubbles in nebulae around evolved stars. The observational part of this study consists mainly in observations obtained from the X-ray satellites X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) and Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). We have made use of optical, infrared, and ultraviolet observations that have complemented our results and analysis. These observations have allowed us to study the Wolf-Rayet (WR) nebulae S 308 and NGC 6888 and that around the WR star WR 16. We have also studied the planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 6543 and Abell 78 (A 78). The X-ray telescopes, XMM-Newton and CXO, have allowed us to study the distribution and physical characteristics of the hot and diffuse gas in the WR nebulae S 308 and NGC 6888 with exquisite detail. Even though the CXO observations do not map entirely NGC 6888, we are able to estimate global parameters of the X-ray emission making use of ROSAT observations. Previous observations performed with were hampered by Suzaku, ROSAT, and ASCA were hampered by a large number of point sources in the line of sight of the nebulae. S 308 was observed with XMM-Newton with four pointings. We have made use of the most up-to-date tools for the analysis of soft and diffuse X-ray emission (the ESAS tasks). We found that in both nebulae the hot gas has a plasma temperature of 1-1.5×10^6 K and it is delineated by the [O III] emission and not the Hα as stated in previous studies. A notable difference between these two WR nebulae is that S 308 has a limb-brightened morphology in the distribution of its hot gas, while NGC 6888 displays three maxima. We have studied the WR nebula around WR 16 with archived XMM-Newton observations. Even though it was expected that diffuse X-ray emission should be detected from a spherical, non-disrupted WR nebula, by comparison with S 308 and NGC 6888, we are not able to detect such emission

  20. The Detection of Circumnuclear X-Ray Emission from the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, I. M.; Turner, T. J.; Netzer, H.; Kraemer, S. B.; Ruiz, J.; Chelouche, D.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Yaqoob, T.; Nandra, K.; Mushotzky, R. F.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution, X-ray image of the circumnuclear regions of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, using the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). All three of the CXO observations reported were performed with one of the two grating assemblies in place, and here we restrict our analysis to undispersed photons (i.e. those detected in the zeroth-order). A previously-unknown X-ray source is detected approximately 6 arcsec (1.1h(sub 75)(exp -1) kpc) NNE of the nucleus (position angle approximately 29 degrees) which we designate CXOU 110648.1 + 723412. Its spectrum can be characterized as a power law with a photon index (Gamma) approximately 1.8 - 2.6, or as thermal emission with a temperature kT approximately 0.7 - 3 keV. Assuming a location within NGC 3516, isotropic emission implies a luminosity L approximately 2 - 8 x 10(exp 39)h(sub 75)(exp-2) erg s(exp -1) in the 0.4 - 2 keV band. If due to a single point source, the object is super-Eddington for a 1.4 solar mass neutron star. However, multiple sources or a small, extended source cannot be excluded using the current data. Large-scale extended S-ray emission is also detected out to approximately 10 arcsec (approximately 2h(sub 75)(exp -1) kpc) from the nucleus to the NE and SW, and is approximately aligned with the morphologies of the radio emission and extended narrow emission line region (ENLR). The mean luminosity of this emission is 1 - 5 x 10(exp 37)h(sub 75)(exp -2) erg s(exp -1) arcsec(exp -2), in the 0.4 - 2 keV band. Unfortunately the current data cannot usefully constrain its spectrum. These results are consistent with earlier suggestions of circumnuclear X-ray emissi in NGC 3516 based on ROSAT observations, and thus provide the first clear detection of extended X-ray emission in a Seyfert 1.0 galaxy. If the extended emission is due to scattering of the nuclear X-ray continuum, then the pressure in the X-ray emitting gas is at least two orders of magnitude too small to provide the confining

  1. X-RAY AND RADIO EMISSION FROM TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA SN 2010jl

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Poonam; Chevalier, Roger A.; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2015-09-01

    We present all X-ray and radio observations of the Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl. The X-ray observations cover a period up to day 1500 with Chandra, XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and Swift-X-ray Telescope (XRT). The Chandra observations after 2012 June, the XMM-Newton observation in 2013 November, and most of the Swift-XRT observations until 2014 December are presented for the first time. All the spectra can be fitted by an absorbed hot thermal model except for Chandra spectra on 2011 October and 2012 June when an additional component is needed. Although the origin of this component is uncertain, it is spatially coincident with the supernova and occurs when there are changes to the supernova spectrum in the energy range close to that of the extra component, indicating that the emission is related to the supernova. The X-ray light curve shows an initial plateau followed by a steep drop starting at day ∼300. We attribute the drop to a decrease in the circumstellar density. The column density to the X-ray emission drops rapidly with time, showing that the absorption is in the vicinity of the supernova. We also present Very Large Array radio observations of SN 2010jl. Radio emission was detected from SN 2010jl from day 570 onwards. The radio light curves and spectra suggest that the radio luminosity was close to its maximum at the first detection. The velocity of the shocked ejecta derived assuming synchrotron self-absorption is much less than that estimated from the optical and X-ray observations, suggesting that free–free absorption dominates.

  2. Modeling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic center from colliding stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Wang, Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical activity. Powering these processes is the injection of wind material from ˜30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12" of the super-massive black hole (SMBH). Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. A Chandra X-ray Visionary Program that observed the Galactic center for 3 Ms resolved this diffuse emission. This work computes the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the WR winds with the aim of reproducing the Chandra observations, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The success of the model is the spectrum from the 2"-5" ring around the SMBH matches the shape of the observed spectrum very well. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the winds speeds of these stars are in general well constrained. The model flux in this ring and over the ±6" images of 4-9keV is ˜2.2× lower than the observations, with stronger feedback mechanisms leading to weaker X-ray emission since more hot, X-ray-emitting gas is cleared from the spherical r < 12" simulation volume. Possible improvements to rectify this flux discrepancy are increasing the mass loss rates of the WRs and/or adding more gas into the simulation, such as from the O stars and their winds, so the adiabatic WR shocks occur closer to their stars, thereby becoming brighter in X-rays.

  3. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed. PMID:24245260

  4. Liquid jet target x-ray tube with field emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, Oliver; Polikhov, Stepan; Karpinskiy, Gennadiy; Geisler, Andreas; Bondarenko, Taras; Botyachkova, Alexandra; Frolov, Sergey; Ivanov, Vladislav

    2015-08-01

    We introduce first results of our research in a promising approach for micro focal x-ray generation. The approach combines the use of liquid metal jet target as anode and carbon based nanostructures as field emission cathode. Results of metal jet break-up CFD simulation and cold cathode performance tests are described. The planned experimental program is discussed herein as well.

  5. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed.

  6. Disentangling X-Ray Emission Processes in Vela-Like Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaensler, Bryan; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present a deep observation with the X-Ray Multimirror Mission of PSR B1823-13, a young pulsar with similar properties to the Vela pulsar. We detect two components to the X-ray emission associated with PSR B1823-13: an elongated core of extent 30 min immediately surrounding the pulsar embedded in a fainter, diffuse component of emission 5 sec in extent, seen only on the southern side of the pulsar. The pulsar itself is not detected, either as a point source or through its pulsations. Both components of the X-ray emission are well fitted by a power-law spectrum, with photon index Gamma approx. 1.6 and X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV) L(sub X) approx. 9 x 10(exp 32) ergs/s for the core and Gamma approx. 2.3 and L(sub X) approx. 3 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s for the diffuse emission, for a distance of 4 kpc. We interpret both components of emission as corresponding to a pulsar wind nebula, which we designate G18.0-0.7. We argue that the core region represents the wind termination shock of this nebula, while the diffuse component indicates the shocked downstream wind. We propose that the asymmetric morphology of the diffuse emission with respect to the pulsar is the result of a reverse shock from an associated supernova remnant, which has compressed and distorted the pulsar-powered nebula. Such an interaction might be typical for pulsars at this stage in their evolution. The associated supernova remnant is not detected directly, most likely being too faint to be seen in existing X-ray and radio observations.

  7. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Benz, A. O.; Christe, S.; Farnik, F.; Kundu, M. R.; Mann, G.; Ning, Z.; Raulin, J.-P.; Silva-Valio, A. V. R.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Vilmer, N.; Warmuth, A.

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the complementary relationship between radio and hard Xray observations of the Sun using primarily results from the era of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite. A primary focus of joint radio and hard X-ray studies of solar flares uses observations of nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission at radio wavelengths and bremsstrahlung hard X-rays to study the properties of electrons accelerated in the main flare site, since it is well established that these two emissions show very similar temporal behavior. A quantitative prescription is given for comparing the electron energy distributions derived separately from the two wavelength ranges: this is an important application with the potential for measuring the magnetic field strength in the flaring region, and reveals significant differences between the electrons in different energy ranges. Examples of the use of simultaneous data from the two wavelength ranges to derive physical conditions are then discussed, including the case of microflares, and the comparison of images at radio and hard X-ray wavelengths is presented. There have been puzzling results obtained from observations of solar flares at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, and the comparison of these results with corresponding hard X-ray data is presented. Finally, the review discusses the association of hard X-ray releases with radio emission at decimeter and meter wavelengths, which is dominated by plasma emission (at lower frequencies) and electron cyclotron maser emission (at higher frequencies), both coherent emission mechanisms that require small numbers of energetic electrons. These comparisons show broad general associations but detailed correspondence remains more elusive.

  8. X ray emission from Wolf-Rayet stars with recurrent dust formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawley, Gayle L.

    1993-01-01

    We were granted a ROSAT observation of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 137 (equals HD 192641) to test a proposed mechanism for producing the infrared variability reported by Williams et al. (1987). These studies showed one clear infrared outburst preceded by what may be the dimming of a previous outburst. The recurrent dust formation model was put forward by Williams et al. (1990) to account for similar variability seen in WR 140, which varies in both the infrared and X-ray bands. The detected X-ray flux from WR 140 was observed to decrease from its normally high (for Wolf-Rayet stars) level as the infrared flux increased. Observation of two apparently-periodic infrared outbursts led to the hypothesis that WR 140 had an O star companion in an eccentric orbit, and that the increase in infrared flux came from a dust formation episode triggered by the compression of the O star and Wolf-Rayet star winds. The absorption of the X-rays by the increased material explained the decrease in flux at those wavelengths. If the infrared variability in WR 137 were caused by a similar interaction of the Wolf-Rayet star with a companion, we might expect that WR 137 would show corresponding X-ray variability and an X-ray luminosity somewhat higher than typical WC stars, as well as a phase-dependent non-thermal X-ray spectrum. Our goals in this study were to obtain luminosity estimates from our counting rates for comparison with previous observations of WR 137 and other WC class stars, especially WR 140; to compare the luminosity with the IR lightcurve; and to characterize the spectral shape of the X-ray emission, including the column density.

  9. X ray emission from Wolf-Rayet stars with recurrent dust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawley, Gayle L.

    1993-10-01

    We were granted a ROSAT observation of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 137 (equals HD 192641) to test a proposed mechanism for producing the infrared variability reported by Williams et al. (1987). These studies showed one clear infrared outburst preceded by what may be the dimming of a previous outburst. The recurrent dust formation model was put forward by Williams et al. (1990) to account for similar variability seen in WR 140, which varies in both the infrared and X-ray bands. The detected X-ray flux from WR 140 was observed to decrease from its normally high (for Wolf-Rayet stars) level as the infrared flux increased. Observation of two apparently-periodic infrared outbursts led to the hypothesis that WR 140 had an O star companion in an eccentric orbit, and that the increase in infrared flux came from a dust formation episode triggered by the compression of the O star and Wolf-Rayet star winds. The absorption of the X-rays by the increased material explained the decrease in flux at those wavelengths. If the infrared variability in WR 137 were caused by a similar interaction of the Wolf-Rayet star with a companion, we might expect that WR 137 would show corresponding X-ray variability and an X-ray luminosity somewhat higher than typical WC stars, as well as a phase-dependent non-thermal X-ray spectrum. Our goals in this study were to obtain luminosity estimates from our counting rates for comparison with previous observations of WR 137 and other WC class stars, especially WR 140; to compare the luminosity with the IR lightcurve; and to characterize the spectral shape of the X-ray emission, including the column density.

  10. Valence x-ray-emission bands of a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithianandam, Jeyasingh; Schnatterly, Stephen E.

    1990-11-01

    Si L2,3 x-ray-emission spectra from amorphous superlattices made with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H are presented and interpreted using a two-phase linear superposition model for the valence-band region. The average thickness of buried interfaces in these superlattices was found to be 1.8 Å and the interfaces were shown to be of silicon-nitride character. A direct measurement of the fluorescence yield ratio in the soft-x-ray spectral range for any two materials is also presented.

  11. Binarity and Accretion: X-Ray Emission from AGB stars with FUV Excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-10-01

    We propose a pilot survey for X-ray emission from AGB stars that are candidates for having binary companions with active accretion. These objects were identified via our innovative technique to search for FUV/NUV excesses in AGB stars using GALEX. The detection (or non-detection) of X-rays from this sample will enable us to begin testing models for the origin of the UV-excesses, leading to vital breakthroughs in our understanding of accretion-related phenomena and binarity in AGB stars. A larger survey, optimised using results fron this study, will be proposed in future cycles.

  12. Extended Hard-X-Ray Emission in the Inner Few Parsecs of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicholas M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K.; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems2, 3, 4, 5.

  13. The hard X-ray emission spectra from accretion columns in intermediate polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray emission from accretion columns in an intermediate polar system, GK Per, using a simple settling solution. The rate of photon emission per logarithmic energy interval can be fitted with a power law, E(exp -gamma), with gamma approximately 2.0, in agreement with observations. This index is only weakly dependent on the mass accretion rate, dot-M, for dot-M in the range of a few times 10(exp 16-18) g/s. The peak energy of the photon spectra (after photoelectric absorption) is expected to be E(sub p) approximately (5 keV) gamma(exp -1/3) (N(sub H)/10(exp 23)/sq cm)(exp 1/3) where N(sub H) is the hydrogen column density along the line of sight. The observed spectra of GK Per and possibly of V1223 Sgr suggest N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This large N(sub H) may be due to partially ionized preshock column material. Alternatively, we also consider absorption by the cool outer parts of an accretion disk. In this case the photoelectric absorption depth in the disk is a sensitive function of inclination. For GK Per the required inclination is approximately 83 deg. For mass accretion rates larger than a critical rate of approximately 10(exp 18) g/s, X-ray emission from the column accretion is significantly affected by radiation drag. Although the mass accretion rate increases dramatically during outbursts, the observed hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray luminosity will not rise proportionately. The slope and peak energy of the outburst spectra are only weakly affected. We conclude that the observed X-ray spectra can be explained by this simple analytic solution and that the production of hard X-rays from the accretion shock at the magnetic poles in the intermediate polars is in general agreement with the observations. However, since the X-ray emission and absorption depend on the mass accretion rate in a complicated manner, observed hard X-ray luminosities (greater than 2 keV) are not a good indicator of the mass

  14. Chandra X-ray Grating Spectrometry of Eta Carinae near X-ray Minimum: I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, D. B.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pittard, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T. R.

    2008-01-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star eta Car, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggesting that the line-forming region is > 1.6 stellar radii from the companion star, and that the emitting plasma may be in a non-equilibrium state. We show that simple geometrical models cannot simultaneously fit both the observed centroid variations and changes in line width as a function of phase. We show that the observed profiles can be fitted with synthetic profiles with a reasonable model of the emissivity along the wind-wind collision boundary. We use this analysis to help constrain the line formation region as a function of orbital phase, and the orbital geometry. Subject headings: X-rays: stars -stars: early-type-stars: individual (q Car)

  15. The Spectacular Radio-near-IR-X-Ray Jet of 3C 111: The X-Ray Emission Mechanism and Jet Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L.; Hogan, Brandon; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic jets are the most energetic manifestation of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) phenomenon. AGN jets are observed from the radio through gamma-rays and carry copious amounts of matter and energy from the sub-parsec central regions out to the kiloparsec and often megaparsec scale galaxy and cluster environs. While most spatially resolved jets are seen in the radio, an increasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near-IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. We discuss new, deep Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the northern and southern hotspots. Important differences are seen between the morphologies in the radio, X-ray, and near-IR bands. The long (over 100 kpc on each side), straight nature of this jet makes it an excellent prototype for future, deep observations, as it is one of the longest such features seen in the radio, near-IR/optical, and X-ray bands. Several independent lines of evidence, including the X-ray and broadband spectral shape as well as the implied velocity of the approaching hotspot, lead us to strongly disfavor the EC/CMB model and instead favor a two-component synchrotron model to explain the observed X-ray emission for several jet components. Future observations with NuSTAR, HST, and Chandra will allow us to further constrain the emission mechanisms.

  16. EFFECT OF METALLICITY ON X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Ursino, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Roncarelli, M.

    2010-09-20

    Hydrodynamic simulations predict that a significant fraction of the gas in the current universe is in the form of high temperature, highly ionized plasma emitting and absorbing primarily in the soft X-ray and UV bands, dubbed the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). Its signature should be observable in redshifted emission and absorption lines from highly ionized elements. To determine the expected WHIM emission in the soft X-ray band we used the output of a large scale smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulation to generate images and spectra with angular resolution of 14'' and energy resolution of 1 eV. The current biggest limit of any hydrodynamic simulation in predicting the X-ray emission comes from metal diffusion. In our investigation, by using four different models for the WHIM metallicity we have found a strong dependence of the emission on the model used, with differences up to almost an order of magnitude. For each model, we have investigated the redshift distribution and angular scale of the emission, confirming that most photons come from redshift z < 1.2 and that the emission has a typical angular scale of less than a few arcminutes. We also compared our simulations with the few currently available observations and found that, within the variation of the metallicity models, our predictions are in good agreement with current constraints on the WHIM emission, and at this time the weak experimental constraints on the WHIM emission are not sufficient to exclude any of the models used.

  17. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; et al

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as wellmore » as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.« less

  18. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glockner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.

  19. Periodicities in the X-ray emission from the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Partha; Jain, Rajmal; Awasthi, Arun K. E-mail: parthares@gmail.com E-mail: awasthi@prl.res.in

    2013-11-20

    We have studied the time series of full disk integrated soft and hard X-ray emission from the solar corona during 2004 January to 2008 December, covering the entire descending phase of solar cycle 23 from a global point of view. We employ the daily X-ray index derived from 1 s cadence X-ray observations from the Si and CZT detectors of the 'Solar X-ray Spectrometer' mission in seven different energy bands ranging between 6 and 56 keV. X-ray data in the energy bands 6-7, 7-10, 10-20, and 4-25 keV from the Si detector are considered, while 10-20, 20-30, and 30-56 keV high energy observations are taken from the CZT detector. The daily time series is subjected to power spectrum analysis after appropriate correction for noise. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram technique has shown prominent periods of ∼13.5 days, ∼27 days, and a near-Rieger period of ∼181 days and ∼1.24 yr in all energy bands. In addition to this, other periods like ∼31, ∼48, ∼57, ∼76, ∼96, ∼130, ∼227, and ∼303 days are also detected in different energy bands. We discuss our results in light of previous observations and existing numerical models.

  20. X-Ray Emission from the Unidentified Gamma-Ray Transient GRO J1838-0415

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    The gamma-ray transient GRO J1838-04 is one of the most enigmatic sources in the sky. Despite its closeness to the Galactic plane, it showed a strong gamma-ray flare in 1995 typical of blazars. However, no blazar is detected in its approx. 1 deg. error box, and a Galactic source is suspected. Other time variable gamma-ray sources are known in the Galactic disk, and GRO J1838-04 may belong to a new class of sources (isolated young pulsars, the only proven Galactic gamma-ray sources, do not show variability). The Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observed the centroid of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) error box of GRO J1838-04 in April 1997. Five weak X-ray sources are detected, one of which appears to be diffuse (3 arcmins). No known radio source is coincident with the X-ray sources. A preliminary report of our results appeared and a more systematic report is being written . The fact that no prominent X-ray source appears in the field, excludes an X-ray transient source with strong persistent emission is a possible counterpart of GRO JI838- 04 (such as superluminal transients). To uncover the nature of GRO J1838-04 requires more study of the weak X-ray sources in its error box, and a long-time scale monitoring of their variability.

  1. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  2. X-ray emission processes in stars and their immediate environment.

    PubMed

    Testa, Paola

    2010-04-20

    A decade of X-ray stellar observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton has led to significant advances in our understanding of the physical processes at work in hot (magnetized) plasmas in stars and their immediate environment, providing new perspectives and challenges, and in turn the need for improved models. The wealth of high-quality stellar spectra has allowed us to investigate, in detail, the characteristics of the X-ray emission across the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. Progress has been made in addressing issues ranging from classical stellar activity in stars with solar-like dynamos (such as flares, activity cycles, spatial and thermal structuring of the X-ray emitting plasma, and evolution of X-ray activity with age), to X-ray generating processes (e.g., accretion, jets, magnetically confined winds) that were poorly understood in the preChandra/XMM-Newton era. I will discuss the progress made in the study of high energy stellar physics and its impact in a wider astrophysical context, focusing on the role of spectral diagnostics now accessible.

  3. The X-ray spectrum and time variability of narrow emission line galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray spectral and temporal observations are reported for six narrow emission line galaxies (NELGs), all of which are fitted by power-law X-ray spectra of energy slope 0.8 and have column densities in the line of sight greater than 1 x 10 to the 22nd atoms/sq cm. Three of the objects, NGC 526a, NGC 2110 and MCG-5-23-16 are variable in their X-ray flux, and the latter two, along with NGC 5506 and NGC 7582, showed detectable variability in at least one observation. The measured X-ray properties of these NELGs, which also included NGC 2992, strongly resemble those of previously-measured type 1 Seyferts of the same X-ray luminosity and lead to the conclusion of great similarity between the NELGs and low-luminosity type 1 Seyferts. The implications of these observations for the optical line-emitting region structure of these galaxies are discussed.

  4. X-ray emission processes in stars and their immediate environment

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Paola

    2010-01-01

    A decade of X-ray stellar observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton has led to significant advances in our understanding of the physical processes at work in hot (magnetized) plasmas in stars and their immediate environment, providing new perspectives and challenges, and in turn the need for improved models. The wealth of high-quality stellar spectra has allowed us to investigate, in detail, the characteristics of the X-ray emission across the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. Progress has been made in addressing issues ranging from classical stellar activity in stars with solar-like dynamos (such as flares, activity cycles, spatial and thermal structuring of the X-ray emitting plasma, and evolution of X-ray activity with age), to X-ray generating processes (e.g., accretion, jets, magnetically confined winds) that were poorly understood in the preChandra/XMM-Newton era. I will discuss the progress made in the study of high energy stellar physics and its impact in a wider astrophysical context, focusing on the role of spectral diagnostics now accessible. PMID:20360562

  5. Measuring the X-ray Emission Impacting the Planets Orbiting Nearby Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    M dwarf planetary systems present a truly exciting opportunity to discover and study the first habitable extrasolar planets in the next 5-10 years. As part of our larger HST MUSCLES project, we propose ACIS-S observations of 4 low-mass exoplanet hosts (3 M dwarfs -- GJ581, GJ1214, GJ849, and 1 K dwarf -- HD97658) that have no existing measurements of their coronal X-ray emission. We will measure their X-ray luminosities and coronal temperatures, and derive the high energy radiation field to facilitate exoplanet atmospheric modeling. These planetary systems allow study of exoplanet atmospheric chemistry and evolution under a wide diversity of physical situations. X-ray heating enhances evaporation and atmospheric escape, which can impact the long-term stability of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  6. X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVAE IN DENSE CIRCUMSTELLAR MATTER ENVIRONMENTS: A SEARCH FOR COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I.; Fox, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Bloom, J. S.; Sullivan, M.; Gnat, O.; Frail, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Corsi, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Nugent, P. E.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Poznanski, D.; and others

    2013-01-20

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick ({tau} {approx}> 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model. We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile

  7. Nanoparticle characterization by means of scanning free grazing emission X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, Yves; Sá, Jacinto; Szlachetko, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles are considered for applications in domains as various as medical and pharmaceutical sciences, opto- and microelectronics, catalysis, photovoltaics, spintronics or nano- and biotechnology. The applications realized with nanocrystals depend strongly on the physical dimensions (shape and size) and elemental constitution. We demonstrate here that grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) is an element sensitive technique that presents the potential for a reliable and accurate determination of the morphology of nanoparticles deposited on a flat substrate (ready-to-use devices). Thanks to the scanning-free approach of the used GEXRF setup, the composition, shape and average size of nanoparticles are determined in short time intervals, minimizing the exposure to radiation. The (scanning-free) GEXRF technique allows for in situ investigations of the nanoparticulate systems thanks to the penetration properties of both the probe X-ray beam and the emitted X-ray fluorescence signal.

  8. X-ray Emission from Supernovae in Dense Circumstellar Matter Environments: a Search for Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofek, E. O.; Fox, D.; Cenko, Stephen B.; Sullivan, M; Gnat, O.; Frail, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Corsi, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Yaron, O.; Fillippenko, A. V; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Poznanski, D.; Arcavi, I.; Laher, R. R.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Surace, J..

    2013-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (Tau approx > 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model.We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above

  9. X-ray observations with the Einstein Observatory of emission-line galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Perola, G. C.; Elvis, M.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray observations of narrow-emission-line galaxies are presented and discussed. One source, NGC 1365, is found to be extended in the soft X-ray band; three others, NGC 2992, NGC 5506, and NGC 7582, have been observed to vary in intensity. The best fit spectral index and cutoff energy E sub a are derived for NGC 2992, NGC 5506, and NGC 7582. The X-ray spectra of these galaxies are similar to those of type 1 Seyfert galaxies. In the case of NGC 5506 and NGC 7582, the absorbing column N sub H derived is about one order of magnitude greater than predicted from the reddening of thy optical continuum and of the Balmer lines. Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  10. Electronic Structure in Thin Film Organic Semiconductors Studied using Soft X-ray Emission and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Downes, J.; Wang, S.; Learmonth, T.; Plucinski, L.; Matsuura, A.; McGuinness, C.; Glans, P.; Bernardis, S.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin films of the organic semiconductors copper and vanadyl (VO) phthalocyanine (Pc) has been measured using resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. For Cu-Pc we report the observation of two discrete states near E{sub F}. This differs from published photoemission results, but is in excellent agreement with density functional calculations. For VO-Pc, the vanadyl species is shown to be highly localized. Both dipole forbidden V 3d to V 3d*, and O 2p to V 3d* charge transfer transitions are observed, and explained in a local molecular orbital model.

  11. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  12. DETECTION OF DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH NEBULAR O VI

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, N.; Guerrero, M. A.; Jacob, R.; Schoenberner, D.; Steffen, M.

    2013-04-10

    The presence of O VI ions can be indicative of plasma temperatures of a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K that are expected in heat conduction layers between the hot shocked stellar wind gas at several 10{sup 6} K and the cooler (10{sup 4} K) nebular gas of planetary nebulae (PNe). We have used FUSE observations of PNe to search for nebular O VI emission or absorption as a diagnostic of the conduction layer to ensure the presence of hot interior gas. Three PNe showing nebular O VI, namely IC 418, NGC 2392, and NGC 6826, have been selected for Chandra observations and diffuse X-ray emission is indeed detected in each of these PNe. Among the three, NGC 2392 has peculiarly high diffuse X-ray luminosity and plasma temperature compared with those expected from its stellar wind's mechanical luminosity and terminal velocity. The limited effects of heat conduction on the plasma temperature of a hot bubble at the low terminal velocity of the stellar wind of NGC 2392 may partially account for its high plasma temperature, but the high X-ray luminosity needs to be powered by processes other than the observed stellar wind, probably the presence of an unseen binary companion of the central star of the PN (CSPN) of NGC 2392. We have compiled relevant information on the X-ray, stellar, and nebular properties of PNe with a bubble morphology and found that the expectations of bubble models including heat conduction compare favorably with the present X-ray observations of hot bubbles around H-rich CSPNe, but have notable discrepancies for those around H-poor [WR] CSPNe. We note that PNe with more massive central stars can produce hotter plasma and higher X-ray surface brightness inside central hot bubbles.

  13. Laboratory measurements of the x-ray emission following dielectronic recombination onto highly charged argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bulbul, Esra; Hell, Natalie; Foster, Adam; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Porter, Frederick Scott; Smith, Randall K.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap to measure the X-ray emission following resonant dielectronic recombination (DR) onto helium-like and lithium-like argon as a function of electron energy. These measurements were completed by sweeping the energy of EBIT-I's near mono-energetic electron beam from below threshold for DR resonance to above threshold for direct excitation of K-shell transitions in helium-like argon. The X-ray emission was recorded as a function of electron beam energy using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer, whose energy resolution is ~ 5 eV, and also a relatively low resolution, solid-state X-ray detector. These results will be useful when analyzing and interpreting high resolution spectra from celestial sources measured with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory (formerly known as Astro-H), as well as data measured using instruments on the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories. Specifically, these data will help determine if the feature detected at ~ 3.56 keV (Bulbul et al. 2014, Boyarsky et al. 2014) in clusters is the result of the decay of a sterile neutrino, a long sought after dark matter particle candidate. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Chandra Grant AR5-16012A.

  14. THE ORIGIN OF THE PUZZLING HARD X-RAY EMISSION OF γ CASSIOPEIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Motch, Christian; Oliveira, Raimundo Lopes de

    2015-06-20

    Massive B and Be stars produce X-rays from shocks in high-velocity winds with temperatures of a few million degrees and maximum X-ray luminosities of ≈10{sup 31} erg s{sup −1}. Surprisingly, a sub-group of early Be stars exhibits ≥20 times hotter X-ray temperatures and ≥10 times higher X-ray luminosities than normal. This group of Be stars, dubbed γ-Cas analogs, contains about 10 known objects. The origin of this bizarre behavior has been extensively debated in the past decades. Two mechanisms have been put forward: accretion of circumstellar disk matter onto an orbiting white dwarf, or magnetic field interaction between the star and the circumstellar disk. We show here that the X-ray and optical emissions of the prototype of the class, γ-Cas, are very well correlated on year timescales with no significant time delay. Since the expected migration time from internal disk regions that emit most of the optical flux to the orbit of the companion star is several years, the simultaneity of the high energy and optical flux variations indicates that X-ray emission arises from close to the star. The systematic lack of magnetic field detection reported in recent spectro-polarimetric surveys of Be stars is consistent with the absence of strong magnetic wind braking in these fast spinning stars but place strong constraints on the possible origin of the magnetic field. We propose that in γ-Cas, the magnetic field emerges from equatorially condensed subsurface convecting layers, the thickness of which steeply increases with rotation rate, and that γ-Cas and its analogs are the most massive and closest to critical rotation Be stars.

  15. The Effects of Clumps in Explaining X-Ray Emission Lines from Hot Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cassinelli, J. P.; Ignace, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Cho, J.; Murphy, N. A.; Lazarian, A.

    2008-08-20

    It is now well established that stellar winds of hot stars are fragmentary and that the X-ray emission from stellar winds has a strong contribution from shocks in winds. Chandra high spectral resolution observations of line profiles of O and B stars have shown numerous properties that had not been expected. Here we suggest explanations by considering the X-rays as arising from bow shocks that occur where the stellar wind impacts on spherical clumps in the winds. We use an accurate and stable numerical hydrodynamic code to obtain steady state physical conditions for the temperature and density structure in a bow shock. We use these solutions plus analytic approximations to interpret some major X-ray features: the simple power-law distribution of the observed emission measure derived from many hot star X-ray spectra and the wide range of ionization stages that appear to be present in X-ray sources throughout the winds. Also associated with the adiabatic cooling of the gas around a clump is a significant transverse velocity for the hot plasma flow around the clumps, and this can help to understand anomalies associated with observed line widths, and the differences in widths seen in stars with high and low mass-loss rates. The differences between bow shocks and the planar shocks that are often used for hot stars are discussed. We introduce an "on the shock" approximation that is useful for interpreting the X-rays and the consequences of clumps in hot star winds and elsewhere in astronomy.

  16. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WOLF-RAYET BUBBLE S 308

    SciTech Connect

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.

    2012-08-10

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its northwest quadrant, map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a central cavity {approx}22' in size and a shell thickness of {approx}8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at 0.43 keV and O VII at 0.57 keV, and declines toward high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T{sub 1} {approx} 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K, T{sub 2} {approx} 13 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), with a total X-ray luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at the assumed distance of 1.5 kpc.

  17. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange in the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick Dean; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  18. Structure of the X-Ray Emission from the Jet of 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Lee, J. C.; Ogle, P. M.; Drake, J. J.; Fruscione, A.; Grimes, J.; Harris, D.; Kraft, R.; Pease, D.; Schwartz, D.; Siemiginowska, A.; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present images from four Chandra observations of the quasar 3C 273. The zeroth order images from two grating observations using the AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) detector are used to examine the structure and spectrum of the jet. The jet has at least four distinct features which are not resolved in previous observations. Using jet feature nomenclature based on HST observations, we find that knot Al is very bright in X-rays. We have measured the X-ray spectrum of this X-ray knot for the first time, obtaining a photon index of 1.36 +/- 0.11 and a flux density of 37 +/- 4 nJy at 1 keV. Combining this measurement with lower frequency data shows that a pure synchrotron model can fit the spectrum of knot Al from 4 GHz to 5 keV (over nine decades in energy) without a change of spectral slope. Knot A2 is also detected and is somewhat blended with knot B1 but synchrotron emission is not likely to explain the X-ray emission due to the spectral turnover observed in the optical-UV band. No other knots are clearly detected but there is an indication of weak emission from the eastern portion of knot H3. near the "head," which is radio-bright. There is diffuse flux which extends from 14 arcsec to 20 arcsec which shows curvature that is comparable to the optical flux found by Bahcall, et al.

  19. The Discovery of X-ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Back in 1974 the UHURU catalog (3U) had been published with many UHGLS - unidentified high galactic latitude sources. Identifications were hampered by the square degree sized error boxes (positional uncertainties). Could these explain the cosmic X-ray background? Could UHGLS be "X-ray galaxies"? Only three active galaxies (AGNs) had been found as X-ray sources: 3C273, Cen A and NGC 4151, while others had upper limits. What was the difference between X-ray and non-X-ray AGNs? It turned out that the slightly better positioning capability and slightly deeper sensitivity of the Ariel V Sky Survey Instrument (SSI), launched in October 1974, were just enough to show that the UHGLS were Seyfert galaxies. And I was lucky enough that I'd joined the Leicester X-ray group and had taken on the UHGLS for my PhD thesis, with Ken Pounds as my supervisor. With the SSI we made a catalog of high latitude sources, the "2A" catalog, including about a dozen known Seyfert galaxies (lowish luminosity nearby AGNs) and, with Mike Penston and Martin Ward, we went on to identify many of them with both newly discovered normal broad emission line AGNs and a few new "narrow emission line galaxies", or NELGs, as we called them. We are now convinced that it is summation of many obscured NELGs that produce the flat spectrum of the X-ray background, and we are still searching for them in Chandra deep surveys and at higher energies with NuSTAR. There was an obvious connection between the X-ray obscuration and the optical reddening, which must lie outside the region emitting the broad optical spectral lines. Andy Lawrence and I, following a clue from Bill Keel, put this together into what we now call the Unified Scheme for AGN structure. This idea of a flattened torus obscuring the inner regions of the AGN was so dramatically confirmed a few years later -- by Ski Antonucci and Joe Miller's discovery of polarized broad emission lines in NGC1068 -- that the precursor papers became irrelevant. But Ariel

  20. EARLY THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2013-02-10

    We performed a series of hydrodynamical calculations of an ultrarelativistic jet propagating through a massive star and the circumstellar matter (CSM) to investigate the interaction between the ejecta and the CSM. We succeed in distinguishing two qualitatively different cases in which the ejecta are shocked and adiabatically cool. To examine whether the cocoon expanding at subrelativistic speeds emits any observable signal, we calculate the expected photospheric emission from the cocoon. It is found that the emission can explain early thermal X-ray emission recently found in some long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The result implies that the difference of the circumstellar environment of long GRBs can be probed by observing their early thermal X-ray emission.

  1. The evolution of planetary nebulae. V. The diffuse X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, M.; Schönberner, D.; Warmuth, A.

    2008-10-01

    Context: Observations with space-borne X-ray telescopes revealed the existence of soft, diffuse X-ray emission from the inner regions of planetary nebulae. Although the existing images support the idea that this emission arises from the hot shocked central-star wind which fills the inner cavity of a planetary nebula, existing models have difficulties to explain the observations consistently. Aims: We investigate how the inclusion of thermal conduction changes the physical parameters of the hot shocked wind gas and the amount of X-ray emission predicted by time-dependent hydrodynamical models of planetary nebulae with central stars of normal, hydrogen-rich surface composition. Methods: We upgraded our 1D hydrodynamics code NEBEL by to account for energy transfer due to heat conduction, which is of importance at the interface separating the hot shocked wind gas (“hot bubble”) from the much cooler nebular material. With this new version of NEBEL we recomputed a selection of our already existing hydrodynamical sequences and obtained synthetic X-ray spectra for representative models along the evolutionary tracks by means of the freely available CHIANTI package. Results: Heat conduction leads to lower temperatures and higher densities within a bubble and brings the physical properties of the X-ray emitting domain into close agreement with the values derived from observations. The amount of X-rays emitted during the course of evolution depends on the energy dumped into the bubble by the fast stellar wind, on the efficiency of “evaporating” cool nebular gas via heat conduction, and on the bubble's expansion rate. We find from our models that the X-ray luminosity of a planetary nebula increases during its evolution across the HR diagram until stellar luminosity and wind power decline. Depending on the central-star mass and the evolutionary phase, our models predict X-ray [ 0.45-2.5 keV] luminosities between 10-8 and 10-4 of the stellar bolometric luminosities, in

  2. Development of tomographic imaging systems using carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    2005-11-01

    Conventional thermionic x-ray sources use hot filament cathodes to generate electrons for x-ray production. The thermionic technology has several inherent limitations such as high operating temperature, slow response time, and difficulty for miniaturization. On the other hand, field emission provides an alternative to generate electrons without all these limitations. The concept of field emission x-ray source has been proposed and tested in the early 1970s. Unfortunately all of the early field emission x-ray systems failed due primarily to the limitations on the electron field emitters. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently emerged as a promising class of electron emissive materials and field emission x-ray source based on CNTs are expected to have significantly improved properties. We have recently developed a CNT-based field emission micro-focus x-ray source. It shows stable tube current under high operating voltage, extraordinary dynamic imaging capability, and excellent potential for miniaturization. All of these new features make it very attractive for various potential industrial and medical applications. In order to demonstrate its applications, two sets of x-ray imaging systems using this field emission x-ray source were constructed in our lab. One is a micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging system using a single field emission x-ray source for dynamic radiographic and tomographic imaging applications. It shows great potential for the future development of dynamic micro-CT scanner. The other one is a multi-beam field emission x-ray source with multiple addressable focal spots which can provide scanning x-ray beams without mechanical movement. It can lead to fast data acquisition rates for future tomographic imaging systems with a simplified experimental set-up.

  3. EUV and soft x-ray excess emission from clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2000-08-01

    Extreme ultra-violet and soft X-ray radiation (~60-400 eV) from extragalactic sources suffers from severe Galactic absorption losses, rendering the detection of radiation at these energies a complicated task. Clusters are well known to be X-ray emitters; some EUV and soft X-rays are therefore expected as the low- energy `tail' of this emission. The first detection of excess EUV emission, i.e., above that expected fro the X-ray emitting gas, was achieved only very recently (1996), nearly thirty years after cluster X-rays were detected. Basic dynamic and energetic properties of clusters of galaxies are reviewed in Chapter 2. Clusters analyzed in this Dissertation (A2199, A1795, Coma and Virgo) all lie along directions of low line-of-sight Galactic HI column density (NH <= 1-2 × 1020 cm-2), and diffuse excess EUV emission from them was detected in the 60-200 eV band by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). Instrumental issues concerning the Deep Survey detector aboard EUVE are therefore scrutinised in Chapter 3 in order to devise a correct method of data analysis. Relevant issues to the ROSAT Position-sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) detector, used for its soft X-ray sensitivity, are also considered. The EUV and soft X-ray excess emission (the cluster soft excess phenomenon, CSE) is found for all four clusters in the sample (Chapter 4). Some of the clusters show a peculiar trend of the CSE emission, resulting in the increase of the relative importance of the CSE emission with radial distance (the soft-excess radial trend, SERT). Two alternative explanations of the CSE emission are explored: non-thermal radiation due to Inverse Compton (IC) scattering of relativistic electrons and radiation from a warm (~106 K) gas. A detailed treatment of IC scattering (off the microwave background field, the MWB) in the cluster environment is described in Chapter 5, where cluster spectra are fitted to IC models. It is initially shown that the soft excess of some clusters (e

  4. INTRAGROUP AND GALAXY-LINKED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-02-15

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L{sub X} -T relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L{sub X} -{sigma} relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L{sub X} increases with decreasing group H I to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on H I morphology whereby systems with intragroup H I indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L{sub X} of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  5. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  6. Disk instability and the time-dependent X-ray emission from the intermediate polar GK Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Kim, Soon-Wook; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The correlation between the disk instability model for the 1981-1989 optical outbursts of the intermediate polar GK Per and the accompanying X-ray emission is examined, and the self-consistency of the combined optical-X-ray model is investigated. Special attention is given to the nature of the transition in the X-ray emission due to the time-dependent accretion rates in the simple column accretion model. The large variation in the efficiency of hard X-ray production is explained.

  7. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Boni, E. de; Willimann, M.; Safonova, O.; Sa, J.; Smolentsev, G.; Szlachetko, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Schmitt, B.; David, C.; Luecke, A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y.; Jagodzinski, P.

    2012-10-15

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  8. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  9. CAN CHARGE EXCHANGE EXPLAIN ANOMALOUS SOFT X-RAY EMISSION IN THE CYGNUS LOOP?

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this ''anomalously'' enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O{sup 8} {sup +}, O{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 6} {sup +}, C{sup 6} {sup +}, and C{sup 5} {sup +} with H with an energy of 1 keV u{sup –1} (438 km s{sup –1}). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O{sup 7} {sup +} + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  10. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SUPERGIANT SHELL IN IC 2574

    SciTech Connect

    Yukita, Mihoko; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2012-05-01

    The M81 group member dwarf galaxy IC 2574 hosts a supergiant shell of current and recent star formation activity surrounding a 1000 Multiplication-Sign 500 pc hole in the ambient H I gas distribution. Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging observations reveal a luminous, L{sub X} {approx} 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.3-8.0 keV band, point-like source within the hole but offset from its center and fainter diffuse emission extending throughout and beyond the hole. The star formation history at the location of the point source indicates a burst of star formation beginning {approx}25 Myr ago and currently weakening and there is a young nearby star cluster, at least 5 Myr old, bracketing the likely age of the X-ray source at between 5 and {approx}25 Myr. The source is thus likely a bright high-mass X-ray binary-either a neutron star or black hole accreting from an early B star undergoing thermal-timescale mass transfer through Roche lobe overflow. The properties of the residual diffuse X-ray emission are consistent with those expected from hot gas associated with the recent star formation activity in the region.

  11. Interpretation of perturbed temperature based on X-ray emissivity in fusion plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, C.; Cote, A.; Dichaud, D.

    1995-05-01

    The relationship between the dynamical response to perturbations of the soft X-ray emissivity (δE), the electron temperature (δTe), the electron density (δne) and the impurity concentration (δni) for a Maxwellian plasma is analysed in detail. In particular, the so-called 'impurity function' F(Zeff) is also strongly dependent on Te via the direct radiative recombination (DRR) contribution to the X-ray emission, which significantly affects the relation between the perturbed quantities as derived from the popular expression E propto F(Zeff)ne2Tealpha even if the impurity content (or Zeff) remains constant. In order to overcome this difficulty, a simple analytical approximation is derived for F(Zeff,Te) that can be used as a formula to relate the perturbed quantities δE, δTe, δne and δF with ease and accuracy. This simple approximation is illustrated by studying saw-toothing discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) with Te, ne and E measured by the Thomson scattering, the FIR interferometer and the X-ray camera diagnostics, and its accuracy is tested against the predictions of a full X-ray modelling code

  12. Detection of extended X-ray emission surrounding cD galaxies in poor clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kriss, G.A.; Canizares, C.R.; McClintock, J.E.; Feigelson, E.D.

    1980-01-15

    The imaging proportional counter on the Einstein Observatory has detected extended X-ray emission from MKW 3s and AWM 4, two poor clusters containing dominant galaxies. In each case the X-ray emission is centered on the D or cD galaxy, but in MKW 3s it is symmetric (core radius 2'.5) while in AWM 4 it is not (extended 1' in NW-SE direction). The 0.25--3 keV luminosities, 10/sup 44/ ergs s/sup -1/ for MKW 3s and 10/sup 43/ ergs s/sup -1/ for AWM 4, are typical of those observed for the richer Abell clusters. We have measured redshifts of three galaxies in MKW 3s to confirm the physical association of the group. The hot gas present in this cluster is dense enough to confine the relativistic particles in 3C 318.1. As in the rich clusters, the mass of X-ray emitting gas in these two clusters is comparable to the visual mass and is approx.10--20% of the virial mass. Our results suggest that poor clusters can collect enough gas to become detectable X-ray sources if they are relatively compact, which the presence of dominant galaxies indicates.

  13. Search for X-Ray Emission in the Nearest Known Brown Dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    The XMM observation were obtained on 2001 January 07-08 for 51767 s. The Optical Monitor (OM) was used with the V filter for 4 exposures of 5000 s each in imaging mode. We used the data given by the OM to confirm the presence of the source in the field of view. The European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) MOS 1 and MOS2 were used 48724 s each in prime full window mode with 2.5 s time resolution. The EPIC PN was used 46618 s in prime full window mode with 73.4 ms time resolution. The X-ray source closest to the expected position of our target is offset by delta R.A=2.5 arcsec and delta Dec=-28.37 arcsec. This offset is high in comparison with the 0.4 arcsec observed with the optical data. So at this point we already knew that the target was not detected. To confirm that conclusion, we performed the identification of all X-ray sources in the field of view by comparing source to source our image with the one obtained by Rutledge et al. with Chandra. This allowed us to identify all the X-ray sources in our field of view in an area of 20 arcsec times 10 arcsec centered on the expected coordinates of LP944-20. We were then able to conclude that the target was not detected during this observation. This result allowed us to determine a new and better 3 sigma upper limit of X-Ray emission for this object. We have also derived duty cycles for X-ray flares as a function of X-ray luminosity by comparing the XMM data with Chandra and ROSAT data. One student has been supported with the grant during four months (Herve Bouy). A Sun workstation was purchased for him.

  14. Multibeam field emission x-ray system with half-scan reconstruction algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yang; Yu Hengyong; Cao Guohua; Zhao Jun; Wang Ge; Zhou, Otto

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this article, the authors propose a multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) system along with a half-scan fan-beam reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The proposed system consists of a linear CNT-based MBFEX source array, a single large area detector that is divided into same number of segments as the number of x-ray beams, a multihole collimator that aligns each beam with a corresponding detector segment, and a sample rotation stage. The collimator is placed between the source and the object to restrict the x-ray radiations through the target object only. In this design, all the x-ray beams are activated simultaneously to provide multiple projection views of the object. The detector is virtually segmented and synchronized with the x-ray exposure and the physiological signals when gating is involved. The transmitted x-ray intensity from each beam is collected by the corresponding segment on the detector. After each exposure, the object is rotated by a step angle until sufficient data set is collected. The half-scan reconstruction formula for MBFEX system is derived from the conventional filtered backprojection algorithm. To demonstrate the advantages of the system and method in reducing motion artifacts, the authors performed simulations with both standard and dynamic Shepp-Logan phantoms. Results: The numerical results indicate that the proposed multibeam system and the associated half-scan algorithm can effectively reduce the scanning time and improve the image quality for a time-varying object. Conclusions: The MBFEX technique offers an opportunity for the innovation of multisource imaging system.

  15. X-ray Emission from Young Stars in the TW Hya Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Ayres, Thomas R.; France, Kevin; Brown, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    The 9 Myr old TW Hya Association (TWA) is the nearest group (typical distances of ˜50 pc) of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars with ages less than 10 Myr and contains stars with both actively accreting disks and debris disks. We have studied the coronal X-ray emission from a group of low mass TWA common proper motion binaries using the Chandra and Swift satellites. Our aim is to understand better their coronal properties and how high energy photons affect the conditions around young stars and their role in photo-exciting atoms, molecules and dust grains in circumstellar disks and lower density circumstellar gas. Once planet formation is underway, this emission influences protoplanetary evolution and the atmospheric conditions of the newly-formed planets. The X-ray properties for 7 individual stars (TWA 13A, TWA 13B, TWA 9A, TWA 9B, TWA 8A, TWA 8B, and TWA 7) and 2 combined binary systems (TWA 3AB and TWA 2AB) have been measured. All the stars with sufficient signal require two-component fits to their CCD-resolution X-ray spectra, typically with a dominant hot (~2 kev (25 MK)) component and a cooler component at ~0.4 keV (4 MK). The brighter sources all show significant X-ray variability (at a level of 50-100% of quiescence) over the course of 5-15 ksec observations due to flares. We present the X-ray properties for each of the stars and find that the coronal emission is in the super-saturated rotational domain.

  16. Solar Control on Jupiter's Equatorial X-ray Emissions: 26-29 November 2003 XMM-Newton Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Ramsay, G.; Rodriquez, P.; Soria, R.; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    During November 26-29,2003 XMM-Newton observed X-ray emissions from Jupiter for 69 hours. The 0.7-2.0 keV X-ray disk of Jupiter is observed to be brightest at the subsolar point, and limb darkening is seen in the 0.2-2.0 keV and 0.7-2.0 keV images. We present simultaneous lightcurves of Jovian equatorial X-rays and solar X-rays measured by the GOES, SOHO/SEM, and TIMED/SEE satellites. The solar X-ray flares occurring on the Jupiter-facing side of the Sun are matched by corresponding features in the Jovian X- rays. These results support the hypothesis that X-ray emissions from Jovian low-latitudes are solar X-rays scattered and fluoresced from the planet's upper atmosphere, and confirm that the Sun directly controls the non-auroral X-rays fiom Jupiter's disk. Our study suggest that Jovian equatorial X-rays; during certain Jupiter phase, can be used to predict the occurrence of solar flare on the hemisphere of the Sun that is invisible to space weather satellites.

  17. Where is the X-ray emission coming from in RT Cru Symbiotic System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    RT Cru is a member of a new sub-class of symbiotic interacting binaries with copious hard X-ray emission. It consists of a high-mass WD (>1.3 Ms) accreting from the wind of an M giant, and it is an important system to study in order to constrain precursor conditions for asymmetric PN and SN Ia. The Chandra HRC-I observation (Dec 2012), and an overlapping Swift observation, detected intermittent soft X-ray flaring, and we find evidence for a significant soft component in the spectrum. The flaring could be a consequence of clumped absorption columns moving in and out of the line of sight, or the variations could be due to changes at the accretion boundary layer. Further observations are needed to determine the origin of the soft emission and its relation to the hard emission.

  18. X-Ray Emission from Supernovae in Dense Circumstellar Matter Environments: A Search for Collisionless Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofek, E.O; Fox, D.; Cenko, B.; Sullivan, M.; Gnat, O.; Frail A.; Horesh, A.; Corsi, A; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Yaron, O.; Filippenko, A. V.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Poznanski, D; Arcavi, L.; Laher, R. R.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Surace, J.

    2012-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (tau approx > 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and -dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into 8. collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift-XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 type-IIn SNe, one type-Ibn SN and eiht hydrogen-poor super-luminous SNe (SLSN-I; SN 2005ap like). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSl\\l. Therefore, we suggest that their optical light curves are powered by shock breakout in CSM. We show that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock breakout model. We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, type-IIn/Ibn SNe are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained at too early times (i.e., near the SN maximum light) to conclude about their nature. Late time X-ray observations are required in order to further test if these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakOut in a wind profile. We argue that the time scale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above the shock region. The optical light curves of SNe, for which the X-ray emission peaks at late times, are likely powered by the

  19. Chandra Observations of Extended X-Ray Emission in ARP 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, J. C.; Clements, D. L.; Lamb, S. A.; Shaked, S.; Hearn, N. C.; Colina, L.; Mundell, C.; Borne, K.; Baker, A. C.; Arribas, S.

    2003-01-01

    We resolve the extended X-ray emission from the prototypical ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. Extended, faint, edge-brightened, soft X-ray lobes outside the optical galaxy are observed to a distance of 1CL 15 kpc on each side of the nuclear region. Bright plumes inside the optical isophotes coincide with the optical line emission and extend 1 1 kpc from end to end across the nucleus. The data for the plumes cannot be fitted by a single-temperature plasma and display a range of temperatures from 0.2 to 1 keV. The plumes emerge from bright, diffuse circumnuclear emission in the inner 3 kpc centered on the Ha peak, which is displaced from the radio nuclei. There is a close morphological correspondence between the Ha and soft X-ray emission on all spatial scales. We interpret the plumes as a starburst-driven superwind and discuss two interpretations of the emission from the lobes in the context of simulations of the merger dynamics of Arp 220.

  20. Resonant x-ray emission from gas-phase TiCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, C.F.; Tronc, M.; De Groot, F.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) has proved to be a powerful tool for studying the electronic structure of condensed matter. Over the past few years it has been used mainly for studying the valence bands of solids and condensed molecules. Very recently the advent of high brightness photon beams provided by third generation synchrotron radiation source undulators, associated with efficient x-ray emission spectrometers has made it possible to perform experiments on free diatomic molecular systems. RXE spectra of free molecules are of prime importance to gain insight into their electronic structure and bonding as they reflect the symmetry of orbitals engaged in the two-electron, two-step process with the l = 0, {+-}2 parity-conserving selection rule, and are free from solid state effects which can introduce difficulties in the interpretation. They provide information (more so than XAS) on the core excited states, and, when performed at fixed incident photon energy as a function of the emitted photon energy, on the electronic excitation (charge transfer, multiplet states). Moreover the anisotropy of the angular distribution of resonant x-ray emission affects the relative intensity of the emission peaks and provides information concerning the symmetries of final states. This is a preliminary report on what are the first RXE spectra of a 3d transition metal complex in the gas phase. The experiment concerns the Ti 3d {yields}2p emission spectrum of TiCl{sub 4} over the 450 to 470 eV region.

  1. Suzaku Observations of the Diffuse X-Ray Emission across the Fermi Bubbles' Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Stawarz, Ł.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Kimura, M.; Takei, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Inoue, Y.; Nakamori, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present Suzaku X-ray observations along two edge regions of the Fermi Bubbles, with eight ~= 20 ks pointings across the northern part of the North Polar Spur (NPS) surrounding the north bubble and six across the southernmost edge of the south bubble. After removing compact X-ray features, diffuse X-ray emission is clearly detected and is well reproduced by a three-component spectral model consisting of unabsorbed thermal emission (temperature kT ~= 0.1 keV) from the Local Bubble, absorbed kT ~= 0.3 keV thermal emission related to the NPS and/or Galactic halo (GH), and a power-law component at a level consistent with the cosmic X-ray background. The emission measure (EM) of the 0.3 keV plasma decreases by ~= 50% toward the inner regions of the northeast bubble, with no accompanying temperature change. However, such a jump in the EM is not clearly seen in the south bubble data. While it is unclear whether the NPS originates from a nearby supernova remnant or is related to previous activity within or around the Galactic center, our Suzaku observations provide evidence that suggests the latter scenario. In the latter framework, the presence of a large amount of neutral matter absorbing the X-ray emission as well as the existence of the kT ~= 0.3 keV gas can be naturally interpreted as a weak shock driven by the bubbles' expansion in the surrounding medium, with velocity v exp ~ 300 km s-1 (corresponding to shock Mach number {M} \\simeq 1.5), compressing the GH gas to form the NPS feature. We also derived an upper limit for any non-thermal X-ray emission component associated with the bubbles and demonstrate that, in agreement with the aforementioned findings, the non-thermal pressure and energy estimated from a one-zone leptonic model of its broadband spectrum, are in rough equilibrium with that of the surrounding thermal plasma.

  2. Suzaku observations of the diffuse X-ray emission across the Fermi bubbles' edges

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Stawarz, Ł.; Kimura, M.; Takei, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Cheung, C. C.; Inoue, Y.; Nakamori, T.

    2013-12-10

    We present Suzaku X-ray observations along two edge regions of the Fermi Bubbles, with eight ≅ 20 ks pointings across the northern part of the North Polar Spur (NPS) surrounding the north bubble and six across the southernmost edge of the south bubble. After removing compact X-ray features, diffuse X-ray emission is clearly detected and is well reproduced by a three-component spectral model consisting of unabsorbed thermal emission (temperature kT ≅ 0.1 keV) from the Local Bubble, absorbed kT ≅ 0.3 keV thermal emission related to the NPS and/or Galactic halo (GH), and a power-law component at a level consistent with the cosmic X-ray background. The emission measure (EM) of the 0.3 keV plasma decreases by ≅ 50% toward the inner regions of the northeast bubble, with no accompanying temperature change. However, such a jump in the EM is not clearly seen in the south bubble data. While it is unclear whether the NPS originates from a nearby supernova remnant or is related to previous activity within or around the Galactic center, our Suzaku observations provide evidence that suggests the latter scenario. In the latter framework, the presence of a large amount of neutral matter absorbing the X-ray emission as well as the existence of the kT ≅ 0.3 keV gas can be naturally interpreted as a weak shock driven by the bubbles' expansion in the surrounding medium, with velocity v {sub exp} ∼ 300 km s{sup –1} (corresponding to shock Mach number M≃1.5), compressing the GH gas to form the NPS feature. We also derived an upper limit for any non-thermal X-ray emission component associated with the bubbles and demonstrate that, in agreement with the aforementioned findings, the non-thermal pressure and energy estimated from a one-zone leptonic model of its broadband spectrum, are in rough equilibrium with that of the surrounding thermal plasma.

  3. Possible Charge-Exchange X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop Detected with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Hiroko; Kimura, Masashi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hewitt. John W.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2011-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopic measurements of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant indicate that metal abundances throughout most of the remnant s rim are depleted to approx.0.2 times the solar value. However, recent X-ray studies have revealed in some narrow regions along the outermost rim anomalously "enhanced" abundances (up to approx. 1 solar). The reason for these anomalous abundances is not understood. Here, we examine X-ray spectra in annular sectors covering nearly the entire rim of the Cygnus Loop using Suzaku (21 pointings) and XMM-Newton (1 pointing). We find that spectra in the "enhanced" abundance regions commonly show a strong emission feature at approx.0.7 keV. This feature is likely a complex of He-like O K(gamma + delta + epsilon), although other possibilities cannot be fully excluded. The intensity of this emission relative to He-like O K(alpha) appears to be too high to be explained as thermal emission. This fact, as well as the spatial concentration of the anomalous abundances in the outermost rim, leads us to propose an origin from charge-exchange processes between neutrals and H-like O. We show that the presence of charge-exchange emission could lead to the inference of apparently "enhanced" metal abundances using pure thermal emission models. Accounting for charge-exchange emission, the actual abundances could be uniformly low throughout the rim. The overall abundance depletion remains an open question. Subject headings: ISM: abundances ISM: individual objects (Cygnus Loop) ISM: supernova remnants X-rays: ISM atomic processes

  4. The Soft X-Ray Emission in a Large Sample of Galaxy Clusters with ROSAT PSPC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Lieu, Richard; Joy, Marshall K.; Nevalainen, Jukka H.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The study of soft X-ray emission of 38 X-ray selected galaxy clusters observed by ROSAT PSPC indicates that the soft excess phenomenon may be a common occurrence in galaxy clusters. Excess soft X-ray radiation, above the contribution from the hot intra-cluster medium, is evident in a large fraction of sources, and is clearly detected with large statistical significance in the deepest observations. The investigation relies on new, high resolution 21 cm HI observations. The sample selection also features analysis of infrared images, to further ensure reliability of results with respect to the characteristics of Galactic absorption. The possibility of background or calibration effects as cause of the excess emission is likewise investigated; a detailed analysis of the distribution of the excess emission with respect to detector position and Galactic HI column density shows that the excess emission is a genuine celestial phenomenon. We find evidence for a preferential distribution of the soft excess emission at distances larger than approx. 150-200 kpc from the centers of clusters; this behavior may be naturally explained in the context of a non-thermal Inverse-Compton scenario. Alternatively, we propose that the phenomenon maybe caused by thermal emission of very large-scale 'warm' filaments seen in recent hydrodynamic simulations. This new interpretation relieves the very demanding requirements of either the traditional intra-cluster 'warm' gas and the non-thermal scenarios. We also investigate the possibility of the soft excess originating from unresolved, X-ray faint cluster galaxies.

  5. An X-ray Survey of FU Orionis Stars andUnusual X-ray Emission from Embedded YoungStars in NGC 2071

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Simmons, A. E.; Audard, M.; Briggs, K. R.; Guedel, M.; Meyer, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    We present new results from the first X-ray survey of accreting FU Orionis stars (FUors) and a pointed X-ray observation of the infrared cluster near the reflection nebula NGC 2071 in the Orion B cloud. Both observations reveal unusual X-ray spectra that challenge interpretive models. FUors are low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars that have undergone optical eruptions attributed to a large increase in the disk accretion rate. The prototype FU Ori and V1735 Cyg were both detected and show high temperature plasma typical of magnetic (e.g. coronal) emission. FU Ori also reveals a cooler component at kT = 0.7 keV viewed through lower absorption that could be shock-related, but a magnetic origin seems more likely (Skinner et al. 2006, ApJ, 643, 995). The IR cluster in NGC 2071 is one of the closest star-forming regions known to contain young high-mass stars. We have detected an unusual X-ray source within 1 arcsec of IRS-1, which is thought to be an embedded high-mass star. It drives a powerful outflow and is surrounded by a dense molecular disk or ring. The X-ray spectrum shows a hard continuum extending up to at least 8 keV and a broad fluorescent Fe line at 6.43 keV. The fluorescent line likely originates in cold nearby material (possibly the surrounding disk) illuminated by the heavily-absorbed X-ray source. This work is supported by NASA grants NNG05GJ15G, NNG05GK52G, and NNX06AE93G.

  6. A Deep X-Ray View of the Bare AGN Ark 120. I. Revealing the Soft X-Ray Line Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. N.; Porquet, D.; Braito, V.; Nardini, E.; Lobban, A.; Turner, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 120 is a prototype example of the so-called class of bare nucleus active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whereby there is no known evidence for the presence of ionized gas along the direct line of sight. Here deep (>400 ks exposure), high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Ark 120 is presented from XMM-Newton observations that were carried out in 2014 March, together with simultaneous Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating exposures. The high-resolution spectra confirmed the lack of intrinsic absorbing gas associated with Ark 120, with the only X-ray absorption present originating from the interstellar medium (ISM) of our own Galaxy, with a possible slight enhancement of the oxygen abundance required with respect to the expected ISM values in the solar neighborhood. However, the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines are revealed for the first time in the XMM-Newton RGS spectrum, associated with the AGN and arising from the He- and H-like ions of N, O, Ne, and Mg. The He-like line profiles of N, O, and Ne appear velocity broadened, with typical FWHMs of ˜5000 km s-1, whereas the H-like profiles are unresolved. From the clean measurement of the He-like triplets, we deduce that the broad lines arise from a gas of density n e ˜ 1011 cm-3, while the photoionization calculations infer that the emitting gas covers at least 10% of 4π steradian. Thus the broad soft X-ray profiles appear coincident with an X-ray component of the optical-UV broad-line region on sub-parsec scales, whereas the narrow profiles originate on larger parsec scales, perhaps coincident with the AGN narrow-line region. The observations show that Ark 120 is not intrinsically bare and substantial X-ray-emitting gas exists out of our direct line of sight toward this AGN.

  7. A Deep X-Ray View of the Bare AGN Ark 120. I. Revealing the Soft X-Ray Line Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. N.; Porquet, D.; Braito, V.; Nardini, E.; Lobban, A.; Turner, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 120 is a prototype example of the so-called class of bare nucleus active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whereby there is no known evidence for the presence of ionized gas along the direct line of sight. Here deep (>400 ks exposure), high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Ark 120 is presented from XMM-Newton observations that were carried out in 2014 March, together with simultaneous Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating exposures. The high-resolution spectra confirmed the lack of intrinsic absorbing gas associated with Ark 120, with the only X-ray absorption present originating from the interstellar medium (ISM) of our own Galaxy, with a possible slight enhancement of the oxygen abundance required with respect to the expected ISM values in the solar neighborhood. However, the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines are revealed for the first time in the XMM-Newton RGS spectrum, associated with the AGN and arising from the He- and H-like ions of N, O, Ne, and Mg. The He-like line profiles of N, O, and Ne appear velocity broadened, with typical FWHMs of ∼5000 km s‑1, whereas the H-like profiles are unresolved. From the clean measurement of the He-like triplets, we deduce that the broad lines arise from a gas of density n e ∼ 1011 cm‑3, while the photoionization calculations infer that the emitting gas covers at least 10% of 4π steradian. Thus the broad soft X-ray profiles appear coincident with an X-ray component of the optical–UV broad-line region on sub-parsec scales, whereas the narrow profiles originate on larger parsec scales, perhaps coincident with the AGN narrow-line region. The observations show that Ark 120 is not intrinsically bare and substantial X-ray-emitting gas exists out of our direct line of sight toward this AGN.

  8. Chandra X-Ray Grating Spectrometry of η Carinae near X-Ray Minimum. I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, D. B.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pittard, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T. R.

    2008-06-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star η Car, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of η Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best-resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The Script R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggesting that the line-forming region is >1.6 stellar radii from the companion star. We show that simple geometrical models cannot simultaneously fit both the observed centroid variations and changes in line width as a function of phase. We show that the observed profiles can be fitted with synthetic profiles with a reasonable model of the emissivity along the wind-wind collision boundary. We use this analysis to help constrain the line formation region as a function of orbital phase, and the orbital geometry.

  9. Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission in Starburst Galaxies as Synchrotron from Very High Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the diffuse hard X-ray (2-10 keV) emission from starburst galaxies is a long-standing problem. We suggest that synchrotron emission of 10-100 TeV electrons and positrons (e ±) can contribute to this emission, because starbursts have strong magnetic fields. We consider three sources of e ± at these energies: (1) primary electrons directly accelerated by supernova remnants, (2) pionic secondary e ± created by inelastic collisions between cosmic ray (CR) protons and gas nuclei in the dense interstellar medium of starbursts, and (3) pair e ± produced between the interactions between 10 and 100 TeV γ-rays and the intense far-infrared (FIR) radiation fields of starbursts. We create one-zone steady-state models of the CR population in the Galactic center (R <= 112 pc), NGC 253, M82, and Arp 220's nuclei, assuming a power-law injection spectrum for electrons and protons. We consider different injection spectral slopes, magnetic field strengths, CR acceleration efficiencies, and diffusive escape times, and include advective escape, radiative cooling processes, and secondary and pair e ±. We compare these models to extant radio and GeV and TeV γ-ray data for these starbursts, and calculate the diffuse synchrotron X-ray and inverse Compton (IC) luminosities of these starbursts in the models which satisfy multiwavelength constraints. If the primary electron spectrum extends to ~PeV energies and has a proton/electron injection ratio similar to the Galactic value, we find that synchrotron emission contributes 2%-20% of their unresolved, diffuse hard X-ray emission. However, there is great uncertainty in this conclusion because of the limited information on the CR electron spectrum at these high energies. IC emission is likewise a minority of the unresolved X-ray emission in these starbursts, from 0.1% in the Galactic center to 10% in Arp 220's nuclei, with the main uncertainty being the starbursts' magnetic field. We also model generic starbursts, including

  10. Dynamics and X-ray emission of a galactic superwind interacting with disk and halo gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchkov, Anatoly A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Leitherner, Claus

    1994-01-01

    There is a general agreement that the conspicuous extranuclear X-ray, optical-line, and radio-contiuum emission of starbursts is associated with powerful galactic superwinds blowing from their centers. However, despite the significant advances in observational studies of superwinds, there is no consensus on the nature of the emitting material and even on the emission mechanisms themselves. This is to a great extent a consequence of a poor understanding of dynamical processes in the starburst superwind regions. To address this issue, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galactic superwinds. While previous similar studies have used a single (disk) component to represent the ISM of the starburst galaxy, we analyze the interaction of the wind with a two-component disk-halo ambient interstellar medium and argue that this two-component representation is crucial for adequate modeling of starbursts. The emphasis of this study is on the geometry and structure of the wind region and the X-ray emission arising in the wind material and the shocked gas in the disk and the halo of the galaxy. The simulation results have shown that a clear-cut bipolar wind can easily develop under a range of very different conditions. On the other hand, a complex 'filamentary' structure associated with the entrained dense disk material is found to arise within the hot bubble blown out by the wind. The flow pattern within the bubble is dominated equally by the central biconic outflow and a system of whirling motions r elated to the origin and development of the 'filaments'. The filament parameters make them a good candidate for optical-emission-line filamentary gas observed in starburst halos. We find that the history of mass and energy deposition in the starburst region of the galaxy is crucial for wind dynamics. A 'mild' early wind, which arises as a result of the cumulative effect of stellar winds from massive stars, produces a bipolar vertical cavity in the disk and

  11. Population synthesis of accreting white dwarfs - II. X-ray and UV emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Woods, T. E.; Yungelson, L. R.; Gilfanov, M.; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-11-01

    Accreting white dwarfs (WDs) with non-degenerate companions are expected to emit in soft X-rays and the UV, if accreted H-rich material burns stably. They are an important component of the unresolved emission of elliptical galaxies, and their combined ionizing luminosity may significantly influence the optical line emission from warm interstellar medium (ISM). In an earlier paper, we modelled populations of accreting WDs, first generating WD with main-sequence, Hertzsprung gap and red giant companions with the population synthesis code BSE, and then following their evolution with a grid of evolutionary tracks computed with MESA. Now we use these results to estimate the soft X-ray (0.3-0.7 keV), H- and He II-ionizing luminosities of nuclear burning WDs and the number of supersoft X-ray sources for galaxies with different star formation histories. For the starburst case, these quantities peak at ˜1 Gyr and decline by ˜1-3 orders of magnitude by the age of 10 Gyr. For stellar ages of ˜10 Gyr, predictions of our model are consistent with soft X-ray luminosities observed by Chandra in nearby elliptical galaxies and He II 4686 Å/H β line ratio measured in stacked Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of retired galaxies, the latter characterizing the strength and hardness of the UV radiation field. However, the soft X-ray luminosity and He II 4686 Å/H β ratio are significantly overpredicted for stellar ages of ≲4-8 Gyr. We discuss various possibilities to resolve this discrepancy and tentatively conclude that it may be resolved by a modification of the typically used criteria of dynamically unstable mass-loss for giant stars.

  12. Soft X-Ray Emission Analysis Of A Pulsed Capillary Discharge Operated In Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present results from a pulsed capillary ns discharge source, operated in Nitrogen and N/He mixtures, in an alumina capillary 2.1mm long with outer diameter of 6.3mm and inner diameter of 1.6mm. The electrical energy stored is 0.5J with peak current of 6kA. Fast charging from an IGBT based pulsed power circuit allows operation at 35-600 Hz with voltages in the range of 18-24kV. Characteristic time-integrated N/He spectra were recorded and analyzed for values of 20-200 Å, with clear evidence of He-like Nitrogen emission at 28.8Å, which represents a possible source for water window soft x-ray microscopy. Filtered diode measurements reveal the influence of axial electron beams, generated by hollow cathode dynamics, on the x-ray emission in the range of 300-450 eV. We discuss optimal voltage applied and pressure conditions for soft x-ray generation. Time-integrated MCP images of a filtered slit-wire system delivered clear evidence of full wall detachment with ~500μm in radial size for the entire emission range and ~200μm for the emission in the 300-450 eV range.

  13. Nonthermal emission model of isolated X-ray pulsar RX J0420.0-5022

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkheidze, N.; Babyk, Iu.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an alternative theoretical interpretation to the generally assumed thermal emission models of the observed X-ray spectrum of isolated pulsar RX J0420.0-5022 is presented. It is well-known that at a pulsar surface, the distribution function of relativistic particles is one-dimensional. However, cyclotron instability causes an appearance of transverse momenta of relativistic electrons, which as a result start to radiate in the synchrotron regime. On the basis of the Vlasov kinetic equation we study the process of quasi-linear diffusion (QLD) developed by means of the cyclotron instability. This mechanism enables the generation optical and X-ray emissions on the light cylinder lengthscales. An analysis of the three archival XMM-Newton observations of RX J0420.0-5022, is performed. Considering a different approach to synchrotron emission theory, a spectral energy distribution was obtained, which was in a good agreement with the observational data. A fit to the X-ray spectrum was conducted using both the present synchrotron emission model spectrum absorbed by cold interstellar matter, as well as the generally assumed black-body absorption model.

  14. A NOVEL PARADIGM FOR SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH EXTENDED X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Rezzolla, Luciano; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-04-01

    The merger of a binary of neutron stars provides natural explanations for many of the features of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), such as the generation of a hot torus orbiting a rapidly rotating black hole, which can then build a magnetic jet and provide the energy reservoir to launch a relativistic outflow. However, this scenario has problems explaining the recently discovered long-term and sustained X-ray emission associated with the afterglows of a subclass of SGRBs. We propose a new model that explains how an X-ray afterglow can be sustained by the product of the merger and how the X-ray emission is produced before the corresponding emission in the gamma-band, though it is observed to follow it. Overall, our paradigm combines in a novel manner a number of well-established features of the emission in SGRBs and results from simulations. Because it involves the propagation of an ultra-relativistic outflow and its interaction with a confining medium, the paradigm also highlights a unifying phenomenology between short and long GRBs.

  15. Evaluation of continuum x-ray emission for measuring electron temperatures in ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, John; Cobble, James; Kyrala, George; Wilson, Douglas

    2008-11-01

    Though most ICF capsules produce plasma conditions where the electron and ion temperatures are not equal and the electrons serve as a sink for the hotter ions, the electron temperature is rarely measured in ICF experiments. When it is measured, one usually relies on spectral emission from much higher z dopants that are assumed do not perturb the conditions in the implosion. We present here an evaluation of the continuum emission produced in thin glass capsule implosions and compare temperatures determined from the continuum emission to that obtained from K-shell line emission in doped implosions. The dopant used is Kr and the x-ray range evaluated is between 12-17 keV. In this evaluation we consider how these two methods compare at many different dopant and gas fill concentrations and estimate the usefulness of the method when no dopant is present. Correlations are also considered with the uniformity of the x-ray source by considering x-ray framing camera images in the same spectral range.

  16. X-ray emission from charge exchange in the Cygnus Loop SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Shawn R.; Wang, Q. Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The Cygnus Loop has been the focus of substantial debate concerning the contribution of charge exchange (CX) to supernova remnant (SNR) X-ray emission. We take advantage of a distinct feature of CX, enhanced Kα forbidden line emission, and employ the energy centroid of the O VII Kα triplet as a diagnostic. Based on X-ray spectra extracted from an extensive set of Suzaku observations, we measure the energy centroid shifts of the triplet on and off the shock rim of the remnant. We find that enhanced forbidden to resonance line emission exists throughout much of the rim and this enhancement azimuthally correlates with non-radiative Hα filaments, a tracer of strong neutral-plasma interaction in the optical. We also show that alternative mechanisms cannot explain the observed enhancement. These results demonstrate the need to model the CX contribution to the X-ray emission of SNRs, particularly for shocks propagating in a partially neutral medium. Such modelling may be critically important to the correct measurements of the ionization, thermal, and chemical properties of SNRs.

  17. Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Crematorium Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Yoskowitz, Joshua; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-MeV protons from the 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. We measured significant concentrations of sulfur, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and iron, but essentially no mercury in the aerosol samples. The lower limit of detection for airborne mercury in this experiment was approximately 0.2 ng / m3. The PIXE analysis of the soil samples showed the presence of elements commonly found in soil (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), but no trace of mercury. There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-Me

  18. SUPERORBITAL MODULATION OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BINARY LSI +61 303

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyakova, M.; Neronov, A.; Molkov, S.; Lutovinov, A.; Pooley, G.

    2012-03-10

    We report the discovery of a systematic constant time lag between the X-ray and radio flares of the gamma-ray binary LSI +61 303, persistent over a long, multi-year timescale. Using the data from the monitoring of the system by RXTE we show that the orbital phase of X-ray flares from the source varies from {phi}{sub X} {approx_equal} 0.35 to {phi}{sub X} {approx_equal} 0.75 on the superorbital 4.6 yr timescale. Simultaneous radio observations show that periodic radio flares always lag the X-ray flare by {Delta}{phi}{sub X-R} {approx_equal} 0.2. We propose that the constant phase lag corresponds to the time of flight of the high-energy particle-filled plasma blobs from inside the binary to the radio emission region at the distance of {approx}10 times the binary separation distance. We put forward a hypothesis that the X-ray bursts correspond to the moments of formation of plasma blobs inside the binary system.

  19. Experimental study of hard-X ray emission from laboratory sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Rizzi, Rolando; Levi, Giuseppe; Malgesini, Roberto; Villa, Andrea; Mazza, Paolo; Labanti, Claudio; Fuschino, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo; Bianchini, David; Brancaccio, Rossella; Montanari, Alessandro; Patrizii, Laura

    2014-05-01

    We present the characterization of hard-X rays produced by meter-long laboratory sparks carried out at the high-voltage laboratory of RSE, Milano, Italy. Sparks are known to emit X-rays when positive and negative streamers connect, before breakdown. Numerical simulations suggest that X-rays are produced by Bremsstrahlung in air by electrons accelerated to the runaway regime in the high electric field at the streamers tip. Positive meter-long discharges are produced by a Marx generator loaded by a meter-long air gap formed by a spherical anode and a conical-shaped cathode. Maximum voltage at breakdown is about 1 MV. We investigate the production of X-rays by means of an array of scintillation detectors deployed around the cathode. Each detector is a 2'' NaI(Tl) scintillating crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Each detector is battery-powered and enclosed in a metallic housing for EM shielding. Analog signal output is trasmitted to a shielded control room by means of optical fibre tranceivers, and then collected by a fast digitizer. We present the experimental setup and first results concerning detection efficiency, energy spectra, and geometrical distribution of the emission.

  20. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N70 and N185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Rosado, M.; Sánchez-Cruces, M.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles (SBs) N70 (DEM L301) and N185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of 2.6×10{sup 6} K and 2.3×10{sup 6} K, for N70 and N185, respectively. For N70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the SB when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission, while for N185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such as a supernova explosion, as has been proposed in previous numerical models.

  1. Models of Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2016-04-01

    The first models of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray production in the heliosphere were developed shortly after the discovery of SWCX emission at the end of 1990s. Since then, continuous monitoring of the global solar wind evolution through the solar cycle has allowed better constraints on its interaction with the interstellar neutrals. We have a fairly accurate description of the interstellar neutral density distributions in interplanetary space. However, the solar wind heavy ion fluxes, and especially their short term variability and propagation through interplanetary space, have remained relatively elusive due to the sparseness or lack of in situ data, especially towards high ecliptic latitudes. In this talk, I will present a summary the heliospheric SWCX modeling efforts, and an overview of the global solar cycle variability of heliospheric SWCX emission, while commenting on the difficulties of modeling the real-time variability of the heliospheric X-ray signal.

  2. Electronic Structure of LiC6 Studied by Soft X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A.; Schnatterly, S.

    1987-04-01

    We present and discuss carbon K soft X-ray emission spectra of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and LiC6, stage 1 Li intercalated graphite. These measurements allow us to observe the filling of the carbon π states by the electrons from the donor alkali atoms. By fitting the shape of these donor-filled π states with simple models, we can determine several parameters describing the electronic density of states near the Fermi energy in this material. In addition knowing the charge transfer, and measuring the area under the donor-filled π states allows us to evaluate the intensity enhancement seen in X-ray emission near the Fermi energy relative to the rest of the π band.

  3. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  4. Multilayer mirror monochromatic self-emission x-ray imaging on the Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Deeney, C.; Coverdale, C. A.; Meyer, C. J.; Le Pell, P. D.

    2006-10-15

    A time-resolved, monochromatic soft x-ray diagnostic has been developed for self-emission imaging of imploding z pinches on the Z accelerator [R. B. Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)] at Sandia National Laboratories. Multiple pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror with narrow photon energy bandwidth (<10 eV) onto a 1 ns gated microchannel plate detector. High-energy bremsstrahlung x rays are not reflected, providing improved signal to noise in comparison to a standard filtered pinhole camera included in the same beamline of the instrument. An example of data from the existing {approx}277 eV imaging system is presented, showing cooler imploding mass extending to larger radius than the on-axis K-shell emission of an aluminum wire array. Multilayer mirror and filter pair configurations ranging from 96 to 769 eV are discussed.

  5. Second launch of the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Sapkota, Dhaka

    2016-04-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission to study the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) and Local Hot Bubble (LHB) X-ray emission. After a successful launch of December 2012, DXL’s capabilities were expanded by using two additional proportional counters and three unique filters for the launch of December 2015. Employing Be-, B- and C-based plastic filters, DXL mission re-scanned the Helium Focusing Cone for better spectral and positional information (to address the IBEX controversy). In this paper, we will review the upgraded mission hardware and performance, while sharing some preliminary results from the latest observation.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  6. Triple-path collector optics for grazing incident x-ray emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokushima, T.; Horikawa, Y.; Shin, S.

    2011-07-01

    A new type of collector optics was developed for grazing incident x-ray emission spectrometer. The collector optics used two cylindrical mirrors to add two extra light paths while keeping the center light path that directly illuminates the grating. The design and properties of the spectrometer using the triple-path collector optics were evaluated using ray-tracing simulations, and validity of this design in terms of throughput and energy resolution was confirmed by the experimentally obtained spectra.

  7. Triple-path collector optics for grazing incident x-ray emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tokushima, T; Horikawa, Y; Shin, S

    2011-07-01

    A new type of collector optics was developed for grazing incident x-ray emission spectrometer. The collector optics used two cylindrical mirrors to add two extra light paths while keeping the center light path that directly illuminates the grating. The design and properties of the spectrometer using the triple-path collector optics were evaluated using ray-tracing simulations, and validity of this design in terms of throughput and energy resolution was confirmed by the experimentally obtained spectra. PMID:21806173

  8. Variable X-Ray and UV emission from AGB stars: Accretion activity associated with binarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Almost all of our current understanding of the late evolutionary stages of (1 — 8) Mʘ stars is based on single-star models. However, binarity can drastically affect late stellar evolution, producing dramatic changes in the history and geometry of mass loss that occurs in stars as they evolve off the AGB to become planetary nebulae (PNe). A variety of binary models have been proposed, which can lead to the generation of accretion disks and magnetic fields, which in turn produce the highly collimated jets that have been proposed as the primary agents for the formation of bipolar and multipolar PNe. However, observational evidence of binarity in AGB stars is sorely lacking simply these stars are very luminous and variable, invalidating standard techniques for binary detection. Using an innovative technique of searching for UV emission from AGB stars with GALEX, we have identified a class of AGB stars with far- ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars), that are likely candidates for active accretion associated with a binary companion. We have carried out a pilot survey for X-ray emission from fuvAGB stars. The X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations show similar variations in the UV fluxes. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a main-sequence companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  9. Laboratory Measurements of the X-ray Line Emission from Neon-like Fe XVII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Scofield, J. H.; Boyce, K. R.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Gu, M. F.; Kahn, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    We have conducted a systematic study of the dominant x-ray line emission from Fe XVII. These studies include relative line intensities in the optically thin limit, intensities in the presence of radiation from satellite lines from lower charge states of iron, and the absolute excitation cross sections of some of the strongest lines. These measurements were conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap facility using crystal spectrometers and a NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center microcalorimeter array.

  10. X-ray emission spectroscopy of well-characterised non-LTE plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgaux, A. C.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Audebert, P.; Marquès, J. R.; Vassura, L.; Vinci, T.; Dorchies, F.; Leguay, P. M.; Chung, H. K.; Bowen, C.; Dervieux, V.; Renaudin, P.; Silvert, V.; Jacquemot, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will present an experimental platform developed on LULI2000 to measure x-ray emission of non-LTE plasmas in well-defined hydrodynamic conditions thanks to implementation of a whole set of diagnostics, including time-resolved electronic and ionic Thomson scattering and self-optical pyrometry. K-, L- and M-shell spectra will be presented and the methodology, that has been developed to analyze them, discussed.

  11. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  12. Infrared emission from central dominant galaxies in X-ray luminous clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Mcnamara, Brian R.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    IRAS strip scans are used to study the emission properties of 27 dominant galaxies that lie in the center of clusters rich in hot gas. In this sample, 30 percent of the objects were detected at 12/25 microns, while 46 percent were detected at 60/100 microns. The ratio of the IR to optical flux densities is an order of magnitude greater than for elliptical and S0 galaxies. The presence of IR emission is not obviously correlated with z, m(v), Mv, the presence of young stellar populations, emission-line gas, the X-ray luminosity, or the cooling rate of hot gas.

  13. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. S.; Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  14. X-ray continuum emission spectroscopy from hot dense matter at Gbar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D. Falcone, R. W.; Döppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Swift, D. C.; Chapman, D. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Neumayer, P.

    2014-11-15

    We have measured the time-resolved x-ray continuum emission spectrum of ∼30 times compressed polystyrene created at stagnation of spherically convergent shock waves within the Gbar fundamental science campaign at the National Ignition Facility. From an exponential emission slope between 7.7 keV and 8.1 keV photon energy and using an emission model which accounts for reabsorption, we infer an average electron temperature of 375 ± 21 eV, which is in good agreement with HYDRA-1D simulations.

  15. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  16. What Can be Learned from the Absence of Auroral X-Ray Emission from Saturn?

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Yawei; Cravens, Thomas E. E.; Ozak, Nataly; Schultz, David Robert

    2010-01-01

    To understand the origin and magnitude of the present upper limit observations of Saturn's auroral X-ray emission, we use simple models based on the mechanism that leads to analogous emission at Jupiter, charge transfer between ion precipitation and atmospheric gas. Several putative sources and characteristics of the precipitation are considered, namely, (1) highly charged solar wind ions with additional acceleration and (2) ambient, thermal ion population originating, for example, from Saturn's satellites, and then accelerated to high energies. Estimates obtained for each of these sources show the need for acceleration, either to focus the highly charged solar wind ions into the atmosphere or to enable stripping of the initially low-charge state ambient ions to higher charges. The former yields a constraint on the existing accelerating potentials present at Saturn but can only account for about a tenth of the observed upper limit to the auroral luminosity, while the latter requires extremely low limits on the area (i.e., less than 100 km{sup 2}) over which field-aligned potentials are active and needed to produce the acceleration to generate the observational upper limit on the X-ray luminosity. We therefore narrow the range of possible ion sources, the accelerating potentials required that are consistent with the present understanding of the magnetosphere, and model upper limit of X-ray emission from ion precipitation.

  17. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoti, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2007-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various spices including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of eta Car showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to the dust formation around the star forming core.

  18. X-ray emission from the PSR B1259-63 system near apastron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, J.; Tavani, M.; Belloni, T.

    1995-01-01

    The PSR B1259-63 system contains a 47 ms radio pulsar in a highly eccentric binary with a Be-star companion. Strongly time-variable X-ray emission was reported from this system as the pulsar was near apastron in 1992- early 1993. The variability was primarily deduced from an apparent nondetection of the PSR B1259-63 system during a first preapastron ROSAT observation in 1992 February. We have reanalyzed the ROSAT observations of the PSR B1259-63 system. Contrary to the results of a previous analysis, we find that the PSR B1259-63 system was detected by ROSAT during the first off-axis 1992 February observation. The intensity of the soft X-ray emission of the PSR B1259-63 system before and after the 1992 apastron appears to vary at most by a factor of approx. 2. Our results sensibly constrain theoretical models of X-ray emission from the PSR B1259-63 system.

  19. Suzaku observations of X-ray excess emission in the cluster of galaxies A 3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, T.; Nevalainen, J.; Bonamente, M.; Ota, N.; Kaastra, J.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: We analysed the Suzaku XIS1 data of the A 3112 cluster of galaxies in order to examine the X-ray excess emission in this cluster reported earlier with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. Methods: We performed X-ray spectroscopy on the data of a single large region. We carried out simulations to estimate the systematic uncertainties affecting the X-ray excess signal. Results: The best-fit temperature of the intracluster gas depends strongly on the choice of the energy band used for the spectral analysis. This proves the existence of excess emission component in addition to the single-temperature MEKAL in A 3112. We showed that this effect is not an artifact due to uncertainties of the background modeling, instrument calibration or the amount of Galactic absorption. Neither does the PSF scatter of the emission from the cool core nor the projection of the cool gas in the cluster outskirts produce the effect. Finally we modeled the excess emission either by using an additional MEKAL or powerlaw component. Due to the small differencies between thermal and non-thermal model we can not rule out the non-thermal origin of the excess emission based on the goodness of the fit. Assuming that it has a thermal origin, we further examined the differential emission measure (DEM) models. We utilised two different DEM models, a Gaussian differential emission measure distribution (GDEM) and WDEM model, where the emission measure of a number of thermal components is distributed as a truncated power law. The best-fit XIS1 MEKAL temperature for the 0.4-7.0 keV band is 4.7 ± 0.1 keV, consistent with that obtained using GDEM and WDEM models.

  20. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the First Be/Black Hole System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Ribó, M.; Iwasawa, K.; Zabalza, V.; Casares, J.

    2014-05-01

    MWC 656 (=HD 215227) was recently discovered to be the first binary system composed of a Be star and a black hole (BH). We observed it with XMM-Newton, and detected a faint X-ray source compatible with the position of the optical star, thus proving it to be the first Be/BH X-ray binary. The spectrum analysis requires a model fit with two components, a blackbody plus a power law, with k_BT = 0.07^{+0.04}_{-0.03} keV and a photon index Γ = 1.0 ± 0.8, respectively. The non-thermal component dominates above sime0.8 keV. The obtained total flux is F(0.3-5.5\\, keV) = (4.6^{+1.3}_{-1.1})\\times 10^{-14} erg cm-2 s-1. At a distance of 2.6 ± 0.6 kpc the total flux translates into a luminosity L X = (3.7 ± 1.7) × 1031 erg s-1. Considering the estimated range of BH masses to be 3.8-6.9 M ⊙, this luminosity represents (6.7 ± 4.4) × 10-8 L Edd, which is typical of stellar-mass BHs in quiescence. We discuss the origin of the two spectral components: the thermal component is associated with the hot wind of the Be star, whereas the power-law component is associated with emission from the vicinity of the BH. We also find that the position of MWC 656 in the radio versus X-ray luminosity diagram may be consistent with the radio/X-ray correlation observed in BH low-mass X-ray binaries. This suggests that this correlation might also be valid for BH high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with X-ray luminosities down to ~10-8 L Edd. MWC 656 will allow the accretion processes and the accretion/ejection coupling at very low luminosities for BH HMXBs to be studied.

  1. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, David; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Webb, Timothy Jay; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Loisel, Guillaume Pascal; Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Bell, Kate Suzanne; Jones, Brent M.; McPherson, Leroy A.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.; Sherlock, Mark; Appelbe, Brian; Giuliani, John; Ouart, Nicholas; Seely, John

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  2. A Differential Absorption/Emission Analysis of the Galactic Central Diffuse X-ray Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yangsen; Wang, Q.

    2007-05-01

    The soft X-ray background shows a general enhancement toward the inner region of the Galaxy. But whether this enhancement is a local feature (e.g., a superbubble within a distance of 200 pc or a phenomenon related to energetic outflows from the Galactic center/bulge remains unclear. Here we report a comparative X-ray emission and absorption study of diffuse hot gas along the sight lines toward 3C 273 and Mrk 421, on and off the enhancement, but at similar Galactic latitudes. The diffuse 3/4-keV emission intensity, as estimated from the ROSAT All Sky Survey, is about three times higher toward 3C 273 than toward Mrk 421. Based on archival Chandra grating observations of these two AGNs, we detect z 0 X-ray absorption lines (e.g., OVII Kalpha, Kbeta, and OVIII Kalpha transitions) and find that the mean hot gas thermal and kinematic properties along the two sight lines are significantly different. By subtracting the background contribution, as determined along the Mrk 421 sight line, we isolate the net X-ray absorption and emission produced by the hot gas associated with the enhancement in the direction of 3C 273. From a joint analysis of these differential data sets, we obtain the temperature, dispersion velocity, and hydrogen column density as 2.0E6 K, 200 km/s, and 2E19 cm^{-2}, respectively, assuming that the gas is approximately isothermal, solar in metal abundances, and in collisional ionization equilibrium. We also constrain the effective extent of the gas to be 3.4 kpc, strongly suggesting that the enhancement most likely represents a Galactic central phenomenon.

  3. The Galactic Central Diffuse X-Ray Enhancement: A Differential Absorption/Emission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yangsen; Wang, Q. Daniel

    2007-09-01

    The soft X-ray background shows a general enhancement toward the inner region of the Galaxy. But whether this enhancement is a local feature (e.g., a superbubble within a distance of <~200 pc) and/or a phenomenon related to energetic outflows from the Galactic center/bulge remains unclear. Here we report a comparative X-ray emission and absorption study of diffuse hot gas along the sight lines toward 3C 273 and Mrk 421, on and off the enhancement, but at similar Galactic latitudes. The diffuse 3/4 keV emission intensity, as estimated from the ROSAT All Sky Survey, is about 3 times higher toward 3C 273 than toward Mrk 421. Based on archival Chandra grating observations of these two AGNs, we detect X-ray absorption lines (e.g., O VII Kα, Kβ, and O VIII Kα transitions at z~0) and find that the mean hot gas thermal and kinematic properties along the two sight lines are significantly different. By subtracting the foreground and background contribution, as determined along the Mrk 421 sight line, we isolate the net X-ray absorption and emission produced by the hot gas associated with the enhancement in the direction of 3C 273. From a joint analysis of these differential data sets, we obtain the temperature, dispersion velocity, and hydrogen column density as 2.0(1.6,2.3)×106 K, 216(104, 480) km s-1, and 2.2(1.4,4.1)×1019 cm-2, respectively (90% confidence intervals), assuming that the gas is approximately isothermal, solar in metal abundances, and equilibrium in collisional ionization. We also constrain the effective line-of-sight extent of the gas to be 3.4(1.0, 10.1) kpc, strongly suggesting that the enhancement most likely represents a Galactic central phenomenon.

  4. Modelling the Central Constant Emission X-ray component of η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Madura, Thomas I.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Hillier, D. John

    2016-05-01

    The X-ray emission of η Carinae shows multiple features at various spatial and temporal scales. The central constant emission (CCE) component is centred on the binary and arises from spatial scales much smaller than the bipolar Homunculus nebula, but likely larger than the central wind-wind collision region between the stars as it does not vary over the ˜2-3 month X-ray minimum when it can be observed. Using large-scale 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we model both the colliding-wind region between the stars, and the region where the secondary wind collides with primary wind ejected from the previous periastron passage. The simulations extend out to one hundred semimajor axes and make two limiting assumptions (strong coupling and no coupling) about the influence of the primary radiation field on the secondary wind. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations on the SPH output to synthesize the X-ray emission, with the aim of reproducing the CCE spectrum. For the preferred primary mass-loss rate dot{M}_A≈ 8.5× 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr-1, the model spectra well reproduce the observation as the strong- and no-coupling spectra bound the CCE observation for longitude of periastron ω ≈ 252°, and bound/converge on the observation for ω ≈ 90°. This suggests that η Carinae has moderate coupling between the primary radiation and secondary wind, that both the region between the stars and the comoving collision on the backside of the secondary generate the CCE, and that the CCE cannot place constraints on the binary's line of sight. We also discuss comparisons with common X-ray fitting parameters.

  5. Modulations of broad-band radio continua and X-ray emissions in the large X-ray flare on 03 November 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Lüthi, T.; Trottet, G.; Krucker, S.; Magun, A.

    The GOES X3.9 flare on 03 November 2003 at ˜09:45 UT was observed from metric to millimetric wavelengths by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH), the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN) and by radio instruments operated by the Institute of Applied Physics (University of Bern). This flare was simultaneously observed and imaged up to several 100 keV by the RHESSI experiment. The time profile of the X-ray emission above 100 keV and of the radio emissions shows two main parts, impulsive emission lasting about 3 min and long duration emission (partially observed by RHESSI) separated in time by 4 min. We shall focus here on the modulations of the broad-band radio continua and of the X-ray emissions observed in the second part of the flare. The observations suggest that gyrosynchrotron emission is the prevailing emission mechanism even at decimetric wavelengths for the broad-band radio emission. Following this interpretation, we deduce the density and the magnetic field of the decimetric sources and briefly comment on possible interpretations of the modulations.

  6. Physical Conditions in the X-Ray Emission-line Gas in NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. B.; Sharma, N.; Turner, T. J.; George, Ian M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed, photoionization modeling analysis of XMM-Newton/Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The spectrum, previously analyzed by Kinkhabwala et al., reveals a myriad of soft X-ray emission lines, including those from H- and He-like carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon, and M- and L-shell iron. As noted in the earlier analysis, based on the narrowness of the radiative recombination continua, the electron temperatures in the emission-line gas are consistent with photoionization, rather than collisional ionization. The strengths of the carbon and nitrogen emission lines, relative to those of oxygen, suggest unusual elemental abundances, which we attribute to the star formation history of the host galaxy. Overall, the emission lines are blueshifted with respect to systemic, with radial velocities ~160 km s-1, similar to that of [O III] λ5007, and thus consistent with the kinematics and orientation of the optical emission-line gas and, hence, likely part of an active galactic nucleus driven outflow. We were able to achieve an acceptable fit to most of the strong emission lines with a two-component photoionization model, generated with CLOUDY. The two components have ionization parameters and column densities of logU = -0.05 and 1.22 and logN H = 20.85 and 21.2 and covering factors of 0.35 and 0.84, respectively. The total mass of the X-ray gas is roughly an order of magnitude greater than the mass of ionized gas determined from optical and near-IR spectroscopy, which indicates that it may be the dominant component of the narrow-line region. Furthermore, we suggest that the medium that produces the scattered/polarized optical emission in NGC 1068 possesses similar physical characteristics to those of the more highly ionized of the X-ray model components.

  7. X-RAY EMISSION LINE PROFILES FROM WIND CLUMP BOW SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Burke, A. E. E-mail: wwaldron@satx.rr.com E-mail: burke.alexander@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two-component flow structure of wind and clumps using two 'beta' velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double-horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the wind can be derived. The emission measure tends to be power law, and the temperature distribution is broad in terms of wind velocity. Although restricted to the case of adiabatic cooling, our models highlight the influence of bow shock effects for hot plasma temperature and emission measure distributions in stellar winds and their impact on X-ray line profile shapes. Previous models have focused on geometrical considerations of the clumps and their distribution in the wind. Our results represent the first time that the temperature distribution of wind clump structures are explicitly and self-consistently accounted for in modeling X-ray line profile shapes for massive stars.

  8. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN THE X-RAY EMISSION-LINE GAS IN NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S. B.; Sharma, N.; Turner, T. J.; George, Ian M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed, photoionization modeling analysis of XMM-Newton/Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The spectrum, previously analyzed by Kinkhabwala et al., reveals a myriad of soft X-ray emission lines, including those from H- and He-like carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon, and M- and L-shell iron. As noted in the earlier analysis, based on the narrowness of the radiative recombination continua, the electron temperatures in the emission-line gas are consistent with photoionization, rather than collisional ionization. The strengths of the carbon and nitrogen emission lines, relative to those of oxygen, suggest unusual elemental abundances, which we attribute to the star formation history of the host galaxy. Overall, the emission lines are blueshifted with respect to systemic, with radial velocities ∼160 km s{sup –1}, similar to that of [O III] λ5007, and thus consistent with the kinematics and orientation of the optical emission-line gas and, hence, likely part of an active galactic nucleus driven outflow. We were able to achieve an acceptable fit to most of the strong emission lines with a two-component photoionization model, generated with CLOUDY. The two components have ionization parameters and column densities of logU = –0.05 and 1.22 and logN {sub H} = 20.85 and 21.2 and covering factors of 0.35 and 0.84, respectively. The total mass of the X-ray gas is roughly an order of magnitude greater than the mass of ionized gas determined from optical and near-IR spectroscopy, which indicates that it may be the dominant component of the narrow-line region. Furthermore, we suggest that the medium that produces the scattered/polarized optical emission in NGC 1068 possesses similar physical characteristics to those of the more highly ionized of the X-ray model components.

  9. Impulsive thermal x-ray emission from a low-lying coronal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Siming; Li, Youping; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the relationship among different emission components plays an essential role in the study of particle acceleration and energy conversion in solar flares. In flares where gradual and impulsive emission components can be readily identified, the impulsive emission has been attributed to non-thermal particles. We carry out detailed analysis of Hα and X-ray observations of a GOES class B microflare loop on the solar disk. The impulsive hard X-ray emission, however, is found to be consistent with a hot, quasi-thermal origin, and there is little evidence of emission from chromospheric footpoints, which challenges conventional models of flares and reveals a class of microflares associated with dense loops. Hα observations indicate that the loop lies very low in the solar corona or even in the chromosphere and both emission and absorption materials evolve during the flare. The enhanced Hα emission may very well originate from the photosphere when the low-lying flare loop heats up the underlying chromosphere and reduces the corresponding Hα opacity. These observations may be compared with detailed modeling of flare loops with the internal kink instability, where the mode remains confined in space without apparent change in the global field shape, to uncover the underlying physical processes and to probe the structure of solar atmosphere.

  10. Neutron star population in the Galactic center region as a potential source of polarized X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajacek, Michal; Karas, Vladimir; Eckart, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the emission properties of neutron stars that are predicted to exist in large numbers of the order of 10000 in the innermost parts of the Galactic center. A part of the population of isolated neutron stars propagates supersonically through denser ionized streams of the Minispiral (Sgr A West), forming bow shocks where particles are accelerated and are expected to produce polarized X-ray synchrotron signal. Another source of the synchrotron emission is an elongated magnetosphere and tail. We investigate whether the polarized X-ray emission from Galactic center neutron stars will be potentially detectable in the framework of future X-ray polarimeters. A special case is a detected young neutron star - magnetar SGRJ1745-2900 - that has undergone a series of outbursts with a peak X-ray luminosity of the order of 10^{35} erg s^{-1} (1-10 keV). Apart from an intrinsic X-ray emission, the X-ray emission from neutron star outbursts may be scattered by molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone by Thomson scattering, which is another potential source of polarized X-ray emission.

  11. On binary-driven hypernovae and their nested late X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Muccino, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Enderli, M.; Izzo, L.; Kovacevic, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm addresses the very energetic (1052-1054 erg) long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated to supernovae (SNe). Unlike the traditional "collapsar" model, an evolved FeCO core with a companion neutron star (NS) in a tight binary system is considered as the progenitor. This special class of sources, here named "binary-driven hypernovae" (BdHNe), presents a composite sequence composed of four different episodes with precise spectral and luminosity features. Aims: We first compare and contrast the steep decay, the plateau, and the power-law decay of the X-ray luminosities of three selected BdHNe (GRB 060729, GRB 061121, and GRB 130427A). Second, to explain the different sizes and Lorentz factors of the emitting regions of the four episodes, for definiteness, we use the most complete set of data of GRB 090618. Finally, we show the possible role of r-process, which originates in the binary system of the progenitor. Methods: We compare and contrast the late X-ray luminosity of the above three BdHNe. We examine correlations between the time at the starting point of the constant late power-law decay t*a, the average prompt luminosity ⟨ Liso ⟩, and the luminosity at the end of the plateau La. We analyze a thermal emission (~ 0.97-0.29 keV), observed during the X-ray steep decay phase of GRB 090618. Results: The late X-ray luminosities of the three BdHNe, in the rest-frame energy band 0.3-10 keV, show a precisely constrained "nested" structure. In a space-time diagram, we illustrate the different sizes and Lorentz factors of the emitting regions of the three episodes. For GRB 090618, we infer an initial dimension of the thermal emitter of ~ 7 × 1012 cm, expanding at Γ ≈ 2. We find tighter correlations than the Dainotti-Willingale ones. Conclusions: We confirm a constant slope power-law behavior for the late X-ray luminosity in the source rest frame, which may lead to a new distance indicator for BdHNe. These results

  12. The Link Between UV and X-ray Emission in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, D.; Salvato, M.; Merloni, A.; Boller, T.; Nandra, K.

    2016-08-01

    Quasars are well known to exhibit a non-linear relationship between the UV emission from their accretion disks and the X-ray emission from the surrounding corona. This relationship has recently been used to include quasars as standard candles in a Hubble diagram in order to estimate the cosmological parameters ΩM and ΩΛ (Risaliti and Lusso 2015). This project aims to improve this method by adding a large sample of quasars detected by ROSAT. These sources have been matched to UV and IR counterparts using GALEX and WISE data, and have optical spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which resulted in a catalogue of 5500 sources in the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 2. This project will investigate whether the L(X-ray) - L(UV) relationship is universal to quasars of all types. Optical spectra and spectral energy distribution fitting will be used to test the L(X-ray) - L(UV) relationship for signs of evolution with quasar properties such as redshift, black hole mass, and Eddington ratio. A large number of sources from this sample will be added to the Hubble diagram in the redshift range currently populated by type 1a supernovae (z ≤ 1.4). This will allow the cosmological parameter results obtained from quasars to be compared directly with those obtained from supernovae.

  13. Thermal and Nonthermal X-ray Emission from the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Decourchelle, Anne; Holt, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra CCD images of Tycho's supernova remnant that delineate its outer shock, seen as a thin, smooth rim along the straight northeastern edge and most of the circular western half. The images also show that the Si and S ejecta are highly clumpy, and have reached the forward shock at numerous locations. Most of the X-ray spectra that we examine along the rim show line emission from Si and S, which in some cases must come from ejecta; the continuum is well represented by either thermal or nonthermal models. In the case that the continuum is assumed to be thermal, the temperatures at the rim are all similar at about 2 keV, and the ionization ages are very low because of the overall weakness of the line emission. Assuming shock velocities inferred from radio and X-ray expansion measurements, these temperatures are substantially below those expected for equilibration of the electron and ion temperatures; electron to mean temperature ratios of approximately less than 0.1 - 0.2 indicate at most modest collisionless heating of the electrons at the shock. The nonthermal contribution to these spectra may be important, however, and may account for as many as half of the counts in the 4-6 keV energy range, based on an extrapolation of the hard X-ray spectrum above 10 keV.

  14. SCO X-1: Origin of the radio and hard X-ray emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Cheng, C. C.; Tsuruta, S.

    1973-01-01

    The consequences of models for the central radio source and the hard X-ray ( 30 keV) emitting region in Sco X-1 are examined. It was found that the radio emission could result from noncoherent synchrotron radiation and that the X-rays may be produced by bremsstrahlung. It is shown that both mechanisms require a mass outflow from Sco X-1. The radio source is located at r approximately 3x10 to the 12th power cm from the center of the star, and its linear dimensions do not exceed 3x10 to the 13th power cm. The magnetic field in the radio source is on the order of 1 gauss. If the hard X-rays are produced by thermal bremsstrahlung, their source is located at 10 to the 9th power approximately r approximately 5x10 to the 9th power cm, the temperature is 2x10 to the 9th power K, and the emission measure is 2x10 to the 56th power/cu cm. This hot plasma loses energy inward by conduction and outward by supersonic expansion. The rates of energy loss for both processes are about 10 to the 36th power erg/s, comparable to the total luminosity of Sco X-1.

  15. POTENTIAL GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: guwm@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-06-20

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from the jets of low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, jet dynamics are dominated by magnetic and proton–matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339–4. The results not only can reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339–4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by the Fermi and CTA telescopes. Future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, which could be employed to distinguish the origin of X-ray emissions.

  16. Role of screening and angular distributions in resonant soft-x-ray emission of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    In the present work the authors focus on two particular properties of resonant X-ray emission, namely core hole screening of the excited electron, and anisotropy caused by the polarization of the exciting synchrotron radiation. The screening of the core hole by the excited electron causes energy shifts and intensity variations in resonant spectra compared to the non-resonant case. The linear polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the dipole nature of the absorption process create a preferential alignment selection of the randomly oriented molecules in the case of resonant excitation, producing an anisotropy in the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays. The authors have chosen CO for this study because this molecule has previously served as a showcase for non-resonant X-ray emission, mapping the valence electronic structure differently according to the local selection rules. With the present work they take interest in how this characteristic feature of the spectroscopy is represented in the resonant case.

  17. Accelerated electrons and hard X-ray emission from X-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Agafonov, A. V.; Romanova, V. M.; Ter-Oganes'yan, A. E.; Tkachenko, S. I.; Blesener, I. C.; Mitchell, M. D.; Chandler, K. M.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.

    2008-09-15

    The generation of accelerated electrons in the X-pinch minidiode is studied experimentally. It is well known that the explosion of an X-pinch consisting of two or more wires is accompanied by the formation of a minidiode, in which electrons are accelerated. The subsequent slowing down of electrons in the products of wire explosion causes the generation of hard X-ray (HXR) emission with photon energies higher than 10 keV. In this work, the spatial and temporal characteristics of X-pinch HXR emission are studied, the specific features of HXR generation are discussed, and the capability of applying this radiation to point-projection X-ray imaging of various plasma and biological objects is considered. The parameters of the electron beam produced in the X-pinch are measured using a Faraday cup and X-ray diagnostics. The experiments were performed with the XP generator (550 kA, 100 ns) at Cornell University (United States) and the BIN generator (270 kA, 150 ns) at the Lebedev Physical Institute (Russia).

  18. X-RAY EMISSION FROM TRANSIENT JET MODEL IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pe'er, Asaf; Markoff, Sera

    2012-07-10

    While the non-thermal radio through at least near-infrared emission in the hard state in X-ray binaries (XRBs) is known to originate in jets, the source of the non-thermal X-ray component is still uncertain. We introduce a new model for this emission, which takes into account the transient nature of outflows, and show that it can explain the observed properties of the X-ray spectrum. Rapid radiative cooling of the electrons naturally accounts for the break often seen below around 10 keV, and for the canonical spectral slope F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -1/2} observed below the break. We derive the constraints set by the data for both synchrotron- and Compton-dominated models. We show that for the synchrotron-dominated case, the jet should be launched at radii comparable to the inner radius of the disk ({approx}few 100 r{sub s} for the 2000 outburst of XTE J1118+480), with typical magnetic field B {approx}> 10{sup 6} G. We discuss the consequences of our results for the possible connection between the inflow and outflow in the hard state of XRBs.

  19. Cometary X-Rays: Line Emission Cross Sections for Multiply Charged Solar Wind Ion Charge Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-12-22

    Absolute line emission cross sections are presented for 1 keV/amu charge exchange collisions of multiply charged solar wind ions with H{sub 2}O, H, O, CO{sub 2}, and CO cometary targets. The present calculations are contrasted with available laboratory data. A parameter-free model is used to successfully predict the recently observed x-ray spectra of comet C/LINEAR 1999 S4. We show that the resulting spectrum is extremely sensitive to the time variations of the solar wind composition. Our results suggest that orbiting x-ray satellites may be a viable way to predict the solar wind intensities and composition on the Earth many hours before the ions reach the earth.

  20. Site determination of oxygen in B6O by oxygen Kα x-ray-emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, J.; Maeda, K.; Higashi, I.; Takami, M.; Hayasi, Y.; Uda, M.

    1990-09-01

    An electron-excited x-ray-emission spectrum of oxygen Kα is presented for boron suboxide B6O (isostructural with B13C2). The spectrum is compared with those calculated by the discrete-variation Xα (DV-Xα) method with various O-O distances as an adjustable parameter in the fixed icosahedral B12 framework. The observed spectrum is reproduced well when the O-O distance is in the range 2.5-3.5 Å. This O-O bond length is more than twice as long as that of a free O2 molecule. The oxygen atom is located very close to the center of the boron triangle (closed three-center bond). These results support the structure determined by x-ray structural analysis.

  1. A versatile medium-resolution x-ray emission spectrometer for diamond anvil cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, D. R.; Seidler, G. T.; Bradley, J. A.; Lipp, M. J.; Evans, W. J.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y.-M.; Boman, G.; Bowden, M. E.

    2013-08-15

    We present design and performance details for a polycapillary-coupled x-ray spectrometer that provides very high collection efficiency at a moderate energy resolution suitable for many studies of nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, especially for samples of heavy elements under high pressures. Using a single Bragg analyzer operating close to backscattering geometry so as to minimize the effect of the weak divergence of the quasicollimated exit beam from the polycapillary optic, this instrument can maintain a typical energy resolution of 5 eV over photon energies from 5 keV to 10 keV. We find dramatically improved count rates as compared to a traditional higher-resolution instrument based on a single spherically bent crystal analyzer.

  2. A Versatile Medium-Resolution X-ray Emission Spectrometer for Diamond Anvil Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, G. T.; Bradley, J. A.; Lipp, M. J.; Evans, W. J.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y. M.; Boman, G.; Bowden, Mark E.

    2013-08-28

    We present design and performance details for a polycapillary-coupled x-ray spectrometer that provides very high collection efficiency at a moderate energy resolution suitable for many studies of nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, especially for samples of heavy elements under high pressures. Using a single Bragg analyzer operating close to a backscattering so as to minimize the effect of the weak divergence of the quasicollimated exit beam from the polycapillary optic, this instrument can maintain a typical energy resolution of 5 eV over photon energies from 5 keV to 10 keV. We find dramatically improved count rates as compared to a traditional higher-resolution instrument based on a single spherically-bent crystal analyzer.

  3. A versatile medium-resolution x-ray emission spectrometer for diamond anvil cell applications.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, D R; Seidler, G T; Bradley, J A; Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Chow, P; Xiao, Y-M; Boman, G; Bowden, M E

    2013-08-01

    We present design and performance details for a polycapillary-coupled x-ray spectrometer that provides very high collection efficiency at a moderate energy resolution suitable for many studies of nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, especially for samples of heavy elements under high pressures. Using a single Bragg analyzer operating close to backscattering geometry so as to minimize the effect of the weak divergence of the quasicollimated exit beam from the polycapillary optic, this instrument can maintain a typical energy resolution of 5 eV over photon energies from 5 keV to 10 keV. We find dramatically improved count rates as compared to a traditional higher-resolution instrument based on a single spherically bent crystal analyzer.

  4. Standardization of proton-induced x-ray emission technique for analysis of thick samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Shad; Zeb, Johar; Ahad, Abdul; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Haneef, M.; Akbar, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the standardization of the proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technique for finding the elemental composition of thick samples. For the standardization, three different samples of standard reference materials (SRMs) were analyzed using this technique and the data were compared with the already known data of these certified SRMs. These samples were selected in order to cover the maximum range of elements in the periodic table. Each sample was irradiated for three different values of collected beam charges at three different times. A proton beam of 2.57 MeV obtained using 5UDH-II Pelletron accelerator was used for excitation of x-rays from the sample. The acquired experimental data were analyzed using the GUPIXWIN software. The results show that the SRM data and the data obtained using the PIXE technique are in good agreement.

  5. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  6. Benchtop Nonresonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy: Coming Soon to Laboratories and XAS Beamlines Near You?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Ditter, Alexander S.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed instrumentation at the University of Washington has allowed for nonresonant x-ray emission spectra (XES) to be measured in a laboratory-setting with an inexpensive, easily operated system. We present a critical evaluation of this equipment by means of Kβ and valence-level XES measurements for several Co compounds. We find peak count rates of ∼5000/s for concentrated samples and a robust relative energy scale with reproducibility of 25 meV or better. We furthermore find excellent agreement with synchrotron measurements with only modest loss in energy resolution. Instruments such as ours, based on only conventional sources that are widely sold for elemental analysis by x-ray fluorescence, can fill an important role to diversify the research applications of XES both by their presence in non-synchrotron laboratories and by their use in conjunction with XAFS beamlines where the complementarity of XAFS and XES holds high scientific potential.

  7. X-Raying Extended Emission and Rapid Decay of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Yasuaki; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Ioka, Kunihito

    2015-09-01

    Extended emission in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) is a mystery. By conducting time-resolved spectral analyses of the nine brightest events observed by the Swift-XRT, we classify the early X-ray emission of SGRBs into two types. One is the extended emission with exponentially rapid decay, which shows significant spectral softening for hundreds of seconds after the SGRB trigger and is also detected by the Swift-BAT. The other is a dim afterglow that only shows power-law decay over 104 s. The correlations between the temporal decay and spectral indices of the extended emissions are inconsistent with the α-β correlation expected for the high-latitude curvature emission from a uniform jet. The observed too-rapid decay suggests that the emission is from a photosphere or a patchy surface, and manifests the stopping via a central engine such as magnetic reconnection at the black hole.

  8. X-RAYING EXTENDED EMISSION AND RAPID DECAY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, Yasuaki; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Ioka, Kunihito E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2015-09-20

    Extended emission in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) is a mystery. By conducting time-resolved spectral analyses of the nine brightest events observed by the Swift-XRT, we classify the early X-ray emission of SGRBs into two types. One is the extended emission with exponentially rapid decay, which shows significant spectral softening for  hundreds of seconds after the SGRB trigger and is also detected by the Swift-BAT. The other is a dim afterglow that only shows power-law decay over 10{sup 4} s. The correlations between the temporal decay and spectral indices of the extended emissions are inconsistent with the α–β correlation expected for the high-latitude curvature emission from a uniform jet. The observed too-rapid decay suggests that the emission is from a photosphere or a patchy surface, and manifests the stopping via a central engine such as magnetic reconnection at the black hole.

  9. Determination of the X-ray reflection emissivity profile of 1H 0707-495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2011-06-01

    When considering the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reflection off the surface of accretion discs of AGN, it is necessary to account for the variation in reflected flux over the disc, i.e. the emissivity profile. This will depend on factors including the location and geometry of the X-ray source and the disc characteristics. We directly obtain the emissivity profile of the disc from the observed spectrum by considering the reflection component as the sum of contributions from successive radii in the disc and fitting to find the relative weightings of these components in a relativistically broadened emission line. This method has successfully recovered known emissivity profiles from synthetic spectra and is applied to XMM-Newton spectra of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0707-495. The data imply a twice-broken power-law form of the emissivity law with a steep profile in the inner regions of the disc (index 7.8) and then a flat region between 5.6 and 34.8rg before tending to a constant index of 3.3 over the outer regions of the disc. The form of the observed emissivity profile is consistent with theoretical predictions, thus reinforcing the reflection interpretation.

  10. Disentangling X-Ray Emission Processes In Vela-Like Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaensler, Bryan; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This grant is to support analysis of data from the X-ray Multi-mirror Mission (XMM). Specifically, we have been awarded time to observe two young neutron stars, B1823-13 and B1046-58, whose X-ray emission is expected to be a complicated combination of emission from an associated supernova remnant, from a wind-powered synchrotron nebula, from magnetospheric pulsations, and from the surface of the neutron star itself. It is only with XMM's unique combination of spectral, temporal and angular resolution that all these different processes can be separated and studied. Observations of B1823-13 have been conducted and analyzed. We interpret the data as follows: The unpulsed extended non-thermal nature of the central core argues that the extended source of emission corresponds to synchrotron emission from a nebula powered by the pulsar. The temperature of the diffuse component is too high to be interpreted as thermal emission; we rather argue that this extended component is non-thermal emission from a surrounding supernova remnant shell.

  11. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in Three Poor Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, M.; Thiering, I.

    2000-02-01

    We report on ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray observations of three poor clusters of galaxies at distances above 100 Mpc (cz>8000 km s-1). In all three cases the emission is centered on the dominant member of the cluster, i.e., NGC 4104, NGC 6269, and NGC 6329, respectively. X-ray emission was detected out to radii of 400-600 kpc. The bolometric X-ray luminosities range from 2.6 to 8.6x1042 ergs s-1. The soft X-ray emission characteristics and the physical properties deduced from our observations of all three poor clusters resemble those of downscaled rich clusters. In each case, the soft X-ray spectrum is well represented by a thermal model with kT~=1.1-1.3 keV and near-solar metallicity in the center, increasing to kT~=1.4-1.6 keV toward the outer boundaries while the metallicity, Z, decreases to about 0.1 solar. Equally good fits can be achieved if the metallicity is left at the solar value and an additional gas component with kT~=0.5 keV is introduced. The central electron densities in all three poor clusters studied here are enhanced with respect to a King profile by factors of 2-6. This, together with the results of the spectral fits, can be interpreted as either indicating the presence of cooling flows or of a two-phase medium in the central areas. The spatial electron density distribution in the outer regions of each cluster can be fitted by King profiles with core radii of 17-60 kpc and exponents of β=0.38-0.44. Using the derived radial temperature and density distributions, the total gravitating mass is obtained. We derive Mtot=3.7+/-0.7x1013 Msolar within a radius of 300 kpc for each of the three systems, as opposed to 1014-1015 Msolar for rich clusters. We find that the LX versus kT relation found by A. C. Edge and G. C. Stewart (1991) for rich clusters of galaxies scales into the domain of poor clusters and groups of galaxies. The spectral fits of the central regions show that none of the first-ranking galaxies of the three poor clusters hosts a Seyfert 1 active

  12. X-Ray Absorption, Nuclear Infrared Emission, and Dust Covering Factors of AGNs: Testing Unification Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Barcons, X.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Watson, M. G.; Blain, A.; Caccianiga, A.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the distributions of the geometrical covering factors of the dusty tori (f2) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using an X-ray selected complete sample of 227 AGNs drawn from the Bright Ultra-hard XMM-Newton Survey. The AGNs have z from 0.05 to 1.7, 2-10 keV luminosities between 1042 and 1046 erg s-1, and Compton-thin X-ray absorption. Employing data from UKIDSS, 2MASS, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in a previous work, we determined the rest-frame 1-20 μm continuum emission from the torus, which we model here with the clumpy torus models of Nenkova et al. Optically classified type 1 and type 2 AGNs are intrinsically different, with type 2 AGNs having, on average, tori with higher f2 than type 1 AGNs. Nevertheless, ˜20% of type 1 AGNs have tori with large covering factors, while ˜23%-28% of type 2 AGNs have tori with small covering factors. Low f2 are preferred at high AGN luminosities, as postulated by simple receding torus models, although for type 2 AGNs the effect is certainly small. f2 increases with the X-ray column density, which implies that dust extinction and X-ray absorption take place in material that share an overall geometry and most likely belong to the same structure, the putative torus. Based on our results, the viewing angle, AGN luminosity, and also f2 determine the optical appearance of an AGN and control the shape of the rest-frame ˜1-20 μm nuclear continuum emission. Thus, the torus geometrical covering factor is a key ingredient of unification schemes.

  13. Carbon and oxygen X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Delvaille, J. P.; Rocchia, R.; Blondel, C.; Cheron, C.; Christy, J. C.; Ducros, R.; Koch, L.; Rothenflug, R.

    1982-01-01

    A soft X-ray, 0.3-1.0 keV spectrum from a 1 sr region which includes a portion of the North Polar Spur, obtained by three rocketborne lithium-drifted silicon detectors, shows the C V, C VI, O VII and O VIII emission lines. The spectrum is well fitted by a two-component, modified Kato (1976) model, where the coronal emission is in collisional equilibrium, with interstellar medium and North Polar Spur temperatures of 1.1 and 3.8 million K, respectively.

  14. Electronic State Interferences in Resonant X-Ray Emission after K-Shell Excitation in HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Kavcic, M.; Zitnik, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Simon, M.

    2010-09-10

    We have measured a series of high-resolution x-ray spectra emitted upon resonant photoexcitation of HCl. The photon energy was tuned across the dissociative 1s{yields}6{sigma}* resonance and the Rydberg states converging to the Cl 1s{sup -1} threshold, and inelastic photon scattering was observed in the region of KL emission lines. Excellent agreement is found between fully ab initio calculated and measured spectra if interferences between different excitation-emission paths are taken into account. The effect of electronic state interferences is enhanced due to dynamical broadening of the 6{sigma}* resonance in HCl.

  15. G346.6-0.2: Non-thermal X-ray emission from a Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, K.; Wong, B. T. T.; Ng, C.-Y.; Slane, P.

    2016-06-01

    The detection of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a unique window into studying particle acceleration at the shock-front. All of the 14 or so SNRs in which non-thermal X-ray synchrotron emission has been detected are shell-like in nature, and show no direct evidence of interaction with large nearby molecular clouds. Here we present a new X-ray study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology (MM) SNR G346.6-0.2 using XMM-Newton. We found that the X-ray emission arises from a cool recombining plasma with sub-solar abundances, confirming previous Suzaku results. In addition, we identified an additional power-law component in the spectrum, with a photon index of ˜2. We investigated its possible origin and conclude that it most likely arises from synchrotron emission produced by particles accelerated at the shock. This makes G346.6-0.2 an important new object in the class of synchrotron emitting SNRs, as unlike shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, MM SNRs are usually thought to have shock velocities that are effectively too slow to accelerate electrons. The dense environment and nature of the remnant, provide conditions unseen in shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect that these properties have on the production of X-ray synchrotron emission.

  16. G346.6-0.2: The Mixed-Morphology Supernova Remnant with Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Ng, Stephen C.-Y.; Wong, B. T. T.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a unique window into studying particle acceleration at the shock-front. All of the 14 or so SNRs in which non-thermal X-ray synchrotron emission has been detected are shell-like in nature, and show no evidence of interaction with large nearby molecular clouds. Here we present a new X-ray study of the molecular cloud interacting mixed-morphology (MM) SNR G346.6-0.2 using XMM-Newton. We found that the X-ray emission arises from a cool recombining plasma with subsolar abundances, confirming previous Suzaku results. In addition, we identified an additional power-law component in the spectrum, with a photon index of ˜2. We investigated its possible origin and conclude that it most likely arises from synchrotron emission produced by particles accelerated at the shock. This makes G346.6-0.2 an important new object in the class of synchrotron emitting SNRs, as unlike shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, MM SNRs are usually thought to have shock velocities that are effectively too slow to accelerate electrons. The dense environment and nature of the remnant, provide conditions unseen in shell type X-ray synchrotron SNRs, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect that these properties have on the production of X-ray synchrotron emission.

  17. X-RAY SPECTRAL CUTOFF AND THE LACK OF HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES M81 X-6 AND HOLMBERG IX X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, G. C.; Misra, R.; Jithesh, V.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2013-07-10

    We present broadband X-ray spectral study of two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M81 X-6 and Holmberg IX X-1, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We perform joint broadband spectral analysis of the brightest sources in the field, i.e., the two ULXs and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in M81, and demonstrate that the X-ray spectra of the ULXs cut off at energies {approx}> 3 keV with negligible contribution at high energies in the Suzaku HXD/PIN band. The 90% upper limit on the 10-30 keV band luminosity of an underlying broadband power-law component is 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. These limits are more than an order of magnitude lower than the bolometric (0.1-30 keV) luminosity of 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} for M81 X-6 and 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} for Holmberg IX X-1. Our results confirm earlier indications of spectral cutoffs inferred from the XMM-Newton observations of bright ULXs and show that there is not an additional high-energy power-law component contributing significantly to the X-ray emission. The spectral form of the two ULXs are very different from those of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) or AGNs. This implies that the ULXs are neither simply scaled-up versions of stellar-mass BHBs nor scaled-down versions of AGNs.

  18. The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS). II. X-Ray Emission from Compact Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M.; Montez, R., Jr.; Kastner, J. H.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Chu, Y.-H.; De Marco, O.; Frank, A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Lopez, J. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sandin, C.; Schönberner, D.; Soker, N.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Steffen, M.; Toalá, J. A.; Ueta, T.; Villaver, E.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ~1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. ChanPlaNS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. ChanPlaNS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R neb <~ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ~1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall ChanPlaNS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ~27% and the point source detection rate to ~36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (lsim 5 × 103 yr), and likewise compact (R neb <~ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (ne >~ 1000 cm-3), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H2 emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  19. LATE-TIME RADIO EMISSION FROM X-RAY-SELECTED TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2013-02-15

    We present new observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of seven X-ray-selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The radio observations were carried out between 9 and 22 years after the initial X-ray discovery, and thus probe the late-time formation of relativistic jets and jet interactions with the interstellar medium in these systems. We detect a compact radio source in the nucleus of the galaxy IC 3599 and a compact radio source that is a possible counterpart to RX J1420.4+5334. We find no radio counterparts for five other sources with flux density upper limits between 51 and 200 {mu}Jy (3{sigma}). If the detections truly represent late radio emission associated with a TDE, then our results suggest that a fraction, {approx}> 10%, of X-ray-detected TDEs are accompanied by relativistic jets. We explore several models for producing late radio emission, including interaction of the jet with gas in the circumnuclear environment (blast wave model), and emission from the core of the jet itself. Upper limits on the radio flux density from archival observations suggest that the jet formation may have been delayed for years after the TDE, possibly triggered by the accretion rate dropping below a critical threshold of {approx}10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} M-dot {sub Edd}. The non-detections are also consistent with this scenario; deeper radio observations can determine whether relativistic jets are present in these systems. The emission from RX J1420.4+5334 is also consistent with the predictions of the blast wave model; however, the radio emission from IC 3599 is substantially underluminous, and its spectral slope is too flat, relative to the blast wave model expectations. Future radio monitoring of IC 3599 and RX J1420.4+5334 will help to better constrain the nature of the jets in these systems.

  20. Space and time resolved emission of hard X-rays from a plasma focus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The X-ray emission from focused plasmas was observed with an image converter camera in the streak and framing modes. Use of a very high gain image intensifier enabled weak hard X-ray emission (above 25 keV) to be recorded. The use of an admixture of higher atomic number into the deuterium was avoided, and the role of the vapor from the anode surface could be discerned. The recorded bremsstrahlung emission seemed to be from a metallic plasma of copper released from the anode surface by bombardment from an intense electron beam. The intensity of emission was determined by the density of copper and the density and energy of the electron beam. The main emission recorded occurred several 100 nsec after the focus was over, which implies that the electric fields driving the beam existed for this duration. It is suggested that the fields were created by annihilation of magnetic flux for a time much longer than the focus duration.

  1. EMISSION LINES BETWEEN 1 AND 2 keV IN COMETARY X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Ian; Christian, Damian J.; Bodewits, Dennis; Dennerl, Konrad; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J. E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu

    2013-01-20

    We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0-2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected five comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model. Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV which we identify as being created by SWCX lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700-2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution that these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.

  2. Unique Properties of Thermally Tailored Copper: Magnetically Active Regions and Anomalous X-ray Fluorescence Emissions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    When high-purity copper (≥99.98%wt) is melted, held in its liquid state for a few hours with iterative thermal cycling, then allowed to resolidify, the ingot surface is found to have many small regions that are magnetically active. X-ray fluorescence analysis of these regions exhibit remarkably intense lines from “sensitized elements” (SE), including in part or fully the contiguous series V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co. The XRF emissions from SE are far more intense than expected from known impurity levels. Comparison with blanks and standards show that the thermal “tailoring” also introduces strongly enhanced SE emissions in samples taken from the interior of the copper ingots. For some magnetic regions, the location as well as the SE emissions, although persistent, vary irregularly with time. Also, for some regions extraordinarily intense “sensitized iron” (SFe) emissions occur, accompanied by drastic attenuation of Cu emissions. PMID:20037657

  3. Discovery of the double Doppler-shifted emission-line systems in the X-ray spectrum of SS 433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotani, Taro; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takashi; Doty, John; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Nagase, Fumiaki; Ricker, George; White, Nick E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the CCD X-ray spectrometers on ASCA and resolved the X-ray emission line from the jet of SS 433 both into Doppler-shifted components with two distinct velocities, and into emission from different ionization states of iron, i.e., Fe XXV and Fe XXVI. This is the first direct detection of the two Doppler shifted beams in the X-ray spectra of SS 433 and allows the radial velocity of the jet along the line of sight to be determined with an accuracy comparable to the optical spectroscopy. We also found pairs of emission lines from other atomic species, such as ionized silicon and sulfur, with the Doppler shifts consistent with each other. This confirms the origin of the X-ray emission in the high temperature plasma in the jets.

  4. BAT AGN spectroscopic survey-II. X-ray emission and high-ionization optical emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berney, Simon; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Baloković, Mislav; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby (z ≃ 0.04) AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (L_[O III]^{int} ∝ L_{14-195}) with a large scatter (RPear = 0.64, σ = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear = 0.63, σ = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low-ionization lines (H α, [S II]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (σ = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long-term AGN variability are important.

  5. Analysis of x-ray emission in charge-exchange collisions of C6+ ions with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6+-He and - H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. The analysis examines the two collision systems for low to intermediate projectile energies. We perform capture cross section and radiative cascade calculations to obtain Lyman line emission ratios which can be compared to measurements that were carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multicharged Ion Research Facility. Single-electron capture is considered for the C6+-He system while both single and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6+- H2 system. We also examine the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of the capture cross sections and the emission ratios. Calculated line emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are found to be in satisfactory agreement with the measurements. Work supported by SHARCNET, OGS, and NSERC, Canada

  6. Relation between electric current densities and X-ray emissions from particles accelerated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    The energy released during solar flares is believed to be stored in non-potential magnetic fields associated with electric currents. This energy is partially transferred to particle acceleration. We studied for several X-class flares located near the solar disk center the relation between the location of the X-ray emissions produced by energetic electrons accelerated in the corona and the magnetic field and vertical component of the electric current density in the photosphere. The study is based on X-ray images with data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and magnetic field maps and current density maps calculated with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes from the spectropolarimetric measurements of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). A comparison between X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) complete the study. We shall present preliminary conclusions on the link between particle acceleration and the presence of electric currents in the active region.

  7. Examining the hard X-ray emission of the redback PSR J2129-0429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, Hind Al; Roberts, Mallory; McLaughlin, Maura; Hessels, Jason; Breton, Rene; 17077031498

    2016-06-01

    We present new NuStar data of the redback millisecond pulsar (MSP) system PSR J2129-0429. Redback systems are important when it comes to understanding the evolution of MSPs, in terms of pulsar recycling, as they have been observed to transition between a state of accretion, where emission is in the optical and X-ray regimes, and a state of eclipsed radio pulsation. This system is particularly interesting due to some peculiarities: it has a more massive companion as well as a stronger magnetic field than other redbacks, indicating that the system is in a fairly early stage of recycling. It’s X-ray lightcurve (as obtained from XMM-Newton data) has a very hard power-law component and exhibits an efficiency of a few percent in X-ray. With the NuStar data, the spectrum can be seen to extend to ~30 keV. Additionally, it shows strong orbital variation, about 5 times greater than is typical for other systems, and is also very clearly double peaked. Hints of similar peaks have been observed in the lightcurves of other redback systems; hence, this system can help in understanding the intrabinary shock of eclipsing MSPs.

  8. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  9. Analyzing x-ray emissions from meter-scale negative discharges in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; Köhn, Christoph; Ebert, Ute; van Deursen, Lex

    2016-08-01

    When voltage pulses of 1 MV drive meter long air discharges, short and intense bursts of x-rays are measured. Here we develop a model for electron acceleration and subsequent photon generation within this discharge to understand these bursts. We start from the observation that the encounter of two streamers of opposite polarity launches the electrons, that they are further accelerated in the discharge field and then lose their energy, e.g., by photon emission through Bremsstrahlung. We model electron and photon dynamics in space and energy with a Monte Carlo model. Also the detector response to incoming photons is modelled in detail. The model justifies the approximation that the x-ray bursts are isotropic in space; this assumption is used to conclude that x-ray bursts near the high-voltage electrode with 6\\centerdot {{10}4} photons and characteristic energies of 160 keV closely reproduce the measured spectra and attenuation curves. The nanosecond duration of the bursts as well as their energy spectrum is consistent with model calculations.

  10. Investigation of the Ionic Hydration in Aqueous Salt Solutions by Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeyachandran, Y L; Meyer, F; Benkert, A; Bär, M; Blum, M; Yang, W; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L; Zharnikov, M

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the molecular structure of the hydration shells and their impact on the hydrogen bond (HB) network of water in aqueous salt solutions is a fundamentally important and technically relevant question. In the present work, such hydration effects were studied for a series of representative salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and KBr) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS). The oxygen K-edge XES spectra could be described with three components, attributed to initial state HB configurations in pure water, water molecules that have undergone an ultrafast dissociation initiated by the X-ray excitation, and water molecules in contact with salt ions. The behavior of the individual components, as well as the spectral shape of the latter component, has been analyzed in detail. In view of the role of ions in such effects as protein denaturation (i.e., the Hofmeister series), we discuss the ion-specific nature of the hydration shells and find that the results point to a predominant role of anions as compared to cations. Furthermore, we observe a concentration-dependent suppression of ultrafast dissociation in all salt solutions, associated with a significant distortion of intact HB configurations of water molecules facilitating such a dissociation. PMID:27442708

  11. Intravenous coronary angiography utilizing K-emission and bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with synchrotron radiation at SSRL and NSLS have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an intense source of monochromatic X-rays. Because of the high cost of an electron synchrotron, theoretical analysis and experiments using inanimate phantoms has been undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the spectrum produced by two appropriately chosen anode materials when bombarded with electrons in the 100--500 keV energy range for angiography. By using the X-rays emitted at 120{degree} to the incident electron direction, about 20--30% of the X-ray intensity would be due to K-emission lines. Calculations using the TIGERP Monte Carlo Code, have shown that high quality angiograms of human coronary arteries should be possible with a contrast agent containing ytterbium, if an electron beam pulses of 16 kJ were used for each anode target. The experimental program supported in part by the DOE has consisted of these theoretical calculations and experiments at the Dynamitron Electron Accelerator Facility at BNL.

  12. X-ray Emission From Young Supernovae as a Probe of their Progenitor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2014-08-01

    After several decades of study, the progenitor stars of supernovae (SNe) have still proven difficult to identify. The identification of progenitors has generally been the purview of optical astronomy, aided by stellar evolution models. But observations at other wavelengths can provide strong clues about the progenitors.We have aggregated together data available in the literature, or analysed by us, to compute the X-ray lightcurves of almost all young SNe. We use these, coupled with analytical and numerical simulations, to explore the various SN types, investigate SN expansion, explore the characteristics of the medium into which SNe are expanding, and examine the implications for their progenitors. We show that the low X-ray luminosity of IIPs sets a limit on the mass-loss rate, and thereby constrains the maximum initial mass of a red supergiant star which can become a Type IIP progenitor to be lower than 19 solar masses. We discuss how current stellar evolution models relate to the X-ray emission from various types of SNe, and where discrepancies appear to arise between observations and theory.

  13. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and X-ray emission studies on iron-bearing silicate perovskite under high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Speciale, Sergio; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Dera, Przemek; Lavina, Babara; Watson, Heather C.

    2010-06-22

    Iron-bearing silicate perovskite is believed to be the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle. Recent studies have shown that Fe{sup 2+} exists predominantly in the intermediate-spin state with a total spin number of 1 in silicate perovskite in the lower part of the lower mantle. Here we have measured the spin states of iron and the pressure-volume relation in silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}] at pressure conditions relevant to the lowermost mantle using in situ X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction in a diamond cell. Our results showed that the intermediate-spin Fe{sup 2+} is stable in the silicate perovskite up to {approx} 125 GPa but starts to transition to the low-spin state at approximately 135 GPa. Concurrent X-ray diffraction measurements showed a decrease of approximately 1% in the unit cell volume in the silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}], which is attributed to the intermediate-spin to the low-spin transition. The transition pressure coincides with the pressure conditions of the lowermost mantle, raising the possibility of the existence of the silicate perovskite phase with the low-spin Fe{sup 2+} across the transition from the post-perovskite to the perovskite phases in the bottom of the D{double_prime} layer.

  14. Intrinsic disc emission and the soft X-ray excess in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, Chris; Davis, S. W.; Jin, C.; Blaes, O.; Ward, M.

    2012-03-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies have low-mass black holes and mass accretion rates close to (or exceeding) Eddington, so a standard blackbody accretion disc should peak in the extreme ultraviolet. However, the lack of true absorption opacity in the disc means that the emission is better approximated by a colour temperature corrected blackbody, and this colour temperature correction is large enough (˜2.4) that the bare disc emission from a zero spin black hole can extend into the soft X-ray bandpass. Part of the soft X-ray excess seen in these objects must be intrinsic emission from the disc unless the vertical structure is very different to that predicted. None the less, this is not the whole story even for the extreme NLS1 as the shape of the soft excess is much broader than predicted by a bare disc spectrum, indicating some Compton upscattering by warm, optically thick material. We associate this with the disc itself, so it must ultimately be powered by mass accretion. We build an energetically self-consistent model assuming that the emission thermalizes to a (colour temperature corrected) blackbody only at large radii. At smaller radii the gravitational energy is split between powering optically thick Comptonized disc emission (forming the soft X-ray excess) and an optically thin corona above the disc (forming the tail to higher energies). We show examples of this model fit to the extreme NLS1 RE J1034+396, and to the much lower Eddington fraction broad-line Seyfert 1 PG 1048+231. We use these to guide our fits and interpretations of three template spectra made from co-adding multiple sources to track out a sequence of active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra as a function of L/LEdd. Both the individual objects and template spectra show the surprising result that the Compton upscattered soft X-ray excess decreases in importance with increasing L/LEdd. The strongest soft excesses are associated with low mass accretion rate AGN rather than being tied to some

  15. Effect of preionization on soft x-ray emission and plasma dynamics in a small plasma focus system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, H. U.; Shafiq, M.; Hussain, S. S.; Zakaullah, M.

    2010-04-01

    A conventional plasma focus device is operated in a volumetric mixture ratio of Ne+He (50:50) to produce a hot and dense plasma without and with preionization which emits radiation in the soft x-ray region. A ring of depleted uranium is employed as a preionization source. Quantrad silicon PIN diodes and a multipinhole camera with suitable filters are used for x-ray analysis. X-ray emission in 4π geometry is measured as a function of Ne+He mixture filling pressure. The experimental results show that preionization not only enhances the yield of the soft x-rays but also increases the focus duration and shot to shot reproducibility of plasma focus. The x-ray images reveal that preionization makes the focus filament symmetric and also enhances its volume.

  16. Hard X-ray Emission Associated with High-Mass Star Formation in the Young Stellar Cluster NGC 2071

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, S. L.; Audard, M.; Güdel, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Simmons, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    X-ray observations can penetrate high intervening extinction and are thus useful for probing physical conditions in young stellar clusters whose members are optically obscured. Such observations can provide information on magnetic processes at or near the surface of a formative (proto)-star and on mass-loss properties as diagnosed from X-ray emission associated with jets and shocked outflows. We present first results of X-ray observations of the embedded infrared cluster NGC 2071 in the Orion B molecular cloud with XMM-Newton. This cluster is of interest because it is one of the closest regions known to harbor high-mass protostars. We report the detection of hard X-ray emission from the dense central NGC 2071-IR subgroup which contains three massive protostars surrounded by ultracompact H II regions (IRS-1,2,3). The X-ray peak lies within ≈1'' of IRS-1, which drives one of the most powerful outflows known. The unusual X-ray spectrum shows a strong fluorescent Fe emission line at 6.4 keV superimposed on a hard continuum. This line is due to Fe I or weakly ionized Fe and likely originates in cold material near the protostar (i.e. a disk or envelope) that is irradiated by the hard central X-ray source.

  17. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  18. Plasma Heating in Solar Flares and their Soft and Hard X-Ray Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  19. Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  20. Angular dependence of L X-rays emission for Ag by 10 keV electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Chengwei

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic X-ray intensities of Ag-Lα, Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 are measured in electron-impact ionization at energy of 10 keV. The emission angle in this work ranges from 0° to 20° at interval of 5°. The angular dependence of L X-ray intensity ratios has been investigated for Lα / Lβ1, Lβ2 / Lβ1 and Lγ1 / Lβ1. It is found from the experimental results that the emissions of Lβ1, Lβ2 and Lγ1 X-rays are spatially isotropic, while the Lα X-rays exhibit anisotropic emission. Consequently, the alignment behavior of vacancy states is discussed with thorough analysis of vacancy transfer process.

  1. Applications of simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.

    1983-05-01

    Simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission (E/sub x/greater than or equal to 300 eV) analyses have been performed using helium ions as probes of the first few hundred nanometers of various materials. These studies serve as a demonstration of the complementary nature of the two types of information obtained. Uncertainties associated with each of the individual techniques were reduced by performing both analyses. The principal advantages of simultaneous analyses over sequential analyses have been delineated.

  2. X-ray iron-line emission from the SN 185 remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    Radio and optical research was carried out in order to show that the supernova remnant RCW86 is a remnant of the earliest supernova event ever recorded in history (185 AD). The results are as follows: (1) an iron-line emission was found at 6.7 keV; (2) the temperature measured from HEAO-1 was approximately 6 keV; and (3) the equivalent width was consistent within the uncertainties with a cosmic iron abundance. These results support the identification of the supernova remnant RCW86 (it's X-ray source) with the historic supernova event.

  3. Comparison Between X-rays Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on a Ceramic Envelop Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafitte, Bruno; Aubes, Michel; Zissis, Georges

    2007-12-01

    Burners of metal halide lamps used for illumination are generally made of polycrystalline alumina ceramic (PCA) which is translucent to visible light. We show that the difficulty of selecting a line of sight through the lamp prevents the use of optical emission diagnostic. X-rays photons are mainly absorbed and not scattered by PCA. Absorption by mercury atoms contributing to the discharge allowed us to determine the density of mercury in the lamp. By comparing diagnostic methods, we put in evidence the difficulty of taking into account the scattering of light mathematically.

  4. A magnetizing system for dichroism measurements in soft x-ray emission excited by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dallera, C.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    1996-02-01

    We present the design and performance of a magnetic circuit suitable for magnetizing solid samples in the measurements of soft x-ray emission dichroism excited by synchrotron radiation. The system allows a variety of samples to be magnetized and satisfies the rather stringent geometrical constraints due to the need for minimizing the effect of photon self-absorption by the sample. The magnetic circuit is ultrahigh vacuum compatible, can reach about 2800 G, and allows fine adjustment of sample position. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. X-ray emission from the remnant of a carbon deflagration supernova - SN 1572 (Tycho)

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, H.; Masai, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1988-11-01

    A spherically symmetric hydrodynamic code is used to study the evolution of a young supernova remnant on the basis of a carbon deflagration model for type Ia supernovae. The nonequilibrium X-ray emission has been determined for the elemental composition of the model. The discrepancy between the derived intensity of the Fe D-alpha line blend and the observed value is eliminated by assuming that the stratification of the elemental composition in the supernova ejecta is partially removed by mixing. 59 references.

  6. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, I. V.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Ene, A.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  7. PENEPMA: a Monte Carlo programme for the simulation of X-ray emission in EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, X.; Salvat, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Monte Carlo programme PENEPMA performs simulations of X-ray emission from samples bombarded with electron beams. It is both based on the general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE, an elaborate system for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport in arbitrary materials, and on the geometry subroutine package PENGEOM, which tracks particles through complex material structures defined by quadric surfaces. In this work, we give a brief overview of the capabilities of the latest version of PENEPMA along with several examples of its application to the modelling of electron probe microanalysis measurements.

  8. X-ray and EUV Emission Studies of Copper Vacuum Spark Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, L. S.; Ghomeishi, M.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2010-07-01

    A vacuum spark system with a copper anode and electrode of gap 1.5 mm is investigated for the purpose of developing it as a possible radiation source for Next Generation Lithography (NGL). At discharge voltage in the range of 10 to 15 kV and an ambient pressure of about 10-3 mbar, both X-ray (measured by PIN diode) and extreme ultraviolet, EUV (measured by SXUV5A with integrated filter) can be measured simultaneously when good pinching discharge as indicated by sharp dip in the waveform of the rate of current is achieved. For discharge with mild pinching, only EUV emission is observed.

  9. Aborted jets and the X-ray emission of radio-quiet AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Matt, G.

    2004-01-01

    We propose that radio-quiet quasars and Seyfert galaxies have central black holes powering outflows and jets which propagate only for a short distance, because the velocity of the ejected material is smaller than the escape velocity. We call them ``aborted" jets. If the central engine works intermittently, blobs of material may be produced, which can reach a maximum radial distance and then fall back, colliding with the blobs produced later and still moving outwards. These collisions dissipate the bulk kinetic energy of the blobs by heating the plasma, and can be responsible (entirely or at least in part) for the generation of the high energy emission in radio-quiet objects. This is alternative to the more conventional scenario in which the X-ray spectrum of radio-quiet sources originates in a hot (and possibly patchy) corona above the accretion disk. In the latter case the ultimate source of energy of the emission of both the disk and the corona is accretion. Here we instead propose that the high energy emission is powered also by the extraction of the rotational energy of the black hole (and possibly of the disk). By means of Montecarlo simulations we calculate the time dependent spectra and light curves, and discuss their relevance to the X-ray spectra in radio-quiet AGNs and galactic black hole sources. In particular, we show that time variability and spectra are similar to those observed in Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  10. Possible Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission from the Cygnus Loop detected with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Hiroko; Kimura, Masashi; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una; Hewitt, John

    We present results of a spatially-resolved X-ray spectral analysis of nearly the entire rim of the Cygnus Loop using Suzaku (21 pointings) and XMM-Newton (1 pointing). We find that some of the spectra show a bump at ˜0.7 keV as a "shoulder" of the lines at ˜0.66 keV which is a combination of O H Lyα and O Heβ. The regions showing the "shoulder" is confined within narrow (< a few arcmin) regions behind the shock at position angles of 0-40, 110-160, and 270-330 degrees measured from north over east. Around the rim, the position angles where the X-ray excess is present correspond to relatively weak radio emission as well as optical emission from non-radiative Hα filaments. While other possibilities (e.g., Fe L emission) cannot be fully excluded, these correlations lead us to consider that the "shoulder" may be O Heγ + δ + etc lines produced by charge exchange between H-like O ions and neutral H. Whatever its origin, the "shoulder" significantly affects the spectral analysis; the best-fit parameters strongly depend on whether or not we include the "shoulder" in the spectral fitting. We will discuss this issue in terms of our previous results of our spectral analysis for the rim regions.

  11. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STELLAR JETS BY COLLISION AGAINST HIGH-DENSITY MOLECULAR CLOUDS: AN APPLICATION TO HH 248

    SciTech Connect

    López-Santiago, J.; Ustamujic, S.; Castro, A. I. Gómez de; Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Orellana, M.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig–Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 10{sup 7} K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  12. Spectral properties of X-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Colmenero, E.

    1998-03-01

    This thesis reports a study of the X-ray and optical properties of two samples of X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs), and their comparison with the properties of broad line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). One sample (18 NELGs) is drawn from the ROSAT International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS), the other (19 NELGs and 33 AGN) from the ROSAT UK Deep Survey. ROSAT multi-channel X-ray spectra have been extracted and fitted with power-law, bremsstrahlung and black body models for the brighter RIXOS sources. In most cases, power-law and bremsstrahlung models provide the best results. The average spectral energy index, alpha, of the RIXOS NELGs is 0.96 +/- 0.07, similar to that of AGN (alpha~1). For the fainter RIXOS NELGs, as well as for all the UK Deep Survey sources, counts in three spectral bands have been extracted and fitted with a power-law model, assuming the Galactic value for N_H. The brighter RIXOS sources demonstrated that the results obtained by these two different extraction and fitting procedures provide consistent results. Two average X-ray spectra, one for the NELGs and another for the AGN, were created from the UK Deep Survey sources. The power-law slope of the average NELG is alpha = 0.45 +/- 0.09, whilst that of the AGN is alpha = 0.96 +/- 0.03. ROSAT X-ray surveys have shown that the fractional surface density of NELGs increases with respect to AGN at faint fluxes (<= 2e-15 ergs cm-2 s-1), thus suggesting that NELGs are important contributors to the residual soft (<2 keV) X-ray background (XRB). Moreover, the spectral slope of this background (alpha~0.4, 1-10 keV) is harder than that of AGN (alpha~1), which are known to contribute most of the XRB at higher flux levels. The work presented in this thesis shows unequivocally for the first time that the integrated spectrum of the faintest NELGs (alpha~0.4) is consistent with that of the soft X-ray background, finally reconciling it with the properties of the sources that are thought to

  13. Spectral properties of x-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Colmenero, Encarnacion

    This thesis reports a study of the X-ray and optical properties of two samples of X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs), and their comparison with the properties of broad line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). One sample (18 NELGs) is drawn from the ROSAT International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS), the other (19 NELGs and 33 AGN) from the ROSAT UK Deep Survey. ROSAT multi-channel X-ray spectra have been extracted and fitted with power-law, bremsstrahlung and black body models for the brighter RIXOS sources. In most cases, power-law and bremsstrahlung models provide the best results. The average spectral energy index, alpha, of the RIXOS NELGs is 0.96 +/- 0.07, similar to that of AGN (alpha ~ 1). For the fainter RIXOS NELGs, as well as for all the UK Deep Survey sources, counts in three spectral bands have been extracted and fitted with a power-law model, assuming the Galactic value for NH. The brighter RIXOS sources demonstrated that the results obtained by these two different extraction and fitting procedures provide consistent results. Two average X-ray spectra, one for the NELGs and another for the AGN, were created from the UK Deep Survey sources. The power-law spectral slope of the average NELG is S = 0.45 +/- 0.09, whilst that of the AGN is S = 0.96 +/- 0.03. ROSAT X-ray surveys have shown that the fractional surface density of NELGs increases with respect to AGN at faint fluxes (< 2 x 10-15erg cm-2 s -1), thus suggesting that NELGs are important contributors to the residual soft (< 2 keV) X-ray background (XRB). Moreover, the spectral slope of this background (S ~ 0.4, 1-10 keV) is harder than that of AGN (S ~ 1), which are known to contribute most of the XRB at higher flux levels. The work presented in this thesis shows unequivocally for the first time that the integrated spectrum of the faintest NELGs (alpha ~ 0.4) is consistent with that of the soft X-ray background, finally reconciling it with the properties of the sources that are thought to

  14. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  15. A Suzaku search for dark matter emission lines in the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, O.; Werner, N.; Allen, S. W.; Simionescu, A.; Kaastra, J. S.; Strigari, L. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for unidentified emission lines in deep Suzaku X-ray spectra of the central regions of the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters: Perseus, Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus. We analyse an optimized energy range (3.2-5.3 keV) that is relatively free of instrumental features, and a plasma emission model incorporating the abundances of elements with the strongest expected emission lines at these energies (S, Ar, Ca) as free parameters. For the Perseus Cluster core, employing this model, we find evidence for an additional emission feature at an energy E=3.51^{+0.02}_{-0.01} keV with a flux of 2.87_{-0.38}^{+0.33}× 10^{-7} photons s^{-1} cm^{-2} arcmin^{-2}. At slightly larger radii, we detect an emission line at 3.59 ± 0.02 keV with a flux of 4.8_{-1.4}^{+1.7}× 10^{-8} photons s^{-1} cm^{-2} arcmin^{-2}. The properties of these features are broadly consistent with previous claims, although the radial variation of the line strength appears in tension with dark matter (DM) decay model predictions. Assuming a decaying DM origin for these features allows us to predict the energies and detected line fluxes for the other clusters. We do not detect an emission feature at the predicted energy and line flux in the Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus clusters. The formal 99.5 per cent upper limits on the line strengths in each cluster are well below the decaying DM model predictions, disfavouring a decaying DM interpretation. The results of further analysis suggest that systematic effects associated with modelling the spectra for the Perseus Cluster, details of the assumed ionization balance and errors in the predicted spectral line emissivities may be largely responsible for the ˜3.55 keV feature.

  16. Spectral Modeling of the Charge-exchange X-Ray Emission from M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuinai; Wang, Q. Daniel; Ji, Li; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.; Zhou, Xin

    2014-10-01

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (~87%), O VIII, and N VII (gsim50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 1051 s-1 undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ~2 × 1045 cm2 that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  17. X-ray and radio emission from the luminous supernova 2005kd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Reddy, R.; Bauer, F. E.

    2016-10-01

    SN 2005kd is among the most luminous supernovae (SNe) to be discovered at X-ray wavelengths. We have re-analysed all good angular resolution (better than 20 arcsec full width at half-maximum point spread function) archival X-ray data for SN 2005kd. The data reveal an X-ray light curve that decreases as t-1.62±0.06. Our modelling of the data suggests that the early evolution is dominated by emission from the forward shock in a high-density medium. Emission from the radiative reverse shock is absorbed by the cold dense shell formed behind the reverse shock. Our results suggest a progenitor with a mass-loss rate towards the end of its evolution of ≥4.3 × 10^{-4} {M_{{⊙}}} yr^{-1}, for a wind velocity of 10 km s-1, at 4.0 × 1016 cm. This mass-loss rate is too high for most known stars, except perhaps hypergiant stars. A higher wind velocity would lead to a correspondingly higher mass-loss rate. A luminous blue variable star undergoing a giant eruption could potentially fulfill this requirement, but would need a high mass-loss rate lasting for several hundred years, and need to explain the plateau observed in the optical light curve. The latter could perhaps be due to the ejecta expanding in the dense circum-stellar material at relatively small radii. These observations are consistent with the fact that Type IIn SNe appear to expand into high-density and high mass-loss rate environments, and also suggest rapid variability in the wind mass-loss parameters within at least the last 5000 yr of stellar evolution prior to core-collapse.

  18. Spectral modeling of the charge-exchange X-ray emission from M82

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuinai; Ji, Li; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Q. Daniel; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.

    2014-10-10

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (∼87%), O VIII, and N VII (≳50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 10{sup 51} s{sup –1} undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ∼2 × 10{sup 45} cm{sup 2} that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  19. Absolute X-ray emission cross section measurements of Fe K transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Natalie; Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyce, Kevin R.; Grinberg, Victoria; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick Scott; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the absolute X-ray emission cross sections of K-shell transitions in highly charged L- and K-shell Fe ions using the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap and the NASA GSFC EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS). The cross sections are determined by using the ECS to simultaneously record the spectrum of the bound-bound K-shell transitions and the emission from radiative recombination from trapped Fe ions. The measured spectrum is then brought to an absolute scale by normalizing the measured flux in the radiative recombination features to their theoretical cross sections, which are well known. Once the spectrum is brought to an absolute scale, the cross sections of the K-shell transitions are determined. These measurements are made possible by the ECS, which consists of a 32 channel array, with 14 channels optimized for detecting high energy photons (hν > 10 keV) and 18 channels optimized for detecting low energy photons (hν < 10 keV). The ECS has a large collection area, relatively high energy resolution, and a large bandpass; all properties necessary for this measurement technique to be successful. These data will be used to benchmark cross sections in the atomic reference data bases underlying the plasma modeling codes used to analyze astrophysical spectra, especially those measured by the Soft X-ray Spectrometer calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by NASA grants to LLNL and NASA/GSFC and by ESA under contract No. 4000114313/15/NL/CB.

  20. Understanding X-ray Spectral and Timing Characteristics of Active Galactic Nuclei by a Novel Picture with Multiple Primary Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.; Makishima, K.; Yamada, S.; Miyake, K.

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of the central engine of type I Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) has been hampered by spectral ambiguity among different X-ray components: e.g., Comptonized primary emission, secondary components possibly affected by strong relativistic effects (e.g., Miniutti et al. 2007), and/or complex partial absorption (e.g., Miller et al. 2008). With a variability-assisted spectral analysis method developed in Noda et al. (2011, 2013), we succeeded in model-independently decomposing the AGN spectra, and establishing a novel view of the engine, that it consists of multiple primary X-ray continua with distinct spectral shapes, variability timescales, and Eddington-ratio dependences (Noda et al. 2013). The novel view with the multiple primary X-ray components can explain several long-lasting problems with the AGN central engine. The hardest of the primary components can now partially explain the "too strong hard X-ray hump", and make the secondary reflection strength moderate. The well-known X-ray spectral softening, when a source brightens, can be successfully reproduced by an increasing dominance of a softer-slope primary component towards higher Eddington ratios. Furthermore, the puzzling lack of good optical vs. X-ray intensity correlation, in some AGNs, can be solved by considering that the optical emission is correlated only with some of the primary X-ray components.

  1. THE SOFT X-RAY AND NARROW-LINE EMISSION OF Mrk 573 ON KILOPARSEC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Garcia, A. M. Perez

    2010-11-10

    We present a study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy Mrk 573 using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. We have studied the morphology of the soft (<2 keV) X-rays comparing it with the [O III] and H{alpha} HST images. The soft X-ray emission is resolved into a complex extended region. The X-ray morphology shows a biconical region extending up to 12 arcsec (4 kpc) in projection from the nucleus. A strong correlation between the X-rays and the highly ionized gas seen in the [O III]{lambda}5007 A image is reported. Moreover, we have studied the line intensities detected with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and used them to fit the low-resolution EPIC/XMM-Newton and ACIS/Chandra spectra. The RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum is dominated by emission lines of C VI, O VII, O VIII, Fe XVII, and Ne IX, among other highly ionized species. A good fit is obtained using these emission lines found in the RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum as a template for Chandra spectra of the nucleus and extended emission, coincident with the cone-like structures seen in the [O III]/H{alpha} map. The photoionization model Cloudy provides a reasonable fit for both the nuclear region and the cone-like structures showing that the dominant excitation mechanism is photoionization. For the nucleus the emission is modeled using two phases: a high ionization [log (U) = 1.23] and a low ionization [log (U) = 0.13]. For the high-ionization phase the transmitted and reflected components are in a 1:2 ratio, whereas for the low ionization the reflected component dominates. For the extended emission, we successfully reproduced the emission with two phases. The first phase shows a higher ionization parameter for the northwest (log (U) = 0.9) than for the southeast cone (log (U) = 0.3). Moreover, this phase is transmission dominated for the southeast cone and reflection dominated for the northwest cone. The second phase shows a low-ionization parameter (log (U

  2. X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM COLLISIONS OF O{sup 6+} IONS WITH CO

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K. A.; Smith, W. W.; Ehrenreich, T.; Kessel, Q. C.; Pollack, E.; Verzani, C.; Kharchenko, V. A.; Chutjian, A.; Lozano, J. A.; Djuric, N.; Smith, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of soft X-ray emissions from collisions between 36 keV O{sup 6+} ions and CO have been carried out with the aim of simulating emissions from comets interacting with the solar wind. Spectra in the range 62-155 eV are recorded and compared to results of the over-barrier model (OBM) and multichannel Landau-Zener (MLZ) calculations. Emissions from n = 3, 4 states of O{sup 5+} are observed. This is in good agreement with the OBM predictions of highest n-state for the electron capture. Line intensities for the n = 4 capture in simulated spectra using the semi-empirical MLZ approach, taking into account multielectron captures, are in very good agreement with experimental measurements. However, the OBM does not correctly account for direct feeding of the n = 3 levels for the CO target, though it does explain predominance of the n = 3 levels for an He target.

  3. On the Extended Emission of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar IE 1547.0-5408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C. -Y.; Zhu, W. W.; Gavriil, F. P.; Woods, P. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the extended emission around the anomalous X-ray pulsar IE 1547.0-5408 using four XMM-Newton observations taken with the source in varying states of outburst as well as in quiescence. We find that the extended emission flux is highly variable and strongly correlated with the flux of the magnetar. Based on this result, as well as on spectral and energetic considerations, we conclude that the extended emission is dominated by a dust-scattering halo and not a pulsar wind nebula (P-VVN), as has been previously argued. We obtain an upper limit on the 2-10 keV flux of a possible PWN of 4.7 x 10(exp -14) erg/s/sq cm, three times less than the previously claimed value, implying an efficiency for conversion of spin-down energy into nebular luminosity of <9 x 10(exp -4) .

  4. X-ray emission from an Ap star /Phi Herculis/ and a late B star /Pi Ceti/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.; Snow, T. P., Jr.; Charles, P.

    1979-01-01

    Using the HEAO 1 soft X-ray sky survey, a search was conducted for X-ray emission from 18 stars in the spectral range B5-A7. The detection of 0.25 keV X-ray sources consistent with the positions of Pi Ceti, a normal B7 V star, and Phi Herculis, a classic Ap star was reported. The detection of these stars argues for large mass motions in the upper layers of stars in this spectral range, and argues against radiative diffusion as the source of abundance anomalies in Ap stars.

  5. Physiologically gated microbeam radiation using a field emission x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Chtcheprov, Pavel E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu; Burk, Laurel; Inscoe, Christina; Ger, Rachel; Hadsell, Michael; Lu, Jianping; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses narrow planes of high dose radiation beams to treat cancerous tumors. This experimental therapy method based on synchrotron radiation has been shown to spare normal tissue at up to 1000 Gy of peak entrance dose while still being effective in tumor eradication and extending the lifetime of tumor-bearing small animal models. Motion during treatment can lead to significant movement of microbeam positions resulting in broader beam width and lower peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR), which reduces the effectiveness of MRT. Recently, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of generating microbeam radiation for small animal treatment using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The purpose of this study is to incorporate physiological gating to the CNT microbeam irradiator to minimize motion-induced microbeam blurring. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source array with a narrow line focal track was operated at 160 kVp. The x-ray radiation was collimated to a single 280 μm wide microbeam at entrance. The microbeam beam pattern was recorded using EBT2 Gafchromic{sup ©} films. For the feasibility study, a strip of EBT2 film was attached to an oscillating mechanical phantom mimicking mouse chest respiratory motion. The servo arm was put against a pressure sensor to monitor the motion. The film was irradiated with three microbeams under gated and nongated conditions and the full width at half maximums and PVDRs were compared. An in vivo study was also performed with adult male athymic mice. The liver was chosen as the target organ for proof of concept due to its large motion during respiration compared to other organs. The mouse was immobilized in a specialized mouse bed and anesthetized using isoflurane. A pressure sensor was attached to a mouse's chest to monitor its respiration. The output signal triggered the electron extraction voltage of the field emission source such that x-ray was generated only during a

  6. Effect of Inter-electrode Gap on the Emission of EUV and X-Ray Radiation from Vacuum Spark Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboohi, Solmaz; Yap, S. L.; Ghomeishi, M.; Chan, L. S.; Wong, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    The emissions of X-ray and Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) from plasmas produced by vacuum spark discharges are investigated. The vacuum spark plasma emits both continuum and characteristic line radiations that cover a wide range of wavelengths extending from the visible, UV, EUV, soft X-ray and to hard X-ray region. Experiments have been carried out with stainless steel anode. The applied voltages are from 6 kV to 20 kV. The operating pressure for all the experiments carried out is maintained at below 10-4 mbar. In order to have a good soft-X-ray emission (maximized), an optimization of the main experimental parameters (capacitor charging voltage, anode—cathode separation, and trigger pulse amplitude) has been performed. The inter-electrode gap is found to be a dominating parameter to determine the intensity of X-ray and EUV emission from the vacuum spark. The inter-electrode gap distance for high intensity and reproducible X-ray and EUV emission is found to be in the range of 2.6 mm to 6.7 mm.

  7. Energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity studies in the IR-T1 tokamak.

    PubMed

    Agah, K Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M; Elahi, A Salar

    2015-01-01

    Determinations of plasma parameters as well as the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) activity, energetic electrons energy and energy confinement time are essential for future fusion reactors experiments and optimized operation. Also some of the plasma information can be deduced from these parameters, such as plasma equilibrium, stability, and MHD instabilities. In this contribution we investigated the relation between energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity in the IR-T1 Tokamak. For this purpose we used the magnetic diagnostics and a hard x-ray spectroscopy in IR-T1 tokamak. A hard x-ray emission is produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles or limiters. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons.

  8. On binary driven hypernovae and their nested late X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccino, Marco; Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Enderli, Maxime; Kovacevic, Milos; Izzo, Luca; Penacchioni, Ana Virginia; Pisani, Giovanni Battista; Rueda, Jorge A.; Wang, Yu

    2015-07-01

    The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm addresses energetic (1052-1054 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated to supernovae (SNe) and proposes as their progenitors tight binary systems composed of an evolved FeCO core and a companion neutron star (NS). Their emission is characterized by four specific episodes: Episode 1, corresponding to the on-set of the FeCO SN explosion and the accretion of the ejecta onto the companion NS; Episode 2, related the collapse of the companionNS to a black hole (BH) and to the emission of a long GRB; Episode 3, observed in X-rays and characterized by a steep decay, a plateau phase and a late power-law decay; Episode 4, corresponding to the optical SN emission due to the 56Ni decay. We focus on Episode 3 and we show that, from the thermal component observed during the steep decay of the prototype GRB 090618, the emission region has a typical dimension of ~1013 cm, which is inconsistent with the typical size of the emitting region of GRBs, e.g., ~1016 cm. We propose, therefore, that the X-ray afterglow emission originates from a spherically symmetric SN ejecta expanding at G ˜ 2 or, possibly, from the accretion onto the newly formed black hole, and we name these systems "binary driven hypernovae" (BdHNe). This interpretation is alternative to the traditional afterglow model based on the GRB synchrotron emission from a collimated jet outflow, expanding at ultra-relativistic Lorentz factor of G ~ 102-103 and originating from the collapse of a single object. We show then that the rest-frame energy band 0.3-10 keV X-ray luminosities of three selected BdHNe, GRB 060729, GRB 061121, and GRB 130427A, evidence a precisely constrained "nested" structure and satisfy precise scaling laws between the average prompt luminosity, < Liso>, and the luminosity at the end of the plateau, La, as functions of the time at the end of the plateau. All these features extend the applicability of the "cosmic candle" nature of Episode 3. The

  9. Investigation on emission characteristics of metal-ceramic cathode applied to industrial X-ray diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Ma; Jianqiang, Yuan; Hongwei, Liu; Hongtao, Li; Lingyun, Wang; Ping, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The industrial x-ray diode with high impedance configuration is usually adopted to generate repetitive x-ray, but its performance would be worsened due to lower electric field on the cathode of diode when a voltage of several hundreds of kV is applied. To improve its performance, a novel metal-ceramic cathode is proposed in this paper. Key factors (width, relative permittivity of ceramic, and so on) affecting electric field distribution on triple points are analyzed by electrostatic field calculation program, so as to optimize the design of this novel cathode. Experiments are done to study the characteristics including emission current of cathode, diode voltage duration, diode mean dynamic impedance, and diode impedance drop velocity within diode power duration. The results show that metal-ceramic cathode could improve diode performance by enhancing emission current and stabling impedance; the impedance drop velocity of diode with spoke-shaped metal-ceramic cathode was reduced to -5 Ω ns(-1) within diode power duration, comparing to -15 Ω ns(-1) with metal foil cathode. PMID:27370441

  10. Quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlione, A.; Aguilera, D. N.; Pons, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. We monitored the quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries after active periods of intense activity in X-rays (outbursts). Aims: The theoretical modeling of the thermal relaxation of the neutron star crust may be used to establish constraints on the crust composition and transport properties, depending on the astrophysical scenarios assumed. Methods: We numerically simulated the thermal evolution of the neutron star crust and compared them with inferred surface temperatures for five sources: MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260, XTE J1701-462, EXO 0748-676 and IGR J17480-2446. Results: We find that the evolution of MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260 and EXO 0748-676 can be well described within a deep crustal cooling scenario. Conversely, we find that the other two sources can only be explained with models beyond crustal cooling. For the peculiar emission of XTE J1701-462 we propose alternative scenarios such as residual accretion during quiescence, additional heat sources in the outer crust, and/or thermal isolation of the inner crust due to a buried magnetic field. We also explain the very recent reported temperature of IGR J17480-2446 with an additional heat deposition in the outer crust from shallow sources.

  11. Investigation on emission characteristics of metal-ceramic cathode applied to industrial X-ray diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Ma; Jianqiang, Yuan; Hongwei, Liu; Hongtao, Li; Lingyun, Wang; Ping, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The industrial x-ray diode with high impedance configuration is usually adopted to generate repetitive x-ray, but its performance would be worsened due to lower electric field on the cathode of diode when a voltage of several hundreds of kV is applied. To improve its performance, a novel metal-ceramic cathode is proposed in this paper. Key factors (width, relative permittivity of ceramic, and so on) affecting electric field distribution on triple points are analyzed by electrostatic field calculation program, so as to optimize the design of this novel cathode. Experiments are done to study the characteristics including emission current of cathode, diode voltage duration, diode mean dynamic impedance, and diode impedance drop velocity within diode power duration. The results show that metal-ceramic cathode could improve diode performance by enhancing emission current and stabling impedance; the impedance drop velocity of diode with spoke-shaped metal-ceramic cathode was reduced to -5 Ω ns(-1) within diode power duration, comparing to -15 Ω ns(-1) with metal foil cathode.

  12. On the x-ray emission from the radio source SGR A*

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, R. F.; Pittard, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent infrared observations of the Galactic Center have permitted the estimation of orbital parameters for the 8 O stars closest to the compact, nonthermal radio source, Sgr A*. The emission of Sgr A* is thought to be due to the accretion of gas down the potential well of a {approx} 3 x 10{sup 6} solar mass black hole at the dynamical heart of the Milky Way. The O stars are located within 0.03 pc of Sgr A* and are likely to have significant stellar winds. Since they are deep within the potential well of a black hole, much of their winds are gravitationally bound. These hot winds may be piling up and emitting significantly in the X-rays. Thus it is possible that the emission from the recently detected compact CHANDRA source may at least in part be due to the winds of these O stars rather than the hot gas close to the event horizon of the black hole. This has serious implications for applicable black hole accretion models. From preliminary 3D numerical simulations which treat the 8 O stars as mass sources moving on individual orbits, we have constructed simulated X-ray images. We present these images and discuss their impact on accretion models for Sgr A*.

  13. On the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji-Ren; Mao, Shu-De

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51 combining both XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra data. Most of the RGS spectrum of M51 can be fitted with a thermal model with a temperature of ∼ 0.5 keV except for the O VII triplet, which is forbidden-line dominated. The Fe L-shell lines peak around the southern cloud, where the O VIII and N VII Lyα lines also peak. In contrast, the peak of the O VII forbidden line is about 10″ offset from that of the other lines, indicating that it is from a spatially distinct component. The spatial distribution of the O VII triplet mapped by the Chandra data shows that most of the O VII triplet flux is located at faint regions near edges, instead of the southern cloud where other lines peak. This distribution of the O VII triplet is inconsistent with the photoionization model. Other mechanisms that could produce the anomalous O VII triplet, including a recombining plasma and charge exchange X-ray emission, are discussed.

  14. Low-energy x-ray emission from magnetic-fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; Eames, D.; von Goeler, S.; Goldman, M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Silver, E.

    1982-04-01

    Complex, transient, spatially inhomogeneous tokamak plasmas require careful diagnosis. As the reactor regime is approached, soft x rays become more important as a versatile diagnostic tool and an energy-loss mechanism. Continuum emission provides a measure of electron temperature and light impurity content. Impurity lines serve as a probe for ion and electron temperature, impurity behavior, and radiative cooling. The entire spectrum yields vital information on instabilities and disruptions. The importance of impurities is illustrated by the extensive efforts toward understanding impurity production, effects, and control. Minute heavy impurity concentrations can prevent reactor ignition. Si(Li) - detector arrays give a broad overview of continuum and line x-ray emission (.3 to 50 keV) with moderate energy (200 eV) and time (50 ms) resolution. Bragg crystal and grating spectrometers provide detailed information on impurity lines with moderate to excellent (E/..delta..E = 100 to 23,000) resolving power and 1 to 50 ms time resolution. Imaging detector arrays measure rapid (approx. 10 ..mu..s) fluctuations due to MHD instabilities and probe impurity behavior and radiative cooling. Future tokamaks require more diagnostic channels to avoid spatial scanning, higher throughput for fast, single-shot diagnosis, increased spectral information per sample period via fast scanning or use of multi-element detectors with dispersive elements, and radiation shielding and hardening of detectors.

  15. X-ray emission on hybird stars: ROSAT observations of alpha Trianguli Australis and iota Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashyap, V.; Rosner, R.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on deep ROSAT observations of two Hybrid atmosphere stars, alpha TrA and iota Aur, and our analysis of these observations. We detect high-energy transient phenomena on alpha TrA and consider the implications of this discovery to the atmospheres of Hybrid stars. We detect iota Aur in the high-energy passband of ROSAT, implying the existence of multimillion degree plasma on the star. Our major results include the following: discovery of two large flare events, detected during pointed observations of alpha TrA; the demonstration that the flare emission most likely comes from the giant itself, rather than from a previously unseen low-mass companion star; the demonstration that the plasma characteristics associated with the flares and with the 'quiescent' component are essentially indistinguishable; and that the geometric dimensions of the emitting plasma are considerably smaller than the critical dimension characterizing stable 'hot' coronal loop structures. Our results suggest that alpha TrA does not have any steady X-ray emission consistent with theoretical expectations, and support the argument that Hybrid stars constitute a transitional type of object in which large-scale magnetic dynamo activity ceases, and the dominant spatial scales characterizing coronal structure rapidly decline as such stars evolve across the X-ray 'Dividing Line' in the H-R diagram.

  16. Elemental analysis of renal slices by proton-induced X-ray emission.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, T; Chen, Q; Fernando, Q; Keith, R; Gandolfi, A J

    1993-01-01

    We optimized proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for tissue analysis in a toxicity-disposition study. We used cultured rabbit renal slices as the biological system to demonstrate the use of PIXE analysis. The renal slices were exposed to HgCl2, CdCl2, K2Cr2O7, or NaAsO2 alone or in a mixture. The PIXE analysis provides information on concentrations of elements above atomic number 11, and it is the only analytical technique that can determine 20-30 elements nondestructively in a single, small sample (approximately 5 mg) with detection limits of 1-5 ppm (dry weight). The renal slices are thin targets that yield X-ray emission spectra with low backgrounds and high elemental sensitivities. The nondestructive nature of PIXE and the ability to simultaneously measure uptake of multiple metals and endogenous elements are unique to this methodology. Images p302-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D p307-a PMID:8275986

  17. X-ray emission and photoluminescence spectroscopy of nanostructured silica with implanted copper ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Kortov, V. S.; Kurmaev, É. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Wilks, R. G.; Moewes, A.

    2008-12-01

    Quartz glass samples and compacted SiO2 nanopowders have been studied by x-ray emission (Cu L 2, 3 transition 3 d4 s → 2 p 1/2, 3/2) and photoluminescence spectroscopy following pulsed Cu+ ion implantation (energy, 30 keV; pulse current up to 0.5 A; pulse duration, 400 μs; irradiation doses, 1015, 1016, and 2 × 1017 cm-2). It has been established that ion irradiation gives rise to the formation of glassy and compacted SiO2 samples of nanosized metallic and oxide phases in the structure. An analysis of Cu L x-ray emission spectra has shown that copper nanoparticles are thermodynamically metastable and chemically active because ion beam bombardment transfers them readily to the oxide form. This results from the radiation-stimulated fracture of regular Si-O-Si bonds in amorphous SiO2 and the formation of defective Si-Si bonds, followed by capture of oxygen by copper atoms. The enhanced degree of oxidation of copper ions in SiO2 nanostructured pellets can be reduced by coimplantation and thermal annealing. Optical spectroscopy studies suggest that, in glasses and SiO2 nanostructured pellets, there exist metallic Cu{/n 0} nanoclusters, which at low temperatures exhibit quantum-confined photoluminescence with a characteristic stepped excitation spectrum.

  18. Solar X-ray Emission Measured by the Vernov Mission During September - October of 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Rozhkov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    Solar hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions were measured by the Detector of the Roentgen and Gamma-ray Emissions (DRGE) instrument, which is part of the RELEC set of instruments operated onboard the Russian satellite Vernov, from July 8, 2014 until December 10, 2014 (on a solar-synchronous orbit with an apogee of 830 km, perigee of 640 km, and an inclination of 98.4°. RELEC measurements of 18 flares with X-ray energy {>} 30 keV, taken in September - October 2014, were connected with the same active region with the number AR 12172 during the first rotation and AR 12192 during the next one. These measurements were compared to the data obtained with RHESSI, Konus-Wind, Fermi Observatory, Radio Solar Telescope Net (RSTN), and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) operating at the same time. Quasi-periodicities with similar periods of 7±2 s were found in about one third of all flares measured by RELEC (Vernov) from September 24 until October 30, 2014.

  19. Searching for Narrow Emission Lines in X-ray Spectra: Computation and Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taeyoung; van Dyk, David A.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra is a challenging statistical task. The Poisson nature of the photon counts leads to local random fluctuations in the observed spectrum that often result in excess emission in a narrow band of energy resembling a weak narrow line. From a formal statistical perspective, this leads to a (sometimes highly) multimodal likelihood. Many standard statistical procedures are based on (asymptotic) Gaussian approximations to the likelihood and simply cannot be used in such settings. Bayesian methods offer a more direct paradigm for accounting for such complicated likelihood functions, but even here multimodal likelihoods pose significant computational challenges. The new Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods developed in 2008 by van Dyk and Park, however, are able to fully explore the complex posterior distribution of the location of a narrow line, and thus provide valid statistical inference. Even with these computational tools, standard statistical quantities such as means and standard deviations cannot adequately summarize inference and standard testing procedures cannot be used to test for emission lines. In this paper, we use new efficient MCMC algorithms to fit the location of narrow emission lines, we develop new statistical strategies for summarizing highly multimodal distributions and quantifying valid statistical inference, and we extend the method of posterior predictive p-values proposed by Protassov and coworkers to test for the presence of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra. We illustrate and validate our methods using simulation studies and apply them to the Chandra observations of the high-redshift quasar PG 1634+706.

  20. Physical constraints on X-ray absorption and emission regions of NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armentrout, Bryan Keith

    2009-06-01

    I present the results of spectral analysis and modeling of nine Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of NGC 4151, spanning the period 2000-2007. The complex and highly variable spectrum is characterized by attenuation of the intrinsic power-law continuum by nested absorption components, which contribute both broadband curvature in the 1-5 keV continuum, and individual line absorption. Significant and variable narrow line emission and radiative recombination continua dominate energies below ~1.5 keV. The modeling process made extensive use of absorption tables produced by a newly-available Cloudy- XSPEC interface. Observed spectral evolution could not be explained entirely by simple changes in absorber ionization states in response to variations in the level of incident continuum, but required additional variations in absorber column densities. This fact implies transverse motion of the absorbers across the line of sight. The transverse velocity, coupled with observed absorber outflow determined from line energies, suggest a possible helical motion for the absorbers. Scattered incident continuum flux was also indicated. Model results predict that the absorbers may also serve as substantial emitters of observed soft X-ray narrow line emission. However, additional emission components, not represented by absorbers, were required. Narrow emission line modeling of a single observation required three separate components, two of which may be represented by model absorbers. A strong Fe Ka fluorescent line was present in all observations, with highly-variable equivalent width. While photoionization model results predicted contributions to Fe Ka line flux by all absorbers, the absorber contributions to emission were minor. High-energy feature analysis revealed the presence of an additional, highly-ionized absorber in at least one observation.

  1. Non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium effects in the x-ray emission of radiatively heated materials of different atomic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földes, I. B.; Eidmann, K.; Veres, G.; Bakos, J. S.; Witte, K.

    2001-07-01

    X-ray self-emission of radiatively heated materials with different values of Z has been investigated. Thin foils were uniformly heated by a 120-eV Hohlraum radiation of 400-ps duration in order to study the self-emission of a homogeneous, optically thin material. The x-ray emission spectra were followed for more than 2 ns. The spectrally integrated emission shows not only a strong Z dependence, but different temporal behaviors for different values of Z. The lower is the value of Z of the x-ray heated matter, the longer is the duration of self-emission. Theoretical comparison with a hydrocode and FLY post-processing shows a non-local-thermal equilibrium behavior caused by direct photoionization due to the thermal pumping radiation, which has a higher brightness temperature than the matter temperature of the heated material.

  2. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10-6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system.

  3. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10(-6) Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system.

  4. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STRONGLY ASYMMETRIC CIRCUMSTELLAR MATERIAL IN THE REMNANT OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Burkey, Mary T.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.

    2013-02-10

    Kepler's supernova remnant resulted from a thermonuclear explosion, but is interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) lost from the progenitor system. We describe a statistical technique for isolating X-ray emission due to CSM from that due to shocked ejecta. Shocked CSM coincides well in position with 24 {mu}m emission seen by Spitzer. We find most CSM to be distributed along the bright north rim, but substantial concentrations are also found projected against the center of the remnant, roughly along a diameter with position angle {approx}100 Degree-Sign . We interpret this as evidence for a disk distribution of CSM before the supernova, with the line of sight to the observer roughly in the disk plane. We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario in qualitative agreement with the observed CSM morphology. Our observations require Kepler to have originated in a close binary system with an asymptotic giant branch star companion.

  5. Spectral analysis of x-ray emission created by intense laser irradiation of copper materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.

    2012-10-15

    We have measured the x-ray emission, primarily from K{sub {alpha}},K{sub {beta}}, and He{sub {alpha}} lines, of elemental copper foil and 'foam' targets irradiated with a mid-10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse. The copper foam at 0.1 times solid density is observed to produce 50% greater He{sub {alpha}} line emission than copper foil, and the measured signal is well-fit by a sum of three synthetic spectra generated by the atomic physics code FLYCHK. Additionally, spectra from both targets reveal characteristic inner shell K{sub {alpha}} transitions from hot electron interaction with the bulk copper. However, only the larger-volume foam target produced significant K{sub {beta}} radiation, confirming a lower bulk temperature in the higher volume sample.

  6. Shakeup in soft-x-ray emission. I. The low-energy tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livins, Peteris; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-04-01

    The L soft-x-ray emission spectra for Al and Si, and the K emission for graphite and diamond are analyzed, taking into account the effects of multielectron transitions which produce a low-energy tail on the main band. Through an appropriate transformation on the initial states, it is shown that the final-state rule of Von Barth and Grossman is a direct result of exchange. A ``Pauli rigidity'' forces the initial-state wave function to approach that of the final state, except near the Fermi energy. An assumption of random phases allows a formal solution that includes single-particle shakeup events to all orders. It is argued that a low-energy feature of silicon is structure due to the shakeup of single-particle-like excitations rather than a plasmon satellite.

  7. UV and X-ray emission in the interacting binary U Cephei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimenez, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Gonzalez-Riestra, R.

    1993-01-01

    The active close binary U Cep has been monitored in the ultraviolet, using IUE, during 1.25 orbital cycles. The emission spectrum at the bottom of the primary total eclipse confirms earlier suggestions of an unexpected absence of the Hell 1640 A line. Stronger than expected emission in some other lines like NV, CII, CIV or AlIII, indicative of hot plasma, points out that some important differences still remain between the active components of RS CVn-type binaries and the mass-losing components of semidetached Algols. Simultaneous X-ray measurements, carried out with GINGA, indicated a low upper limit flux in the observed energy range (1 to 10 keV). A comparison with other binary systems or isolated stars is discussed in order to understand the obtained results.

  8. X-ray microspectroscopy of sulfur in basaltic glass inclusions. Inference on the volcanic sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métrich, N.; Susini, J.; Galoisy, L.; Calas, G.; Bonnin-Mosbah, M.; Menez, B.

    2003-03-01

    It is commonly accepted that sulfur is carried out as sulfide (S^{II-}) or/and sulfate (S^{VI}) by Earth mantlederived melts, before being released as SO2 and/or H2S in volcanic emissions. By analyzing reference compounds and a selection of minute glass inclusions in olivine crystals using μXANES (X-ray Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge, we demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of sulfite (S^{IV}) in addition to sulfate (S^{VI}) in these rare inclusions representative of oxidized and water rich-basaltic magmas, prior to loss of sulfur and water. The sulfide (S^{II-}) when exists is minor. We proposed that sulfite (S^{IV}) acts as an intermediate, metastable species which results in partitioning of sulfur into the volcanic gas emissions.

  9. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    SciTech Connect

    Poletto, L. Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F.; Finetti, P.; Grazioli, C.; Kivimäki, A.; Stagira, S.; Coreno, M.

    2014-10-15

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  10. EBIS-A facility for the studies of X-ray emission from solids bombarded by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaś, D.; Jabłoński, Ł.; Jagodziński, P.; Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Sobota, D.; Pajek, M.

    2015-07-01

    We report here on the progress in the X-ray spectroscopy program at the EBIS-A facility installed recently at the Institute of Physics of Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. In this facility the beams of low-energy highly charged ions (HCI) produced by the Dresden EBIS-A ion source, after extraction and charge-state separation in the double focusing magnet, are directed to the experimental UHV chamber equipped with a 5-axis universal sample manipulator. The X-rays emitted in interaction of the highly charged ions with solids can be measured by an energy dispersive X-ray silicon drift detector (SDD) and/or a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS) mounted at the experimental chamber. The surface nanostructures formed by an impact of HCI will be studied by the grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique and using a multiprobe surface analysis system based on the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) coupled to the UHV chamber of the EBIS-A facility. In this paper a brief description of the facility, X-ray instrumentation and the surface analysis system is given and the first results are presented.

  11. Subnanosecond X-ray apparatus with flexible cable radiator probe based on small-size explosive emission vacuum diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, S. N.; Mesyats, G. A.; Shpak, V. G.

    2011-05-01

    Subnanosecond X-ray apparatus with a miniature radiator tube, which was connected to a source of high-voltage pulses through a commercial thin flexible radio-frequency coaxial cable (PK50, production of Russia), rated at 50 Ohm and having a length of 1 m, was created. Miniature explosive emission vacuum diodes were used as the picosecond X-ray emitter. The main advantages of the new subnanosecond X-ray apparatus with a flexible cable radiator probe, in comparison with a conventional one, include a small size and a lightweight (from 10 to 32 kg in our performance), as well as the possibility to bring the small-size X-ray tube by means of a long and thin flexible supply cable immediately to an object, which is hard to reach with available X-ray apparatus. The developed X-ray apparatus may find application in medicine for close-focus intracavitary roentgenotherapy, and also in industry for X-ray non-destructive inspection of small diameter lengthy intricate hollow parts.

  12. MODELING UV AND X-RAY EMISSION IN A POST-CORONAL MASS EJECTION CURRENT SHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Raymond, John C.; Vrsnak, Bojan; Vujic, Eugen

    2010-10-10

    A post-coronal mass ejection (CME) current sheet (CS) is a common feature developed behind an erupting flux rope in CME models. Observationally, white light observations have recorded many occurrences of a thin ray appearing behind a CME eruption that closely resembles a post-CME CS in its spatial correspondence and morphology. UV and X-ray observations further strengthen this interpretation by the observations of high-temperature emission at locations consistent with model predictions. The next question then becomes whether the properties inside a post-CME CS predicted by a model agree with observed properties. In this work, we assume that the post-CME CS is a consequence of Petschek-like reconnection and that the observed ray-like structure is bounded by a pair of slow mode shocks developed from the reconnection site. We perform time-dependent ionization calculations and model the UV line emission. We find that such a model is consistent with SOHO/UVCS observations of the post-CME CS. The change of Fe XVIII emission in one event implies an inflow speed of {approx}10 km s{sup -1} and a corresponding reconnection rate of M{sub A} {approx} 0.01. We calculate the expected X-ray emission for comparison with X-ray observations by Hinode/XRT, as well as the ionic charge states as would be measured in situ at 1 AU. We find that the predicted count rate for Hinode/XRT agrees with what was observed in a post-CME CS on 2008 April 9, and the predicted ionic charge states are consistent with high ionization states commonly measured in the interplanetary CMEs. The model results depend strongly on the physical parameters in the ambient corona, namely the coronal magnetic field, the electron density, and temperature during the CME event. It is crucial to obtain these ambient coronal parameters and as many facets of the CS properties as possible by observational means so that the post-CME CS models can be scrutinized more effectively.

  13. Determining the X-ray Emission Mechanism for the Large-Scale Quasar Jet of 3C 111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L.; Hogan, Brandon Scott; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-04-01

    Relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN) are powerful phenomena that transport prodigious amounts of energy and mass from the core of a galaxy out to kiloparsec or even megaparsec distances. While most spatially-resolved jets are seen in the radio, an increasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near-IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. The jet itself extends over 100 kpc on each side, making it one of the longest to be seen in the radio, near-IR/optical and X-ray bands. Its length and straight nature makes it ideal for studying jet physics over many kiloparsecs. We discuss new, deep Chandra and HST observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the approaching and receding hotspots. The near-IR and X-ray emission in the jet is restricted to several knots, and there are important differences between the morphologies seen in the radio, near-IR, and X-ray bands. In several jet regions we detect X-ray maxima significantly upstream of the radio maxima. We analyze the broad-band spectral energy distributions of the jet components and the X-ray spectra of the brightest regions. We compare competing models of emission as they relate to frequency-dependent relativistic beaming. The morphological differences coupled with the X-ray spectral slopes lead us to favor the two-component synchrotron model and disfavor the IC/CMB model.

  14. Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordgren, J.; Bray, G.; Cramm, S.; Nyholm, R.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Wassdahl, N.

    1989-07-01

    Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy is a common tool for the study of the electronic structure of molecules and solids. However, the interpretation of spectra is sometimes made difficult by overlaying lines due to satellite transitions or close-lying core holes. Also, irrelevant inner core transitions may accidentally fall in the wavelength region under study. These problems, which often arise for spectra excited with electrons or broadband photon sources can be removed by using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. In addition, one achieves other advantages as well, such as the ability to study resonant behavior. Another important aspect is the softness of this excitation agent, which allows chemically fragile compounds to be investigated. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of using monochromatized synchrotron radiation to excite soft x-ray spectra. We also show new results which have been accomplished as a result of the selectivity of the excitation. The work has been carried out using the Flipper I wiggler beamline at HASYLAB in Hamburg using a new grazing incidence instrument designed specifically for this experiment. The photon flux at the Flipper I station (typically 5×1012 photons per second on the sample with a 1% bandpass) is enough to allow soft x-ray fluorescence spectra to be recorded at relatively high resolution and within reasonable accumulation times (typically, the spectra presented in this work were recorded in 30 min). The spectrometer is based on a new concept which allows the instrument to be quite small, still covering a large wavelength range (10-250 Å). The basic idea involves the use of several fixed mounted gratings and a large two-dimensional detector. The grating arrangement provides simple mounting within a limited space and, in particular, large spectral range. The detector can be moved in a three-axis coordinate system in order to cover the different Rowland curves defined by the different gratings. The arrangement permits

  15. Coronal accretion: the power of X-ray emission in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.-F.; Taam, R. E.; Qiao, E.; Yuan, W.

    2016-02-01

    The optical/UV and X-ray emissions in luminous AGN are commonly believed to be produced in an accretion disk and an embedded hot corona respectively. We explore the possibility that a geometrically thick coronal gas flow, which is supplied by gravitational capture of interstellar medium or stellar wind, condenses partially to a geometrically thin cold disk and accretes via a thin disk and a corona onto the supermassive black hole. We found that for mass supply rates less than about 0.01 (expressed in Eddington units), condensation does not occur and the accretion flow takes the form of a corona/ADAF. For higher mass supply rates, corona gas condenses to the disk. As a consequence, the coronal mass flow rate decreases and the cool mass flow rate increases towards the black hole. Here the thin disk is characterized by the condensation rate of hot gas as it flows towards the black hole. With increase of mass supply rate, condensation becomes more efficient, while the mass flow rate of the coronal gas attains values of order 0.02 in the innermost regions of the disk, which can help to elucidate the production of strong X-ray with respect to the optical and ultraviolet radiation in high luminosity AGN.

  16. X-Ray, EUV, UV and Optical Emissivities of Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This grant primarily covered the development of the thermal X-ray emission model code called APEC, which is meant to replace the Raymond and Smith (1977) code. The new code contains far more spectral lines and a great deal of updated atomic data. The code is now available (http://hea-www.harvard.edu/APEC), though new atomic data is still being added, particularly at longer wavelengths. While initial development of the code was funded by this grant, current work is carried on by N. Brickhouse, R. Smith and D. Liedahl under separate funding. Over the last five years, the grant has provided salary support for N. Brickhouse, R. Smith, a summer student (L. McAllister), an SAO predoctoral fellow (A. Vasquez), and visits by T. Kallman, D. Liedahl, P. Ghavamian, J.M. Laming, J. Li, P. Okeke, and M. Martos. In addition to the code development, the grant supported investigations into X-ray and UV spectral diagnostics as applied to shock waves in the ISM, accreting black holes and white dwarfs, and stellar coronae. Many of these efforts are continuing. Closely related work on the shock waves and coronal mass ejections in the solar corona has grown out of the efforts supported by the grant.

  17. ROSAT observations of pulsed soft X-ray emission from PSR 1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegelman, Hakki; Finley, John P.

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing the position-sensitive proportional counter and the high-resolution imager aboard the orbiting X-ray observatory ROSAT, we have detected pulsations at the radio period from the pulsar PSR 1055-52. The pulse shapes are energy-dependent and show a transition at about 0.5 keV where the phase angle of the pulse peak changes by about -120 deg and the pulsed fraction increases from 11 percent to 63 percent toward larger energies. Simple spectral models are found to be unsatisfactory, while multicomponent models, such as a soft blackbody and hard power-law tail, yield better fits to the pulse-height data. The hard power-law tail is consistent with the extension of the recently reported EGRET results and may indicate a common emission mechanism for the X-ray through GeV gamma-ray regime. The soft blackbody component with T(infinity) = (7.5 +/- 0.6) x 10 exp 5 K, if interpreted as the initial cooling of a neutron star, is consistent with standard cooling models and does not require the presence of exotic components.

  18. X-ray emission spectroscopy of bulk liquid water in "no-man's land"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellberg, Jonas A.; McQueen, Trevor A.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kennedy, Brian; Nordlund, Dennis; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schlesinger, Daniel; Tokushima, Takashi; Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Eckert, Sebastian; Segtnan, Vegard H.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Kubicek, Katharina; Techert, Simone; Bergmann, Uwe; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Schlotter, William F.; Harada, Yoshihisa; Bogan, Michael J.; Wernet, Philippe; Föhlisch, Alexander; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The structure of bulk liquid water was recently probed by x-ray scattering below the temperature limit of homogeneous nucleation (TH) of ˜232 K [J. A. Sellberg et al., Nature 510, 381-384 (2014)]. Here, we utilize a similar approach to study the structure of bulk liquid water below TH using oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Based on previous XES experiments [T. Tokushima et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 460, 387-400 (2008)] at higher temperatures, we expected the ratio of the 1b1' and 1b1″ peaks associated with the lone-pair orbital in water to change strongly upon deep supercooling as the coordination of the hydrogen (H-) bonds becomes tetrahedral. In contrast, we observed only minor changes in the lone-pair spectral region, challenging an interpretation in terms of two interconverting species. A number of alternative hypotheses to explain the results are put forward and discussed. Although the spectra can be explained by various contributions from these hypotheses, we here emphasize the interpretation that the line shape of each component changes dramatically when approaching lower temperatures, where, in particular, the peak assigned to the proposed disordered component would become more symmetrical as vibrational interference becomes more important.

  19. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  20. High temperature emissivity, reflectivity, and x-ray absorption of BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Néstor E.; del Campo, Leire; de Souza Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Fabbris, Gilberto F. L.; Azevedo, G. de M.; Martínez-Lope, María Jesús; Alonso, José Antonio

    2010-10-01

    We report on the lattice evolution of BiFeO3 as function of temperature using far infrared emissivity, reflectivity, and x-ray absorption local structure. A power law fit to the lowest frequency soft phonon in the magnetic ordered phase yields an exponent β =0.25 as for a tricritical point. At about 200 K below TN˜640 K it ceases softening as consequence of BiFeO3 metastability. We identified this temperature as corresponding to a crossover transition to an order-disorder regime. Above ˜700 K strong band overlapping, merging, and smearing of modes are consequence of thermal fluctuations and chemical disorder. Vibrational modes show band splits in the ferroelectric phase as emerging from triple degenerated species as from a paraelectric cubic phase above TC˜1090 K. Temperature dependent x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the Fe K edge shows that lower temperature Fe3+ turns into Fe2+. While this matches the FeO wüstite XANES profile, the Bi LIII-edge downshift suggests a high temperature very complex bond configuration at the distorted A perovskite site. Overall, our local structural measurements reveal high temperature defect-induced irreversible lattice changes, below, and above the ferroelectric transition, in an environment lacking of long-range coherence. We did not find an insulator to metal transition prior to melting.

  1. Synchrotron soft X-ray and field-emission electron sources: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Howells, M R

    2002-12-01

    The soft X-ray spectral region and the useful range of electron energy-loss spectroscopy are very similar, both including the energy range 100-1000 eV. Moreover, well-developed monochromators and parallel detection devices with comparable resolution exist for both. Despite the differing interactions of electrons and photons, many complementary experiments in imaging, spectroscopy and diffraction have been performed using both techniques. We therefore compare the brightness, degeneracy, monochromaticity, beam size, source size, spatial and temporal coherence of field-emission electron beams and soft X-ray synchrotron radiation from typical undulators. Recent brightness values for nanotip field emitters and undulators, both measured and calculated, are provided with examples from the Advanced Light Source synchrotron-radiation facility at Berkeley USA. The quantum mechanical upper limit on source brightness, as well as relationships among beam brightness, coherence parameters, and degeneracy, are discussed. Factors which limit these parameters and methods of measurement are reviewed, and the implications for diffraction, imaging and spectroscopic experiments as well as radiation damage are briefly commented on.

  2. Laboratory Studies of the X-Ray Emission Produced by the Interaction of Solar Wind Heavy Ions with Comets

    SciTech Connect

    Beriersdorfer, P; Chen, H; May, M J; Thorn, D; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kelly, R L; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Szymkowiak, A E; Kahn, S M

    2002-08-09

    The process of X-ray emission following charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary gases is studied in the laboratory. The emission is recorded with the spare ASTRO-E 6 x 6 microcalorimeter array. The microcalorimeter affords a resolution of better than 10 eV in the range of X-ray energies of interest and thus individual emission lines can be resolved. Our present measurements focus on the most abundant K-shell heavy ions found in the solar wind. In particular, we measure the K-shell emission of bare C, N, O, and Ne, and their hydrogen-like counter parts interacting with such gases as CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Several results are noted that had not been considered in the early cometary X-ray models.

  3. Laboratory Studies of the X-ray Emission Produced by the Interaction of Solar Wind Heavy Ions with Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; May, M.; Thorn, D.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    2002-01-01

    The process of X-ray emission following charge exchange between solar wind heavy ions and cometary gases is studied in the laboratory. The emission is recorded with the spare ASTRO-E 6x6 microcalorimeter array. The microcalorimeter affords a resolution of better than 10 eV in the range of X-ray energies of interest arid thus individual emission lines can be resolved. Our present measurements focus on the most abundant K-shell heavy ions found in the solar wind. In particular, we measure the K-shell emission of bare C, N, O, and Ne, and their hydrogenlike counter parts interacting with such gases as CO2, N2, and CH4. Several results are noted that had not been considered in the early cometary X-ray models.

  4. X-ray emission from a metal depleted accretion shock onto the classical T Tauri star TW Hya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, B.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2004-05-01

    We present the X-ray spectrum of TW Hya observed at high and intermediate spectral resolution with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. TW Hya is the first classical T Tauri star for which simultaneous X-ray data with both high spectral resolution and high sensitivity were obtained, thus allowing to probe the X-ray emission properties of stars in the early pre-main sequence phase. Despite TW Hya's high X-ray luminosity in excess of 1030 erg/s its X-ray spectrum is dominated by emission lines from rather cool plasma (T ≈ 3 MK), and only little emission measure is present at high temperatures (T ≈ 10 MK). We determine photon fluxes for the emission lines in the high resolution spectrum, confirming the earlier result from Chandra that the predominant emission is from neon and oxygen, with comparatively weak iron lines. Further, the line ratios of He-like triplets of nitrogen, oxygen and neon require densities of n_e ˜ 1013 cm-3, about two orders of magnitude higher than for any other star observed so far at high spectral resolution. Finally, we find that nearly all metals are underabundant with respect to solar abundances, while the abundances of nitrogen and neon are enhanced. The high plasma density, the (comparatively) low temperature, and peculiar chemical abundances in the X-ray emitting region on TW Hya are untypical for stellar coronae. An alternative X-ray production mechanism is therefore called for and a natural explanation is an accretion column depleted of grain forming elements. The metal depletion could be either due to the original molecular cloud that formed TW Hya or due to a settling of dust in the circumstellar disk of TW Hya.

  5. X-Ray and Multiwavelength Insights into the Nature of Weak Emission-line Quasars at Low Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Anderson, Scott F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Hall, Patrick B.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad

    2012-03-01

    We report on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of 11 radio-quiet quasars with weak or no emission lines identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshift z = 0.4-2.5. Our sample was selected from the Plotkin et al. catalog of radio-quiet, weak-featured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The distribution of relative X-ray brightness for our low-redshift weak-line quasar (WLQ) candidates is significantly different from that of typical radio-quiet quasars, having an excess of X-ray weak sources, but it is consistent with that of high-redshift WLQs. Over half of the low-redshift WLQ candidates are X-ray weak by a factor of >~ 5, compared to a typical SDSS quasar with similar UV/optical luminosity. These X-ray weak sources generally show similar UV emission-line properties to those of the X-ray weak quasar PHL 1811 (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines, weak semiforbidden lines, and strong UV Fe emission); they may belong to the notable class of PHL 1811 analogs. The average X-ray spectrum of these sources is somewhat harder than that of typical radio-quiet quasars. Several other low-redshift WLQ candidates have normal ratios of X-ray-to-optical/UV flux, and their average X-ray spectral properties are also similar to those of typical radio-quiet quasars. The X-ray weak and X-ray normal WLQ candidates may belong to the same subset of quasars having high-ionization "shielding gas" covering most of the wind-dominated broad emission-line region, but be viewed at different inclinations. The mid-infrared-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources are generally consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars, showing that they are not likely to be BL Lac objects with relativistically boosted continua and diluted emission lines. The mid-infrared-to-UV SEDs of most radio-quiet weak-featured AGNs without sensitive X-ray coverage (34 objects) are also consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars. However, one source in our X-ray

  6. X-RAY AND MULTIWAVELENGTH INSIGHTS INTO THE NATURE OF WEAK EMISSION-LINE QUASARS AT LOW REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Anderson, Scott F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Hall, Patrick B.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Shemmer, Ohad

    2012-03-01

    We report on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of 11 radio-quiet quasars with weak or no emission lines identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshift z = 0.4-2.5. Our sample was selected from the Plotkin et al. catalog of radio-quiet, weak-featured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The distribution of relative X-ray brightness for our low-redshift weak-line quasar (WLQ) candidates is significantly different from that of typical radio-quiet quasars, having an excess of X-ray weak sources, but it is consistent with that of high-redshift WLQs. Over half of the low-redshift WLQ candidates are X-ray weak by a factor of {approx}> 5, compared to a typical SDSS quasar with similar UV/optical luminosity. These X-ray weak sources generally show similar UV emission-line properties to those of the X-ray weak quasar PHL 1811 (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines, weak semiforbidden lines, and strong UV Fe emission); they may belong to the notable class of PHL 1811 analogs. The average X-ray spectrum of these sources is somewhat harder than that of typical radio-quiet quasars. Several other low-redshift WLQ candidates have normal ratios of X-ray-to-optical/UV flux, and their average X-ray spectral properties are also similar to those of typical radio-quiet quasars. The X-ray weak and X-ray normal WLQ candidates may belong to the same subset of quasars having high-ionization 'shielding gas' covering most of the wind-dominated broad emission-line region, but be viewed at different inclinations. The mid-infrared-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources are generally consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars, showing that they are not likely to be BL Lac objects with relativistically boosted continua and diluted emission lines. The mid-infrared-to-UV SEDs of most radio-quiet weak-featured AGNs without sensitive X-ray coverage (34 objects) are also consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars. However, one source in our X-ray

  7. Enhanced x-ray emissions from Au-Gd mixture targets ablated by a high-power nanosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Shang, Wanli; Yang, Jiamin Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Zhan, Xiayu; Du, Huabing; Deng, Bo; Pu, Yikang

    2014-01-28

    As an important x-ray source, enhancement of x-ray emissions from laser-produced plasmas is imperative for various applications. High-Z Au-Gd mixture targets are proposed to enhance the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency compared to pure Au target. In the experiments, a 1 ns frequency-tripled (351 nm wavelength) laser light was used to obtain an intensity of 3×10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} on the targets. The x-ray spectra, total absolute x-ray emissions of all space, M-band fraction and backscattering from pure Au and Au-Gd mixture have been measured, respectively. It is shown that the absolute laser to x-ray conversion efficiency for the Au-Gd mixture containing 60% gold by atom is 47.7%, which has a 15% enhancement compared with that of the pure Au target. The experimental results are consistent with the radiation hydrodynamic simulations.

  8. X-ray emission at the low-mass end - Results from an extensive Einstein Observatory survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1993-01-01

    We have used available IPC data and a critical compilation of cataloged optical data to measure the 0.16-3.5 keV X-ray emission from 88 K and 169 M stars of luminosity classes IV, V, and VI within 25 pc from the Sun. The IPC detected 54 out of the 88 K stars, 70 out of the 138 M stars with M(v) less than 13.4, and 15 out of the 31 fainter M stars. We have identified a subsample of surveyed stars that is statistically representative of the population of K and M stars in the solar neighborhood. On the basis of this subsample (1) we have shown the occurrence of a drop in the level of X-ray emission for M stars later than approximately M5; (2) we have built unbiased maximum likelihood X-ray luminosity functions for the K, early M, and late M stars; (3) we have confirmed, both for K and M stars, the decrease of X-ray luminosity with increasing stellar age in the range of ages of disk population stars: and (4) we have shown that no obvious correlation is present between X-ray and bolometric luminosities in the entire representative samples of K and M stars, but only within flare stars which also seem to mark a saturation in X-ray luminosity level.

  9. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVA 1970G WITH CHANDRA: FILLING THE VOID BETWEEN SUPERNOVAE AND SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan; Kuntz, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from SN 1970G in M101, 35 yr after its outburst, using deep X-ray imaging with the Chundra X-Ray Observatory. The Chandra ACIS spectrum shows that the emission is soft (52 keV) and characteristic of the reverse-shock region. The X-ray luminosity, Lo,,, = (1.1 3 0.2) x lo3# ergs s-1, is likely caused by the interaction of the supernova shock with dense circumstellar matter. If the material was deposited by the stellar wind from the progenitor, a mass-loss rate of M = (2.6 ? 0.4) x M, yr-I (v,/lO km s-I) is inferred. Utilizing the high-resolution Chandra ACIS data of SN 1970G and its environment, we reconstruct the X-ray lightcurve from previous ROSAT HRI, PSPC, and XMM-Newton EPIC observations, and find a best-fit linear rate of decline of L cc t-# with index s = 2.7 t 0.9 over a period of -20-35 yr after the outburst. As the oldest supernova detected in X-rays, SN 1970G allows, for the first time, direct observation of the transition from a supenova to its supernova remnant phase.

  10. Solar Magnetic Reconnection at Low Altitudes and Associated Type III Solar Radio Bursts and X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Lobzin, V. V.; Donea, A.; Tingay, S. J.; Oberoi, D.; Reiner, M. J.; Melrose, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection events are identified definitively in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) data on 25 September 2011, with double-sided jets, current sheets and cusp-like geometries on top of loops, and strong outflows at 200 km/s along pairs of open magnetic field lines. Strong type III bursts observed by the Learmonth radio spectrograph and imaged by the MurchisonWidefield Array (MWA) are demonstrated to be in very good temporal and spatial coincidence with specic SDO magnetic reconnection events and with bursts of nonthermal 3-35 keV X-rays observed by the RHESSI spacecraft. The reconnection sites are low, near heights of 5-10 Mm or 0.01 solar radii, alleviating the number problem for producing the energetic electrons and X-rays. These data, especially the images and event timings, provide direct evidence for the long-unproven but standard model for type III bursts: semi-relativistic electrons energized in magnetic reconnection regions produce radio emission as they move away from the Sun and X-rays as they move into the chromosphere. Since not all SDO events produce X-ray or type III events, different special conditions must exist for the production of strong radio, X-ray, or UV bursts by reconnection events. These conditions are both on the production of suitable energetic electrons and on the production of observable radio, X-ray, and UV emissions from these electrons.

  11. Polarized synchrotron emission in quiescent black hole X-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, David M.; Shahbaz, Tariq; Lewis, Fraser; Gallo, Elena

    2016-08-01

    We present near-infrared polarimetric observations of the black hole X-ray binaries Swift J1357.2-0933 and A0620-00. In both sources, recent studies have demonstrated the presence of variable infrared synchrotron emission in quiescence, most likely from weak compact jets. For Swift J1357.2-0933 we find that the synchrotron emission is polarized at a level of 8.0 ± 2.5 per cent (a 3.2 σ detection of intrinsic polarization). The mean magnitude and rms variability of the flux (fractional rms of 19-24 per cent in KS-band) agree with previous observations. These properties imply a continuously launched (stable on long timescales), highly variable (on short timescales) jet in the Swift J1357.2-0933 system in quiescence, which has a moderately tangled magnetic field close to the base of the jet. We find that for A0620-00, there are likely to be three components to the optical-infrared polarization; interstellar dust along the line of sight, scattering within the system, and