Science.gov

Sample records for ring finger e3

  1. TRIM proteins as RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The tripartite motif(TRIM) proteins harboring the RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil (RBCC) domain motifs form a large protein family. The members of this family are involved in various biological processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis and transcription and also in diseases and oncogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that TRIM proteins play key roles in innate antiviral immunity. An accumulating body of evidence has demonstrated that some TRIM proteins function as E3 ubiquitin ligases in specific ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathways; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully elucidated. In this chapter, we focus on the TRIM family of proteins specially with regard to E3 ligase.

  2. Identification of TRIM22 as a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Zhijian; Gao Bo; Xu Wei; Xiong Sidong

    2008-09-26

    TRIM22, a member of the TRIM family proteins which contain RING finger, B-box, and coiled-coil domains, has been reported as a transcriptional regulator and involved in various cellular processes. In this study, the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, a novel property of TRIM22, was demonstrated. It was found that TRIM22 underwent self-ubiquitylation in vitro in combination with the E2 enzyme UbcH5B and the ubiquitylation was dependent on its RING finger domain. Further evidences showed that TRIM22 could also be self-ubiquitylated in vivo. Importantly, TRIM22 was conjugated with poly-ubiquitin chains and stabilized by the proteasome inhibitor in 293T cells, suggesting that TRIM22 targeted itself for proteasomal degradation through the poly-ubiquitylation. We also found that TRIM22 was located in the nucleus, indicating that TRIM22 might function as a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  3. RING finger E3 ligase PPP1R11 regulates TLR2 signaling and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    McKelvey, Alison C; Lear, Travis B; Dunn, Sarah R; Evankovich, John; Londino, James D; Bednash, Joseph S; Zhang, Yingze; McVerry, Bryan J; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Bill B

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a pattern recognition receptor that recognizes many types of PAMPs that originate from gram-positive bacteria. Here we describe a novel mechanism regulating TLR2 protein expression and subsequent cytokine release through the ubiquitination and degradation of the receptor in response to ligand stimulation. We show a new mechanism in which an uncharacterized RING finger E3 ligase, PPP1R11, directly ubiquitinates TLR2 both in vitro and in vivo, which leads to TLR2 degradation and disruption of the signaling cascade. Lentiviral gene transfer or knockdown of PPP1R11 in mouse lungs significantly affects lung inflammation and the clearance of Staphylococcus aureus. There is a negative correlation between PPP1R11 and TLR2 levels in white blood cell samples isolated from patients with Staphylococcus aureus infections. These results suggest that PPP1R11 plays an important role in regulating innate immunity and gram-positive bacterial clearance by functioning, in part, through the ubiquitination and degradation of TLR2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18496.001 PMID:27805901

  4. Levels of the Mahogunin Ring Finger 1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Do Not Influence Prion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silvius, Derek; Pitstick, Rose; Ahn, Misol; Meishery, Delisha; Oehler, Abby; Barsh, Gregory S.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Carlson, George A.; Gunn, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare but invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders. They are associated with spongiform encephalopathy, a histopathology characterized by the presence of large, membrane-bound vacuolar structures in the neuropil of the brain. While the primary cause is recognized as conversion of the normal form of prion protein (PrPC) to a conformationally distinct, pathogenic form (PrPSc), the cellular pathways and mechanisms that lead to spongiform change, neuronal dysfunction and death are not known. Mice lacking the Mahogunin Ring Finger 1 (MGRN1) E3 ubiquitin ligase develop spongiform encephalopathy by 9 months of age but do not become ill. In cell culture, PrP aberrantly present in the cytosol was reported to interact with and sequester MGRN1. This caused endo-lysosomal trafficking defects similar to those observed when Mgrn1 expression is knocked down, implicating disrupted MGRN1-dependent trafficking in the pathogenesis of prion disease. As these defects were rescued by over-expression of MGRN1, we investigated whether reduced or elevated Mgrn1 expression influences the onset, progression or pathology of disease in mice inoculated with PrPSc. No differences were observed, indicating that disruption of MGRN1-dependent pathways does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PMID:23383230

  5. The RING Finger E3 Ligase SpRing is a Positive Regulator of Salt Stress Signaling in Salt-Tolerant Wild Tomato Species.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shilian; Lin, Qingfang; Zhu, Huishan; Gao, Fenghua; Zhang, Wenhao; Hua, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Protein ubiquitination in plants plays critical roles in many biological processes, including adaptation to abiotic stresses. Previously, RING finger E3 ligase has been characterized during salt stress response in several plant species, but little is known about its function in tomato. Here, we report that SpRing, a stress-inducible gene, is involved in salt stress signaling in wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium 'PI365967'. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that SpRing is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and the RING finger conserved region is required for its activity. SpRing is expressed in all tissues of wild tomato and up-regulated by salt, drought and osmotic stresses, but repressed by low temperature. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion analysis showed that SpRing is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing of SpRing through a virus-induced gene silencing approach led to increased sensitivity to salt stress in wild tomato. Overexpression of SpRing in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in enhanced salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling development. The expression levels of certain key stress-related genes are altered both in SpRing-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants and virus-induced gene silenced tomato seedlings. Taken together, our results indicate that SpRing is involved in salt stress and functions as a positive regulator of salt tolerance.

  6. TRIM37 defective in mulibrey nanism is a novel RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Kallijaervi, Jukka; Lahtinen, Ulla; Haemaelaeinen, Riikka; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina . E-mail: anna-elina.lehesjoki@helsinki.fi

    2005-08-01

    Mulibrey nanism is an autosomal recessive prenatal-onset growth disorder characterized by dysmorphic features, cardiomyopathy, and hepatomegaly. Mutations in TRIM37 encoding a tripartite motif (TRIM, RING-B-box-coiled-coil)-family protein underlie mulibrey nanism. We investigated the ubiquitin ligase activity predicted for the RING domain of TRIM37 by analyzing its autoubiquitination. Full-length TRIM37 and its TRIM domain were highly polyubiquitinated when co-expressed with ubiquitin. Polyubiquitination was decreased in a mutant protein with disrupted RING domain (Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser) and in the Leu76Pro mutant protein, a disease-associated missense mutation affecting the TRIM domain of TRIM37. Bacterially produced GST-TRIM domain fusion protein, but not its Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser or Leu76Pro mutants, were polyubiquitinated in cell-free conditions, implying RING-dependent modification. Ubiquitin was also identified as an interaction partner for TRIM37 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Ectopically expressed TRIM37 rapidly formed aggregates that were ubiquitin-, proteasome subunit-, and chaperone-positive in immunofluorescence analysis, defining them as aggresomes. The Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser mutant and the Leu76Pro and Gly322Val patient mutant proteins were markedly less prone to aggregation, implying that aggresomal targeting reflects a physiological function of TRIM37. These findings suggest that TRIM37 acts as a TRIM domain-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase and imply defective ubiquitin-dependent degradation of an as-yet-unidentified target protein in the pathogenesis of mulibrey nanism.

  7. The RING Finger Ubiquitin E3 Ligase OsHTAS Enhances Heat Tolerance by Promoting H2O2-Induced Stomatal Closure in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Cuicui; Wei, Chuchu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Mugui; Yu, Feifei; Xie, Qi; Tu, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress often results in the generation of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which plays a vital role as a secondary messenger in the process of abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal closure. Here, we characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) HEAT TOLERANCE AT SEEDLING STAGE (OsHTAS) gene, which plays a positive role in heat tolerance at the seedling stage. OsHTAS encodes a ubiquitin ligase localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. OsHTAS expression was detected in all tissues surveyed and peaked in leaf blade, in which the expression was concentrated in mesophyll cells. OsHTAS was responsive to multiple stresses and was strongly induced by exogenous ABA. In yeast two-hybrid assays, OsHTAS interacted with components of the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system and an isoform of rice ascorbate peroxidase. OsHTAS modulated hydrogen peroxide accumulation in shoots, altered the stomatal aperture status of rice leaves, and promoted ABA biosynthesis. The results suggested that the RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase OsHTAS functions in leaf blade to enhance heat tolerance through modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced stomatal closure and is involved in both ABA-dependent and DROUGHT AND SALT TOLERANCE-mediated pathways. PMID:26564152

  8. An E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Ring Finger 41, is a candidate gene for anxiety-like behavior and β-carboline-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S.; Zhang, S.; Choi, KH; Reister, R.; Do, Chi; Baykiz, A.F.; Gershenfeld, H.K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Identification of the genes underlying psychiatric illness remains a thorny problem. Previously, Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for anxiety-like behaviors and beta-carboline-induced seizure vulnerability have been mapped to the distal portion of mouse chromosome 10, using crosses of A/J and C57BL6 mice. Methods An interval specific congenic strain for this chromosomal 10 region facilitated the genetic dissection of novelty-induced exploratory behaviors. Results By microarray studies, an unsuspected E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Ring Finger 41 (Rnf41) was differentially expressed in the region of interest, being upregulated in the hippocampi of B6 compared to A/J as well as congenic A.B6chr10 vs. A/J. By qRT-PCR, Rnf41 expression levels were significantly increased 1.5 and 1.3-fold in the hippocampi of C57BL6/J and A.B6chr10 mice compared to A/J mice, respectively. Protein levels of Rnf41 were increased in hippocampi of B6 mice compared to A/J mice across postnatal development with a 5.5-fold difference at P56. Yeast two hybrid studies searching for Rnf41 binding partners in fetal hippocampus identified several potential targets. An interaction between Rnf41 and NogoA was validated by GST-Rnf41 pulldown experiments. Re-analyzing a microarray database of human post-mortem prefrontal cortex (Brodmann’s Area 46/10), RNF41 mRNA expression levels were reduced significantly in patients with major depression and bipolar disorder compared to unaffected controls and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Conclusion Overall, Rnf41 is nominated as a candidate gene for anxiety-like behaviors, depression, and vulnerability to seizures. RNF41 and its binding partners suggest molecular pathways underlying behavior, highlighting a potential role for the ubiquitin proteasome system in psychiatric illness. PMID:18986647

  9. ATL9, a RING Zinc Finger Protein with E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Implicated in Chitin- and NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Stone, Sophia; Yang, Xin; Antico, Jay; Callis, Judy; Ramonell, Katrina M.; Somerville, Shauna

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are signals detected by plants that activate basal defenses. One of these PAMPs is chitin, a carbohydrate present in the cell walls of fungi and in insect exoskeletons. Previous work has shown that chitin treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana induced defense-related genes in the absence of a pathogen and that the response was independent of the salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways. One of these genes is ATL9 ( = ATL2G), which encodes a RING zinc-finger like protein. In the current work we demonstrate that ATL9 has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. The expression pattern of ATL9 is positively correlated with basal defense responses against Golovinomyces cichoracearum, a biotrophic fungal pathogen. The basal levels of expression and the induction of ATL9 by chitin, in wild type plants, depends on the activity of NADPH oxidases suggesting that chitin-mediated defense response is NADPH oxidase dependent. Although ATL9 expression is not induced by treatment with known defense hormones (SA, JA or ET), full expression in response to chitin is compromised slightly in mutants where ET- or SA-dependent signaling is suppressed. Microarray analysis of the atl9 mutant revealed candidate genes that appear to act downstream of ATL9 in chitin-mediated defenses. These results hint at the complexity of chitin-mediated signaling and the potential interplay between elicitor-mediated signaling, signaling via known defense pathways and the oxidative burst. PMID:21203445

  10. HTLV-1 Tax Stimulates Ubiquitin E3 Ligase, Ring Finger Protein 8, to Assemble Lysine 63-Linked Polyubiquitin Chains for TAK1 and IKK Activation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yik-Khuan; Zhi, Huijun; Bowlin, Tara; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Philip, Subha; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Semmes, Oliver John; Schaefer, Brian; Glover, J N Mark; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2015-08-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, impacts a multitude of cellular processes, including I-κB kinase (IKK)/NF-κB signaling, DNA damage repair, and mitosis. These activities of Tax have been implicated in the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in HTLV-1-infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. IKK and its upstream kinase, TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), contain ubiquitin-binding subunits, NEMO and TAB2/3 respectively, which interact with K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63-pUb) chains. Recruitment to K63-pUb allows cross auto-phosphorylation and activation of TAK1 to occur, followed by TAK1-catalyzed IKK phosphorylation and activation. Using cytosolic extracts of HeLa and Jurkat T cells supplemented with purified proteins we have identified ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8), and E2 conjugating enzymes, Ubc13:Uev1A and Ubc13:Uev2, to be the cellular factors utilized by Tax for TAK1 and IKK activation. In vitro, the combination of Tax and RNF8 greatly stimulated TAK1, IKK, IκBα and JNK phosphorylation. In vivo, RNF8 over-expression augmented while RNF8 ablation drastically reduced canonical NF-κB activation by Tax. Activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax, however, is unaffected by the loss of RNF8. Using purified components, we further demonstrated biochemically that Tax greatly stimulated RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to assemble long K63-pUb chains. Finally, co-transfection of Tax with increasing amounts of RNF8 greatly induced K63-pUb assembly in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, Tax targets RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to promote the assembly of K63-pUb chains, which signal the activation of TAK1 and multiple downstream kinases including IKK and JNK. Because of the roles RNF8 and K63-pUb chains play in DNA damage repair and cytokinesis, this mechanism may also explain the genomic instability of HTLV-1-transformed T cells and ATL cells.

  11. HTLV-1 Tax Stimulates Ubiquitin E3 Ligase, Ring Finger Protein 8, to Assemble Lysine 63-Linked Polyubiquitin Chains for TAK1 and IKK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yik-Khuan; Zhi, Huijun; Bowlin, Tara; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Philip, Subha; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Semmes, Oliver John; Schaefer, Brian; Glover, J. N. Mark; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2015-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, impacts a multitude of cellular processes, including I-κB kinase (IKK)/NF-κB signaling, DNA damage repair, and mitosis. These activities of Tax have been implicated in the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in HTLV-1-infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. IKK and its upstream kinase, TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), contain ubiquitin-binding subunits, NEMO and TAB2/3 respectively, which interact with K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63-pUb) chains. Recruitment to K63-pUb allows cross auto-phosphorylation and activation of TAK1 to occur, followed by TAK1-catalyzed IKK phosphorylation and activation. Using cytosolic extracts of HeLa and Jurkat T cells supplemented with purified proteins we have identified ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8), and E2 conjugating enzymes, Ubc13:Uev1A and Ubc13:Uev2, to be the cellular factors utilized by Tax for TAK1 and IKK activation. In vitro, the combination of Tax and RNF8 greatly stimulated TAK1, IKK, IκBα and JNK phosphorylation. In vivo, RNF8 over-expression augmented while RNF8 ablation drastically reduced canonical NF-κB activation by Tax. Activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax, however, is unaffected by the loss of RNF8. Using purified components, we further demonstrated biochemically that Tax greatly stimulated RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to assemble long K63-pUb chains. Finally, co-transfection of Tax with increasing amounts of RNF8 greatly induced K63-pUb assembly in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, Tax targets RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to promote the assembly of K63-pUb chains, which signal the activation of TAK1 and multiple downstream kinases including IKK and JNK. Because of the roles RNF8 and K63-pUb chains play in DNA damage repair and cytokinesis, this mechanism may also explain the genomic instability of HTLV-1-transformed T cells and ATL cells. PMID:26285145

  12. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  13. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  14. RING-type E3 ligases: Master manipulators of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Meredith B.; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Weissman, Allan M.

    2013-01-01

    RING finger domain and RING finger-like ubiquitin ligases (E3s), such as U-box proteins, constitute the vast majority of known E3s. RING-type E3s function together with ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) to mediate ubiquitination and are implicated in numerous cellular processes. In part because of their importance in human physiology and disease, these proteins and their cellular functions represent an intense area of study. Here we review recent advances in RING-type E3 recognition of substrates, their cellular regulation, and their varied architecture. Additionally, recent structural insights into RING-type E3 function, with a focus on important interactions with E2s and ubiquitin, are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. PMID:23747565

  15. Suramin inhibits cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kenneth; Chong, Robert A.; Yu, Qing; Bai, Jin; Spratt, Donald E.; Ching, Kevin; Lee, Chan; Miao, Haibin; Tappin, Inger; Hurwitz, Jerard; Zheng, Ning; Shaw, Gary S.; Sun, Yi; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Sanchez, Roberto; Zheng, Jun-nian; Pan, Zhen-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) control a myriad of biological processes by directing numerous protein substrates for proteasomal degradation. Key to CRL activity is the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 through electrostatic interactions between E3′s cullin conserved basic canyon and the acidic C terminus of the E2 enzyme. This report demonstrates that a small-molecule compound, suramin, can inhibit CRL activity by disrupting its ability to recruit Cdc34. Suramin, an antitrypansomal drug that also possesses antitumor activity, was identified here through a fluorescence-based high-throughput screen as an inhibitor of ubiquitination. Suramin was shown to target cullin 1’s conserved basic canyon and to block its binding to Cdc34. Suramin inhibits the activity of a variety of CRL complexes containing cullin 2, 3, and 4A. When introduced into cells, suramin induced accumulation of CRL substrates. These observations help develop a strategy of regulating ubiquitination by targeting an E2–E3 interface through small-molecule modulators. PMID:27001857

  16. Building and remodelling Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lydeard, John R; Schulman, Brenda A; Harper, J Wade

    2013-01-01

    Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) control a plethora of biological pathways through targeted ubiquitylation of signalling proteins. These modular assemblies use substrate receptor modules to recruit specific targets. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the mechanisms that control the activity state of CRLs through dynamic alterations in CRL architecture. Central to these processes are cycles of cullin neddylation and deneddylation, as well as exchange of substrate receptor modules to re-sculpt the CRL landscape, thereby responding to the cellular requirements to turn over distinct proteins in different contexts. This review is focused on how CRLs are dynamically controlled with an emphasis on how cullin neddylation cycles are integrated with receptor exchange. PMID:24232186

  17. A palmitoylated RING finger ubiquitin ligase and its homologue in the brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazuaki; Kawamura, Meiko; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Kanbe, Daiji; Ishii, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Tomio; Kumanishi, Toshiro; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-08-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) ligation is implicated in active protein metabolism and subcellular trafficking and its impairment is involved in various neurologic diseases. In rat brain, we identified two novel Ub ligases, Momo and Sakura, carrying double zinc finger motif and RING finger domain. Momo expression is enriched in the brain gray matter and testis, and Sakura expression is more widely detected in the brain white matter as well as in many peripheral organs. Both proteins associate with the cell membranes of neuronal and/or glial cells. We examined their Ub ligase activity in vivo and in vitro using viral expression vectors carrying myc-tagged Momo and Sakura. Overexpression of either Momo or Sakura in mixed cortical cultures increased total polyubiquitination levels. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that the combination of Momo and UbcH4 and H5c, or of Sakura and UbcH4, H5c and H6 is required for the reaction. Deletion mutagenesis suggested that the E3 Ub ligase activity of Momo and Sakura depended on their C-terminal domains containing RING finger structure, while their N-terminal domains influenced their membrane association. In agreement, Sakura associating with the membrane was specifically palmitoylated. Although the molecular targets of their Ub ligation remain to be identified, these findings imply a novel function of the palmitoylated E3 Ub ligase(s).

  18. RING finger protein PLR-1 blocks Wnt signaling by altering trafficking of Wnt Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan E.

    Secreted Wnt proteins control a wide range of essential developmental processes, including axon guidance and establishment of anteroposterior neuronal polarity. We identified a transmembrane RING finger protein, PLR-1, that governs the response to Wnts by reducing the cell surface levels of Wnt receptors Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are normally enriched at the plasma membrane where they are capable of detecting and responding to extracellular Wnts. However, when PLR-1 is expressed Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are no longer detected at the cell surface and instead colocalize with PLR-1 in endosomes and Golgi. PLR-1 is related to a broad family of transmembrane proteins that contain a lumenal protease associated domain and a cytosolic RING finger. The RING finger is a hallmark of one type of E3 ubiquitin ligase and monoubiquitination is commonly used to regulate protein trafficking. Protease associated domains are largely thought to mediate interactions between proteins. To identify the domains responsible for PLR-1 regulation of Frizzled from the cell surface we utilized a series of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and protein truncations containing various domains from PLR-1 and Frizzled. Our data suggests that PLR-1 and Frizzled interact and form a complex via their respective extracellular/lumenal domains, and that ubiqiuitination of Frizzled by PLR-1 targets the Frizzled/PLR-1 complex to the endosome.

  19. Anatomic variation of the extensor tendons to the ring and little fingers: a cadaver dissection study.

    PubMed

    Seradge, H; Tian, W; Baer, C

    1999-07-01

    We found an anatomic variation of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) in a cadaveric dissection. The EDM had three tendon slips; two slips to the little finger and one to the ring finger metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint. The ring finger slip inserted in the extensor hood with the EDC. The EDC had a separate tendon to the little finger extensor hood. The EDM had an additional pulley distal to the extensor retinaculum. The MP joints of the little and ring fingers extended simultaneously upon pulling the EDM or the EDC. The third slip of the EDM could provide an extra donor site and possibly poses a unique clinical presentation.

  20. Magic Ring: a finger-worn device for multiple appliances control using static finger gestures.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lei; Zhou, Yinghui; Cheng, Zixue; Huang, Tongjun

    2012-01-01

    An ultimate goal for Ubiquitous Computing is to enable people to interact with the surrounding electrical devices using their habitual body gestures as they communicate with each other. The feasibility of such an idea is demonstrated through a wearable gestural device named Magic Ring (MR), which is an original compact wireless sensing mote in a ring shape that can recognize various finger gestures. A scenario of wireless multiple appliances control is selected as a case study to evaluate the usability of such a gestural interface. Experiments comparing the MR and a Remote Controller (RC) were performed to evaluate the usability. From the results, only with 10 minutes practice, the proposed paradigm of gestural-based control can achieve a performance of completing about six tasks per minute, which is in the same level of the RC-based method.

  1. Magic Ring: A Finger-Worn Device for Multiple Appliances Control Using Static Finger Gestures

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lei; Zhou, Yinghui; Cheng, Zixue; Huang, Tongjun

    2012-01-01

    An ultimate goal for Ubiquitous Computing is to enable people to interact with the surrounding electrical devices using their habitual body gestures as they communicate with each other. The feasibility of such an idea is demonstrated through a wearable gestural device named Magic Ring (MR), which is an original compact wireless sensing mote in a ring shape that can recognize various finger gestures. A scenario of wireless multiple appliances control is selected as a case study to evaluate the usability of such a gestural interface. Experiments comparing the MR and a Remote Controller (RC) were performed to evaluate the usability. From the results, only with 10 minutes practice, the proposed paradigm of gestural-based control can achieve a performance of completing about six tasks per minute, which is in the same level of the RC-based method. PMID:22778612

  2. Multifunctional nature of the arenavirus RING finger protein Z.

    PubMed

    Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Lennartz, Frank; Strecker, Thomas

    2012-11-09

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped negative-stranded RNA viruses that can cause severe human disease ranging from encephalitis symptoms to fulminant hemorrhagic fever. The bi‑segmented RNA genome encodes four polypeptides: the nucleoprotein NP, the surface glycoprotein GP, the polymerase L, and the RING finger protein Z. Although it is the smallest arenavirus protein with a length of 90 to 99 amino acids and a molecular weight of approx. 11 kDa, the Z protein has multiple functions in the viral life cycle including (i) regulation of viral RNA synthesis, (ii) orchestration of viral assembly and budding, (iii) interaction with host cell proteins, and (iv) interferon antagonism. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the structural and functional role of the Z protein in the arenavirus replication cycle.

  3. Multifunctional Nature of the Arenavirus RING Finger Protein Z

    PubMed Central

    Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Lennartz, Frank; Strecker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped negative-stranded RNA viruses that can cause severe human disease ranging from encephalitis symptoms to fulminant hemorrhagic fever. The bi‑segmented RNA genome encodes four polypeptides: the nucleoprotein NP, the surface glycoprotein GP, the polymerase L, and the RING finger protein Z. Although it is the smallest arenavirus protein with a length of 90 to 99 amino acids and a molecular weight of approx. 11 kDa, the Z protein has multiple functions in the viral life cycle including (i) regulation of viral RNA synthesis, (ii) orchestration of viral assembly and budding, (iii) interaction with host cell proteins, and (iv) interferon antagonism. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the structural and functional role of the Z protein in the arenavirus replication cycle. PMID:23202512

  4. Genome-wide identification, evolution and expression analysis of RING finger protein genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Intikhab; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Yong; Zhu, Mei-Lan; Wang, Heng-Bo; Chalhoub, Boulos; Lu, Yun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    More and more RING finger genes were found to be implicated in various important biological processes. In the present study, a total of 731 RING domains in 715 predicted proteins were identified in Brassica rapa genome (AA, 2n = 20), which were further divided into eight types: RING-H2 (371), RING-HCa (215), RING-HCb (47), RING-v (44), RING-C2 (38), RING-D (10), RING-S/T (5) and RING-G (1). The 715 RING finger proteins were further classified into 51 groups according to the presence of additional domains. 700 RING finger protein genes were mapped to the 10 chromosomes of B. rapa with a range of 47 to 111 genes for each chromosome. 667 RING finger protein genes were expressed in at least one of the six tissues examined, indicating their involvement in various physiological and developmental processes in B. rapa. Hierarchical clustering analysis of RNA-seq data divided them into seven major groups, one of which includes 231 members preferentially expressed in leaf, and constitutes then a panel of gene candidates for studying the genetic and molecular mechanisms of leafy head traits in Brassica crops. Our results lay the foundation for further studies on the classification, evolution and putative functions of RING finger protein genes in Brassica species. PMID:28094809

  5. The Role of the Transmembrane RING Finger Proteins in Cellular and Organelle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    A large number of RING finger (RNF) proteins are present in eukaryotic cells and the majority of them are believed to act as E3 ubiquitin ligases. In humans, 49 RNF proteins are predicted to contain transmembrane domains, several of which are specifically localized to membrane compartments in the secretory and endocytic pathways, as well as to mitochondria and peroxisomes. They are thought to be molecular regulators of the organization and integrity of the functions and dynamic architecture of cellular membrane and membranous organelles. Emerging evidence has suggested that transmembrane RNF proteins control the stability, trafficking and activity of proteins that are involved in many aspects of cellular and physiological processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mammalian transmembrane RNF proteins, focusing on their roles and significance. PMID:24957874

  6. Two partially embedded rings resulting in chronic erosion of a finger.

    PubMed

    Moore, Forrest O; Thornton, Brian P; Shiroff, Adam M; Zabel, David D; Vasconez, Henry C

    2004-12-01

    Embedded rings in the fingers may cause neurovascular, tendinous, or bony injury. These are very rare injuries usually found in patients with mental illness. To minimize the potentially serious complications, mentally-challenged individuals should have tight rings removed. We present a case of a 41-year-old gentleman with schizophrenia who had two partially embedded rings on his left index finger but consistently refused to have the rings removed. Following appointment of a guardian, the patient was returned for surgery to remove the rings. He recovered without further sequelae.

  7. The Membrane Associated RING-CH Proteins: A Family of E3 Ligases with Diverse Roles through the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Means, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery that conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins can drive proteolytic degradation, ubiquitination has been shown to perform a diverse range of functions in the cell. It plays an important role in endocytosis, signal transduction, trafficking of vesicles inside the cell, and even DNA repair. The process of ubiquitination-mediated control has turned out to be remarkably complex, involving a diverse array of proteins and many levels of control. This review focuses on a family of structurally related E3 ligases termed the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) ubiquitin ligases, which were originally discovered as structural homologs to the virals E3s, K3, and K5 from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). These proteins contain a catalytic RING-CH finger and are typically membrane-bound, with some having up to 14 putative transmembrane domains. Despite several lines of evidence showing that the MARCH proteins play a complex and essential role in several cellular processes, this family remains understudied. PMID:27419207

  8. Characterization of a novel RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase GhRING2 differentially expressed in cotton fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis pathway is responsible for the degradation of abnormal and short-lived proteins to regulate many important biochemical activities in eukaryotes. By employing affymetrix microarray analysis, we have identified a novel ubiquitin ligase E3 gene GhRING2 that is diffe...

  9. Role of Ring Finger Protein 213 in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Le-Bao; Zhao, Ji-Zong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to help people comprehensively understand the research advances related to ring finger protein 213 (RNF213) in moyamoya disease (MMD) and to understand the disease at the molecular level to provide a new perspective of the diagnosis of the disease. Data Sources: This review was based on data in articles published between 2005 and 2015 that were retrieved from the PubMed database. The search terms included RNF213, MMD, intracranial major artery stenosis/occlusion (ICASO), genotype, phenotype, mutant and variants, and the combinations of these terms. Study Selection: Articles related to MMD and RNF213 were selected for review, and we also reviewed publications related to ICASO. Results: RNF213 is not only associated with MMD but also associated with intracranial major artery stenosis. In addition, RNF213 variants exhibit apparent ethnic diversity; specifically, the c.14576G>A variant is mainly detected in Korean, Chinese, and Japanese populations, particularly the latter population. The genotypes of RNF213 correlate with the phenotypes of MMD; for example, the homozygous c.14576G>A variant is associated with early-onset, severe symptoms, and an unfavorable prognosis. Furthermore, the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant should be considered during the diagnosis of MMD because no patients with quasi-MMD have been reported to carry the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant whereas 66 of 78 patients with definite MMD have been found to carry this variant. Conclusions: The growing literature demonstrates that MMD is primarily caused by the synergy of genetic and environmental factors, and unknown genetic modifiers might play roles in the etiology of MMD. Further research should be conducted to clarify the pathogenic mechanism of MMD. PMID:27748344

  10. Identification and functional expression of the pepper RING type E3 ligase, CaDTR1, involved in drought stress tolerance via ABA-mediated signalling

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyunhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Drought negatively affects plant growth and development, thereby leading to loss of crop productivity. Several plant E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) and thus play important roles in the drought stress response. Here, we show that the C3HC4-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaDTR1, regulates the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. CaDTR1 contains an amino-terminal RING finger motif and two carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions; the RING finger motif functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins, and the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions function during subcellular localisation. The expression of CaDTR1 was induced by ABA, drought, and NaCl treatments. CaDTR1 localised in the nucleus and displayed in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterised by high levels of transpirational water loss. On the other hand, CaDTR1-overexpressing (OX) Arabidopsis plants exhibited an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype during the germinative and post-germinative growth stages. Moreover, in contrast to CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants, CaDTR1-OX plants exhibited a drought-tolerant phenotype characterised by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and high leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaDTR1 functions as a positive regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. PMID:27439598

  11. Palmaris longus muscle substituting for the ring finger slip of flexor digitorum superficialis.

    PubMed

    Cassell, M D; Bergman, R A

    1990-01-01

    An unusual and unrecorded variation in palmaris longus muscle is described. The muscle had a normal appearance and origin from the common tendon arising from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and from the surrounding intermuscular septa. The distal tendon however entered the hand via the carpal tunnel medial and deep to the median nerve, split and inserted into the lateral and medial sides of the middle phalanx of the ring finger. It therefore substituted completely for the slip to the ring finger from flexor digitorum superficials, which was absent.

  12. Cbl-c Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Is Increased via the Interaction of Its RING Finger Domain with a LIM Domain of the Paxillin Homolog, Hic 5

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Philip E.; Kales, Stephen C.; Yadavalli, Rajgopal; Nau, Marion M.; Zhang, Han; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Cbl proteins (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) are ubiquitin ligases that are critical regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling. In this study we identify a new Cbl-c interacting protein, Hydrogen peroxide Induced Construct 5 (Hic-5). The two proteins interact through a novel interaction mediated by the RING finger of Cbl-c and the LIM2 domain of Hic-5. Further, this interaction is mediated and dependent on specific zinc coordinating complexes within the RING finger and LIM domain. Binding of Hic-5 to Cbl-c leads to an increase in the ubiquitin ligase activity of Cbl-c once Cbl-c has been activated by Src phosphorylation or through an activating phosphomimetic mutation. In addition, co-transfection of Hic-5 with Cbl-c leads to an increase in Cbl-c mediated ubiquitination of the EGFR. These data suggest that Hic-5 enhances Cbl-c ubiquitin ligase activity once Cbl-c has been phosphorylated and activated. Interactions between heterologous RING fingers have been shown to activate E3s. This is the first demonstration of enhancement of ubiquitin ligase activity of a RING finger ubiquitin ligase by the direct interaction of a LIM zinc coordinating domain. PMID:23145173

  13. Genomic and Phenomic Screens for Flower Related RING Type Ubiquitin E3 Ligases in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pavicic, Mirko; Mouhu, Katriina; Wang, Feng; Bilicka, Marcelina; Chovanček, Erik; Himanen, Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    Flowering time control integrates endogenous as well as environmental signals to promote flower development. The pathways and molecular networks involved are complex and integrate many modes of signal transduction. In plants ubiquitin mediated protein degradation pathway has been proposed to be as important mode of signaling as phosphorylation and transcription. To systematically study the role of ubiquitin signaling in the molecular regulation of flowering we have taken a genomic approach to identify flower related Ubiquitin Proteasome System components. As a large and versatile gene family the RING type ubiquitin E3 ligases were chosen as targets of the genomic screen. The complete list of Arabidopsis RING E3 ligases were retrieved and verified in the Arabidopsis genome v11 and their differential expression was used for their categorization into flower organs or developmental stages. Known regulators of flowering time or floral organ development were identified in these categories through literature search and representative mutants for each category were purchased for functional characterization by growth and morphological phenotyping. To this end, a workflow was developed for high throughput phenotypic screening of growth, morphology and flowering of nearly a thousand Arabidopsis plants in one experimental round.

  14. Giant Cell Tumour of Proximal Phalanx of Ring Finger: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Rishit; Shah, Malkesh; Patel, Amit; Golwala, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone arising from a phalanx of a finger is extremely rare. Only two percent of all reported GCTs are found in the hand, which show a higher rate of recurrence as compared to those occurring at a more proximal location. Here we report a rare case of giant cell tumour of proximal phalanx of the ring finger in a 20-year-old male, which was treated with extended curettage and bone grafting. After two years of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with complete functional recovery and no signs of recurrence. PMID:27900230

  15. Actin Cytoskeletal Organization in Drosophila Germline Ring Canals Depends on Kelch Function in a Cullin-RING E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Andrew M.; Mannix, Katelynn M.; Cooley, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila Kelch protein is required to organize the ovarian ring canal cytoskeleton. Kelch binds and cross-links F-actin in vitro, and it also functions with Cullin 3 (Cul3) as a component of a ubiquitin E3 ligase. How these two activities contribute to cytoskeletal remodeling in vivo is not known. We used targeted mutagenesis to investigate the mechanism of Kelch function. We tested a model in which Cul3-dependent degradation of Kelch is required for its function, but we found no evidence to support this hypothesis. However, we found that mutant Kelch deficient in its ability to interact with Cul3 failed to rescue the kelch cytoskeletal defects, suggesting that ubiquitin ligase activity is the principal activity required in vivo. We also determined that the proteasome is required with Kelch to promote the ordered growth of the ring canal cytoskeleton. These results indicate that Kelch organizes the cytoskeleton in vivo by targeting a protein substrate for degradation by the proteasome. PMID:26384358

  16. Upf1 potentially serves as a RING-related E3 ubiquitin ligase via its association with Upf3 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shinya; Araki, Yasuhiro; Ohya, Yuriko; Sakuno, Takeshi; Hoshino, Shin-Ichi; Kontani, Kenji; Nishina, Hiroshi; Katada, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Three Upf proteins are essential to the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. Although these proteins assemble on polysomes for recognition of aberrant mRNAs containing premature termination codons, the significance of this assembly remains to be elucidated. The Cys- and His-rich repeated N terminus (CH domain) of Upf1 has been implicated in its binding to Upf2. Here, we show that CH domain also plays a RING-related role for Upf1 to exhibit E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in yeast. Despite the sequence divergence from typical E3-RING fingers, the CH domain of yeast Upf1 specifically and directly interacted with the yeast E2 Ubc3. Interestingly, Upf1 served as a substrate for the in vitro self-ubiquitination, and the modification required its association with Upf3 rather than Upf2. Substitution of the coordinated Cys and His residues in the CH domain impaired not only self-ubiquitination of Upf1 but also rapid decay of aberrant mRNAs. These results suggest that Upf1 may serve as an E3 ubiquitin ligase upon its association with Upf3 and play an important role in signaling to the NMD pathway. PMID:18676617

  17. Expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of SAG, a ring finger redox-sensitive protein.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, M; Bian, J; Aviram, M; Duan, H; Bisgaier, C L; Loo, J A; Sun, Y

    1999-07-01

    We recently reported the cloning and characterization of SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene), a novel zinc RING finger protein, that is redox responsive and protects mammalian cells from apoptosis. Here we report the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of SAG. Bacterially expressed SAG is brown in color and dithiothreitol (DTT)-sensitive. SAG forms large oligomers without DTT that can be reduced into a monomer in the presence of DTT. These features help us to purify SAG using the chromatography with or without DTT. Likewise, purified SAG is redox sensitive. Upon H2O2 exposure, SAG forms oligomers as well as monomer doublets due to the formation of the inter- or intramolecular disulfide bonds, respectively. This process can be reversed by DTT or prevented by pretreatment with the alkylating reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). Although SAG contains two putative heme-binding sites and a RING finger domain, the protein appears not to bind with heme and to lack transcription factor activity as determined in a Gal4-fusion/transactivation assay. Wildtype, but not RING finger domain-disrupted SAG mutants, prevents copper-induced lipid peroxidation. These results, along with our previous observations, suggest that SAG is an intracellular antioxidant molecule that may act as a redox sensor to buffer oxidative-stress induced damage.

  18. Structure of the human FANCL RING-Ube2T complex reveals determinants of cognate E3-E2 selection.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Charlotte; Purkiss, Andrew; Miles, Jennifer Anne; Walden, Helen

    2014-02-04

    The combination of an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with an E3 ubiquitin-ligase is essential for ubiquitin modification of a substrate. Moreover, the pairing dictates both the substrate choice and the modification type. The molecular details of generic E3-E2 interactions are well established. Nevertheless, the determinants of selective, specific E3-E2 recognition are not understood. There are ∼40 E2s and ∼600 E3s giving rise to a possible ∼24,000 E3-E2 pairs. Using the Fanconi Anemia pathway exclusive E3-E2 pair, FANCL-Ube2T, we report the atomic structure of the FANCL RING-Ube2T complex, revealing a specific and extensive network of additional electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, we show that these specific interactions are required for selection of Ube2T over other E2s by FANCL.

  19. Functional roles of the pepper RING finger protein gene, CaRING1, in abscisic acid signaling and dehydration tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, which include pathogens and conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate the defense response of plants to abiotic stress. Previously, we isolated Ring finger protein gene (CaRING1) from pepper (Capsicum annuum), which is associated with resistance to bacterial pathogens, accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Here, we report a new function of the CaRING1 gene product in the ABA-mediated defense responses of plants to dehydration stress. The expression of the CaRING1 gene was induced in pepper leaves treated with ABA or exposed to dehydration or NaCl. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 in pepper plants exhibited low degree of ABA-induced stomatal closure and high levels of transpirational water loss in dehydrated leaves. These led to be more vulnerable to dehydration stress in CaRING1-silenced pepper than in the control pepper, accompanied by reduction of ABA-regulated gene expression and low accumulation of ABA and H2O2. In contrast, CaRING1-overexpressing transgenic plants showed enhanced sensitivity to ABA during the seedling growth and establishment. These plants were also more tolerant to dehydration stress than the wild-type plants because of high ABA accumulation, enhanced stomatal closure and increased expression of stress-responsive genes. Together, these results suggest that the CaRING1 acts as positive factor for dehydration tolerance in Arabidopsis by modulating ABA biosynthesis and ABA-mediated stomatal closing and gene expression.

  20. The atrzf1 mutation of the novel RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase increases proline contents and enhances drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun-Woo; Min, Ji-Hee; Chung, Moon-Soo; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2013-04-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to proteins plays a fundamental role in the regulation of cellular function through biological events involving abiotic or biotic stress responses, immune responses, and apoptosis. Here, we characterize the biological function of the Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) in dehydration response. AtRZF1 was significantly reduced by drought stress. The atrzf1 mutant was less sensitive to osmotic stress than the wild-type during early seedling development, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing AtRZF1 were hypersensitive, indicating that AtRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the AtRZF1 gene was very significantly influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, membrane ion leakage and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. AtRZF1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase, and its conserved C3H2C3-type RING domain is likely important for the biological function of AtRZF1 in drought response. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase AtRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development.

  1. Functional characterization of EI24-induced autophagy in the degradation of RING-domain E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Sushil; Jeong, Hyobin; Kim, Yunmi; Ali, Muhammad; Roh, Jae-il; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Han-Woong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy pathways were believed to be independent; however, recent data indicate that these pathways engage in crosstalk. To date, the players mediating this crosstalk have been elusive. Here, we show experimentally that EI24 (EI24, autophagy associated transmembrane protein), a key component of basal macroautophagy/autophagy, degrades 14 physiologically important E3 ligases with a RING (really interesting new gene) domain, whereas 5 other ligases were not degraded. Based on the degradation results, we built a statistical model that predicts the RING E3 ligases targeted by EI24 using partial least squares discriminant analysis. Of 381 RING E3 ligases examined computationally, our model predicted 161 EI24 targets. Those targets are primarily involved in transcription, proteolysis, cellular bioenergetics, and apoptosis and regulated by TP53 and MTOR signaling. Collectively, our work demonstrates that EI24 is an essential player in UPS-autophagy crosstalk via degradation of RING E3 ligases. These results indicate a paradigm shift regarding the fate of E3 ligases. PMID:27541728

  2. Transcriptional repression by RING finger protein TIF1 beta that interacts with the KRAB repressor domain of KOX1.

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, P; Georgiev, O; Le Douarin, B; Bourquin, J P; Schaffner, W

    1996-01-01

    Many of the vertebrate zinc finger factors of the Kruppel type (C2H2 zinc fingers) contain in their N-terminus a conserved sequence referred to as the KRAB (Kruppel-associated box) domain that, when tethered to DNA, efficiently represses transcription. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have isolated an 835 amino acid RING finger (C3HC4 zinc finger) protein, TIF1 beta (also named KAP-1), that specifically interacts with the KRAB domain of the human zinc finger factor KOX1/ZNF10. TIF1 beta, TIF1 alpha, PML and efp belong to a characteristic subgroup of RING finger proteins that contain one or two other Cys/His-rich clusters (B boxes) and a putative coiled-coil in addition to the classical C3HC4 RING finger motif (RBCC configuration). Like TIF1 alpha, TIF1 beta also contains an additional Cys/His cluster (PHD finger) and a bromo-related domain. When tethered to DNA, TIF1 beta can repress transcription in transiently transfected mammalian cells both from promoter-proximal and remote (enhancer) positions, similarly to the KRAB domain itself. We propose that TIF1 beta is a mediator of the transcriptional repression exerted by the KRAB domain. PMID:9016654

  3. Functional diversification of the RING finger and other binuclear treble clef domains in prokaryotes and the early evolution of the ubiquitin system.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies point to a diverse assemblage of prokaryotic cognates of the eukaryotic ubiquitin (Ub) system. These systems span an entire spectrum, ranging from those catalyzing cofactor and amino acid biosynthesis, with only adenylating E1-like enzymes and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls), to those that are closer to eukaryotic systems by virtue of possessing E2 enzymes. Until recently E3 enzymes were unknown in such prokaryotic systems. Using contextual information from comparative genomics, we uncover a diverse group of RING finger E3s in prokaryotes that are likely to function with E1s, E2s, JAB domain peptidases and Ubls. These E1s, E2s and RING fingers suggest that features hitherto believed to be unique to eukaryotic versions of these proteins emerged progressively in such prokaryotic systems. These include the specific configuration of residues associated with oxyanion-hole formation in E2s and the C-terminal UFD in the E1 enzyme, which presents the E2 to its active site. Our study suggests for the first time that YukD-like Ubls might be conjugated by some of these systems in a manner similar to eukaryotic Ubls. We also show that prokaryotic RING fingers possess considerable functional diversity and that not all of them are involved in Ub-related functions. In eukaryotes, other than RING fingers, a number of distinct binuclear (chelating two Zn atoms) and mononuclear (chelating one zinc atom) treble clef domains are involved in Ub-related functions. Through detailed structural analysis we delineated the higher order relationships and interaction modes of binuclear treble clef domains. This indicated that the FYVE domain acquired the binuclear state independently of the other binuclear forms and that different treble clef domains have convergently acquired Ub-related functions independently of the RING finger. Among these, we uncover evidence for notable prokaryotic radiations of the ZF-UBP, B-box, AN1 and LIM clades of treble clef domains and present

  4. Dasatinib Targets B-Lineage Cells but Does Not Provide an Effective Therapy for Myeloproliferative Disease in c-Cbl RING Finger Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duyvestyn, Johanna M.; Taylor, Samuel J.; Dagger, Samantha A.; Orandle, Marlene; Morse, Herbert C.; Thien, Christine B. F.; Langdon, Wallace Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the multi-kinase inhibitor dasatinib would provide an effective therapy for myeloproliferative diseases (MPDs) involving c-Cbl mutations. These mutations, which occur in the RING finger and linker domains, abolish the ability of c-Cbl to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and downregulate activated protein tyrosine kinases. Here we analyzed the effects of dasatinib in a c-Cbl RING finger mutant mouse that develops an MPD with a phenotype similar to the human MPDs. The mice are characterized by enhanced tyrosine kinase signaling resulting in an expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors and cells within the myeloid lineage. Since c-Cbl is a negative regulator of c-Kit and Src signaling we reasoned that dasatinib, which targets these kinases, would be an effective therapy. Furthermore, two recent studies showed dasatinib to be effective in inhibiting the in vitro growth of cells from leukemia patients with c-Cbl RING finger and linker domain mutations. Surprisingly we found that dasatinib did not provide an effective therapy for c-Cbl RING finger mutant mice since it did not suppress any of the hematopoietic lineages that promote MPD development. Thus we conclude that dasatinib may not be an appropriate therapy for leukemia patients with c-Cbl mutations. We did however find that dasatinib caused a marked reduction of pre-B cells and immature B cells which correlated with a loss of Src activity. This study is therefore the first to provide a detailed characterization of in vivo effects of dasatinib in a hematopoietic disorder that is driven by protein tyrosine kinases other than BCR-ABL. PMID:24718698

  5. Brown tumour in phalanx of the ring finger due to chronic kidney failure. A case report.

    PubMed

    Forigua V, J E; Brunicardi H, R A; Morales V, C A; Archila, M Del P; Chaparro Rivera, D M

    2016-11-25

    Brown tumours are highly vascular lytic bone lesions found in primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The brown term is given due to the red-brown colour of the tissue, which is due to the accumulation of hemosiderin. The case is presented of a 29 year-old male with chronic renal failure, who had a mass in the tip of the ring finger after a trauma of 4 months onset, which had increased progressively in size and pain. He was treated surgically, by amputation, with no recurrence 10 months after the surgery.

  6. RING finger ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase Nrdp1/FLRF regulates parkin stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ling; Tan, Ying; Zhou, An; Yu, Qingming; Zhou, Jianhua

    2005-03-11

    Parkin is a ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase. It has been suggested that loss of function in parkin causes accumulation and aggregation of its substrates, leading to death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we isolated a RING finger protein that interacted with the N terminus of parkin in a Drosophila cDNA library. Interaction between human parkin and the mammalian RING finger protein homologue Nrdp1/FLRF, a ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase that ubiquitinates ErbB3 and ErbB4, was validated by in vitro binding assay, co-immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence co-localization. Significantly, pulse-chase experiments showed that cotransfection of Nrdp1 and parkin reduced the half-life of parkin from 5 to 2.5 h. Consistent with these findings, we further observed that degradation of CDCrel-1, a parkin substrate, was facilitated by overexpression of parkin protein. However, co-transfection of Nrdp1 with parkin reversed the effects of parkin on CDCrel-1 degradation. We conclude that Nrdp1 is a parkin modifier that accelerates degradation of parkin, resulting in a reduction of parkin activity.

  7. Overview of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) E3 ligase family.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johannes; Bakke, Oddmund; Morth, J Preben

    2016-12-14

    E3 ligases are critical checkpoints for protein ubiquitination, a signal that often results in protein sorting and degradation but has also been linked to regulation of transcription and DNA repair. In line with their key role in cellular trafficking and cell-cycle control, malfunction of E3 ligases is often linked to human disease. Thus, they have emerged as prime drug targets. However, the molecular basis of action of membrane-bound E3 ligases is still unknown. Here, we review the current knowledge on the membrane-embedded MARCH E3 ligases (MARCH-1-6,7,8,11) with a focus on how the transmembrane regions can contribute via GxxxG-motifs to the selection and recognition of other membrane proteins as substrates for ubiquitination. Further understanding of the molecular parameters that govern target protein recognition of MARCH E3 ligases will contribute to development of strategies for therapeutic regulation of MARCH-induced ubiquitination.

  8. Convergent solid-phase and solution approaches in the synthesis of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 RING finger domain.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas; Gatos, Dimitrios

    2009-12-01

    The RING finger domain of the Mdm2, located at the C-terminus of the protein, is necessary for regulation of p53, a tumor suppressor protein. The 48-residues long Mdm2 peptide is an important target for studying its interaction with small anticancer drug candidates. For the chemical synthesis of the Mdm2 RING finger domain, the fragment condensation on solid-phase and the fragment condensation in solution were studied. The latter method was performed using either protected or free peptides at the C-terminus as the amino component. Best results were achieved using solution condensation where the N-component was applied with the C-terminal carboxyl group left unprotected. The developed method is well suited for large-scale synthesis of Mdm2 RING finger domain, combining the advantages of both solid-phase and solution synthesis.

  9. Capturing a substrate in an activated RING E3/E2-SUMO complex

    PubMed Central

    Streich, Frederick C.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Post-translational protein modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins such as small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO) regulates processes including protein homeostasis, the DNA damage response, and the cell cycle. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is modified by Ub or poly-Ub at Lys164 after DNA damage to recruit repair factors. Yeast PCNA is modified by SUMO on Lys164 and Lys127 during S-phase to recruit the anti-recombinogenic helicase Srs2. Lys164 modification requires specialized E2/E3 enzyme pairs for SUMO or Ub conjugation. For SUMO, Lys164 modification is strictly dependent on the E3 ligase Siz1, suggesting the E3 alters E2 specificity to promote Lys164 modification. The structural basis for substrate interactions in activated E3/E2-Ub/Ubl complexes remains unclear. Here, we report an engineered E2 protein and cross-linking strategies that trap an E3/E2-Ubl/substrate complex for structure determination, illustrating how an E3 can bypass E2 specificity to force-feed a substrate lysine into the E2 active site. PMID:27509863

  10. RING E3 mechanism for ubiquitin ligation to a disordered substrate visualized for human anaphase-promoting complex

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Watson, Edmond R.; ...

    2015-03-30

    For many E3 ligases, a mobile RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain stimulates ubiquitin (Ub) transfer from a thioester-linked E2~Ub intermediate to a lysine on a remotely bound disordered substrate. One such E3 is the gigantic, multisubunit 1.2-MDa anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC), which controls cell division by ubiquitinating cell cycle regulators to drive their timely degradation. Intrinsically disordered substrates are typically recruited via their KEN-box, D-box, and/or other motifs binding to APC and a coactivator such as CDH1. On the opposite side of the APC, the dynamic catalytic core contains the cullin-like subunit APC2 and its RING partner APC11, which collaboratesmore » with the E2 UBCH10 (UBE2C) to ubiquitinate substrates. However, how dynamic RING–E2~Ub catalytic modules such as APC11–UBCH10~Ub collide with distally tethered disordered substrates remains poorly understood. In this paper, we report structural mechanisms of UBCH10 recruitment to APCCDH1 and substrate ubiquitination. Unexpectedly, in addition to binding APC11’s RING, UBCH10 is corecruited via interactions with APC2, which we visualized in a trapped complex representing an APCCDH1–UBCH10~Ub–substrate intermediate by cryo-electron microscopy, and in isolation by X-ray crystallography. To our knowledge, this is the first structural view of APC, or any cullin–RING E3, with E2 and substrate juxtaposed, and it reveals how tripartite cullin–RING–E2 interactions establish APC’s specificity for UBCH10 and harness a flexible catalytic module to drive ubiquitination of lysines within an accessible zone. Finally, we propose that multisite interactions reduce the degrees of freedom available to dynamic RING E3–E2~Ub catalytic modules, condense the search radius for target lysines, increase the chance of active-site collision with conformationally fluctuating substrates, and enable regulation.« less

  11. RING E3 mechanism for ubiquitin ligation to a disordered substrate visualized for human anaphase-promoting complex

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Watson, Edmond R.; Qiao, Renping; Grace, Christy R. R.; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Weissmann, Florian; Frye, Jeremiah J.; Dube, Prakash; Ei Cho, Shein; Actis, Marcelo L.; Rodrigues, Patrick; Fujii, Naoaki; Peters, Jan-Michael; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2015-03-30

    For many E3 ligases, a mobile RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain stimulates ubiquitin (Ub) transfer from a thioester-linked E2~Ub intermediate to a lysine on a remotely bound disordered substrate. One such E3 is the gigantic, multisubunit 1.2-MDa anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC), which controls cell division by ubiquitinating cell cycle regulators to drive their timely degradation. Intrinsically disordered substrates are typically recruited via their KEN-box, D-box, and/or other motifs binding to APC and a coactivator such as CDH1. On the opposite side of the APC, the dynamic catalytic core contains the cullin-like subunit APC2 and its RING partner APC11, which collaborates with the E2 UBCH10 (UBE2C) to ubiquitinate substrates. However, how dynamic RING–E2~Ub catalytic modules such as APC11–UBCH10~Ub collide with distally tethered disordered substrates remains poorly understood. In this paper, we report structural mechanisms of UBCH10 recruitment to APCCDH1 and substrate ubiquitination. Unexpectedly, in addition to binding APC11’s RING, UBCH10 is corecruited via interactions with APC2, which we visualized in a trapped complex representing an APCCDH1–UBCH10~Ub–substrate intermediate by cryo-electron microscopy, and in isolation by X-ray crystallography. To our knowledge, this is the first structural view of APC, or any cullin–RING E3, with E2 and substrate juxtaposed, and it reveals how tripartite cullin–RING–E2 interactions establish APC’s specificity for UBCH10 and harness a flexible catalytic module to drive ubiquitination of lysines within an accessible zone. Finally, we propose that multisite interactions reduce the degrees of freedom available to dynamic RING E3–E2~Ub catalytic modules, condense the search radius for target lysines, increase the chance of active-site collision with conformationally fluctuating substrates, and enable regulation.

  12. Targeting Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases for drug discovery: structure, assembly and small-molecule modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bulatov, Emil; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the ubiquitin–proteasome system has emerged as a valid target for the development of novel therapeutics. E3 ubiquitin ligases are particularly attractive targets because they confer substrate specificity on the ubiquitin system. CRLs [Cullin–RING (really interesting new gene) E3 ubiquitin ligases] draw particular attention, being the largest family of E3s. The CRLs assemble into functional multisubunit complexes using a repertoire of substrate receptors, adaptors, Cullin scaffolds and RING-box proteins. Drug discovery targeting CRLs is growing in importance due to mounting evidence pointing to significant roles of these enzymes in diverse biological processes and human diseases, including cancer, where CRLs and their substrates often function as tumour suppressors or oncogenes. In the present review, we provide an account of the assembly and structure of CRL complexes, and outline the current state of the field in terms of available knowledge of small-molecule inhibitors and modulators of CRL activity. A comprehensive overview of the reported crystal structures of CRL subunits, components and full-size complexes, alone or with bound small molecules and substrate peptides, is included. This information is providing increasing opportunities to aid the rational structure-based design of chemical probes and potential small-molecule therapeutics targeting CRLs. PMID:25886174

  13. Fertilization in C. elegans requires an intact C-terminal RING finger in sperm protein SPE-42

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The C. elegans sperm protein SPE-42, a membrane protein of unknown structure and molecular function, is required for fertilization. Sperm from worms with spe-42 mutations appear normal but are unable to fertilize eggs. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 8 conserved cysteine residues in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of this protein suggesting these residues form a zinc-coordinating RING finger structure. Results We made an in silico structural model of the SPE-42 RING finger domain based on primary sequence analysis and previously reported RING structures. To test the model, we created spe-42 transgenes coding for mutations in each of the 8 cysteine residues predicted to coordinate Zn++ ions in the RING finger motif. Transgenes were crossed into a spe-42 null background and protein function was measured by counting progeny. We found that all 8 cysteines are required for protein function. We also showed that sequence differences between the C-terminal 29 and 30 amino acids in C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 following the RING finger domain are not responsible for the failure of the C. briggsae SPE-42 homolog to rescue C. elegans spe-42 mutants. Conclusions The results suggest that a bona fide RING domain is present at the C-terminus of the SPE-42 protein and that this motif is required for sperm-egg interactions during C. elegans fertilization. Our structural model of the RING domain provides a starting point for further structure-function analysis of this critical region of the protein. The C-terminal domain swap experiment suggests that the incompatibility between the C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 proteins is caused by small amino acid differences outside the C-terminal domain. PMID:21345212

  14. The negative regulator of plant cold responses, HOS1, is a RING E3 ligase that mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of ICE1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Agarwal, Manu; Zhang, Yiyue; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2006-01-01

    Plant responses to cold stress are mediated by a transcriptional cascade, in which the transcription factor ICE1 and possibly related proteins activate the expression of C-repeat (CRT)-binding factors (CBFs), leading to the transcription of downstream effector genes. The variant RING finger protein high expression of osmotically responsive gene (HOS)1 was identified genetically as a negative regulator of cold responses. We present evidence here that HOS1 is an E3 ligase required for the ubiquitination of ICE1. HOS1 physically interacts with ICE1 and mediates the ubiquitination of ICE1 both in vitro and in vivo. We found that cold induces the degradation of ICE1 in plants, and this degradation requires HOS1. Consistent with enhanced cold-responsive gene expression in loss-of-function hos1 mutant plants, overexpression of HOS1 represses the expression of CBFs and their downstream genes and confers increased sensitivity to freezing stress. Our results indicate that cold stress responses in Arabidopsis are attenuated by a ubiquitination/proteasome pathway in which HOS1 mediates the degradation of the ICE1 protein. PMID:16702557

  15. NERF encodes a RING E3 ligase important for drought resistance and enhances the expression of its antisense gene NFYA5 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Liu, Wenwen; Zhao, Meng; Li, Wen-Xue

    2015-01-01

    NFYA5 is an important drought-stress inducible transcription factor gene that is targeted by miR169 in Arabidopsis. We show here that the cis-natural antisense transcript gene of NFYA5, NFYA5 Enhancing RING FINGER (NERF), can produce siRNAs from their overlapping region (OR) and affect NFYA5 transcripts by functioning together with miR169. The NERF protein functions as an E3 ligase for ubiquitination. Overexpression of NERF or OR cDNA leads to siRNANERF accumulation, miR169 repression, and NFYA5 transcript enhancement; knock-down of NERF transcripts by an artificial miRNA enhances miR169 abundance and reduces NFYA5 transcripts. Overexpression of NFYA5 does not affect the NERF mRNA level. Deep sequencing of the small RNA library from 35S::OR plants identifies 960 sequences representing 323 unique siRNAs that originate from OR; the sequences of some siRNANERF are similar/complementary to those of miR169. Overexpression of the 195- to 280-bp OR cDNA-containing siRNAs similar/complementary to miR169 also leads to the accumulation of NFYA5 transcripts. Analysis of NERF knock-down plants and NERF overexpression lines showed that, like NFYA5, NERF is important for controlling stomatal aperture and drought resistance. This regulatory model might apply to other natural antisense transcripts with positively correlated expression patterns. PMID:25514924

  16. The brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger family, maps within the Smith-Magenis syndrome region at 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Inazawa, Johji

    1997-03-31

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SAIS) is caused by a microdeletion of 17p11.2 and comprises developmental and growth delay, facial abnormalities, unusual behavior and sleep problems. This phenotype may be due to haploinsufficiency of several contiguous genes. The human brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger protein family, has been isolated and mapped to l7p11.2. FISH analyses of metaphase or interphase chromosomes of 6 patients with SMS show that ZNF179 was deleted in one of the 2 homologs (17p11.2), indicating a possible association of the defect of this gene with the pathogenesis of SMS. Furthermore, using a prophase FISH ordering system, we sublocalized ZNF179 proximally to LLGL which lies on the critical region for SMS. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  17. PJA1, encoding a RING-H2 finger ubiquitin ligase, is a novel human X chromosome gene abundantly expressed in brain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Chen, Yiwang; Tagle, Danilo A; Cai, Tao

    2002-06-01

    RING-finger proteins contain cysteine-rich, zinc-binding domains and are involved in the formation of macromolecular scaffolds important for transcriptional repression and ubiquitination. In this study, we have identified a RING-H2 finger gene, PJA1 (for praja-1), from a human brain cDNA library and mapped it to human chromosome Xq12 between markers DXS983 and DXS1216, a region implicated in X-linked mental retardation (MRX). Northern blot analysis indicated a 2.7-kb transcript that was abundantly expressed in the brain, including regions of the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, medulla, occipital pole, frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and putamen. Amino acid sequence analysis of the 71-kDa protein PJA1 showed 52.3% identity to human PJA2 (for praja-2, also known as NEURODAP1/KIAA0438) and also a significant identity to its homologs in rat, mouse, and zebrafish. In vitro binding and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that both PJA1 and PJA2 are able to bind the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH5B. Moreover, the ubiquitination assay indicated that PJA1 and PJA2 have an E2-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Thus our findings demonstrate that PJA1 can be involved in protein ubiquitination in the brain and is a suitable candidate gene for MRX.

  18. RING Type E3 Ligase CaAIR1 in Pepper Acts in the Regulation of ABA Signaling and Drought Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Baek, Woonhee; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Several E3 ubiquitin ligases have been associated with the response to abiotic and biotic stresses in higher plants. Here, we report that the hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) ABA-Insensitive RING protein 1 gene (CaAIR1) is essential for a hypersensitive response to drought stress. CaAIR1 contains a C3HC4-type RING finger motif, which plays a role for attachment of ubiquitins to the target protein, and a putative transmembrane domain. The expression levels of CaAIR1 are up-regulated in pepper leaves by ABA treatments, drought and NaCl, suggesting its role in the response to abiotic stress. Our analysis showed that CaAIR1 displays self-ubiquitination and is localized in the nucleus. We generated CaAIR1-silenced peppers via virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and CaAIR1-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to evaluate their responses to ABA and drought. VIGS of CaAIR1 in pepper plants conferred an enhanced tolerance to drought stress, which was accompanied by low levels of transpirational water loss in the drought-treated leaves. CaAIR1-OX plants displayed an impaired sensitivity to ABA during seed germination, seedling and adult stages. Moreover, these plants showed enhanced sensitivity to drought stress because of reduced stomatal closure and decreased expression of stress-responsive genes. Thus, our data indicate that CaAIR1 is a negative regulator of the ABA-mediated drought stress tolerance mechanism.

  19. Maintenance of muscle mass and load-induced growth in Muscle RING Finger 1 null mice with age.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Baehr, Leslie M; Philp, Andrew; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C

    2014-02-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass occurs to varying degrees in all individuals and has a detrimental effect on morbidity and mortality. Muscle RING Finger 1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase, is believed to mediate muscle atrophy through the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Deletion of MuRF1 (KO) in mice attenuates the loss of muscle mass following denervation, disuse, and glucocorticoid treatment; however, its role in age-related muscle loss is unknown. In this study, skeletal muscle from male wild-type (WT) and MuRF1 KO mice was studied up to the age of 24 months. Muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area decreased significantly with age in WT, but not in KO mice. In aged WT muscle, significant decreases in proteasome activities, especially 20S and 26S β5 (20-40% decrease), were measured and were associated with significant increases in the maladaptive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker, CHOP. Conversely, in aged MuRF1 KO mice, 20S or 26S β5 proteasome activity was maintained or decreased to a lesser extent than in WT mice, and no increase in CHOP expression was measured. Examination of the growth response of older (18 months) mice to functional overload revealed that old WT mice had significantly less growth relative to young mice (1.37- vs. 1.83-fold), whereas old MuRF1 KO mice had a normal growth response (1.74- vs. 1.90-fold). These data collectively suggest that with age, MuRF1 plays an important role in the control of skeletal muscle mass and growth capacity through the regulation of cellular stress.

  20. The equine herpesvirus 1 gene 63 RING finger protein partially complements Vmw110, its herpes simplex virus type 1 counterpart.

    PubMed

    Everett, R; Orr, A; Elliott, M

    1995-09-01

    All alpha herpesviruses of known DNA sequence have been found to encode a protein with similarities to immediate early protein Vmw110 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The conserved portion of this family of proteins is a characteristic zinc binding module, known as a RING finger or C3HC4 domain. Examples of RING finger domains occur in many other proteins of diverse evolutionary origin and function. Recently, the solution structure of the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) RING finger protein, encoded by gene 63, has been solved. To investigate whether this structure could be considered to be a paradigm of herpesvirus RING domains, we have constructed a recombinant HSV-1 which expresses the EHV-1 gene 63 protein (EHVg63) in place of Vmw110. Comparison of the growth properties of the recombinant with those of wild-type and Vmw110-defective viruses indicates that EHVg63 is able to fulfil partially, but not completely, the roles of Vmw110 during virus growth in tissue culture.

  1. The Pepper E3 Ubiquitin Ligase RING1 Gene, CaRING1, Is Required for Cell Death and the Salicylic Acid-Dependent Defense Response1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is essential for ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated protein degradation in plant development and defense. Here, we identified a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase RING1 gene, CaRING1, from pepper (Capsicum annuum). In pepper, CaRING1 expression is induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria infection. CaRING1 contains an amino-terminal transmembrane domain and a carboxyl-terminal RING domain. In addition, it displays in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and the RING domain is essential for E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in CaRING1. CaRING1 also localizes to the plasma membrane. In pepper plants, virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 confers enhanced susceptibility to avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria infection, which is accompanied by compromised hypersensitive cell death, reduced expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1, and lowered salicylic acid levels in leaves. Transient expression of CaRING1 in pepper leaves induces cell death and the defense response that requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CaRING1. By contrast, overexpression of CaRING1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confers enhanced resistance to hemibiotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and biotrophic Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infections. Taken together, these results suggest that CaRING1 is involved in the induction of cell death and the regulation of ubiquitination during the defense response to microbial pathogens. PMID:21628629

  2. Characterization of an Italian Founder Mutation in the RING-Finger Domain of BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Mara; Congregati, Caterina; Sarkar, Mohosin; Magliery, Thomas J.; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Foglia, Claudia; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Manoukian, Siranoush; Tondini, Carlo; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Bernard, Loris

    2014-01-01

    The identification of founder mutations in cancer predisposing genes is important to improve risk assessment in geographically defined populations, since it may provide specific targets resulting in cost-effective genetic testing. Here, we report the characterization of the BRCA1 c.190T>C (p.Cys64Arg) mutation, mapped to the RING-finger domain coding region, that we detected in 43 hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families, for the large part originating from the province of Bergamo (Northern Italy). Haplotype analysis was performed in 21 families, and led to the identification of a shared haplotype extending over three BRCA1-associated marker loci (0.4 cM). Using the DMLE+2.2 software program and regional population demographic data, we were able to estimate the age of the mutation to vary between 3,100 and 3,350 years old. Functional characterization of the mutation was carried out at both transcript and protein level. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis on lymphoblastoid cells revealed expression of full length mRNA from the mutant allele. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fragment reassembly assay showed that the p.Cys64Arg substitution prevents the binding of the BRCA1 protein to the interacting protein BARD1, in a similar way as proven deleterious mutations in the RING-domain. Overall, 55 of 83 (66%) female mutation carriers had a diagnosis of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Our observations indicate that the BRCA1 c.190T>C is a pathogenic founder mutation present in the Italian population. Further analyses will evaluate whether screening for this mutation can be suggested as an effective strategy for the rapid identification of at-risk individuals in the Bergamo area. PMID:24516540

  3. Important Roles of Ring Finger Protein 112 in Embryonic Vascular Development and Brain Functions.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Jen-Hui; Yang, Ying-Chen; Pao, Ping-Chieh; Lin, Hui-Ching; Huang, Nai-Kuei; Lin, Shih-Ting; Hsu, Kuei-Sen; Yeh, Che-Ming; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Kuo, Chu-Jen; Yang, De-Ming; Lin, Jiann-Her; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao

    2017-04-01

    Rnf112 is a member of the RING finger protein family. The expression of Rnf112 is abundant in the brain and is regulated during brain development. Our previous study has revealed that Rnf112 can promote neuronal differentiation by inhibiting the progression of the cell cycle in cell models. In this study, we further revealed the important functions of Rnf112 in embryo development and in adult brain. Our data showed that most of the Rnf112 (-/-) embryos exhibited blood vascular defects and died in utero. Upon further investigation, we found that the survival rate of homozygous Rnf112 knockout mice in 129/sv and C57BL/6 mixed genetic background was increased. The survived newborns of Rnf112 (-/-) mice manifested growth retardation as indicated by smaller size and a reduced weight. Although the overall organization of the brain did not appear to be severely affected in Rnf112 (-/-) mice, using in vivo 3D MRI imaging, we found that when compared to wild-type littermates, brains of Rnf112 (-/-) mice were smaller. In addition, Rnf112 (-/-) mice displayed impairment of brain functions including motor balance, and spatial learning and memory. Our results provide important aspects for the study of Rnf112 gene functions.

  4. Highly sensitive detection of E2 activity in ubiquitination using an artificial RING finger.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Sumida, Miho; Yuasa-Sunagawa, Mayumi; Saito, Kazuki

    2017-03-01

    The ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzymes of protein ubiquitination are associated with various diseases such as leukemia, lung cancer, and breast cancer. Rapid and accurate detection of E2 enzymatic activities remains poor. Here, we described the detection of E2 activity on a signal accumulation ISFET biosensor (AMIS sensor) using an artificial RING finger (ARF). The use of ARF enables the simplified detection of E2 activity without a substrate. The high-sensitivity quantitative detection of E2 activities was demonstrated via real-time monitoring over a response range of femtomolar to micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, the monitoring of E2 activities was successfully achieved using human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells following treatment with the anticancer drug bortezomib, which allowed the assessment of the pathological conditions. This strategy is extremely simple and convenient, and the present detection could be widely applied to specific E2s for various types of cancers. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Ring Finger Protein 11 Inhibits Melanocortin 3 and 4 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anne; Niederstadt, Lars; Jonas, Wenke; Yi, Chun-Xia; Meyer, Franziska; Wiedmer, Petra; Fischer, Jana; Grötzinger, Carsten; Schürmann, Annette; Tschöp, Matthias; Kleinau, Gunnar; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Intact melanocortin signaling via the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R), and melanocortin receptor 3 (MC3R) is crucial for body weight maintenance. So far, no connection between melanocortin signaling and hypothalamic inflammation has been reported. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation library screen, we identified a new interaction partner for these receptors, ring finger protein 11 (RNF11). RNF11 participates in the constitution of the A20 complex that is involved in reduction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced NFκB signaling, an important pathway in hypothalamic inflammation. Mice treated with high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 days demonstrated a trend toward an increase in hypothalamic Rnf11 expression, as shown for other inflammatory markers under HFD. Furthermore, Gs-mediated signaling of MC3/4R was demonstrated to be strongly reduced to 20–40% by co-expression of RNF11 despite unchanged total receptor expression. Cell surface expression was not affected for MC3R but resulted in a significant reduction of MC4R to 61% by co-expression with RNF11. Mechanisms linking HFD, inflammation, and metabolism remain partially understood. In this study, a new axis between signaling of specific body weight regulating GPCRs and factors involved in hypothalamic inflammation is suggested. PMID:27551276

  6. Deletion of the RING-finger peroxin 2 gene in Aspergillus nidulans does not affect meiotic development.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Michael J; Murray, Sandra L; Kahn, Freya K

    2010-05-01

    Peroxins are required for protein import into peroxisomes as well as for peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation. Loss-of-function mutations in genes for the RING-finger peroxins Pex2, Pex10 and Pex12 lead to a specific block in meiosis in the ascomycete Podospora anserina. However, loss of protein import into peroxisomes does not result in this meiotic defect. Therefore, it has been suggested that these peroxins have a specific function required for meiosis. To determine whether this role is conserved in other filamentous fungi, we have deleted the gene encoding Pex2 in Aspergillus nidulans. The phenotypes resulting from this deletion are no different from those of previously isolated pex mutants affected in peroxisomal protein import, and viable ascospores are produced in selfed crosses. Therefore, the role of the RING-finger peroxins in meiosis is not conserved in filamentous ascomycetes.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuhong; Sun, Chao; Hu, Yuanlei; Lin, Zhongping

    2008-03-01

    A RING zinc finger ankyrin protein gene,designated AdZFP1, was isolated from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum Spreng by mRNA differential display and RACE. Its cDNA was 1723 bp and encoded a putative protein of 445 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 47.9 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.49. A typical C3HC4- type RING finger domain was found at the C-terminal region of the AdZFP1 protein,and several groups of ankyrin repeats were found at the N-terminal region. Alignments of amino acid sequence showed that AdZFP1 was 66% identical to the Arabidopsis thaliana putative RING zinc finger ankyrin protein AAN31869. Transcriptional analysis showed that AdZFP1 was inducible under drought stress in root,stem and leaf of the plant.Semi-quantitative reverse- transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the transcript of AdZFP1 was strongly induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and also by salinity,cold and heat to some extent. Overexpression of the AdZFP1 gene in transgenic tobacco enhanced their tolerance to drought stress.

  8. The RING E3 Ligase KEEP ON GOING Modulates JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN12 Stability1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Laurens; Ritter, Andrés; Goossens, Jonas; Durand, Astrid Nagels; Liu, Hongxia; Gu, Yangnan; Geerinck, Jan; Boter, Marta; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van Leene, Jelle; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto; Stone, Sophia; Innes, Roger W.; Callis, Judy; Goossens, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signaling in plants is mediated by the JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins that repress the activity of several transcription factors regulating JA-inducible gene expression. The hormone JA-isoleucine triggers the interaction of JAZ repressor proteins with the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1), part of an S-phase kinase-associated protein1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1 (SCFCOI1) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, and their degradation by the 26S proteasome. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the JAZ family consists of 13 members. The level of redundancy or specificity among these members is currently not well understood. Here, we characterized JAZ12, encoded by a highly expressed JAZ gene. JAZ12 interacted with the transcription factors MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 in vivo and repressed MYC2 activity. Using tandem affinity purification, we found JAZ12 to interact with SCFCOI1 components, matching with observed in vivo ubiquitination and with rapid degradation after treatment with JA. In contrast to the other JAZ proteins, JAZ12 also interacted directly with the E3 RING ligase KEEP ON GOING (KEG), a known repressor of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 transcription factor in abscisic acid signaling. To study the functional role of this interaction, we circumvented the lethality of keg loss-of-function mutants by silencing KEG using an artificial microRNA approach. Abscisic acid treatment promoted JAZ12 degradation, and KEG knockdown led to a decrease in JAZ12 protein levels. Correspondingly, KEG overexpression was capable of partially inhibiting COI1-mediated JAZ12 degradation. Our results provide additional evidence for KEG as an important factor in plant hormone signaling and a positive regulator of JAZ12 stability. PMID:26320228

  9. Muscle RING finger-1 attenuates IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibiting JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Wadosky, Kristine M; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Hite, Rebecca L; Min, Jin-na; Walton, Bethany L; Willis, Monte S

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies implicate the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) in inhibiting pathological cardiomyocyte growth in vivo by inhibiting the transcription factor SRF. These studies led us to hypothesize that MuRF1 similarly inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated physiological cardiomyocyte growth. We identified two lines of evidence to support this hypothesis: IGF-I stimulation of cardiac-derived cells with MuRF1 knockdown 1) exhibited an exaggerated hypertrophy and, 2) conversely, increased MuRF1 expression-abolished IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte growth. Enhanced hypertrophy with MuRF1 knockdown was accompanied by increases in Akt-regulated gene expression. Unexpectedly, MuRF1 inhibition of this gene expression profile was not a result of differences in p-Akt. Instead, we found that MuRF1 inhibits total protein levels of Akt, GSK-3β (downstream of Akt), and mTOR while limiting c-Jun protein expression, a mechanism recently shown to govern Akt, GSK-3β, and mTOR activities and expression. These findings establish that MuRF1 inhibits IGF-I signaling by restricting c-Jun activity, a novel mechanism recently identified in the context of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Since IGF-I regulates exercise-mediated physiological cardiac growth, we challenged MuRF1(-/-) and MuRF1-Tg+ mice and their wild-type sibling controls to 5 wk of voluntary wheel running. MuRF1(-/-) cardiac growth was increased significantly over wild-type control; conversely, the enhanced exercise-induced cardiac growth was lost in MuRF1-Tg+ animals. These studies demonstrate that MuRF1-dependent attenuation of IGF-I signaling via c-Jun is applicable in vivo and establish that further understanding of this novel mechanism may be crucial in the development of therapies targeting IGF-I signaling.

  10. ZmRFP1, the putative ortholog of SDIR1, encodes a RING-H2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent manner in maize.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Liu, Quanjun; Wu, Jianyu; Ding, Junqiang

    2012-03-10

    Drought is one of the most important limiting factors in crop production. To identify genes required for the drought stress response in the cereal crop maize, a gene coding for RING-finger protein (ZmRFP1), which is highly responsive to PEG-induced drought stress, was isolated by mRNA differential display and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The ZmRFP1 encodes a protein of 280 amino acids and contains a single C(3)H(2)C(3)-type RING motif in its C-terminal region. ZmRFP1 is an ortholog of Arabidopsis SDIR1 (salt- and drought-induced RING finger 1) (66% identity to AtSDIR1).The recombinant ZmRFP1 protein purified from Escherichia coli exhibited an in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Real-time PCR analysis indicates that the transcript levels of ZmRFP1 were higher in aerial tissues including stems, leaves, tassels and immature ears, and were markedly up-regulated by drought stress, and exogenous ABA, but not by salt, heat and cold stresses. Transient expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-ZmRFP1 fusion protein in onion cells revealed a plasma membrane localization of the protein. Further analysis of ZmRFP1 transcripts between an ABA-deficient transposon mutant viviparous14 (vp14) and its isogenic wild-type line W22 showed that ZmRFP1 transcript levels were induced significantly in the wild-type line under drought stress, but not in the mutant line VP14. These results indicate that ZmRFP1 responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent way and is likely to function in the ubiquitin conjunction pathway. The ZmRFP1 might serve as a candidate gene in genetic improvement for drought tolerance engineering in cereal crop plants.

  11. RING finger-dependent ubiquitination by PRAJA is dependent on TGF-beta and potentially defines the functional status of the tumor suppressor ELF.

    PubMed

    Saha, T; Vardhini, D; Tang, Y; Katuri, V; Jogunoori, W; Volpe, E A; Haines, D; Sidawy, A; Zhou, X; Gallicano, I; Schlegel, R; Mishra, B; Mishra, L

    2006-02-02

    In gastrointestinal cells, biological signals for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) are transduced through transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors that signal to Smad proteins. Smad4, a tumor suppressor, is often mutated in human gastrointestinal cancers. The mechanism of Smad4 inactivation, however, remains uncertain and could be through E3-mediated ubiquitination of Smad4/adaptor protein complexes. Disruption of ELF (embryonic liver fodrin), a Smad4 adaptor protein, modulates TGF-beta signaling. We have found that PRAJA, a RING-H2 protein, interacts with ELF in a TGF-beta-dependent manner, with a fivefold increase of PRAJA expression and a subsequent decrease in ELF and Smad4 expression, in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines (P < 0.05). Strikingly, PRAJA manifests substantial E3-dependent ubiquitination of ELF and Smad3, but not Smad4. Delta-PRAJA, which has a deleted RING finger domain at the C terminus, abolishes ubiquitination of ELF. A stable cell line that overexpresses PRAJA exhibits low levels of ELF in comparison to a Delta-PRAJA stable cell line, where ELF expression is high compared to normal controls. The alteration of ELF and/or Smad4 expression and/or function in the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be induced by enhancement of ELF degradation, which is mediated by a high-level expression of PRAJA in gastrointestinal cancers. In hepatocytes, half-life (t(1/2)) and rate constant for degradation (k(D)) of ELF is 1.91 h and 21.72 min(-1) when coupled with ectopic expression of PRAJA in cells stimulated by TGF-beta, compared to PRAJA-transfected unstimulated cells (t(1/2) = 4.33 h and k(D) = 9.6 min(-1)). These studies reveal a mechanism for tumorigenesis whereby defects in adaptor proteins for Smads, such as ELF, can undergo degradation by PRAJA, through the ubiquitin-mediated pathway.

  12. Rotavirus NSP1 Associates with Components of the Cullin RING Ligase Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Lindy M.; Pace, Chandler R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 acts as an antagonist of the host antiviral response by inducing degradation of key proteins required to activate interferon (IFN) production. Protein degradation induced by NSP1 is dependent on the proteasome, and the presence of a RING domain near the N terminus has led to the hypothesis that NSP1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. To examine this hypothesis, pulldown assays were performed, followed by mass spectrometry to identify components of the host ubiquitination machinery that associate with NSP1. Multiple components of cullin RING ligases (CRLs), which are essential multisubunit ubiquitination complexes, were identified in association with NSP1. The mass spectrometry was validated in both transfected and infected cells to show that the NSP1 proteins from different strains of rotavirus associated with key components of CRL complexes, most notably the cullin scaffolding proteins Cul3 and Cul1. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins confirmed that NSP1 specifically interacted with Cul3 and that the N-terminal region of Cul3 was responsible for binding to NSP1. To test if NSP1 used CRL3 to induce degradation of the target protein IRF3 or β-TrCP, Cul3 levels were knocked down using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach. Unexpectedly, loss of Cul3 did not rescue IRF3 or β-TrCP from degradation in infected cells. The results indicate that, rather than actively using CRL complexes to induce degradation of target proteins required for IFN production, NSP1 may use cullin-containing complexes to prevent another cellular activity. IMPORTANCE The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important regulatory role in numerous cellular functions, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to exploit or manipulate this pathway to enhance replication and spread. Rotavirus, a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children that causes approximately 420,000 deaths worldwide each year, utilizes the ubiquitin

  13. Structure of a glomulin-RBX1-CUL1 complex: inhibition of a RING E3 ligase through masking of its E2-binding surface.

    PubMed

    Duda, David M; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Tron, Adriana E; Hammel, Michal; Lambert, Lester J; Waddell, M Brett; Mittag, Tanja; DeCaprio, James A; Schulman, Brenda A

    2012-08-10

    The approximately 300 human cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are multisubunit E3s in which a RING protein, either RBX1 or RBX2, recruits an E2 to catalyze ubiquitination. RBX1-containing CRLs also can bind Glomulin (GLMN), which binds RBX1's RING domain, regulates the RBX1-CUL1-containing SCF(FBW7) complex, and is disrupted in the disease Glomuvenous Malformation. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between GLMN, RBX1, and a fragment of CUL1. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that GLMN adopts a HEAT-like repeat fold that tightly binds the E2-interacting surface of RBX1, inhibiting CRL-mediated chain formation by the E2 CDC34. The structure explains the basis for GLMN's selectivity toward RBX1 over RBX2, and how disease-associated mutations disrupt GLMN-RBX1 interactions. Our study reveals a mechanism for RING E3 ligase regulation, whereby an inhibitor blocks E2 access, and raises the possibility that other E3s are likewise controlled by cellular proteins that mask E2-binding surfaces to mediate inhibition.

  14. Structure of a Glomulin-RBX1-CUL1 complex: inhibition of a RING E3 ligase through masking of its E2-binding surface

    PubMed Central

    Duda, David M.; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Tron, Adriana E.; Hammel, Michal; Lambert, Lester J.; Waddell, M. Brett; Mittag, Tanja; DeCaprio, James A.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ~300 human Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are multisubunit E3s in which a RING protein, either RBX1 or RBX2, recruits an E2 to catalyze ubiquitination. RBX1-containing CRLs also can bind Glomulin (GLMN), which binds RBX1’s RING domain, regulates the RBX1-CUL1-containing SCFFBW7 complex, and is disrupted in the disease Glomuvenous Malformation. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between GLMN, RBX1, and a fragment of CUL1. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that GLMN adopts a HEAT-like repeat fold that tightly binds the E2-interacting surface of RBX1, inhibiting CRL-mediated chain formation by the E2 CDC34. The structure explains the basis for GLMN’s selectivity toward RBX1 over RBX2, and how disease-associated mutations disrupt GLMN-RBX1 interactions. Our study reveals a mechanism for RING E3 ligase regulation whereby an inhibitor blocks E2 access, and raises the possibility that other E3s are likewise controlled by cellular proteins that mask E2-binding surfaces to mediate inhibition. PMID:22748924

  15. Targeting RING domains of Mdm2-MdmX E3 complex activates apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xu, C; Ling, X; Fan, C; Buckley, B P; Chernov, M V; Ellis, L; Li, F; Muñoz, I G; Wang, X

    2015-12-31

    Reactivation of tumor-suppressor p53 for targeted cancer therapy is an attractive strategy for cancers bearing wild-type (WT) p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interface or MdmX ((MDM4), mouse double minute 4)-p53 interface or both has been a focus in the field. However, targeting the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2-MdmX really interesting new gene (RING)-RING interaction as a novel anticancer strategy has never been explored. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors targeting Mdm2-MdmX RING-RING interaction as a new class of E3 ligase inhibitors. With a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based E3 activity assay in high-throughput screening of a chemical library, we identified inhibitors (designated as MMRis (Mdm2-MdmX RING domain inhibitors)) that specifically inhibit Mdm2-MdmX E3 ligase activity toward Mdm2 and p53 substrates. MMRi6 and its analog MMRi64 are capable of disrupting Mdm2-MdmX interactions in vitro and activating p53 in cells. In leukemia cells, MMRi64 potently induces downregulation of Mdm2 and MdmX. In contrast to Nutlin3a, MMRi64 only induces the expression of pro-apoptotic gene PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) with minimal induction of growth-arresting gene p21. Consequently, MMRi64 selectively induces the apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells. Owing to the distinct mechanisms of action of MMRi64 and Nutlin3a, their combination synergistically induces p53 and apoptosis. Taken together, this study reveals that Mdm2-MdmX has a critical role in apoptotic response of the p53 pathway and MMRi64 may serve as a new pharmacological tool for p53 studies and a platform for cancer drug development.

  16. Insights into Ubiquitination from the Unique Clamp-like Binding of the RING E3 AO7 to the E2 UbcH5B*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengjian; Liang, Yu-He; Mariano, Jennifer; Metzger, Meredith B.; Stringer, Daniel K.; Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Li, Jess; Randazzo, Paul A.; Tsai, Yien Che; Ji, Xinhua; Weissman, Allan M.

    2015-01-01

    RING proteins constitute the largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Unlike most RINGs, AO7 (RNF25) binds the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, UbcH5B (UBE2D2), with strikingly high affinity. We have defined, by co-crystallization, the distinctive means by which AO7 binds UbcH5B. AO7 contains a structurally unique UbcH5B binding region (U5BR) that is connected by an 11-amino acid linker to its RING domain, forming a clamp surrounding the E2. The U5BR interacts extensively with a region of UbcH5B that is distinct from both the active site and the RING-interacting region, referred to as the backside of the E2. An apparent paradox is that the high-affinity binding of the AO7 clamp to UbcH5B, which is dependent on the U5BR, decreases the rate of ubiquitination. We establish that this is a consequence of blocking the stimulatory, non-covalent, binding of ubiquitin to the backside of UbcH5B. Interestingly, when non-covalent backside ubiquitin binding cannot occur, the AO7 clamp now enhances the rate of ubiquitination. The high-affinity binding of the AO7 clamp to UbcH5B has also allowed for the co-crystallization of previously described and functionally important RING mutants at the RING-E2 interface. We show that mutations having marked effects on function only minimally affect the intermolecular interactions between the AO7 RING and UbcH5B, establishing a high degree of complexity in activation through the RING-E2 interface. PMID:26475854

  17. miR-762 promotes porcine immature Sertoli cell growth via the ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) gene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changping; Song, Huibin; Yu, Lei; Guan, Kaifeng; Hu, Pandi; Li, Yang; Xia, Xuanyan; Li, Jialian; Jiang, Siwen; Li, Fenge

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of reports have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in spermatogenesis. Our previous study showed that miR-762 is differentially expressed in immature and mature testes of Large White boars. Our present data shows that miR-762 directly binds the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) and down-regulates RNF4 expression. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the RNF4 3′UTR that is significantly associated with porcine sperm quality traits leads to a change in the miR-762 binding ability. Moreover, miR-762 promotes the proliferation of and inhibits apoptosis in porcine immature Sertoli cells, partly by accelerating DNA damage repair and by reducing androgen receptor (AR) expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-762 may play a role in pig spermatogenesis by regulating immature Sertoli cell growth. PMID:27596571

  18. IRT1 degradation factor1, a ring E3 ubiquitin ligase, regulates the degradation of iron-regulated transporter1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Lung-Jiun; Lo, Jing-Chi; Chen, Guan-Hong; Callis, Judy; Fu, Hongyong; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2013-08-01

    Fe is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development; plants have developed sophisticated strategies to acquire ferric Fe from the soil. Nongraminaceous plants acquire Fe by a reduction-based mechanism, and graminaceous plants use a chelation-based mechanism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which uses the reduction-based method, iron-regulated transporter1 (IRT1) functions as the most important transporter for ferrous Fe uptake. Rapid and constitutive degradation of IRT1 allows plants to quickly respond to changing conditions to maintain Fe homeostasis. IRT1 degradation involves ubiquitination. To identify the specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in IRT1 degradation, we screened a set of insertional mutants in RING-type E3 ligases and identified a mutant that showed delayed degradation of IRT1 and loss of IRT1-ubiquitin complexes. The corresponding gene was designated IRT1 degradation factor1 (IDF1). Evidence of direct interaction between IDF1 and IRT1 in the plasma membrane supported the role of IDF1 in IRT1 degradation. IRT1 accumulation was reduced when coexpressed with IDF1 in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes. IDF1 function was RING domain dependent. The idf1 mutants showed increased tolerance to Fe deficiency, resulting from increased IRT1 levels. This evidence indicates that IDF1 directly regulates IRT1 degradation through its RING-type E3 ligase activity.

  19. IRT1 DEGRADATION FACTOR1, a RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Regulates the Degradation of IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Lung-Jiun; Lo, Jing-Chi; Chen, Guan-Hong; Callis, Judy; Fu, Hongyong; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Fe is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development; plants have developed sophisticated strategies to acquire ferric Fe from the soil. Nongraminaceous plants acquire Fe by a reduction-based mechanism, and graminaceous plants use a chelation-based mechanism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which uses the reduction-based method, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 (IRT1) functions as the most important transporter for ferrous Fe uptake. Rapid and constitutive degradation of IRT1 allows plants to quickly respond to changing conditions to maintain Fe homeostasis. IRT1 degradation involves ubiquitination. To identify the specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in IRT1 degradation, we screened a set of insertional mutants in RING-type E3 ligases and identified a mutant that showed delayed degradation of IRT1 and loss of IRT1-ubiquitin complexes. The corresponding gene was designated IRT1 DEGRADATION FACTOR1 (IDF1). Evidence of direct interaction between IDF1 and IRT1 in the plasma membrane supported the role of IDF1 in IRT1 degradation. IRT1 accumulation was reduced when coexpressed with IDF1 in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes. IDF1 function was RING domain dependent. The idf1 mutants showed increased tolerance to Fe deficiency, resulting from increased IRT1 levels. This evidence indicates that IDF1 directly regulates IRT1 degradation through its RING-type E3 ligase activity. PMID:23995086

  20. Molecular characterization of Oryza sativa arsenic-induced RING E3 ligase 1 (OsAIR1): Expression patterns, localization, functional interaction, and heterogeneous overexpression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Hyeon Mi; Han, A-Reum; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2016-02-01

    High levels of arsenic (As) in plants are a serious threat to human health, and arsenic accumulation affects plant metabolism and ultimately photosynthesis, growth, and development. We attempted to isolate As-responsive Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ubiquitin ligase genes from rice, and we have designated one such gene Oryza sativa arsenic-induced RING E3 ligase 1 (OsAIR1). OsAIR1 expression was induced under abiotic stress conditions, including drought, salt, heat, and As exposure. Results from an in vitro ubiquitination assay showed that OsAIR1 possesses E3 ligase activity. Within the cell, the expression of this gene was found to be localized to the vacuole. In a network-based analysis, we found significantly enriched gene ontology (GO) functions, which included ribonucleoprotein complexes such as ribosomes, suggesting that the function of OsAIR1 are related to translation. Differences in the proportion of seedlings with expanded cotyledons and root lengths, and the lack of differences in germination rates between OsAIR1-overexpressing lines and control plants under AsV stress, suggest that OsAIR1 may positively regulate post-germination plant growth under stress conditions.

  1. Insights into Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase recruitment: Structure of the VHL–EloBC–Cul2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Henry C.; Yang, Haitao; Fribourgh, Jennifer L.; Wolfe, Leslie S.; Xiong, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Summary The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (VHL) recruits a Cullin 2 (Cul2) E3 ubiquitin ligase to downregulate HIF-1α, an essential transcription factor for the hypoxia response. Mutations in VHL lead to VHL disease and renal cell carcinomas. Inhibition of this pathway to upregulate erythropoietin production is a promising new therapy to treat ischemia and chronic anemia. Here we report the crystal structure of VHL bound to a Cul2 N-terminal domain, Elongin B (EloB), and Elongin C (EloC). Cul2 interacts with both the VHL BC box and cullin box and a novel EloC site. Comparison to other cullin E3 ligase structures shows that there is a conserved, yet flexible, cullin recognition module and that cullin selectivity is influenced by distinct electrostatic interactions. Our structure provides a structural basis for the study of the pathogenesis of VHL disease and the rationale design of novel compounds that may modulate cullin–substrate receptor interactions. PMID:25661653

  2. Insights into Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase recruitment: structure of the VHL-EloBC-Cul2 complex.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Henry C; Yang, Haitao; Fribourgh, Jennifer L; Wolfe, Leslie S; Xiong, Yong

    2015-03-03

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (VHL) recruits a Cullin 2 (Cul2) E3 ubiquitin ligase to downregulate HIF-1α, an essential transcription factor for the hypoxia response. Mutations in VHL lead to VHL disease and renal cell carcinomas. Inhibition of this pathway to upregulate erythropoietin production is a promising new therapy to treat ischemia and chronic anemia. Here, we report the crystal structure of VHL bound to a Cul2 N-terminal domain, Elongin B, and Elongin C (EloC). Cul2 interacts with both the VHL BC box and cullin box and a novel EloC site. Comparison with other cullin E3 ligase structures shows that there is a conserved, yet flexible, cullin recognition module and that cullin selectivity is influenced by distinct electrostatic interactions. Our structure provides a structural basis for the study of the pathogenesis of VHL disease and rationale for the design of novel compounds that may modulate cullin-substrate receptor interactions.

  3. Suppression of Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL78 increases tolerance to cold stress and decreases tolerance to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek

    2013-08-19

    AtATL78 is an Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase. RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays revealed that AtATL78 was up-regulated by cold stress and down-regulated by drought. AtATL78 was localized at the plasma-membrane. Suppression of AtATL78 increased tolerance to cold stress but decreased tolerance to drought. Our data suggests that AtATL78 is a negative regulator of cold stress response and a positive regulator of drought stress response in Arabidopsis. These results further suggest that AtATL78 plays opposing roles in cold and drought stress responses.

  4. The Arabidopsis RING-Type E3 Ligase TEAR1 Controls Leaf Development by Targeting the TIE1 Transcriptional Repressor for Degradation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinzhe; Wei, Baoye; Yuan, Rongrong; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The developmental plasticity of leaf size and shape is important for leaf function and plant survival. However, the mechanisms by which plants form diverse leaves in response to environmental conditions are not well understood. Here, we identified TIE1-ASSOCIATED RING-TYPE E3 LIGASE1 (TEAR1) and found that it regulates leaf development by promoting the degradation of TCP INTERACTOR-CONTAINING EAR MOTIF PROTEIN1 (TIE1), an important repressor of CINCINNATA (CIN)-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors, which are key for leaf development. TEAR1 contains a typical C3H2C3-type RING domain and has E3 ligase activity. We show that TEAR1 interacts with the TCP repressor TIE1, which is ubiquitinated in vivo and degraded by the 26S proteasome system. We demonstrate that TEAR1 is colocalized with TIE1 in nuclei and negatively regulates TIE1 protein levels. Overexpression of TEAR1 rescued leaf defects caused by TIE1 overexpression, whereas disruption of TEAR1 resulted in leaf phenotypes resembling those caused by TIE1 overexpression or TCP dysfunction. Deficiency in TEAR partially rescued the leaf defects of TCP4 overexpression line and enhanced the wavy leaf phenotypes of jaw-5D. We propose that TEAR1 positively regulates CIN-like TCP activity to promote leaf development by mediating the degradation of the TCP repressor TIE1. PMID:28100709

  5. Multivalent interactions of the SUMO-interaction motifs in RING finger protein 4 determine the specificity for chains of the SUMO.

    PubMed

    Keusekotten, Kirstin; Bade, Veronika N; Meyer-Teschendorf, Katrin; Sriramachandran, Annie Miriam; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Krause, Anke; Horst, Christiane; Schwarz, Günter; Hofmann, Kay; Dohmen, R Jürgen; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2014-01-01

    RNF4 (RING finger protein 4) is a STUbL [SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier)-targeted ubiquitin ligase] controlling PML (promyelocytic leukaemia) nuclear bodies, DNA double strand break repair and other nuclear functions. In the present paper, we describe that the sequence and spacing of the SIMs (SUMO-interaction motifs) in RNF4 regulate the avidity-driven recognition of substrate proteins carrying SUMO chains of variable length.

  6. Requirement of the C3HC4 zinc RING finger of the Arabidopsis PEX10 for photorespiration and leaf peroxisome contact with chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Uwe; Prestele, Jakob; O'Geen, Henriette; Brueggeman, Robert; Wanner, Gerhard; Gietl, Christine

    2007-01-16

    Plant peroxisomes perform multiple vital metabolic processes including lipid mobilization in oil-storing seeds, photorespiration, and hormone biosynthesis. Peroxisome biogenesis requires the function of peroxin (PEX) proteins, including PEX10, a C(3)HC(4) Zn RING finger peroxisomal membrane protein. Loss of function of PEX10 causes embryo lethality at the heart stage. We investigated the function of PEX10 with conditional sublethal mutants. Four T-DNA insertion lines expressing pex10 with a dysfunctional RING finger were created in an Arabidopsis WT background (DeltaZn plants). They could be normalized by growth in an atmosphere of high CO(2) partial pressure, indicating a defect in photorespiration. beta-Oxidation in mutant glyoxysomes was not affected. However, an abnormal accumulation of the photorespiratory metabolite glyoxylate, a lowered content of carotenoids and chlorophyll a and b, and a decreased quantum yield of photosystem II were detected under normal atmosphere, suggesting impaired leaf peroxisomes. Light and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated leaf peroxisomes of the DeltaZn plants to be more numerous, multilobed, clustered, and not appressed to the chloroplast envelope as in WT. We suggest that inactivation of the RING finger domain in PEX10 has eliminated protein interaction required for attachment of peroxisomes to chloroplasts and movement of metabolites between peroxisomes and chloroplasts.

  7. A Critical Role for Muscle Ring Finger-1 in Acute Lung Injury–associated Skeletal Muscle Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Files, D. Clark; D'Alessio, Franco R.; Johnston, Laura F.; Kesari, Priya; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Simmers, Jessica L.; DeGorordo, Antonio; Murdoch, Jared; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam; Tankersley, Clarke G.; Messi, Maria L.; Liu, Chun; Delbono, Osvaldo; Furlow, J. David; Bodine, Sue C.; Cohn, Ronald D.; King, Landon S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a debilitating condition associated with severe skeletal muscle weakness that persists in humans long after lung injury has resolved. The molecular mechanisms underlying this condition are unknown. Objectives: To identify the muscle-specific molecular mechanisms responsible for muscle wasting in a mouse model of ALI. Methods: Changes in skeletal muscle weight, fiber size, in vivo contractile performance, and expression of mRNAs and proteins encoding muscle atrophy–associated genes for muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) and atrogin1 were measured. Genetic inactivation of MuRF1 or electroporation-mediated transduction of miRNA-based short hairpin RNAs targeting either MuRF1 or atrogin1 were used to identify their role in ALI-associated skeletal muscle wasting. Measurements and Main Results: Mice with ALI developed profound muscle atrophy and preferential loss of muscle contractile proteins associated with reduced muscle function in vivo. Although mRNA expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin1, was increased in ALI mice, only MuRF1 protein levels were up-regulated. Consistent with these changes, suppression of MuRF1 by genetic or biochemical approaches prevented muscle fiber atrophy, whereas suppression of atrogin1 expression was without effect. Despite resolution of lung injury and down-regulation of MuRF1 and atrogin1, force generation in ALI mice remained suppressed. Conclusions: These data show that MuRF1 is responsible for mediating muscle atrophy that occurs during the period of active lung injury in ALI mice and that, as in humans, skeletal muscle dysfunction persists despite resolution of lung injury. PMID:22312013

  8. Global analysis of ankyrin repeat domain C3HC4-type RING finger gene family in plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Shiyang; Yu, Mingli; Su, Hongyan; Shu, Huairui; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat (ANK) C3HC4-type RING finger (RF) genes comprise a large family in plants and play important roles in various physiological processes of plant life. In this study, we identified 187 ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins from 29 species with complete genomes and named the ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins the XB3-like proteins because they are structurally related to the rice (Oryza sativa) XB3. A phylogenetic relationship analysis suggested that the XB3-like genes originated from ferns, and the encoded proteins fell into 3 major groups. Among these groups, we found that the spacing between the metal ligand position 6 and 7, and the conserved residues, which was in addition to the metal ligand amino acids, in the C3HC4-type RF were different. Using a wide range of protein structural analyses, protein models were established, and all XB3-like proteins were found to contain two to seven ANKs and a C3HC4-type RF. The microarray data for the XB3-like genes of Arabidopsis, Oryza sative, Zea mays and Glycine max revealed that the expression of XB3-like genes was in different tissues and during different life stages. The preferential expression of XB3-like genes in specified tissues and the response to phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments of Arabidopsis and Zea mays not only confirmed the microarray analysis data but also demonstrated that the XB3-like proteins play roles in plant growth and development as well as in stress responses. Our data provide a very useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of members of this gene family and also provide a new method for the genome-wide analysis of gene families.

  9. The RING ubiquitin E3 RNF114 interacts with A20 and modulates NF-κB activity and T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M S; Egaña, I; Lopitz-Otsoa, F; Aillet, F; Lopez-Mato, M P; Dorronroso, A; Lobato-Gil, S; Sutherland, J D; Barrio, R; Trigueros, C; Lang, V

    2014-01-01

    Accurate regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity is crucial to prevent a variety of disorders including immune and inflammatory diseases. Active NF-κB promotes IκBα and A20 expression, important negative regulatory molecules that control the NF-κB response. In this study, using two-hybrid screening we identify the RING-type zinc-finger protein 114 (RNF114) as an A20-interacting factor. RNF114 interacts with A20 in T cells and modulates A20 ubiquitylation. RNF114 acts as negative regulator of NF-κB-dependent transcription, not only by stabilizing the A20 protein but also IκBα. Importantly, we demonstrate that in T cells, the effect of RNF114 is linked to the modulation of T-cell activation and apoptosis but is independent of cell cycle regulation. Altogether, our data indicate that RNF114 is a new partner of A2O involved in the regulation of NF-κB activity that contributes to the control of signaling pathways modulating T cell-mediated immune response. PMID:25165885

  10. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  11. Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL80 is negatively involved in phosphate mobilization and cold stress response in sufficient phosphate growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-08-07

    Phosphate (Pi) remobilization in plants is critical to continuous growth and development. AtATL80 is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized RING E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that belongs to the Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family. AtATL80 was upregulated by long-term low Pi (0-0.02 mM KH2PO4) conditions in Arabidopsis seedlings. AtATL80-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:AtATL80-sGFP) displayed increased phosphorus (P) accumulation in the shoots and lower biomass, as well as reduced P-utilization efficiency (PUE) under high Pi (1 mM KH2PO4) conditions compared to wild-type plants. The loss-of-function atatl80 mutant line exhibited opposite phenotypic traits. The atatl80 mutant line bolted earlier than wild-type plants, whereas AtATL80-overexpressors bloomed significantly later and produced lower seed yields than wild-type plants under high Pi conditions. Thus, AtATL80 is negatively correlated not only with P content and PUE, but also with biomass and seed yield in Arabidopsis. In addition, AtATL80-overexpressors were significantly more sensitive to cold stress than wild-type plants, while the atatl80 mutant line exhibited an increased tolerance to cold stress. Taken together, our results suggest that AtATL80, a PM-localized ATL-type RING E3 Ub ligase, participates in the Pi mobilization and cold stress response as a negative factor in Arabidopsis.

  12. BrRZFP1 a Brassica rapa C3HC4-type RING zinc finger protein involved in cold, salt and dehydration stress.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y J; Lee, I H; Nou, I S; Lee, K D; Rashotte, A M; Kang, K K

    2013-03-01

    C3HC4-type RING zinc finger proteins are known to be essential in the regulation of plant processes, including responses to abiotic stress. Here, we identify, clone and examine the first C3HC4-type RING zinc finger protein (BrRZFP1) from Brassica rapa under stress conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of BrRZFP1 revealed strong sequence similarity to C3HC4-type zinc finger proteins from Arabidopsis that are induced by abiotic stresses. Diverse environmental stresses, including salt and cold, were found to induce BrRZFP1 transcripts greater than eightfold in B. rapa. Additional strong induction was shown of the stress hormone abscisic acid, together suggesting that BrRZFP1 could play a role as a general stress modulator. Similar profiles of induction for each of these stresses was found in both root and shoot tissues, although at much higher levels in roots. Constitutive expression of BrRZFP1 in Nicotiana tabacum was conducted to further analyse how changes in gene expression levels would affect plant stress responses. BrRZFP1 overexpression conferred increased tolerance to cold, salt and dehydration stresses. This was observed in several assays examining growth status throughout development, including increased germination, fresh weight and length of shoots and roots, as well as enhanced chlorophyll retention. These results suggest that the transcription factor BrRZFP1 is an important determinant of stress response in plants and that changes in its expression level in plants could increase stress tolerance.

  13. TRIM4; a novel mitochondrial interacting RING E3 ligase, sensitizes the cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Lavie, Julie; Singh, Kritarth; Lakshmi, Sripada; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Bénard, Giovanni; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    The emerging evidences suggest that posttranslational modification of target protein by ubiquitin (Ub) not only regulate its turnover through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) but is a critical regulator of various signaling pathways. During ubiquitination, E3 ligase recognizes the target protein and determines the topology of ubiquitin chains. In current study, we studied the role of TRIM4, a member of the TRIM/RBCC protein family of RING E3 ligase, in regulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death. TRIM4 is expressed differentially in human tissues and expressed in most of the analyzed human cancer cell lines. The subcellular localization studies showed that TRIM4 forms distinct cytoplasmic speckle like structures which transiently interacts with mitochondria. The expression of TRIM4 induces mitochondrial aggregation and increased level of mitochondrial ROS in the presence of H2O2. It sensitizes the cells to H2O2 induced death whereas knockdown reversed the effect. TRIM4 potentiates the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytochrome c release in the presence of H2O2. The analysis of TRIM4 interacting proteins showed its interaction with peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1), including other proteins involved in regulation of mitochondrial and redox homeostasis. TRIM4 interaction with PRX1 is critical for the regulation of H2O2 induced cell death. Collectively, the evidences in the current study suggest the role of TRIM4 in regulation of oxidative stress induced cell death.

  14. FLRF, a novel evolutionarily conserved RING finger gene, is differentially expressed in mouse fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, J M; Li, X; Nachtman, R G; Jurecic, R

    2001-01-01

    Through differential screening of mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and progenitor subtracted cDNA libraries we have identified a HSC-specific transcript that represents a novel RING finger gene, named FLRF (fetal liver ring finger). FLRF represent a novel evolutionarily highly conserved RING finger gene, present in Drosophila, zebrafish, Xenopus, mouse, and humans. Full-length cDNA clones for mouse and human gene encode an identical protein of 317 amino acids with a C3HC4 RING finger domain at the amino terminus. During embryonic hematopoiesis FLRF is abundantly transcribed in mouse fetal liver HSC (Sca-1+c-kit+AA4.1+Lin- cells), but is not expressed in progenitors (AA4.1-). In adult mice FLRF is not transcribed in a highly enriched population of bone marrow HSC (Rh-123lowSca-1+c-kit+Lin- cells). Its expression is upregulated in a more heterogeneous population of bone marrow HSC (Lin-Sca-1+ cells), downregulated as they differentiate into progenitors (Lin-Sca-1- cells), and upregulated as progenitors differentiate into mature lymphoid and myeloid cell types. The human FLRF gene that spans a region of at least 12 kb and consists of eight exons was localized to chromosome 12q13, a region with frequent chromosome aberrations associated with multiple cases of acute myeloid leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The analysis of the genomic sequence upstream of the first exon in the mouse and human FLRF gene has revealed that both putative promoters contain multiple putative binding sites for several hematopoietic (GATA-1, GATA-2, GATA-3, Ikaros, SCL/Tal-1, AML1, MZF-1, and Lmo2) and other transcription factors, suggesting that mouse and human FLRF expression could be regulated in a developmental and cell-specific manner during hematopoiesis. Evolutionary conservation and differential expression in fetal and adult HSC and progenitors suggest that the FLRF gene could play an important role in HSC/progenitor cell lineage commitment and differentiation and could be

  15. Inactivation of the Cullin (CUL)-RING E3 ligase by the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 triggers protective autophagy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongguang; Pan, Yongfu; Jeong, Lak Shin; Liu, Jie; Jia, Lijun

    2012-11-01

    The multiunit Cullin (CUL)-RING E3 ligase (CRL) controls diverse biological processes by targeting a mass of substrates for ubiquitination and degradation, whereas its dysfunction causes carcinogenesis. Post-translational neddylation of CUL, a process triggered by the NEDD8-activating enzyme E1 subunit 1 (NAE1), is required for CRL activation. Recently, MLN4924 was discovered via a high-throughput screen as a specific NAE1 inhibitor and first-in-class anticancer drug. By blocking CUL neddylation, MLN4924 inactivates CRL and causes the accumulation of CRL substrates that trigger cell cycle arrest, senescence and/or apoptosis to suppress the growth of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Recently, we found that MLN4924 also triggers protective autophagy in response to CRL inactivation. MLN4924-induced autophagy is attributed partially to the inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (also known as mammalian target of rapamycin, MTOR) activity by the accumulation of the MTOR inhibitory protein DEPTOR, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Moreover, the blockage of autophagy response enhances apoptosis in MLN4924-treated cells. Together, our findings not only reveal autophagy as a novel cellular response to CRL inactivation by MLN4924, but also provide a piece of proof-of-concept evidence for the combination of MLN4924 with autophagy inhibitors to enhance therapeutic efficacy.

  16. RBR E3 ubiquitin ligases: new structures, new insights, new questions

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Walden, Helen; Shaw, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The RBR (RING-BetweenRING-RING) or TRIAD [two RING fingers and a DRIL (double RING finger linked)] E3 ubiquitin ligases comprise a group of 12 complex multidomain enzymes. This unique family of E3 ligases includes parkin, whose dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of early-onset Parkinson's disease, and HOIP (HOIL-1-interacting protein) and HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1), members of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). The RBR E3 ligases share common features with both the larger RING and HECT (homologous with E6-associated protein C-terminus) E3 ligase families, directly catalysing ubiquitin transfer from an intrinsic catalytic cysteine housed in the C-terminal domain, as well as recruiting thioester-bound E2 enzymes via a RING domain. Recent three-dimensional structures and biochemical findings of the RBRs have revealed novel protein domain folds not previously envisioned and some surprising modes of regulation that have raised many questions. This has required renaming two of the domains in the RBR E3 ligases to more accurately reflect their structures and functions: the C-terminal Rcat (required-for-catalysis) domain, essential for catalytic activity, and a central BRcat (benign-catalytic) domain that adopts the same fold as the Rcat, but lacks a catalytic cysteine residue and ubiquitination activity. The present review discusses how three-dimensional structures of RBR (RING1-BRcat-Rcat) E3 ligases have provided new insights into our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of these important enzymes in ubiquitin biology. PMID:24576094

  17. An ATL78-Like RING-H2 Finger Protein Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance through Interacting with RAV2 and CSN5B in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jianwen; Xing, Yali; Munir, Shoaib; Yu, Chuying; Song, Lulu; Li, Hanxia; Wang, Taotao; Ye, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    RING finger proteins play an important role in plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. In the present study, a wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites) cold-induced RING-H2 finger gene, ShATL78L, was isolated, which has been identified as an abiotic stress responsive gene in tomato. The results showed that ShATL78L was constitutively expressed in various tissues such as root, leaf, petiole, stem, flower, and fruit. Cold stress up-regulated ShATL78L in the cold-tolerant S. habrochaites compared to the susceptible cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Furthermore, ShATL78L expression was also regulated under different stresses such as drought, salt, heat, wound, osmotic stress, and exogenous hormones. Functional characterization showed that cultivated tomato overexpressing ShATL78L had improved tolerance to cold, drought and oxidative stresses compared to the wild-type and the knockdown lines. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of ShATL78L regulating abiotic stress responses, we performed yeast one-hybrid and two-hybrid assays and found that RAV2 could bind to the promoter of ShATL78L and activates/alters its transcription, and CSN5B could interact with ShATL78L to regulate abiotic stress responses. Taken together, these results show that ShATL78L plays an important role in regulating plant adaptation to abiotic stresses through bound by RAV2 and interacting with CSN5B. Highlight: RAV2 binds to the promoter of ShATL78L to activates/alters its transcription to adapt the environmental conditions; furthermore, ShATL78L interacts with CSN5B to regulate the stress tolerance. PMID:27621744

  18. ATLs and BTLs, plant-specific and general eukaryotic structurally-related E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2014-02-01

    Major components of the ubiquitin proteasome system are the enzymes that operate on the transfer of ubiquitin to selected target substrate, known as ubiquitin ligases. The RING finger is a domain that is present in key classes of ubiquitin ligases. This domain coordinates the interaction with a suitable E2 conjugase and the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 to protein targets. Additional domains coupled to the same polypeptide are important for modulating the function of these ubiquitin ligases. Plants contain several types of E3 ubiquitin ligases that in many cases have expanded as multigene families. Some families are specific to the plant lineage, whereas others may have a common ancestor among plants and other eukaryotic lineages. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATLs) and BCA2 zinc finger ATLs (BTLs) are two families of ubiquitin ligases that share some common structural features. These are intronless genes that encode a highly related RING finger domain, and yet during evolutionary history, their mode of gene expansion and function is rather different. In each of these two families, the co-occurrence of transmembrane helices or C2/C2 (BZF finger) domains with a selected variation on the RING finger has been subjected to strong selection pressure in order to preserve their unique domain architectures during evolution.

  19. Systematic Characterization of the Zinc-Finger-Containing Proteins in the Mouse Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ravasi, Timothy; Huber, Thomas; Zavolan, Mihaela; Forrest, Alistair; Gaasterland, Terry; Grimmond, Sean; Hume, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Zinc-finger-containing proteins can be classified into evolutionary and functionally divergent protein families that share one or more domains in which a zinc ion is tetrahedrally coordinated by cysteines and histidines. The zinc finger domain defines one of the largest protein superfamilies in mammalian genomes;46 different conserved zinc finger domains are listed in InterPro (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/InterPro). Zinc finger proteins can bind to DNA, RNA, other proteins, or lipids as a modular domain in combination with other conserved structures. Owing to this combinatorial diversity, different members of zinc finger superfamilies contribute to many distinct cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, mRNA stability and processing, and protein turnover. Accordingly, mutations of zinc finger genes lead to aberrations in a broad spectrum of biological processes such as development, differentiation, apoptosis, and immunological responses. This study provides the first comprehensive classification of zinc finger proteins in a mammalian transcriptome. Specific detailed analysis of the SP/Krüppel-like factors and the E3 ubiquitin-ligase RING-H2 families illustrates the importance of such an analysis for a more comprehensive functional classification of large protein families. We describe the characterization of a new family of C2H2 zinc-finger-containing proteins and a new conserved domain characteristic of this family, the identification and characterization of Sp8, a new member of the Sp family of transcriptional regulators, and the identification of five new RING-H2 proteins. PMID:12819142

  20. Expression of the nuclear RING finger protein SNURF/RNF4 during rat testis development suggests a role in spermatid maturation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Hirvonen-Santti, Sirpa J; Palvimo, Jorma J; Toppari, Jorma; Jänne, Olli A

    2002-10-01

    A small nuclear RING finger protein, termed SNURF (or RNF4), is a coregulator of androgen receptor-dependent transcription. To elucidate the physiological role of SNURF in vivo, cell type-specific localization and changes in SNURF mRNA and protein accumulation were followed during testicular development and spermatogenesis of the rat. Two SNURF transcripts, approximately 3.0 and 1.6 kb in size, were detected in adult rat testis. Both mRNA species are capable of encoding full-length SNURF protein. The 3.0 kb SNURF mRNA is persistently expressed in Sertoli cells of both immature and mature testes, whereas the expression of the 1.6 kb transcript appears after day 30 of postnatal life and is restricted to step 4-11 spermatids. Increased accumulation of SNURF in step 4-11 spermatids, which do not express the androgen receptor, indicates that SNURF action is not restricted to the regulation of androgen signaling. Germ cell expression of SNURF coincides with the last transcriptional activity of the haploid genome and alterations in chromatin structure, suggesting that SNURF is involved in the regulation of processes required for late steps of spermatid maturation.

  1. Negative Regulation of the Acetyltransferase TIP60-p53 Interplay by UHRF1 (Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING Finger Domains 1)*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Shi, Dingding; Gu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate the importance of acetylation in p53-mediated stress responses upon DNA damage. We and others previously showed that TIP60 (Tat-interacting protein of 60 kDa)-mediated acetylation of p53 at K120 is crucial for p53-dependent apoptotic responses. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how TIP60-mediated effects on p53 are dynamically regulated in vivo. Here, we report that UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING finger domains 1) interacts with TIP60 both in vitro and in vivo and induces degradation-independent ubiquitination of TIP60. Moreover, UHRF1 expression markedly suppresses the ability of TIP60 to acetylate p53. In contrast, RNAi-mediated knockdown of UHRF1 increases the endogenous levels of p53 acetylation at K120 and p53-mediated apoptosis is significantly enhanced in UHRF1-depleted cells. To elucidate the mechanisms of this regulation, we found that the interaction between TIP60 and p53 is severely inhibited in the presence of UHRF1, suggesting that UHRF1 modulates TIP60-mediated functions in both K120 acetylation-dependent and -independent manners. Consistent with this notion, UHRF1 knockdown promotes activation of p21 and PUMA but not MDM2. These findings demonstrate that UHRF1 is a critical negative regulator of TIP60 and suggest that UHRF1-mediated effects on p53 may contribute, at least in part, to its role in tumorigenesis. PMID:23677994

  2. A cancer-associated RING finger protein, RNF43, is a ubiquitin ligase that interacts with a nuclear protein, HAP95

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, Takeyuki Yamaguchi, Aya; Miyamoto, Kentaro

    2008-04-15

    RNF43 is a recently discovered RING finger protein that is implicated in colon cancer pathogenesis. This protein possesses growth-promoting activity but its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, to gain insight into the biological action of RNF43 we characterized it biochemically and intracellularly. A combination of indirect immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation experiments suggests that RNF43 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as in the nuclear envelope. Sucrose density gradient fractionation demonstrates that RNF43 co-exists with emerin, a representative inner nuclear membrane protein in the nuclear subcompartment. The cell-free system with pure components reveals that recombinant RNF43 fused with maltose-binding protein has autoubiquitylation activity. By the yeast two-hybrid screening we identified HAP95, a chromatin-associated protein interfacing the nuclear envelope, as an RNF43-interacting protein and substantiated this interaction in intact cells by the co-immunoprecipitation experiments. HAP95 is ubiquitylated and subjected to a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway, however, the experiments in which 293 cells expressing both RNF43 and HAP95 were treated with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, show that HAP95 is unlikely to serve as a substrate of RNF43 ubiquitin ligase. These results infer that RNF43 is a resident protein of the ER and, at least partially, the nuclear membrane, with ubiquitin ligase activity and may be involved in cell growth control potentially through the interaction with HAP95.

  3. The ancient source of a distinct gene family encoding proteins featuring RING and C(3)H zinc-finger motifs with abundant expression in developing brain and nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gray, T A; Hernandez, L; Carey, A H; Schaldach, M A; Smithwick, M J; Rus, K; Marshall Graves, J A; Stewart, C L; Nicholls, R D

    2000-05-15

    Intronless genes can arise by germline retrotransposition of a cDNA originating as mRNA from an intron-containing source gene. Previously, we described several members of a family of intronless mammalian genes encoding a novel class of zinc-finger proteins, including one that shows imprinted expression and one that escapes X-inactivation. We report here the identification and characterization of the Makorin ring finger protein 1 gene (MKRN1), a highly transcribed, intron-containing source for this family of genes. Phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that the MKRN1 gene is the ancestral founder of this gene family. We have identified MKRN1 orthologs from human, mouse, wallaby, chicken, fruitfly, and nematode, underscoring the age and conservation of this gene. The MKRN gene family encodes putative ribonucleoproteins with a distinctive array of zinc-finger motifs, including two to four C(3)H zinc-fingers, an unusual Cys/His arrangement that may represent a novel zinc-finger structure, and a highly conserved RING zinc-finger. To date, we have identified nine MKRN family loci distributed throughout the human genome. The human and mouse MKRN1 loci map to a conserved syntenic group near the T-cell receptor beta cluster (TCRB) in chromosome 7q34-q35 and chromosome 6A, respectively. MKRN1 is widely transcribed in mammals, with high levels in murine embryonic nervous system and adult testis. The ancient origin of MKRN1, high degree of conservation, and expression pattern suggest important developmental and functional roles for this gene and its expressed family members.

  4. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  5. Stabilization of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nrdp1 by the Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiuli; Yen, Lily; Irwin, Lisa; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L.

    2004-01-01

    Nrdp1 is a RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that physically interacts with and regulates steady-state cellular levels of the ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinases and has been implicated in the degradation of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein BRUCE. Here we demonstrate that the Nrdp1 protein undergoes efficient proteasome-dependent degradation and that mutations in its RING finger domain that disrupt ubiquitin ligase activity enhance stability. These observations suggest that Nrdp1 self-ubiquitination and stability could play an important role in regulating the activity of this protein. Using affinity chromatography, we identified the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8 (also called Ubpy) as a protein that physically interacts with Nrdp1. Nrdp1 and USP8 could be coimmunoprecipitated, and in transfected cells USP8 specifically bound to Nrdp1 but not cbl, a RING finger E3 ligase involved in ligand-stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation. The USP8 rhodanese and catalytic domains mediated Nrdp1 binding. USP8 markedly enhanced the stability of Nrdp1, and a point mutant that disrupts USP8 catalytic activity destabilized endogenous Nrdp1. Our results indicate that Nrdp1 is a specific target for the USP8 deubiquitinating enzyme and are consistent with a model where USP8 augments Nrdp1 activity by mediating its stabilization. PMID:15314180

  6. Stabilization of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 by the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuli; Yen, Lily; Irwin, Lisa; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L

    2004-09-01

    Nrdp1 is a RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that physically interacts with and regulates steady-state cellular levels of the ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinases and has been implicated in the degradation of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein BRUCE. Here we demonstrate that the Nrdp1 protein undergoes efficient proteasome-dependent degradation and that mutations in its RING finger domain that disrupt ubiquitin ligase activity enhance stability. These observations suggest that Nrdp1 self-ubiquitination and stability could play an important role in regulating the activity of this protein. Using affinity chromatography, we identified the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8 (also called Ubpy) as a protein that physically interacts with Nrdp1. Nrdp1 and USP8 could be coimmunoprecipitated, and in transfected cells USP8 specifically bound to Nrdp1 but not cbl, a RING finger E3 ligase involved in ligand-stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation. The USP8 rhodanese and catalytic domains mediated Nrdp1 binding. USP8 markedly enhanced the stability of Nrdp1, and a point mutant that disrupts USP8 catalytic activity destabilized endogenous Nrdp1. Our results indicate that Nrdp1 is a specific target for the USP8 deubiquitinating enzyme and are consistent with a model where USP8 augments Nrdp1 activity by mediating its stabilization.

  7. Central Precocious Puberty That Appears to Be Sporadic Caused by Paternally Inherited Mutations in the Imprinted Gene Makorin Ring Finger 3

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Delanie B.; Abreu, Ana Paula; Reis, Ana Claudia S.; Montenegro, Luciana R.; Dauber, Andrew; Beneduzzi, Daiane; Cukier, Priscilla; Silveira, Leticia F. G.; Teles, Milena G.; Carroll, Rona S.; Junior, Gil Guerra; Filho, Guilherme Guaragna; Gucev, Zoran; Arnhold, Ivo J. P.; de Castro, Margaret; Moreira, Ayrton C.; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Brito, Vinicius N.; Antonini, Sonir R.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Loss-of-function mutations in makorin ring finger 3 (MKRN3), an imprinted gene located on the long arm of chromosome 15, have been recognized recently as a cause of familial central precocious puberty (CPP) in humans. MKRN3 has a potential inhibitory effect on GnRH secretion. Objectives: The objective of the study was to investigate potential MKRN3 sequence variations as well as copy number and methylation abnormalities of the 15q11 locus in patients with apparently sporadic CPP. Setting and Participants: We studied 215 unrelated children (207 girls and eight boys) from three university medical centers with a diagnosis of CPP. All but two of these patients (213 cases) reported no family history of premature sexual development. First-degree relatives of patients with identified MKRN3 variants were included for genetic analysis. Main Outcome Measures: All 215 CPP patients were screened for MKRN3 mutations by automatic sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed in a partially overlapping cohort of 52 patients. Results: We identified five novel heterozygous mutations in MKRN3 in eight unrelated girls with CPP. Four were frame shift mutations predicted to encode truncated proteins and one was a missense mutation, which was suggested to be deleterious by in silico analysis. All patients with MKRN3 mutations had classical features of CPP with a median age of onset at 6 years. Copy number and methylation abnormalities at the 15q11 locus were not detected in the patients tested for these abnormalities. Segregation analysis was possible in five of the eight girls with MKRN3 mutations; in all cases, the mutation was inherited on the paternal allele. Conclusions: We have identified novel inherited MKRN3 defects in children with apparently sporadic CPP, supporting a fundamental role of this peptide in the suppression of the reproductive axis. PMID:24628548

  8. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-08-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes.

  9. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-01-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes. PMID:22827943

  10. The Arabidopsis RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligase AtAIRP3/LOG2 Participates in Positive Regulation of High-Salt and Drought Stress Responses1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hum; Kim, Woo Taek

    2013-01-01

    Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ubiquitin ligases have been implicated in cellular responses to the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) as well as to environmental stresses in higher plants. Here, an ABA-insensitive RING protein3 (atairp3) loss-of-function mutant line in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was isolated due to its hyposensitivity to ABA during its germination stage as compared with wild-type plants. AtAIRP3 contains a single C3HC4-type RING motif, a putative myristoylation site, and a domain associated with RING2 (DAR2) domain. Unexpectedly, AtAIRP3 was identified as LOSS OF GDU2 (LOG2), which was recently shown to participate in an amino acid export system via interaction with GLUTAMINE DUMPER1. Thus, AtAIRP3 was renamed as AtAIRP3/LOG2. Transcript levels of AtAIRP3/LOG2 were up-regulated by drought, high salinity, and ABA, suggesting a role for this factor in abiotic stress responses. The atairp3/log2-2 knockout mutant and 35S:AtAIRP3-RNAi knockdown transgenic plants displayed impaired ABA-mediated seed germination and stomata closure. Cosuppression and complementation studies further supported a positive role for AtAIRP3/LOG2 in ABA responses. Suppression of AtAIRP3/LOG2 resulted in marked hypersensitive phenotypes toward high salinity and water deficit relative to wild-type plants. These results suggest that Arabidopsis RING E3 AtAIRP3/LOG2 is a positive regulator of the ABA-mediated drought and salt stress tolerance mechanism. Using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid, in vitro, and in vivo immunoprecipitation, cell-free protein degradation, and in vitro ubiquitination assays, RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION21 was identified as a substrate protein of AtAIRP3/LOG2. Collectively, our data suggest that AtAIRP3/LOG2 plays dual functions in ABA-mediated drought stress responses and in an amino acid export pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:23696092

  11. Mallet finger - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Baseball finger - aftercare; Drop finger - aftercare; Avulsion fracture - mallet finger - aftercare ... away from the rest of the bone (avulsion fracture) Mallet finger most often occurs when something hits ...

  12. RING finger protein 11 (RNF11) modulates susceptibility to 6-OHDA-induced nigral degeneration and behavioral deficits through NF-κB signaling in dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Pranski, Elaine L; Dalal, Nirjari V; Sanford, Carson Van; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Gearing, Marla; Lazo, Carlos; Miller, Gary W; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Betarbet, Ranjita S

    2013-06-01

    Chronic activation of the NF-κB pathway is associated with progressive neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Given the role of neuronal RING finger protein 11 (RNF11) as a negative regulator of the NF-κB pathway, in this report we investigated the function of RNF11 in dopaminergic cells in PD-associated neurodegeneration. We found that RNF11 knockdown in an in vitro model of PD mediated protection against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity. In converse, over-expression of RNF11 enhanced 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death. Furthermore, by directly manipulating NF-κB signaling, we showed that the observed RNF11-enhanced 6-OHDA toxicity is mediated through inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription of TNF-α, antioxidants GSS and SOD1, and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2. Experiments in an in vivo 6-OHDA rat model of PD recapitulated the in vitro results. In vivo targeted RNF11 over-expression in nigral neurons enhanced 6-OHDA toxicity, as evident by increased amphetamine-induced rotations and loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons as compared to controls. This enhanced toxicity was coupled with the downregulation of NF-κB transcribed GSS, SOD1, BCL2, and neurotrophic factor BDNF mRNA levels, in addition to decreased TNF-α mRNA levels in ventral mesenchephalon samples. In converse, knockdown of RNF11 was associated with protective phenotypes and increased expression of above-mentioned NF-κB transcribed genes. Collectively, our in vitro and in vivo data suggest that RNF11-mediated inhibition of NF-κB in dopaminergic cells exaggerates 6-OHDA toxicity by inhibiting neuroprotective responses while loss of RNF11 inhibition on NF-κB activity promotes neuronal survival. The decreased expression of RNF11 in surviving cortical and nigral tissue detected in PD patients, thus implies a compensatory response in the diseased brain to PD-associated insults. In summary, our findings demonstrate that RNF11 in neurons can modulate susceptibility to 6-OHDA toxicity through NF

  13. Ectopic expression of PtaRHE1, encoding a poplar RING-H2 protein with E3 ligase activity, alters plant development and induces defence-related responses

    PubMed Central

    Mukoko Bopopi, Johnny; Vandeputte, Olivier M.; Himanen, Kristiina; Mol, Adeline; Vaessen, Quentin; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2010-01-01

    RING (really interesting new gene)-H2 domain-containing proteins are widely represented in plants and play important roles in the regulation of many developmental processes as well as in plant–environment interactions. In the present report, experiments were performed to unravel the role of the poplar gene PtaRHE1, coding for a RING-H2 protein. In vitro ubiquitination assays indicate a functional E3 ligase activity for PtaRHE1 with the specific E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH5a. The overexpression of PtaRHE1 in tobacco resulted in a pleiotropic phenotype characterized by a curling of the leaves, the formation of necrotic lesions on leaf blades, growth retardation, and a delay in floral transition. The plant gene expression response to PtaRHE1 overexpression provided evidence for the up-regulation of defence- and/or programmed cell death-related genes. Moreover, genes coding for WRKY transcription factors as well as for mitogen-activated protein kinases, such as wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK), were also found to be induced in the transgenic lines as compared with the wild type. In addition, histochemical β-glucuronidase staining showed that the PtaRHE1 promoter is induced by plant pathogens and by elicitors such as salicylic acid and cellulase. Taken together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase PtaRHE1 plays a role in the ubiquitination-mediated regulation of defence response, possibly by acting upstream of WIPK and/or in the activation of WRKY factors. PMID:19892745

  14. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  15. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2)*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)1 and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126. PMID:26253232

  16. Rehabilitation of single finger amputation with customized silicone prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Niharika; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Finger amputations are common in accidents at home, work, and play. Apart from trauma, congenital disease and deformity also leads to finger amputation. This results in loss of function, loss of sensation as well as loss of body image. Finger prosthesis offers psychological support and social acceptance in such cases. This clinical report describes a method to fabricate ring retained silicone finger prosthesis in a patient with partial finger loss. PMID:28163487

  17. A RING finger protein 114 (RNF114) homolog from Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) possesses immune-regulation properties via modulating RIG-I signaling pathway-mediated interferon expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiaojun; Nie, Dongsong; Wang, Jiajia; Wu, Mingjiang

    2014-12-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in immune regulation. The human RNF114 (RING finger protein 114), an ubiquitin ligase, was recently reported to be involved in immune response to double-stranded RNA in disease pathogenesis. Here, we identified a RNF114 homolog in Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) and investigated its potential role in immune response. The full-length cDNA of Chinese sturgeon RNF114 (csRNF114) contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 681 nucleotides coding a protein of 227 amino acids. csRNF114 shares the highest identity of 76% at amino acid level to other RNF114 homologs, clustering with bony fish RNF114s based on phylogenetic analysis. The main structural features of csRNF114, including a C3HC4 (Cys3-His-Cys4) RING domain, a C2HC (Cys2-His-Cys)-type zinc finger motif, a C2H2 (Cys2-His2)-type zinc finger motif, and a UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif), take csRNF114 as an ubiquitin ligase. csRNF114 mRNA was widely expressed in various tissues and significantly up-regulated in poly(I:C)-treated Chinese sturgeon. Over-expression of csRNF114 in HEK293T cells significantly promoted both basal and poly(I:C)-induced activation of interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) downstream retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling pathway and expression of target genes type I interferon (IFN), which was nearly abolished by knockdown of RIG-I with specific human siRNA and by mutation of the C3HC4 RING domain (C28A/C31A) in csRNF114 as well. Furthermore, csRNF114 associated with ubiquitinated proteins in HEK293T cells, for which the C3HC4 RING domain was essential. These data suggested that an ubiquitin ligase RNF114 homolog with a potential role in antiviral response possibly through modulating RIG-I signaling pathway was cloned from Chinese sturgeon, which might contribute to our understanding of the immune biology of Chinese sturgeon.

  18. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The author has been prompted to write this article about finger multiplication for a number of reasons. Firstly there are a number of related articles in past issues of "Mathematics Teaching" ("MT") which have connections to this algorithm. Secondly, very few of his primary teaching students and professional colleagues appear to be aware of the…

  19. Expansion and diversification of BTL ring-H2 ubiquitin ligases in angiosperms: putative Rabring7/BCA2 orthologs.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Hernández, Victor; Medina, Juliana; Aguilar-Henonin, Laura; Guzmán, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    RING finger E3 ligases are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) that mediate the transfer of ubiquitin to substrates. Single-subunit RING finger E3s binds the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and contains recognition sequences for the substrate within the same polypeptide. Here we describe the characterization of a class of RING finger E3 ligases that is conserved among eukaryotes. This class encodes a RING-H2 domain related in sequence to the ATL RING-H2 domain, another class of E3 ligases, and a C2/C2 zing finger at the amino-terminus, formerly described as BZF. In viridiplantae (green algae and land plants), we designed this family as BTL for BZF ATLs. BTLs are putative orthologs of the mammalian Rabring7/BCA2 RING-H2 E3s that have expanded in angiosperms. They are found in numbers ranging from three to thirty-one, which is in contrast to the one to three members normally found in animals, fungi, and protists. Furthermore, the number of sequence LOGOs generated in angiosperms is four times greater than that in other eukaryotes. In contrast to ATLs, which show expansion by tandem duplication, tandemly duplicated BTLs are scarce. The mode of action of Rabring7/BCA2 and BTLs may be similar since both the Rabring7/BCA2 BZF and the ath|BTL4 BZF are likely to mediate the binding of ubiquitin. This study introduces valuable information on the evolution and domain structure of the Rabring7/BCA2/BTL class of E3 ligases which may be important for core eukaryotic genes.

  20. Expansion and Diversification of BTL Ring-H2 Ubiquitin Ligases in Angiosperms: Putative Rabring7/BCA2 Orthologs

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Henonin, Laura; Guzmán, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    RING finger E3 ligases are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) that mediate the transfer of ubiquitin to substrates. Single-subunit RING finger E3s binds the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and contains recognition sequences for the substrate within the same polypeptide. Here we describe the characterization of a class of RING finger E3 ligases that is conserved among eukaryotes. This class encodes a RING-H2 domain related in sequence to the ATL RING-H2 domain, another class of E3 ligases, and a C2/C2 zing finger at the amino-terminus, formerly described as BZF. In viridiplantae (green algae and land plants), we designed this family as BTL for BZF ATLs. BTLs are putative orthologs of the mammalian Rabring7/BCA2 RING-H2 E3s that have expanded in angiosperms. They are found in numbers ranging from three to thirty-one, which is in contrast to the one to three members normally found in animals, fungi, and protists. Furthermore, the number of sequence LOGOs generated in angiosperms is four times greater than that in other eukaryotes. In contrast to ATLs, which show expansion by tandem duplication, tandemly duplicated BTLs are scarce. The mode of action of Rabring7/BCA2 and BTLs may be similar since both the Rabring7/BCA2 BZF and the ath|BTL4 BZF are likely to mediate the binding of ubiquitin. This study introduces valuable information on the evolution and domain structure of the Rabring7/BCA2/BTL class of E3 ligases which may be important for core eukaryotic genes. PMID:23951330

  1. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Finger Foods for Babies KidsHealth > For Parents > Finger Foods for ... will accept a new food. previous continue Finger Foods to Avoid Finger feeding is fun and rewarding ...

  2. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    PubMed Central

    van den Noort, Josien C.; van Beek, Nathalie; van der Kraan, Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instructed fingers) and range of independent finger movement through the whole finger flexion trajectory in single and multi-finger movement tasks. Thirteen young healthy subjects performed single- and multi-finger movement tasks under two conditions: active flexion through the full range of movement with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed finger(s) were restrained. Finger kinematics were measured using inertial sensors (PowerGlove), to assess enslaving and range of independent finger movement. Although all fingers showed enslaving movement to some extent, highest enslaving was found in adjacent fingers. Enslaving effects in ring and little finger were increased with movement of additional, non-adjacent fingers. The middle finger was the only finger affected by restriction in movement of non-instructed fingers. Each finger showed a range of independent movement before the non-instructed fingers started to move, which was largest for the index finger. The start of enslaving was asymmetrical for adjacent fingers. Little finger enslaving movement was affected by multi-finger movement. We conclude that no finger can move independently through the full range of finger flexion, although some degree of full independence is present for smaller movements. This range of independent movement is asymmetric and variable between fingers and between subjects. The presented results provide insight into the role of finger independency for different types of tasks and populations. PMID:27992598

  3. MKRN2 is a novel ubiquitin E3 ligase for the p65 subunit of NF-κB and negatively regulates inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chanyoung; Ito, Yuma; Ichikawa, Shota; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Activation of NF-κB transcription factor is strictly regulated to prevent excessive inflammatory responses leading to immunopathology. However, it still remains unclear how NF-κB activation is negatively controlled. The PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein PDLIM2 is a nuclear ubiquitin E3 ligase targeting the p65 subunit of NF-κB for degradation, thus terminating NF-κB-mediated inflammation. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we sought to isolate PDLIM2-interacting proteins that are critical for suppressing NF-κB signaling. Here we identified MKRN2, a RING finger domain-containing protein that belongs to the makorin ring finger protein gene family, as a novel p65 ubiquitin E3 ligase. MKRN2 bound to p65 and promoted the polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of p65 through the MKRN2 RING finger domain, thereby suppressing p65-mediated NF-κB transactivation. Notably, MKRN2 and PDLIM2 synergistically promote polyubiquitination and degradation of p65. Consistently, MKRN2 knockdown in dendritic cells resulted in larger amounts of nuclear p65 and augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines in responses to innate stimuli. These results delineate a novel role of MKRN2 in negatively regulating NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses, cooperatively with PDLIM2. PMID:28378844

  4. Cosmetic amputation of the fourth ray as possible outcome of the traumatic amputation of the ring finger injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzini, Alessio; Calderazzi, Filippo; Bertoni, Nicola; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this work is to describe a case of traumatic amputation of the fourth finger of the left hand. In its first phase, a treatment which consisted in a disarticulation at the level of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was carried out; in the second phase, three months after this emergency treatment, a cosmetic amputation of the fourth metacarpal ray was required. Surgery was performed in accordance with the technique described by Bunnell, which consisted in the disarticulation of the fourth metacarpal, together with radial traslation of the fifth ray. Eighteen months after the operation The patient reported the absence of any subjective problems, with complete functional recovery of the hand that had been operated on. By that time she was back at her job; she also was satisfied with the cosmetic results that had been achieved.

  5. TRIM16 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and can heterodimerize with other TRIM family members.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jessica L; Malyukova, Alena; Holien, Jessica K; Koach, Jessica; Parker, Michael W; Kavallaris, Maria; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B

    2012-01-01

    The TRIM family of proteins is distinguished by its tripartite motif (TRIM). Typically, TRIM proteins contain a RING finger domain, one or two B-box domains, a coiled-coil domain and the more variable C-terminal domains. TRIM16 does not have a RING domain but does harbour two B-box domains. Here we showed that TRIM16 homodimerized through its coiled-coil domain and heterodimerized with other TRIM family members; TRIM24, Promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein and Midline-1 (MID1). Although, TRIM16 has no classic RING domain, three-dimensional modelling of TRIM16 suggested that its B-box domains adopts RING-like folds leading to the hypothesis that TRIM16 acts as an ubiquitin ligase. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrated that TRIM16, devoid of a classical RING domain had auto-polyubiquitination activity and acted as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vivo and in vitro assays. Thus via its unique structure, TRIM16 possesses both heterodimerization function with other TRIM proteins and also has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

  6. E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 regulates peroxisome biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ronghui; Satkovich, John; Hu, Jianping

    2016-10-31

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous eukaryotic organelles that play pivotal roles in a suite of metabolic processes and often act coordinately with other organelles, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria. Peroxisomes import proteins to the peroxisome matrix by peroxins (PEX proteins), but how the function of the PEX proteins is regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we identified the Arabidopsis RING (really interesting new gene) type E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 [suppressor of plastid protein import locus 1 (ppi1) 1] as a peroxisome membrane protein with a regulatory role in peroxisome protein import. SP1 interacts physically with the two components of the peroxisomemore » protein docking complex PEX13–PEX14 and the (RING)-finger peroxin PEX2. Loss of SP1 function suppresses defects of the pex14-2 and pex13-1 mutants, and SP1 is involved in the degradation of PEX13 and possibly PEX14 and all three RING peroxins. An in vivo ubiquitination assay showed that SP1 has the ability to promote PEX13 ubiquitination. Our study has revealed that, in addition to its previously reported function in chloroplast biogenesis, SP1 plays a role in peroxisome biogenesis. The same E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes the destabilization of components of two distinct protein-import machineries, indicating that degradation of organelle biogenesis factors by the ubiquitin–proteasome system may constitute an important regulatory mechanism in coordinating the biogenesis of metabolically linked organelles in eukaryotes.« less

  7. Contributions and co-ordination of individual fingers in multiple finger prehension.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, H; Kawai, S; Ikuta, K

    1995-06-01

    The contributions and co-ordination of external finger grip forces were examined during a lifting task with a precision grip using multiple fingers. The subjects (n = 10) lifted a force transducer-equipped grip apparatus. Grip force from each of the five fingers was continuously measured under different object weight (200 g, 400 g and 800 g) and surface structure (plastic and sandpaper) conditions. The effect of five-, four-, and three-finger grip modes was also examined. It was found that variation of object weight or surface friction resulted in change of the total grip force magnitude; the largest change in finger force, was that for the index finger, followed by the middle, ring, and little fingers. Percentage contribution of static grip force to the total grip force for the index, middle, ring, and little fingers was 42.0%, 27.4%, 17.6% and 12.9%, respectively. These values were fairly constant for all object weight conditions, as well as for all surface friction conditions, suggesting that all individual finger force adjustments for light loads less than 800 g are controlled comprehensively simply by using a single common scaling value. A higher surface friction provided faster lifting initiation and required lesser grip force exertion, indicating advantageous effect of a non-slippery surface over a slippery surface. The results indicate that nearly 40% force reduction can be obtained when a non-slippery surface is used. Variation in grip mode changed the total grip force, i.e., the fewer the number of fingers, the greater the total grip force. The percent value of static grip force for the index, middle, and ring fingers in the four-finger grip mode was 42.7%, 32.5%, and 24.7%, respectively, and that for the index and middle fingers in the three-finger grip mode was 43.0% and 56.9%, respectively. Therefore, the grip mode was found to influence the force contributions of the middle and ring fingers, but not of the index finger.

  8. Ubiquitination-dependent degradation of p73 by the mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades.

    PubMed

    Min, Bumki; Ryu, Jiwon; Chi, Seung-Wook; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2015-11-13

    p73 is a member of the p53 family of transcription factors which plays an essential role in tumor suppression. p73 is associated with the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy and the prognosis of many cancers. In this study, we showed the ubiquitination-dependent degradation of p73 by the mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades. First, the binding between p73 and Hades was identified by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, and it was found that the Hades RING-finger domain mediates the interaction with p73. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that p73 moves to the mitochondria and colocalizes with Hades during etoposide-induced apoptosis. By performing in vivo and in vitro ubiquitination assays, we observed that the Hades RING-finger domain promotes ubiquitination of p73. Finally, it was shown that SiRNA-mediated depletion of Hades stabilizes p73. Taken together, our results showed that Hades mediates the ubiquitination-dependent degradation of mitochondrial p73 under apoptotic conditions. These findings suggest that Hades-mediated p73 ubiquitination is a novel regulatory mechanism for the exonuclear function of p73.

  9. Functional characterization of SAG/RBX2/ROC2/RNF7, an antioxidant protein and an E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Li, Hua

    2013-02-01

    SAG (Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene), also known as RBX2 (RING box protein 2), ROC2 (Regulator of Cullins 2), or RNF7 (RING Finger Protein 7), was originally cloned in our laboratory as a redox inducible antioxidant protein and later characterized as the second member of the RBX/ROC RING component of the SCF (SKP1-CUL-F-box Proteins) E3 ubiquitin ligase. When acting alone, SAG scavenges oxygen radicals by forming inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bonds, whereas by forming a complex with other components of the SCF E3 ligase, SAG promotes ubiquitination and degradation of a number of protein substrates, including c-JUN, DEPTOR, HIF-1α, IκBα, NF1, NOXA, p27, and procaspase-3, thus regulating various signaling pathways and biological processes. Specifically, SAG protects cells from apoptosis, confers radioresistance, and plays an essential and non-redundant role in mouse embryogenesis and vasculogenesis. Furthermore, stress-inducible SAG is overexpressed in a number of human cancers and SAG overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis. Finally, SAG transgenic expression in epidermis causes an early stage inhibition, but later stage promotion, of skin tumorigenesis triggered by DMBA/TPA. Given its major role in promoting targeted degradation of tumor suppressive proteins, leading to apoptosis suppression and accelerated tumorigenesis, SAG E3 ligase appears to be an attractive anticancer target.

  10. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua; Duan, Changzhu

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  11. The role and mechanism of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer and its potential therapy implications

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Youzhou; Yan, Fan; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-01-01

    CRLs (Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases) are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes, which ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involved in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage response, genomic integrity, tumor suppression and embryonic development. CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, as one member of CRLs family, consists of a RING finger domain protein, cullin4 (CUL4) scaffold protein and DDB1–CUL4 associated substrate receptors. The CUL4 subfamily includes two members, CUL4A and CUL4B, which share extensively sequence identity and functional redundancy. Aberrant expression of CUL4 has been found in a majority of tumors. Given the significance of CUL4 in cancer, understanding its detailed aspects of pathogenesis of human malignancy would have significant value for the treatment of cancer. Here, the work provides an overview to address the role of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer development and progression, and discuss the possible mechanisms of CRL4 ligase involving in many cellular processes associated with tumor. Finally, we discuss its potential value in cancer therapy. PMID:26460955

  12. Ring Finger Protein 34 (RNF34) Interacts with and Promotes γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type-A Receptor Degradation via Ubiquitination of the γ2 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongbing; Chiou, Tzu-Ting; Serwanski, David R.; Miralles, Celia P.; Pinal, Noelia; De Blas, Angel L.

    2014-01-01

    We have found that the large intracellular loop of the γ2 GABAA receptor (R) subunit (γ2IL) interacts with RNF34 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase), as shown by yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pulldown assays. In brain extracts, RNF34 co-immunoprecipitates with assembled GABAARs. In co-transfected HEK293 cells, RNF34 reduces the expression of the γ2 GABAAR subunit by increasing the ratio of ubiquitinated/nonubiquitinated γ2. Mutating several lysines of the γ2IL into arginines makes the γ2 subunit resistant to RNF34-induced degradation. RNF34 also reduces the expression of the γ2 subunit when α1 and β3 subunits are co-assembled with γ2. This effect is partially reversed by leupeptin or MG132, indicating that both the lysosomal and proteasomal degradation pathways are involved. Immunofluorescence of cultured hippocampal neurons shows that RNF34 forms clusters and that a subset of these clusters is associated with GABAergic synapses. This association is also observed in the intact rat brain by electron microscopy immunocytochemistry. RNF34 is not expressed until the 2nd postnatal week of rat brain development, being highly expressed in some interneurons. Overexpression of RNF34 in hippocampal neurons decreases the density of γ2 GABAAR clusters and the number of GABAergic contacts that these neurons receive. Knocking down endogenous RNF34 with shRNA leads to increased γ2 GABAAR cluster density and GABAergic innervation. The results indicate that RNF34 regulates postsynaptic γ2-GABAAR clustering and GABAergic synaptic innervation by interacting with and ubiquitinating the γ2-GABAAR subunit promoting GABAAR degradation. PMID:25193658

  13. E3 Success Story - Accelerating Adoption of E3 Recommendations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The state of Michigan, along with numerous local and state partners, formed E3 Michigan in 2010. This partnership will allow for up to 10 E3 assessments in southeast Michigan and 10 E3 assessments in western Michigan.

  14. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A; Masuda, Claudio A; Jenkins, Brian V; Nelms, Keats A; Goodnow, Christopher C; Glynne, Richard J; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kay, Steve A

    2009-02-17

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19196968

  16. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-01-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53. PMID:21597459

  17. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-12-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53.

  18. Structure of a BMI-1-Ring1B Polycomb Group Ubiquitin Ligase Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Li,Z.; Cao, R.; Wang, M.; Myers, M.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins Bmi-1 and Ring1B are core subunits of the PRC1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of Hox gene expression, X-chromosome inactivation, tumorigenesis and stem cell self-renewal. The RING finger protein Ring1B is an E3 ligase that participates in the ubiquitination of lysine 119 of histone H2A, and the binding of Bmi-1 stimulates the E3 ligase activity. We have mapped the regions of Bmi-1 and Ring1B required for efficient ubiquitin transfer and determined a 2.5 Angstroms structure of the Bmi-1-Ring1B core domain complex. The structure reveals that Ring1B 'hugs' Bmi-1 through extensive RING domain contacts and its N-terminal tail wraps around Bmi-1. The two regions of interaction have a synergistic effect on the E3 ligase activity. Our analyses suggest a model where the Bmi-1-Ring1B complex stabilizes the interaction between the E2 enzyme and the nucleosomal substrate to allow efficient ubiquitin transfer.

  19. Current concepts: mallet finger.

    PubMed

    Alla, Sreenivasa R; Deal, Nicole D; Dempsey, Ian J

    2014-06-01

    Loss of the extensor mechanism at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint leads to mallet finger also known as baseball finger or drop finger. This can be secondary to tendon substance disruption or to a bony avulsion. Soft tissue mallet finger is the result of a rupture of the extensor tendon in Zone 1, and a bony mallet finger is the result of an avulsion of the extensor tendon from the distal phalanx with a small fragment of bone attached to the avulsed tendon. Mallet finger leads to an imbalance in the distribution of the extensor force between the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and DIP joints. If left untreated, mallet finger leads to a swan neck deformity from PIP joint hyper extension and DIP joint flexion. Most mallet finger injuries can be managed non-surgically, but occasionally surgery is recommended for either an acute or a chronic mallet finger or for salvage of failed prior treatment.

  20. Spatiotemporal Patterns of RING1 Expression after Rat Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanzhang; Ji, Wei; Gong, Peipei; Liu, Chun; Duan, Chengwei; Gao, Yilu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhu, Shunxing; Gong, Leilei

    2016-12-28

    Ring finger protein 1 (RING1) is a RING domain characterized protein belonging to the RING finger family. It is an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase that mediated monoubiquitination of histone H2A and the core component of PRC1 complex, which is the repressive multiprotein complex of Polycomb group (PcG). Previous studies showed the important tumorigenic role of RING1 via promoting cell proliferation and the crucial function in maintaining transcriptional program stability during development. However, its mechanism for spinal cord injury (SCI) is still unknown. In our research, we established an acute SCI model in adult rats and studied the expression and function profiles of RING1. RING1 protein level detected by western blot peaked at day 3 after trauma and then decreased gradually. Immunohistochemistry showed the increase of RING1 expression displayed in the white matter more obviously than in the gray matter. Furthermore, increased co-expression of RING1 and GFAP confirmed activated astrocytes in injured spinal cord via double immunofluorescence staining. Meanwhile, we also found the co-localization of PCNA, a famous marker of proliferative cells, with RING1 and GFAP, which indicated RING1 might play a role in astrocyte proliferation after SCI. In vitro studies, RING1 protein level in C6 cells increased after LPS challenge and RING1 was required for astrocyte proliferation and activation induced by LPS. In summary, we took a new insight into the function of RING1 in the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of SCI.

  1. Discrimination of Finger Area of Somatosensory Cortex by NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingdi; Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji

    We carried out a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to observe the hemodynamic responses associated with cortical activation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) by finger electrical stimulation. We examined whether NIRS can assist in investigating the somatotopic arrangement of fingers on the SI hand area. We found that although relatively low in spatial resolution, NIRS can to some extent help to discriminate the representations of thumb and ring finger on the SI hand area.

  2. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  3. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  4. High aromatic ring-cleavage diversity in birch rhizosphere: PAH treatment-specific changes of I.E.3 group extradiol dioxygenases and 16S rRNA bacterial communities in soil.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Timo P; Keskinen, Anna-Kaisa; Akerman, Marja-Leena; Fortelius, Carola; Haahtela, Kielo; Yrjälä, Kim

    2008-09-01

    Genes encoding key enzymes of catabolic pathways can be targeted by DNA fingerprinting to explore genetic degradation potential in pristine and polluted soils. We performed a greenhouse microcosm experiment to elucidate structural and functional bacterial diversity in polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-polluted soil and to test the suitability of birch (Betula pendula) for remediation. Degradation of PAHs was analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography, DNA isolated from soil amplified and fingerprinted by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Bacterial 16S rRNA T-RFLP fingerprinting revealed a high structural bacterial diversity in soil where PAH amendment altered the general community structure as well as the rhizosphere community. Birch augmented extradiol dioxygenase diversity in rhizosphere showing a rhizosphere effect, and further pyrene was more efficiently degraded in planted pots. Degraders of aromatic compounds upon PAH amendment were shown by the changed extradiol ring-cleavage community structure in soil. The RFLP analysis grouped extradiol dioxygenase marker genes into 17 distinct operational taxonomic units displaying novel phylogenetic clusters of ring-cleavage dioxygenases representing putative catabolic pathways, and the peptide sequences contained conserved amino-acid signatures of extradiol dioxygenases. A branch of major environmental TS cluster was identified as being related to Parvibaculum lavantivorans ring-cleavage dioxygenase. The described structural and functional diversity demonstrated a complex interplay of bacteria in PAH pollution. The findings improve our understanding of rhizoremediation and unveil the extent of uncharacterized enzymes and may benefit bioremediation research by facilitating the development of molecular tools to detect and monitor populations involved in degradative processes.

  5. An Arginine-rich Motif of Ring Finger Protein 4 (RNF4) Oversees the Recruitment and Degradation of the Phosphorylated and SUMOylated Krüppel-associated Box Domain-associated Protein 1 (KAP1)/TRIM28 Protein during Genotoxic Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Li, Xu; Kong, Xiang-Qian; Luo, Cheng; Chang, Che-Chang; Chung, Yiyin; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Li, Keqin Kathy; Ann, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-associated box domain-associated protein 1 (KAP1) is a universal transcriptional corepressor that undergoes multiple posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including SUMOylation and Ser-824 phosphorylation. However, the functional interplay of KAP1 PTMs in regulating KAP1 turnover during DNA damage response remains unclear. To decipher the role and cross-talk of multiple KAP1 PTMs, we show here that DNA double strand break-induced KAP1 Ser-824 phosphorylation promoted the recruitment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 4 (RNF4), and subsequent RNF4-mediated, SUMO-dependent degradation. Besides the SUMO interacting motif (SIM), a previously unrecognized, but evolutionarily conserved, arginine-rich motif (ARM) in RNF4 acts as a novel recognition motif for selective target recruitment. Results from combined mutagenesis and computational modeling studies suggest that RNF4 utilizes concerted bimodular recognition, namely SIM for Lys-676 SUMOylation and ARM for Ser(P)-824 of simultaneously phosphorylated and SUMOylated KAP1 (Ser(P)-824-SUMO-KAP1). Furthermore, we proved that arginines 73 and 74 within the ARM of RNF4 are required for efficient recruitment to KAP1 or accelerated degradation of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) under stress. In parallel, results of bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays validated the role of the ARM in recognizing Ser(P)-824 in living cells. Taken together, we establish that the ARM is required for RNF4 to efficiently target Ser(P)-824-SUMO-KAP1, conferring ubiquitin Lys-48-mediated proteasomal degradation in the context of double strand breaks. The conservation of such a motif may possibly explain the requirement for timely substrate selectivity determination among a myriad of SUMOylated proteins under stress conditions. Thus, the ARM dynamically regulates the SIM-dependent recruitment of targets to RNF4, which could be critical to dynamically fine-tune the

  6. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  7. 21 CFR 880.6200 - Ring cutter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES....6200 Ring cutter. (a) Identification. A ring cutter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to cut a ring on a patient's finger so that the ring can be removed. The device incorporates...

  8. MicroRNA‑128a, BMI1 polycomb ring finger oncogene, and reactive oxygen species inhibit the growth of U‑87 MG glioblastoma cells following exposure to X‑ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lan; Yu, Guanying; Wang, Cuihong; Du, Bin; Sun, Dianshui; Liu, Junli; Qi, Tonggang; Yu, Xiaoming; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of numerous types of malignant tumors, including glioma. However, radioresistance and anti‑apoptotic mechanisms decrease the efficacy of radiotherapy in many patients with glioma. BMI1 polycomb ring finger oncogene (Bmi‑1) is an oncogene associated with radioresistance in tumor cells. MicroRNA (miRNA)‑128a is a brain-specific miRNA, which suppresses Bmi‑1 expression. The present study investigated the effects of various radiation intensities on U‑87 MG glioma cells, as well as the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Bmi‑1, and miRNA‑128a in the cellular response to radiotherapy. The response of U‑87 MG cells following exposure to X‑ray radiation was assessed using a cell growth curve and inhibition ratio. Cell cycle distribution and the levels of intracellular ROS were evaluated by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression levels of Bmi‑1 and those of miRNA‑128a in U‑87 MG cells exposed to X‑ray radiation were evaluated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. X‑ray radiation did not decrease the number of U‑87 MG cells; however, it did inhibit cellular growth in a dose‑dependent manner. Following exposure to X‑ray radiation for 24 h, cell cycle distribution was altered, with an increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase. The mRNA expression levels of Bmi‑1 were downregulated in the 1 and 2 Gy groups, and upregulated in the 6 and 8 Gy groups. The expression levels of miRNA‑128a were upregulated in the 1 and 2 Gy groups, and downregulated in the 8 Gy group. The levels of ROS were increased following exposure to ≥2 Gy, and treatment with N-acetyl cysteine was able to induce radioresistance. These results suggested that U‑87 MG cells exhibited radioresistance. High doses of X‑ray radiation increased the expression levels of Bmi‑1, which may be associated with the evasion of cellular senescence. miRNA‑128a and its downstream

  9. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  10. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    PubMed Central

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  11. Skeletal muscle atrophy and the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Sue C; Baehr, Leslie M

    2014-09-15

    Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 were identified more than 10 years ago as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are increased transcriptionally in skeletal muscle under atrophy-inducing conditions, making them excellent markers of muscle atrophy. In the past 10 years much has been published about MuRF1 and MAFbx with respect to their mRNA expression patterns under atrophy-inducing conditions, their transcriptional regulation, and their putative substrates. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of both genes in the regulation of mass and other cellular functions in striated muscle. Although both MuRF1 and MAFbx are enriched in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle, this review will focus on the current understanding of MuRF1 and MAFbx in skeletal muscle, highlighting the critical questions that remain to be answered.

  12. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HOS1 is involved in ethylene regulation of leaf expansion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyounghee; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as flowering, senescence, abscission, and fruit ripening. In particular, leaf expansion is also controlled by ethylene in Arabidopsis. Exogenous treatment with ethylene inhibits leaf expansion, and consistently, ethylene insensitive mutants show increased leaf area. Here, we report that the RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES 1 (HOS1) regulates leaf expansion in an ethylene signaling pathway. The HOS1-deficient mutant showed reduced leaf area and was insensitive to ethylene perception inhibitor, silver thiosulfate (STS). Accordingly, genes encoding ethylene signaling components were significantly up-regulated in hos1-3. This study demonstrates that the HOS1 protein is involved in ethylene signal transduction for the proper regulation of leaf expansion possibly under environmentally stressful conditions.

  13. Typing keystroke duration changed after submaximal isometric finger exercises.

    PubMed

    Joe Chang, Che-Hsu; Johnson, Peter W; Katz, Jeffrey N; Eisen, Ellen A; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2009-01-01

    A repeated-measures laboratory experiment tested whether keystroke duration during touch-typing changes after a finger performs submaximal isometric flexion exercises. Fourteen right-handed touch-typists used right ring finger to perform three 15-min exercise conditions, two isometric exercises and a no-force condition, each on a separate day. Before and after each exercise condition, typing keystroke duration and isometric force elicited by electrical stimulation were measured for right ring finger. Keystroke duration of right ring finger decreased by 5% (6 ms, P < 0.05) immediately after the exercises but not after the no-force condition. Peak isometric finger force elicited by electrical stimulation decreased by 17-26% (P < 0.05) for the flexor digitorum superficialis and decreased by 4-8% for the extensor digitorum communis after the isometric exercises. After the finger was exposed to isometric exercises, changes in typing keystroke duration coincided with changes in the physiological state of the finger flexor and extensor muscles.

  14. Transfer of tactile perceptual learning to untrained neighboring fingers reflects natural use relationships.

    PubMed

    Dempsey-Jones, Harriet; Harrar, Vanessa; Oliver, Jonathan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Spence, Charles; Makin, Tamar R

    2016-03-01

    Tactile learning transfers from trained to untrained fingers in a pattern that reflects overlap between the representations of fingers in the somatosensory system (e.g., neurons with multifinger receptive fields). While physical proximity on the body is known to determine the topography of somatosensory representations, tactile coactivation is also an established organizing principle of somatosensory topography. In this study we investigated whether tactile coactivation, induced by habitual inter-finger cooperative use (use pattern), shapes inter-finger overlap. To this end, we used psychophysics to compare the transfer of tactile learning from the middle finger to its adjacent fingers. This allowed us to compare transfer to two fingers that are both physically and cortically adjacent to the middle finger but have differing use patterns. Specifically, the middle finger is used more frequently with the ring than with the index finger. We predicted this should lead to greater representational overlap between the former than the latter pair. Furthermore, this difference in overlap should be reflected in differential learning transfer from the middle to index vs. ring fingers. Subsequently, we predicted temporary learning-related changes in the middle finger's representation (e.g., cortical magnification) would cause transient interference in perceptual thresholds of the ring, but not the index, finger. Supporting this, longitudinal analysis revealed a divergence where learning transfer was fast to the index finger but relatively delayed to the ring finger. Our results support the theory that tactile coactivation patterns between digits affect their topographic relationships. Our findings emphasize how action shapes perception and somatosensory organization.

  15. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  16. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  17. Development of cylindrical-type finger force measuring system using force sensors and its characteristics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Min; Yoon, Joungwon; Shin, Hee-Suk; Kim, Gab-Soon

    2012-02-01

    Some patients cannot use their hands because of the paralysis of their fingers. Their fingers can recover with rehabilitative training, and the extent of rehabilitation can be judged by grasping a cylindrical-object with their fingers. At present, the cylindrical-object used in hospitals is only a plastic cylinder, which cannot measure grasping force of the fingers. Therefore, doctors must judge the extent of rehabilitation by watching patients' fingers as they grasp the plastic cylinder. In this paper, the development of two cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems with four force sensors for left hand and right hand were developed. The developed finger force measuring system can measure the grasping force of patients' each finger (forefinger, middle finger, ring finger and little finger), and the measured results could be used to judge the rehabilitation extent of a finger patient. The grasping force tests of men and women were performed using the developed cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems. The tests confirm that the average finger forces of right hand and left hand for men were about 194 N and 179 N, and for women, 108 N and 95 N.

  18. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients.

  19. E3 Sustainable Manufacturing Curriculum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A short E3 course containing three modules on Environmental Sustainability; Lean Manufacturing and Pollution Prevention; and Energy and Carbon. Each module includes slides, a facilitator's guide with handouts, activities, quizzes, and facilitator's notes.

  20. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    PubMed

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  1. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... textures. No longer are baby purees and mushy cereals the only things on the menu. By the ... ll still be helping out by spoon-feeding cereal and other important dietary elements. Encouraging finger feeding ...

  2. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  3. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ...

  4. Response to reflected-force feedback to fingers in teleoperations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, P. H.; Iatridis, J. C.; Thakor, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    Reflected-force feedback is an important aspect of teleoperations. The objective is to determine the ability of the human operator to respond to that force. Telerobotics operation is simulated by computer control of a motor-driven device with capabilities for programmable force feedback and force measurement. A computer-controlled motor drive is developed that provides forces against the fingers as well as (angular) position control. A load cell moves in a circular arc as it is pushed by a finger and measures reaction forces on the finger. The force exerted by the finger on the load cell and the angular position are digitized and recorded as a function of time by the computer. Flexure forces of the index, long and ring fingers of the human hand in opposition to the motor driven load cell are investigated. Results of the following experiments are presented: (1) Exertion of maximum finger force as a function of angle; (2) Exertion of target finger force against a computer controlled force; and (3) Test of the ability to move to a target force against a force that is a function of position. Averaged over ten individuals, the maximum force that could be exerted by the index or long finger is about 50 Newtons, while that of the ring finger is about 40 Newtons. From the tests of the ability of a subject to exert a target force, it was concluded that reflected-force feedback can be achieved with the direct kinesthetic perception of force without the use of tactile or visual clues.

  5. Heterologous expression of the gourd E3 ubiquitin ligase gene LsRZF1 compromises the drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Hee; Ju, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Chung, Jung-Sung; Cho, Baik-Ho; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2014-04-01

    Protein ubiquitination is one of the major regulatory processes used by eukaryotic cells. The ubiquitin E3 ligase acts as a main determinant of substrate specificity. However, the precise roles of E3 ligase in plants to drought stress are poorly understood. In this study, a gourd family (Lagenaria siceraria) ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) gene, designated LsRZF1, was identified and characterized. LsRZF1 was reduced by abscisic acid (ABA), osmotic stress, and drought conditions. Compared to wild type, transgenic Arabidopsis plants ectopic expressing LsRZF1 were hypersensitive to ABA and osmotic stress during early seedling development, indicating that LsRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the LsRZF1 gene was very influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. Furthermore, ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and genetic data indicate that AtRZF1 and LsRZF1 function in similar pathway to control proline metabolism in Arabidopsis under drought condition. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase LsRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development.

  6. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  7. Rines E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates MAO-A levels and emotional responses.

    PubMed

    Kabayama, Miyuki; Sakoori, Kazuto; Yamada, Kazuyuki; Ornthanalai, Veravej G; Ota, Maya; Morimura, Naoko; Katayama, Kei-ichi; Murphy, Niall P; Aruga, Jun

    2013-08-07

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), the catabolic enzyme of norepinephrine and serotonin, plays a critical role in emotional and social behavior. However, the control and impact of endogenous MAO-A levels in the brain remains unknown. Here we show that the RING finger-type E3 ubiquitin ligase Rines/RNF180 regulates brain MAO-A subset, monoamine levels, and emotional behavior. Rines interacted with MAO-A and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation. Rines knock-out mice displayed impaired stress responses, enhanced anxiety, and affiliative behavior. Norepinephrine and serotonin levels were altered in the locus ceruleus, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala in either stressed or resting conditions, and MAO-A enzymatic activity was enhanced in the locus ceruleus in Rines knock-out mice. Treatment of Rines knock-out mice with MAO inhibitors showed genotype-specific effects on some of the abnormal affective behaviors. These results indicated that the control of emotional behavior by Rines is partly due to the regulation of MAO-A levels. These findings verify that Rines is a critical regulator of the monoaminergic system and emotional behavior and identify a promising candidate drug target for treating diseases associated with emotion.

  8. Psh1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets the centromeric histone variant Cse4

    PubMed Central

    Hewawasam, Geetha; Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Mattingly, Mark; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Martin-Brown, Skylar; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Cse4 is a variant of histone H3 that is incorporated into a single nucleosome at each centromere in budding yeast. We have discovered an E3 ubiquitin ligase, called Psh1, which controls the cellular level of Cse4 via ubiquitylation and proteolysis. The activity of Psh1 is dependent on both its RING and Zinc finger domains. We demonstrate the specificity of the ubiquitylation activity of Psh1 toward Cse4 in vitro and map the sites of ubiquitylation. Mutation of key lysines prevents ubiquitylation of Cse4 by Psh1 in vitro and stabilizes Cse4 in vivo. While deletion of Psh1 stabilizes Cse4, elimination of the Cse4-specific chaperone Scm3 destabilizes Cse4 and the addition of Scm3 to the Psh1-Cse4 ubiquitylation reaction prevents Cse4 ubiquitylation, together suggesting Scm3 may protect Cse4 from ubiquitylation. Without Psh1, Cse4 overexpression is toxic and Cse4 is found at ectopic locations. Our results suggest Psh1 functions to prevent the mislocalization of Cse4. PMID:21070970

  9. Radiographic assessment of the relative lengths of the bones of the fingers of the human hand.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R; Dunsmuir, R A

    2002-12-01

    The study assessed whether a relationship existed between the lengths of the phalanges of the fingers of the hand. The centres of rotation of the joints in each finger were determined by dissection of cadaveric hands. Using these data, the distances between the joint centres was determined on anteroposterior hand X-rays taken for clinical purposes. The study has shown that, for all the fingers, there is a ratio of 1 for the distance between the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint and the distance between the proximal interphalangeal joint and the finger tip. The ratio for the distances between the interphalangeal joints and the distal joint and the tip approximates to 1.3 for the index, middle and ring fingers and to 1.0 for the little finger. No evidence was found to support Littler's hypothesis that the interarticular distances of the finger follow the Fibonacci sequence.

  10. The role of E3 ubiquitin-ligases MuRF-1 and MAFbx in loss of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Rom, Oren; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2016-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the main regulatory mechanism of protein degradation in skeletal muscle. The ubiquitin-ligase enzymes (E3s) have a central role in determining the selectivity and specificity of the UPS. Since their identification in 2001, the muscle specific E3s, muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), have been shown to be implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle atrophy in various pathological and physiological conditions. This review aims to explore the involvement of MuRF-1 and MAFbx in catabolism of skeletal muscle during various pathologies, such as cancer cachexia, sarcopenia of aging, chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, the effects of various lifestyle and modifiable factors (e.g. nutrition, exercise, cigarette smoking, and alcohol) on MuRF-1 and MAFbx regulation will be discussed. Finally, evidence of potential strategies to protect against skeletal muscle wasting through inhibition of MuRF-1 and MAFbx expression will be explored.

  11. E3 ubiquitin ligase RFWD2 controls lung branching through protein-level regulation of ETV transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Herriges, John C.; Zhang, Zhen; Young, Randee E.; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Sun, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian lung is an elaborate branching organ, and it forms following a highly stereotypical morphogenesis program. It is well established that precise control at the transcript level is a key genetic underpinning of lung branching. In comparison, little is known about how regulation at the protein level may play a role. Ring finger and WD domain 2 (RFWD2, also termed COP1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that modifies specific target proteins, priming their degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system. RFWD2 is known to function in the adult in pathogenic processes such as tumorigenesis. Here, we show that prenatal inactivation of Rfwd2 gene in the lung epithelium led to a striking halt in branching morphogenesis shortly after secondary branch formation. This defect is accompanied by distalization of the lung epithelium while growth and cellular differentiation still occurred. In the mutant lung, two E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors essential for normal lung branching, ETS translocation variant 4 (ETV4) and ETV5, were up-regulated at the protein level, but not at the transcript level. Introduction of Etv loss-of-function alleles into the Rfwd2 mutant background attenuated the branching phenotype, suggesting that RFWD2 functions, at least in part, through degrading ETV proteins. Because a number of E3 ligases are known to target factors important for lung development, our findings provide a preview of protein-level regulatory network essential for lung branching morphogenesis. PMID:27335464

  12. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  13. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  14. Cullin RING Ligases: Glommed by Glomulin

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Stringer, Daniel K.; Weissman, Allan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cullin ring ligases (CRLs) constitute the largest group of RING finger ubiquitin ligases. Two recent studies in Molecular Cell describe glomulin as a CRL1 inhibitor that blocks interactions with its ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) (Duda et al., 2012; Tron et al., 2012). These findings and their significance are discussed. PMID:22883621

  15. Finger-specific loss of independent control of movements in musicians with focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Furuya, S; Altenmüller, E

    2013-09-05

    The loss of independent control of finger movements impairs the dexterous use of the hand. Focal hand dystonia is characterised by abnormal structural and functional changes at the cortical and subcortical regions responsible for individuated finger movements and by the loss of surround inhibition in the finger muscles. However, little is known about the pathophysiological impact of focal dystonia on the independent control of finger movements. Here we addressed this issue by asking pianists with and without focal dystonia to repetitively strike a piano key with one of the four fingers as fast as possible while the remaining digits kept the adjacent keys depressed. Using principal component analysis and cluster analysis to the derived keystroke data, we successfully classified pianists according to the presence or absence of dystonic symptoms with classification rates and cross-validation scores of approximately 90%. This confirmed the effects of focal dystonia on the individuated finger movements. Interestingly, the movement features that contributed to successful classification differed across fingers. Compared to healthy pianists, pianists with an affected index finger were characterised predominantly by stronger keystrokes, whereas pianists with affected middle or ring fingers exhibited abnormal temporal control of the keystrokes, such as slowness and rhythmic inconsistency. The selective alternation of the movement features indicates a finger-specific loss of the independent control of finger movements in focal dystonia of musicians.

  16. Hemangioma of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Kodachi, K; Kojima, T; Shimbashi, T; Furusato, M

    1990-01-01

    Fingers often suffer trauma and the clinician is continuously faced with the difficult task of clarifying the distinction between a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion. This study was undertaken to examine ten cases in which a small skin mass located on a finger had been diagnosed preoperatively as hemangioma. Our results showed that seven masses were confirmed pathologically as hemangioma (five cavernous hemangiomas and two capillary hemangiomas), two as traumatic thrombosis and one varix. The clinical manifestations of the two cases of traumatic thrombosis were related to those of hemangioma. In the varix, endothelial proliferation was observed in the area of the thrombosis. This phenomenon is called "intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia", and can confuse the differential diagnosis between a vascular neoplasm and a traumatic thrombosis. Our findings demonstrate that since the traumatic lesions were firmer than the hemangiomas, hardness on physical examination may be a helpful indicator in the differential diagnosis of a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion.

  17. Pepper CaREL1, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, regulates drought tolerance via the ABA-signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Park, Chanmi; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Joo, Hyunhee; Hong, Eunji; Lee, Sung Chul

    2017-03-28

    Drought stress conditions in soil or air hinder plant growth and development. Here, we report that the hot pepper (C apsicum a nnuum) RING type E3 Ligase 1 gene (CaREL1) is essential to the drought stress response. CaREL1 encodes a cytoplasmic- and nuclear-localized protein with E3 ligase activity. CaREL1 expression was induced by abscisic acid (ABA) and drought. CaREL1 contains a C3H2C3-type RING finger motif, which functions in ubiquitination of the target protein. We used CaREL1-silenced pepper plants and CaREL1-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to evaluate the in vivo function of CaREL1 in response to drought stress and ABA treatment. CaREL1-silenced pepper plants displayed a drought-tolerant phenotype characterized by ABA hypersensitivity. In contrast, CaREL1-OX plants exhibited ABA hyposensitivity during the germination, seedling, and adult stages. In addition, plant growth was severely impaired under drought stress conditions, via a high level of transpirational water loss and decreased stomatal closure. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that ABA-related drought stress responsive genes were more weakly expressed in CaREL1-OX plants than in wild-type plants, indicating that CaREL1 functions in the drought stress response via the ABA-signalling pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that CaREL1 functions as a negative regulator of ABA-mediated drought stress tolerance.

  18. Lengths, girths, and diameters of children's fingers from 3 to 10 years of age.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Burkhart, K J; Rommens, P M; Prommersberger, K J; Konerding, M A

    2010-05-20

    We obtained data on the lengths, girths, and diameters of the fingers of children from 3 to 10 years of age. A total of 160 children (78 girls, 82 boys) were examined in a cross-sectional investigation. The length of each finger of the right hand of every child was measured, as were the girths of the proximal, middle, and distal phalanges, and of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joint. The average length of the thumb was 49 (35-65) mm. The index and ring fingers both averaged 69 (index, 50-88; ring, 42-96) mm in length, while the middle and little fingers averaged 72 (57-100) and 56 (40-74) mm, respectively. Average diameter, calculated from the girth measurement, was 16 (11-22) mm for the thumb, 15 mm for both the index (9-22) and middle (10-21) fingers, 14 (10-20) and 13 (8-19) mm for the ring and little fingers, respectively. The average length of each finger increased by 37% from 3 to 10 years of age, average girth by 24%, and diameter increased by 20%. We observed no differences in length, girth, and diameter between the sexes. The dimensions of children's fingers are relevant to injuries from automatic, power-operated window lifters of motor vehicles because risk of injury to a finger jammed between an ascending window and the seal entry depends upon the diameter of the finger. Additionally, short fingers of young children can be jammed over almost their entire length in the oblique design of a car window seal entry.

  19. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  20. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  1. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  2. Finger Injuries in Ball Sports.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Pham, Dang T; Staines, Kimberly Goldie

    2017-02-01

    Finger injuries are common in athletes playing in professional ball sports. Understanding the intricate anatomy of the digit is necessary to properly diagnose and manage finger injuries. Unrecognized or poorly managed finger injuries can lead to chronic deformities that can affect an athlete's performance. Multiple factors and treatment options should be considered to provide the best functional outcome and rapid return to play for an athlete. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play recommendations for common finger injuries in ball sports.

  3. Differences in finger localisation performance of patients with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Kessels, Roy P C; de Haan, Edward H F; Kappelle, L Jaap; Leijten, Frans S; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2008-09-17

    Several neuropsychological studies have suggested parallel processing of somatosensory input when localising a tactile stimulus on one's own by pointing towards it (body schema) and when localising this touched location by pointing to it on a map of a hand (body image). Usually these reports describe patients with impaired detection, but intact sensorimotor localisation. This study examined three patients with a lesion of the angular gyrus with intact somatosensory processing, but with selectively disturbed finger identification (finger agnosia). These patients performed normally when pointing towards the touched finger on their own hand but failed to indicate this finger on a drawing of a hand or to name it. Similar defects in the perception of other body parts were not observed. The findings provide converging evidence for the dissociation between body image and body schema and, more importantly, reveal for the first time that this distinction is also present in higher-order cognitive processes selectively for the fingers.

  4. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  5. The relationship of the number of Meissner's corpuscles to dermatoglyphic characters and finger size

    PubMed Central

    DILLON, YVONNE K.; HAYNES, JULIE; HENNEBERG, MACIEJ

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between the density of Meissner's corpuscles and the dermatoglyphic characteristics of human fingers. Dermatoglyphic prints and tissue samples were collected from the index (II) and ring (IV) fingers of 28 cadavers from the Medical School, University of Adelaide. Pattern types, pattern intensity, total ridge count and ridge breadth, were determined for each sample and the density of Meissner's corpuscles established by recording the mean number of Meissner's corpuscles underlying a 10 mm long line on the skin surface. No relationship was found between the density of Meissner's corpuscles and pattern type, pattern intensity or total ridge count. Negative correlations were found for the density of Meissner's corpuscles with both ridge width and size of fingers. Males were found to have significantly larger fingers, larger ridge breadth, and a lower density of Meissner's corpuscles per 10 mm compared with females. However, there was no difference between the total number of Meissner's corpuscles per finger in males and females. No significant differences were found in either the density of Meissner's corpuscles between antimeres or between the index and ring fingers. These results suggest that for both the left and right hand in males and females, there is a similar number of Meissner's corpuscles for both the index and ring fingers. PMID:11760888

  6. Skilled Finger Movements in Typing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Donald R.

    Six skilled typists were studied while they transcribed English text. The typists showed stable patterns of performance, but with significant individual differences among themselves. Inter-keypress latencies for two-finger digraphs (typed by two fingers on the same hand) were particularly variable among typists. Two typists showed large…

  7. Gert Finger Becomes Emeritus Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Lucuix, C.; Péron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Gert Finger has retired after almost 33 years service and he has been made the first Emeritus Physicist at ESO. An appreciation of some of his many achievements in the development of infrared instrumentation and detector controllers is given. A retirement party for Gert Finger was held in February 2016.

  8. Optimal three finger grasps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, J.; Lafferriere, G.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of optimal force distribution among three point fingers holding a planar object. A scheme that reduces the nonlinear optimization problem to an easily solved generalized eigenvalue problem is proposed. This scheme generalizes and simplifies results of Ji and Roth (1988). The generalizations include all possible geometric arrangements and extensions to three dimensions and to the case of variable coefficients of friction. For the two-dimensional case with constant coefficients of friction, it is proved that, except for some special cases, the optimal grasping forces (in the sense of minimizing the dependence on friction) are those for which the angles with the corresponding normals are all equal (in absolute value).

  9. E3 ubiquitin ligase Pirh2 enhances tumorigenic properties of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Olga; Shuvalov, Oleg; Merkulov, Valeriy; Vasileva, Elena; Antonov, Alexey; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2016-01-01

    The product of RCHY1 human gene, Pirh2, is a RING-finger containing E3 ligase that modifies p53 with ubiquitin residues resulting in its subsequent degradation in proteasomes. Transcription of RCHY1 is regulated by p53 itself thus forming a negative regulatory feedback loop. Functionally, by eliminating p53, Pirh2 facilitates tumorigenesis. However, the role of Pirh2 in cancer cells lacking p53 is yet not well understood. Therefore, we decided to elucidate the role of Pirh2 in p53-negative human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells, H1299. We found that ectopic expression of Pirh2 enhanced cell proliferation, resistance to doxorubicin, and increased migration potential. Ablation of Pirh2 by specific shRNA reversed these phenotypes. Mechanistically, Pirh2 increased mRNA and protein levels of the c-Myc oncogene. The bioinformatics data indicate that co-expression of both c-Myc and Pirh2 strongly correlated with poor survival of lung cancer patients. Collectively, our results suggest that Pirh2 can be considered as a potential pharmacological target for developing anticancer therapies to treat p53-negative cancers. PMID:28191284

  10. Ubiquitylation of Rad51d Mediated by E3 Ligase Rnf138 Promotes the Homologous Recombination Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deqiang; Liang, Junbo; Lu, Yalan; Xu, Longchang; Miao, Shiying; Lu, Lin-Yu; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation has an important role as a signal transducer that regulates protein function, subcellular localization, or stability during the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Ring domain E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF138 is recruited to DNA damage site quickly. And the recruitment is mediated through its Zinc finger domains. We further confirm that RNF138 is phosphorylated by ATM at Ser124. However, the phosphorylation was dispensable for recruitment to the DNA damage site. Our findings also indicate that RAD51 assembly at DSB sites following irradiation is dramatically affected in RNF138-deficient cells. Hence, RNF138 is likely involved in regulating homologous recombination repair pathway. Consistently, efficiency of homologous recombination decreased observably in RNF138-depleted cells. In addition, RNF138-deficient cell is hypersensitive to DNA damage insults, such as IR and MMS. And the comet assay confirmed that RNF138 directly participated in DNA damage repair. Moreover, we find that RAD51D directly interacted with RNF138. And the recruitment of RAD51D to DNA damage site is delayed and unstable in RNF138-depleted cells. Taken together, these results suggest that RNF138 promotes the homologous recombination repair pathway. PMID:27195665

  11. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  12. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  13. Replantation (Finger, Hand, or Arm)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin ... A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ...

  14. It takes two to tango: the structure and function of LIM, RING, PHD and MYND domains.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J M; Bhati, M; Lehtomaki, E; Mansfield, R E; Cubeddu, L; Mackay, J P

    2009-01-01

    LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3), RING (Really interesting new gene), PHD (Plant homology domain) and MYND (myeloid, Nervy, DEAF-1) domains are all zinc-binding domains that ligate two zinc ions. Unlike the better known classical zinc fingers, these domains do not bind DNA, but instead mediate interactions with other proteins. LIM-domain containing proteins have diverse functions as regulators of gene expression, cell adhesion and motility and signal transduction. RING finger proteins are generally associated with ubiquitination; the presence of such a domain is the defining feature of a class of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases. PHD proteins have been associated with SUMOylation but most recently have emerged as a chromatin recognition motif that reads the methylation state of histones. The function of the MYND domain is less clear, but MYND domains are also found in proteins that have ubiquitin ligase and/or histone methyltransferase activity. Here we review the structure-function relationships for these domains and discuss strategies to modulate their activity.

  15. Neural correlates of finger gnosis.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Tamè, Luigi; Furlan, Michele; Haggard, Patrick; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Adriani, Michela; Ferrari, Paolo; Braun, Christoph; Schwarzbach, Jens

    2014-07-02

    Neuropsychological studies have described patients with a selective impairment of finger identification in association with posterior parietal lesions. However, evidence of the role of these areas in finger gnosis from studies of the healthy human brain is still scarce. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the brain network engaged in a novel finger gnosis task, the intermanual in-between task (IIBT), in healthy participants. Several brain regions exhibited a stronger blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in IIBT than in a control task that did not explicitly rely on finger gnosis but used identical stimuli and motor responses as the IIBT. The IIBT involved stronger signal in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), bilateral precuneus (PCN), bilateral premotor cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. In all regions, stimulation of nonhomologous fingers of the two hands elicited higher BOLD signal than stimulation of homologous fingers. Only in the left anteromedial IPL (a-mIPL) and left PCN did signal strength decrease parametrically from nonhomology, through partial homology, to total homology with stimulation delivered synchronously to the two hands. With asynchronous stimulation, the signal was stronger in the left a-mIPL than in any other region, possibly indicating retention of task-relevant information. We suggest that the left PCN may contribute a supporting visuospatial representation via its functional connection to the right PCN. The a-mIPL may instead provide the core substrate of an explicit bilateral body structure representation for the fingers that when disrupted can produce the typical symptoms of finger agnosia.

  16. Multimodal biometric authentication based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Jun; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new multimodal biometric recognition based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry. This research shows three novelties compared to previous works. First, this is the first approach to combine the finger vein and finger geometry information at the same time. Second, the proposed method includes a new finger geometry recognition based on the sequential deviation values of finger thickness extracted from a single finger. Third, we integrate finger vein and finger geometry by a score-level fusion method based on a support vector machine. Results show that recognition accuracy is significantly enhanced using the proposed method.

  17. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  18. Losing dexterity: patterns of impaired coordination of finger movements in musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Tominaga, Kenta; Miyazaki, Fumio; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training can bring about highly-skilled action, but may also impair motor dexterity by producing involuntary movements and muscular cramping, as seen in focal dystonia (FD) and tremor. To elucidate the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms of FD, the present study addressed the organization of finger movements during piano performance in pianists suffering from the condition. Principal component (PC) analysis identified three patterns of fundamental joint coordination constituting finger movements in both patients and controls. The first two coordination patterns described less individuated movements between the “dystonic” finger and key-striking fingers for patients compared to controls. The third coordination pattern, representing the individuation of movements between the middle and ring fingers, was evident during a sequence of strikes with these fingers in controls, which was absent in the patients. Consequently, rhythmic variability of keystrokes was more pronounced during this sequence of strikes for the patients. A stepwise multiple-regression analysis further identified greater variability of keystrokes for individuals displaying less individuated movements between the affected and striking fingers. The findings suggest that FD alters dexterous joint coordination so as to lower independent control of finger movements, and thereby degrades fine motor control. PMID:26289433

  19. Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps (UBAITs) identify E3 ligase binding partners.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Hazel F; Lyon, Nancy; Leung, Justin W; Agarwal, Poonam; Swaim, Caleb D; Miller, Kyle M; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new class of reagents for identifying substrates, adaptors, and regulators of HECT and RING E3s. UBAITs (Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps) are E3-ubiquitin fusion proteins and, in an E1- and E2-dependent manner, the C-terminal ubiquitin moiety forms an amide linkage to proteins that interact with the E3, enabling covalent co-purification of the E3 with partner proteins. We designed UBAITs for both HECT (Rsp5, Itch) and RING (Psh1, RNF126, RNF168) E3s. For HECT E3s, trapping of interacting proteins occurred in vitro either through an E3 thioester-linked lariat intermediate or through an E2 thioester intermediate, and both WT and active-site mutant UBAITs trapped known interacting proteins in yeast and human cells. Yeast Psh1 and human RNF126 and RNF168 UBAITs also trapped known interacting proteins when expressed in cells. Human RNF168 is a key mediator of ubiquitin signaling that promotes DNA double-strand break repair. Using the RNF168 UBAIT, we identify H2AZ--a histone protein involved in DNA repair--as a new target of this E3 ligase. These results demonstrate that UBAITs represent powerful tools for profiling a wide range of ubiquitin ligases.

  20. TRIM25 Enhances the Antiviral Action of Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein (ZAP)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Zerlina; Cheung, Pamela; Schneider, William M.; Bozzacco, Leonia; Buehler, Eugen; Takaoka, Akinori; Rice, Charles M.; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2017-01-01

    The host factor and interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) product, zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP), inhibits a number of diverse viruses by usurping and intersecting with multiple cellular pathways. To elucidate its antiviral mechanism, we perform a loss-of-function genome-wide RNAi screen to identify cellular cofactors required for ZAP antiviral activity against the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV). In order to exclude off-target effects, we carry out stringent confirmatory assays to verify the top hits. Important ZAP-liaising partners identified include proteins involved in membrane ion permeability, type I IFN signaling, and post-translational protein modification. The factor contributing most to the antiviral function of ZAP is TRIM25, an E3 ubiquitin and ISG15 ligase. We demonstrate here that TRIM25 interacts with ZAP through the SPRY domain, and TRIM25 mutants lacking the RING or coiled coil domain fail to stimulate ZAP’s antiviral activity, suggesting that both TRIM25 ligase activity and its ability to form oligomers are critical for its cofactor function. TRIM25 increases the modification of both the short and long ZAP isoforms by K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin, although ubiquitination of ZAP does not directly affect its antiviral activity. However, TRIM25 is critical for ZAP’s ability to inhibit translation of the incoming SINV genome. Taken together, these data uncover TRIM25 as a bona fide ZAP cofactor that leads to increased ZAP modification enhancing its translational inhibition activity. PMID:28060952

  1. Individual finger control of a modular prosthetic limb using high-density electrocorticography in a human subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotson, Guy; McMullen, David P.; Fifer, Matthew S.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Katyal, Kapil D.; Para, Matthew P.; Armiger, Robert; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Wester, Brock A.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. We used native sensorimotor representations of fingers in a brain-machine interface (BMI) to achieve immediate online control of individual prosthetic fingers. Approach. Using high gamma responses recorded with a high-density electrocorticography (ECoG) array, we rapidly mapped the functional anatomy of cued finger movements. We used these cortical maps to select ECoG electrodes for a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis classification scheme to predict: (1) if any finger was moving, and, if so, (2) which digit was moving. To account for sensory feedback, we also mapped the spatiotemporal activation elicited by vibrotactile stimulation. Finally, we used this prediction framework to provide immediate online control over individual fingers of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory modular prosthetic limb. Main results. The balanced classification accuracy for detection of movements during the online control session was 92% (chance: 50%). At the onset of movement, finger classification was 76% (chance: 20%), and 88% (chance: 25%) if the pinky and ring finger movements were coupled. Balanced accuracy of fully flexing the cued finger was 64%, and 77% had we combined pinky and ring commands. Offline decoding yielded a peak finger decoding accuracy of 96.5% (chance: 20%) when using an optimized selection of electrodes. Offline analysis demonstrated significant finger-specific activations throughout sensorimotor cortex. Activations either prior to movement onset or during sensory feedback led to discriminable finger control. Significance. Our results demonstrate the ability of ECoG-based BMIs to leverage the native functional anatomy of sensorimotor cortical populations to immediately control individual finger movements in real time.

  2. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  3. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  4. Cullin E3 Ligases and Their Rewiring by Viral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal; Krogan, Nevan J.; Craik, Charles S.; Pick, Elah

    2014-01-01

    The ability of viruses to subvert host pathways is central in disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, a critical role for the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) in counteracting host immune factors during viral infection has emerged. This counteraction is commonly achieved by the expression of viral proteins capable of sequestering host ubiquitin E3 ligases and their regulators. In particular, many viruses hijack members of the Cullin-RING E3 Ligase (CRL) family. Viruses interact in many ways with CRLs in order to impact their ligase activity; one key recurring interaction involves re-directing CRL complexes to degrade host targets that are otherwise not degraded within host cells. Removal of host immune factors by this mechanism creates a more amenable cellular environment for viral propagation. To date, a small number of target host factors have been identified, many of which are degraded via a CRL-proteasome pathway. Substantial effort within the field is ongoing to uncover the identities of further host proteins targeted in this fashion and the underlying mechanisms driving their turnover by the UPS. Elucidation of these targets and mechanisms will provide appealing anti-viral therapeutic opportunities. This review is focused on the many methods used by viruses to perturb host CRLs, focusing on substrate sequestration and viral regulation of E3 activity. PMID:25314029

  5. E3: Economy, Energy and Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    E3 is a technical assistance framework helping communities, manufacturers, and manufacturing supply chains adapt and thrive in today's green economy. Find information on pollution prevention, sustainable business practices, and energy efficiency.

  6. E3 Financing How-to Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Financing How-to-Guide is intended to help manufacturers and their communities navigate financing and investment opportunities. While this guide provides an overview, there is no one-way to pay for E3 activities or attract investment.

  7. SAG/ROC-SCF beta-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes pro-caspase-3 degradation as a mechanism of apoptosis protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingjia; Gallegos, Jayme R; Gu, Qingyang; Huang, Yuanhui; Li, Jun; Jin, Yetao; Lu, Hua; Sun, Yi

    2006-12-01

    Skp1-cullin-F-box protein (SCF) is a multicomponent E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that ubiquitinates a number of important biologic molecules such as p27, beta-catenin, and IkappaB for proteasomal degradation, thus regulating cell proliferation and survival. One SCF component, SAG/ROC2/Rbx2/Hrt2, a RING finger protein, was first identified as a redox-inducible protein, which, when overexpressed, inhibited apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. We report here that sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), as well as its family member ROC1/Rbx1, bound to the proinactive form of caspase-3 (pro-caspase-3). Binding was likely mediated through F-box protein, beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP), which binds to the first 38 amino acids of pro-caspase-3. Importantly, beta-TrCP1 expression significantly shortened the protein half-life of pro-caspase-3, whereas expression of a dominant-negative beta-TrCP1 mutant with the F-box domain deleted extended it. An in vitro ubiquitination assay showed that SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) promoted ubiquitination of pro-caspase-3. Furthermore, endogenous levels of pro-caspase-3 were decreased by overexpression of SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) E3 Ub ligases, but increased on siRNA silencing of SAG, regulator of cullin-1 (ROC1), or beta-TrCPs, leading to increased apoptosis by etoposide and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand through increased activation of caspase-3. Thus, pro-caspase-3 appears to be a substrate of SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) E3 Ub ligase, which protects cells from apoptosis through increased apoptosis threshold by reducing the basal level of pro-caspase-3.

  8. Muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases are involved in muscle atrophy of cancer cachexia: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Han, Jun; Meng, Qingyang; Xi, Qiulei; Zhuang, Qiulin; Jiang, Yi; Han, Yusong; Zhang, Bo; Fang, Jing; Wu, Guohao

    2015-05-01

    Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 and muscle ring-finger-1 (MuRF-1) have been identified as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle during muscle atrophy. However, the role of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases during the process of muscle atrophy of cancer cachexia remains largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 in the skeletal muscle of patients with malignant and benign disease. The possible mechanisms were studied both in a colon 26-induced cancer cachexia mouse model and in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced atrophy C2C12 cells. Our results demonstrated that atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 tended to be increased in the skeletal muscle of patients with malignant disease even before weight loss. Non-tumor body weights and gastrocnemius weights were significantly decreased while expression levels of ubiquitin proteasome pathway associated genes (atrogin-1, MuRF-1, ubiquitin and E2-14K) were upregulated in cancer cachexia mice. Significant myotube atrophy with atrogin-1 overexpression was observed in the C2C12 cells treated with TNF-α. Meanwhile, knockdown of atrogin-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) protected C2C12 cells from the adverse effect of TNF-α. In conclusion, muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases were upregulated during cancer cachexia, and atrogin-1 may be a potential molecular target for treating muscle atrophy induced by cancer cachexia.

  9. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  10. Diverse functions of PHD fingers of the MLL/KMT2 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Hom, Robert A; Blakeslee, Weston; Ikenouye, Larissa; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2014-02-01

    Five members of the KMT2 family of lysine methyltransferases, originally named the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL1-5) proteins, regulate gene expression during embryogenesis and development. Each KMT2A-E contains a catalytic SET domain that methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and one or several PHD fingers. Over the past few years a growing number of studies have uncovered diverse biological roles of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, implicating them in binding to methylated histones and other nuclear proteins, and in mediating the E3 ligase activity and dimerization. Mutations in the PHD fingers or deletion of these modules are linked to human diseases including cancer and Kabuki syndrome. In this work, we summarize recently identified biological functions of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, discuss mechanisms of their action, and examine preference of these domains for histone and non-histone ligands.

  11. Identification of a Protein Network Interacting with TdRF1, a Wheat RING Ubiquitin Ligase with a Protective Role against Cellular Dehydration1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Davide; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Lopez-Torrejon, Gema; Marzin, Stephan; Schweizer, Patrick; Stanca, Antonio Michele; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Cattivelli, Luigi; Mazzucotelli, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Plants exploit ubiquitination to modulate the proteome with the final aim to ensure environmental adaptation and developmental plasticity. Ubiquitination targets are specifically driven to degradation through the action of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Genetic analyses have indicated wide functions of ubiquitination in plant life; nevertheless, despite the large number of predicted E3s, only a few of them have been characterized so far, and only a few ubiquitination targets are known. In this work, we characterized durum wheat (Triticum durum) RING Finger1 (TdRF1) as a durum wheat nuclear ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, its barley (Hordeum vulgare) homolog was shown to protect cells from dehydration stress. A protein network interacting with TdRF1 has been defined. The transcription factor WHEAT BEL1-TYPE HOMEODOMAIN1 (WBLH1) was degraded in a TdRF1-dependent manner through the 26S proteasome in vivo, the mitogen-activated protein kinase TdWNK5 [for Triticum durum WITH NO LYSINE (K)5] was able to phosphorylate TdRF1 in vitro, and the RING-finger protein WHEAT VIVIPAROUS-INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (WVIP2) was shown to have a strong E3 ligase activity. The genes coding for the TdRF1 interactors were all responsive to cold and/or dehydration stress, and a negative regulative function in dehydration tolerance was observed for the barley homolog of WVIP2. A role in the control of plant development was previously known, or predictable based on homology, for wheat BEL1-type homeodomain1(WBLH1). Thus, TdRF1 E3 ligase might act regulating the response to abiotic stress and remodeling plant development in response to environmental constraints. PMID:22167118

  12. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  13. Optimality versus variability: effect of fatigue in multi-finger redundant tasks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaebum; Singh, Tarkeshwar; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    We used two methods to address two aspects of multi-finger synergies and their changes after fatigue of the index finger. Analytical inverse optimization (ANIO) was used to identify cost functions and corresponding spaces of optimal solutions over a broad range of task parameters. Analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to quantify co-variation of finger forces across repetitive trials that helped reduce variability of (stabilized) performance variables produced by all the fingers together. Subjects produced steady-state levels of total force and moment of force simultaneously as accurately as possible by pressing with the four fingers of the right hand. Both before and during fatigue, the subjects performed single trials for many force-moment combinations covering a broad range; the data were used for the ANIO analysis. Multiple trials were performed at two force-moment combinations; these data were used for analysis within the UCM hypothesis. Fatigue was induced by 1-min maximal voluntary contraction exercise by the index finger. Principal component (PC) analysis showed that the first two PCs explained over 90% of the total variance both before and during fatigue. Hence, experimental observations formed a plane in the four-dimensional finger force space both before and during fatigue conditions. Based on this finding, quadratic cost functions with linear terms were estimated from the experimental data. The dihedral angle between the plane of optimal solutions and the plane of experimental observations (D (ANGLE)) was very small (a few degrees); it increased during fatigue. There was an increase in fatigue of the coefficient at the quadratic term for the index finger force balanced by a drop in the coefficients for the ring and middle fingers. Within each finger pair (index-middle and ring-little), the contribution of the "central" fingers to moment production increased during fatigue. An index of antagonist moment production dropped

  14. OPTIMALITY VS. VARIABILITY: EFFECT OF FATIGUE IN MULTI-FINGER REDUNDANT TASKS

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaebum; Singh, Tarkeshwar; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    We used two methods to address two aspects of multi-finger synergies and their changes after fatigue of the index finger. Analytical inverse optimization (ANIO) was used to identify cost functions and corresponding spaces of optimal solutions over a broad range of task parameters. Analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to quantify co-variation of finger forces across repetitive trials that helped reduce variability of (stabilized) performance variables produced by all the fingers together. Subjects produced steady-state levels of total force and moment of force simultaneously as accurately as possible by pressing with the four fingers of the right hand. Both before- and during-fatigue, the subjects performed single trials for many force-moment combinations covering a broad range; the data were used for the ANIO analysis. Multiple trials were performed at two force-moment combinations; these data were used for analysis within the UCM hypothesis. Fatigue was induced by 1-min maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise by the index finger. Principal component (PC) analysis showed that the first two PCs explained over 90% of the total variance both before and during fatigue. Hence, it was concluded that experimental observations formed a plane in the four-dimensional finger force space both before and during fatigue conditions. Based on this conclusion, quadratic cost functions with linear terms were assumed. The dihedral angle between the plane of optimal solutions and the plane of experimental observations was very small (a few degrees); it increased during fatigue. There was an increase with fatigue of the coefficient at the quadratic term for the index finger force balanced by a drop in the coefficients for the ring and middle fingers. Within each finger pair (index-middle and ring-little), the contribution of the “central” fingers to moment production increased during fatigue. An index of antagonist moment production dropped with

  15. Finger posture modulates structural body representations

    PubMed Central

    Tamè, Luigi; Dransfield, Elanah; Quettier, Thomas; Longo, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lesions of the left posterior parietal cortex commonly fail in identifying their fingers, a condition known as finger agnosia, yet are relatively unimpaired in sensation and skilled action. Such dissociations have traditionally been interpreted as evidence that structural body representations (BSR), such as the body structural description, are distinct from sensorimotor representations, such as the body schema. We investigated whether performance on tasks commonly used to assess finger agnosia is modulated by changes in hand posture. We used the ‘in between’ test in which participants estimate the number of unstimulated fingers between two touched fingers or a localization task in which participants judge which two fingers were stimulated. Across blocks, the fingers were placed in three levels of splay. Judged finger numerosity was analysed, in Exp. 1 by direct report and in Exp. 2 as the actual number of fingers between the fingers named. In both experiments, judgments were greater when non-adjacent stimulated fingers were positioned far apart compared to when they were close together or touching, whereas judgements were unaltered when adjacent fingers were stimulated. This demonstrates that BSRs are not fixed, but are modulated by the real-time physical distances between body parts. PMID:28223685

  16. MARCH1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Dampens the Innate Inflammatory Response by Modulating Monocyte Functions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Galbas, Tristan; Raymond, Maxime; Sabourin, Antoine; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Guimont-Desrochers, Fanny; Yun, Tae Jin; Cailhier, Jean-François; Ishido, Satoshi; Lesage, Sylvie; Cheong, Cheolho; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2017-01-15

    Ubiquitination was recently identified as a central process in the pathogenesis and development of numerous inflammatory diseases, such as obesity, atherosclerosis, and asthma. Treatment with proteasomal inhibitors led to severe side effects because ubiquitination is heavily involved in a plethora of cellular functions. Thus, new players regulating ubiquitination processes must be identified to improve therapies for inflammatory diseases. In addition to their role in adaptive immunity, endosomal MHC class II (MHCII) molecules were shown to modulate innate immune responses by fine tuning the TLR4 signaling pathway. However, the role of MHCII ubiquitination by membrane associated ring-CH-type finger 1 (MARCH1) E3 ubiquitin ligase in this process remains to be assessed. In this article, we demonstrate that MARCH1 is a key inhibitor of innate inflammation in response to bacterial endotoxins. The higher mortality of March1(-/-) mice challenged with a lethal dose of LPS was associated with significantly stronger systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines and splenic NK cell activation; however, we did not find evidence that MARCH1 modulates LPS or IL-10 signaling pathways. Instead, the mechanism by which MARCH1 protects against endotoxic shock rests on its capacity to promote the transition of monocytes from Ly6C(Hi) to Ly6C(+/-) Moreover, in competitive bone marrow chimeras, March1(-/-) monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils outcompeted wild-type cells with regard to bone marrow egress and homing to peripheral organs. We conclude that MARCH1 exerts MHCII-independent effects that regulate the innate arm of immunity. Thus, MARCH1 might represent a potential new target for emerging therapies based on ubiquitination reactions in inflammatory diseases.

  17. Asymptomatic Papulo-nodules Localized to One Finger

    PubMed Central

    Rambhia, Kinjal D; Khopkar, Uday S

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous or deep granuloma annulare is a benign asymptomatic condition characterized by firm asymptomatic nodules in deep subcutaneous tissues that may be associated with intradermal lesions. A 53-year-old female presented with asymptomatic skin-colored, firm nodules over the right ring finger. Histopathology revealed a palisading granuloma with central degenerated collagen and mucin deposition in the dermis suggestive of granuloma annulare. Isolated and unilateral involvement of a single digit with clusters of nodules of subcutaneous granuloma annulare (GA) in an adult is rare and differentiation from its simulator rheumatoid nodule is essential. PMID:26538728

  18. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  19. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  20. Transient bone resorption following finger replantation: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Lucchina, Stefano; Becker, Hillary-A; Fusetti, Cesare; Shin, Alexander-Y

    2011-06-01

    Radiographic changes consisting of alterations in mineral content, osteopaenia or destructive neuropathy that occur following successful finger replantation have already been described. We report our experience about four fingers in three individuals in whom bone changes developed in the first three months postoperatively with complete "restitution ad integrum". Three patients, 21-49 years old (average 36 years) sustained a clean-cut amputation of four fingers. The first patient had an amputation at the base of the middle phalanx of the index finger and the second patient at the base of the proximal phalanx of the ring finger. The third had an amputation at the base of the first metacarpal bone and the proximal phalanx of the small finger in a five finger amputation. In the first case, two dorsal veins and two palmar digital arteries and nerves were repaired. In the second case, one palmar artery and one dorsal vein were reanastomosed. In the third case at the thumb, two dorsal veins and two palmar digital arteries and nerves were reconstructed. At the small finger, one dorsal vein, one palmar digital artery and two digital nerves were reconstructed. Bone fixation was achieved with two and three K-wires or tension-band wiring. Replantation was successful in all cases. Three weeks after replantation, the X-rays showed rapid development of osteopaenia in the juxtaarticular region and metaphyses of the bone. These changes were followed by subperiosteal, intracortical and endosteal bone resorption. No further surgical procedures or splintage were needed and hand therapy was not discontinued. At 10-13 weeks (average 12 weeks) postoperatively, the X-rays showed a complete recovery with new periosteal bone formation. We suggest that the radiographic changes after finger replantation are transient, first evident subperiosteally and progressing centrally. They may reflect small-vessel compromise and microinfarction and transient hyperemia secondary to neurovascular damage

  1. Integration of tactile input across fingers in a patient with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Overvliet, Krista E; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Brenner, Eli; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2011-01-01

    Finger agnosia has been described as an inability to explicitly individuate between the fingers, which is possibly due to fused neural representations of these fingers. Hence, are patients with finger agnosia unable to keep tactile information perceived over several fingers separate? Here, we tested a finger agnosic patient (GO) on two tasks that measured the ability to keep tactile information simultaneously perceived by individual fingers separate. In experiment 1 GO performed a haptic search task, in which a target (the absence of a protruded line) needed to be identified among distracters (protruded lines). The lines were presented simultaneously to the fingertips of both hands. Similarly to the controls, her reaction time decreased when her fingers were aligned as compared to when her fingers were stretched and in an unaligned position. This suggests that she can keep tactile input from different fingers separate. In experiment two, GO was required to judge the position of a target tactile stimulus to the index finger, relatively to a reference tactile stimulus to the middle finger, both in fingers uncrossed and crossed position. GO was able to indicate the relative position of the target stimulus as well as healthy controls, which indicates that she was able to keep tactile information perceived by two neighbouring fingers separate. Interestingly, GO performed better as compared to the healthy controls in the finger crossed condition. Together, these results suggest the GO is able to implicitly distinguish between tactile information perceived by multiple fingers. We therefore conclude that finger agnosia is not caused by minor disruptions of low-level somatosensory processing. These findings further underpin the idea of a selective impaired higher order body representation restricted to the fingers as underlying cause of finger agnosia.

  2. Multiple toe transplantations to reconstruct three amputated neighbouring distal fingers by heat press injury--a case report.

    PubMed

    Fumiaki, Shimizu; Wei, Fu-Chan; Sassu, Paolo; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Yu-Te

    2009-09-01

    Heat press injury to the finger results in severe damage. When it is difficult to recover the function in the damaged finger, amputation may be unavoidable. We present a case of three heat press-injured neighbouring fingers reconstructed by multiple toe transplantations. All transplanted toes survived successfully. Two-point discrimination was 9, 10 and 7 mm in the index, middle and ring finger, respectively. The overall motion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint was as follows: 30/130 degrees, 30/75 degrees and 30/105 degrees at the index, middle and ring finger. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint presented a claw deformity of 110 degrees, 65 degrees and 65 degrees. The ability to perform different kinds of pinches was judged fully satisfactory. We have found that toe transplantation is a good option for reconstruction of multiple amputated fingers by heat press injury. In our case, it was difficult to decide on the degree of debridement. Indeed, the reconstructed middle finger unfortunately developed secondary osteoarthritis as a result of the original heat press injury to the bone. Some may have preferred to sacrifice the joint, however, since the patient is young and highly motivated towards rehabilitation, we opted to preserve the PIP joint in the hope of providing superior function. Our principle is that great efforts should be afforded to preserve viable tissues during initial debridement if we plan to perform toe transplantation.

  3. Chang'E-3 Science Exploration Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yongliao; Ouyang, Ziyuan

    Chang’e-3 mission is the second phase of China Lunar Exploration Program which its main science objectives is to map the landing site and the rover path, determine its surface chemical composition and study the regional geological and geochemical characteristics, map the earth’s plasmasphere and study Earth’s plasmasphere responses to solar activity and plasma behaviors in the magnetosphere, monitor the variable stars, bright active galactic nuclei ( AGN ) and survey the sky. Eight scientific payloads onboard the CE-3 probe has obtained lots of data, and this paper will introduce their exploration progresses and some new scientific results. Key words: Chang’e-3 Mission, Science Exploration Progress, Scientific Payloads

  4. Iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy involves an Akt-forkhead box O3-E3 ubiquitin ligase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yasumasa; Imao, Mizuki; Satoh, Akiho; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Hamano, Hirofumi; Horinouchi, Yuya; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Licht; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting or sarcopenia is a critical health problem. Skeletal muscle atrophy is induced by an excess of iron, which is an essential trace metal for all living organisms. Excessive amounts of iron catalyze the formation of highly toxic hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction. However, the molecular mechanism of iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy has remained unclear. In this study, 8-weeks-old C57BL6/J mice were divided into 2 groups: vehicle-treated group and the iron-injected group (10 mg iron day(-1)mouse(-1)) during 2 weeks. Mice in the iron-injected group showed an increase in the iron content of the skeletal muscle and serum and ferritin levels in the muscle, along with reduced skeletal muscle mass. The skeletal muscle showed elevated mRNA expression of the muscle atrophy-related E3 ubiquitin ligases, atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1(MuRF1), on days 7 and 14 of iron treatment. Moreover, iron-treated mice showed reduced phosphorylation of Akt and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3a) in skeletal muscles. Inhibition of FOXO3a using siRNA in vitro in C2C12 myotube cells inhibited iron-induced upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and reversed the reduction in myotube diameters. Iron-load caused oxidative stress, and an oxidative stress inhibitor abrogated iron-induced muscle atrophy by reactivating the Akt-FOXO3a pathway. Iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is suggested to involve the E3 ubiquitin ligase mediated by the reduction of Akt-FOXO3a signaling by oxidative stress.

  5. Viscous fingering in an elastic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, Andrew L.; Ducloué, Lucie; Juel, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the fingering instability of a flat, steadily propagating interface in a Hele-Shaw channel, where the top boundary has been replaced by an elastic membrane. In order to create a steadily propagating flat front, we exploit the reopening modes of fluid-filled elasto-rigid channels. The collapsed upper boundary reopens through the steady propagation of a wide finger, when air is injected from one end at a constant flow rate. For high levels of collapse and high finger speed, the tip of the finger becomes flat, creating a leading edge normal to the direction of propagation, which in turn is subject to a smaller scale viscous fingering instability. By modifying the cross-sectional geometry of the channel, we can actuate the finger shape to observe a variety of small-scale fingering phenomena including growth in a direction normal to the propagation and dendrite formation. The instability of the flat front exhibits constant-length fingers, very similar to the stubby fingers observed in radial compliant Hele-Shaw cells, and reminiscent of the printer's instability travel with the front. We investigate the geometry of those fingers in terms of the speed of the front, and the geometry of the reopening region. The financial support of the Leverhulme Trust is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  7. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pereyra, J Felipe; Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user.

  8. E3 Success Story - E3 Southwest Virginia: Economy, Energy and the Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    E3 Southwest Virginia supports sustainable manufacturing in 17 counties in southwest Virginia. The MTC provides manufacturers with assessments of production processes to reduce their energy consumption and drive innovation.

  9. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  10. Finger-Jointed Wood Products.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    long enough to be useful (14, 36, 38, 59, 124). Nonstructural finger joints are primarily found in molding stock, trim, siding, fascia boards, door...all beams but two in series 7 and 8 to the grain. The average modulus of be slightly higher than that for apparently was related to the joints, rupture ...inch, and a tip thickness of combinations laminated by the plant . (a)A bolt hole on tensile strength 0.031 inch. The other was classified Straight-bevel

  11. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  12. Molecular characterization and concerted evolution of two genes encoding RING-C2 type proteins in rice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Lim, Sung Don; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2012-08-15

    RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger proteins are believed to play a critical role in mediating the transfer of ubiquitin to heterogeneous substrate(s). While the two canonical types, RING-H2 and RING-HC, have been well-characterized, the molecular functions of the modified types, particularly the RING-C2 types, remain elusive. We isolated two rice genes harboring the RING-C2 domain on the distal parts of rice chromosomes 11 and 12, termed OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2, respectively. A comparison of sequence divergences between 10 duplicate pairs on the distal parts of rice chromosomes 11 and 12 and randomly selected duplicate pairs suggested that OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2 have evolved in concert via gene conversion. An in vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that both proteins possess E3 ligase activity, suggesting that the innate functions of these RING domains have not been affected by their modifications during evolution. Subcellular localizations were strikingly different; OsRINGC2-1 was found only in the cytoplasm with many punctate complexes, whereas OsRINGC2-2 was observed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. The expression patterns of both genes showed striking differences in response to salt stress, whereas plants heterogeneous for both genes mediated salt tolerance in Arabidopsis, supporting the notion of concerted evolution. These results shed light on the molecular functions of OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2 and provide insight into their molecular evolution.

  13. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  14. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  15. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  16. Mining and characterization of ubiquitin E3 ligases expressed in the mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ubiquitin-mediated protein modification and degradation are believed to play important roles in mammalian spermatogenesis. The catalogues of ubiquitin activating enzymes, conjugating enzymes, and ligases (E3s) have been known for mammals such as mice and humans. However, a systematic characterization of E3s expressed during spermatogenesis has not been carried out. Results In present study, we set out to mine E3s from the mouse genome and to characterize their expression pattern, subcellular localization, and enzymatic activities based on microarray data and biochemical assays. We identified 398 putative E3s belonging to the RING, U-box, and HECT subfamilies and found that most genes were conserved between mice and humans. We discovered that 73 of them were highly or specifically expressed in the testes based on the microarray expression data. We selected 10 putative E3 genes to examine their mRNA expression pattern, and several genes to study their subcellular localization and E3 ligase activity. RT-PCR results showed that all the selected genes were predominately expressed in the testis. Some putative E3s were localized in the cytoplasm while others were in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Moreover, all the selected proteins were enzymatically active as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo assays. Conclusions We have identified a large number of putative E3s that are expressed during mouse spermatogenesis. Among these, a significant portion is highly or specifically expressed in the testis. Subcellular localization and enzymatic activity assays suggested that these E3s might execute diverse functions in mammalian spermatogenesis. Our results may serve as an initial guide to the field for further functional analysis. PMID:22992278

  17. Finger Mathematics: A Method for All Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Chavez, Maria

    The instruction of finger counting and finger calculation, also known as Chisanbop, is promoted as a natural method of introducing and teaching the basic processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to children, particularly to those who are mentally and physically handicapped. The sequential process for teaching finger…

  18. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  19. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  20. Fingering in Stochastic Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Aristotelous, Andreas C.; Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread use of hybrid-discrete cellular automata in modeling cancer, two simple growth models are studied on the two dimensional lattice that incorporate a nutrient, assumed to be oxygen. In the first model the oxygen concentration u(x, t) is computed based on the geometry of the growing blob, while in the second one u(x, t) satisfies a reaction-diffusion equation. A threshold θ value exists such that cells give birth at rate β(u(x, t) − θ)+ and die at rate δ(θ − u(x, t)+. In the first model, a phase transition was found between growth as a solid blob and “fingering” at a threshold θc = 0.5, while in the second case fingering always occurs, i.e., θc = 0. PMID:26430353

  1. Finger tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lakie, M; Mutch, W J

    1989-03-01

    Finger tremor was investigated in 20 patients (age range 54-88 yr) diagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease and six controls of a similar age and no known neurological abnormality. In nine of the patients tremor was not clinically obvious. When the tremor of these patients was recorded immediately after voluntary movement and subjected to instrumental analysis there were consistently observable differences from the controls. Such analysis may have diagnostic potential when there is clinical uncertainty. Surface EMG recordings were obtained from four patients. One patient had a large resting tremor with obvious reciprocating activity in flexors and extensors; in the others who had no symptomatic tremor there was reciprocating activity only after movement, and this died away in a few seconds as the induced tremor disappeared.

  2. Elastic Suppression of Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gunnar; Lister, John

    2016-11-01

    Consider peeling an elastic tape or beam away from a rigid base to which it is stuck by a film of viscous liquid. The peeling motion requires air to invade the viscous liquid and is thus susceptible to the Saffman-Taylor fingering instability. We analyse the fundamental travelling-wave solution and show that the advancing air-liquid interface remains linearly stable at higher capillary numbers than in a standard Hele-Shaw cell. A short-wavelength expansion yields an analytical expression for the growth rate which is valid for all unstable modes throughout the parameter space, allowing us to identify and quantify four distinct physical mechanisms that each help suppress the instability. Applying our method to the experiments by Pihler-Puzovic et al. (2012) reveals that the radial geometry and time-variation stabilize the system further.

  3. Composition, Roles, and Regulation of Cullin-Based Ubiquitin E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christina M.; Gray, William M.; Mooney, Sutton; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants depend on flexible regulatory systems that allow them to adequately regulate developmental and physiological processes in context with environmental cues. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which targets a great number of proteins for degradation, is cellular tool that provides the necessary flexibility to accomplish this task. Ubiquitin E3 ligases provide the needed specificity to the pathway by selectively binding to particular substrates and facilitating their ubiquitylation. The largest group of E3 ligases known in plants is represented by CULLIN-REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) E3 ligases (CRLs). In recent years, a great amount of knowledge has been generated to reveal the critical roles of these enzymes across all aspects of plant life. This review provides an overview of the different classes of CRLs in plants, their specific complex compositions, the variety of biological processes they control, and the regulatory steps that can affect their activities. PMID:25505853

  4. E3 Success Story - San Antonio E3 Case Study: UEMC “Now Hiring”

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    exas Manufacturing Assistance Center conducted an E3 assessment as part of the local Lean-Clean-Energy program in October of 2009. Overall, UEMC has reduced demand by approximately 30kw and reduced consumption by over 100,000 kwh/year.

  5. An effective preprocessing method for finger vein recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, JiaLiang; Li, Qiong; Wang, Ning; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2013-07-01

    The image preprocessing plays an important role in finger vein recognition system. However, previous preprocessing schemes remind weakness to be resolved for the high finger vein recongtion performance. In this paper, we propose a new finger vein preprocessing that includes finger region localization, alignment, finger vein ROI segmentation and enhancement. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme is capable of enhancing the quality of finger vein image effectively and reliably.

  6. ZRF1 mediates remodeling of E3 ligases at DNA lesion sites during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Gracheva, Ekaterina; Chitale, Shalaka; Wilhelm, Thomas; Rapp, Alexander; Byrne, Jonathan; Stadler, Jens; Medina, Rebeca; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation elicits both the recruitment of DNA repair factors and the deposition of histone marks such as monoubiquitylation of histone H2A at lesion sites. Here, we report how a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex specific to DNA repair is remodeled at lesion sites in the global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2A-ubiquitin) is catalyzed predominantly by a novel E3 ligase complex consisting of DDB2, DDB1, CUL4B, and RING1B (UV–RING1B complex) that acts early during lesion recognition. The H2A-ubiquitin binding protein ZRF1 mediates remodeling of this E3 ligase complex directly at the DNA lesion site, causing the assembly of the UV–DDB–CUL4A E3 ligase complex (DDB1–DDB2–CUL4A-RBX1). ZRF1 is an essential factor in GG-NER, and its function at damaged chromatin sites is linked to damage recognition factor XPC. Overall, the results shed light on the interplay between epigenetic and DNA repair recognition factors at DNA lesion sites. PMID:27091446

  7. Free toe pulp flap for finger pulp and volar defect reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Jyoshid R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fingertip injury requiring flap cover is very common in the modern era. The ideal cover should fulfill both functional and aesthetic improvement. Materials and Methods: From June 2015 to April 2016, we performed seven free toe pulp flaps for finger defect reconstruction. All patients were males. Five flaps were done in emergency post-traumatic cases, and two were done in elective set up. The cases included reconstruction of three thumbs, one index and one ring finger in an emergency set up and two ring fingers in the elective. Thumb reconstruction was done with great toe lateral pulp and the other digits reconstructed with second toe pulp flap. Follow-up evaluation included both functional and aesthetic assessment. Results: Five flaps survived completely, one suffered partial loss, and one flap failed completely. The median follow-up period was 9 months. The median duration of surgery was 255 min (range 210 to 300 min). The median two-point discrimination was 6.5 mm (range 4–8 mm). There was the return of temperature sensation in all patients; two had cold intolerance. The Semmes-Weinstein monofilament score varied from 3.61 to 5.07 (median filament index value 4.31/pressure value of 2 g/mm2). Three patients had delayed donor site wound healing. Conclusions: The free toe pulp flap is an efficient choice for fingertip and volar finger defects reconstruction with an excellent tissue match. PMID:27833279

  8. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  9. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  10. Patient-Specific Prosthetic Fingers by Remote Collaboration–A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabibihan, John-John

    2011-01-01

    The concealment of amputation through prosthesis usage can shield an amputee from social stigma and help improve the emotional healing process especially at the early stages of hand or finger loss. However, the traditional techniques in prosthesis fabrication defy this as the patients need numerous visits to the clinics for measurements, fitting and follow-ups. This paper presents a method for constructing a prosthetic finger through online collaboration with the designer. The main input from the amputee comes from the Computer Tomography (CT) data in the region of the affected and the non-affected fingers. These data are sent over the internet and the prosthesis is constructed using visualization, computer-aided design and manufacturing tools. The finished product is then shipped to the patient. A case study with a single patient having an amputated ring finger at the proximal interphalangeal joint shows that the proposed method has a potential to address the patient's psychosocial concerns and minimize the exposure of the finger loss to the public. PMID:21573246

  11. A three-dimensional analysis of finger and bow string movements during the release in archery.

    PubMed

    Horsak, Brian; Heller, Mario

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine finger and bow string movements during archery by investigating a top Austrian athlete (FITA score = 1233) under laboratory conditions. Maximum lateral bow string deflection and angular displacements for index, third, and ring fingers between the full draw position and the end of the release were quantified using a motion tracking system. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether bow string deflection and finger movements are predictive for scoring. Joint ranges of motion during the shot itself were large in the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and much smaller in the metacarpophalangeal joints. Contrary to our expectations, greater deflection leads to higher scores (R2 = .18, p < .001) and the distal interphalangeal joint of the third finger weakly predicts the deflection (R2 = .11, p < .014). More variability in the joint angles of the third finger was found in bad shots than in good shots. Findings in this study let presume that maximum lateral bow string deflection does not adversely affect the archer's performance.

  12. Solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in protein FON

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Umehara, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The zinc finger HIT domain is a sequence motif found in many proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 3 (TRIP-3), which is possibly involved in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Novel zinc finger motifs are suggested to play important roles in gene regulation and chromatin remodeling. Here, we determined the high-resolution solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in ZNHIT2 (protein FON) from Homo sapiens, by an NMR method based on 567 upper distance limits derived from NOE intensities measured in three-dimensional NOESY spectra. The structure yielded a backbone RMSD to the mean coordinates of 0.19 Å for the structured residues 12–48. The fold consists of two consecutive antiparallel β-sheets and two short C-terminal helices packed against the second β-sheet, and binds two zinc ions. Both zinc ions are coordinated tetrahedrally via a CCCC-CCHC motif to the ligand residues of the zf-HIT domain in an interleaved manner. The tertiary structure of the zinc finger HIT domain closely resembles the folds of the B-box, RING finger, and PHD domains with a cross-brace zinc coordination mode, but is distinct from them. The unique three-dimensional structure of the zinc finger HIT domain revealed a novel zinc-binding fold, as a new member of the treble clef domain family. On the basis of the structural data, we discuss the possible functional roles of the zinc finger HIT domain. PMID:17656577

  13. Isolated Kaposi sarcoma of the finger pulp in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Aïm, F; Rosier, L; Dumontier, C

    2012-02-01

    A 63-year-old woman with long-standing AIDS and previous Kaposi sarcomas of the lower limb presented to our consultation complaining of a painful left ring finger with pulp enlargement. X-rays revealed an osteolytic lesion of the distal phalanx. We suspected an isolated osseous Kaposi sarcoma and at surgery we found a hemorrhagic lesion with bone extension into the phalanx. Bone involvement is rare in Kaposi sarcoma and even rarer in patients without a cutaneous location.

  14. The Chang'e 3 Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlai; Liu, Jianjun; Ren, Xin; Zuo, Wei; Tan, Xu; Wen, Weibin; Li, Han; Mu, Lingli; Su, Yan; Zhang, Hongbo; Yan, Jun; Ouyang, Ziyuan

    2015-07-01

    The Chang'e 3 (CE-3) mission was implemented as the first lander/rover mission of the Chinese Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP). After its successful launch at 01:30 local time on December 2, 2013, CE-3 was inserted into an eccentric polar lunar orbit on December 6, and landed to the east of a 430 m crater in northwestern Mare Imbrium (19.51°W, 44.12°N) at 21:11 on December 14, 2013. The Yutu rover separated from the lander at 04:35, December 15, and traversed for a total of 0.114 km. Acquisition of science data began during the descent of the lander and will continue for 12 months during the nominal mission. The CE-3 lander and rover each carry four science instruments. Instruments on the lander are: Landing Camera (LCAM), Terrain Camera (TCAM), Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC), and Moon-based Ultraviolet Telescope (MUVT). The four instruments on the rover are: Panoramic Camera (PCAM), VIS-NIR Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), Active Particle induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), and Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR). The science objectives of the CE-3 mission include: (1) investigation of the morphological features and geological structures of and near the landing area; (2) integrated in-situ analysis of mineral and chemical composition of and near the landing area; and (3) exploration of the terrestrial-lunar space environment and lunar-based astronomical observations. This paper describes the CE-3 objectives and measurements that address the science objectives outlined by the Comprehensive Demonstration Report of Phase II of CLEP. The CE-3 team has archived the initial science data, and we describe data accessibility by the science community.

  15. The effect of enslaving on perception of finger forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Leonard, Charles T

    2006-07-01

    The primary purpose was to examine the effect of enslaving on finger force perception during isometric finger force production using an ipsilateral force-matching paradigm. Fourteen subjects were instructed to produce varying levels of reference forces [10, 20, 30, and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] force using one finger (index, I or little, L) and to reproduce these forces using the same finger (homo-finger tasks, I/I and L/L) or a different finger (hetero-finger tasks, I/L and L/I). Forces of all fingers were recorded. During homo-finger tasks, no differences were found in force magnitude or relative level of force (expressed as a proportion of MVC). The index finger matching force magnitudes were greater than the little finger reference force magnitudes, with significantly lower levels of relative force during L/I tasks; while the little finger matching forces underestimated the index finger reference forces with significantly higher levels of relative force during I/L tasks. The difference in the matching and reference forces by the instructed finger(s), i.e., matching error, was larger in hetero-finger tasks than in homo-finger tasks, particularly at high reference force levels (30, 40% MVC). When forces of all fingers were considered, enslaving (uninstructed finger forces) significantly minimized matching errors of the total force during both I/L and L/I hetero-finger tasks, especially at high reference force levels. Our results show that there is a tendency to match the absolute magnitude of the total force during ipsilateral finger force-matching tasks. This tendency is likely related to enslaving effects. Our results provide evidence that all (instructed and uninstructed) finger forces are sensed, thus resulting in perception of the absolute magnitude of total finger force.

  16. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis.

  17. Vortex Ring Interaction with a Heated Screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason; Krueger, Paul S.

    2008-11-01

    Previous examinations of vortex rings impinging on porous screens has shown the reformation of the vortex ring with a lower velocity after passing through the screen, the creation of secondary vortices, and mixing. A heated screen could, in principle, alter the vortex-screen interaction by changing the local liquid viscosity and density. In the present investigation, a mechanical piston-cylinder vortex ring generator was used to create vortex rings in an aqueous sucrose solution. The rings impinged on a screen of horizontal wires that were heated using electrical current. The flow was visualized with food color and video imaging. Tests with and without heat were conducted at a piston stroke-to-jet diameter ratio of 4 and a jet Reynolds number (Re) of 1000. The vortex rings slowed after passing through the screen, but in tests with heat, they maintained a higher fraction of their before-screen velocity due to reduction in fluid viscosity near the wires. In addition, small ``fingers'' that developed on the front of the vortex rings as they passed through the screen exhibited positive buoyancy effects in the heated case.

  18. More efficient swimming by spreading your fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis; Breugem, Wim Paul; Westerweel, Jerry; Delfos, Rene; Grift, Ernst Jan

    2016-11-01

    A tantalizing question in free-style swimming is whether the stroke efficiency during the pull phase depends on spreading the fingers. It is a subtle effect-not more than a few percent-but it could make a big difference in a race. We measure the drag of arm models with increasing finger spreading in a wind tunnel and compare forces and moments to the results of immersed boundary simulations. Virtual arms were used in the simulations and their 3D-printed real versions in the experiment. We find an optimal finger spreading, accompanied by a marked increase of coherent vortex shedding. A simple actuator disk model explains this optimum.

  19. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  20. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C.; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K.; Ware, Carl F.; Mace, Peter D.; Riedl, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signaling and function1. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate2,3. The RBR family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases4–6. The RBR family includes Parkin4 and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC)7. While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall autoinhibited forms are available8–13, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely enigmatic. Here we present the first structure of the fully active HOIP-RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP-RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of autoinhibited RBRs. HOIP-RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centers ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, surprisingly, three distinct helix–IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~Ub conjugate as well as an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP-RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  1. Kayser-Fleischer Rings

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know about Wilson Disease Kayser-Fleischer Rings Definition Kayser-Fleischer Ring: Clinical sign. Brownish-yellow ring ... Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation For Patients & Families Resources Membership Events Centers ...

  2. Modular synthetic inverters from zinc finger proteins and small RNAs

    DOE PAGES

    Hsia, Justin; Holtz, William J.; Maharbiz, Michel M.; ...

    2016-02-17

    Synthetic zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) can be created to target promoter DNA sequences, repressing transcription. The binding of small RNA (sRNA) to ZFP mRNA creates an ultrasensitive response to generate higher effective Hill coefficients. Here we combined three “off the shelf” ZFPs and three sRNAs to create new modular inverters in E. coli and quantify their behavior using induction fold. We found a general ordering of the effects of the ZFPs and sRNAs on induction fold that mostly held true when combining these parts. We then attempted to construct a ring oscillator using our new inverters. In conclusion, our chosenmore » parts performed insufficiently to create oscillations, but we include future directions for improvement upon our work presented here.« less

  3. Modular synthetic inverters from zinc finger proteins and small RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Justin; Holtz, William J.; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Arcak, Murat; Keasling, Jay D.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2016-02-17

    Synthetic zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) can be created to target promoter DNA sequences, repressing transcription. The binding of small RNA (sRNA) to ZFP mRNA creates an ultrasensitive response to generate higher effective Hill coefficients. Here we combined three “off the shelf” ZFPs and three sRNAs to create new modular inverters in E. coli and quantify their behavior using induction fold. We found a general ordering of the effects of the ZFPs and sRNAs on induction fold that mostly held true when combining these parts. We then attempted to construct a ring oscillator using our new inverters. In conclusion, our chosen parts performed insufficiently to create oscillations, but we include future directions for improvement upon our work presented here.

  4. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1.

    PubMed

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Hein, Marco Y; Müller, Marcel A; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-08-30

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95-144 of RCHY1 and 389-652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PL(pro)s from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD-PL(pro) fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PL(pro) alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes.

  5. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1

    PubMed Central

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Müller, Marcel A.; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PLpro), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95–144 of RCHY1 and 389–652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PLpros from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD–PLpro fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PLpro alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes. PMID:27519799

  6. Modeling the finger joint moments in a hand at the maximal isometric grip: the effects of friction.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Dong, Ren G; McDowell, Thomas W; Welcome, Daniel E

    2009-12-01

    The interaction between the handle and operator's hand affects the comfort and safety of tool and machine operations. In most of the previous studies, the investigators considered only the normal contact forces. The effect of friction on the joint moments in fingers has not been analyzed. Furthermore, the observed contact forces have not been linked to the internal musculoskeletal loading in the previous experimental studies. In the current study, we proposed a universal model of a hand to evaluate the joint moments in the fingers during grasping tasks. The hand model was developed on the platform of the commercial software package AnyBody. Only four fingers (index, long, ring, and little finger) were included in the model. The anatomical structure of each finger is comprised of four phalanges (distal, middle, proximal, and metacarpal phalange). The simulations were performed using an inverse dynamics technique. The joint angles and the normal contact forces on each finger section reported by previous researchers were used as inputs, while the joint moments of each finger were predicted. The predicted trends of the dependence of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint moments on the cylinder diameter agree with those of the contact forces on the fingers observed in the previous experimental study. Our results show that the DIP and PIP joint moments reach their maximums at a cylinder diameter of about 31mm, which is consistent with the trend of the finger contact forces measured in the experiments. The proposed approach will be useful for simulating musculoskeletal loading in the hand for occupational activities, thereby optimizing tool-handle design.

  7. [Ligament injuries of fingers and thumbs].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic ligament lesions of the carpometacarpal joints frequently occur at the thumb ray, whereas the carpometacarpal amphiarthrosis of other finger rays are rarely affected. The metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the thumb and fingers are stabilized by bilaterally running collateral ligaments and palmar plates. At the base of the metacarpophalangeal joints, several ligaments of the extensor hoods guide the extensor tendons and coordinate the fine motoric skills of phalangeal flexing and extending. Several annular and cruciform ligaments hold the flexor tendons close to the finger skeleton. Other than at the wrist, differentiation between dynamic and static instability patterns is possible by physical examination. This review article presents the ligaments of the thumb and the fingers, the traumatic and degenerative lesions as well as the diagnostic capability of x‑rays, cinematography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography.

  8. Trajectory of the index finger during grasping.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jason; Flash, Tamar

    2009-07-01

    The trajectory of the index finger during grasping movements was compared to the trajectories predicted by three optimization-based models. The three models consisted of minimizing the integral of the weighted squared joint derivatives along the path (inertia-like cost), minimizing torque change, and minimizing angular jerk. Of the three models, it was observed that the path of the fingertip and the joint trajectories, were best described by the minimum angular jerk model. This model, which does not take into account the dynamics of the finger, performed equally well when the inertia of the finger was altered by adding a 20 g weight to the medial phalange. Thus, for the finger, it appears that trajectories are planned based primarily on kinematic considerations at a joint level.

  9. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-01-01

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis. PMID:23988821

  10. Salt-finger convection under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to differential diffusion rates. Because of the fact that the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number (the ratio of thermal diffusivity to solute diffusivity) salt-finger convection can be generated at very much reduced gravity levels. This effect may be of importance in the directional solidification of binary alloys carried out in space. The transport of solute and heat by salt-finger convection at microgravity conditions is considered; instability arising from surface tension gradients, the Marangoni instability, is discussed, and the possible consequences of combined salt-finger and Marangoni instability are considered.

  11. Clubbing of the fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clubbing Images Clubbing Clubbed fingers References Davis JL, Murray JF. History and physical examinations. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst MD, et al. Murray & Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  12. Repair of webbed fingers - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Syndactyly is the abnormal development of the hand, such that the fingers are fused. The number of ... second surgery, depending on the complexity of the syndactyly. Hospital stays of 1 or 2 days are ...

  13. Repair of webbed fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When joined fingers share a single fingernail, the creation of two normal-looking nails is rarely possible. ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  14. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  15. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  16. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  17. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  18. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  19. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  20. Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative warning of wind chill. Indeed, guidance on the risk of finger freezing is important not only to safeguard the finger, but also because it pertains more closely to susceptible facial features, such as the nose, than if only the risk of cheek freezing was provided. The importance of blood flow to the finger and the modeling of vaso-constriction are demonstrated through cooling predictions that agree reasonably well with several reported observations. Differences in the prediction between the present physiologic-based model and the engineering model used to develop the wind chill index are also discussed. New wind chill charts are presented that tabulate the mean cooling rates and corresponding onset times to freezing of the finger for various combinations of air temperature and wind speed. Results indicate that the surface of the finger cools to its freezing point in approximately one-eighth of the time predicted for the cheek. For combinations that result in the same wind chill temperature (WCT), the rate of finger cooling is faster at the higher wind speed. This asymmetry was previously disclosed through the application of the model to cheek cooling, and it reiterates the ambiguity associated with the reporting of WCT. It is further emphasized that the reporting of onset times to freezing, or safe exposure limits, is a more logical and meaningful alternative to the WCT.

  1. Structural and functional insights into the E3 ligase, RNF126

    PubMed Central

    Krysztofinska, Ewelina M.; Martínez-Lumbreras, Santiago; Thapaliya, Arjun; Evans, Nicola J.; High, Stephen; Isaacson, Rivka L.

    2016-01-01

    RNF126 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that collaborates with the BAG6 sortase complex to ubiquitinate hydrophobic substrates in the cytoplasm that are destined for proteasomal recycling. Composed of a trimeric complex of BAG6, TRC35 and UBL4A the BAG6 sortase is also associated with SGTA, a co-chaperone from which it can obtain hydrophobic substrates. Here we solve the solution structure of the RNF126 zinc finger domain in complex with the BAG6 UBL domain. We also characterise an interaction between RNF126 and UBL4A and analyse the competition between SGTA and RNF126 for the N-terminal BAG6 binding site. This work sheds light on the sorting mechanism of the BAG6 complex and its accessory proteins which, together, decide the fate of stray hydrophobic proteins in the aqueous cytoplasm. PMID:27193484

  2. Oligomerization of the Nrdp1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Is Necessary for Efficient Autoubiquitination but Not ErbB3 Ubiquitination*

    PubMed Central

    Printsev, Ignat; Yen, Lily; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the ErbB3 receptor tyrosine kinase protein in breast and other cancers contributes to tumor malignancy and therapeutic resistance. The RBCC/TRIM family RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 mediates the ubiquitination of ErbB3 in normal mammary epithelial cells to facilitate receptor degradation and suppress steady-state receptor levels. Post-transcriptional loss of Nrdp1 in patient breast tumors allows ErbB3 overexpression and receptor contribution to tumor progression, and elevated lability through autoubiquitination contributes to the observed loss of Nrdp1 in tumors relative to normal tissue. To begin to understand the mechanisms underlying Nrdp1 protein self-regulation through lability, we investigated the structural determinants required for efficient autoubiquitination and ErbB3 ubiquitination. Using mutagenesis, chemical cross-linking, size exclusion chromatography, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we demonstrate that Nrdp1 self-associates into a stable oligomeric complex in cells. Deletion of its coiled-coil domain abrogates oligomerization but does not affect Nrdp1-mediated ErbB3 ubiquitination or degradation. On the other hand, the presence of the coiled-coil domain is necessary for efficient Nrdp1 autoubiquitination via a trans mechanism, indicating that Nrdp1 ubiquitination of its various targets is functionally separable. Finally, a GFP fusion of the coiled-coil domain stabilizes Nrdp1 and potentiates ErbB3 ubiquitination and degradation. These observations point to a model whereby the coiled-coil domain plays a key role in regulating Nrdp1 lability by promoting its assembly into an oligomeric complex, and raise the possibility that inhibition of ligase oligomerization via its coiled-coil domain could be of therapeutic benefit to breast cancer patients by restoring Nrdp1 protein. PMID:24519943

  3. Oligomerization of the Nrdp1 E3 ubiquitin ligase is necessary for efficient autoubiquitination but not ErbB3 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Printsev, Ignat; Yen, Lily; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L

    2014-03-21

    Overexpression of the ErbB3 receptor tyrosine kinase protein in breast and other cancers contributes to tumor malignancy and therapeutic resistance. The RBCC/TRIM family RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 mediates the ubiquitination of ErbB3 in normal mammary epithelial cells to facilitate receptor degradation and suppress steady-state receptor levels. Post-transcriptional loss of Nrdp1 in patient breast tumors allows ErbB3 overexpression and receptor contribution to tumor progression, and elevated lability through autoubiquitination contributes to the observed loss of Nrdp1 in tumors relative to normal tissue. To begin to understand the mechanisms underlying Nrdp1 protein self-regulation through lability, we investigated the structural determinants required for efficient autoubiquitination and ErbB3 ubiquitination. Using mutagenesis, chemical cross-linking, size exclusion chromatography, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we demonstrate that Nrdp1 self-associates into a stable oligomeric complex in cells. Deletion of its coiled-coil domain abrogates oligomerization but does not affect Nrdp1-mediated ErbB3 ubiquitination or degradation. On the other hand, the presence of the coiled-coil domain is necessary for efficient Nrdp1 autoubiquitination via a trans mechanism, indicating that Nrdp1 ubiquitination of its various targets is functionally separable. Finally, a GFP fusion of the coiled-coil domain stabilizes Nrdp1 and potentiates ErbB3 ubiquitination and degradation. These observations point to a model whereby the coiled-coil domain plays a key role in regulating Nrdp1 lability by promoting its assembly into an oligomeric complex, and raise the possibility that inhibition of ligase oligomerization via its coiled-coil domain could be of therapeutic benefit to breast cancer patients by restoring Nrdp1 protein.

  4. New Finger Biometric Method Using Near Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eui Chul; Jung, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeoul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new finger biometric method. Infrared finger images are first captured, and then feature extraction is performed using a modified Gaussian high-pass filter through binarization, local binary pattern (LBP), and local derivative pattern (LDP) methods. Infrared finger images include the multimodal features of finger veins and finger geometries. Instead of extracting each feature using different methods, the modified Gaussian high-pass filter is fully convolved. Therefore, the extracted binary patterns of finger images include the multimodal features of veins and finger geometries. Experimental results show that the proposed method has an error rate of 0.13%. PMID:22163741

  5. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy.

  6. Mice lacking the PSD-95–interacting E3 ligase, Dorfin/Rnf19a, display reduced adult neurogenesis, enhanced long-term potentiation, and impaired contextual fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwool; Yang, Jinhee; Kim, Ryunhee; Li, Yan; Lee, Yeunkum; Lee, Chungwoo; Park, Jongil; Lee, Dongmin; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination has a significant influence on diverse aspects of neuronal development and function. Dorfin, also known as Rnf19a, is a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, but its in vivo functions have not been explored. We report here that Dorfin is a novel binding partner of the excitatory postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95. Dorfin-mutant (Dorfin−/−) mice show reduced adult neurogenesis and enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, but normal long-term potentiation in the CA1 region. Behaviorally, Dorfin−/− mice show impaired contextual fear conditioning, but normal levels of cued fear conditioning, fear extinction, spatial learning and memory, object recognition memory, spatial working memory, and pattern separation. Using a proteomic approach, we also identify a number of proteins whose ubiquitination levels are decreased in the Dorfin−/− brain. These results suggest that Dorfin may regulate adult neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and contextual fear memory. PMID:26553645

  7. Electrothermal ring burn from a car battery.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Paul A; Godwin, Kenneth A

    2013-08-01

    Despite prevention efforts, burn injuries among auto mechanics are described in the literature. Electrothermal ring burns from car batteries occur by short-circuiting through the ring when it touches the open terminal or metal housing. This article describes a 34-year-old male auto mechanic who was holding a wrench when his gold ring touched the positive terminal of a 12-volt car battery and the wrench touched both his ring and the negative terminal. He felt instant pain and had a deep partial-thickness circumferential burn at the base of his ring finger. No other soft tissues were injured. He was initially managed conservatively, but after minimal healing at 3 weeks, he underwent a full-thickness skin graft. The graft incorporated well and healed by 4 weeks postoperatively. He had full range of motion. The cause of ring burns has been controversial, but based on reports similar to the current patient's mechanism, they are most likely electrothermal burns. Gold, a metal with high thermal conductivity, can heat up to its melting point in a matter of seconds. Many treatments have been described, including local wound care to split- and full-thickness skin grafts. Because most burns are preventable, staff should be warned and trained about the potential risks of contact burns. All jewelry should be removed, and the live battery terminal should be covered while working in the vicinity of the battery.

  8. Finger muscle attachments for an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S; Dennerlein, Jack T; Jindrich, Devin L

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements.

  9. Finger Muscle Attachments for an OpenSim Upper-Extremity Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Jindrich, Devin L.

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements. PMID:25853869

  10. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-08-20

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously.

  11. Design and preliminary evaluation of the FINGER rehabilitation robot: controlling challenge and quantifying finger individuation during musical computer game play

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), a device for assisting in finger rehabilitation after neurologic injury. We developed FINGER to assist stroke patients in moving their fingers individually in a naturalistic curling motion while playing a game similar to Guitar Hero®a. The goal was to make FINGER capable of assisting with motions where precise timing is important. Methods FINGER consists of a pair of stacked single degree-of-freedom 8-bar mechanisms, one for the index and one for the middle finger. Each 8-bar mechanism was designed to control the angle and position of the proximal phalanx and the position of the middle phalanx. Target positions for the mechanism optimization were determined from trajectory data collected from 7 healthy subjects using color-based motion capture. The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths. For initial evaluation, we asked individuals with a stroke (n = 16) and without impairment (n = 4) to play a game similar to Guitar Hero® while connected to FINGER. Results Precision design, low friction bearings, and separate high speed linear actuators allowed FINGER to individually actuate the fingers with a high bandwidth of control (−3 dB at approximately 8 Hz). During the tests, we were able to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game by automatically adjusting the controller gains of FINGER. We also used FINGER to measure subjects’ effort and finger individuation while playing the game. Conclusions Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:24495432

  12. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  13. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record ‘three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals. PMID:25366032

  14. Individual variability in finger-to-finger transmission efficiency of Enterococcus faecium clones

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Sánchez-Díaz, Ana María; Zamora, Javier; Torres, Carmen; Cintas, Luis María; Franco, Elvira; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A fingertip-to-fingertip intraindividual transmission experiment was carried out in 30 healthy volunteers, using four MLST-typed Enterococcus faecium clones. Overall results showed an adequate fit goodness to a theoretical exponential model, whereas four volunteers (13%) exhibited a significantly higher finger-to-finger bacterial transmission efficiency. This observation might have deep consequences in nosocomial epidemiology. PMID:24382843

  15. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  16. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ...

  17. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  18. Structure of the Siz/PIAS SUMO E3 Ligase Siz1 and Determinants Required for SUMO Modification of PCNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-01-12

    Siz1 is a founding member of the Siz/PIAS RING family of SUMO E3 ligases. The X-ray structure of an active Siz1 ligase revealed an elongated tripartite architecture comprised of an N-terminal PINIT domain, a central zinc-containing RING-like SP-RING domain, and a C-terminal domain we term the SP-CTD. Structure-based mutational analysis and biochemical studies show that the SP-RING and SP-CTD are required for activation of the E2SUMO thioester, while the PINIT domain is essential for redirecting SUMO conjugation to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at lysine 164, a nonconsensus lysine residue that is not modified by the SUMO E2 in the absence of Siz1. Mutational analysis of Siz1 and PCNA revealed surfaces on both proteins that are required for efficient SUMO modification of PCNA in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Finger injuries caused by power-operated windows of motor vehicles: an experimental cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Pollinger, P; Burkhart, K J; Konerding, M A; Prommersberger, K J; Rommens, P M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this experimental cadaver study was to investigate which kinds of lesions could occur in jam events between the glass and seal entry of power-operated motor vehicle side door windows at two different closing forces. Ten hands of fresh cadaver specimens were used. Three different hand positions chosen to simulate real events in which a finger is jammed between the glass and seal entry of the window of a current motor vehicle were examined. The index, middle, ring, and little finger of each hand were separately jammed both at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joint at closing forces of 300 and 500 N with a constant window glass closing speed of 10 cm/s. Macroscopically visible injuries were documented and radiographs of all fingers were obtained in two standard planes. At a closing force of 300 N, contusion marks of the skin, palmar joint instabilities and superficial skin lesions occurred, whilst at 500 N superficial skin lesions, superficial and deep open crush injuries, and fractures were observed. The results of this study experimentally demonstrate the kinds of finger injuries that could be expected in real jam events between the glass and seal entry in automatic power-operated windows.

  20. Soft-tissue coverage of complex dorsal hand and finger defects using the turnover adipofascial flap.

    PubMed

    Deal, D Nicole; Barnwell, Jonathan; Li, Zhongyu

    2011-02-01

    Complex hand wounds with exposed tendon or bone often require free tissue transfer. We report results in 13 patients with complex dorsal hand or digital wounds who underwent soft-tissue reconstruction using a turnover adipofascial flap and skin grafting over a 35-month period. The mean patient age was 44 years. Mechanism of injury included the following: three gunshot, four degloving, one table saw, three chain saw, one thumb avulsion, and one crush. Flap sizes varied from 2 × 4 to 10 × 18 cm, involving the dorsum of the hand in four patients, thumb in two patients, index finger in one patient, long finger in three patients, long and ring fingers in one patient, and web space in two patients. Skin graft survival was 100% in 12 patients. One patient died of sepsis from unrelated medical conditions. All fractures were healed at follow-up, and there were no donor site complications. The adipofascial flap is a good alternative to free tissue transfer for the coverage of complex dorsal hand and finger soft-tissue defects and is associated with technical ease, good cosmetic results, and minimal donor site morbidity.

  1. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    PubMed Central

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense. PMID:25852582

  2. Blood pressure measurement using finger cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choi, E; Jeong, H; Kim, K; Park, J

    2005-01-01

    Many research groups have studied blood pressure measurement in finger artery because of its convenience. But, low accuracy prohibits many hypertension patients from using this device. So, we suggest measurement algorithm that measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure in finger artery. And we also develop calibration method that decreases the error from difference of finger circumference by subjects. We apply our methods for 90 subjects (age form 20 to 49, 55 male, 35 female) to test feasibility of our method by AAMI SP10 standard. The mean difference of our system is ±4.7mmHg for systolic pressure, ±4.2mmHg for systolic pressure. It proved that the feasibility of our method is clinically acceptable.(under ±5mmHg).

  3. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  4. Finger recognition and gesture imitation in Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moro, V; Pernigo, S; Urgesi, C; Zapparoli, P; Aglioti, S M

    2008-01-01

    We report the association between finger agnosia and gesture imitation deficits in a right-handed, right-hemisphere damaged patient with Gerstmann's syndrome (GS), a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by finger and toe agnosia, left-right disorientation and dyscalculia. No language deficits were found. The patient showed a gestural imitation deficit that specifically involved finger movements and postures. The association between finger recognition and imitation deficits suggests that both static and dynamic aspects of finger representations are impaired in GS. We suggest that GS is a disorder of body representation that involves hands and fingers, that is, the non-facial body parts most involved in social interactions.

  5. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG) signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Methods Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with that of the experimental results from the human and prosthetic finger phalanges. The simulation models were used to investigate the effects of (a) varying the internal topology of the finger phalanx and (b) varying different materials for the internal and external layers. Results and Conclusions During handshake, the high magnitudes of contact forces were observed at the areas where the full grasping enclosure of the other person's hand can be achieved. From these areas, the middle phalanges of the (a) little, (b) ring, and (c) middle fingers were selected. The indentation experiments on these areas showed that a 2 N force corresponds to skin tissue displacements of more than 2 mm. The results from the simulation model show that introducing an open pocket with 2 mm height on the internal structure of synthetic finger phalanges increased the skin compliance of the silicone material to 235% and the polyurethane material to 436%, as compared to a

  6. Finger tapping in musicians and nonmusicians.

    PubMed

    Franĕk, M; Mates, J; Radil, T; Beck, K; Pöppel, E

    1991-12-01

    Timing plays an important role in perceiving and performing music. Finger tapping has been successfully used for analyzing timing processes (Fraisse, 1966, Franĕk et al., 1987, 1988). The aim of this study is to determine differences between musically trained and untrained subjects in their ability to follow repetitive rhythmic tonal patterns by finger tapping. It has been found previously (Povel, 1981; Smith, 1983) that time estimation differs among musicians and nonmusicians under certain conditions. The results presented here show that motor timing revealed by tapping is more accurate in musicians than in nonmusicians.

  7. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  8. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  9. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  10. Targeting the mTOR-DEPTOR Pathway by CRL E3 Ubiquitin Ligases: Therapeutic Application1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals and serves as a central regulator of cell metabolism, growth, proliferation, survival, and autophagy. The mTOR pathway is frequently activated in many human cancers, mainly resulting from alterations in the upstream regulators, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation, PTEN loss or dysregulation of mTOR-negative regulators (e.g., TSC1/2), leading to uncontrolled proliferation. Thus, inhibiting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways is widely considered as an effective approach for targeted cancer therapy. Recently, we and others found that DEPTOR, a naturally occurring inhibitor of both mTORC1 and mTORC2, was degraded by SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F box proteins) E3 ubiquitin ligase, the founding member of cullin-RING-ligases (CRLs), resulting in mTOR activation and cell proliferation. In addition to DEPTOR, previous studies have demonstrated that several other negative regulators of mTOR pathway are also substrates of CRL/SCF E3s. Thus, targeting CRL/SCF E3s is expected to cause the accumulation of these mTOR signal inhibitors to effectively block the mTOR pathway. In this review, we will discuss mTOR signaling pathway, how DEPTOR regulates mTOR/AKT axis, thus acting as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in some cases, how DEPTOR is ubiquitinated and degraded by SCFβ-TrCP E3, and how MLN4924, a small-molecule indirect inhibitor of CRL/SCF E3 ligases through blocking cullin neddylation, might be useful as a novel approach of mTOR pathway targeting for cancer therapy. PMID:22745582

  11. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products.

  12. Transdermal anaesthesia for percutaneous trigger finger release.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transdermal anaesthesia using eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) in patients undergoing percutaneous trigger finger release and to compare it with lidocaine infiltration. In this prospective, randomised study percutaneous release of the A1 annular pulley was performed to treat stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger syndrome) in 50 patients (50 fingers). The procedure was performed either under transdermal anaesthesia using EMLA applied transcutaneously 120 minutes prior to the operation (Group A, n = 25) or using local infiltration anaesthesia using lidocaine (Group B, n = 25). Pain experienced during administration of anaesthesia and during the operation was assessed using a 10-point Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), while all patients rated the effectiveness of anaesthesia with a 5-point scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the VAPS during the operation (1.33 +/- 0.52 versus 1.59 +/- 0.87) and the satisfaction scores (4.6 +/- 0.2 versus 4.4 +/- 0.3). The VAPS score during the administration of anaesthesia was statistically significantly less in the EMLA group (0 versus 5.96 +/- 2.41). All patients were satisfied with the final result of the operation. Percutaneous trigger finger release can be performed as an office procedure with the use of EMLA avoiding the use of injectable local infiltration anaesthesia.

  13. Fingering and fracturing in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Holtzman, R.; Szulczewski, M.

    2012-12-01

    Here, we describe the phenomenon of capillary fracturing in granular media. We study the displacement of immiscible fluids in deformable, non-cohesive granular media. Experimentally, we inject air into a thin bed of water-saturated glass beads and observe the invasion morphology. The control parameters are the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. We identify three invasion regimes: capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and "capillary fracturing", where capillary forces overcome frictional resistance and induce the opening of conduits. We derive two dimensionless numbers that govern the transition among the different regimes: a modified capillary number and a fracturing number. The experiments and analysis predict the emergence of fracturing in fine-grained media under low confining stress, a phenomenon that likely plays a fundamental role in many natural processes such as primary oil migration, methane venting from lake sediments, and the formation of desiccation cracks.Examples of experimentally observed patterns. We classify these patterns into three regimes: viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and fracturing.

  14. Layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, J. F.; Garaud, P.; Alsinan, A.; Meiburg, E.

    2017-04-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at larger density ratios. It also gives rise to a new layering instability that exists in $\\gamma-$stable regimes. The former is likely quite ubiquitous in geophysical systems for sufficiently large settling velocities, while the latter probably grows too slowly to be relevant, at least in the context of sediments in water.

  15. Compact Tactile Sensors for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.; Lussy, David; Gaudiano, Frank; Hulse, Aaron; Diftler, Myron A.; Rodriguez, Dagoberto; Bielski, Paul; Butzer, Melisa

    2004-01-01

    Compact transducer arrays that measure spatial distributions of force or pressure have been demonstrated as prototypes of tactile sensors to be mounted on fingers and palms of dexterous robot hands. The pressure- or force-distribution feedback provided by these sensors is essential for the further development and implementation of robot-control capabilities for humanlike grasping and manipulation.

  16. Viscous fingering of HCI through gastric mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, K. Ramakrishnan; Garik, Peter; Turner, Bradley S.; Bradley, James Douglas; Bansil, Rama; Stanley, H. Eugene; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1992-12-01

    THE HCI in the mammalian stomach is concentrated enough to digest the stomach itself, yet the gastric epithelium remains undamaged. One protective factor is gastric mucus, which forms a protective layer over the surface epithelium1-4 and acts as a diffusion barrier5,6 Bicarbonate ions secreted by the gastric epithelium7 are trapped in the mucus gel, establishing a gradient from pH 1-2 at the lumen to pH 6-7 at the cell surface8-10. How does HCI, secreted at the base of gastric glands by parietal cells, traverse the mucus layer without acidifying it? Here we demonstrate that injection of HCI through solutions of pig gastric mucin produces viscous fingering patterns11-18 dependent on pH, mucin concentration and acid flow rate. Above pH 4, discrete fingers are observed, whereas below pH 4, HCI neither penetrates the mucin solution nor forms fingers. Our in vitro results suggest that HCI secreted by the gastric gland can penetrate the mucus gel layer (pH 5-7) through narrow fingers, whereas HC1 in the lumen (pH 2) is prevented from diffusing back to the epithelium by the high viscosity of gastric mucus gel on the luminal side.

  17. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  18. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  19. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  20. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  1. Prediction of zinc finger DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K

    1995-04-01

    Using the neural network algorithm with back-propagation training procedure, we analysed the zinc finger DNA binding protein sequences. We incorporated the characteristic patterns around the zinc finger motifs TFIIIA type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-13-His-X2-5-His) and the steroid hormone receptor type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-15-Cys-X2-5-Cys-X15-16-Cys-X4-5-Cys-X8-10- Cys-X2-3-Cys) in the neural network algorithm. The patterns used in the neural network were the amino acid pattern, the electric charge and polarity pattern, the side-chain chemical property and subproperty patterns, the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity patterns and the secondary structure propensity pattern. Two consecutive patterns were also considered. Each pattern was incorporated in the single layer perceptron algorithm and the combinations of patterns were considered in the two-layer perceptron algorithm. As for the TFIIIA type zinc finger DNA binding motifs, the prediction results of the two-layer perceptron algorithm reached up to 96.9% discrimination, and the prediction results of the discriminant analysis using the combination of several characters reached up to 97.0%. As for the steroid hormone receptor type zinc finger, the prediction results of neural network algorithm and the discriminant analyses reached up to 96.0%.

  2. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  3. Coriolis effects on fingering patterns under rotation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2008-08-01

    The development of immiscible viscous fingering patterns in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell is investigated. We focus on understanding how the time evolution and the resulting morphologies are affected by the action of the Coriolis force. The problem is approached analytically and numerically by employing a vortex sheet formalism. The vortex sheet strength and a linear dispersion relation are derived analytically, revealing that the most relevant Coriolis force contribution comes from the normal component of the averaged interfacial velocity. It is shown that this normal velocity, uniquely due to the presence of the Coriolis force, is responsible for the complex-valued nature of the linear dispersion relation making the linear phases vary with time. Fully nonlinear stages are studied through intensive numerical simulations. A suggestive interplay between inertial and viscous effects is found, which modifies the dynamics, leading to different pattern-forming structures. The inertial Coriolis contribution plays a characteristic role: it generates a phase drift by deviating the fingers in the sense opposite to the actual rotation of the cell. However, the direction and intensity of finger bending is predominantly determined by viscous effects, being sensitive to changes in the magnitude and sign of the viscosity contrast. The finger competition behavior at advanced time stages is also discussed.

  4. Probes of Ubiquitin E3 ligases distinguish different stages of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Stanley, Mathew; Han, Cong; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Murphy, Paul; Balk, Kristin; Wood, Nicola T.; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Muqit, Miratul M.K.; Virdee, Satpal

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligases represent an important class of enzymes, yet there are currently no chemical probes to profile their activity. We develop a new class of activity-based probe by reengineering of a ubiquitin-charged E2 conjugating enzyme and demonstrate their utility by profiling the transthiolation activity of the RING-in-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligase Parkin in vitro and in cellular extracts. Our study provides valuable insight into the roles, and cellular hierarchy, of distinct phosphorylation events in Parkin activation. We also profile Parkin patient disease-associated mutations and strikingly demonstrate that they largely mediate their effect by altering transthiolation activity. Furthermore, our probes enable direct and quantitative measurement of endogenous Parkin activity revealing that endogenous Parkin is activated in neuronal cell lines (≥75 %) in response to mitochondrial depolarization. This new technology also holds promise as a novel biomarker of PINK1-Parkin signalling as demonstrated by compatibility with Parkinson’s disease patient-derived samples. PMID:26928937

  5. Functional analysis of a RING domain ankyrin repeat protein that is highly expressed during flower senescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinjia; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Donnelly, Linda; Reid, Michael S

    2007-01-01

    A gene encoding a RING zinc finger ankyrin repeat protein (MjXB3), a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, is highly expressed in petals of senescing four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) flowers, increasing >40,000-fold during the onset of visible senescence. The gene has homologues in many other species, and the Petunia homologue is strongly up-regulated in senescing Petunia corollas. Silencing the expression of this gene in Petunia, using virus-induced gene silencing, resulted in a 2 d extension in flower life. In Mirabilis, a 2 kb promoter region, 5' upstream of the MjXB3 gene, was isolated. The promoter sequence included putative binding sites for many DNA-binding proteins, including the bZIP, Myb, homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip), MADS-box, and WRKY transcription factors. The construct containing a 1 kb promoter region immediately upstream of the MjXB3 gene drove the strongest expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in a transient expression assay. In Petunia, GUS expression under the control of this heterologous promoter fragment was specific to senescing flowers. The Mirabilis promoter GUS construct was tested in other flower species; while GUS activity in carnation petals was high during senescence, no expression was detected in three monocotyledonous flowers--daylily (Hemerocallis 'Stella d'Oro'), daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus 'King Alfred'), and orchid (Dendrobium 'Emma White').

  6. SUMO E3 ligase activity of TRIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Y; Yang, X

    2011-03-03

    SUMOylation governs numerous cellular processes and is essential to most eukaryotic life. Despite increasing recognition of the importance of this process, an extremely limited number of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein ligases (E3s) have been identified. Here we show that at least some members of the functionally diverse tripartite motif (TRIM) superfamily are SUMO E3s. These TRIM proteins bind both the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and substrates and strongly enhance transfer of SUMOs from Ubc9 to these substrates. Among the substrates of TRIM SUMO E3s are the tumor suppressor p53 and its principal antagonist Mdm2. The E3 activity depends on the TRIM motif, suggesting it to be the first widespread SUMO E3 motif. Given the large number of TRIM proteins, our results may greatly expand the identified SUMO E3s. Furthermore, TRIM E3 activity may be an important contributor to SUMOylation specificity and the versatile functions of TRIM proteins.

  7. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  8. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  9. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  10. Robot-Assisted Guitar Hero for Finger Rehabilitation after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B.; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Wolbrecht, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (−3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n = 8) and without impairment (n = 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject’s effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:23366783

  11. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  16. Robot-assisted Guitar Hero for finger rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (-3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n= 8) and without impairment (n= 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject's success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject's effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke.

  17. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  18. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase RLIM Negatively Regulates c-Myc Transcriptional Activity and Restrains Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Cai, Hao; Zhu, Jingjing; Yu, Long

    2016-01-01

    RNF12/RLIM is a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase whose function has only begun to be elucidated recently. Although RLIM was reported to play important roles in some biological processes such as imprinted X-chromosome inactivation and regulation of TGF-β pathway etc., other functions of RLIM are largely unknown. Here, we identified RLIM as a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase for c-Myc, one of the most frequently deregulated oncoproteins in human cancers. RLIM associates with c-Myc in vivo and in vitro independently of the E3 ligase activity of RLIM. Moreover, RLIM promotes the polyubiquitination of c-Myc protein independently of Ser62 and Thr58 phosphorylation of c-Myc. However, RLIM-mediated ubiquitination does not affect c-Myc stability. Instead, RLIM inhibits the transcriptional activity of c-Myc through which RLIM restrains cell proliferation. Our results suggest that RLIM may function as a tumor suppressor by controlling the activity of c-Myc oncoprotein. PMID:27684546

  19. Characterization of the mammalian family of DCN-type NEDD8 E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Keuss, Matthew J.; Thomas, Yann; Mcarthur, Robin; Wood, Nicola T.; Knebel, Axel; Kurz, Thimo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cullin-RING ligases (CRL) are ubiquitin E3 enzymes that bind substrates through variable substrate receptor proteins and are activated by attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to the cullin subunit. DCNs are NEDD8 E3 ligases that promote neddylation. Mammalian cells express five DCN-like (DCNL) proteins but little is known about their specific functions or interaction partners. We found that DCNLs form stable stoichiometric complexes with CAND1 and cullins that can only be neddylated in the presence of a substrate adaptor. These CAND–cullin–DCNL complexes might represent ‘reserve’ CRLs that can be rapidly activated when needed. We further found that all DCNLs interact with most cullin subtypes, but that they are probably responsible for the neddylation of different subpopulations of any given cullin. This is consistent with the fact that the subcellular localization of DCNLs in tissue culture cells differs and that they show unique tissue-specific expression patterns in mice. Thus, the specificity between DCNL-type NEDD8 E3 enzymes and their cullin substrates is only apparent in well-defined physiological contexts and related to their subcellular distribution and restricted expression. PMID:26906416

  20. About E3: Economy – Energy – Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page explains EPA's E3 – Economy, Energy, and Environment – program, a federal and local technical assistance initiative, helping manufacturers adapt and thrive with a focus on sustainability.

  1. E3 ubiquitin ligases and abscisic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongxia

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in the regulation of nearly every aspect of plant growth and development. Protein ubiquitination involves the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to target proteins through a cascade catalyzed by three enzymes known as E1, E2 and E3. E3s are of particular interest as they confer substrate specificity during ubiquitination through their diverse substrate recognition domains. Recently, a number of E3s have been identified that actively participate in abscisic acid hormone biology, including regulation of biosynthesis, de-repression or activation of abscisic acid response and degradation of signaling components. In this review, we summarize recent exciting studies of the different types of E3s that target specific mediators of abscisic acid signaling or affect the plants response to the hormone. PMID:21364320

  2. Dynamic interactions of proteins in complex networks: identifying the complete set of interacting E2s for functional investigation of E3-dependent protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Devin E; Klevit, Rachel E

    2009-10-01

    A ubiquitin ligase (E3) functions at the crossroad between ubiquitin activation and the attachment of ubiquitin to protein substrates. During this process, the E3 interacts with both a substrate and a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2). Although a major goal when investigating an E3 is to identify its substrates, recent evidence indicates that the E2 dictates the type of ubiquitin modification that will occur on the substrate. There are approximately 30 E2s identified in the human genome, many of which remain to be characterized. We found that the RING E3 BRCA1/BARD1 can interact with 10 different E2s. The ability of BRCA1 to interact with multiple E2s is likely to be a common feature among other RING and U-box E3s. We and others have also found that certain E2s show a preference for attaching either the first ubiquitin to a substrate lysine or ubiquitin to itself (chain building), suggesting that E2s may play a role in dictating product formation. Therefore, when investigating the functions of an E3 it is advisable to identify all E2s that interact with the E3 so that these can be used in E3-dependent substrate-ubiquitination assays. We describe a method used to identify all the E2s that interact with BRCA1. Defining the set of E2s that interact with other RING and U-box E3s will open the door for predictive models and lead to a better understand of substrate ubiquitination.

  3. Analysis of prosody in finger braille using electromyography.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Manabi; Nishida, Masafumi; Horiuchi, Yasuo; Ichikawa, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Finger braille is one of the communication methods for the deaf blind. The interpreter types braille codes on the fingers of deaf blind. Finger braille seems to be the most suitable medium for real-time communication by its speed and accuracy of transmitting characters. We hypothesize that the prosody information exists in the time structure and strength of finger braille typing. Prosody is the paralinguistic information that has functions to transmit the sentence structure, prominence, emotions and other form of information in real time communication. In this study, we measured the surface electromyography (sEMG) of finger movement to analyze the typing strength of finger braille. We found that the typing strength increases at the beginning of a phrase and a prominent phrase. The result shows the possibility that the prosody in the typing strength of finger braille can be applied to create an interpreter system for the deafblind.

  4. Nylon-muscle-actuated robotic finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianjun; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Rome, Richard S.; Haines, Carter; Lima, Marcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental analysis of novel artificial muscles, made of twisted and coiled nylon fibers, for powering a biomimetic robotic hand. The design is based on circulating hot and cold water to actuate the artificial muscles and obtain fast finger movements. The actuation system consists of a spring and a coiled muscle within a compliant silicone tube. The silicone tube provides a watertight, expansible compartment within which the coiled muscle contracts when heated and expands when cooled. The fabrication and characterization of the actuating system are discussed in detail. The performance of the coiled muscle fiber in embedded conditions and the related characteristics of the actuated robotic finger are described.

  5. Spliceosomal introns in the 5′ untranslated region of plant BTL RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases are evolutionary conserved and required for gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Introns located close to the 5′ end of a gene or in the 5′ untranslated region often exert positive effects on gene expression. This effect, known as intron-mediated enhancement (IME), has been observed in diverse eukaryotic organisms, including plants. The sequences involved in IME seem to be spread across the intron and function in an additive manner. The IMEter algorithm was developed to predict plant introns that may enhance gene expression. We have identified several plant members of the BTL class of E3s, which may have orthologs across eukaryotes, that contain a 5′UTR intron. The RING finger E3 ligases are key enzymes of the ubiquitination system that mediate the transfer of ubiquitin to substrates. Results In this study, we retrieved BTL sequences from several angiosperm species and found that 5′UTR introns showing a strong IMEter score were predicted, suggesting that they may be conserved by lineage. Promoter-GUS fusion lines were used to confirm the IME effect of these 5′UTR introns on gene expression. IMEter scores of BTLs were compared with the 5′UTR introns of two gene families MHX and polyubiquitin genes. Conclusions Analysis performed in two Arabidopsis BTL E3 ligases genes indicated that the 5′UTR introns were essential for gene expression in all the tissues tested. Comparison of the average 5′UTR intron size on three gene families in ten angiosperm species suggests that a prevalent size for a 5′UTR intron is in the range of 600 nucleotides, and that the overall IMEter score within a gene family is preserved across several angiosperms. Our results indicated that gene expression dependent on a 5′UTR intron is an efficient regulatory mechanism in BTL E3 ligases that has been preserved throughout plant evolution. PMID:24228887

  6. E3 Success Story - Working Together: E3 Ohio and the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) received funding to support the integration of the national E3 sustainability initiative with the Ohio By-Product Synergy (BPS) Network to create an efficient and replicable model for reducing GHGs.

  7. Experimental discrimination between charge 2e/3 top quark and charge 4e/3 exotic quark production scenarios.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-01-26

    We present the first experimental discrimination between the 2e/3 and 4e/3 top quark electric charge scenarios, using top quark pairs (tt) produced in pp collisions at (square root) s = 1.96 TeV by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We use 370 pb;{-1} of data collected by the D0 experiment and select events with at least one high transverse momentum electron or muon, high transverse energy imbalance, and four or more jets. We discriminate between b- and b-quark jets by using the charge and momenta of tracks within the jet cones. The data are consistent with the expected electric charge, |q|=2e/3. We exclude, at the 92% C.L., that the sample is solely due to the production of exotic quark pairs QQ with |q|=4e/3. We place an upper limit on the fraction of QQ pairs rho<0.80 at the 90% C.L.

  8. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  9. [Periarthritis calcarea of the finger joints].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Goth, D

    1989-11-01

    Calcium deposits close to finger joints are seen very often and are common in systemic diseases. There are also calcium deposits with no relation to other symptoms and therefore diagnosis is difficult. Between 1984-1988 we have analysed twelve such cases and explained the differential diagnosis and therapy. It seems important that these cases with typical clinical and radiologic findings are self-limiting and restitutio ad integrum is common without any therapy.

  10. Empathizing, systemizing and finger length ratio in a Swedish sample.

    PubMed

    Von Horn, Agneta; Bäckman, Lisa; Davidsson, Thomas; Hansen, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The Empathy- and Systemizing Quotients (EQ and SQ, respectively; Baron-Cohen, 2003) were determined in a Swedish sample consisting mainly of university undergraduates. Females had significantly higher EQ than males, who in turn scored higher on the SQ inventory. Gender explained 12-14% of the variation. Males were strikingly overrepresented in the group defined by a high SQ/low EQ profile or by a large SQ - EQ difference; females dominated among people with a low SQ/high EQ profile or by a large EQ - SQ difference. Students majoring in the natural sciences had higher SQs than psychology majors, but in both groups the gender difference in SQ and EQ was strong. For each participant a weighted composite score was generated by multivariate processing of the EQ and SQ data (Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis). These scores were associated in a sex-linked fashion to a biometric measure reflecting prenatal testosterone exposure, i.e. the ratio between index (2D)- and ring (4D) finger lengths. In males a high (female-typical) 2D:4D ratio predicted an enhanced tendency to empathize and a reduced tendency to systemize; in women, by contrast, the 2D:4D ratio was unrelated to these traits. The present research confirms earlier work of a gender difference in EQ and SQ. The difference appears robust as it appears as large in Sweden (a country with high cultural gender-equality) as in countries with considerably lower gender-equality.

  11. E2 conjugating enzyme selectivity and requirements for function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Soss, Sarah E; Yue, Yuanyuan; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-06-17

    The transfer of ubiquitin (Ub) to a substrate protein requires a cascade of E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligating enzymes. E3 Ub ligases containing U-box and RING domains bind both E2∼Ub conjugates and substrates to facilitate transfer of the Ub molecule. Although the overall mode of action of E3 ligases is well established, many of the mechanistic details that determine the outcome of ubiquitination are poorly understood. CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) is a U-box E3 ligase that serves as a co-chaperone to heat shock proteins and is critical for the regulation of unfolded proteins in the cytosol. We have performed a systematic analysis of the interactions of CHIP with E2 conjugating enzymes and found that only a subset bind and function. Moreover, some E2 enzymes function in pairs to create products that neither create individually. Characterization of the products of these reactions showed that different E2 enzymes produce different ubiquitination products, i.e. that E2 determines the outcome of Ub transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis on the E2 enzymes Ube2D1 and Ube2L3 (UbcH5a and UbcH7) established that an SPA motif in loop 7 of E2 is required for binding to CHIP but is not sufficient for activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate and consequent ubiquitination activity. These data support the proposal that the E2 SPA motif provides specificity for binding to CHIP, whereas activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate is derived from other molecular determinants.

  12. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  13. Multi-finger Prehension: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the available experimental evidence on what people do when they grasp an object with several digits and then manipulate it. In addition to the Introduction, the paper includes three parts each addressing a specific aspect of multi-finger prehension. Part II discusses manipulation forces, i.e. the resultant force and moment of force exerted on the object, and the digits contribution to such force production. Part III deals with internal forces defined as forces that cancel each other and do not disturb object equilibrium. The role of the internal forces in maintaining the object stability is discussed with respect to such issues as slip prevention, tilt prevention and resistance to perturbations. Part IV is devoted to the motor control of prehension. It covers such topics as prehension synergies, chain effects, the principle of superposition, inter-finger connection matrices and reconstruction of neural commands, mechanical advantage of the fingers, and the simultaneous digit adjustment to several mutually reinforcing or conflicting demands. PMID:18782719

  14. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ian M.; Smith, Irene J.; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-01-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints. PMID:27433323

  15. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze.

    PubMed

    Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Thornton, Ian M; Smith, Irene J; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-03-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  16. Comprehensive Rehabilitation of Partially Amputated Index Finger with Silicone Prosthesis: A Case Report with 3 years of Follow Up.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manawar; Balakrishnan, Dhanasekar; Narayan, Aparna; Naim, Hina

    2014-12-01

    The loss of all or part of a finger following traumatic amputation may have a negative impact on physical and psychological well-being. An esthetic prosthesis can offer psychological, functional, and rehabilitative advantages. One of the major problems associated with somato-prosthetic replacement of partially amputated finger is inadequate retention of the prosthesis. This may stem from the weight of the prosthesis, inadequate tissue support, and/or the particular area of the finger to be replaced. A number of means have been employed to enhance retention. Among the more common are adhesives, adhesive tape, magnets and implants. The purpose of this article is to describe a technique which eliminates the need for adhesive materials and utilizes copper wire to fabricate a finger ring as a primary means of retention. This technique can be utilized whenever the prosthesis encompasses more than 180° of the affected area. This clinical report presents a case of rehabilitation of a partially amputated index finger defect and describes a method of retention for the same with a copper ring.

  17. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  18. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-07

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  19. The role of fingers in number processing in young children

    PubMed Central

    Lafay, Anne; Thevenot, Catherine; Castel, Caroline; Fayol, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4–7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children's performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task), even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations. PMID:23908643

  20. Terrain reconstruction from Chang'e-3 PCAM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Rui; Ren, Xin; Wang, Fen-Fei; Liu, Jian-Jun; Li, Chun-Lai

    2015-07-01

    The existing terrain models that describe the local lunar surface have limited resolution and accuracy, which can hardly meet the needs of rover navigation, positioning and geological analysis. China launched the lunar probe Chang'e-3 in December, 2013. Chang'e-3 encompassed a lander and a lunar rover called “Yutu” (Jade Rabbit). A set of panoramic cameras were installed on the rover mast. After acquiring panoramic images of four sites that were explored, the terrain models of the local lunar surface with resolution of 0.02m were reconstructed. Compared with other data sources, the models derived from Chang'e-3 data were clear and accurate enough that they could be used to plan the route of Yutu. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  1. Influence of local vibration on finger functions of forest workers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Nakamura, K; Sato, K; Tanaka, K

    1997-07-01

    We physically examined of forest workers in the northern part of Fukushima District, Japan. The main purpose of this study was to survey the state of finger functions, especially the differences between the functions of right and left fingers of forest workers. This physical examination was conducted in winter. The items of the physical examination were hand grip strength, finger skin temperature, vibration sensation threshold, nail pressure test of the finger. Subjects were classified into A and B groups on the base of the results of the physical examination. A group is normal or slight disorder, and B group is disorder or illness. Hand grip strength was measured five times at five-second intervals. The decrease ratio of the left hand grip strength was greater than that of the right hand grip strength. Although there were significant differences among each finger of A and B groups, there were no big differences in the skin temperatures of the fingers in each group. Vibration sensation threshold was measured for II, III and IV fingers. The vibration sensation threshold of the index finger was the most sensitive and that of IV finger was the least sensitive. The vibration sensation threshold of the right fingers was more sensitive than that of the left fingers. The reaction times of the nail pressure test of the right fingers were generally faster than those of the left fingers. Forestry workers in Japan become elderly. There are big differences among the physical reactions or strengths of elderly people. Standard values for the measuring items for ageing are needed.

  2. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  3. Regulation of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Walden, Helen; Martinez-Torres, R Julio

    2012-09-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase mutated in autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson's disease. In addition, it is a putative tumour suppressor, and has roles outside its enzymatic activity. It is critical for mitochondrial clearance through mitophagy, and is an essential protein in most eukaryotes. As such, it is a tightly controlled protein, regulated through an array of external interactions with multiple proteins, posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation, and self-regulation through internal associations. In this review, we highlight some of the recent studies into Parkin regulation and discuss future challenges for gaining a full molecular understanding of the regulation of Parkin E3 ligase activity.

  4. On certain Hecke rings

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Sam; Bressler, Paul

    1987-01-01

    We examine rings that embed into the smash product of the group algebra of the Weyl group with the field of meromorphic functions on the Cartan subalgebra and are generated by elements that satisfy braid relations. We prove that every such ring is isomorphic to either the Hecke algebra, the nil Hecke ring, or the group algebra of the Weyl group. PMID:16593804

  5. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  6. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  7. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  8. FINGER INTERACTION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRESSING TASK

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Shweta; Friedman, Jason; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate control of forces produced by the fingers is essential for performing object manipulation. This study examines the indices of finger interaction when accurate time profiles of force are produced in different directions, while using one of the fingers or all four fingers of the hand. We hypothesized that patterns of unintended force production among shear force components may involve features not observed in the earlier studies of vertical force production. In particular, we expected to see unintended forces generated by non-task fingers not in the direction on the instructed force but in the opposite direction as well as substantial force production in directions orthogonal to the instructed direction. We also tested a hypothesis that multi-finger synergies, quantified using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, will help reduce across-trials variance of both total force magnitude and direction. Young, healthy subjects were required to produce accurate ramps of force in five different directions by pressing on force sensors with the fingers of the right (dominant) hand. The index finger induced the smallest unintended forces in non-task fingers. The little finger showed the smallest unintended forces when it was a non-task finger. Task fingers showed substantial force production in directions orthogonal to the intended force direction. During four-finger tasks, individual force vectors typically pointed off the task direction, with these deviations nearly perfectly matched to produce a resultant force in the task direction. Multi-finger synergy indices reflected strong co-variation in the space of finger modes (commands to fingers) that reduced variability of the total force magnitude and direction across trials. The synergy indices increased in magnitude over the first 30% of the trial time and then stayed at a nearly constant level. The synergy index for stabilization of total force magnitude was higher for shear force components as

  9. Finger Length Ratio (2D:4D) in Central India and an Attempt to Verify Fraternal Birth Order Effect: A Population Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Chaitali; Jha, Dilip Kumar; Biswas, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A normal physiology of a human being is not mere a series of functions occurring with specific intensities and timing. There are lot of factors that may change the normal physiological activity within normal limits. Finger length ratio is one of the markers of intrauterine androgen exposure and it is debated and contradicted by many authors. Digit ratio varies among the ethnicities. Many Indian studies show that there is considerable difference in finger length ratio in different population. Data regarding Central India was not found on extensive search. Aim To find out the finger length ratio and explore the birth order effect on finger length ratio among the first two successive born in the said population. Materials and Methods We conducted a survey on 1500 volunteer persons (800 male and 700 female) over two years of time. We measured the length of the index finger (2D) and ring finger (4D) of both the hands and asked about their birth order history to find out the digit ratio for Central India population and any existing correlation of the same with birth order. T Test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for the measure of significance and difference among the groups. The p< 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results Our study reports that, study population mean for right hand 2D:4D ratio was 0.976 (SD±0.031) and for left hand it was found to be 0.969 (SD±0.035). For males, mean finger length ratio for right hand was 0.967 (SD±0.033) and 0.963 (SD±0.037) for left hand. In females the mean Finger length ratio was 0.982 (SD±0.027) for right hand and 0.974 (SD±0.034) for the left hand respectively. Finger length ratio was found to be significantly less (p=0.03) in males for right hand. No significant (p=0.24) difference was observed for left hand. When assessed fraternal birth order effect among the eldest, second born with elder brother and second born with elder sister groups, no significant (p>0.05) variation for finger length

  10. DNA multi-ring formation via evaporation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Maheshwari, Siddharth; Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2007-03-01

    We present a study of multi-ring pattern formation of DNA aggregates during the solvent evaporation of a DNA droplet. When the contact line of a droplet is pinned at a solid substrate, a `coffee ring' pattern is often observed due to the outward flow during evaporation which carries the nonvolatile solute to the edge of the contact line. Here we report a remarkable observation of multiple rings of DNA stain, where stretched DNA molecules connect each ring. We use a high-speed confocal scanning microscope to investigate the kinetics of the multi-ring formation, when DNAs aggregate at the contact-line and cause a stick-slip receding process with periodic depinning of the contact line. A saw-tooth pattern in measured contact angle during droplet evaporation confirms the stick-slip receding dynamics, and a miscible viscous fingering pattern further confirms the stagnation flow responsible for the formation of consecutive rings. We also report a scaling behavior of the multi-ring wavelength with DNA concentration, droplet size and evaporation temperature, consistent with our proposed mechanism.

  11. Iduna is a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Yun-Il; Shin, Joo-Ho; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Chi, Zhikai; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Yunjong; Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Byoung Dae; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin mediated protein degradation is crucial for regulation of cell signaling and protein quality control. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a cell-signaling molecule that mediates changes in protein function through binding at PAR binding sites. Here we characterize the PAR binding protein, Iduna, and show that it is a PAR-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligase. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity requires PAR binding because point mutations at Y156A and R157A eliminate Iduna’s PAR binding and Iduna’s E3 ligase activity. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity also requires an intact really interesting new gene (RING) domain because Iduna possessing point mutations at either H54A or C60A is devoid of ubiquitination activity. Tandem affinity purification reveals that Iduna binds to a number of proteins that are either PARsylated or bind PAR including PAR polymerase-1, 2 (PARP1, 2), nucleolin, DNA ligase III, KU70, KU86, XRCC1, and histones. PAR binding to Iduna activates its E3 ligase function, and PAR binding is required for Iduna ubiquitination of PARP1, XRCC1, DNA ligase III, and KU70. Iduna’s PAR-dependent ubiquitination of PARP1 targets it for proteasomal degradation. Via PAR binding and ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, Iduna protects against cell death induced by the DNA damaging agent N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and rescues cells from G1 arrest and promotes cell survival after γ-irradiation. Moreover, Iduna facilitates DNA repair by reducing apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites after MNNG exposure and facilitates DNA repair following γ-irradiation as assessed by the comet assay. These results define Iduna as a PAR-dependent E3 ligase that regulates cell survival and DNA repair. PMID:21825151

  12. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  13. Finger agnosia and cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Trotter, Jeffrey S; Hertza, Jeremy; Bell, Christopher D; Dean, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of finger agnosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to determine if level of finger agnosia was related to cognitive impairment. Finger agnosia is a sensitive measure of cerebral impairment and is associated with neurofunctional areas implicated in AD. Using a standardized and norm-referenced approach, results indicated that patients with AD evidenced significantly decreased performance on tests of bilateral finger agnosia compared with healthy age-matched controls. Finger agnosia was predictive of cognitive dysfunction on four of seven domains, including: Crystallized Language, Fluid Processing, Associative Learning, and Processing Speed. Results suggest that measures of finger agnosia, a short and simple test, may be useful in the early detection of AD.

  14. Relation between index finger width and hand width anthropometric measures.

    PubMed

    Komandur, Sashidharan; Johnson, Peter W; Storch, Richard L; Yost, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    Measures of hand and finger anthropometry are very important for designing many hand held devices as well as understanding anthropometric effects on the operation of such devices. Many historical datasets have measured and recorded gross hand dimensions but do not often record the finer dimensions of the hand such as finger anthropometry. Knowing the size and mass of fingers across genders can be critical to the design and operation of hand held devices. In this paper we compare two empirical linear models that predicts index finger width at the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (a finger anthropometric measure) based on hand-width (hand anthropometric measure). This will be especially useful for deriving population measures of finger anthropometry from large historical data sets where only gross hand dimensions are available.

  15. Ligand Supported E3 Clusters (E = Si-Sn).

    PubMed

    Pan, Sudip; Saha, Ranajit; Osorio, Edison; Chattaraj, Pratim K; Frenking, Gernot; Merino, Gabriel

    2017-03-08

    The interaction among E3 (E = Si, Ge, Sn) clusters and different ligands (L) encompassing five carbon-based donors (cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbene (cAAC), N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC), saturated NHC (SNHC), mesoionic carbenes (MIC1, and MIC2)), two nitrogen-based donors (trimethylamine and pyridine), and two phosphorous-based donors (phosphinine and trimethylphosphine) in E3(L)3 complexes is explored via density functional theory computations. Although all the carbenes form very strong bond with E3 clusters, cAAC makes the strongest bond with Si3 and Ge3 clusters, and MIC1 with Sn3 cluster. Nevertheless, other ligands bound complexes are also viable at room temperature. This finding indicates that experimentalists may make use of them to synthesize the desired clusters based on precursor availability. The nature of interaction in E-L bonds is analyzed through natural bond orbital analysis, energy decomposition analysis in combination with the natural orbital for chemical valence and adaptive natural density partitioning analysis. The L->E sigma-donation and L<-E pi-back-donation play important roles to make the favorable contacts between L and E3 clusters where the former is significantly more dominant over the latter.

  16. Cullin E3 Ligase Activity Is Required for Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Blondelle, Jordan; Shapiro, Paige; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Lange, Stephan

    2017-04-07

    The role of cullin E3-ubiquitin ligases for muscle homeostasis is best known during muscle atrophy, as the cullin-1 substrate adaptor atrogin-1 is among the most well-characterized muscle atrogins. We investigated whether cullin activity was also crucial during terminal myoblast differentiation and aggregation of acetylcholine receptors for the establishment of neuromuscular junctions in vitro. The activity of cullin E3-ligases is modulated through post-translational modification with the small ubiquitin-like modifier nedd8. Using either the Nae1 inhibitor MLN4924 (Pevonedistat) or siRNA against nedd8 in early or late stages of differentiation on C2C12 myoblasts, and primary satellite cells from mouse and human, we show that cullin E3-ligase activity is necessary for each step of the muscle cell differentiation program in vitro. We further investigate known transcriptional repressors for terminal muscle differentiation, namely ZBTB38, Bhlhe41, and Id1. Due to their identified roles for terminal muscle differentiation, we hypothesize that the accumulation of these potential cullin E3-ligase substrates may be partially responsible for the observed phenotype. MLN4924 is currently undergoing clinical trials in cancer patients, and our experiments highlight concerns on the homeostasis and regenerative capacity of muscles in these patients who often experience cachexia.

  17. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  18. Fingerprint imaging of dry finger using photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Young; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2017-03-01

    Fingerprint imaging has been widely used in biometric identification systems. This work presents a photoacoustic (PA) fingerprint imaging system that provides acoustic resolution using a pulsed laser and focused ultrasound transducer operating as a receiver. This PA system can measure dry fingers with a wide-range laser field based on the differences in the ultrasound coupling between the fingertip areas contacting and not contacting a solid plate. To demonstrate and validate the image accuracy of the PA system, PA fingerprint images were compared to images captured using a pulse-echo ultrasound system and an ink-pressed fingerprint scan.

  19. A Finger Vein Identification Method Based on Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Tao, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    New methods for extracting vein features from finger vein image and generating templates for matching are proposed. In the algorithm for generating templates, we proposed a parameter-templates quality factor (TQF) - to measure the quality of generated templates. So that we can use fewer finger vein samples to generate templates that meet the quality requirement of identification. The recognition accuracy of using proposed methods of finger vein feature extraction and template generation strategy for identification is 97.14%.

  20. On the solar dust ring(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.

    Based on a mechanism to form the solar dust ring, it is proved that the observed peak in infrared F-corona cannot be explained by silicate type grains alone. Preliminary analysis on the recent infrared data of the F-corona by Maihara et al. (1984) has suggested that the ring particles have different physical properties compared with the dust grains, which produce the background F-corona.

  1. Bilateral Volleyball-Related Deformity of the Little Fingers: Mallet Finger and Clinodactyly Mimic

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Mustafa; Solak, Kazim; Ozsahin, Mustafa; Uzun, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old male high school volleyball player was seen to evaluate right- and left-hand little-finger distal interphalangeal joint deformity and pain. His symptoms began during his second season of competitive play. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the little fingers flexed 20-30°, and a 10-15° valgus deformity was seen at the same joints. Pain was relieved with rest but returned immediately after playing volleyball, so plain radiographs were obtained. The flexion and valgus deformity was obvious on plain radiographs and through a clinical examination. Thus, a bilateral little-finger distal phalanx base epiphysis injury was seen. This injury is characterized by a biplanar Salter Harris physeal injury; type 5 on anteroposterior radiographs and type 2 on lateral plain radiographs. The deformity occurred as a result of competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral biplanar physial injury of the base of distal phalanges of the little fingers. Flexion and valgus deformities of DIP joints are a result of repeated micro traumas around the physis. Key points As a result of repeated micro traumas to the physial region, flexion and valgus deformities of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints should be occurred. Sports injuries to the hand often require treatment in orthopedic departments to avoid permanent deformities. Short- or long-term functional results can be gained by simple splinting procedures and abstention from play. PMID:24149318

  2. Vertical Finger Displacement is Reduced in Index Finger Tapping During Repeated Bout Rate Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mora-Jensen, Mark Holten; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-12-21

    The present study tested 1) whether a recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement in finger tapping (i.e. a cumulating increase in freely chosen finger tapping frequency following submaximal muscle activation in form of externally unloaded voluntary tapping) could be replicated, and 2) the hypotheses that the faster tapping was accompanied by changed vertical displacement of the fingertip and by changed peak force during tapping. Right-handed, healthy, and recreationally active individuals (n=24) performed two 3-min index finger tapping bouts at freely chosen tapping frequency, separated by 10 min rest. The recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement was replicated. The faster tapping (8.8±18.7 taps min-1, corresponding to 6.0±11.0%, p=.033) was accompanied by reduced vertical displacement (1.6±2.9 mm, corresponding to 6.3±14.9%, p=.012) of the fingertip. Concurrently, peak force was unchanged. The present study points at separate control mechanisms governing kinematics and kinetics during finger tapping.

  3. Stick-slip instability for viscous fingering in a gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puff, N.; Debrégeas, G.; di Meglio, J.-M.; Higgins, D.; Bonn, D.; Wagner, C.

    2002-05-01

    The growth dynamics of an air finger injected in a visco-elastic gel (a PVA/borax aqueous solution) is studied in a linear Hele-Shaw cell. Besides the standard Saffman-Taylor instability, we observe—with increasing finger velocities—the existence of two new regimes: (a) a stick-slip regime for which the finger tip velocity oscillates between 2 different values, producing local pinching of the finger at regular intervals; (b) a "tadpole" regime where a fracture-type propagation is observed. A scaling argument is proposed to interpret the dependence of the stick-slip frequency with the measured rheological properties of the gel.

  4. Swimming propulsion forces are enhanced by a small finger spread.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Reis, Victor M; Kjendlie, Per L; Alves, Francisco B; Vilas-Boas, João P; Machado, Leandro; Silva, António J; Rouboa, Abel I

    2010-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of finger spread on the propulsive force production in swimming using computational fluid dynamics. Computer tomography scans of an Olympic swimmer hand were conducted. This procedure involved three models of the hand with differing finger spreads: fingers closed together (no spread), fingers with a small (0.32 cm) spread, and fingers with large (0.64 cm) spread. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent code. The measured forces on the hand models were decomposed into drag and lift coefficients. For hand models, angles of attack of 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 75 degrees, and 90 degrees, with a sweep back angle of 0 degrees, were used for the calculations. The results showed that the model with a small spread between fingers presented higher values of drag coefficient than did the models with fingers closed and fingers with a large spread. One can note that the drag coefficient presented the highest values for an attack angle of 90 degrees in the three hand models. The lift coefficient resembled a sinusoidal curve across the attack angle. The values for the lift coefficient presented few differences among the three models, for a given attack angle. These results suggested that fingers slightly spread could allow the hand to create more propulsive force during swimming.

  5. Multiple trigger fingers in a musician: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Masoud; Hassanpour, Seyed Esmail; Mosavizadeh, Seyed Mehdi

    2010-05-01

    Trigger finger is a common disease which particularly occurs in middle-aged women. We present a rare case of a male musician with six trigger fingers (five in the left hand and one in the right hand). Mostly these fingers had been used for playing the guitar. The patient had previously been treated with local steroid injections in his fingers, however no response was seen. Therefore, we performed a surgical procedure. Four weeks after surgery, the patient could play the guitar without discomfort in his hands.

  6. Allosteric Interactions by p53 mRNA Govern HDM2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Specificity under Different Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Medina, Ixaura; García-Beltrán, Paola; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Millot, Guy; Fahraeus, Robin; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Sampedro, José G.

    2016-01-01

    HDM2 and HDMX are key negative regulatory factors of the p53 tumor suppressor under normal conditions by promoting its degradation or preventing its trans activity, respectively. It has more recently been shown that both proteins can also act as positive regulators of p53 after DNA damage. This involves phosphorylation by ATM on serine residues HDM2(S395) and HDMX(S403), promoting their respective interaction with the p53 mRNA. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how these phosphorylation events switch HDM2 and HDMX from negative to positive regulators of p53 is not known. Our results show that these phosphorylation events reside within intrinsically disordered domains and change the conformation of the proteins. The modifications promote the exposition of N-terminal interfaces that support the formation of a new HDMX-HDM2 heterodimer independent of the C-terminal RING-RING interaction. The E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of this complex toward p53 is prevented by the p53 mRNA ligand but, interestingly, does not affect the capacity to ubiquitinate HDMX and HDM2. These results show how ATM-mediated modifications of HDMX and HDM2 switch HDM2 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity away from p53 but toward HDMX and itself and illustrate how the substrate specificity of HDM2 E3 ligase activity is regulated. PMID:27215386

  7. Allosteric Interactions by p53 mRNA Govern HDM2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Specificity under Different Conditions.

    PubMed

    Medina-Medina, Ixaura; García-Beltrán, Paola; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Millot, Guy; Fahraeus, Robin; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Sampedro, José G; Olivares-Illana, Vanesa

    2016-08-15

    HDM2 and HDMX are key negative regulatory factors of the p53 tumor suppressor under normal conditions by promoting its degradation or preventing its trans activity, respectively. It has more recently been shown that both proteins can also act as positive regulators of p53 after DNA damage. This involves phosphorylation by ATM on serine residues HDM2(S395) and HDMX(S403), promoting their respective interaction with the p53 mRNA. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how these phosphorylation events switch HDM2 and HDMX from negative to positive regulators of p53 is not known. Our results show that these phosphorylation events reside within intrinsically disordered domains and change the conformation of the proteins. The modifications promote the exposition of N-terminal interfaces that support the formation of a new HDMX-HDM2 heterodimer independent of the C-terminal RING-RING interaction. The E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of this complex toward p53 is prevented by the p53 mRNA ligand but, interestingly, does not affect the capacity to ubiquitinate HDMX and HDM2. These results show how ATM-mediated modifications of HDMX and HDM2 switch HDM2 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity away from p53 but toward HDMX and itself and illustrate how the substrate specificity of HDM2 E3 ligase activity is regulated.

  8. New Insights into the RNA-Binding and E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activities of Roquins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Fan, Lixin; Hou, Feng; Dong, Aiping; Wang, Yun-Xing; Tong, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Roquins are a family of highly conserved RNA-binding proteins that also contain a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase domain. They repress constitutive decay elements containing mRNAs and play a critical role in RNA homeostasis and immunological self-tolerance. Here we present the crystal structures of the RNA-binding region of Roquin paralog RC3H2 in both apo- and RNA-bound forms. The RNA-binding region has a bipartite architecture composed of ROQ and HEPN domains, and can bind to stem-loop and double-stranded RNAs simultaneously. The two domains undergo a large orientation change to accommodate RNA duplex binding. We profiled E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that pair with Roquins and found that RC3H1 and RC3H2 interact with two sets of overlapping but not identical E2 enzymes to drive the assembly of polyubiquitin chains of different linkages. Crystal structures, small-angle X-ray scattering, and E2 profiling revealed that while the two paralogs are highly homologous, RC3H2 and RC3H1 are different in their structures and functions. We also demonstrated that RNA duplex binding to RC3H2 cross-talks with its E3 ubiquitin ligase function using an in vitro auto-ubiquitination assay. PMID:26489670

  9. The role of the E3 ligase Not4 in cotranslational quality control

    PubMed Central

    Panasenko, Olesya O.

    2014-01-01

    Cotranslational quality control (QC) is the mechanism by which the cell checks the integrity of newly synthesized proteins and mRNAs. In the event of mistakes these molecules are degraded. The Ccr4-Not complex has been proposed to play a role in this process. It contains both deadenylation and ubiquitination activities, thus it may target both aberrant proteins and mRNAs. Deadenylation is the first step in mRNA degradation. In yeast it is performed by the Ccr4 subunit of the Ccr4-Not complex. Another complex subunit, namely Not4, is a RING E3 ligase and it provides the ubiquitination activity of the complex. It was found associated with translating ribosomes. Thus, it has been suggested that Not4 is involved in ribosome-associated ubiquitination and degradation of aberrant peptides. However, several other E3 ligases have been associated with peptide ubiquitination on the ribosome and the relevance of Not4 in this process remains unclear. In this review we summarize the recent data and suggest a role for Not4 in cotranslational protein QC. PMID:24904641

  10. SUMO E3 ligase HIGH PLOIDY2 regulates endocycle onset and meristem maintenance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takashi; Fujiwara, Sumire; Miura, Kenji; Stacey, Nicola; Yoshimura, Mika; Schneider, Katja; Adachi, Sumiko; Minamisawa, Kazunori; Umeda, Masaaki; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2009-08-01

    Endoreduplication involves a doubling of chromosomal DNA without corresponding cell division. In plants, many cell types transit from the mitotic cycle to the endoreduplication cycle or endocycle, and this transition is often coupled with the initiation of cell expansion and differentiation. Although a number of cell cycle regulators implicated in endocycle onset have been identified, it is still largely unknown how this transition is developmentally regulated at the whole organ level. Here, we report that a nuclear-localized SUMO E3 ligase, HIGH PLOIDY2 (HPY2), functions as a repressor of endocycle onset in Arabidopsis thaliana meristems. Loss of HPY2 results in a premature transition from the mitotic cycle to the endocycle, leading to severe dwarfism with defective meristems. HPY2 possesses an SP-RING domain characteristic of MMS21-type SUMO E3 ligases, and we show that the conserved residues within this domain are required for the in vivo and in vitro function of HPY2. HPY2 is predominantly expressed in proliferating cells of root meristems and it functions downstream of meristem patterning transcription factors PLETHORA1 (PLT1) and PLT2. These results establish that HPY2-mediated sumoylation modulates the cell cycle progression and meristem development in the PLT-dependent signaling pathway.

  11. Single-particle EM reveals extensive conformational variability of the Ltn1 E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Doamekpor, Selom K; Bengtson, Mario H; Lee, Joong-Won; Toro, Tasha B; Petroski, Matthew D; Lima, Christopher D; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2013-01-29

    Ltn1 is a 180-kDa E3 ubiquitin ligase that associates with ribosomes and marks certain aberrant, translationally arrested nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. In addition to its evolutionarily conserved large size, Ltn1 is characterized by the presence of a conserved N terminus, HEAT/ARM repeats predicted to comprise the majority of the protein, and a C-terminal catalytic RING domain, although the protein's exact structure is unknown. We used numerous single-particle EM strategies to characterize Ltn1's structure based on negative stain and vitreous ice data. Two-dimensional classifications and subsequent 3D reconstructions of electron density maps show that Ltn1 has an elongated form and presents a continuum of conformational states about two flexible hinge regions, whereas its overall architecture is reminiscent of multisubunit cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complexes. We propose a model of Ltn1 function based on its conformational variability and flexibility that describes how these features may play a role in cotranslational protein quality control.

  12. Functional role of TRIM E3 ligase oligomerization and regulation of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koliopoulos, Marios G; Esposito, Diego; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Taylor, Ian A; Rittinger, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate a wide variety of cellular processes and are particularly important during innate immune signalling events. They are characterized by a conserved tripartite motif in their N-terminal portion which comprises a canonical RING domain, one or two B-box domains and a coiled-coil region that mediates ligase dimerization. Self-association via the coiled-coil has been suggested to be crucial for catalytic activity of TRIMs; however, the precise molecular mechanism underlying this observation remains elusive. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the TRIM ligases TRIM25 and TRIM32 and show how their oligomeric state is linked to catalytic activity. The crystal structure of a complex between the TRIM25 RING domain and an ubiquitin-loaded E2 identifies the structural and mechanistic features that promote a closed E2~Ub conformation to activate the thioester for ubiquitin transfer allowing us to propose a model for the regulation of activity in the full-length protein. Our data reveal an unexpected diversity in the self-association mechanism of TRIMs that might be crucial for their biological function.

  13. Itch WW Domains Inhibit Its E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity by Blocking E2-E3 Ligase Trans-thiolation.

    PubMed

    Riling, Christopher; Kamadurai, Hari; Kumar, Suresh; O'Leary, Claire E; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Manion, Erica E; Ying, Mingjie; Schulman, Brenda A; Oliver, Paula M

    2015-09-25

    Nedd4-family E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate an array of biologic processes. Autoinhibition maintains these catalytic ligases in an inactive state through several mechanisms. However, although some Nedd4 family members are activated by binding to Nedd4 family-interacting proteins (Ndfips), how binding activates E3 function remains unclear. Our data reveal how these two regulatory processes are linked functionally. In the absence of Ndfip1, the Nedd4 family member Itch can bind an E2 but cannot accept ubiquitin onto its catalytic cysteine. This is because Itch is autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between its HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxy terminus domain) and two central WW domains. Ndfip1 binds these WW domains to release the HECT, allowing trans-thiolation and Itch catalytic activity. This molecular switch also regulates the closely related family member WWP2. Importantly, multiple PY motifs are required for Ndfip1 to activate Itch, functionally distinguishing Ndfips from single PY-containing substrates. These data establish a novel mechanism for control of the function of a subfamily of Nedd4 E3 ligases at the level of E2-E3 trans-thiolation.

  14. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  15. Teleoperation of Robonaut Using Finger Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champoux, Rachel G.; Luo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of new finger tracking systems, the idea of a more expressive and intuitive user interface is being explored and implemented. One practical application for this new kind of interface is that of teleoperating a robot. For humanoid robots, a finger tracking interface is required due to the level of complexity in a human-like hand, where a joystick isn't accurate. Moreover, for some tasks, using one's own hands allows the user to communicate their intentions more effectively than other input. The purpose of this project was to develop a natural user interface for someone to teleoperate a robot that is elsewhere. Specifically, this was designed to control Robonaut on the international space station to do tasks too dangerous and/or too trivial for human astronauts. This interface was developed by integrating and modifying 3Gear's software, which includes a library of gestures and the ability to track hands. The end result is an interface in which the user can manipulate objects in real time in the user interface. then, the information is relayed to a simulator, the stand in for Robonaut, at a slight delay.

  16. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers.

    PubMed

    Stapanian, Martin A; Stapanian, Adrienne M P; Staley, Keith E

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  17. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  18. Finger-Powered Electro-Digital-Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Ju, Y Sungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Portable microfluidic devices are promising for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis and bio- and environmental surveillance in resource-constrained or non-laboratory environments. Lateral-flow devices, some built off paper or strings, have been widely developed but the fixed layouts of their underlying wicking/microchannel structures limit their flexibility and present challenges in implementing multistep reactions. Digital microfluidics can circumvent these difficulties by addressing discrete droplets individually. Existing approaches to digital microfluidics, however, often require bulky power supplies/batteries and high voltage circuits. We present a scheme to drive digital microfluidic devices by converting mechanical energy of human fingers to electrical energy using an array of piezoelectric elements. We describe the integration our scheme into two promising digital microfluidics platforms: one based on the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) phenomenon and the other on the electrophoretic control of droplet (EPD). Basic operations of droplet manipulations, such as droplet transport, merging and splitting, are demonstrated using the finger-powered digital-microfluidics.

  19. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  20. CHANG'E-3 contingency scheme and trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Cao, Jian-feng; Liu, Yong; Hu, Song-jie; Tang, Ge-shi; Xie, Jian-feng

    2015-02-01

    This paper addresses contingency trajectories of CHANG'E-3 in the case of a failure of the lunar brake, which is crucial to the CHANG'E-3 mission, i.e., the first Chinese lunar soft-landing and rover mission. Considering the flight-time and control-energy requirements placed on the contingency trajectories, the paper proposes a direct return method and a low-energy return method and develops the corresponding contingency trajectories based on the CHANG'E-3 cislunar transfer trajectory. The direct return method was studied on return style, flight time, control energy, and influence of maneuver time on energy. The low-energy return method was investigated using the method of invariant manifold calculations for a Lissajous orbit, the method of direct libration-point orbit transfer and injection, and the control strategy used for a low-energy trajectory. The results demonstrate that the control energy for direct return trajectories can be reduced using a certain flight course. When a flight time of less than half of a month is desired, a trajectory from the north celestial pole should be selected as a lunar approach trajectory for CHANG'E-3. Otherwise, a trajectory from the south celestial pole should be selected. Furthermore, these two trajectories have approximately equal velocity increments if their flight-time difference is close to half of a month. In the case of the low-energy return method, methods using approximate manifold calculations for a Lissajous orbit and the direct transfer and injection to a libration-point orbit are proposed and shown to be useful. CHANG'E-3 would return via the Sun-Earth L2 libration point and would require four maneuvers during its flight. The low-energy return method offers remarkable energy savings of up to 267 m/s compared to the direct return method. The methodology not only provides a contingency control technique for CHANG'E-3 and for future lunar missions, but it also serves as a beneficial supplement to the present studies

  1. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  2. [Effects of zinc-finger proteins and artificial zinc-finger proteins on microbial metabolisms--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Zhang, Fei; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Zinc-finger proteins have been widely studied due to their highly conserved structures and DNA-binding specificity of zinc-finger domains. However, researches on the zinc-finger proteins from microorganisms, especially those from prokaryotes, are still very limited. This review focuses on the latest progress on microbial zinc-finger proteins, especially those from prokaryotes and the application of artificial zinc-finger proteins in the breeding of robust strains. Artificial zinc-finger proteins with transcriptional activation or repression domain can regulate the global gene transcription of microbial cells to acquire improved phenotypes, such as stress tolerance to heat, ethanol, butanol, and osmotic pressure. Using the zinc-finger domain as DNA scaffold in the construction of enzymatic system can enhance the catalytic efficiency and subsequently the production of specific metabolites. Currently, zinc-finger domains used in the construction of artificial transcription factor are usually isolated from mammalian cells. In the near future, novel transcription factors can be designed for strain development based on the natural zinc-finger domains from different microbes, which may be used to regulate the global gene expression of microbial cells more efficiently.

  3. Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

  4. CCD photometry of the sparse halo cluster E3

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclure, R.D.; Hesser, J.E.; Stetson, P.B.; Stryker, L.L.

    1985-08-01

    New photometry in B and V for the sparse halo cluster E3 has been obtained with the prime-focus CCD camera at the CTIO 4-m telescope. The principal sequences are better defined than in the previous color-magnitude (C-M) diagrams, but the large scatter of evolved stars above the turnoff remains. The C-M morphology, inferred old age, and position in the halo definitely indicate that E3 is a globular cluster. Evidence for possible main-sequence binaries appears in the C-M diagram in the form of a sequence parallel to the cluster main sequence and three-quarters of a magnitude above it. The luminosity function drops off sharply, about 2.5 mag below the turnoff, supporting the suggestion by van den Bergh, Demers, and Kunkel (1980), that the cluster is severely truncated by tidal forces. 34 references.

  5. Interim review of the Energy Efficient Engine /E3/ Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.; Hannah, W.; Gray, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-sponsored Energy Efficient Engine (E3) Program, which is now in its fourth year, is assessed from the viewpoint of one of its research contractors. Attention is given to the development status of the shroudless fan, segmented combustor and exhaust mixer components which are encompassed by the program. The shroudless fan blades are two-thirds hollow for lightness, and are fabricated by means of plies and cores subjected to hot isostatic pressing diffusion bonding. The combustor's segmented liner is cast from turbine blade materials. Exhaust mixer flow visualization tests are described. Consideration is given to the effects of integrating the technology described with the low and high pressure advanced turbines whose development is also part of the E3 program.

  6. Systematic approaches to identify E3 ligase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Iconomou, Mary; Saunders, Darren N.

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation is a widespread post-translational modification, regulating cellular signalling with many outcomes, such as protein degradation, endocytosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair and transcription. E3 ligases are a critical component of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), determining the substrate specificity of the cascade by the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to substrate proteins. Currently, there are over 600 putative E3 ligases, but many are poorly characterized, particularly with respect to individual protein substrates. Here, we highlight systematic approaches to identify and validate UPS targets and discuss how they are underpinning rapid advances in our understanding of the biochemistry and biology of the UPS. The integration of novel tools, model systems and methods for target identification is driving significant interest in drug development, targeting various aspects of UPS function and advancing the understanding of a diverse range of disease processes. PMID:27834739

  7. Spectrum Management and Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Business Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-06

    Includes EO12046 to delegate Presidential Authority to DOC/NTIA OMB Circular A-11 (12 July 1999)  DOD Acquisition Regulations (5000 series...NTAs and measures . This effort is just one of the many moving parts surrounding EMS, EW, E3, EMI, Spectrum Warfare initiatives. The (CIP) process will...Navy Tactical (NTA) and associated measures to ensure Afloat / Ashore and Joint MF&T are captured in the Defense Readiness Reporting System-Navy

  8. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  9. Assessment of the presence of independent flexor digitorum superficialis function in the small fingers of professional string players: is this an example of natural selection?

    PubMed

    Godwin, Y; Wheble, G A C; Feig, C

    2014-01-01

    This study estimated the prevalence of independent flexor digitorum superficialis function in the small fingers of 90 violin and viola players. The hypothesis tested was that the independent digital movements required in this population would select out those with absent flexor digitorum superficialis function. Professional string players were tested clinically, using standard and modified tests, for flexor digitorum superficialis function. Two additional physical tests were applied: the gap and stretch tests. These tests assess ring finger movement once the small finger is placed and the instrument is held in the chin-hold position. A statistically significant reduction in the prevalence of absent flexor digitorum superficialis function was confirmed in the musicians compared with a control group and published meta-analysis. This suggests that independent flexor digitorum superficialis function is important for professional musicians playing at an elite level.

  10. Ethyl (E)-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(morpholinocarbonyl)propenoate.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vargas, Juana E; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco J; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I; Höpfl, Herbert; García-Báez, Efrén V

    2004-07-01

    The title compound, C16H19NO5, crystallizes as a centrosymmetric dimer through strong O-H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions between the hydroxyphenyl and morpholinocarbonyl groups. The morpholinocarbonyl group is almost perpendicular to the propenoate moiety. Electron delocalization in the N-C(=O) fragment leads to the formation of hydrogen-bonded S(5) ring motifs through C-H...O interactions.

  11. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  12. Saturn's E ring revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Klinglesmith, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Images of the E ring of Saturn obtained by the image processing of photographs of the 1966 edge-on presentation of the planet's ring plane are presented. Two methods of image enhancement were used: scanning with an image quantizer operated in the derivative mode to enhance contrast and computerized subtraction of a circularly symmetric image of the overexposed Saturn disk. Further photographic and CCD observation confirming the existence of the ring extending to twice the diameter of the A ring, which was not detected by the Pioneer 11 imaging photopolarimeter, is indicated.

  13. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  14. Robust finger vein ROI localization based on flexible segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu; Xie, Shan Juan; Yoon, Sook; Yang, Jucheng; Park, Dong Sun

    2013-10-24

    Finger veins have been proved to be an effective biometric for personal identification in the recent years. However, finger vein images are easily affected by influences such as image translation, orientation, scale, scattering, finger structure, complicated background, uneven illumination, and collection posture. All these factors may contribute to inaccurate region of interest (ROI) definition, and so degrade the performance of finger vein identification system. To improve this problem, in this paper, we propose a finger vein ROI localization method that has high effectiveness and robustness against the above factors. The proposed method consists of a set of steps to localize ROIs accurately, namely segmentation, orientation correction, and ROI detection. Accurate finger region segmentation and correct calculated orientation can support each other to produce higher accuracy in localizing ROIs. Extensive experiments have been performed on the finger vein image database, MMCBNU_6000, to verify the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method shows the segmentation accuracy of 100%. Furthermore, the average processing time of the proposed method is 22 ms for an acquired image, which satisfies the criterion of a real-time finger vein identification system.

  15. A biomechanical study of the finger pulley system during repair.

    PubMed

    Amirouche, F; Gonzalez, M; Koldoff, J; Tioco, J; Ham, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the mechanics of the finger/pulley system when subjected to various excisions and repairs. Several cadaver hands were used to study the finger/pulley's function, finger joint dynamics, and the relationship between tendon excursion and finger joint angles of rotation. By using a method of continuous and simultaneous data acquisition of the entire finger joint's motion, a more detailed analysis was achieved. Our experimental investigation is based on the use of four micro-potentiometers inserted at the finger's joints and a pulley system to simulate tendon excursion. Using this procedure, a detailed kinematic analysis of the entire finger was performed. This included analysis of the intact hand, various pulley excisions, and reconstruction. In addition to introducing a new method of acquisition, a mathematical model was developed for the inverse dynamic analysis of the finger pulley system. From this model, the torques required at the joints for the motion were computed. The results provided new insight into possible ways of characterizing kinematic changes resulting from pulley damage and repair.

  16. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tomoko; Rivlis, Gil; Schieber, Marc H

    2016-02-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals.

  17. Detection of finger gesture using singular spectrum transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Umetani, T.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to detect finger movement using a singular spectrum transformation method. Human gesture recognition is essential for realizing natural user interfaces. However, constructing a robust, easily installable interface is extremely difficult. Our proposed method uses singular spectrum transformation to classify finger movements. This method robustly classifies gestures and behavior.

  18. Use of tactile afferent information in sequential finger movements.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A M; Soechting, J F

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated how tactile afferent information contributes to the generation of sequences of skilled finger movements by anesthetizing the right index fingers of experienced typists. Subjects were asked to type phrases in which the right index finger was used only once every seven to 12 keypresses. The time at which each key was depressed was recorded with a digital timer, and the translational and rotational motion of the fingers and wrist of the right hand were recorded optoelectronically from the location of reflective markers placed on the fingers. Midway through the experiment, a local anesthetic was injected at the base of the distal phalange of the right index finger. Following digital anesthesia, error rates increased considerably, mainly due to the diminished accuracy of movements of the anesthetized finger. The typing intervals following keypresses with the anesthetized fingertip were unaffected by the removal of tactile information. When errors occurred during control trials, the intervals immediately following the errors were greatly prolonged. However, errors produced with the anesthetized right index finger did not influence the timing of subsequent keypresses, implying that lack of tactile cues affected error recognition. The movement patterns during keypresses were similar before and after digital anesthesia for some subjects, while a less pronounced flexion-extension movement was seen in other subjects. The results suggest that tactile afferent information is not essential for initiating movement segments in a sequence. Rather, they emphasize the importance of this information for ensuring movement accuracy and for detecting errors.

  19. Coordination of bowing and fingering in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Baader, Andreas P; Kazennikov, Oleg; Wiesendanger, Mario

    2005-05-01

    Playing string instruments implies motor skills including asymmetrical interlimb coordination. How special is musical skill as compared to other bimanually coordinated, non-musical skillful performances? We succeeded for the first time to measure quantitatively bimanual coordination in violinists playing repeatedly a simple tone sequence. A motion analysis system was used to record finger and bow trajectories for assessing the temporal structure of finger-press, finger-lift (left hand), and bow stroke reversals (right arm). The main results were: (1) fingering consisted of serial and parallel (anticipatory) mechanisms; (2) synchronization between finger and bow actions varied from -12 ms to 60 ms, but these 'errors' were not perceived. The results suggest that (1) bow-finger synchronization varied by about 50 ms from perfect simultaneity, but without impairing auditory perception; (2) the temporal structure depends on a number of combinatorial mechanisms of bowing and fingering. These basic mechanisms were observed in all players, including all amateurs. The successful biomechanical measures of fingering and bowing open a vast practical field of assessing motor skills. Thus, objective assessment of larger groups of string players with varying musical proficiency, or of professional string players developing movement disorders, may be helpful in music education.

  20. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration.

    PubMed

    Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen

    PubMed Central

    Rivlis, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals. PMID:26683065

  2. Finger-vein image separation algorithms and realization with MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Ma, Junshan; Wu, Jiajie

    2010-10-01

    According to the characteristics of the finger-vein image, we adopted a series of methods to enhance the contrast of the image in order to separate the finger-vein areas from the background areas, and made prepare for the subsequent research such as feature extraction and recognition processing . The method consists of three steps: denoising, contrast enhancement and image binarization. In denoising, considering the relationship between gray levels in the adjacent areas of the finger-vein image, we adopted the Gradient Inverse Weighted Smoothing method. In contrast enhancement, we improved the conventional High Frequency Stress Filtering method and adopted a method which combined the traditional High Frequency Stress Filtering algorithm together with the Histogram Equalization. With this method, the contrast of the finger-vein area and the background area has been enhanced significantly. During the binarization process, after taking the differences of the gray levels between the different areas of the finger-vein image into consideration, we proposed a method which combined the binarization by dividing the image into several segments and the Morphological Image Processing means. Our experiment results show that after a series of processing mentioned above by using MATLAB, the finger-vein areas can be separated from the background areas obviously. We can get a vivid figure of the finger-vein which provided some references for the following research such as finger-vein image feature extraction, matching and identification.

  3. Finger vein extraction using gradient normalization and principal curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon Hwan; Song, Wonseok; Kim, Taejeong; Lee, Seung-Rae; Kim, Hee Chan

    2009-02-01

    Finger vein authentication is a personal identification technology using finger vein images acquired by infrared imaging. It is one of the newest technologies in biometrics. Its main advantage over other biometrics is the low risk of forgery or theft, due to the fact that finger veins are not normally visible to others. Extracting finger vein patterns from infrared images is the most difficult part in finger vein authentication. Uneven illumination, varying tissues and bones, and changes in the physical conditions and the blood flow make the thickness and brightness of the same vein different in each acquisition. Accordingly, extracting finger veins at their accurate positions regardless of their thickness and brightness is necessary for accurate personal identification. For this purpose, we propose a new finger vein extraction method which is composed of gradient normalization, principal curvature calculation, and binarization. As local brightness variation has little effect on the curvature and as gradient normalization makes the curvature fairly uniform at vein pixels, our method effectively extracts finger vein patterns regardless of the vein thickness or brightness. In our experiment, the proposed method showed notable improvement as compared with the existing methods.

  4. Modified spiral wound retaining ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, A. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A spiral wound retaining ring with angled ends is described. The ring is crimped at the same angle as the ring ends to maintain a constant thickness dimension. The angling of the ends of the ring and crimp allow the ends to be positioned closer together while maintaining enough clearance to enable insertion and removal of the ring. By reducing the separation distance between the ends a stronger ring results since the double layer area of the ring is maximized.

  5. Actinomycosis of Finger: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Mansour; Zarch, Mojtaba Babaei

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous actinomycosis of finger is very unusual, chronic granulomatous disease caused by a group of anaerobic or microaerophilic Gram-positive filamentous bacteria that normally colonize the mouth, colon and urogenital tract. Actinomycosis of finger is rare but clinically important condition that requires suitable evaluation for guiding appropriate therapy. We hereby report a case of cutaneous actinomycosis of the right finger- a rare site, in a 34-year-old female patient which underwent usual treatment of surgical excision. This patient complained of existence of a mass and tenderness in the pulp of right index finger. The X-ray of hand revealed no significant abnormality. The patient was treated successfully with surgical excision. Surgery detected five small nodules measuring 0.5 to 1 cm in size. Histopathologic examination of the biopsy from the lesions confirmed diagnosis of cutaneous actinomycosis. Here, we report a cutaneous actinomycosis in a 34-year-old female located in the index finger. PMID:27656447

  6. Finger motion capture from wrist-electrode contact resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shunsuke; Kawaguchi, Junki; Imura, Masataka; Oshiro, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Hand motion capture is an important yet challenging topic for biomechanics and human computer interaction. We proposed a novel electrical sensing technology for capturing the finger angles from the variation of the wrist shape. The proposed device detects the signal related to the wrist-electrode contact resistances, which change according to the variation of the wrist shape accompanying finger movements. The developed sensing device consists of a wrist band, sixteen electrodes and a sensing circuit of contact resistances. We investigated the relationships between the finger angles and the system outputs by using a glove-type joint angle sensor. As a result, we confirmed high correlations of the system outputs with the finger angles for several electrodes. Therefore, we conclude that the proposed system can be used for the estimation of the finger joint angles.

  7. A new algorithmic approach for fingers detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubashar Khan, Arslan; Umar, Waqas; Choudhary, Taimoor; Hussain, Fawad; Haroon Yousaf, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    Gesture recognition is concerned with the goal of interpreting human gestures through mathematical algorithms. Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Hand gesture detection in a real time environment, where the time and memory are important issues, is a critical operation. Hand gesture recognition largely depends on the accurate detection of the fingers. This paper presents a new algorithmic approach to detect and identify fingers of human hand. The proposed algorithm does not depend upon the prior knowledge of the scene. It detects the active fingers and Metacarpophalangeal (MCP) of the inactive fingers from an already detected hand. Dynamic thresholding technique and connected component labeling scheme are employed for background elimination and hand detection respectively. Algorithm proposed a new approach for finger identification in real time environment keeping the memory and time constraint as low as possible.

  8. Measurement and evaluation of finger tapping movements using magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Shima, Keisuke; Tsuji, Toshio; Kan, Eriko; Kandori, Akihiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a quantitative measurement and evaluation method of finger tapping movements for diagnosis support and assessment of motor function. In this method, a magnetic sensor consisting of two coils is used to measure movement. The coil voltage induced by the electromagnetic induction law changes depending on the distance between the two coils; this enables estimation of the distance between two coil-bearing fingertips from the voltage measured by the nonlinear modeling relationships between the voltages and distances. Further, the finger movements measured are evaluated by computing ten indices such as the finger tapping interval, and radar charts of the evaluation indices and phase-plane trajectories of the finger movements are then displayed in real time on a monitor. Evaluation experiments were performed on finger movement in 16 Parkinson's disease patients and 32 normal elderly subjects, with the results showing that all evaluation indices differ significantly for each subject (p < 0.05).

  9. Development of a CPM Machine for Injured Fingers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yili; Zhang, Fuxiang; Ma, Xin; Meng, Qinggang

    2005-01-01

    Human fingers are easy to be injured. A CPM machine is a mechanism based on the rehabilitation theory of continuous passive motion (CPM). To develop a CPM machine for the clinic application in the rehabilitation of injured fingers is a significant task. Therefore, based on the theories of evidence based medicine (EBM) and CPM, we've developed a set of biomimetic mechanism after modeling the motions of fingers and analyzing its kinematics and dynamics analysis. We also design an embedded operating system based on ARM (a kind of 32-bit RISC microprocessor). The equipment can achieve the precise control of moving scope of fingers, finger's force and speed. It can serves as a rational checking method and a way of assessment for functional rehabilitation of human hands. Now, the first prototype has been finished and will start the clinical testing in Harbin Medical University shortly.

  10. Isolated index finger palsy due to cortical infarction.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yuichi; Miyaji, Yosuke; Joki, Hideto; Seki, Syunsuke; Mori, Kentaro; Kamide, Tomoya; Tamase, Akira; Nomura, Motohiro; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    The case of an 86-year-old man presenting with isolated left index finger palsy caused by infarction on the lateral side of the right precentral knob is presented. Embolization from aortic atheroma was considered the cause of infarction. Cases with selective palsy of a particular group of fingers without sensory deficits due to cortical infarction of the precentral knob have been reported by several authors, and predominant weakness of radial-side fingers is known to be usually caused by laterally located infarction of the precentral knob. Among the previous reports, only 1 case involved isolated index finger palsy by an atypical, medially located infarction of the precentral knob in association with a concurrent nonrelated lesion. This is the first reported isolated index finger palsy caused by a single lateral precentral knob infarction.

  11. Finger gnosia: a predictor of numerical abilities in children?

    PubMed

    Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2005-10-01

    This paper aimed to test the specificity of predicting power of finger gnosia on later numerical abilities in school-age children and to contribute to the understanding of this effect. Forty-one children were tested in the beginning of Grade 1 on finger gnosia, left-right orientation (another sign of the Gerstmann "syndrome"), and global development. Fifteen months later, numerical and reading abilities were assessed. Analyses of the results indicated that, contrary to the general measures of cognitive development, performance in the finger gnosia test was a good predictor of numerical skills 1 year later but not of reading skills, which proves the specificity of that predictor. The same conclusion was also true for the left-right orientation. However, finger gnosia could equally predict performance in numerical tasks that do or do not rely heavily on finger representation or on magnitude representation. Results are discussed in terms of the localizationist and the functional hypotheses.

  12. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  13. Acute blue finger: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed; Elmasry, Mohamed; Mabote, Thato; Elsayed, Ayman; Sunthareswaran, Rame

    2014-01-01

    The management of the acute blue finger is controversial with many regarding it as a benign condition. However, we would argue that it should always be considered as an emergency. We present a challenging case of a 43-year-old woman who presented with a 1-week history of sudden onset blue discolouration of the left fifth digit, and a 6-week history of episodic joint problems. Examination showed bilateral normal radial and ulnar pulses. Following blood investigations, an initial working diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis with associated Raynaud's phenomenon was made. Also, infective endocarditis was considered due to temporary misleading physical signs. Later, CT angiography of the left upper limb arteries showed a significant proximal left subclavian stenosis. Subsequently, a diagnosis of the left subclavian arteritis associated with digit ischaemia from embolic debris was made and the patient underwent a left subclavian angioplasty. However, delayed management resulted in a necrotic digit, which was left to autoamputate. PMID:24429047

  14. Ferritin, finger clubbing, and lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shneerson, J M; Jones, B M

    1981-01-01

    The serum ferritin concentration has been determined by an immunoradiometric assay in 90 subjects with a variety of pulmonary diseases. No association between ferritin concentrations and finger clubbing has been found in any of the diseases studied. Ferritin levels were significantly raised in the subjects with bronchial carcinoma, but were not useful in monitoring recurrence of the tumour. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary vein ferritin concentrations were similar to systemic venous concentrations. It is therefore unlikely that the tumour releases ferritin into the pulmonary circulation. Ferritin levels were raised in patients with acute pneumonias but did not correlate with the total white cell count or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum ferritin concentrations were also increased in a variety of chronic lung diseases but were normal in subjects with asbestosis. PMID:7314044

  15. An Arginine Finger Regulates the Sequential Action of Asymmetrical Hexameric ATPase in the Double-Stranded DNA Translocation Motor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhengyi; De-Donatis, Gian Marco; Schwartz, Chad; Fang, Huaming; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Biological motors are ubiquitous in living systems. Currently, how the motor components coordinate the unidirectional motion is elusive in most cases. Here, we report that the sequential action of the ATPase ring in the DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ϕ29 is regulated by an arginine finger that extends from one ATPase subunit to the adjacent unit to promote noncovalent dimer formation. Mutation of the arginine finger resulted in the interruption of ATPase oligomerization, ATP binding/hydrolysis, and DNA translocation. Dimer formation reappeared when arginine mutants were mixed with other ATPase subunits that can offer the arginine to promote their interaction. Ultracentrifugation and virion assembly assays indicated that the ATPase was presenting as monomers and dimer mixtures. The isolated dimer alone was inactive in DNA translocation, but the addition of monomer could restore the activity, suggesting that the hexameric ATPase ring contained both dimer and monomers. Moreover, ATP binding or hydrolysis resulted in conformation and entropy changes of the ATPase with high or low DNA affinity. Taking these observations together, we concluded that the arginine finger regulates sequential action of the motor ATPase subunit by promoting the formation of the dimer inside the hexamer. The finding of asymmetrical hexameric organization is supported by structural evidence of many other ATPase systems showing the presence of one noncovalent dimer and four monomer subunits. All of these provide clues for why the asymmetrical hexameric ATPase gp16 of ϕ29 was previously reported as a pentameric configuration by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) since the contact by the arginine finger renders two adjacent ATPase subunits closer than other subunits. Thus, the asymmetrical hexamer would appear as a pentamer by cryo-EM, a technology that acquires the average of many images. PMID:27457616

  16. Ring finger protein 10 is a novel synaptonuclear messenger encoding activation of NMDA receptors in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Margarita C; Guzzetti, Francesca; Karpova, Anna; Lim, Dmitry; Mitro, Nico; Musardo, Stefano; Mellone, Manuela; Marcello, Elena; Stanic, Jennifer; Samaddar, Tanmoy; Burguière, Adeline; Caldarelli, Antonio; Genazzani, Armando A; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Kreutz, Michael R; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Luca, Monica Di

    2016-01-01

    Synapses and nuclei are connected by bidirectional communication mechanisms that enable information transfer encoded by macromolecules. Here, we identified RNF10 as a novel synaptonuclear protein messenger. RNF10 is activated by calcium signals at the postsynaptic compartment and elicits discrete changes at the transcriptional level. RNF10 is enriched at the excitatory synapse where it associates with the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs and induction of long term potentiation (LTP) lead to the translocation of RNF10 from dendritic segments and dendritic spines to the nucleus. In particular, we provide evidence for importin-dependent long-distance transport from synapto-dendritic compartments to the nucleus. Notably, RNF10 silencing prevents the maintenance of LTP as well as LTP-dependent structural modifications of dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12430.001 PMID:26977767

  17. [Index finger pollicization for congenitally deficient first finger of the hand in children].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Rueda, F; Ayala Montoro, J; Blanco López, F; Ocaña Losa, J M

    2001-10-01

    Pollicization is a single-stage neurovascular pedicle transfer of the index digit to function as a thumb. The objective of this study is to investigate the results of index finger pollicization for correction of congenital deficiency of the first ray in pediatric hand. We have done 6 pollicizations of index fingers in 6 hands (there were 2 right hands, 2 left hands, and 1 bilaterally) in 5 patients (4 boys and 1 girl) who had absent or nonfunctioning thumbs (type III-V of Blauth's classification). Associated anomalies where numerous and included radial club hand, mirror hand and cardiovascular and urologic anomalies. The average time of Kirschner wire extraction was 32 days (30 to 36 days) and to beginning the hand rehabilitation at 5 degrees to 10 degrees day. The average age at pollicization was 5.5 years (range 2 to 8 years), and follow-up averaged 8 years (5 to 11 years). The cosmetic and functional results were excellent, with manual dexterity of prehension and opposition. Pollicization in children can be performed at least 2 years of age, to due of minor risk of neurovascular lesion but without delayed the cortical representation of the pollicized finger.

  18. Some Preliminary Scientific Results of Chang'E-3 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Y.; Li, W.; Zheng, Y.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    Chang'E-3 mission is the main task of Phase two of China Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP), and also is Chinese first probe of landing, working and roving on the moon. Chang'E-3 craft composed of a lander and a rover, and each of them carry four scientific payloads respectively. The landing site of Chang'E-3 was located at 44.12 degrees north latitude and 19.51 degrees west longitude, where is in the northern part of Imbrium Which the distance in its west direction from the landing site of former Soviet probe Luna-17 is about 400 km, and about 780km far from the landing site of Appolo-17 in its southeast direction. Unfortunately, after a series of scientific tests and exploration on the surface of the moon, the motor controller communication of the rover emerged a breakdown on January 16, 2014, which leaded the four payloads onboard the rover can't obtain data anymore. However, we have received some interesting scientific data which have been studied by Chinese scientists. During the landing process of Chang'E-3, the Landing camera got total 4673 images with the Resolution in millimeters to meters, and the lander and rover took pictures for each other at different point with Topography camera and Panoramic camera. We can find characteristic changes in celestial brightness with time by analyzing image data from Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) and an unprecedented constraint on water content in the sunlit lunar exosphere seen by LUT). The figure observed by EUV camera (EUVC) shows that there is a transient weak area of the Earth's plasma sphere; This event took place about three hours. The scientists think that it might be related to the change of the particle density of mid-latitude ionosphere. The preliminary spectral and mineralogical results from the landing site are derived according to the data of Visible and Near-infrared Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS). Seven major elements including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe have been identified by the Active Particle

  19. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  20. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  1. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina, where it slowly releases hormones — the chemicals the body makes to control organ function — through the vaginal wall into the ...

  2. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  3. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  4. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  5. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  6. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  7. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  8. Five- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia and calculation abilities.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children's representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation.

  9. Five- to 7-Year-Olds’ Finger Gnosia and Calculation Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds’ finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children’s representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation. PMID:22171220

  10. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  11. Ring chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, A; Voyce, M A; Romain, D

    1977-01-01

    A mentally and physically retarded boy with a 46,XY,ring (4) (p16q35) chromosome complement is described. Chromosome banding showed that the amount of chromosome material deleted from the ring chromosome 4 was minimal, apparently no more than the telomeres. Chromosomal aberrations appear to be restricted to the production of double-sized dicentric rings, and aneuploidy. The mosiacism resulting from the behavioural peculiarities of ring chromosomes is described as dynamic mosaicism. It is suggested that the clinical features associated with this ring chromosome are more likely to be the result of the effects of a diploid/monosomy 4/polysomy 4 mosaicism than to the deficiency of the telomeric regions of the chromosome. Images PMID:881718

  12. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  13. Functional conservation of the pre-sensor one beta-finger hairpin (PS1-hp) structures in mini-chromosome maintenance proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaea.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Christopher J; Sclafani, Robert A

    2014-05-28

    Mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins form complexes that are required for DNA replication and are highly conserved throughout evolution. The replicative helicase of eukaryotic organisms is composed of the six paralogs MCM2-7, which form a heterohexameric ring structure. In contrast, the structure of the archaean replicative MCM helicase is a single Mcm protein that forms a homohexameric complex. Atomic structures of archaeal MCMs have identified multiple beta-finger structures in Mcm proteins whose in vivo function is unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the physiological role of the pre-sensor 1 beta-hairpin (PS1-hp) beta-fingers of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm4p and Mcm5p in DNA replication initiation and elongation in vivo. The PS1-hp beta-finger mutant of Mcm5p (mcm5-HAT K506A::URA3) has a growth defect at both 18° and 37°. Mutation of the Mcm4p PS1-hp beta-finger (mcm4-HA K658A::TRP1) does not have a growth defect, indicating different functional contributions of the PS1-hp beta-finger structures of different MCM helicase subunits. Both Mcm4p and Mcm5p PS1-hp beta-finger mutants can coimmunoprecipitate Mcm2p, indicating the formation of the hexameric MCM helicase complex. Both PS1-hp beta-finger mutants have a plasmid loss phenotype that is suppressible by origin dosage, indicating a defective replication initiation. Surprisingly, a defect in the binding of PS1-hp MCM mutants to origins of DNA replication was not found by chromatin immunoprecipitation, suggesting a novel interpretation in which the defect is in a subsequent step of DNA strand separation by the MCM helicase. The double mutant mcm4-HA K658A::TRP1 mcm5-HAT K506A::URA3 is lethal, displaying a terminal MCM mutant phenotype of large budded cells.

  14. Realization of a primary-filling e/3 quasiparticle interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino, F. E.; Zhou, W.; Goldman, V. J.

    2007-03-01

    We report experiments on a quasiparticle interferometer where the entire system is on the f=1/3 primary fractional quantum Hall plateau. Electron-beam lithography is used to define an electron island separated from the 2D bulk by two wide constrictions, much less depleted than in our prior work [1]. This results in the entire electron island being at filling f=1/3 under quantum-coherent tunneling conditions. For the first time in such devices we report interferometric Aharonov-Bohm-like conductance oscillations. The flux and charge periods of the interferometer device are calibrated with electrons in the integer regime. In the fractional regime, we observe magnetic flux and charge periods h/e and e/3, respectively, corresponding to creation of one quasielectron in the island. These periods are the same as in quantum antidots, but the quasiparticle path encloses no electron vacuum in the interferometer. Quantum theory predicts a 3h/e flux period for charge e/3, integer statistics particles. Accordingly, the observed periods demonstrate anyonic statistics of Laughlin quasiparticles. [1] F. E. Camino et al., PRL 95, 246802 (2005); PRB 72, 075342 (2005).

  15. Performance Measurement of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG project is providing life, reliability, and performance testing data of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The latest version of the ASC (ASC-E3, to represent the third cycle of engineering model test hardware) is of a design identical to the forthcoming flight convertors. For this generation of hardware, a joint Sunpower and GRC effort was initiated to improve and standardize the test support hardware. After this effort was completed, the first pair of ASC-E3 units was produced by Sunpower and then delivered to GRC in December 2012. GRC has begun operation of these units. This process included performance verification, which examined the data from various tests to validate the convertor performance to the product specification. Other tests included detailed performance mapping that encompassed the wide range of operating conditions that will exist during a mission. These convertors were then transferred to Lockheed Martin for controller checkout testing. The results of this latest convertor performance verification activity are summarized here.

  16. Finger vein verification system based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yang; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Haixia; Zhang, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Finger vein verification is a promising biometric pattern for personal identification in terms of security and convenience. The recognition performance of this technology heavily relies on the quality of finger vein images and on the recognition algorithm. To achieve efficient recognition performance, a special finger vein imaging device is developed, and a finger vein recognition method based on sparse representation is proposed. The motivation for the proposed method is that finger vein images exhibit a sparse property. In the proposed system, the regions of interest (ROIs) in the finger vein images are segmented and enhanced. Sparse representation and sparsity preserving projection on ROIs are performed to obtain the features. Finally, the features are measured for recognition. An equal error rate of 0.017% was achieved based on the finger vein image database, which contains images that were captured by using the near-IR imaging device that was developed in this study. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is faster and more robust than previous methods.

  17. Management of the Stiff Finger: Evidence and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; McGlinn, Evan P.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The term “stiff finger” refers to a reduction in the range of motion in the finger, and it is a condition that has many different causes and involves a number of different structures. Almost all injuries of the fingers and some diseases can cause finger stiffness. Hand surgeons often face difficulty treating stiff fingers that are affected by irreversible soft tissues fibrosis. Stiff fingers can be divided into flexion and extension deformities. They can also be sub-classified into four categories according to the involved tissues extending from the skin to the joint capsule. Prevention of stiff fingers by judicious mobilization of the joints is prudent to avoid more complicated treatment after established stiffness occurs. Static progressive and dynamic splints have been considered as effective non-operative interventions to treat stiff fingers. Most authors believe force of joint distraction and time duration of stretching are two important factors to consider while applying a splint or cast. We also introduce the concepts of capsulotomy and collateral ligament release and other soft tissue release of the MCP and PIP joint in this article. Future outcomes research is vital to assessing the effectiveness of these surgical procedures and guiding postoperative treatment recommendations. PMID:24996467

  18. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  19. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  20. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  1. Arabidopsis BPM proteins function as substrate adaptors to a cullin3-based E3 ligase to affect fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyuan; Lee, Joo Hyun; Weber, Henriette; Tohge, Takayuki; Witt, Sandra; Roje, Sanja; Fernie, Alisdair R; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2013-06-01

    Regulation of transcriptional processes is a critical mechanism that enables efficient coordination of the synthesis of required proteins in response to environmental and cellular changes. Transcription factors require accurate activity regulation because they play a critical role as key mediators assuring specific expression of target genes. In this work, we show that cullin3-based E3 ligases have the potential to interact with a broad range of ethylene response factor (ERF)/APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factors, mediated by Math-BTB/POZ (for Meprin and TRAF [tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor] homolog)-Broad complex, Tramtrack, Bric-a-brac/Pox virus and Zinc finger) proteins. The assembly with an E3 ligase causes degradation of their substrates via the 26S proteasome, as demonstrated for the wrinkled1 ERF/AP2 protein. Furthermore, loss of Math-BTB/POZ proteins widely affects plant development and causes altered fatty acid contents in mutant seeds. Overall, this work demonstrates a link between fatty acid metabolism and E3 ligase activities in plants and establishes CUL3-based E3 ligases as key regulators in transcriptional processes that involve ERF/AP2 family members.

  2. Abscinazole-E3M, a practical inhibitor of abscisic acid 8′-hydroxylase for improving drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Jun; Okamoto, Masanori; Mega, Ryosuke; Kanno, Yuri; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Todoroki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential phytohormone that regulates plant water use and drought tolerance. However, agricultural applications of ABA have been limited because of its rapid inactivation in plants, which involves hydroxylation of ABA by ABA 8′-hydroxylase (CYP707A). We previously developed a selective inhibitor of CYP707A, (−)-Abz-E2B, by structurally modifying S-uniconazole, which functions as an inhibitor of CYP707A and as a gibberellin biosynthetic enzyme. However, its synthetic yield is too low for practical applications. Therefore, we designed novel CYP707A inhibitors, Abz-T compounds, that have simpler structures in which the 1,2,3-triazolyl ring of (−)-Abz-E2B has been replaced with a triple bond. They were successfully synthesised in shorter steps, resulting in greater yields than that of (−)-Abz-E2B. In the enzymatic assays, one of the Abz-T compounds, (−)-Abz-E3M, acted as a strong and selective inhibitor of CYP707A, similar to (−)-Abz-E2B. Analysis of the biological effects in Arabidopsis revealed that (−)-Abz-E3M enhanced ABA’s effects more than (−)-Abz-E2B in seed germination and in the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Treatment with (−)-Abz-E3M induced stomatal closure and improved drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, (−)-Abz-E3M also increased the ABA response in rice and maize. Thus, (−)-Abz-E3M is a more practical and effective inhibitor of CYP707A than (−)-Abz-E2B. PMID:27841331

  3. [Idiopathic palmar vein thrombosis of the fingers - rare but relevant].

    PubMed

    Spies, C K; Schwarz-Furlan, S; Hahn, P; Oppermann, J; Unglaub, F

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic thrombosis of palmar finger veins is rare and women suffer from it almost exclusively. Synovial cysts, epidermoid inclusion cysts, giant cell tumours and haemangiomatous lesions should be considered in the process of diagnosis. We present a 56-year-old woman with idiopathic and symptomatic thrombosis of palmar finger veins. Using the palmar approach the painful veins were identified and excised completely. An uncomplicated wound healing has followed with completely unrestricted and painless range of motion. Surgical excision of the finger vein thrombosis should be considered if there is continuing pain.

  4. A hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Tao; Yang, Gongping; Yang, Lu

    2014-12-01

    Finger knuckle print has recently been seen as an effective biometric technique. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition, which is rooted in traditional score-level fusion methods. In the proposed method, we firstly take Gabor feature as the basic feature for finger knuckle print recognition and then a new decision rule is defined based on the predefined threshold. Finally, the minor feature speeded-up robust feature is conducted for these users, who cannot be recognized by the basic feature. Extensive experiments are performed to evaluate the proposed method, and experimental results show that it can achieve a promising performance.

  5. Narrow fingers in the Saffman-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, Y.; Gerard, N.; Rabaud, M.

    1986-12-01

    Saffman-Taylor fingers with a relative width much smaller than the classical limit lambda = 0.5 are found when a small isolated bubble is located at their tip. These solutions are members of a family found by Saffman and Taylor (1958) neglecting superficial tension. Recent theories have shown that when capillary forces are taken into account an unphysical cusplike singularity would appear at the tip of all the fingers with lambda less than 0.5. Conversely, here the replacement of the tip by a small bubble makes these solutions possible. At large velocity these fingers show dendritic instability.

  6. Finger rafting: a generic instability of floating elastic sheets.

    PubMed

    Vella, Dominic; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-02-23

    Colliding ice floes are often observed to form a series of interlocking fingers. We show that this striking phenomenon is not a result of some peculiar property of ice but rather a general and robust mechanical phenomenon reproducible in the laboratory with other floating materials. We determine the theoretical relationship between the width of the resulting fingers and the material's mechanical properties and present experimental results along with field observations to support the theory. The generality of this "finger rafting" suggests that analogous processes may be responsible for creating the large-scale structures observed at the boundaries between Earth's convergent tectonic plates.

  7. Genetically engineered mouse models for functional studies of SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weihua; Wei, Wenyi; Sun, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The SCF (SKP1 (S-phase-kinase-associated protein 1), Cullin-1, F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligases, the founding member of Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in mammals. Each individual SCF E3 ligase consists of one adaptor protein SKP1, one scaffold protein cullin-1 (the first family member of the eight cullins), one F-box protein out of 69 family members, and one out of two RING (Really Interesting New Gene) family proteins RBX1/ROC1 or RBX2/ROC2/SAG/RNF7. Various combinations of these four components construct a large number of SCF E3s that promote the degradation of many key regulatory proteins in cell-context, temporally, and spatially dependent manners, thus controlling precisely numerous important cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, gene transcription, signal transduction, DNA replication, maintenance of genome integrity, and tumorigenesis. To understand how the SCF E3 ligases regulate these cellular processes and embryonic development under in vivo physiological conditions, a number of mouse models with transgenic (Tg) expression or targeted deletion of components of SCF have been established and characterized. In this review, we will provide a brief introduction to the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, followed by a comprehensive overview on the existing Tg and knockout (KO) mouse models of the SCF E3s, and discuss the role of each component in mouse embryogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, as well as other pathogenic processes associated with human diseases. We will end with a brief discussion on the future directions of this research area and the potential applications of the knowledge gained to more effective therapeutic interventions of human diseases. PMID:23528706

  8. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  9. Iron-binding E3 ligase mediates iron response in plants by targeting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Selote, Devarshi; Samira, Rozalynne; Matthiadis, Anna; Gillikin, Jeffrey W; Long, Terri A

    2015-01-01

    Iron uptake and metabolism are tightly regulated in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), BRUTUS (BTS), which contains three hemerythrin (HHE) domains and a Really Interesting New Gene (RING) domain, interacts with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are capable of forming heterodimers with POPEYE (PYE), a positive regulator of the iron deficiency response. BTS has been shown to have E3 ligase capacity and to play a role in root growth, rhizosphere acidification, and iron reductase activity in response to iron deprivation. To further characterize the function of this protein, we examined the expression pattern of recombinant ProBTS::β-GLUCURONIDASE and found that it is expressed in developing embryos and other reproductive tissues, corresponding with its apparent role in reproductive growth and development. Our findings also indicate that the interactions between BTS and PYE-like (PYEL) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors occur within the nucleus and are dependent on the presence of the RING domain. We provide evidence that BTS facilitates 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of PYEL proteins in the absence of iron. We also determined that, upon binding iron at the HHE domains, BTS is destabilized and that this destabilization relies on specific residues within the HHE domains. This study reveals an important and unique mechanism for plant iron homeostasis whereby an E3 ubiquitin ligase may posttranslationally control components of the transcriptional regulatory network involved in the iron deficiency response.

  10. Identification of a novel motif that affects the conformation and activity of the MARCH1 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2013-02-15

    MARCH1, a member of the membrane-associated RING-CH family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, regulates antigen presentation by downregulating the cell surface expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II and CD86 molecules. MARCH1 is a transmembrane protein that exposes both its N- and C-terminus to the cytoplasm. We have conducted a structure-function analysis of its two cytoplasmic tails to gain insights into the trafficking of MARCH1 in the endocytic pathway. Fusion of the N-terminal portion of MARCH1 to a type II transmembrane reporter molecule revealed that this cytoplasmic tail contains endosomal sorting motifs. The C-terminal domain also appears to contain intracellular sorting signals because it reduced surface expression of a type I transmembrane reporter molecule. Mutation of the two putative C-terminal tyrosine-based sorting signals did not affect the activity of human MARCH1; however, it did reduce its incorporation into exosomes. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis pointed to a functional C-terminal 221VQNC224 sequence that affects the spatial organization of the two cytoplasmic regions. This motif is also found in other RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases, such as parkin. Altogether, these findings highlight the complex regulation of MARCH1 trafficking in the endocytic pathway as well as the intricate interactions between its cytoplasmic tails.

  11. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  12. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  13. Supernumerary small ring chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Kaffe, S; Kim, H J; Hsu, L Y; Brill, C B; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    A supernumerary small ring chromosome was found in 30% of cultured peripheral leucocytes and 50% of skin fibroblasts in a 6-year-old boy with mild mental retardation and midline cleft palate. The extra chromosome appeared to carry a densely staining region on Giemsa banding. The banding patterns of the remaining 46 chromosomes were normal. C banding indicated that the ring chromosome contained mainly centromeric constitutive heterochromatin. Chromosome analysis of both parents showed normal karyotypes by both conventional and banding techniques; thus the origin of the ring chromosome could not be determined. Images PMID:604496

  14. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  15. Subscale Diffuser Testing, E-3 produces first steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Phase 2 of the A-3 Test Facility Subscale Diffuser Risk Mitigation Project at Stennis Space Center reached a milestone Oct. 25 when the E-3 Test Facility produced superheated (500+ degrees) steam for approximately 3 seconds at more than 400 psi. The test team, led by Barry Robinson of NASA's Test Projects Office, followed that success with further tests to lengthen the duration of steam production. On Nov. 1, they were able to maintain a consistent pressure and temperature of steam for 60 seconds. In December, the team began Phase 3 of the testing, providing data for the design and procurement to build the full-scale version of the steam diffuser for SSC's A-3 Test Stand.

  16. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    PubMed Central

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V.; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L.; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism. PMID:24982993

  17. Radial fingering at an active interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagilla, Amarender; Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Jadhav, Sameer

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the shapes of single cells crawling on surfaces and those of the fronts of thin layers of cells collectively expanding to close a wound are the results of fingering instabilities. Motivated by these studies, we investigate the conditions under which an actively forced interface between a pair of immiscible viscous fluids will destabilize under Hele-Shaw confinement. The case of a circular active interface with surface tension and bending resistance is considered. Active forces exerted by the inner fluid at the interfacial region can be either completely internal or due to interactions with the confining substrate. In addition, the effects of cell growth or actin depolymerization or external injection of cell suspensions are modeled by including a distributed source and a point source of arbitrary strengths. Linear stability analysis reveals that at any given mean radius of the interface, its stability is dictated by two key dimensionless parameters. We discuss the different regions in a state space of these parameters.

  18. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  19. Finger length ratios in Serbian transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D:4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D:4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D:4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D:4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D:4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D:4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism.

  20. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO₂) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO₂ was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO₂ was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO₂ was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO₂ without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO₂ in any condition of the fetus.

  1. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The generation of zinc finger proteins by modular assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Mital; Segal, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The modular assembly (MA) method of generating engineered zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) was the first practical method for creating custom DNA-binding proteins. As such, MA has enabled a vast exploration of sequence-specific methods and reagents, ushering in the modern era of zinc finger-based applications that are described in this volume. The first zinc finger nuclease to cleave an endogenous site was created using MA, as was the first artificial transcription factor to enter phase II clinical trials. In recent years, other excellent methods have been developed that improved the affinity and specificity of the engineered ZFPs. However, MA is still used widely for many applications. This chapter will describe methods and give guidance for the creation of ZFPs using MA. Such ZFPs might be useful as starting materials to perform other methods described in this volume. Here, we also describe a single-strand annealing recombination assay for the initial testing of zinc finger nucleases. PMID:20680825

  3. [Raynaud's phenomenon and other circulatory disorders of the fingers].

    PubMed

    Mahler, Felix

    2014-02-26

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is defined as attacks of blanking, subsequent cyanosis and rubeosis of fingers due to vasospasms in response to cold or emotional stimuli. Primary RP has no known underlying cause and occurs mainly in young and otherwise healthy women. Secondary RP goes along with various causes such as connective tissue diseases, toxic substances, drugs, physical trauma or organic finger artery occlusions, and occurs at any age and in both genders. Related affections are acrocyanosis and finger artery occlusions either due to arteriosclerosis or vasculitis. Also spontaneous finger hematoma may provoke an episode of RP. Therapeutically strict cold protection and avoidance of possible noxa is recommended besides the treatment of underlying diseases. No standard vasoactive drug has proven ideal for RP due to side effects. In cases with rest pain or ulcerations the same principles are applied as in ischemic diseases with no possibility for revascularization.

  4. Finger vein recognition based on local directional code.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianjing; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2012-11-05

    Finger vein patterns are considered as one of the most promising biometric authentication methods for its security and convenience. Most of the current available finger vein recognition methods utilize features from a segmented blood vessel network. As an improperly segmented network may degrade the recognition accuracy, binary pattern based methods are proposed, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP), Local Derivative Pattern (LDP) and Local Line Binary Pattern (LLBP). However, the rich directional information hidden in the finger vein pattern has not been fully exploited by the existing local patterns. Inspired by the Webber Local Descriptor (WLD), this paper represents a new direction based local descriptor called Local Directional Code (LDC) and applies it to finger vein recognition. In LDC, the local gradient orientation information is coded as an octonary decimal number. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LDC achieves better performance than methods using LLBP.

  5. Seal finger: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin P; Jewer, David D

    2009-01-01

    A recent case of seal finger which was misdiagnosed and hence mistreated at the patient’s first presentation is described. The patient was eventually referred to a hand specialist and after the correct treatment with tetracycline, responded well without any long-term sequelae. Seal finger is an occupational injury that occurs to those who work directly or indirectly with seals. The disease entity has been described in both Scandinavian and Canadian literature. The causative microorganism was unknown until 1991, when Mycoplasma phocacerebrale was isolated from both the finger of a patient with seal finger and from the mouth of a seal that bit the patient. Although rare, the disease is not uncommon in marine workers, biologists and veterinarians. Prompt identification based on patient history and treatment with oral tetracycline is pendant to a favourable patient outcome. PMID:21119845

  6. [Spontaneous Non Ischaemic Blue Finger: A Rare and Benign Phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Franco, Daniela; Alves, Daniela; Almeida, Ana Cristina; Almeida, Carlos Costa; Moreno, Cecília; Freixo, Joâo

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous non-ischaemic blue finger is a rare and benign disorder, characterized by purple discoloration of a finger, with complete resolution. This article reports the case of a woman of 88 years, which after a few hours of stay in the emergency department developed without associated trauma, a purplish color of the 3rd finger of the right hand, with a palpable pulse and without temperature changes or pain. The etiological investigation was negative. The patient was assessed one week after the event and showed completeresolution. There are several diseases that share the same signs and symptoms, as such the diagnosis is based on the spontaneous violaceous color sparing the finger tip, and fast resolution without treatment. Though being a harmless phenomenon, it requires early assessment for timely differential diagnosis with severe pathologies.

  7. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  8. Seal finger: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    White, Colin P; Jewer, David D

    2009-01-01

    A recent case of seal finger which was misdiagnosed and hence mistreated at the patient's first presentation is described. The patient was eventually referred to a hand specialist and after the correct treatment with tetracycline, responded well without any long-term sequelae. Seal finger is an occupational injury that occurs to those who work directly or indirectly with seals. The disease entity has been described in both Scandinavian and Canadian literature. The causative microorganism was unknown until 1991, when Mycoplasma phocacerebrale was isolated from both the finger of a patient with seal finger and from the mouth of a seal that bit the patient. Although rare, the disease is not uncommon in marine workers, biologists and veterinarians. Prompt identification based on patient history and treatment with oral tetracycline is pendant to a favourable patient outcome.

  9. Finger Vein Recognition Based on Local Directional Code

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianjing; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2012-01-01

    Finger vein patterns are considered as one of the most promising biometric authentication methods for its security and convenience. Most of the current available finger vein recognition methods utilize features from a segmented blood vessel network. As an improperly segmented network may degrade the recognition accuracy, binary pattern based methods are proposed, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP), Local Derivative Pattern (LDP) and Local Line Binary Pattern (LLBP). However, the rich directional information hidden in the finger vein pattern has not been fully exploited by the existing local patterns. Inspired by the Webber Local Descriptor (WLD), this paper represents a new direction based local descriptor called Local Directional Code (LDC) and applies it to finger vein recognition. In LDC, the local gradient orientation information is coded as an octonary decimal number. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LDC achieves better performance than methods using LLBP. PMID:23202194

  10. The effects of finger extension on shoulder muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-Woo; Shin, Ju-Yong; Kim, Youn-Joung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to examine the effects of the extension of the fingers (distal upper limb) on the activity of the shoulder muscles (proximal upper limb). [Subjects and Methods] This study involved 14 healthy male adults with no musculoskeletal disorder or pain related to the shoulders and hands. The subjects in a sitting posture abducted the angle of the shoulder joints at 60° and had their palms in the front direction. Electromyography (EMG) was comparatively analyzed to look at the activities of the infraspinatus (IS) and rhomboid major (RM) when the fingers were extended and relaxed. [Results] The activity of the IS was statistically significantly higher when the fingers were extended than when they were relaxed. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, finger extension is considered to affect the muscles for connected shoulder joint stability. PMID:26504277

  11. Suppression of viscous fingering in nonflat Hele-Shaw cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Rodolfo; Fontana, João V.; Miranda, José A.

    2014-11-01

    Viscous fingering formation in flat Hele-Shaw cells is a classical and widely studied fluid mechanical problem. Recently, instead of focusing on the development of the fingering instability, researchers have devised different strategies aiming to suppress its appearance. In this work, we study a protocol that intends to inhibit the occurrence of fingering instabilities in nonflat (spherical and conical) Hele-Shaw cell geometries. By using a mode-coupling theory to describe interfacial evolution, plus a variational controlling technique, we show that viscous fingering phenomena can be minimized in such a confined, curved environment by properly manipulating a time-dependent injection flow rate Q (t ) . Explicit expressions for Q (t ) are derived for the specific cases of spherical and conical cells. The suitability of the controlling method is verified for linear and weakly nonlinear stages of the flow.

  12. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  13. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  14. Fingered bola body, bola with same, and methods of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenitis, John M. (Inventor); Billica, Linda W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses bola bodies, bolas, and a snaring method which makes use such devices. A bola body, according to the present invention, is nonspherical or irregular in shape rather than a smooth sphere or ovoid body. One or more fingers extends from the bola body. These fingers may be relatively straight or they may have crooked or bent portions to enhance entanglement with a bola line or lines or with each other. Two or more of such fingers may be used and may be regularly or irregularly spaced apart on a bola body. A bola with such bodies includes lines which are connected to the other bodies. In one particular embodiment of a bola body, according to the present invention, the body has an irregular shape with a bottom rectangular portion and a top pyramid portion forming a nose. A plurality of fingers is extended from the pyramidal top portion with one finger extended up and away from each of four corners of the top portion. Such a bola body tends to be initially oriented with its nose and fingers against an object being snared since the body is pulled nose first when a bola line is secured at the tip of the pyramidal portion of the bola body. With such a bola, an unwrapping bola body can slip around a target member so that two of the rod-shaped fingers catch a bola line and guide it into an area or crook between the fingers and a side of the top pyramidal portion of the bola body. Tension on the bola line maintains the line in the crook and tends to press the fingers against the unwrapped target member to stabilize the wrapping of the line about the target member. With such a bola, it is difficult for two or more lines unwrapping in different directions to move past one another without being forced together by line tension. Also, the fingers of such bola bodies may hook and hold each other. The fingers may also hook or entangle some object on or portion of the target member. A probable known target member has known dimensions and shapes so that

  15. Inactivation of SAG/RBX2 E3 ubiquitin ligase suppresses KrasG12D-driven lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Tan, Mingjia; Jia, Lijun; Wei, Dongping; Zhao, Yongchao; Chen, Guoan; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Lili; Thomas, Dafydd; Beer, David G; Sun, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are a family of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that rely on either RING-box 1 (RBX1) or sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), also known as RBX2, for activity. RBX1 and SAG are both overexpressed in human lung cancer; however, their contribution to patient survival and lung tumorigenesis is unknown. Here, we report that overexpression of SAG, but not RBX1, correlates with poor patient prognosis and more advanced disease. We found that SAG is overexpressed in murine KrasG12D-driven lung tumors and that Sag deletion suppressed lung tumorigenesis and extended murine life span. Using cultured lung cancer cells, we showed that SAG knockdown suppressed growth and survival, inactivated both NF-κB and mTOR pathways, and resulted in accumulation of tumor suppressor substrates, including p21, p27, NOXA, and BIM. Importantly, growth suppression by SAG knockdown was partially rescued by simultaneous knockdown of p21 or the mTOR inhibitor DEPTOR. Treatment with MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of CRL E3s, also inhibited the formation of KrasG12D-induced lung tumors through a similar mechanism involving inactivation of NF-κB and mTOR and accumulation of tumor suppressor substrates. Together, our results demonstrate that Sag is a Kras-cooperating oncogene that promotes lung tumorigenesis and suggest that targeting SAG-CRL E3 ligases may be an effective therapeutic approach for Kras-driven lung cancers.

  16. Inactivation of SAG E3 ubiquitin ligase blocks embryonic stem cell differentiation and sensitizes leukemia cells to retinoid acid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingjia; Li, Yun; Yang, Ruiguo; Xi, Ning; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG), also known as RBX2 (RING box protein-2), is the RING component of SCF (SKP1, Cullin, and F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Our previous studies have demonstrated that SAG is an anti-apoptotic protein and an attractive anti-cancer target. We also found recently that Sag knockout sensitized mouse embryonic stem cells (mES) to radiation and blocked mES cells to undergo endothelial differentiation. Here, we reported that compared to wild-type mES cells, the Sag(-/-) mES cells were much more sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (RA)-induced suppression of cell proliferation and survival. While wild-type mES cells underwent differentiation upon exposure to RA, Sag(-/-) mES cells were induced to death via apoptosis instead. The cell fate change, reflected by cellular stiffness, can be detected as early as 12 hrs post RA exposure by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). We then extended this novel finding to RA differentiation therapy of leukemia, in which the resistance often develops, by testing our hypothesis that SAG inhibition would sensitize leukemia to RA. Indeed, we found a direct correlation between SAG overexpression and RA resistance in multiple leukemia lines. By using MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE), that inactivates SAG-SCF E3 ligase by blocking cullin neddylation, we were able to sensitize two otherwise resistant leukemia cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1 to RA. Mechanistically, RA sensitization by MLN4924 was mediated via enhanced apoptosis, likely through accumulation of pro-apoptotic proteins NOXA and c-JUN, two well-known substrates of SAG-SCF E3 ligase. Taken together, our study provides the proof-of-concept evidence for effective treatment of leukemia patients by RA-MLN4924 combination.

  17. Bending the Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Saturn's rings appear strangely warped in this view of the rings seen through the upper Saturn atmosphere.

    The atmosphere acts like a lens in refracting (bending) the light reflected from the rings. As the rings pass behind the overexposed limb (edge) of Saturn as seen from Cassini, the ring structure appears to curve downward due to the bending of the light as it passes through the upper atmosphere.

    This image was obtained using a near-infrared filter. The filter samples a wavelength where methane gas does not absorb light, thus making the far-off rings visible through the upper atmosphere.

    By comparing this image to similar ones taken using filters where methane gas does absorb, scientists can estimate the vertical profile of haze and the abundance of methane in Saturn's high atmosphere.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 14, 2005, through a filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 938 nanometers and at a distance of approximately 197,000 kilometers (123,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 820 meters (2,680 feet) per pixel.

  18. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish: use of zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ivone Un San; Lai, Daniel; Lan, Chuan-Ching; Johnson, Ross; Love, Donald R; Johnson, Ross; Love, Donald R

    2011-09-01

    The modeling of human disease in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) is moving away from chemical mutagensis and transient downregulation using morpholino oligomers to more targeted and stable transgenic methods. In this respect, zinc finger nucleases offer a means of introducing mutations at targeted sites at high efficiency. We describe here the development of zinc finger nucleases and their general use in model systems with a focus on the zebrafish.

  19. High-pressure injection injury of the finger

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The high-pressure injection injuries are unusual injuries and the extent of tissue damage is often under estimated. They represent potentially disabling forms of trauma and have disastrous effects on tissues if not treated promptly. We present a case of high pressure injection injury to the finger from lubricant oil. The patient presented late with necrosis of volar tissue of left index finger. The patient was aggressively managed in stages, with delayed flap cover, with satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcome. PMID:23325982

  20. Repeatability Evaluation of Finger Tapping Device with Magnetic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuko; Kandori, Akihiko; Shima, Keisuke; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Toshio; Noda, Masafumi; Higashikawa, Fumiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    We tested the repeatability of a finger tapping device with magnetic sensors to determine its reliability. This device, which was developed to assist in the diagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and strokes, measures the distance between the first and index fingers during finger tapping movements (opening and closing the fingers repeatedly). We evaluated three types of repeatability based on ICC (interclass correlation coefficient) and Welch's test (test for equal means in a oneway layout): repeatability when measured at different times, when using different devices, and when using different measurers. We calculated these three types for three finger tapping tasks on both hands for 21 characteristics calculated from finger tapping waveforms. Results demonstrated that the repeatability when using different devices is high regardless of the task or hand. The repeatability when measuring at different times and when using different measurers is high at some tasks, but not all. One of the finger tapping tasks (finger tapping movement with the largest amplitude and highest velocity), which is used in a conventional PD diagnosis method (UPDRS), does not have enough repeatability, while other tasks show high repeatability. Results also showed that five characteristics have the highest repeatability (ICC ≥ 0.5 or significance probability of Welch's test ≥ 5% in all tasks): “total moving distance,” “average of local minimum acceleration in opening motion,” “average of local minimum acceleration in closing motion,” “average of local maximum distance” and “average of local minimum velocity”. These results clearly demonstrate the strong repeatability of this device and lead to more precise diagnosis of movement disorders.