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Sample records for ring finger e3

  1. TRIM proteins as RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The tripartite motif(TRIM) proteins harboring the RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil (RBCC) domain motifs form a large protein family. The members of this family are involved in various biological processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis and transcription and also in diseases and oncogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that TRIM proteins play key roles in innate antiviral immunity. An accumulating body of evidence has demonstrated that some TRIM proteins function as E3 ubiquitin ligases in specific ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathways; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully elucidated. In this chapter, we focus on the TRIM family of proteins specially with regard to E3 ligase.

  2. Structural model of ubiquitin transfer onto an artificial RING finger as an E3 ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-10-01

    The artificial WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger was designed via ``α-helical region substitution'', and its structural model for the attachment of activated ubiquitin has been demonstrated. Chemical modifications of Cys residues, the circular dichroism spectra, and substrate-independent ubiquitination assays illustrated that the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger has E3 activity, and it is ubiquitinated via Lys14. Homology modeling calculations revealed that the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger possesses a classical RING fold for specific E2-E3 binding. The docking poses of the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger with the UbcH5b-ubiquitin conjugate provided insight into its functional E2 interaction and development of ubiquitination at the atomic level. The structural model of the artificial WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger proposed by the present work is useful and may help to extend the strategy of α-helical region substitution.

  3. RING finger palmitoylation of the endoplasmic reticulum Gp78 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Maria; Huang, Kun; El-Husseini, Alaa; Nabi, Ivan R

    2012-07-30

    Gp78 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase within the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway. We show that Flag-tagged gp78 undergoes sulfhydryl cysteine palmitoylation (S-palmitoylation) within the RING finger motif, responsible for its ubiquitin ligase activity. Screening of 19 palmitoyl acyl transferases (PATs) identified five that increased gp78 RING finger palmitoylation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized Myc-DHHC6 overexpression promoted the peripheral ER distribution of Flag-gp78 while RING finger mutation and the palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate restricted gp78 to the central ER. Palmitoylation of RING finger cysteines therefore regulates gp78 distribution to the peripheral ER. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of TRIM22 as a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Zhijian; Gao Bo; Xu Wei; Xiong Sidong

    2008-09-26

    TRIM22, a member of the TRIM family proteins which contain RING finger, B-box, and coiled-coil domains, has been reported as a transcriptional regulator and involved in various cellular processes. In this study, the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, a novel property of TRIM22, was demonstrated. It was found that TRIM22 underwent self-ubiquitylation in vitro in combination with the E2 enzyme UbcH5B and the ubiquitylation was dependent on its RING finger domain. Further evidences showed that TRIM22 could also be self-ubiquitylated in vivo. Importantly, TRIM22 was conjugated with poly-ubiquitin chains and stabilized by the proteasome inhibitor in 293T cells, suggesting that TRIM22 targeted itself for proteasomal degradation through the poly-ubiquitylation. We also found that TRIM22 was located in the nucleus, indicating that TRIM22 might function as a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  5. RING finger E3 ligase PPP1R11 regulates TLR2 signaling and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    McKelvey, Alison C; Lear, Travis B; Dunn, Sarah R; Evankovich, John; Londino, James D; Bednash, Joseph S; Zhang, Yingze; McVerry, Bryan J; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Bill B

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a pattern recognition receptor that recognizes many types of PAMPs that originate from gram-positive bacteria. Here we describe a novel mechanism regulating TLR2 protein expression and subsequent cytokine release through the ubiquitination and degradation of the receptor in response to ligand stimulation. We show a new mechanism in which an uncharacterized RING finger E3 ligase, PPP1R11, directly ubiquitinates TLR2 both in vitro and in vivo, which leads to TLR2 degradation and disruption of the signaling cascade. Lentiviral gene transfer or knockdown of PPP1R11 in mouse lungs significantly affects lung inflammation and the clearance of Staphylococcus aureus. There is a negative correlation between PPP1R11 and TLR2 levels in white blood cell samples isolated from patients with Staphylococcus aureus infections. These results suggest that PPP1R11 plays an important role in regulating innate immunity and gram-positive bacterial clearance by functioning, in part, through the ubiquitination and degradation of TLR2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18496.001 PMID:27805901

  6. Levels of the Mahogunin Ring Finger 1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Do Not Influence Prion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silvius, Derek; Pitstick, Rose; Ahn, Misol; Meishery, Delisha; Oehler, Abby; Barsh, Gregory S.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Carlson, George A.; Gunn, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare but invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders. They are associated with spongiform encephalopathy, a histopathology characterized by the presence of large, membrane-bound vacuolar structures in the neuropil of the brain. While the primary cause is recognized as conversion of the normal form of prion protein (PrPC) to a conformationally distinct, pathogenic form (PrPSc), the cellular pathways and mechanisms that lead to spongiform change, neuronal dysfunction and death are not known. Mice lacking the Mahogunin Ring Finger 1 (MGRN1) E3 ubiquitin ligase develop spongiform encephalopathy by 9 months of age but do not become ill. In cell culture, PrP aberrantly present in the cytosol was reported to interact with and sequester MGRN1. This caused endo-lysosomal trafficking defects similar to those observed when Mgrn1 expression is knocked down, implicating disrupted MGRN1-dependent trafficking in the pathogenesis of prion disease. As these defects were rescued by over-expression of MGRN1, we investigated whether reduced or elevated Mgrn1 expression influences the onset, progression or pathology of disease in mice inoculated with PrPSc. No differences were observed, indicating that disruption of MGRN1-dependent pathways does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PMID:23383230

  7. TRIM37 defective in mulibrey nanism is a novel RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Kallijaervi, Jukka; Lahtinen, Ulla; Haemaelaeinen, Riikka; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina . E-mail: anna-elina.lehesjoki@helsinki.fi

    2005-08-01

    Mulibrey nanism is an autosomal recessive prenatal-onset growth disorder characterized by dysmorphic features, cardiomyopathy, and hepatomegaly. Mutations in TRIM37 encoding a tripartite motif (TRIM, RING-B-box-coiled-coil)-family protein underlie mulibrey nanism. We investigated the ubiquitin ligase activity predicted for the RING domain of TRIM37 by analyzing its autoubiquitination. Full-length TRIM37 and its TRIM domain were highly polyubiquitinated when co-expressed with ubiquitin. Polyubiquitination was decreased in a mutant protein with disrupted RING domain (Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser) and in the Leu76Pro mutant protein, a disease-associated missense mutation affecting the TRIM domain of TRIM37. Bacterially produced GST-TRIM domain fusion protein, but not its Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser or Leu76Pro mutants, were polyubiquitinated in cell-free conditions, implying RING-dependent modification. Ubiquitin was also identified as an interaction partner for TRIM37 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Ectopically expressed TRIM37 rapidly formed aggregates that were ubiquitin-, proteasome subunit-, and chaperone-positive in immunofluorescence analysis, defining them as aggresomes. The Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser mutant and the Leu76Pro and Gly322Val patient mutant proteins were markedly less prone to aggregation, implying that aggresomal targeting reflects a physiological function of TRIM37. These findings suggest that TRIM37 acts as a TRIM domain-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase and imply defective ubiquitin-dependent degradation of an as-yet-unidentified target protein in the pathogenesis of mulibrey nanism.

  8. The RING Finger E3 Ligase SpRing is a Positive Regulator of Salt Stress Signaling in Salt-Tolerant Wild Tomato Species.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shilian; Lin, Qingfang; Zhu, Huishan; Gao, Fenghua; Zhang, Wenhao; Hua, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Protein ubiquitination in plants plays critical roles in many biological processes, including adaptation to abiotic stresses. Previously, RING finger E3 ligase has been characterized during salt stress response in several plant species, but little is known about its function in tomato. Here, we report that SpRing, a stress-inducible gene, is involved in salt stress signaling in wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium 'PI365967'. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that SpRing is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and the RING finger conserved region is required for its activity. SpRing is expressed in all tissues of wild tomato and up-regulated by salt, drought and osmotic stresses, but repressed by low temperature. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion analysis showed that SpRing is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing of SpRing through a virus-induced gene silencing approach led to increased sensitivity to salt stress in wild tomato. Overexpression of SpRing in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in enhanced salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling development. The expression levels of certain key stress-related genes are altered both in SpRing-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants and virus-induced gene silenced tomato seedlings. Taken together, our results indicate that SpRing is involved in salt stress and functions as a positive regulator of salt tolerance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Homoclinic finger-rings in RN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changrong; Zhang, Weinian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we investigate bifurcations of a degenerate homoclinic loop in RN. We prove that a homoclinic finger-ring, an invariant manifold of a definite dimension textured with homoclinic orbits, arises from the degenerate homoclinic orbit. The size of the homoclinic finger-ring is decided by not only its dimension of manifold but also its width. For the rise of homoclinic finger-rings of different dimensions we give conditions, which are proved to form bifurcation manifolds in the parameter space. We further estimate the width for the homoclinic finger-ring and give a method to compute the bifurcation manifolds approximately.

  10. RKP, a RING finger E3 ligase induced by BSCTV C4 protein, affects geminivirus infection by regulation of the plant cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jianbin; Chen, Hao; Teng, Kunling; Zhao, Qingzhen; Zhang, Zhonghui; Li, Yin; Liang, Liming; Xia, Ran; Wu, Yaorong; Guo, Huishan; Xie, Qi

    2009-03-01

    The C4 protein from Curtovirus is known as a major symptom determinant, but the mode of action of the C4 protein remains unclear. To understand the mechanism of involvement of C4 protein in virus-plant interactions, we introduced the C4 gene from Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) into Arabidopsis under a conditional expression promoter; the resulting overexpression of BSCTV C4 led to abnormal host cell division. RKP, a RING finger protein, which is a homolog of the human cell cycle regulator KPC1, was discovered to be induced by BSCTV C4 protein. Mutation of RKP reduced the susceptibility to BSCTV in Arabidopsis and impaired BSCTV replication in plant cells. Callus formation is impaired in rkp mutants, indicating a role of RKP in the plant cell cycle. RKP was demonstrated to be a functional ubiquitin E3 ligase and is able to interact with cell-cycle inhibitor ICK/KRP proteins in vitro. Accumulation of the protein ICK2/KRP2 was found increased in the rkp mutant. The above results strengthen the possibility that RKP might regulate the degradation of ICK/KRP proteins. In addition, the protein level of ICK2/KRP2 was decreased upon BSCTV infection. Overexpression of ICK1/KRP1 in Arabidopsis could reduce the susceptibility to BSCTV. In conclusion, we found that RKP is induced by BSCTV C4 and may affect BSCTV infection by regulating the host cell cycle.

  11. The RING Finger Ubiquitin E3 Ligase OsHTAS Enhances Heat Tolerance by Promoting H2O2-Induced Stomatal Closure in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Cuicui; Wei, Chuchu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Mugui; Yu, Feifei; Xie, Qi; Tu, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress often results in the generation of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which plays a vital role as a secondary messenger in the process of abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal closure. Here, we characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) HEAT TOLERANCE AT SEEDLING STAGE (OsHTAS) gene, which plays a positive role in heat tolerance at the seedling stage. OsHTAS encodes a ubiquitin ligase localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. OsHTAS expression was detected in all tissues surveyed and peaked in leaf blade, in which the expression was concentrated in mesophyll cells. OsHTAS was responsive to multiple stresses and was strongly induced by exogenous ABA. In yeast two-hybrid assays, OsHTAS interacted with components of the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system and an isoform of rice ascorbate peroxidase. OsHTAS modulated hydrogen peroxide accumulation in shoots, altered the stomatal aperture status of rice leaves, and promoted ABA biosynthesis. The results suggested that the RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase OsHTAS functions in leaf blade to enhance heat tolerance through modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced stomatal closure and is involved in both ABA-dependent and DROUGHT AND SALT TOLERANCE-mediated pathways. PMID:26564152

  12. ATL9, a RING Zinc Finger Protein with E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Implicated in Chitin- and NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Stone, Sophia; Yang, Xin; Antico, Jay; Callis, Judy; Ramonell, Katrina M.; Somerville, Shauna

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are signals detected by plants that activate basal defenses. One of these PAMPs is chitin, a carbohydrate present in the cell walls of fungi and in insect exoskeletons. Previous work has shown that chitin treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana induced defense-related genes in the absence of a pathogen and that the response was independent of the salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways. One of these genes is ATL9 ( = ATL2G), which encodes a RING zinc-finger like protein. In the current work we demonstrate that ATL9 has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. The expression pattern of ATL9 is positively correlated with basal defense responses against Golovinomyces cichoracearum, a biotrophic fungal pathogen. The basal levels of expression and the induction of ATL9 by chitin, in wild type plants, depends on the activity of NADPH oxidases suggesting that chitin-mediated defense response is NADPH oxidase dependent. Although ATL9 expression is not induced by treatment with known defense hormones (SA, JA or ET), full expression in response to chitin is compromised slightly in mutants where ET- or SA-dependent signaling is suppressed. Microarray analysis of the atl9 mutant revealed candidate genes that appear to act downstream of ATL9 in chitin-mediated defenses. These results hint at the complexity of chitin-mediated signaling and the potential interplay between elicitor-mediated signaling, signaling via known defense pathways and the oxidative burst. PMID:21203445

  13. HTLV-1 Tax Stimulates Ubiquitin E3 Ligase, Ring Finger Protein 8, to Assemble Lysine 63-Linked Polyubiquitin Chains for TAK1 and IKK Activation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yik-Khuan; Zhi, Huijun; Bowlin, Tara; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Philip, Subha; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Semmes, Oliver John; Schaefer, Brian; Glover, J N Mark; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2015-08-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, impacts a multitude of cellular processes, including I-κB kinase (IKK)/NF-κB signaling, DNA damage repair, and mitosis. These activities of Tax have been implicated in the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in HTLV-1-infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. IKK and its upstream kinase, TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), contain ubiquitin-binding subunits, NEMO and TAB2/3 respectively, which interact with K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63-pUb) chains. Recruitment to K63-pUb allows cross auto-phosphorylation and activation of TAK1 to occur, followed by TAK1-catalyzed IKK phosphorylation and activation. Using cytosolic extracts of HeLa and Jurkat T cells supplemented with purified proteins we have identified ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8), and E2 conjugating enzymes, Ubc13:Uev1A and Ubc13:Uev2, to be the cellular factors utilized by Tax for TAK1 and IKK activation. In vitro, the combination of Tax and RNF8 greatly stimulated TAK1, IKK, IκBα and JNK phosphorylation. In vivo, RNF8 over-expression augmented while RNF8 ablation drastically reduced canonical NF-κB activation by Tax. Activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax, however, is unaffected by the loss of RNF8. Using purified components, we further demonstrated biochemically that Tax greatly stimulated RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to assemble long K63-pUb chains. Finally, co-transfection of Tax with increasing amounts of RNF8 greatly induced K63-pUb assembly in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, Tax targets RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to promote the assembly of K63-pUb chains, which signal the activation of TAK1 and multiple downstream kinases including IKK and JNK. Because of the roles RNF8 and K63-pUb chains play in DNA damage repair and cytokinesis, this mechanism may also explain the genomic instability of HTLV-1-transformed T cells and ATL cells.

  14. HTLV-1 Tax Stimulates Ubiquitin E3 Ligase, Ring Finger Protein 8, to Assemble Lysine 63-Linked Polyubiquitin Chains for TAK1 and IKK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yik-Khuan; Zhi, Huijun; Bowlin, Tara; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Philip, Subha; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Semmes, Oliver John; Schaefer, Brian; Glover, J. N. Mark; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2015-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, impacts a multitude of cellular processes, including I-κB kinase (IKK)/NF-κB signaling, DNA damage repair, and mitosis. These activities of Tax have been implicated in the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in HTLV-1-infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. IKK and its upstream kinase, TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), contain ubiquitin-binding subunits, NEMO and TAB2/3 respectively, which interact with K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63-pUb) chains. Recruitment to K63-pUb allows cross auto-phosphorylation and activation of TAK1 to occur, followed by TAK1-catalyzed IKK phosphorylation and activation. Using cytosolic extracts of HeLa and Jurkat T cells supplemented with purified proteins we have identified ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8), and E2 conjugating enzymes, Ubc13:Uev1A and Ubc13:Uev2, to be the cellular factors utilized by Tax for TAK1 and IKK activation. In vitro, the combination of Tax and RNF8 greatly stimulated TAK1, IKK, IκBα and JNK phosphorylation. In vivo, RNF8 over-expression augmented while RNF8 ablation drastically reduced canonical NF-κB activation by Tax. Activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax, however, is unaffected by the loss of RNF8. Using purified components, we further demonstrated biochemically that Tax greatly stimulated RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to assemble long K63-pUb chains. Finally, co-transfection of Tax with increasing amounts of RNF8 greatly induced K63-pUb assembly in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, Tax targets RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to promote the assembly of K63-pUb chains, which signal the activation of TAK1 and multiple downstream kinases including IKK and JNK. Because of the roles RNF8 and K63-pUb chains play in DNA damage repair and cytokinesis, this mechanism may also explain the genomic instability of HTLV-1-transformed T cells and ATL cells. PMID:26285145

  15. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  16. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  17. Characterization and Promoter Analysis of a Cotton Ring-Type Ubiquitin Ligase (E3) Gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cotton fiber cDNA, GhRING1, and its corresponding gene have been cloned and characterized. The GhRING1 gene encodes a RING-type ubiquitin ligase (E3) containing 337 amino acids (aa). The GhRING1 protein contains a RING finger motif with conserved cysteine and histine residues at the C-terminus a...

  18. RING-type E3 ligases: Master manipulators of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Meredith B.; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Weissman, Allan M.

    2013-01-01

    RING finger domain and RING finger-like ubiquitin ligases (E3s), such as U-box proteins, constitute the vast majority of known E3s. RING-type E3s function together with ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) to mediate ubiquitination and are implicated in numerous cellular processes. In part because of their importance in human physiology and disease, these proteins and their cellular functions represent an intense area of study. Here we review recent advances in RING-type E3 recognition of substrates, their cellular regulation, and their varied architecture. Additionally, recent structural insights into RING-type E3 function, with a focus on important interactions with E2s and ubiquitin, are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. PMID:23747565

  19. Structural basis for role of ring finger protein RNF168 RING domain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jie; Wu, Minhao; Wu, Huakai; Arokiaraj, Aloysius Wilfred; Wang, Chengliang; Zhang, Weichang; Tao, Yue; Huen, Michael S.Y.; Zang, Jianye

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin adducts surrounding DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have emerged as molecular platforms important for the assembly of DNA damage mediator and repair proteins. Central to these chromatin modifications lies the E2 UBC13, which has been implicated in a bipartite role in priming and amplifying lys63-linked ubiquitin chains on histone molecules through coupling with the E3 RNF8 and RNF168. However, unlike the RNF8-UBC13 holoenyzme, exactly how RNF168 work in concert with UBC13 remains obscure. To provide a structural perspective for the RNF168-UBC13 complex, we solved the crystal structure of the RNF168 RING domain. Interestingly, while the RNF168 RING adopts a typical RING finger fold with two zinc ions coordinated by several conserved cystine and histine residues arranged in a C3HC4 “cross-brace” manner, structural superimposition of RNF168 RING with other UBC13-binding E3 ubiquitin ligases revealed substantial differences at its corresponding UBC13-binding interface. Consistently, and in stark contrast to that between RNF8 and UBC13, RNF168 did not stably associate with UBC13 in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, domain-swapping experiments indicated that the RNF8 and RNF168 RING domains are not functionally interchangeable. We propose that RNF8 and RNF168 operate in different modes with their cognate E2 UBC13 at DSBs. PMID:23255131

  20. Suramin inhibits cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kenneth; Chong, Robert A.; Yu, Qing; Bai, Jin; Spratt, Donald E.; Ching, Kevin; Lee, Chan; Miao, Haibin; Tappin, Inger; Hurwitz, Jerard; Zheng, Ning; Shaw, Gary S.; Sun, Yi; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Sanchez, Roberto; Zheng, Jun-nian; Pan, Zhen-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) control a myriad of biological processes by directing numerous protein substrates for proteasomal degradation. Key to CRL activity is the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 through electrostatic interactions between E3′s cullin conserved basic canyon and the acidic C terminus of the E2 enzyme. This report demonstrates that a small-molecule compound, suramin, can inhibit CRL activity by disrupting its ability to recruit Cdc34. Suramin, an antitrypansomal drug that also possesses antitumor activity, was identified here through a fluorescence-based high-throughput screen as an inhibitor of ubiquitination. Suramin was shown to target cullin 1’s conserved basic canyon and to block its binding to Cdc34. Suramin inhibits the activity of a variety of CRL complexes containing cullin 2, 3, and 4A. When introduced into cells, suramin induced accumulation of CRL substrates. These observations help develop a strategy of regulating ubiquitination by targeting an E2–E3 interface through small-molecule modulators. PMID:27001857

  1. Suramin inhibits cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kenneth; Chong, Robert A; Yu, Qing; Bai, Jin; Spratt, Donald E; Ching, Kevin; Lee, Chan; Miao, Haibin; Tappin, Inger; Hurwitz, Jerard; Zheng, Ning; Shaw, Gary S; Sun, Yi; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Sanchez, Roberto; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Pan, Zhen-Qiang

    2016-04-05

    Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) control a myriad of biological processes by directing numerous protein substrates for proteasomal degradation. Key to CRL activity is the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 through electrostatic interactions between E3's cullin conserved basic canyon and the acidic C terminus of the E2 enzyme. This report demonstrates that a small-molecule compound, suramin, can inhibit CRL activity by disrupting its ability to recruit Cdc34. Suramin, an antitrypansomal drug that also possesses antitumor activity, was identified here through a fluorescence-based high-throughput screen as an inhibitor of ubiquitination. Suramin was shown to target cullin 1's conserved basic canyon and to block its binding to Cdc34. Suramin inhibits the activity of a variety of CRL complexes containing cullin 2, 3, and 4A. When introduced into cells, suramin induced accumulation of CRL substrates. These observations help develop a strategy of regulating ubiquitination by targeting an E2-E3 interface through small-molecule modulators.

  2. Building and remodelling Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lydeard, John R; Schulman, Brenda A; Harper, J Wade

    2013-01-01

    Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) control a plethora of biological pathways through targeted ubiquitylation of signalling proteins. These modular assemblies use substrate receptor modules to recruit specific targets. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the mechanisms that control the activity state of CRLs through dynamic alterations in CRL architecture. Central to these processes are cycles of cullin neddylation and deneddylation, as well as exchange of substrate receptor modules to re-sculpt the CRL landscape, thereby responding to the cellular requirements to turn over distinct proteins in different contexts. This review is focused on how CRLs are dynamically controlled with an emphasis on how cullin neddylation cycles are integrated with receptor exchange. PMID:24232186

  3. Expression in Escherichia coli, purification and characterization of LRSAM1, a LRR and RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanmin; Bian, Weixiang; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    LRSAM1 is a typical RING-finger E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays an important role in many processes. The expression and purification of LRSAM1 from Escherichiacoli had not yet been reported. Here, strategies to clone, express and purify recombinant LRSAM1 in E. coli cells were developed. LRSAM1 was expressed with high yield as inclusion bodies and successfully recovered in soluble form by subsequent denaturation and renaturation steps. Refolded LRSAM1 was directly purified through two steps of ammonium sulfate precipitation, resulting in a purity of up to 95% and a yield of about 6 mg/L bacterial culture. Purified recombinant LRSAM1 exhibited a pH-dependent E3 ligase activity. Its ligase activity was RING-finger domain-dependent, and its ubiquitination favors K6-, K27-, K29- and K48-linkages in cooperation with UbcH5-type E2 enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The RING finger domain E3 ubiquitin ligases BRCA1 and the RNF20/RNF40 complex in global loss of the chromatin mark histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) in cell line models and primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Kristie-Ann; Cole, Alexander J; Gill, Anthony J; Clarkson, Adele; Gard, Gregory B; Chou, Angela; Kennedy, Catherine J; Henderson, Beric R; Fereday, Sian; Traficante, Nadia; Alsop, Kathryn; Bowtell, David D; deFazio, Anna; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Marsh, Deborah J

    2016-12-15

    Enzymatic factors driving cancer-associated chromatin remodelling are of increasing interest as the role of the cancer epigenome in gene expression and DNA repair processes becomes elucidated. Monoubiquitination of histone H2B at lysine 120 (H2Bub1) is a central histone modification that functions in histone cross-talk, transcriptional elongation, DNA repair, maintaining centromeric chromatin and replication-dependent histone mRNA 3'-end processing, as well as being required for the differentiation of stem cells. The loss of global H2Bub1 is seen in a number of aggressive malignancies and has been linked to tumour progression and/or a poorer prognosis in some cancers. Here, we analyse a large cohort of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and show loss of global H2Bub1 in 77% (313 of 407) of tumours. Loss of H2Bub1 was seen at all stages (I-IV) of HGSOC, indicating it is a relatively early epigenomic event in this aggressive malignancy. Manipulation of key H2Bub1 E3 ubiquitin ligases, RNF20, RNF40 and BRCA1, in ovarian cancer cell line models modulated H2Bub1 levels, indicative of the role of these RING finger ligases in monoubiquitination of H2Bub1 in vitro. However, in primary HGSOC, loss of RNF20 protein expression was identified in just 6% of tumours (26 of 424) and did not correlate with global H2Bub1 loss. Similarly, germline mutation of BRCA1 did not show a correlation with the global H2Bub1 loss. We conclude that the regulation of tumour-associated H2Bub1 levels is complex. Aberrant expression of alternative histone-associated 'writer' or 'eraser' enzymes are likely responsible for the global loss of H2Bub1 seen in HGSOC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Systematic Analysis of Dimeric E3-RING Interactions Reveals Increased Combinatorial Complexity in Human Ubiquitination Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Woodsmith, Jonathan; Jenn, Robert C.; Sanderson, Chris M.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitination controls the stability or function of many human proteins, thereby regulating a wide range of physiological processes. In most cases the combinatorial pattern of protein interactions that facilitate substrate recognition or modification remain unclear. Moreover, the efficiency of ubiquitination reactions can be altered by the formation of homo- and heterotypic E3-RING complexes. To establish the prevalence and nature of binary E3-RING/E3-RING interactions systematic yeast two-hybrid screens were performed to test 7269 potential interactions between 124 human E3-RING proteins. These studies identified 228 dimeric interactions between 100 E3-RINGs, of which 205 were novel. Complementary co-immunoprecipitation studies were performed to test predicted network interactions, showing a high correlation (64%) with primary yeast two-hybrid data. This data was integrated with known E3-RING interactions, tissue expression profiles and proteomic ubiquitination datasets to facilitate identification of subnetworks in which E3-RING dimerization events have the potential to alter network structure. These results reveal a widespread yet selective pattern of E3-RING dimerization events, which have the potential to confer further combinatorial complexity within human ubiquitination cascades. PMID:22493164

  6. A palmitoylated RING finger ubiquitin ligase and its homologue in the brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazuaki; Kawamura, Meiko; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Kanbe, Daiji; Ishii, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Tomio; Kumanishi, Toshiro; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-08-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) ligation is implicated in active protein metabolism and subcellular trafficking and its impairment is involved in various neurologic diseases. In rat brain, we identified two novel Ub ligases, Momo and Sakura, carrying double zinc finger motif and RING finger domain. Momo expression is enriched in the brain gray matter and testis, and Sakura expression is more widely detected in the brain white matter as well as in many peripheral organs. Both proteins associate with the cell membranes of neuronal and/or glial cells. We examined their Ub ligase activity in vivo and in vitro using viral expression vectors carrying myc-tagged Momo and Sakura. Overexpression of either Momo or Sakura in mixed cortical cultures increased total polyubiquitination levels. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that the combination of Momo and UbcH4 and H5c, or of Sakura and UbcH4, H5c and H6 is required for the reaction. Deletion mutagenesis suggested that the E3 Ub ligase activity of Momo and Sakura depended on their C-terminal domains containing RING finger structure, while their N-terminal domains influenced their membrane association. In agreement, Sakura associating with the membrane was specifically palmitoylated. Although the molecular targets of their Ub ligation remain to be identified, these findings imply a novel function of the palmitoylated E3 Ub ligase(s).

  7. RING finger protein PLR-1 blocks Wnt signaling by altering trafficking of Wnt Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan E.

    Secreted Wnt proteins control a wide range of essential developmental processes, including axon guidance and establishment of anteroposterior neuronal polarity. We identified a transmembrane RING finger protein, PLR-1, that governs the response to Wnts by reducing the cell surface levels of Wnt receptors Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are normally enriched at the plasma membrane where they are capable of detecting and responding to extracellular Wnts. However, when PLR-1 is expressed Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are no longer detected at the cell surface and instead colocalize with PLR-1 in endosomes and Golgi. PLR-1 is related to a broad family of transmembrane proteins that contain a lumenal protease associated domain and a cytosolic RING finger. The RING finger is a hallmark of one type of E3 ubiquitin ligase and monoubiquitination is commonly used to regulate protein trafficking. Protease associated domains are largely thought to mediate interactions between proteins. To identify the domains responsible for PLR-1 regulation of Frizzled from the cell surface we utilized a series of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and protein truncations containing various domains from PLR-1 and Frizzled. Our data suggests that PLR-1 and Frizzled interact and form a complex via their respective extracellular/lumenal domains, and that ubiqiuitination of Frizzled by PLR-1 targets the Frizzled/PLR-1 complex to the endosome.

  8. SGR9, a RING type E3 ligase, modulates amyloplast dynamics important for gravity sensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Miyo T.; Nakamura, Moritaka; Tasaka, Masao

    Gravitropism is triggered when the directional change of gravity is sensed in the specific cells, called statocytes. In higher plants, statocytes contain sinking heavier amyloplasts which are particular plastids accumulating starch granules. The displacement of amyloplasts within the statocytes is thought to be the initial event of gravity perception. We have demonstrated that endodermal cells are most likely to be the statocytes in Arabidop-sis shoots. Live cell imaging of the endodermal cell of stem has shown that most amyloplasts are sediment to the direction of gravity but they are not static. Several amyloplasts move dynamically in an actin filament (F-actin) dependent manner. In the presence of actin poly-merization inhibitor, all amyloplasts become static and sediment to the direction of gravity. In addition, stems treated with the inhibitor can exhibit gravitropism. These results suggest that F-actin-dependent dynamic movement of amyloplasts is not essential for gravity sensing. sgr (shoot gravitropism) 9 mutant exhibits greatly reduced shoot gravitropism. In endodermal cells of sgr9, dynamic amyloplast movement was predominantly observed and amyloplasts did not sediment to the direction of gravity. Interestingly, inhibition of actin polymerization re-stored both gravitropism and amyloplast sedimentation in sgr9. The SGR9 encodes a novel RING finger protein, which is localized to amyloplasts in endodermal cells. SGR9 showed ubiq-uitin E3 ligase activity in vitro. Together with live cell imaging of amyloplasts and F-actin, our data suggest that SGR9 modulate interaction between amyloplasts and F-actin on amylo-plasts. SGR9 positively act on amyloplasts sedimentation, probably by releasing amyloplasts from F-actin. SGR9 that is localized to amyloplast, possibly degrades unknown substrates by its E3 ligase activity, and this might promote release of amyloplasts from F-actin.

  9. Anatomic variation of the extensor tendons to the ring and little fingers: a cadaver dissection study.

    PubMed

    Seradge, H; Tian, W; Baer, C

    1999-07-01

    We found an anatomic variation of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) in a cadaveric dissection. The EDM had three tendon slips; two slips to the little finger and one to the ring finger metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint. The ring finger slip inserted in the extensor hood with the EDC. The EDC had a separate tendon to the little finger extensor hood. The EDM had an additional pulley distal to the extensor retinaculum. The MP joints of the little and ring fingers extended simultaneously upon pulling the EDM or the EDC. The third slip of the EDM could provide an extra donor site and possibly poses a unique clinical presentation.

  10. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B.E.; Lougheed, J.C.; Callaway, K.; Velasquez, M.; Brecht, E.; Nguyen, L.; Shaler, T.; Walker, D.; Yang, Y.; Regnstrom, K.; Diep, L.; Zhang, Z.; Chiou, S.; Bova, M.; Artis, D.R.; Yao, N.; Baker, J.; Yednock, T.; Johnston, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson’s disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed ‘RING/HECT hybrid’ enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin’s cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein. PMID:23770887

  11. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases.

    PubMed

    Riley, B E; Lougheed, J C; Callaway, K; Velasquez, M; Brecht, E; Nguyen, L; Shaler, T; Walker, D; Yang, Y; Regnstrom, K; Diep, L; Zhang, Z; Chiou, S; Bova, M; Artis, D R; Yao, N; Baker, J; Yednock, T; Johnston, J A

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson's disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed 'RING/HECT hybrid' enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin's cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein.

  12. Magic Ring: a finger-worn device for multiple appliances control using static finger gestures.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lei; Zhou, Yinghui; Cheng, Zixue; Huang, Tongjun

    2012-01-01

    An ultimate goal for Ubiquitous Computing is to enable people to interact with the surrounding electrical devices using their habitual body gestures as they communicate with each other. The feasibility of such an idea is demonstrated through a wearable gestural device named Magic Ring (MR), which is an original compact wireless sensing mote in a ring shape that can recognize various finger gestures. A scenario of wireless multiple appliances control is selected as a case study to evaluate the usability of such a gestural interface. Experiments comparing the MR and a Remote Controller (RC) were performed to evaluate the usability. From the results, only with 10 minutes practice, the proposed paradigm of gestural-based control can achieve a performance of completing about six tasks per minute, which is in the same level of the RC-based method.

  13. Magic Ring: A Finger-Worn Device for Multiple Appliances Control Using Static Finger Gestures

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lei; Zhou, Yinghui; Cheng, Zixue; Huang, Tongjun

    2012-01-01

    An ultimate goal for Ubiquitous Computing is to enable people to interact with the surrounding electrical devices using their habitual body gestures as they communicate with each other. The feasibility of such an idea is demonstrated through a wearable gestural device named Magic Ring (MR), which is an original compact wireless sensing mote in a ring shape that can recognize various finger gestures. A scenario of wireless multiple appliances control is selected as a case study to evaluate the usability of such a gestural interface. Experiments comparing the MR and a Remote Controller (RC) were performed to evaluate the usability. From the results, only with 10 minutes practice, the proposed paradigm of gestural-based control can achieve a performance of completing about six tasks per minute, which is in the same level of the RC-based method. PMID:22778612

  14. Multifunctional nature of the arenavirus RING finger protein Z.

    PubMed

    Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Lennartz, Frank; Strecker, Thomas

    2012-11-09

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped negative-stranded RNA viruses that can cause severe human disease ranging from encephalitis symptoms to fulminant hemorrhagic fever. The bi‑segmented RNA genome encodes four polypeptides: the nucleoprotein NP, the surface glycoprotein GP, the polymerase L, and the RING finger protein Z. Although it is the smallest arenavirus protein with a length of 90 to 99 amino acids and a molecular weight of approx. 11 kDa, the Z protein has multiple functions in the viral life cycle including (i) regulation of viral RNA synthesis, (ii) orchestration of viral assembly and budding, (iii) interaction with host cell proteins, and (iv) interferon antagonism. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the structural and functional role of the Z protein in the arenavirus replication cycle.

  15. Multifunctional Nature of the Arenavirus RING Finger Protein Z

    PubMed Central

    Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Lennartz, Frank; Strecker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped negative-stranded RNA viruses that can cause severe human disease ranging from encephalitis symptoms to fulminant hemorrhagic fever. The bi‑segmented RNA genome encodes four polypeptides: the nucleoprotein NP, the surface glycoprotein GP, the polymerase L, and the RING finger protein Z. Although it is the smallest arenavirus protein with a length of 90 to 99 amino acids and a molecular weight of approx. 11 kDa, the Z protein has multiple functions in the viral life cycle including (i) regulation of viral RNA synthesis, (ii) orchestration of viral assembly and budding, (iii) interaction with host cell proteins, and (iv) interferon antagonism. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the structural and functional role of the Z protein in the arenavirus replication cycle. PMID:23202512

  16. Genome-wide identification, evolution and expression analysis of RING finger protein genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Intikhab; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Yong; Zhu, Mei-Lan; Wang, Heng-Bo; Chalhoub, Boulos; Lu, Yun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    More and more RING finger genes were found to be implicated in various important biological processes. In the present study, a total of 731 RING domains in 715 predicted proteins were identified in Brassica rapa genome (AA, 2n = 20), which were further divided into eight types: RING-H2 (371), RING-HCa (215), RING-HCb (47), RING-v (44), RING-C2 (38), RING-D (10), RING-S/T (5) and RING-G (1). The 715 RING finger proteins were further classified into 51 groups according to the presence of additional domains. 700 RING finger protein genes were mapped to the 10 chromosomes of B. rapa with a range of 47 to 111 genes for each chromosome. 667 RING finger protein genes were expressed in at least one of the six tissues examined, indicating their involvement in various physiological and developmental processes in B. rapa. Hierarchical clustering analysis of RNA-seq data divided them into seven major groups, one of which includes 231 members preferentially expressed in leaf, and constitutes then a panel of gene candidates for studying the genetic and molecular mechanisms of leafy head traits in Brassica crops. Our results lay the foundation for further studies on the classification, evolution and putative functions of RING finger protein genes in Brassica species. PMID:28094809

  17. Structure of a RING E3 ligase and ubiquitin-loaded E2 primed for catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Plechanovová, Anna; Jaffray, Ellis; Tatham, Michael H.; Naismith, James H.; Hay, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Ubiquitin modification is mediated by a large family of specificity determining ubiquitin E3 ligases. To facilitate ubiquitin transfer, RING E3 ligases bind both substrate and a ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme linked to ubiquitin via a thioester bond, but the mechanism of transfer has remained elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of the dimeric RING of RNF4 in complex with E2 (UbcH5a) linked by an isopeptide bond to ubiquitin. While the E2 contacts a single protomer of the RING, ubiquitin is folded back onto the E2 by contacts from both RING protomers. The C-terminal tail of ubiquitin is locked into an active site groove on the E2 by an intricate network of interactions, resulting in changes at the E2 active site. This arrangement is primed for catalysis as it can deprotonate the incoming substrate lysine residue and stabilise the consequent tetrahedral transition state intermediate. PMID:22842904

  18. The Membrane Associated RING-CH Proteins: A Family of E3 Ligases with Diverse Roles through the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Means, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery that conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins can drive proteolytic degradation, ubiquitination has been shown to perform a diverse range of functions in the cell. It plays an important role in endocytosis, signal transduction, trafficking of vesicles inside the cell, and even DNA repair. The process of ubiquitination-mediated control has turned out to be remarkably complex, involving a diverse array of proteins and many levels of control. This review focuses on a family of structurally related E3 ligases termed the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) ubiquitin ligases, which were originally discovered as structural homologs to the virals E3s, K3, and K5 from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). These proteins contain a catalytic RING-CH finger and are typically membrane-bound, with some having up to 14 putative transmembrane domains. Despite several lines of evidence showing that the MARCH proteins play a complex and essential role in several cellular processes, this family remains understudied. PMID:27419207

  19. Characterization of a novel RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase GhRING2 differentially expressed in cotton fiber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis pathway is responsible for the degradation of abnormal and short-lived proteins to regulate many important biochemical activities in eukaryotes. By employing affymetrix microarray analysis, we have identified a novel ubiquitin ligase E3 gene GhRING2 that is diffe...

  20. The Role of the Transmembrane RING Finger Proteins in Cellular and Organelle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    A large number of RING finger (RNF) proteins are present in eukaryotic cells and the majority of them are believed to act as E3 ubiquitin ligases. In humans, 49 RNF proteins are predicted to contain transmembrane domains, several of which are specifically localized to membrane compartments in the secretory and endocytic pathways, as well as to mitochondria and peroxisomes. They are thought to be molecular regulators of the organization and integrity of the functions and dynamic architecture of cellular membrane and membranous organelles. Emerging evidence has suggested that transmembrane RNF proteins control the stability, trafficking and activity of proteins that are involved in many aspects of cellular and physiological processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mammalian transmembrane RNF proteins, focusing on their roles and significance. PMID:24957874

  1. Two partially embedded rings resulting in chronic erosion of a finger.

    PubMed

    Moore, Forrest O; Thornton, Brian P; Shiroff, Adam M; Zabel, David D; Vasconez, Henry C

    2004-12-01

    Embedded rings in the fingers may cause neurovascular, tendinous, or bony injury. These are very rare injuries usually found in patients with mental illness. To minimize the potentially serious complications, mentally-challenged individuals should have tight rings removed. We present a case of a 41-year-old gentleman with schizophrenia who had two partially embedded rings on his left index finger but consistently refused to have the rings removed. Following appointment of a guardian, the patient was returned for surgery to remove the rings. He recovered without further sequelae.

  2. Rice RING E3 ligase may negatively regulate gamma-ray response to mediate the degradation of photosynthesis-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Chan; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Dong Sub; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2015-05-01

    In this study, our findings regarding the regulation of GA irradiation-induced OsGIRP1 in relation to the levels of photosynthesis-related proteins such as OsrbcL1 and OsrbcS1 and hypersensitive responses of overexpressing plants to GR irradiation provide insight into the molecular functions of OsGIRP1 as a negative regulator in response to the stress of radiation. The RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger proteins are known to play crucial roles in various abiotic stresses in plants. Here, we report on RING finger E3 ligase, Oryza sativa gamma rays-induced RING finger protein1 gene (OsGIRP1), which is highly induced by gamma rays (GR) irradiation. In vitro ubiquitination assay demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution (OsGIRP1(C196A)) of the RING domain showed no E3 ligase activity, supporting the notion that the activity of most E3s is specified by a RING domain. We isolated at least 6 substrate proteins of OsGIRP1, including 2 Rubisco subunits, OsrbcL1 and OsrbcSl, via yeast two-hybridization and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. OsGIRP1 and its partner proteins were targeted to the cytosol and the cytosol or chloroplasts, respectively; however, florescence signals of the complexes with OsGIPR1 were observed in the cytosol. Protein degradation in cell extracts showed that OsGIRP1 mediates proteolysis of 2 substrates, OsrbcS1 and OsrbcL1, via the 26S proteasome degradation pathway. The Arabidopsis plants overexpressing OsGIRP1 clearly exhibited increased sensitivity to GR irradiation. These results might suggest that OsGIRP1 acts as a negative regulator of GR response to mediate the degradation of photosynthesis-related proteins.

  3. Muscle ring finger 1 mediates cardiac atrophy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Rojas, Mauricio; Li, Luge; Selzman, Craig H; Tang, Ru-Hang; Stansfield, William E; Rodriguez, Jessica E; Glass, David J; Patterson, Cam

    2009-04-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, induced by various etiologies such as high blood pressure and aortic stenosis, develops in response to increased afterload and represents a common intermediary in the development of heart failure. Understandably then, the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy is associated with a significant reduction in cardiovascular event risk and represents an important, yet underdeveloped, target of therapeutic research. Recently, we determined that muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific protein, inhibits the development of experimentally induced pathological; cardiac hypertrophy. We now demonstrate that therapeutic cardiac atrophy induced in patients after left ventricular assist device placement is associated with an increase in cardiac MuRF1 expression. This prompted us to investigate the role of MuRF1 in two independent mouse models of cardiac atrophy: 1) cardiac hypertrophy regression after reversal of transaortic constriction (TAC) reversal and 2) dexamethasone-induced atrophy. Using echocardiographic, histological, and gene expression analyses, we found that upon TAC release, cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas in MuRF1(-/-) mice decreased approximately 70% less than in wild type mice in the 4 wk after release. This was in striking contrast to wild-type mice, who returned to baseline cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte size within 4 days of TAC release. Despite these differences in atrophic remodeling, the transcriptional activation of cardiac hypertrophy measured by beta-myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and brain natriuretic peptide was attenuated similarly in both MuRF1(-/-) and wild-type hearts after TAC release. In the second model, MuRF1(-/-) mice also displayed resistance to dexamethasone-induced cardiac atrophy, as determined by echocardiographic analysis. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that MuRF1 is essential for cardiac atrophy in vivo, both in the setting of therapeutic

  4. Role of Ring Finger Protein 213 in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Le-Bao; Zhao, Ji-Zong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to help people comprehensively understand the research advances related to ring finger protein 213 (RNF213) in moyamoya disease (MMD) and to understand the disease at the molecular level to provide a new perspective of the diagnosis of the disease. Data Sources: This review was based on data in articles published between 2005 and 2015 that were retrieved from the PubMed database. The search terms included RNF213, MMD, intracranial major artery stenosis/occlusion (ICASO), genotype, phenotype, mutant and variants, and the combinations of these terms. Study Selection: Articles related to MMD and RNF213 were selected for review, and we also reviewed publications related to ICASO. Results: RNF213 is not only associated with MMD but also associated with intracranial major artery stenosis. In addition, RNF213 variants exhibit apparent ethnic diversity; specifically, the c.14576G>A variant is mainly detected in Korean, Chinese, and Japanese populations, particularly the latter population. The genotypes of RNF213 correlate with the phenotypes of MMD; for example, the homozygous c.14576G>A variant is associated with early-onset, severe symptoms, and an unfavorable prognosis. Furthermore, the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant should be considered during the diagnosis of MMD because no patients with quasi-MMD have been reported to carry the RNF213 c.14576G>A variant whereas 66 of 78 patients with definite MMD have been found to carry this variant. Conclusions: The growing literature demonstrates that MMD is primarily caused by the synergy of genetic and environmental factors, and unknown genetic modifiers might play roles in the etiology of MMD. Further research should be conducted to clarify the pathogenic mechanism of MMD. PMID:27748344

  5. MAGE-RING Protein Complexes Comprise a Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jennifer M.; Gao, Jinlan; Wang, Jiawei; Yang, Maojun; Potts, Patrick Ryan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The melanoma antigen (MAGE) family consists of more than 60 genes, many of which are cancer-testis antigens that are highly expressed in cancer and play a critical role in tumorigenesis. However, the biochemical and cellular functions of this enigmatic family of proteins have remained elusive. Here, we identify really interesting new gene (RING) domain proteins as binding partners for MAGE family proteins. Multiple MAGE family proteins bind E3 RING ubiquitin ligases with specificity. The crystal structure of one of these MAGE-RING complexes, MAGE-G1-NSE1, reveals structural insights into MAGE family proteins and their interaction with E3 RING ubiquitin ligases. Biochemical and cellular assays demonstrate that MAGE proteins enhance the ubiquitin ligase activity of RING domain proteins. For example, MAGE-C2-TRIM28 is shown to target p53 for degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner, consistent with its tumorigenic functions. These findings define a biochemical and cellular function for the MAGE protein family. PMID:20864041

  6. Identification of a gene in Leishmania infantum encoding a protein that contains a SP-RING/MIZ zinc finger domain.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Reguera, Rosa M; Villa, Héctor; Requena, José María; Müller, Stefan; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael; Ordóñez, David

    2003-10-01

    The SP-RING or Miz zinc finger domain that is related to the classical RING-finger motif, defines a class of proteins that can act as E3-like factors in the pathway of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation. This family includes the mammalian protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) proteins and related proteins from lower eukaryotes. Here we report the existence of a gene in Leishmania infantum, present as two identical copies placed upstream of each MAT2 gene copy, and transcribed as a single approximately 2.2 kb mRNA both in the logarithmic and stationary phases of the promastigote stage. This gene encodes a 47 kDa protein that has been named LORIEN. LORIEN is circumscribed to the cell periphery and it is antigenic during L. infantum infection of dogs and hamsters. Strikingly, this novel protein contains a highly conserved SP-RING/Miz zinc finger domain, raising the possibility that a SUMO or ubiquitin-like system may exist in this microorganism.

  7. Suture-Button Device Stabilization Following Ring Finger Ray Amputation: A Comparative Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Emily N; Means, Kenneth R; Paez, Adrian G; Parks, Brent G; Innis, Peter C

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether placing the suture-button device between the long and small finger metacarpals following ring finger ray amputation may better close the intermetacarpal gap and allow early range of motion without increasing the risk of malrotation than soft tissue repair alone. We performed ray amputation of the ring finger of 14 cadaver specimens by performing an osteotomy of the base of the ring finger metacarpal and then excising the remainder of the digit. We first performed a soft tissue repair of the transverse metacarpal ligaments and then cycled the fingers in simulated active flexion and extension on a custom computer-controlled device to re-create 6 weeks of range of motion. We then placed a suture-button device across the long and small finger metacarpals and tested the specimens again, thereby using each hand as an internal control. The distance between the ring and small finger metacarpals was reduced following suture-button device placement compared with the initial control; this spacing was maintained following complete cycling of the fingers. The angle between the metacarpals was divergent following soft tissue repair, and then became slightly convergent after insertion of the suture-button device. None of the hands developed clinically relevant scissoring of the digits before or after application of the suture-button device. The suture-button device provides stable fixation to withstand early range of motion following ring finger ray amputation and significantly closes the gap and angle between the adjacent metacarpals without causing scissoring.

  8. Identification and functional expression of the pepper RING type E3 ligase, CaDTR1, involved in drought stress tolerance via ABA-mediated signalling

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyunhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Drought negatively affects plant growth and development, thereby leading to loss of crop productivity. Several plant E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) and thus play important roles in the drought stress response. Here, we show that the C3HC4-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaDTR1, regulates the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. CaDTR1 contains an amino-terminal RING finger motif and two carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions; the RING finger motif functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins, and the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions function during subcellular localisation. The expression of CaDTR1 was induced by ABA, drought, and NaCl treatments. CaDTR1 localised in the nucleus and displayed in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterised by high levels of transpirational water loss. On the other hand, CaDTR1-overexpressing (OX) Arabidopsis plants exhibited an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype during the germinative and post-germinative growth stages. Moreover, in contrast to CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants, CaDTR1-OX plants exhibited a drought-tolerant phenotype characterised by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and high leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaDTR1 functions as a positive regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. PMID:27439598

  9. The pepper E3 ubiquitin ligase RING1 gene, CaRING1, is required for cell death and the salicylic acid-dependent defense response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-08-01

    Ubiquitination is essential for ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated protein degradation in plant development and defense. Here, we identified a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase RING1 gene, CaRING1, from pepper (Capsicum annuum). In pepper, CaRING1 expression is induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria infection. CaRING1 contains an amino-terminal transmembrane domain and a carboxyl-terminal RING domain. In addition, it displays in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and the RING domain is essential for E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in CaRING1. CaRING1 also localizes to the plasma membrane. In pepper plants, virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 confers enhanced susceptibility to avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria infection, which is accompanied by compromised hypersensitive cell death, reduced expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1, and lowered salicylic acid levels in leaves. Transient expression of CaRING1 in pepper leaves induces cell death and the defense response that requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CaRING1. By contrast, overexpression of CaRING1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confers enhanced resistance to hemibiotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and biotrophic Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infections. Taken together, these results suggest that CaRING1 is involved in the induction of cell death and the regulation of ubiquitination during the defense response to microbial pathogens.

  10. Genomic and Phenomic Screens for Flower Related RING Type Ubiquitin E3 Ligases in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pavicic, Mirko; Mouhu, Katriina; Wang, Feng; Bilicka, Marcelina; Chovanček, Erik; Himanen, Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    Flowering time control integrates endogenous as well as environmental signals to promote flower development. The pathways and molecular networks involved are complex and integrate many modes of signal transduction. In plants ubiquitin mediated protein degradation pathway has been proposed to be as important mode of signaling as phosphorylation and transcription. To systematically study the role of ubiquitin signaling in the molecular regulation of flowering we have taken a genomic approach to identify flower related Ubiquitin Proteasome System components. As a large and versatile gene family the RING type ubiquitin E3 ligases were chosen as targets of the genomic screen. The complete list of Arabidopsis RING E3 ligases were retrieved and verified in the Arabidopsis genome v11 and their differential expression was used for their categorization into flower organs or developmental stages. Known regulators of flowering time or floral organ development were identified in these categories through literature search and representative mutants for each category were purchased for functional characterization by growth and morphological phenotyping. To this end, a workflow was developed for high throughput phenotypic screening of growth, morphology and flowering of nearly a thousand Arabidopsis plants in one experimental round. PMID:28400782

  11. Palmaris longus muscle substituting for the ring finger slip of flexor digitorum superficialis.

    PubMed

    Cassell, M D; Bergman, R A

    1990-01-01

    An unusual and unrecorded variation in palmaris longus muscle is described. The muscle had a normal appearance and origin from the common tendon arising from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and from the surrounding intermuscular septa. The distal tendon however entered the hand via the carpal tunnel medial and deep to the median nerve, split and inserted into the lateral and medial sides of the middle phalanx of the ring finger. It therefore substituted completely for the slip to the ring finger from flexor digitorum superficials, which was absent.

  12. RING finger protein 121 facilitates the degradation and membrane localization of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Low, Sean E; Yamada, Kenta; Saint-Amant, Louis; Zhou, Weibin; Muto, Akira; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi; Kuwada, John Y; Hirata, Hiromi

    2015-03-03

    Following their synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are transported to the membranes of excitable cells, where they often cluster, such as at the axon initial segment of neurons. Although the mechanisms by which NaV channels form and maintain clusters have been extensively examined, the processes that govern their transport and degradation have received less attention. Our entry into the study of these processes began with the isolation of a new allele of the zebrafish mutant alligator, which we found to be caused by mutations in the gene encoding really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 121 (RNF121), an E3-ubiquitin ligase present in the ER and cis-Golgi compartments. Here we demonstrate that RNF121 facilitates two opposing fates of NaV channels: (i) ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and (ii) membrane localization when coexpressed with auxiliary NaVβ subunits. Collectively, these results indicate that RNF121 participates in the quality control of NaV channels during their synthesis and subsequent transport to the membrane.

  13. Cbl-c Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Is Increased via the Interaction of Its RING Finger Domain with a LIM Domain of the Paxillin Homolog, Hic 5

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Philip E.; Kales, Stephen C.; Yadavalli, Rajgopal; Nau, Marion M.; Zhang, Han; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Cbl proteins (Cbl, Cbl-b and Cbl-c) are ubiquitin ligases that are critical regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling. In this study we identify a new Cbl-c interacting protein, Hydrogen peroxide Induced Construct 5 (Hic-5). The two proteins interact through a novel interaction mediated by the RING finger of Cbl-c and the LIM2 domain of Hic-5. Further, this interaction is mediated and dependent on specific zinc coordinating complexes within the RING finger and LIM domain. Binding of Hic-5 to Cbl-c leads to an increase in the ubiquitin ligase activity of Cbl-c once Cbl-c has been activated by Src phosphorylation or through an activating phosphomimetic mutation. In addition, co-transfection of Hic-5 with Cbl-c leads to an increase in Cbl-c mediated ubiquitination of the EGFR. These data suggest that Hic-5 enhances Cbl-c ubiquitin ligase activity once Cbl-c has been phosphorylated and activated. Interactions between heterologous RING fingers have been shown to activate E3s. This is the first demonstration of enhancement of ubiquitin ligase activity of a RING finger ubiquitin ligase by the direct interaction of a LIM zinc coordinating domain. PMID:23145173

  14. Actin Cytoskeletal Organization in Drosophila Germline Ring Canals Depends on Kelch Function in a Cullin-RING E3 Ligase.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Andrew M; Mannix, Katelynn M; Cooley, Lynn

    2015-11-01

    The Drosophila Kelch protein is required to organize the ovarian ring canal cytoskeleton. Kelch binds and cross-links F-actin in vitro, and it also functions with Cullin 3 (Cul3) as a component of a ubiquitin E3 ligase. How these two activities contribute to cytoskeletal remodeling in vivo is not known. We used targeted mutagenesis to investigate the mechanism of Kelch function. We tested a model in which Cul3-dependent degradation of Kelch is required for its function, but we found no evidence to support this hypothesis. However, we found that mutant Kelch deficient in its ability to interact with Cul3 failed to rescue the kelch cytoskeletal defects, suggesting that ubiquitin ligase activity is the principal activity required in vivo. We also determined that the proteasome is required with Kelch to promote the ordered growth of the ring canal cytoskeleton. These results indicate that Kelch organizes the cytoskeleton in vivo by targeting a protein substrate for degradation by the proteasome. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Actin Cytoskeletal Organization in Drosophila Germline Ring Canals Depends on Kelch Function in a Cullin-RING E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Andrew M.; Mannix, Katelynn M.; Cooley, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila Kelch protein is required to organize the ovarian ring canal cytoskeleton. Kelch binds and cross-links F-actin in vitro, and it also functions with Cullin 3 (Cul3) as a component of a ubiquitin E3 ligase. How these two activities contribute to cytoskeletal remodeling in vivo is not known. We used targeted mutagenesis to investigate the mechanism of Kelch function. We tested a model in which Cul3-dependent degradation of Kelch is required for its function, but we found no evidence to support this hypothesis. However, we found that mutant Kelch deficient in its ability to interact with Cul3 failed to rescue the kelch cytoskeletal defects, suggesting that ubiquitin ligase activity is the principal activity required in vivo. We also determined that the proteasome is required with Kelch to promote the ordered growth of the ring canal cytoskeleton. These results indicate that Kelch organizes the cytoskeleton in vivo by targeting a protein substrate for degradation by the proteasome. PMID:26384358

  16. Circumferential burns to the fingers associated with gold and platinum rings.

    PubMed

    Regan, M W; Moss, A L

    1986-06-01

    Two patients sustained circumferential burns to the fingers associated with metal rings. The first case was caused by molten zinc and was treated by early burn excision and split skin grafting, while the second case was an electrical burn caused by a car battery and was treated conservatively.

  17. Upf1 potentially serves as a RING-related E3 ubiquitin ligase via its association with Upf3 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shinya; Araki, Yasuhiro; Ohya, Yuriko; Sakuno, Takeshi; Hoshino, Shin-Ichi; Kontani, Kenji; Nishina, Hiroshi; Katada, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Three Upf proteins are essential to the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. Although these proteins assemble on polysomes for recognition of aberrant mRNAs containing premature termination codons, the significance of this assembly remains to be elucidated. The Cys- and His-rich repeated N terminus (CH domain) of Upf1 has been implicated in its binding to Upf2. Here, we show that CH domain also plays a RING-related role for Upf1 to exhibit E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in yeast. Despite the sequence divergence from typical E3-RING fingers, the CH domain of yeast Upf1 specifically and directly interacted with the yeast E2 Ubc3. Interestingly, Upf1 served as a substrate for the in vitro self-ubiquitination, and the modification required its association with Upf3 rather than Upf2. Substitution of the coordinated Cys and His residues in the CH domain impaired not only self-ubiquitination of Upf1 but also rapid decay of aberrant mRNAs. These results suggest that Upf1 may serve as an E3 ubiquitin ligase upon its association with Upf3 and play an important role in signaling to the NMD pathway. PMID:18676617

  18. Structure and E3-ligase activity of the Ring–Ring complex of Polycomb proteins Bmi1 and Ring1b

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, Gretel; van der Stoop, Petra; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Perrakis, Anastassis; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Sixma, Titia K

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins Ring1b and Bmi1 (B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukaemia virus integration site 1) are critical components of the chromatin modulating PRC1 complex. Histone H2A ubiquitination by the PRC1 complex strongly depends on the Ring1b protein. Here we show that the E3-ligase activity of Ring1b on histone H2A is enhanced by Bmi1 in vitro. The N-terminal Ring-domains are sufficient for this activity and Ring1a can replace Ring1b. E2 enzymes UbcH5a, b, c or UbcH6 support this activity with varying processivity and selectivity. All four E2s promote autoubiquitination of Ring1b without affecting E3-ligase activity. We solved the crystal structure of the Ring–Ring heterodimeric complex of Ring1b and Bmi1. In the structure the arrangement of the Ring-domains is similar to another H2A E3 ligase, the BRCA1/BARD1 complex, but complex formation depends on an N-terminal arm of Ring1b that embraces the Bmi1 Ring-domain. Mutation of a critical residue in the E2/E3 interface shows that catalytic activity resides in Ring1b and not in Bmi1. These data provide a foundation for understanding the critical enzymatic activity at the core of the PRC1 polycomb complex, which is implicated in stem cell maintenance and cancer. PMID:16710298

  19. Simulated microbe removal around finger rings using different hand sanitation methods.

    PubMed

    Alur, Archana A; Rane, Madhavi J; Scheetz, James P; Lorenz, Douglas J; Gettleman, Lawrence

    2009-09-01

    It is our opinion that the CDC and the WHO have underestimated cross-contamination under examination gloves in dental clinics while wearing jewelry, such as finger rings. These agencies only "recommend" removing jewelry, and only washing hands for 15 seconds with soap and warm water before donning gloves. This study examined several washing procedures and finger rings using simulated microbes. A gloved rubber hand manikin was made and fitted with a fresh disposable vinyl glove. Four fingers were fitted with rings or no ring, dusted with simulated microbes, and washed with a scrub brush for 5, 15, and 25 seconds under 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C water alone, or with liquid hand soap. Light levels (in lux) of fluorescent powder before and after washing were measured and delta scores calculated for changes in light levels, equivalent to effectiveness of hand washing procedures. A full-factorial, 3-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for differences among levels of the three study factors-time, temperature, and soap use. Tukey's post hoc honestly significant difference (HSD) test was applied to significant factors to examine pair-wise differences between factor levels. It was found that the longer the hands with rings were washed with a scrub brush under flowing water, the more simulated microbes were removed. By 25 seconds, all methods were essentially the same. Simulated microbes were more difficult to remove from the palm compared to the back of the hand. The liquid hand soap used in this study was more effective with warm water than cold. When given a choice of washing with cold water up to 15 seconds, it would be preferable not to use soap to remove simulated microbes. Qualitatively, the outer surface of finger rings were more effectively cleaned than the crevice below the ring, and the ring with a stone setting appeared to accumulate and retain simulated microbes more than other rings. The most effective treatment was washing with warm water

  20. Simulated Microbe Removal around Finger Rings Using Different Hand Sanitation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Alur, Archana A; Rane, Madhavi J; Scheetz, James P; Lorenz, Douglas J; Gettleman, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Aim It is our opinion that the CDC and the WHO have underestimated cross-contamination under examination gloves in dental clinics while wearing jewelry, such as finger rings. These agencies only “recommend” removing jewelry, and only washing hands for 15 seconds with soap and warm water before donning gloves. This study examined several washing procedures and finger rings using simulated microbes. Methodology A gloved rubber hand manikin was made and fitted with a fresh disposable vinyl glove. Four fingers were fitted with rings or no ring, dusted with simulated microbes, and washed with a scrub brush for 5, 15, and 25 seconds under 20°C and 40°C water alone, or with liquid hand soap. Light levels (in lux) of fluorescent powder before and after washing were measured and delta scores calculated for changes in light levels, equivalent to effectiveness of hand washing procedures. A full-factorial, 3-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for differences among levels of the three study factors—time, temperature, and soap use. Tukey's post hoc honestly significant difference (HSD) test was applied to significant factors to examine pair-wise differences between factor levels. Results It was found that the longer the hands with rings were washed with a scrub brush under flowing water, the more simulated microbes were removed. By 25 seconds, all methods were essentially the same. Simulated microbes were more difficult to remove from the palm compared to the back of the hand. The liquid hand soap used in this study was more effective with warm water than cold. When given a choice of washing with cold water up to 15 seconds, it would be preferable not to use soap to remove simulated microbes. Qualitatively, the outer surface of finger rings were more effectively cleaned than the crevice below the ring, and the ring with a stone setting appeared to accumulate and retain simulated microbes more than other rings. Conclusion The most effective treatment was

  1. Giant Cell Tumour of Proximal Phalanx of Ring Finger: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Rishit; Shah, Malkesh; Patel, Amit; Golwala, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone arising from a phalanx of a finger is extremely rare. Only two percent of all reported GCTs are found in the hand, which show a higher rate of recurrence as compared to those occurring at a more proximal location. Here we report a rare case of giant cell tumour of proximal phalanx of the ring finger in a 20-year-old male, which was treated with extended curettage and bone grafting. After two years of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with complete functional recovery and no signs of recurrence. PMID:27900230

  2. Estimation of Sex From Index and Ring Finger Lengths in An Indigenous Population of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Jaydip; Ghosh, Ahana; Mondal, Nitish; Krishan, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Forensic anthropology involves the identification of human remains for medico-legal purposes. Estimation of sex is an essential element of medico-legal investigations when identification of unknown dismembered remains is involved. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to estimate sex from index and ring finger lengths of adult individuals belonging to an indigenous population of eastern India. Materials and Methods A total of 500 unrelated adult individuals (18-60 years) from the Rajbanshi population (males: 250, females: 250) took part in the study. A total of 400 (males: 200, 200 female) participants were randomly used to develop sex estimation models using Binary Logistic Regression Analysis (BLR). A separate group of 200 adults (18-60 years) from the Karbi tribal population (males 100, females 100) were included to validate the results obtained on the Rajbanshi population. The univarate and bivariate models derived on the study group (n=400) were tested on hold-out sample of Rajbanshi participants (n=100) and the other test population of the Karbi (n=200) participants. Results The results indicate that Index Finger Length (IFL) and Ring Finger Length (RFL) of both hands were significantly longer in males as compared to females. The ring finger was longer than the index finger in both sexes. The study successfully highlights the existence of sex differences in IFL and RFL (p<0.05). No sex differences were however, observed for the index and ring finger ratio. The predictive accuracy of IFL and RFL in sex estimation ranged between 70%-75% (in the hold out sample from the Rajbanshi population) and 60-66% (in the test sample from the Karbi population). A Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis was performed to test the predictive accuracy after predicting the probability of IFL and RFL in sex estimation. The predicted probabilities using ROC analysis were observed to be higher on the left side and in multivariate analysis. Conclusion The

  3. Structure of the Human FANCL RING-Ube2T Complex Reveals Determinants of Cognate E3-E2 Selection

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, Charlotte; Purkiss, Andrew; Miles, Jennifer Anne; Walden, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The combination of an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with an E3 ubiquitin-ligase is essential for ubiquitin modification of a substrate. Moreover, the pairing dictates both the substrate choice and the modification type. The molecular details of generic E3-E2 interactions are well established. Nevertheless, the determinants of selective, specific E3-E2 recognition are not understood. There are ∼40 E2s and ∼600 E3s giving rise to a possible ∼24,000 E3-E2 pairs. Using the Fanconi Anemia pathway exclusive E3-E2 pair, FANCL-Ube2T, we report the atomic structure of the FANCL RING-Ube2T complex, revealing a specific and extensive network of additional electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, we show that these specific interactions are required for selection of Ube2T over other E2s by FANCL. PMID:24389026

  4. Structure of the human FANCL RING-Ube2T complex reveals determinants of cognate E3-E2 selection.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Charlotte; Purkiss, Andrew; Miles, Jennifer Anne; Walden, Helen

    2014-02-04

    The combination of an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with an E3 ubiquitin-ligase is essential for ubiquitin modification of a substrate. Moreover, the pairing dictates both the substrate choice and the modification type. The molecular details of generic E3-E2 interactions are well established. Nevertheless, the determinants of selective, specific E3-E2 recognition are not understood. There are ∼40 E2s and ∼600 E3s giving rise to a possible ∼24,000 E3-E2 pairs. Using the Fanconi Anemia pathway exclusive E3-E2 pair, FANCL-Ube2T, we report the atomic structure of the FANCL RING-Ube2T complex, revealing a specific and extensive network of additional electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, we show that these specific interactions are required for selection of Ube2T over other E2s by FANCL.

  5. Flexible cullins in cullin-RING E3 ligases allosterically regulate ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-11-25

    How do the cullins, with conserved structures, accommodate substrate-binding proteins with distinct shapes and sizes? Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitate ubiquitin transfer from E2 to the substrate, tagging the substrate for degradation. They contain substrate-binding, adaptor, cullin, and Rbx proteins. Previously, we showed that substrate-binding and Rbx proteins are flexible. This allows shortening of the E2-substrate distance for initiation of ubiquitination or increasing the distance to accommodate the polyubiquitin chain. However, the role of the cullin remained unclear. Is cullin a rigid scaffold, or is it flexible and actively assists in the ubiquitin transfer reaction? Why are there different cullins, and how do these cullins specifically facilitate ubiquitination for different substrates? To answer these questions, we performed structural analysis and molecular dynamics simulations based on Cul1, Cul4A, and Cul5 crystal structures. Our results show that these three cullins are not rigid scaffolds but are flexible with conserved hinges in the N-terminal domain. However, the degrees of flexibilities are distinct among the different cullins. Of interest, Cul1 flexibility can also be changed by deletion of the long loop (which is absent in Cul4A) in the N-terminal domain, suggesting that the loop may have an allosteric functional role. In all three cases, these conformational changes increase the E2-substrate distance to a specific range to facilitate polyubiquitination, suggesting that rather than being inert scaffold proteins, cullins allosterically regulate ubiquitination.

  6. Functional characterization of EI24-induced autophagy in the degradation of RING-domain E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Sushil; Jeong, Hyobin; Kim, Yunmi; Ali, Muhammad; Roh, Jae-il; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Han-Woong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy pathways were believed to be independent; however, recent data indicate that these pathways engage in crosstalk. To date, the players mediating this crosstalk have been elusive. Here, we show experimentally that EI24 (EI24, autophagy associated transmembrane protein), a key component of basal macroautophagy/autophagy, degrades 14 physiologically important E3 ligases with a RING (really interesting new gene) domain, whereas 5 other ligases were not degraded. Based on the degradation results, we built a statistical model that predicts the RING E3 ligases targeted by EI24 using partial least squares discriminant analysis. Of 381 RING E3 ligases examined computationally, our model predicted 161 EI24 targets. Those targets are primarily involved in transcription, proteolysis, cellular bioenergetics, and apoptosis and regulated by TP53 and MTOR signaling. Collectively, our work demonstrates that EI24 is an essential player in UPS-autophagy crosstalk via degradation of RING E3 ligases. These results indicate a paradigm shift regarding the fate of E3 ligases. PMID:27541728

  7. The Pepper RING-Type E3 Ligase, CaAIP1, Functions as a Positive Regulator of Drought and High Salinity Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-10-01

    Plant adaptive responses to osmotic stress are co-ordinated by restriction of growth and developmental processes and by molecular and physiological activities. The phytohormone ABA is the primary regulator that induces and responds to osmotic stress, and its sensitivity markedly influences osmotic stress tolerance levels. Several E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of ABA, thereby mediating sensitivity to osmotic stress in higher plants. Here, we report that the C3H2C3-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaAIP1, regulates osmotic stress responses via ABA-mediated signaling. CaAIP1 contains a RING finger motif, which functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins. Expression of CaAIP1 was induced by ABA, drought and NaCl treatments, suggesting its role in the osmotic stress response. CaAIP1-silenced pepper plants displayed a drought-sensitive phenotype characterized by a high level of transpirational water loss in the drought-treated leaves. CaAIP1-overexpressing (OX) plants exhibited increased sensitivity to ABA, but an NaCl- and mannitol-tolerant phenotype during seed germination and seedling growth. CaAIP1-OX plants further displayed enhanced tolerance to drought stress, characterized by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and leaf temperature. Our data indicate that CaAIP1 is a positive regulator of the osmotic stress tolerance mechanism. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The atrzf1 mutation of the novel RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase increases proline contents and enhances drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun-Woo; Min, Ji-Hee; Chung, Moon-Soo; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2013-04-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to proteins plays a fundamental role in the regulation of cellular function through biological events involving abiotic or biotic stress responses, immune responses, and apoptosis. Here, we characterize the biological function of the Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) in dehydration response. AtRZF1 was significantly reduced by drought stress. The atrzf1 mutant was less sensitive to osmotic stress than the wild-type during early seedling development, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing AtRZF1 were hypersensitive, indicating that AtRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the AtRZF1 gene was very significantly influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, membrane ion leakage and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. AtRZF1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase, and its conserved C3H2C3-type RING domain is likely important for the biological function of AtRZF1 in drought response. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase AtRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development.

  9. Isolated ring-little finger metacarpal synostosis: a new classification system and treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Tian, Wen; Chen, Shan-Lin; Li, Chun; Zhu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    To devise a comprehensive classification system for isolated ring-little finger metacarpal synostosis that offers a clear guide to specific treatment for each variation of the deformity. Based on the experience of 13 cases (20 hands) of isolated ring-little finger metacarpal synostosis, we devised a classification system that takes into account 2 key pathological features of this malformation: the fourth-fifth intermetacarpal angle and the severity of hypoplasia of the fifth ray. In our classification, all patients were divided into 3 types, according to the fourth-fifth intermetacarpal angle, and each type was further subdivided into 2 subtypes according to the length of the fifth ray. All 20 hands could be classified according to our classification, including 2 hands of type A (both A1), 10 hands of type B (9 B1; 1 B2), and 8 hands of type C (7 C1; 1 C2). Patients of different classification types received different treatments according to our proposed classification-related guidelines. It was also possible to classify all the cases found in literature according to this scheme. Our classification for ring-little finger metacarpal synostosis is simple and easy to remember. It is applicable to all possible variations of the congenital anomaly and can guide treatment for the whole spectrum of the deformity. Therapeutic V. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of SAG, a ring finger redox-sensitive protein.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, M; Bian, J; Aviram, M; Duan, H; Bisgaier, C L; Loo, J A; Sun, Y

    1999-07-01

    We recently reported the cloning and characterization of SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene), a novel zinc RING finger protein, that is redox responsive and protects mammalian cells from apoptosis. Here we report the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of SAG. Bacterially expressed SAG is brown in color and dithiothreitol (DTT)-sensitive. SAG forms large oligomers without DTT that can be reduced into a monomer in the presence of DTT. These features help us to purify SAG using the chromatography with or without DTT. Likewise, purified SAG is redox sensitive. Upon H2O2 exposure, SAG forms oligomers as well as monomer doublets due to the formation of the inter- or intramolecular disulfide bonds, respectively. This process can be reversed by DTT or prevented by pretreatment with the alkylating reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). Although SAG contains two putative heme-binding sites and a RING finger domain, the protein appears not to bind with heme and to lack transcription factor activity as determined in a Gal4-fusion/transactivation assay. Wildtype, but not RING finger domain-disrupted SAG mutants, prevents copper-induced lipid peroxidation. These results, along with our previous observations, suggest that SAG is an intracellular antioxidant molecule that may act as a redox sensor to buffer oxidative-stress induced damage.

  11. Effect of wearing fingers rings on the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Teruo; Okamura, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Tomoka; Watanabe, Katsuya; Yokoi, Shigeko; Atae, Hitoshi; Ueda, Masayuki; Kuwayama, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Shigekazu; Tomino, Saaya; Fujii, Hideo; Honda, Takefumi; Morita, Takayosi; Yukawa, Takafumi; Harada, Nobuko

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to examine the effects of an approach that wears finger rings on elderly females with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Method: The subjects were seven Japanese dementia patients living in elderly nursing homes. A single-case experimental design was adopted for the study. Each study subject was asked to put rings on her finger (from 9:00 to 19:00) for 7 days. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory, scenes of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, interest in wearing rings, self-awareness, and overall profile were determined to assess the effect on the patients of wearing rings. Results: The majority of nursing care providers stated, based on their assessment, that the “irritability/lability” that was noted during the baseline period disappeared during the ring-wearing intervention period in the three patients who displayed an interest in rings. In the assessment of the self-awareness ability, these three women were aware themselves of their intellect collapsing and were capable of conjecturing their own and others’ minds. It was commonly seen that the nursing staff, even though they had not been asked to do so by the researchers, told the patients, “Mrs. XX, you look so beautiful” when they found a patient wearing rings. Discussion/conclusion: Individuals with low self-esteem are inclined to get angry and display aggression. In subjects with low self-esteem, anger and aggression readily arise when they are slighted by others. Self-esteem is low in those women who are aware of their own status of collapsing intellect. It is concluded that the words of conjuration, “you look so beautiful,” which the wearing of the ring per se by the patient elicited from the caregivers heightened the self-esteem and alleviated “irritability/lability” in the study subjects. PMID:28856006

  12. Effect of wearing fingers rings on the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Teruo; Okamura, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Tomoka; Watanabe, Katsuya; Yokoi, Shigeko; Atae, Hitoshi; Ueda, Masayuki; Kuwayama, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Shigekazu; Tomino, Saaya; Fujii, Hideo; Honda, Takefumi; Morita, Takayosi; Yukawa, Takafumi; Harada, Nobuko

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of an approach that wears finger rings on elderly females with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The subjects were seven Japanese dementia patients living in elderly nursing homes. A single-case experimental design was adopted for the study. Each study subject was asked to put rings on her finger (from 9:00 to 19:00) for 7 days. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory, scenes of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, interest in wearing rings, self-awareness, and overall profile were determined to assess the effect on the patients of wearing rings. The majority of nursing care providers stated, based on their assessment, that the "irritability/lability" that was noted during the baseline period disappeared during the ring-wearing intervention period in the three patients who displayed an interest in rings. In the assessment of the self-awareness ability, these three women were aware themselves of their intellect collapsing and were capable of conjecturing their own and others' minds. It was commonly seen that the nursing staff, even though they had not been asked to do so by the researchers, told the patients, "Mrs. XX, you look so beautiful" when they found a patient wearing rings. Individuals with low self-esteem are inclined to get angry and display aggression. In subjects with low self-esteem, anger and aggression readily arise when they are slighted by others. Self-esteem is low in those women who are aware of their own status of collapsing intellect. It is concluded that the words of conjuration, "you look so beautiful," which the wearing of the ring per se by the patient elicited from the caregivers heightened the self-esteem and alleviated "irritability/lability" in the study subjects.

  13. Drosophila SCE/dRING E3-ligase inhibits apoptosis in a Dp53 dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Simoes da Silva, Carolina J; Fereres, Sol; Simón, Rocío; Busturia, Ana

    2017-09-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins control developmental gene silencing and are highly conserved between flies and mammals. PcG proteins function by controlling post-translational modification of histones, such as ubiquitylation, which impacts chromatin compaction and thus gene transcription. Changes in PcG cellular levels have drastic effects on organismal development and are involved in the generation of human pathologies such as cancer. However, the mechanisms controlling their levels of expression and their physiological effects are only partially understood. In this work we describe the effects of modulating levels of SCE/dRING, a conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase and member of the PcG known to mono-ubiquitylate histone H2A. We find that inactivation of Sce induces apoptosis, an effect that is decreased in the absence of Dp53 function. However, over-expression of SCE produce no developmental effects but inhibits DP53-induced apoptosis. Thus, Sce functions as a Dp53-dependent apoptosis inhibitor. The SCE inhibition of DP53-induced apoptosis requires dRYBP, an ubiquitin binding protein and member of the PcG. Moreover, this inhibition of apoptosis involves the reduction of DP53 protein levels. Finally, high levels of SCE inhibit X-ray induced apoptosis as well as the apoptosis associated with tumor growth. We propose that SCE, together with dRYBP, inhibits apoptosis either by epigenetically regulating Dp53 transcription or by controlling the stabilization of DP53 protein levels thus promoting its ubiquitylation for proteaosomal degradation. This function may generate a homeostatic balance between apoptosis and proliferation during development that provides cell survival during the initiation and progression of disease processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional roles of the pepper RING finger protein gene, CaRING1, in abscisic acid signaling and dehydration tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, which include pathogens and conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate the defense response of plants to abiotic stress. Previously, we isolated Ring finger protein gene (CaRING1) from pepper (Capsicum annuum), which is associated with resistance to bacterial pathogens, accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Here, we report a new function of the CaRING1 gene product in the ABA-mediated defense responses of plants to dehydration stress. The expression of the CaRING1 gene was induced in pepper leaves treated with ABA or exposed to dehydration or NaCl. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 in pepper plants exhibited low degree of ABA-induced stomatal closure and high levels of transpirational water loss in dehydrated leaves. These led to be more vulnerable to dehydration stress in CaRING1-silenced pepper than in the control pepper, accompanied by reduction of ABA-regulated gene expression and low accumulation of ABA and H2O2. In contrast, CaRING1-overexpressing transgenic plants showed enhanced sensitivity to ABA during the seedling growth and establishment. These plants were also more tolerant to dehydration stress than the wild-type plants because of high ABA accumulation, enhanced stomatal closure and increased expression of stress-responsive genes. Together, these results suggest that the CaRING1 acts as positive factor for dehydration tolerance in Arabidopsis by modulating ABA biosynthesis and ABA-mediated stomatal closing and gene expression.

  15. Critical Role of the Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of UHRF1, a Nuclear RING Finger Protein, in Tumor Cell GrowthD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Yonchu; Markovtsov, Vadim; Lang, Wayne; Sharma, Poonam; Pearsall, Denise; Warner, Justin; Franci, Christian; Huang, Betty; Huang, Jianing; Yam, George C.; Vistan, Joseph P.; Pali, Erlina; Vialard, Jorge; Janicot, Michel; Lorens, James B.; Payan, Donald G.; Hitoshi, Yasumichi

    2005-01-01

    Early cellular events associated with tumorigenesis often include loss of cell cycle checkpoints or alteration in growth signaling pathways. Identification of novel genes involved in cellular proliferation may lead to new classes of cancer therapeutics. By screening a tetracycline-inducible cDNA library in A549 cells for genes that interfere with proliferation, we have identified a fragment of UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like protein containing PHD and RING domains 1), a nuclear RING finger protein, that acts as a dominant negative effector of cell growth. Reduction of UHRF1 levels using an UHRF1-specific shRNA decreased growth rates in several tumor cell lines. In addition, treatment of A549 cells with agents that activated different cell cycle checkpoints resulted in down-regulation of UHRF1. The primary sequence of UHRF1 contains a PHD and a RING motif, both of which are structural hallmarks of ubiquitin E3 ligases. We have confirmed using an in vitro autoubiquitination assay that UHRF1 displays RING-dependent E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of a GFP-fused UHRF1 RING mutant that lacks ligase activity sensitizes cells to treatment with various chemotherapeutics. Taken together, our results suggest a general requirement for UHRF1 in tumor cell proliferation and implicate the RING domain of UHRF1 as a functional determinant of growth regulation. PMID:16195352

  16. Transcriptional repression by RING finger protein TIF1 beta that interacts with the KRAB repressor domain of KOX1.

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, P; Georgiev, O; Le Douarin, B; Bourquin, J P; Schaffner, W

    1996-01-01

    Many of the vertebrate zinc finger factors of the Kruppel type (C2H2 zinc fingers) contain in their N-terminus a conserved sequence referred to as the KRAB (Kruppel-associated box) domain that, when tethered to DNA, efficiently represses transcription. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have isolated an 835 amino acid RING finger (C3HC4 zinc finger) protein, TIF1 beta (also named KAP-1), that specifically interacts with the KRAB domain of the human zinc finger factor KOX1/ZNF10. TIF1 beta, TIF1 alpha, PML and efp belong to a characteristic subgroup of RING finger proteins that contain one or two other Cys/His-rich clusters (B boxes) and a putative coiled-coil in addition to the classical C3HC4 RING finger motif (RBCC configuration). Like TIF1 alpha, TIF1 beta also contains an additional Cys/His cluster (PHD finger) and a bromo-related domain. When tethered to DNA, TIF1 beta can repress transcription in transiently transfected mammalian cells both from promoter-proximal and remote (enhancer) positions, similarly to the KRAB domain itself. We propose that TIF1 beta is a mediator of the transcriptional repression exerted by the KRAB domain. PMID:9016654

  17. Removal of nail polish and finger rings to prevent surgical infection.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Vickie A; Taylor, Rosemary

    2012-05-16

    Surgical wound infections may be caused by the transfer of bacteria from the hands of surgical teams to patients during operations. Surgical scrubbing prior to surgery reduces the number of bacteria on the skin, but wearing rings and nail polish on the fingers may reduce the efficacy of scrubbing, as bacteria may remain in microscopic imperfections of nail polish and on the skin beneath rings. To assess the effect of the presence or absence of rings and nail polish on the hands of the surgical scrub team on postoperative wound infection rates. For this update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 27 January 2012); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1); Ovid MEDLINE (2010 to January Week 2 2012); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, January 26, 2012); Ovid EMBASE (2010 to 2012 Week 03); and EBSCO CINAHL (2010 to January 6 2012). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of wearing or removing finger rings and nail polish on the efficacy of the surgical scrub and postoperative wound infection rate. All abstracts were checked against a checklist to determine whether they fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Full reports of relevant studies were obtained. Excluded trial reports were checked by all authors to ensure appropriate exclusion. We identified: no new trials; no RCTs that compared wearing of rings with the removal of rings; and no trials of nail polish versus no nail polish that measured surgical infection rates. We found one small RCT (102 scrub nurses) that evaluated the effect of nail polish on the number of bacterial colony forming units left on hands after pre-operative surgical scrubbing. Nurses had either unpolished nails, freshly-applied nail polish (less than two days old), or old nail polish (more than four days old). There were no significant differences in the number of bacteria on hands between the groups before and after

  18. Removal of nail polish and finger rings to prevent surgical infection.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Vickie A; Taylor, Rosemary

    2014-08-04

    Surgical wound infections may be caused by the transfer of bacteria from the hands of surgical teams to patients during operations. Surgical scrubbing prior to surgery reduces the number of bacteria on the skin, but wearing rings and nail polish on the fingers may reduce the efficacy of scrubbing, as bacteria may remain in microscopic imperfections of nail polish and on the skin beneath rings. To assess the effect of the presence or absence of rings and nail polish on the hands of the surgical scrub team on postoperative wound infection rates. For this fifth update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 23 July 2014); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of wearing or removing finger rings and nail polish on the efficacy of the surgical scrub and postoperative wound infection rate. All abstracts were checked against a checklist to determine whether they fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Full reports of relevant studies were obtained. Excluded trial reports were checked by all review authors to ensure appropriate exclusion. We identified: no new trials; no RCTs that compared wearing of rings with the removal of rings; and no trials of nail polish versus no nail polish that measured surgical infection rates. We found one small RCT (102 scrub nurses) that evaluated the effect of nail polish on the number of bacterial colony forming units left on hands after pre-operative surgical scrubbing. Nurses had either unpolished nails, freshly-applied nail polish (less than two days old), or old nail polish (more than four days old). There were no significant differences in the number of bacteria on hands between the groups before and after surgical scrubbing. No trials have investigated whether wearing nail polish or finger rings affects the

  19. Functional diversification of the RING finger and other binuclear treble clef domains in prokaryotes and the early evolution of the ubiquitin system.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies point to a diverse assemblage of prokaryotic cognates of the eukaryotic ubiquitin (Ub) system. These systems span an entire spectrum, ranging from those catalyzing cofactor and amino acid biosynthesis, with only adenylating E1-like enzymes and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls), to those that are closer to eukaryotic systems by virtue of possessing E2 enzymes. Until recently E3 enzymes were unknown in such prokaryotic systems. Using contextual information from comparative genomics, we uncover a diverse group of RING finger E3s in prokaryotes that are likely to function with E1s, E2s, JAB domain peptidases and Ubls. These E1s, E2s and RING fingers suggest that features hitherto believed to be unique to eukaryotic versions of these proteins emerged progressively in such prokaryotic systems. These include the specific configuration of residues associated with oxyanion-hole formation in E2s and the C-terminal UFD in the E1 enzyme, which presents the E2 to its active site. Our study suggests for the first time that YukD-like Ubls might be conjugated by some of these systems in a manner similar to eukaryotic Ubls. We also show that prokaryotic RING fingers possess considerable functional diversity and that not all of them are involved in Ub-related functions. In eukaryotes, other than RING fingers, a number of distinct binuclear (chelating two Zn atoms) and mononuclear (chelating one zinc atom) treble clef domains are involved in Ub-related functions. Through detailed structural analysis we delineated the higher order relationships and interaction modes of binuclear treble clef domains. This indicated that the FYVE domain acquired the binuclear state independently of the other binuclear forms and that different treble clef domains have convergently acquired Ub-related functions independently of the RING finger. Among these, we uncover evidence for notable prokaryotic radiations of the ZF-UBP, B-box, AN1 and LIM clades of treble clef domains and present

  20. Dasatinib Targets B-Lineage Cells but Does Not Provide an Effective Therapy for Myeloproliferative Disease in c-Cbl RING Finger Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duyvestyn, Johanna M.; Taylor, Samuel J.; Dagger, Samantha A.; Orandle, Marlene; Morse, Herbert C.; Thien, Christine B. F.; Langdon, Wallace Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the multi-kinase inhibitor dasatinib would provide an effective therapy for myeloproliferative diseases (MPDs) involving c-Cbl mutations. These mutations, which occur in the RING finger and linker domains, abolish the ability of c-Cbl to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and downregulate activated protein tyrosine kinases. Here we analyzed the effects of dasatinib in a c-Cbl RING finger mutant mouse that develops an MPD with a phenotype similar to the human MPDs. The mice are characterized by enhanced tyrosine kinase signaling resulting in an expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors and cells within the myeloid lineage. Since c-Cbl is a negative regulator of c-Kit and Src signaling we reasoned that dasatinib, which targets these kinases, would be an effective therapy. Furthermore, two recent studies showed dasatinib to be effective in inhibiting the in vitro growth of cells from leukemia patients with c-Cbl RING finger and linker domain mutations. Surprisingly we found that dasatinib did not provide an effective therapy for c-Cbl RING finger mutant mice since it did not suppress any of the hematopoietic lineages that promote MPD development. Thus we conclude that dasatinib may not be an appropriate therapy for leukemia patients with c-Cbl mutations. We did however find that dasatinib caused a marked reduction of pre-B cells and immature B cells which correlated with a loss of Src activity. This study is therefore the first to provide a detailed characterization of in vivo effects of dasatinib in a hematopoietic disorder that is driven by protein tyrosine kinases other than BCR-ABL. PMID:24718698

  1. RING Finger Protein 38 Is a Neuronal Protein in the Brain of Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Cham, Kai Lin; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2017-01-01

    Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein is a type of zinc-binding motif found in a large family of functionally distinct proteins. RING finger proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes including apoptosis, DNA repair, cell cycle, signal transduction, tumour suppressor, vesicular transport, and peroxisomal biogenesis. RING finger protein 38 (RNF38) is a member of the family whose functions remain unknown. To gain insight into the putative effects of RNF38 in the central nervous system, we localised its expression. The aim of this study was to identify the neuroanatomical location(s) of rnf38 mRNA and its peptide, determine the type of RNF38-expressing cells, and measure rnf38 gene expression in the brain of male tilapia. The distributions of rnf38 mRNA and its peptide were visualised using in situ hybridisation with digoxigenin-labelled RNA antisense and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Both were identically distributed throughout the brain, including the telencephalon, preoptic area, optic tectum, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and the hindbrain. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry for RNF38 and the neuronal marker HuC/D showed that most but not all RNF38 protein was expressed in neuronal nuclei. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed the highest level of rnf38 mRNA in the midbrain, followed by the preoptic area, cerebellum, optic tectum, telencephalon, hindbrain and hypothalamus. These findings reveal a differential spatial pattern of RNF38 in the tilapia brain, suggesting that it has potentially diverse functions related to neuronal activity. PMID:28912690

  2. Brown tumour in phalanx of the ring finger due to chronic kidney failure. A case report.

    PubMed

    Forigua V, J E; Brunicardi H, R A; Morales V, C A; Archila, M Del P; Chaparro Rivera, D M

    Brown tumours are highly vascular lytic bone lesions found in primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The brown term is given due to the red-brown colour of the tissue, which is due to the accumulation of hemosiderin. The case is presented of a 29 year-old male with chronic renal failure, who had a mass in the tip of the ring finger after a trauma of 4 months onset, which had increased progressively in size and pain. He was treated surgically, by amputation, with no recurrence 10 months after the surgery. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Capturing a substrate in an activated RING E3/E2-SUMO complex

    PubMed Central

    Streich, Frederick C.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Post-translational protein modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins such as small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO) regulates processes including protein homeostasis, the DNA damage response, and the cell cycle. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is modified by Ub or poly-Ub at Lys164 after DNA damage to recruit repair factors. Yeast PCNA is modified by SUMO on Lys164 and Lys127 during S-phase to recruit the anti-recombinogenic helicase Srs2. Lys164 modification requires specialized E2/E3 enzyme pairs for SUMO or Ub conjugation. For SUMO, Lys164 modification is strictly dependent on the E3 ligase Siz1, suggesting the E3 alters E2 specificity to promote Lys164 modification. The structural basis for substrate interactions in activated E3/E2-Ub/Ubl complexes remains unclear. Here, we report an engineered E2 protein and cross-linking strategies that trap an E3/E2-Ubl/substrate complex for structure determination, illustrating how an E3 can bypass E2 specificity to force-feed a substrate lysine into the E2 active site. PMID:27509863

  4. Overview of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) E3 ligase family.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johannes; Bakke, Oddmund; Morth, J Preben

    2017-09-25

    E3 ligases are critical checkpoints for protein ubiquitination, a signal that often results in protein sorting and degradation but has also been linked to regulation of transcription and DNA repair. In line with their key role in cellular trafficking and cell-cycle control, malfunction of E3 ligases is often linked to human disease. Thus, they have emerged as prime drug targets. However, the molecular basis of action of membrane-bound E3 ligases is still unknown. Here, we review the current knowledge on the membrane-embedded MARCH E3 ligases (MARCH-1-6,7,8,11) with a focus on how the transmembrane regions can contribute via GxxxG-motifs to the selection and recognition of other membrane proteins as substrates for ubiquitination. Further understanding of the molecular parameters that govern target protein recognition of MARCH E3 ligases will contribute to development of strategies for therapeutic regulation of MARCH-induced ubiquitination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Convergent solid-phase and solution approaches in the synthesis of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 RING finger domain.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas; Gatos, Dimitrios

    2009-12-01

    The RING finger domain of the Mdm2, located at the C-terminus of the protein, is necessary for regulation of p53, a tumor suppressor protein. The 48-residues long Mdm2 peptide is an important target for studying its interaction with small anticancer drug candidates. For the chemical synthesis of the Mdm2 RING finger domain, the fragment condensation on solid-phase and the fragment condensation in solution were studied. The latter method was performed using either protected or free peptides at the C-terminus as the amino component. Best results were achieved using solution condensation where the N-component was applied with the C-terminal carboxyl group left unprotected. The developed method is well suited for large-scale synthesis of Mdm2 RING finger domain, combining the advantages of both solid-phase and solution synthesis.

  6. Surgical refinements and sensory recovery of using transverse sensate thoracodorsal artery perforator flaps to resurface ring-avulsed fingers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Ta; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2014-03-01

    To improve the use of thoracodorsal artery perforator flaps in resurfacing ring-avulsed fingers, the relations between the thoracodorsal artery perforators and intercostal nerves were investigated. The surgical refinements, clinical results, and sensory recovery of flaps were presented. Eleven patients with ring-avulsed fingers were reviewed. Separated and conjoint relations were found. Eleven flaps were harvested with 3 refinements. First is the transverse flap design. Second is operating color Doppler sonography to identify the relations. Third is using the conjoint relation to facilitate adequate flap thinning. Four patients had separated relation, and 7 patients had conjoint relation. Only 1 patient showed flap tip necrosis. Two patients with separated relation needed flap debulking. Ten patients acquired protective to normal tactile sensation, and 9 patients gained fair to normal discriminative sensation. The free transverse sensate thoracodorsal artery perforator flaps can be an option in the reconstruction of ring-avulsed fingers.

  7. RING E3 mechanism for ubiquitin ligation to a disordered substrate visualized for human anaphase-promoting complex

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Watson, Edmond R.; ...

    2015-03-30

    For many E3 ligases, a mobile RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain stimulates ubiquitin (Ub) transfer from a thioester-linked E2~Ub intermediate to a lysine on a remotely bound disordered substrate. One such E3 is the gigantic, multisubunit 1.2-MDa anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC), which controls cell division by ubiquitinating cell cycle regulators to drive their timely degradation. Intrinsically disordered substrates are typically recruited via their KEN-box, D-box, and/or other motifs binding to APC and a coactivator such as CDH1. On the opposite side of the APC, the dynamic catalytic core contains the cullin-like subunit APC2 and its RING partner APC11, which collaboratesmore » with the E2 UBCH10 (UBE2C) to ubiquitinate substrates. However, how dynamic RING–E2~Ub catalytic modules such as APC11–UBCH10~Ub collide with distally tethered disordered substrates remains poorly understood. In this paper, we report structural mechanisms of UBCH10 recruitment to APCCDH1 and substrate ubiquitination. Unexpectedly, in addition to binding APC11’s RING, UBCH10 is corecruited via interactions with APC2, which we visualized in a trapped complex representing an APCCDH1–UBCH10~Ub–substrate intermediate by cryo-electron microscopy, and in isolation by X-ray crystallography. To our knowledge, this is the first structural view of APC, or any cullin–RING E3, with E2 and substrate juxtaposed, and it reveals how tripartite cullin–RING–E2 interactions establish APC’s specificity for UBCH10 and harness a flexible catalytic module to drive ubiquitination of lysines within an accessible zone. Finally, we propose that multisite interactions reduce the degrees of freedom available to dynamic RING E3–E2~Ub catalytic modules, condense the search radius for target lysines, increase the chance of active-site collision with conformationally fluctuating substrates, and enable regulation.« less

  8. RING E3 mechanism for ubiquitin ligation to a disordered substrate visualized for human anaphase-promoting complex

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Watson, Edmond R.; Qiao, Renping; Grace, Christy R. R.; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Weissmann, Florian; Frye, Jeremiah J.; Dube, Prakash; Ei Cho, Shein; Actis, Marcelo L.; Rodrigues, Patrick; Fujii, Naoaki; Peters, Jan-Michael; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2015-03-30

    For many E3 ligases, a mobile RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain stimulates ubiquitin (Ub) transfer from a thioester-linked E2~Ub intermediate to a lysine on a remotely bound disordered substrate. One such E3 is the gigantic, multisubunit 1.2-MDa anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC), which controls cell division by ubiquitinating cell cycle regulators to drive their timely degradation. Intrinsically disordered substrates are typically recruited via their KEN-box, D-box, and/or other motifs binding to APC and a coactivator such as CDH1. On the opposite side of the APC, the dynamic catalytic core contains the cullin-like subunit APC2 and its RING partner APC11, which collaborates with the E2 UBCH10 (UBE2C) to ubiquitinate substrates. However, how dynamic RING–E2~Ub catalytic modules such as APC11–UBCH10~Ub collide with distally tethered disordered substrates remains poorly understood. In this paper, we report structural mechanisms of UBCH10 recruitment to APCCDH1 and substrate ubiquitination. Unexpectedly, in addition to binding APC11’s RING, UBCH10 is corecruited via interactions with APC2, which we visualized in a trapped complex representing an APCCDH1–UBCH10~Ub–substrate intermediate by cryo-electron microscopy, and in isolation by X-ray crystallography. To our knowledge, this is the first structural view of APC, or any cullin–RING E3, with E2 and substrate juxtaposed, and it reveals how tripartite cullin–RING–E2 interactions establish APC’s specificity for UBCH10 and harness a flexible catalytic module to drive ubiquitination of lysines within an accessible zone. Finally, we propose that multisite interactions reduce the degrees of freedom available to dynamic RING E3–E2~Ub catalytic modules, condense the search radius for target lysines, increase the chance of active-site collision with conformationally fluctuating substrates, and enable regulation.

  9. Targeting Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases for drug discovery: structure, assembly and small-molecule modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bulatov, Emil; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the ubiquitin–proteasome system has emerged as a valid target for the development of novel therapeutics. E3 ubiquitin ligases are particularly attractive targets because they confer substrate specificity on the ubiquitin system. CRLs [Cullin–RING (really interesting new gene) E3 ubiquitin ligases] draw particular attention, being the largest family of E3s. The CRLs assemble into functional multisubunit complexes using a repertoire of substrate receptors, adaptors, Cullin scaffolds and RING-box proteins. Drug discovery targeting CRLs is growing in importance due to mounting evidence pointing to significant roles of these enzymes in diverse biological processes and human diseases, including cancer, where CRLs and their substrates often function as tumour suppressors or oncogenes. In the present review, we provide an account of the assembly and structure of CRL complexes, and outline the current state of the field in terms of available knowledge of small-molecule inhibitors and modulators of CRL activity. A comprehensive overview of the reported crystal structures of CRL subunits, components and full-size complexes, alone or with bound small molecules and substrate peptides, is included. This information is providing increasing opportunities to aid the rational structure-based design of chemical probes and potential small-molecule therapeutics targeting CRLs. PMID:25886174

  10. The RING finger protein NtRCP1 is involved in the floral transition in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yun; Yu, Yi; Sun, Yong-Duo; Han, Li-Bo; Wu, Xiao-Min; Wu, Jia-He; Xia, Gui-Xian; Liu, Guo-Qin

    2015-06-20

    The transition from the vegetative phase to the reproductive phase is a major developmental process in flowering plants. The underlying mechanism controlling this cellular process remains a research focus in the field of plant molecular biology. In the present work, we identified a gene encoding the C3H2C3-type RING finger protein NtRCP1 from tobacco BY-2 cells. Enzymatic analysis demonstrated that NtRCP1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. In tobacco plants, expression level of NtRCP1 was higher in the reproductive shoot apices than in the vegetative ones. NtRCP1-overexpressing plants underwent a more rapid transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase and flowered markedly earlier than the wild-type control. Histological analysis revealed that the shoot apical meristem of NtRCP1-overexpressing plants initiated inflorescence primordia precociously compared to the wild-type plant due to accelerated cell division. Overexpression of NtRCP1 in BY-2 suspension cells promoted cell division, which was a consequence of the shortened G2 phase in the cell cycle. Together, our data suggest that NtRCP1 may act as a regulator of the phase transition, possibly through its role in cell cycle regulation, during vegetative/reproductive development in tobacco plant. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Four closely-related RING-type E3 ligases, APD1-4, are involved in pollen mitosis II regulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guo; Gu, Hongya; Liu, Jingjing; Qu, Li-Jia

    2012-10-01

    Ubiquitination of proteins is one of the critical regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotes. In higher plants, protein ubiquitination plays an essential role in many biological processes, including hormone signaling, photomorphogenesis, and pathogen defense. However, the roles of protein ubiquitination in the reproductive process are not clear. In this study, we identified four plant-specific RING-finger genes designated Aberrant Pollen Development 1 (APD1) to APD4, as regulators of pollen mitosis II (PMII) in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.). The apd1 apd2 double mutant showed a significantly increased percentage of bicellular-like pollen at the mature pollen stage. Further downregulation of the APD3 and APD4 transcripts in apd1 apd2 by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in more severe abnormal bicellular-like pollen phenotypes than in apd1 apd2, suggesting that cell division was defective in male gametogenesis. All of the four genes were expressed in multiple stages at different levels during male gametophyte development. Confocal analysis using green florescence fusion proteins (GFP) GFP-APD1 and GFP-APD2 showed that APDs are associated with intracellular membranes. Furthermore, APD2 had E2-dependent E3 ligase activity in vitro, and five APD2-interacting proteins were identified. Our results suggest that these four genes may be involved, redundantly, in regulating the PMII process during male gametogenesis. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. The negative regulator of plant cold responses, HOS1, is a RING E3 ligase that mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of ICE1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Agarwal, Manu; Zhang, Yiyue; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2006-01-01

    Plant responses to cold stress are mediated by a transcriptional cascade, in which the transcription factor ICE1 and possibly related proteins activate the expression of C-repeat (CRT)-binding factors (CBFs), leading to the transcription of downstream effector genes. The variant RING finger protein high expression of osmotically responsive gene (HOS)1 was identified genetically as a negative regulator of cold responses. We present evidence here that HOS1 is an E3 ligase required for the ubiquitination of ICE1. HOS1 physically interacts with ICE1 and mediates the ubiquitination of ICE1 both in vitro and in vivo. We found that cold induces the degradation of ICE1 in plants, and this degradation requires HOS1. Consistent with enhanced cold-responsive gene expression in loss-of-function hos1 mutant plants, overexpression of HOS1 represses the expression of CBFs and their downstream genes and confers increased sensitivity to freezing stress. Our results indicate that cold stress responses in Arabidopsis are attenuated by a ubiquitination/proteasome pathway in which HOS1 mediates the degradation of the ICE1 protein. PMID:16702557

  13. NERF encodes a RING E3 ligase important for drought resistance and enhances the expression of its antisense gene NFYA5 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Liu, Wenwen; Zhao, Meng; Li, Wen-Xue

    2015-01-01

    NFYA5 is an important drought-stress inducible transcription factor gene that is targeted by miR169 in Arabidopsis. We show here that the cis-natural antisense transcript gene of NFYA5, NFYA5 Enhancing RING FINGER (NERF), can produce siRNAs from their overlapping region (OR) and affect NFYA5 transcripts by functioning together with miR169. The NERF protein functions as an E3 ligase for ubiquitination. Overexpression of NERF or OR cDNA leads to siRNANERF accumulation, miR169 repression, and NFYA5 transcript enhancement; knock-down of NERF transcripts by an artificial miRNA enhances miR169 abundance and reduces NFYA5 transcripts. Overexpression of NFYA5 does not affect the NERF mRNA level. Deep sequencing of the small RNA library from 35S::OR plants identifies 960 sequences representing 323 unique siRNAs that originate from OR; the sequences of some siRNANERF are similar/complementary to those of miR169. Overexpression of the 195- to 280-bp OR cDNA-containing siRNAs similar/complementary to miR169 also leads to the accumulation of NFYA5 transcripts. Analysis of NERF knock-down plants and NERF overexpression lines showed that, like NFYA5, NERF is important for controlling stomatal aperture and drought resistance. This regulatory model might apply to other natural antisense transcripts with positively correlated expression patterns. PMID:25514924

  14. RING Type E3 Ligase CaAIR1 in Pepper Acts in the Regulation of ABA Signaling and Drought Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Baek, Woonhee; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Several E3 ubiquitin ligases have been associated with the response to abiotic and biotic stresses in higher plants. Here, we report that the hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) ABA-Insensitive RING protein 1 gene (CaAIR1) is essential for a hypersensitive response to drought stress. CaAIR1 contains a C3HC4-type RING finger motif, which plays a role for attachment of ubiquitins to the target protein, and a putative transmembrane domain. The expression levels of CaAIR1 are up-regulated in pepper leaves by ABA treatments, drought and NaCl, suggesting its role in the response to abiotic stress. Our analysis showed that CaAIR1 displays self-ubiquitination and is localized in the nucleus. We generated CaAIR1-silenced peppers via virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and CaAIR1-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to evaluate their responses to ABA and drought. VIGS of CaAIR1 in pepper plants conferred an enhanced tolerance to drought stress, which was accompanied by low levels of transpirational water loss in the drought-treated leaves. CaAIR1-OX plants displayed an impaired sensitivity to ABA during seed germination, seedling and adult stages. Moreover, these plants showed enhanced sensitivity to drought stress because of reduced stomatal closure and decreased expression of stress-responsive genes. Thus, our data indicate that CaAIR1 is a negative regulator of the ABA-mediated drought stress tolerance mechanism.

  15. Intra- and inter-tester reliability and validity of normal finger size measurement using the Japanese ring gauge system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Sato, Y; Sotome, S; Arai, H; Arai, A; Yoshida, H

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the reliability and validity of measurements of finger diameters with a ring gauge. A reliability study enrolled two independent samples (50 participants and seven examiners in Study I; 26 participants and 26 examiners in Study II). The sizes of each participant's little fingers were measured twice with a ring gauge by each examiner. To investigate the validity of the measurements, five hand therapists compared the finger size and hand volume of 30 participants with the ring gauge and with a figure-of-eight technique (Study III). The intra-class correlation coefficient for intra-observer reliability ranged from 0.97 to 0.99 in Study I, and 0.90 to 0.97 in Study II. The intra-class correlation coefficient for inter-observer reliability was 0.95 in Study I and 0.94 in Study II. The validity study showed a Pearson product moment correlation coefficient of 0.75. The ring gauge showed high reliability and validity for measurement of finger size. III, diagnostic.

  16. Fertilization in C. elegans requires an intact C-terminal RING finger in sperm protein SPE-42

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The C. elegans sperm protein SPE-42, a membrane protein of unknown structure and molecular function, is required for fertilization. Sperm from worms with spe-42 mutations appear normal but are unable to fertilize eggs. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 8 conserved cysteine residues in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of this protein suggesting these residues form a zinc-coordinating RING finger structure. Results We made an in silico structural model of the SPE-42 RING finger domain based on primary sequence analysis and previously reported RING structures. To test the model, we created spe-42 transgenes coding for mutations in each of the 8 cysteine residues predicted to coordinate Zn++ ions in the RING finger motif. Transgenes were crossed into a spe-42 null background and protein function was measured by counting progeny. We found that all 8 cysteines are required for protein function. We also showed that sequence differences between the C-terminal 29 and 30 amino acids in C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 following the RING finger domain are not responsible for the failure of the C. briggsae SPE-42 homolog to rescue C. elegans spe-42 mutants. Conclusions The results suggest that a bona fide RING domain is present at the C-terminus of the SPE-42 protein and that this motif is required for sperm-egg interactions during C. elegans fertilization. Our structural model of the RING domain provides a starting point for further structure-function analysis of this critical region of the protein. The C-terminal domain swap experiment suggests that the incompatibility between the C. elegans and C. briggsae SPE-42 proteins is caused by small amino acid differences outside the C-terminal domain. PMID:21345212

  17. The Pepper E3 Ubiquitin Ligase RING1 Gene, CaRING1, Is Required for Cell Death and the Salicylic Acid-Dependent Defense Response1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is essential for ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated protein degradation in plant development and defense. Here, we identified a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase RING1 gene, CaRING1, from pepper (Capsicum annuum). In pepper, CaRING1 expression is induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria infection. CaRING1 contains an amino-terminal transmembrane domain and a carboxyl-terminal RING domain. In addition, it displays in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and the RING domain is essential for E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in CaRING1. CaRING1 also localizes to the plasma membrane. In pepper plants, virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 confers enhanced susceptibility to avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria infection, which is accompanied by compromised hypersensitive cell death, reduced expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1, and lowered salicylic acid levels in leaves. Transient expression of CaRING1 in pepper leaves induces cell death and the defense response that requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CaRING1. By contrast, overexpression of CaRING1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confers enhanced resistance to hemibiotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and biotrophic Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infections. Taken together, these results suggest that CaRING1 is involved in the induction of cell death and the regulation of ubiquitination during the defense response to microbial pathogens. PMID:21628629

  18. The brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger family, maps within the Smith-Magenis syndrome region at 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Inazawa, Johji

    1997-03-31

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SAIS) is caused by a microdeletion of 17p11.2 and comprises developmental and growth delay, facial abnormalities, unusual behavior and sleep problems. This phenotype may be due to haploinsufficiency of several contiguous genes. The human brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger protein family, has been isolated and mapped to l7p11.2. FISH analyses of metaphase or interphase chromosomes of 6 patients with SMS show that ZNF179 was deleted in one of the 2 homologs (17p11.2), indicating a possible association of the defect of this gene with the pathogenesis of SMS. Furthermore, using a prophase FISH ordering system, we sublocalized ZNF179 proximally to LLGL which lies on the critical region for SMS. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Regulation of Drosophila Vasa In Vivo through Paralogous Cullin-RING E3 Ligase Specificity Receptors▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Jan-Michael; Woo, Jae-Sung; Oh, Byung-Ha; Lasko, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila species, molecular asymmetries guiding embryonic development are established maternally. Vasa, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, accumulates in the posterior pole plasm, where it is required for embryonic germ cell specification. Maintenance of Vasa at the posterior pole requires the deubiquitinating enzyme Fat facets, which protects Vasa from degradation. Here, we found that Gustavus (Gus) and Fsn, two ubiquitin Cullin-RING E3 ligase specificity receptors, bind to the same motif on Vasa through their paralogous B30.2/SPRY domains. Both Gus and Fsn accumulate in the pole plasm in a Vasa-dependent manner. Posterior Vasa accumulation is precocious in Fsn mutant oocytes; Fsn overexpression reduces ovarian Vasa levels, and embryos from Fsn-overexpressing females form fewer primordial germ cells (PGCs); thus, Fsn destabilizes Vasa. In contrast, endogenous Gus may promote Vasa activity in the pole plasm, as gus females produce embryos with fewer PGCs, and posterior accumulation of Vas is delayed in gus mutant oocytes that also lack one copy of cullin-5. We propose that Fsn- and Gus-containing E3 ligase complexes contribute to establishing a fine-tuned steady state of Vasa ubiquitination that influences the kinetics of posterior Vasa deployment. PMID:20123973

  20. Maintenance of muscle mass and load-induced growth in Muscle RING Finger 1 null mice with age.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Baehr, Leslie M; Philp, Andrew; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C

    2014-02-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass occurs to varying degrees in all individuals and has a detrimental effect on morbidity and mortality. Muscle RING Finger 1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase, is believed to mediate muscle atrophy through the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Deletion of MuRF1 (KO) in mice attenuates the loss of muscle mass following denervation, disuse, and glucocorticoid treatment; however, its role in age-related muscle loss is unknown. In this study, skeletal muscle from male wild-type (WT) and MuRF1 KO mice was studied up to the age of 24 months. Muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area decreased significantly with age in WT, but not in KO mice. In aged WT muscle, significant decreases in proteasome activities, especially 20S and 26S β5 (20-40% decrease), were measured and were associated with significant increases in the maladaptive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker, CHOP. Conversely, in aged MuRF1 KO mice, 20S or 26S β5 proteasome activity was maintained or decreased to a lesser extent than in WT mice, and no increase in CHOP expression was measured. Examination of the growth response of older (18 months) mice to functional overload revealed that old WT mice had significantly less growth relative to young mice (1.37- vs. 1.83-fold), whereas old MuRF1 KO mice had a normal growth response (1.74- vs. 1.90-fold). These data collectively suggest that with age, MuRF1 plays an important role in the control of skeletal muscle mass and growth capacity through the regulation of cellular stress. © 2013 the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The equine herpesvirus 1 gene 63 RING finger protein partially complements Vmw110, its herpes simplex virus type 1 counterpart.

    PubMed

    Everett, R; Orr, A; Elliott, M

    1995-09-01

    All alpha herpesviruses of known DNA sequence have been found to encode a protein with similarities to immediate early protein Vmw110 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The conserved portion of this family of proteins is a characteristic zinc binding module, known as a RING finger or C3HC4 domain. Examples of RING finger domains occur in many other proteins of diverse evolutionary origin and function. Recently, the solution structure of the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) RING finger protein, encoded by gene 63, has been solved. To investigate whether this structure could be considered to be a paradigm of herpesvirus RING domains, we have constructed a recombinant HSV-1 which expresses the EHV-1 gene 63 protein (EHVg63) in place of Vmw110. Comparison of the growth properties of the recombinant with those of wild-type and Vmw110-defective viruses indicates that EHVg63 is able to fulfil partially, but not completely, the roles of Vmw110 during virus growth in tissue culture.

  2. Overexpression of RING domain E3 ligase ZmXerico1 confers drought tolerance through regulation of ABA homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brugiere, Norbert; Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, John; Scolaro, Eric J; Lu, Cheng; Kahsay, Robel Y; Kise, Rie; Trecker, Libby; Williams, Robert W; Hakimi, Salim; Niu, Xiping; Lafitte, Renee; Habben, Jeffrey E

    2017-09-12

    Drought stress is one of the main environmental problems encountered by crop growers. Reduction in arable land area and reduced water availability make it paramount to identify and develop strategies to allow crops to be more resilient in water limiting environments. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the plants' response to drought stress through its control of stomatal aperture and water transpiration; and transgenic modulation of ABA levels therefore represents an attractive avenue to improve the drought tolerance of crops. Several steps in the ABA signaling pathway are controlled by ubiquitination involving RING domain containing proteins. We characterized the maize RING protein family and identified two novel RING-H2 genes called ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2. Expression of ZmXerico genes is induced by drought stress and we show that overexpression of ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2 in Arabidopsis and maize confers ABA hypersensitivity and improved water use efficiency which can lead to enhanced maize yield performance in a controlled drought stress environment. Overexpression of ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2 in maize results in increased ABA levels and decreased levels of ABA degradation products diphaseic acid and phaseic acid. We show that ZmXerico1 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, where ABA 8'-hydroxylases have been shown to be localized, and that it functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We demonstrate that ZmXerico1 plays a role in the control of ABA homeostasis through regulation of ABA 8'-hydroxylase protein stability, representing a novel control point in the regulation of the ABA pathway. {copyright, serif} 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of an Italian Founder Mutation in the RING-Finger Domain of BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Mara; Congregati, Caterina; Sarkar, Mohosin; Magliery, Thomas J.; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Foglia, Claudia; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Manoukian, Siranoush; Tondini, Carlo; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Bernard, Loris

    2014-01-01

    The identification of founder mutations in cancer predisposing genes is important to improve risk assessment in geographically defined populations, since it may provide specific targets resulting in cost-effective genetic testing. Here, we report the characterization of the BRCA1 c.190T>C (p.Cys64Arg) mutation, mapped to the RING-finger domain coding region, that we detected in 43 hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families, for the large part originating from the province of Bergamo (Northern Italy). Haplotype analysis was performed in 21 families, and led to the identification of a shared haplotype extending over three BRCA1-associated marker loci (0.4 cM). Using the DMLE+2.2 software program and regional population demographic data, we were able to estimate the age of the mutation to vary between 3,100 and 3,350 years old. Functional characterization of the mutation was carried out at both transcript and protein level. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis on lymphoblastoid cells revealed expression of full length mRNA from the mutant allele. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fragment reassembly assay showed that the p.Cys64Arg substitution prevents the binding of the BRCA1 protein to the interacting protein BARD1, in a similar way as proven deleterious mutations in the RING-domain. Overall, 55 of 83 (66%) female mutation carriers had a diagnosis of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Our observations indicate that the BRCA1 c.190T>C is a pathogenic founder mutation present in the Italian population. Further analyses will evaluate whether screening for this mutation can be suggested as an effective strategy for the rapid identification of at-risk individuals in the Bergamo area. PMID:24516540

  4. Regulation of 2-oxoglutarate (alpha-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase stability by the RING finger ubiquitin ligase Siah.

    PubMed

    Habelhah, Hasem; Laine, Aaron; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Gershwin, M Eric; Bowtell, David D L; Ronai, Ze'ev

    2004-12-17

    The 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGHDC) (also known as the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the mitochondrial Krebs cycle. Here we report that the RING finger ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase Siah2 binds to and targets OGDHC-E2 for ubiquitination-dependent degradation. OGDHC-E2 expression and activity are elevated in Siah2(-/-) cells compared with Siah2(+)(/)(+) cells. Deletion of the mitochondrial targeting sequence of OGDHC-E2 results in its cytoplasmic localization and rapid proteasome-dependent degradation in Siah2(+)(/)(+) but not in Siah2(-/-) cells. Significantly, because of its overexpression or disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of OGDHC-E2 from mitochondria to the cytoplasm also results in its concomitant degradation. The role of the Siah family of ligases in the regulation of OGDHC-E2 stability is expected to take place under pathological conditions in which the levels of OGDHC-E2 are altered.

  5. Highly sensitive detection of E2 activity in ubiquitination using an artificial RING finger.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Sumida, Miho; Yuasa-Sunagawa, Mayumi; Saito, Kazuki

    2017-03-01

    The ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzymes of protein ubiquitination are associated with various diseases such as leukemia, lung cancer, and breast cancer. Rapid and accurate detection of E2 enzymatic activities remains poor. Here, we described the detection of E2 activity on a signal accumulation ISFET biosensor (AMIS sensor) using an artificial RING finger (ARF). The use of ARF enables the simplified detection of E2 activity without a substrate. The high-sensitivity quantitative detection of E2 activities was demonstrated via real-time monitoring over a response range of femtomolar to micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, the monitoring of E2 activities was successfully achieved using human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells following treatment with the anticancer drug bortezomib, which allowed the assessment of the pathological conditions. This strategy is extremely simple and convenient, and the present detection could be widely applied to specific E2s for various types of cancers. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. MDM2 promotes cell motility and invasiveness through a RING-finger independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Polański, Radosław; Warburton, Hazel E; Ray-Sinha, Arpita; Devling, Timothy; Pakula, Hubert; Rubbi, Carlos P; Vlatković, Nikolina; Boyd, Mark T

    2010-11-19

    Recent studies connect MDM2 with increased cell motility, invasion and/or metastasis proposing an MDM2-mediated ubiquitylation-dependent mechanism. Interestingly, in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) p53/MDM2 co-expression is associated with reduced survival which is independently linked with metastasis. We therefore investigated whether expression of p53 and/or MDM2 promotes aggressive cell phenotypes. Our data demonstrate that MDM2 promotes increased motility and invasiveness in RCC cells (N.B. similar results are obtained in non-RCC cells). This study shows for the first time both that endogenous MDM2 significantly contributes to cell motility and that this does not depend upon the MDM2 RING-finger, i.e. is independent of ubiquitylation (and NEDDylation). Our data suggest that protein-protein interactions provide a likely mechanistic basis for MDM2-promoted motility which may constitute future therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Important Roles of Ring Finger Protein 112 in Embryonic Vascular Development and Brain Functions.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Jen-Hui; Yang, Ying-Chen; Pao, Ping-Chieh; Lin, Hui-Ching; Huang, Nai-Kuei; Lin, Shih-Ting; Hsu, Kuei-Sen; Yeh, Che-Ming; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Kuo, Chu-Jen; Yang, De-Ming; Lin, Jiann-Her; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao

    2017-04-01

    Rnf112 is a member of the RING finger protein family. The expression of Rnf112 is abundant in the brain and is regulated during brain development. Our previous study has revealed that Rnf112 can promote neuronal differentiation by inhibiting the progression of the cell cycle in cell models. In this study, we further revealed the important functions of Rnf112 in embryo development and in adult brain. Our data showed that most of the Rnf112 (-/-) embryos exhibited blood vascular defects and died in utero. Upon further investigation, we found that the survival rate of homozygous Rnf112 knockout mice in 129/sv and C57BL/6 mixed genetic background was increased. The survived newborns of Rnf112 (-/-) mice manifested growth retardation as indicated by smaller size and a reduced weight. Although the overall organization of the brain did not appear to be severely affected in Rnf112 (-/-) mice, using in vivo 3D MRI imaging, we found that when compared to wild-type littermates, brains of Rnf112 (-/-) mice were smaller. In addition, Rnf112 (-/-) mice displayed impairment of brain functions including motor balance, and spatial learning and memory. Our results provide important aspects for the study of Rnf112 gene functions.

  8. The novel heart-specific RING finger protein 207 is involved in energy metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Wataru; Takahashi, Hidehisa; Watanabe, Masashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Matsushima, Shouji; Takada, Shingo; Yokota, Takashi; Furihata, Takaaki; Matsumoto, Junichi; Tsuda, Masaya; Chiba, Ikuru; Nagashima, Shun; Yanagi, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2016-11-01

    A failing heart shows severe energy insufficiency, and it is presumed that this energy shortage plays a critical role in the development of cardiac dysfunction. However, little is known about the mechanisms that cause energy metabolic alterations in the failing heart. Here, we show that the novel RING-finger protein 207 (RNF207), which is specifically expressed in the heart, plays a role in cardiac energy metabolism. Depletion of RNF207 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) leads to a reduced cellular concentration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Consistent with this result, we observed here that the expression of RNF207 was significantly reduced in mice with common cardiac diseases including heart failure. Intriguingly, proteomic approaches revealed that RNF207 interacts with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is considered to be a key regulator of mitochondria function, as an RNF207-interacting protein. Our findings indicate that RNF207 is involved in ATP production by cardiomyocytes, suggesting that RNF207 plays an important role in the development of heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ring Finger Protein 11 Inhibits Melanocortin 3 and 4 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anne; Niederstadt, Lars; Jonas, Wenke; Yi, Chun-Xia; Meyer, Franziska; Wiedmer, Petra; Fischer, Jana; Grötzinger, Carsten; Schürmann, Annette; Tschöp, Matthias; Kleinau, Gunnar; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Intact melanocortin signaling via the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R), and melanocortin receptor 3 (MC3R) is crucial for body weight maintenance. So far, no connection between melanocortin signaling and hypothalamic inflammation has been reported. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation library screen, we identified a new interaction partner for these receptors, ring finger protein 11 (RNF11). RNF11 participates in the constitution of the A20 complex that is involved in reduction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced NFκB signaling, an important pathway in hypothalamic inflammation. Mice treated with high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 days demonstrated a trend toward an increase in hypothalamic Rnf11 expression, as shown for other inflammatory markers under HFD. Furthermore, Gs-mediated signaling of MC3/4R was demonstrated to be strongly reduced to 20–40% by co-expression of RNF11 despite unchanged total receptor expression. Cell surface expression was not affected for MC3R but resulted in a significant reduction of MC4R to 61% by co-expression with RNF11. Mechanisms linking HFD, inflammation, and metabolism remain partially understood. In this study, a new axis between signaling of specific body weight regulating GPCRs and factors involved in hypothalamic inflammation is suggested. PMID:27551276

  10. Deletion of the RING-finger peroxin 2 gene in Aspergillus nidulans does not affect meiotic development.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Michael J; Murray, Sandra L; Kahn, Freya K

    2010-05-01

    Peroxins are required for protein import into peroxisomes as well as for peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation. Loss-of-function mutations in genes for the RING-finger peroxins Pex2, Pex10 and Pex12 lead to a specific block in meiosis in the ascomycete Podospora anserina. However, loss of protein import into peroxisomes does not result in this meiotic defect. Therefore, it has been suggested that these peroxins have a specific function required for meiosis. To determine whether this role is conserved in other filamentous fungi, we have deleted the gene encoding Pex2 in Aspergillus nidulans. The phenotypes resulting from this deletion are no different from those of previously isolated pex mutants affected in peroxisomal protein import, and viable ascospores are produced in selfed crosses. Therefore, the role of the RING-finger peroxins in meiosis is not conserved in filamentous ascomycetes.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuhong; Sun, Chao; Hu, Yuanlei; Lin, Zhongping

    2008-03-01

    A RING zinc finger ankyrin protein gene,designated AdZFP1, was isolated from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum Spreng by mRNA differential display and RACE. Its cDNA was 1723 bp and encoded a putative protein of 445 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 47.9 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.49. A typical C3HC4- type RING finger domain was found at the C-terminal region of the AdZFP1 protein,and several groups of ankyrin repeats were found at the N-terminal region. Alignments of amino acid sequence showed that AdZFP1 was 66% identical to the Arabidopsis thaliana putative RING zinc finger ankyrin protein AAN31869. Transcriptional analysis showed that AdZFP1 was inducible under drought stress in root,stem and leaf of the plant.Semi-quantitative reverse- transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the transcript of AdZFP1 was strongly induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and also by salinity,cold and heat to some extent. Overexpression of the AdZFP1 gene in transgenic tobacco enhanced their tolerance to drought stress.

  12. The RING E3 Ligase KEEP ON GOING Modulates JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN12 Stability1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Laurens; Ritter, Andrés; Goossens, Jonas; Durand, Astrid Nagels; Liu, Hongxia; Gu, Yangnan; Geerinck, Jan; Boter, Marta; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van Leene, Jelle; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto; Stone, Sophia; Innes, Roger W.; Callis, Judy; Goossens, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signaling in plants is mediated by the JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins that repress the activity of several transcription factors regulating JA-inducible gene expression. The hormone JA-isoleucine triggers the interaction of JAZ repressor proteins with the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1), part of an S-phase kinase-associated protein1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1 (SCFCOI1) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, and their degradation by the 26S proteasome. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the JAZ family consists of 13 members. The level of redundancy or specificity among these members is currently not well understood. Here, we characterized JAZ12, encoded by a highly expressed JAZ gene. JAZ12 interacted with the transcription factors MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 in vivo and repressed MYC2 activity. Using tandem affinity purification, we found JAZ12 to interact with SCFCOI1 components, matching with observed in vivo ubiquitination and with rapid degradation after treatment with JA. In contrast to the other JAZ proteins, JAZ12 also interacted directly with the E3 RING ligase KEEP ON GOING (KEG), a known repressor of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 transcription factor in abscisic acid signaling. To study the functional role of this interaction, we circumvented the lethality of keg loss-of-function mutants by silencing KEG using an artificial microRNA approach. Abscisic acid treatment promoted JAZ12 degradation, and KEG knockdown led to a decrease in JAZ12 protein levels. Correspondingly, KEG overexpression was capable of partially inhibiting COI1-mediated JAZ12 degradation. Our results provide additional evidence for KEG as an important factor in plant hormone signaling and a positive regulator of JAZ12 stability. PMID:26320228

  13. Evidence for a regulatory role of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 in insulin signalling§

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Michael; Hartmann, Thomas; Lempart, Justine; Mühlich, Susanne; Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.; Field, Loren J.; Charron, Maureen J.; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional regulation of signalling pathways downstream of the insulin receptor plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In this study we report both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence for a role of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 (CRL7) in the regulation of insulin signalling and glucose homeostasis. We show that Cul7−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts displayed enhanced AKT and Erk MAP kinase phosphorylation upon insulin stimulation. Depletion of CUL7 by RNA interference in C2C12 myotubes led to increased activation of insulin signalling pathways and cellular glucose uptake, as well as a reduced capacity of these cells to execute insulin-induced degradation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). In vivo, heterozygosity of either Cul7 or Fbxw8, both key components of CRL7, resulted in elevated PI3 kinase / AKT activation in skeletal muscle tissue upon insulin stimulation when compared to wild-type controls. Finally, Cul7+/− or Fbxw8+/− mice exhibited enhanced insulin sensitivity and plasma glucose clearance. Collectively, our findings point to a yet unrecognized role of CRL7 in insulin-mediated control of glucose homeostasis by restraining PI3 kinase / AKT activities in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:24219910

  14. Evidence for a regulatory role of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 in insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Scheufele, Florian; Wolf, Benjamin; Kruse, Michael; Hartmann, Thomas; Lempart, Justine; Mühlich, Susanne; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Field, Loren J; Charron, Maureen J; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways downstream of the insulin receptor plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In this study we report both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence for a role of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 (CRL7) in the regulation of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis. We show that Cul7(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts displayed enhanced AKT and Erk MAP kinase phosphorylation upon insulin stimulation. Depletion of CUL7 by RNA interference in C2C12 myotubes led to increased activation of insulin signaling pathways and cellular glucose uptake, as well as a reduced capacity of these cells to execute insulin-induced degradation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). In vivo, heterozygosity of either Cul7 or Fbxw8, both key components of CRL7, resulted in elevated PI3 kinase/AKT activation in skeletal muscle tissue upon insulin stimulation when compared to wild-type controls. Finally, Cul7(+/-) or Fbxw8(+/-) mice exhibited enhanced insulin sensitivity and plasma glucose clearance. Collectively, our findings point to a yet unrecognized role of CRL7 in insulin-mediated control of glucose homeostasis by restraining PI3 kinase/AKT activities in skeletal muscle cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Muscle ring finger-3 protects against diabetic cardiomyopathy induced by a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Megan T; He, Jun; Sullivan, Jenyth; Grevengoed, Trisha; Schisler, Jonathan; Han, Yipin; Hill, Joseph A; Yates, Cecelia C; Stansfield, William E; Mapanga, Rudo F; Essop, M Faadiel; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Newgard, Christopher B; Bain, James R; Willis, Monte S

    2015-07-28

    The pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) involves the enhanced activation of peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) transcription factors, including the most prominent isoform in the heart, PPARα. In cancer cells and adipocytes, post-translational modification of PPARs have been identified, including ligand-dependent degradation of PPARs by specific ubiquitin ligases. However, the regulation of PPARs in cardiomyocytes and heart have not previously been identified. We recently identified that muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) and MuRF2 differentially inhibit PPAR activities by mono-ubiquitination, leading to the hypothesis that MuRF3 may regulate PPAR activity in vivo to regulate DCM. MuRF3-/- mice were challenged with 26 weeks 60% high fat diet to induce insulin resistance and DCM. Conscious echocardiography, blood glucose, tissue triglyceride, glycogen levels, immunoblot analysis of intracellular signaling, heart and skeletal muscle morphometrics, and PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ1 activities were assayed. MuRF3-/- mice exhibited a premature systolic heart failure by 6 weeks high fat diet (vs. 12 weeks in MuRF3+/+). MuRF3-/- mice weighed significantly less than sibling-matched wildtype mice after 26 weeks HFD. These differences may be largely due to resistance to fat accumulation, as MRI analysis revealed MuRF3-/- mice had significantly less fat mass, but not lean body mass. In vitro ubiquitination assays identified MuRF3 mono-ubiquitinated PPARα and PPARγ1, but not PPARβ. These findings suggest that MuRF3 helps stabilize cardiac PPARα and PPARγ1 in vivo to support resistance to the development of DCM. MuRF3 also plays an unexpected role in regulating fat storage despite being found only in striated muscle.

  16. Rotavirus NSP1 Associates with Components of the Cullin RING Ligase Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Lindy M.; Pace, Chandler R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 acts as an antagonist of the host antiviral response by inducing degradation of key proteins required to activate interferon (IFN) production. Protein degradation induced by NSP1 is dependent on the proteasome, and the presence of a RING domain near the N terminus has led to the hypothesis that NSP1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. To examine this hypothesis, pulldown assays were performed, followed by mass spectrometry to identify components of the host ubiquitination machinery that associate with NSP1. Multiple components of cullin RING ligases (CRLs), which are essential multisubunit ubiquitination complexes, were identified in association with NSP1. The mass spectrometry was validated in both transfected and infected cells to show that the NSP1 proteins from different strains of rotavirus associated with key components of CRL complexes, most notably the cullin scaffolding proteins Cul3 and Cul1. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins confirmed that NSP1 specifically interacted with Cul3 and that the N-terminal region of Cul3 was responsible for binding to NSP1. To test if NSP1 used CRL3 to induce degradation of the target protein IRF3 or β-TrCP, Cul3 levels were knocked down using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach. Unexpectedly, loss of Cul3 did not rescue IRF3 or β-TrCP from degradation in infected cells. The results indicate that, rather than actively using CRL complexes to induce degradation of target proteins required for IFN production, NSP1 may use cullin-containing complexes to prevent another cellular activity. IMPORTANCE The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important regulatory role in numerous cellular functions, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to exploit or manipulate this pathway to enhance replication and spread. Rotavirus, a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children that causes approximately 420,000 deaths worldwide each year, utilizes the ubiquitin

  17. Rotavirus NSP1 Associates with Components of the Cullin RING Ligase Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Lindy M; Pace, Chandler R; Arnold, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    The rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 acts as an antagonist of the host antiviral response by inducing degradation of key proteins required to activate interferon (IFN) production. Protein degradation induced by NSP1 is dependent on the proteasome, and the presence of a RING domain near the N terminus has led to the hypothesis that NSP1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. To examine this hypothesis, pulldown assays were performed, followed by mass spectrometry to identify components of the host ubiquitination machinery that associate with NSP1. Multiple components of cullin RING ligases (CRLs), which are essential multisubunit ubiquitination complexes, were identified in association with NSP1. The mass spectrometry was validated in both transfected and infected cells to show that the NSP1 proteins from different strains of rotavirus associated with key components of CRL complexes, most notably the cullin scaffolding proteins Cul3 and Cul1. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins confirmed that NSP1 specifically interacted with Cul3 and that the N-terminal region of Cul3 was responsible for binding to NSP1. To test if NSP1 used CRL3 to induce degradation of the target protein IRF3 or β-TrCP, Cul3 levels were knocked down using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach. Unexpectedly, loss of Cul3 did not rescue IRF3 or β-TrCP from degradation in infected cells. The results indicate that, rather than actively using CRL complexes to induce degradation of target proteins required for IFN production, NSP1 may use cullin-containing complexes to prevent another cellular activity. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important regulatory role in numerous cellular functions, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to exploit or manipulate this pathway to enhance replication and spread. Rotavirus, a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children that causes approximately 420,000 deaths worldwide each year, utilizes the ubiquitin-proteasome system to subvert

  18. ZmRFP1, the putative ortholog of SDIR1, encodes a RING-H2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent manner in maize.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Liu, Quanjun; Wu, Jianyu; Ding, Junqiang

    2012-03-10

    Drought is one of the most important limiting factors in crop production. To identify genes required for the drought stress response in the cereal crop maize, a gene coding for RING-finger protein (ZmRFP1), which is highly responsive to PEG-induced drought stress, was isolated by mRNA differential display and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The ZmRFP1 encodes a protein of 280 amino acids and contains a single C(3)H(2)C(3)-type RING motif in its C-terminal region. ZmRFP1 is an ortholog of Arabidopsis SDIR1 (salt- and drought-induced RING finger 1) (66% identity to AtSDIR1).The recombinant ZmRFP1 protein purified from Escherichia coli exhibited an in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Real-time PCR analysis indicates that the transcript levels of ZmRFP1 were higher in aerial tissues including stems, leaves, tassels and immature ears, and were markedly up-regulated by drought stress, and exogenous ABA, but not by salt, heat and cold stresses. Transient expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-ZmRFP1 fusion protein in onion cells revealed a plasma membrane localization of the protein. Further analysis of ZmRFP1 transcripts between an ABA-deficient transposon mutant viviparous14 (vp14) and its isogenic wild-type line W22 showed that ZmRFP1 transcript levels were induced significantly in the wild-type line under drought stress, but not in the mutant line VP14. These results indicate that ZmRFP1 responds to drought stress in an ABA-dependent way and is likely to function in the ubiquitin conjunction pathway. The ZmRFP1 might serve as a candidate gene in genetic improvement for drought tolerance engineering in cereal crop plants.

  19. Cardiac proteasome activity in muscle ring finger-1 null mice at rest and following synthetic glucocorticoid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hwee, Darren T.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2011-01-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac mass through its control of the ubiquitin proteasome system. While it has been suggested that MuRF1 is required for cardiac atrophy, a resting cardiac phenotype has not been reported in mice with a null deletion [knockout (KO)] of MuRF1. Here, we report that MuRF1 KO mice have significantly larger hearts than age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates at ≥6 mo of age and that loss of cardiac mass can occur in the absence of MuRF1. The objective of this study was to determine whether changes in proteasome activity were responsible for the cardiac phenotypes observed in MuRF1 KO mice. Cardiac function, architecture, and proteasome activity were analyzed at rest and following 28 days of dexamethasone (Dex) treatment in 6-mo-old WT and MuRF1 KO mice. Echocardiography demonstrated normal cardiac function in the enlarged hearts in MURF1 KO mice. At rest, heart mass and cardiomyocyte diameter were significantly greater in MuRF1 KO than in WT mice. The increase in cardiac size in MuRF1 KO mice was related to a decrease in proteasome activity and an increase in Akt signaling relative to WT mice. Dex treatment induced a significant loss of cardiac mass in MuRF1 KO, but not WT, mice. Furthermore, Dex treatment resulted in an increase in proteasome activity in KO, but a decrease in WT, mice. In contrast, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling decreased in MuRF1 KO mice and increased in WT mice in response to Dex treatment. These findings demonstrate that MuRF1 plays an important role in regulating cardiac size through alterations in protein turnover and that MuRF1 is not required to induce cardiac atrophy. PMID:21828340

  20. Cardiac proteasome activity in muscle ring finger-1 null mice at rest and following synthetic glucocorticoid treatment.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Gomes, Aldrin V; Bodine, Sue C

    2011-11-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac mass through its control of the ubiquitin proteasome system. While it has been suggested that MuRF1 is required for cardiac atrophy, a resting cardiac phenotype has not been reported in mice with a null deletion [knockout (KO)] of MuRF1. Here, we report that MuRF1 KO mice have significantly larger hearts than age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates at ≥ 6 mo of age and that loss of cardiac mass can occur in the absence of MuRF1. The objective of this study was to determine whether changes in proteasome activity were responsible for the cardiac phenotypes observed in MuRF1 KO mice. Cardiac function, architecture, and proteasome activity were analyzed at rest and following 28 days of dexamethasone (Dex) treatment in 6-mo-old WT and MuRF1 KO mice. Echocardiography demonstrated normal cardiac function in the enlarged hearts in MURF1 KO mice. At rest, heart mass and cardiomyocyte diameter were significantly greater in MuRF1 KO than in WT mice. The increase in cardiac size in MuRF1 KO mice was related to a decrease in proteasome activity and an increase in Akt signaling relative to WT mice. Dex treatment induced a significant loss of cardiac mass in MuRF1 KO, but not WT, mice. Furthermore, Dex treatment resulted in an increase in proteasome activity in KO, but a decrease in WT, mice. In contrast, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling decreased in MuRF1 KO mice and increased in WT mice in response to Dex treatment. These findings demonstrate that MuRF1 plays an important role in regulating cardiac size through alterations in protein turnover and that MuRF1 is not required to induce cardiac atrophy.

  1. Forkhead box O1 and muscle RING finger 1 protein expression in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors and E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) are believed to participate in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. The function of FoxO transcription factors is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In the present study FoxO1 protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation as well as MuRF1 protein expression, were examined in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated skeletal muscle. Methods Protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation were studied semi-quantitatively using Western blots. Muscles studied were 6-days denervated mouse hind-limb muscles (anterior tibial as well as pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, all atrophic), 6-days denervated mouse hemidiaphragm muscles (hypertrophic) and innervated control muscles. Total muscle homogenates were used as well as separated nuclear and cytosolic fractions of innervated and 6-days denervated anterior tibial and hemidiaphragm muscles. Results Expression of FoxO1 and MuRF1 proteins increased 0.3-3.7-fold in all 6-days denervated muscles studied, atrophic as well as hypertrophic. Phosphorylation of FoxO1 at S256 increased about 0.8-1-fold after denervation in pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and in hemidiaphragm but not in unfractionated anterior tibial muscle. A small (0.2-fold) but statistically significant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation was, however, observed in cytosolic fractions of denervated anterior tibial muscle. A statistically significant increase in FoxO1 acetylation (0.8-fold) was observed only in denervated anterior tibial muscle. Increases in total FoxO1 and in phosphorylated FoxO1 were only seen in cytosolic fractions of denervated atrophic anterior tibial muscle whereas in denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm both total FoxO1 and phosphorylated FoxO1 increased in cytosolic as well as in nuclear fractions. MuRF1 protein expression increased in cytosolic as well

  2. Analysis and interpretation of a unique Arabic finger ring from the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Wåhlander, Linda; Saage, Ragnar; Rezakhani, Khodadad; Hamid Hassan, Saied A; Neiß, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this work we used non-destructive SEM imaging and EDS analysis to characterize the material composition of an Arabic finger ring, which was found in a 9(th) c. woman's grave at the Viking Age (A.D. 793-1066) trading center of Birka, Sweden. The ring is set with a violet stone inscribed with Arabic Kufic writing, here interpreted as reading "il-la-lah", i.e. "For/to Allah". The stone was previously thought to be an amethyst, but the current results show it to be coloured glass. The ring has been cast in a high-grade silver alloy (94.5/5.5 Ag/Cu) and retains the post-casting marks from the filing done to remove flash and mold lines. Thus, the ring has rarely been worn, and likely passed from the silversmith to the woman buried at Birka with few owners in between. The ring may therefore constitute material evidence for direct interactions between Viking Age Scandinavia and the Islamic world. Being the only ring with an Arabic inscription found at a Scandinavian archaeological site, it is a unique object among Swedish Viking Age material. The technical analysis presented here provides a better understanding of the properties and background of this intriguing piece of jewelry. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cardiac muscle ring finger-1 increases susceptibility to heart failure in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Monte S.; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Li, Luge; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Hilliard, Eleanor G.; Charles, Peter C.; Patterson, Cam

    2009-01-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific protein implicated in the regulation of cardiac myocyte size and contractility. MuRF2, a closely related family member, redundantly interacts with protein substrates, and hetero-dimerizes with MuRF1. Mice lacking either MuRF1 or MuRF2 are phenotypically normal whereas mice lacking both proteins develop a spontaneous cardiac and skeletal muscle hypertrophy indicating cooperative control of muscle mass by MuRF1 and MuRF2. In order to identify the unique role that MuRF1 plays in regulating cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, we created transgenic mice expressing increased amounts of cardiac MuRF1. Adult MuRF1 transgenic (Tg+) hearts exhibited a non-progressive thinning of the left ventricular wall and a concomitant decrease in cardiac function. Experimental induction of cardiac hypertrophy by trans-aortic constriction (TAC) induced rapid failure of MuRF1 Tg+ hearts. Microarray analysis identified that the levels of genes associated with metabolism (and in particular mitochondrial processes) were significantly altered in MuRF1 Tg+ hearts, both at baseline and during the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Surprisingly, ATP levels in MuRF1 Tg+ mice did not differ from wild type mice despite the depressed contractility following TAC. In comparing the level and activity of creatine kinase (CK) between wild type and MuRF1 Tg+ hearts we found that mCK and CK-M/B protein levels were unaffected in MuRF1 Tg+ hearts, however total CK activity was significantly inhibited. We conclude that increased expression of cardiac MuRF1 results in a broad disruption of primary metabolic functions, including alterations in CK activity that leads to increased susceptibility to heart failure following TAC. This study demonstrates for the first time a role for MuRF1 in the regulation of cardiac energetics in vivo. PMID:19498199

  4. Muscle RING finger-1 attenuates IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibiting JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wadosky, Kristine M.; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Hite, Rebecca L.; Min, Jin-na; Walton, Bethany L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies implicate the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) in inhibiting pathological cardiomyocyte growth in vivo by inhibiting the transcription factor SRF. These studies led us to hypothesize that MuRF1 similarly inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated physiological cardiomyocyte growth. We identified two lines of evidence to support this hypothesis: IGF-I stimulation of cardiac-derived cells with MuRF1 knockdown 1) exhibited an exaggerated hypertrophy and, 2) conversely, increased MuRF1 expression-abolished IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte growth. Enhanced hypertrophy with MuRF1 knockdown was accompanied by increases in Akt-regulated gene expression. Unexpectedly, MuRF1 inhibition of this gene expression profile was not a result of differences in p-Akt. Instead, we found that MuRF1 inhibits total protein levels of Akt, GSK-3β (downstream of Akt), and mTOR while limiting c-Jun protein expression, a mechanism recently shown to govern Akt, GSK-3β, and mTOR activities and expression. These findings establish that MuRF1 inhibits IGF-I signaling by restricting c-Jun activity, a novel mechanism recently identified in the context of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Since IGF-I regulates exercise-mediated physiological cardiac growth, we challenged MuRF1−/− and MuRF1-Tg+ mice and their wild-type sibling controls to 5 wk of voluntary wheel running. MuRF1−/− cardiac growth was increased significantly over wild-type control; conversely, the enhanced exercise-induced cardiac growth was lost in MuRF1-Tg+ animals. These studies demonstrate that MuRF1-dependent attenuation of IGF-I signaling via c-Jun is applicable in vivo and establish that further understanding of this novel mechanism may be crucial in the development of therapies targeting IGF-I signaling. PMID:24425758

  5. Muscle RING finger-1 attenuates IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibiting JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Wadosky, Kristine M; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Hite, Rebecca L; Min, Jin-na; Walton, Bethany L; Willis, Monte S

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies implicate the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) in inhibiting pathological cardiomyocyte growth in vivo by inhibiting the transcription factor SRF. These studies led us to hypothesize that MuRF1 similarly inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated physiological cardiomyocyte growth. We identified two lines of evidence to support this hypothesis: IGF-I stimulation of cardiac-derived cells with MuRF1 knockdown 1) exhibited an exaggerated hypertrophy and, 2) conversely, increased MuRF1 expression-abolished IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte growth. Enhanced hypertrophy with MuRF1 knockdown was accompanied by increases in Akt-regulated gene expression. Unexpectedly, MuRF1 inhibition of this gene expression profile was not a result of differences in p-Akt. Instead, we found that MuRF1 inhibits total protein levels of Akt, GSK-3β (downstream of Akt), and mTOR while limiting c-Jun protein expression, a mechanism recently shown to govern Akt, GSK-3β, and mTOR activities and expression. These findings establish that MuRF1 inhibits IGF-I signaling by restricting c-Jun activity, a novel mechanism recently identified in the context of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Since IGF-I regulates exercise-mediated physiological cardiac growth, we challenged MuRF1(-/-) and MuRF1-Tg+ mice and their wild-type sibling controls to 5 wk of voluntary wheel running. MuRF1(-/-) cardiac growth was increased significantly over wild-type control; conversely, the enhanced exercise-induced cardiac growth was lost in MuRF1-Tg+ animals. These studies demonstrate that MuRF1-dependent attenuation of IGF-I signaling via c-Jun is applicable in vivo and establish that further understanding of this novel mechanism may be crucial in the development of therapies targeting IGF-I signaling.

  6. RING finger-dependent ubiquitination by PRAJA is dependent on TGF-beta and potentially defines the functional status of the tumor suppressor ELF.

    PubMed

    Saha, T; Vardhini, D; Tang, Y; Katuri, V; Jogunoori, W; Volpe, E A; Haines, D; Sidawy, A; Zhou, X; Gallicano, I; Schlegel, R; Mishra, B; Mishra, L

    2006-02-02

    In gastrointestinal cells, biological signals for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) are transduced through transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors that signal to Smad proteins. Smad4, a tumor suppressor, is often mutated in human gastrointestinal cancers. The mechanism of Smad4 inactivation, however, remains uncertain and could be through E3-mediated ubiquitination of Smad4/adaptor protein complexes. Disruption of ELF (embryonic liver fodrin), a Smad4 adaptor protein, modulates TGF-beta signaling. We have found that PRAJA, a RING-H2 protein, interacts with ELF in a TGF-beta-dependent manner, with a fivefold increase of PRAJA expression and a subsequent decrease in ELF and Smad4 expression, in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines (P < 0.05). Strikingly, PRAJA manifests substantial E3-dependent ubiquitination of ELF and Smad3, but not Smad4. Delta-PRAJA, which has a deleted RING finger domain at the C terminus, abolishes ubiquitination of ELF. A stable cell line that overexpresses PRAJA exhibits low levels of ELF in comparison to a Delta-PRAJA stable cell line, where ELF expression is high compared to normal controls. The alteration of ELF and/or Smad4 expression and/or function in the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be induced by enhancement of ELF degradation, which is mediated by a high-level expression of PRAJA in gastrointestinal cancers. In hepatocytes, half-life (t(1/2)) and rate constant for degradation (k(D)) of ELF is 1.91 h and 21.72 min(-1) when coupled with ectopic expression of PRAJA in cells stimulated by TGF-beta, compared to PRAJA-transfected unstimulated cells (t(1/2) = 4.33 h and k(D) = 9.6 min(-1)). These studies reveal a mechanism for tumorigenesis whereby defects in adaptor proteins for Smads, such as ELF, can undergo degradation by PRAJA, through the ubiquitin-mediated pathway.

  7. Structure of a glomulin-RBX1-CUL1 complex: inhibition of a RING E3 ligase through masking of its E2-binding surface.

    PubMed

    Duda, David M; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Tron, Adriana E; Hammel, Michal; Lambert, Lester J; Waddell, M Brett; Mittag, Tanja; DeCaprio, James A; Schulman, Brenda A

    2012-08-10

    The approximately 300 human cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are multisubunit E3s in which a RING protein, either RBX1 or RBX2, recruits an E2 to catalyze ubiquitination. RBX1-containing CRLs also can bind Glomulin (GLMN), which binds RBX1's RING domain, regulates the RBX1-CUL1-containing SCF(FBW7) complex, and is disrupted in the disease Glomuvenous Malformation. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between GLMN, RBX1, and a fragment of CUL1. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that GLMN adopts a HEAT-like repeat fold that tightly binds the E2-interacting surface of RBX1, inhibiting CRL-mediated chain formation by the E2 CDC34. The structure explains the basis for GLMN's selectivity toward RBX1 over RBX2, and how disease-associated mutations disrupt GLMN-RBX1 interactions. Our study reveals a mechanism for RING E3 ligase regulation, whereby an inhibitor blocks E2 access, and raises the possibility that other E3s are likewise controlled by cellular proteins that mask E2-binding surfaces to mediate inhibition.

  8. Structure of a Glomulin-RBX1-CUL1 complex: inhibition of a RING E3 ligase through masking of its E2-binding surface

    PubMed Central

    Duda, David M.; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Tron, Adriana E.; Hammel, Michal; Lambert, Lester J.; Waddell, M. Brett; Mittag, Tanja; DeCaprio, James A.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ~300 human Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are multisubunit E3s in which a RING protein, either RBX1 or RBX2, recruits an E2 to catalyze ubiquitination. RBX1-containing CRLs also can bind Glomulin (GLMN), which binds RBX1’s RING domain, regulates the RBX1-CUL1-containing SCFFBW7 complex, and is disrupted in the disease Glomuvenous Malformation. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between GLMN, RBX1, and a fragment of CUL1. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that GLMN adopts a HEAT-like repeat fold that tightly binds the E2-interacting surface of RBX1, inhibiting CRL-mediated chain formation by the E2 CDC34. The structure explains the basis for GLMN’s selectivity toward RBX1 over RBX2, and how disease-associated mutations disrupt GLMN-RBX1 interactions. Our study reveals a mechanism for RING E3 ligase regulation whereby an inhibitor blocks E2 access, and raises the possibility that other E3s are likewise controlled by cellular proteins that mask E2-binding surfaces to mediate inhibition. PMID:22748924

  9. Targeting RING domains of Mdm2-MdmX E3 complex activates apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xu, C; Ling, X; Fan, C; Buckley, B P; Chernov, M V; Ellis, L; Li, F; Muñoz, I G; Wang, X

    2015-12-31

    Reactivation of tumor-suppressor p53 for targeted cancer therapy is an attractive strategy for cancers bearing wild-type (WT) p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interface or MdmX ((MDM4), mouse double minute 4)-p53 interface or both has been a focus in the field. However, targeting the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2-MdmX really interesting new gene (RING)-RING interaction as a novel anticancer strategy has never been explored. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors targeting Mdm2-MdmX RING-RING interaction as a new class of E3 ligase inhibitors. With a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based E3 activity assay in high-throughput screening of a chemical library, we identified inhibitors (designated as MMRis (Mdm2-MdmX RING domain inhibitors)) that specifically inhibit Mdm2-MdmX E3 ligase activity toward Mdm2 and p53 substrates. MMRi6 and its analog MMRi64 are capable of disrupting Mdm2-MdmX interactions in vitro and activating p53 in cells. In leukemia cells, MMRi64 potently induces downregulation of Mdm2 and MdmX. In contrast to Nutlin3a, MMRi64 only induces the expression of pro-apoptotic gene PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) with minimal induction of growth-arresting gene p21. Consequently, MMRi64 selectively induces the apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells. Owing to the distinct mechanisms of action of MMRi64 and Nutlin3a, their combination synergistically induces p53 and apoptosis. Taken together, this study reveals that Mdm2-MdmX has a critical role in apoptotic response of the p53 pathway and MMRi64 may serve as a new pharmacological tool for p53 studies and a platform for cancer drug development.

  10. Ubiquitin E3 ligase Ring1b/Rnf2 of polycomb repressive complex 1 contributes to stable maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    van der Stoop, Petra; Boutsma, Erwin A; Hulsman, Danielle; Noback, Sonja; Heimerikx, Mike; Kerkhoven, Ron M; Voncken, J Willem; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2008-05-21

    Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) core member Ring1b/Rnf2, with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity towards histone H2A at lysine 119, is essential for early embryogenesis. To obtain more insight into the role of Ring1b in early development, we studied its function in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. We investigated the effects of Ring1b ablation on transcriptional regulation using Ring1b conditional knockout ES cells and large-scale gene expression analysis. The absence of Ring1b results in aberrant expression of key developmental genes and deregulation of specific differentiation-related pathways, including TGFbeta signaling, cell cycle regulation and cellular communication. Moreover, ES cell markers, including Zfp42/Rex-1 and Sox2, are downregulated. Importantly, retained expression of ES cell regulators Oct4, Nanog and alkaline phosphatase indicates that Ring1b-deficient ES cells retain important ES cell specific characteristics. Comparative analysis of our expression profiling data with previously published global binding studies shows that the genes that are bound by Ring1b in ES cells have bivalent histone marks, i.e. both active H3K4me3 and repressive H3K27me3, or the active H3K4me3 histone mark alone and are associated with CpG-'rich' promoters. However, deletion of Ring1b results in deregulation, mainly derepression, of only a subset of these genes, suggesting that additional silencing mechanisms are involved in repression of the other Ring1b bound genes in ES cells. Ring1b is essential to stably maintain an undifferentiated state of mouse ES cells by repressing genes with important roles during differentiation and development. These genes are characterized by high CpG content promoters and bivalent histone marks or the active H3K4me3 histone mark alone.

  11. Insights into Ubiquitination from the Unique Clamp-like Binding of the RING E3 AO7 to the E2 UbcH5B*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengjian; Liang, Yu-He; Mariano, Jennifer; Metzger, Meredith B.; Stringer, Daniel K.; Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Li, Jess; Randazzo, Paul A.; Tsai, Yien Che; Ji, Xinhua; Weissman, Allan M.

    2015-01-01

    RING proteins constitute the largest class of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Unlike most RINGs, AO7 (RNF25) binds the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, UbcH5B (UBE2D2), with strikingly high affinity. We have defined, by co-crystallization, the distinctive means by which AO7 binds UbcH5B. AO7 contains a structurally unique UbcH5B binding region (U5BR) that is connected by an 11-amino acid linker to its RING domain, forming a clamp surrounding the E2. The U5BR interacts extensively with a region of UbcH5B that is distinct from both the active site and the RING-interacting region, referred to as the backside of the E2. An apparent paradox is that the high-affinity binding of the AO7 clamp to UbcH5B, which is dependent on the U5BR, decreases the rate of ubiquitination. We establish that this is a consequence of blocking the stimulatory, non-covalent, binding of ubiquitin to the backside of UbcH5B. Interestingly, when non-covalent backside ubiquitin binding cannot occur, the AO7 clamp now enhances the rate of ubiquitination. The high-affinity binding of the AO7 clamp to UbcH5B has also allowed for the co-crystallization of previously described and functionally important RING mutants at the RING-E2 interface. We show that mutations having marked effects on function only minimally affect the intermolecular interactions between the AO7 RING and UbcH5B, establishing a high degree of complexity in activation through the RING-E2 interface. PMID:26475854

  12. IRT1 DEGRADATION FACTOR1, a RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Regulates the Degradation of IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Lung-Jiun; Lo, Jing-Chi; Chen, Guan-Hong; Callis, Judy; Fu, Hongyong; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Fe is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development; plants have developed sophisticated strategies to acquire ferric Fe from the soil. Nongraminaceous plants acquire Fe by a reduction-based mechanism, and graminaceous plants use a chelation-based mechanism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which uses the reduction-based method, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 (IRT1) functions as the most important transporter for ferrous Fe uptake. Rapid and constitutive degradation of IRT1 allows plants to quickly respond to changing conditions to maintain Fe homeostasis. IRT1 degradation involves ubiquitination. To identify the specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in IRT1 degradation, we screened a set of insertional mutants in RING-type E3 ligases and identified a mutant that showed delayed degradation of IRT1 and loss of IRT1-ubiquitin complexes. The corresponding gene was designated IRT1 DEGRADATION FACTOR1 (IDF1). Evidence of direct interaction between IDF1 and IRT1 in the plasma membrane supported the role of IDF1 in IRT1 degradation. IRT1 accumulation was reduced when coexpressed with IDF1 in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes. IDF1 function was RING domain dependent. The idf1 mutants showed increased tolerance to Fe deficiency, resulting from increased IRT1 levels. This evidence indicates that IDF1 directly regulates IRT1 degradation through its RING-type E3 ligase activity. PMID:23995086

  13. IRT1 degradation factor1, a ring E3 ubiquitin ligase, regulates the degradation of iron-regulated transporter1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Lung-Jiun; Lo, Jing-Chi; Chen, Guan-Hong; Callis, Judy; Fu, Hongyong; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2013-08-01

    Fe is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development; plants have developed sophisticated strategies to acquire ferric Fe from the soil. Nongraminaceous plants acquire Fe by a reduction-based mechanism, and graminaceous plants use a chelation-based mechanism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which uses the reduction-based method, iron-regulated transporter1 (IRT1) functions as the most important transporter for ferrous Fe uptake. Rapid and constitutive degradation of IRT1 allows plants to quickly respond to changing conditions to maintain Fe homeostasis. IRT1 degradation involves ubiquitination. To identify the specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in IRT1 degradation, we screened a set of insertional mutants in RING-type E3 ligases and identified a mutant that showed delayed degradation of IRT1 and loss of IRT1-ubiquitin complexes. The corresponding gene was designated IRT1 degradation factor1 (IDF1). Evidence of direct interaction between IDF1 and IRT1 in the plasma membrane supported the role of IDF1 in IRT1 degradation. IRT1 accumulation was reduced when coexpressed with IDF1 in yeast or Xenopus laevis oocytes. IDF1 function was RING domain dependent. The idf1 mutants showed increased tolerance to Fe deficiency, resulting from increased IRT1 levels. This evidence indicates that IDF1 directly regulates IRT1 degradation through its RING-type E3 ligase activity.

  14. Isolation and gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with constitutive expression of ATL2, an early elicitor-response RING-H2 zinc-finger gene.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mario; Guzmán, Plinio

    2004-01-01

    Genes with unstable transcripts often encode proteins that play important regulatory roles. ATL2 is a member of a multigene family coding highly related RING-H2 zinc-finger proteins that may function as E3 ubiquitin ligases. ATL2 mRNA accumulation occurs rapidly and transiently after incubation with elicitors of pathogen response. We screened 50,000 M(2) families from a line that carries a fusion of pATL2 to the GUS reporter gene and isolated five mutants, which we named eca (expresión constitutiva de ATL2), that showed constitutive expression of the reporter gene. One mutant exhibits a drastic stunted phenotype while the other four grow similarly to wild type. Two early chitin-induced genes and known pathogenesis-related genes such as NPR1, PAL, and CHS are activated in all the mutants whereas members of the ATL family and PR-1 and PDF2.1, which are markers of the salicylic acid (SA) jasmonate (JA) defense-response pathways, display differential expression between the mutants. These observations indicate that the ECA gene products may function in the early steps of an elicitor-response pathway, although some of them may function at other stages on the SA or JA defense-response pathways. Likewise, the fact that ATL2 and other members of the ATL family are activated in eca mutants links the induction of this putative class of ubiquitin ligases to plant defense signaling pathways. PMID:15238540

  15. miR-762 promotes porcine immature Sertoli cell growth via the ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) gene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changping; Song, Huibin; Yu, Lei; Guan, Kaifeng; Hu, Pandi; Li, Yang; Xia, Xuanyan; Li, Jialian; Jiang, Siwen; Li, Fenge

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of reports have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in spermatogenesis. Our previous study showed that miR-762 is differentially expressed in immature and mature testes of Large White boars. Our present data shows that miR-762 directly binds the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) and down-regulates RNF4 expression. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the RNF4 3′UTR that is significantly associated with porcine sperm quality traits leads to a change in the miR-762 binding ability. Moreover, miR-762 promotes the proliferation of and inhibits apoptosis in porcine immature Sertoli cells, partly by accelerating DNA damage repair and by reducing androgen receptor (AR) expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-762 may play a role in pig spermatogenesis by regulating immature Sertoli cell growth. PMID:27596571

  16. Molecular characterization of Oryza sativa arsenic-induced RING E3 ligase 1 (OsAIR1): Expression patterns, localization, functional interaction, and heterogeneous overexpression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Hyeon Mi; Han, A-Reum; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2016-02-01

    High levels of arsenic (As) in plants are a serious threat to human health, and arsenic accumulation affects plant metabolism and ultimately photosynthesis, growth, and development. We attempted to isolate As-responsive Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ubiquitin ligase genes from rice, and we have designated one such gene Oryza sativa arsenic-induced RING E3 ligase 1 (OsAIR1). OsAIR1 expression was induced under abiotic stress conditions, including drought, salt, heat, and As exposure. Results from an in vitro ubiquitination assay showed that OsAIR1 possesses E3 ligase activity. Within the cell, the expression of this gene was found to be localized to the vacuole. In a network-based analysis, we found significantly enriched gene ontology (GO) functions, which included ribonucleoprotein complexes such as ribosomes, suggesting that the function of OsAIR1 are related to translation. Differences in the proportion of seedlings with expanded cotyledons and root lengths, and the lack of differences in germination rates between OsAIR1-overexpressing lines and control plants under AsV stress, suggest that OsAIR1 may positively regulate post-germination plant growth under stress conditions.

  17. CBL linker region and RING finger mutations lead to enhanced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling via elevated levels of JAK2 and LYN.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mojib; Richmond, Terri D; Huang, Kai; Barber, Dwayne L

    2013-07-05

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is characterized by hypersensitivity to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). SHP2, NF-1, KRAS, and NRAS are mutated in JMML patients, leading to aberrant regulation of RAS signaling. A subset of JMML patients harbor CBL mutations associated with 11q acquired uniparental disomy. Many of these mutations are in the linker region and the RING finger of CBL, leading to a loss of E3 ligase activity. We investigated the mechanism by which CBL-Y371H, a linker region mutant, and CBL-C384R, a RING finger mutant, lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling. Expression of CBL mutants in the TF-1 cell line resulted in enhanced survival in the absence of GM-CSF. Cells expressing CBL mutations displayed increased phosphorylation of GM-CSF receptor βc subunit in response to stimulation, although expression of total GM-CSFR βc was lower. This suggested enhanced kinase activity downstream of GM-CSFR. JAK2 and LYN kinase expression is elevated in CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutant cells, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of CBL and S6 in response to GM-CSF stimulation. Incubation with the JAK2 inhibitor, TG101348, abolished the increased phosphorylation of GM-CSFR βc in cells expressing CBL mutants, whereas treatment with the SRC kinase inhibitor dasatinib resulted in equalization of GM-CSFR βc phosphorylation signal between wild type CBL and CBL mutant samples. Dasatinib treatment inhibited the elevated phosphorylation of CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutants. Our study indicates that CBL linker and RING finger mutants lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling due to elevated kinase expression, which can be blocked using small molecule inhibitors targeting specific downstream pathways.

  18. CBL Linker Region and RING Finger Mutations Lead to Enhanced Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Signaling via Elevated Levels of JAK2 and LYN*

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Mojib; Richmond, Terri D.; Huang, Kai; Barber, Dwayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is characterized by hypersensitivity to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). SHP2, NF-1, KRAS, and NRAS are mutated in JMML patients, leading to aberrant regulation of RAS signaling. A subset of JMML patients harbor CBL mutations associated with 11q acquired uniparental disomy. Many of these mutations are in the linker region and the RING finger of CBL, leading to a loss of E3 ligase activity. We investigated the mechanism by which CBL-Y371H, a linker region mutant, and CBL-C384R, a RING finger mutant, lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling. Expression of CBL mutants in the TF-1 cell line resulted in enhanced survival in the absence of GM-CSF. Cells expressing CBL mutations displayed increased phosphorylation of GM-CSF receptor βc subunit in response to stimulation, although expression of total GM-CSFR βc was lower. This suggested enhanced kinase activity downstream of GM-CSFR. JAK2 and LYN kinase expression is elevated in CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutant cells, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of CBL and S6 in response to GM-CSF stimulation. Incubation with the JAK2 inhibitor, TG101348, abolished the increased phosphorylation of GM-CSFR βc in cells expressing CBL mutants, whereas treatment with the SRC kinase inhibitor dasatinib resulted in equalization of GM-CSFR βc phosphorylation signal between wild type CBL and CBL mutant samples. Dasatinib treatment inhibited the elevated phosphorylation of CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutants. Our study indicates that CBL linker and RING finger mutants lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling due to elevated kinase expression, which can be blocked using small molecule inhibitors targeting specific downstream pathways. PMID:23696637

  19. Insights into Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase recruitment: structure of the VHL-EloBC-Cul2 complex.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Henry C; Yang, Haitao; Fribourgh, Jennifer L; Wolfe, Leslie S; Xiong, Yong

    2015-03-03

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (VHL) recruits a Cullin 2 (Cul2) E3 ubiquitin ligase to downregulate HIF-1α, an essential transcription factor for the hypoxia response. Mutations in VHL lead to VHL disease and renal cell carcinomas. Inhibition of this pathway to upregulate erythropoietin production is a promising new therapy to treat ischemia and chronic anemia. Here, we report the crystal structure of VHL bound to a Cul2 N-terminal domain, Elongin B, and Elongin C (EloC). Cul2 interacts with both the VHL BC box and cullin box and a novel EloC site. Comparison with other cullin E3 ligase structures shows that there is a conserved, yet flexible, cullin recognition module and that cullin selectivity is influenced by distinct electrostatic interactions. Our structure provides a structural basis for the study of the pathogenesis of VHL disease and rationale for the design of novel compounds that may modulate cullin-substrate receptor interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Insights into Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase recruitment: Structure of the VHL–EloBC–Cul2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Henry C.; Yang, Haitao; Fribourgh, Jennifer L.; Wolfe, Leslie S.; Xiong, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Summary The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (VHL) recruits a Cullin 2 (Cul2) E3 ubiquitin ligase to downregulate HIF-1α, an essential transcription factor for the hypoxia response. Mutations in VHL lead to VHL disease and renal cell carcinomas. Inhibition of this pathway to upregulate erythropoietin production is a promising new therapy to treat ischemia and chronic anemia. Here we report the crystal structure of VHL bound to a Cul2 N-terminal domain, Elongin B (EloB), and Elongin C (EloC). Cul2 interacts with both the VHL BC box and cullin box and a novel EloC site. Comparison to other cullin E3 ligase structures shows that there is a conserved, yet flexible, cullin recognition module and that cullin selectivity is influenced by distinct electrostatic interactions. Our structure provides a structural basis for the study of the pathogenesis of VHL disease and the rationale design of novel compounds that may modulate cullin–substrate receptor interactions. PMID:25661653

  1. Suppression of Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL78 increases tolerance to cold stress and decreases tolerance to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek

    2013-08-19

    AtATL78 is an Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase. RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays revealed that AtATL78 was up-regulated by cold stress and down-regulated by drought. AtATL78 was localized at the plasma-membrane. Suppression of AtATL78 increased tolerance to cold stress but decreased tolerance to drought. Our data suggests that AtATL78 is a negative regulator of cold stress response and a positive regulator of drought stress response in Arabidopsis. These results further suggest that AtATL78 plays opposing roles in cold and drought stress responses.

  2. The Arabidopsis RING-Type E3 Ligase TEAR1 Controls Leaf Development by Targeting the TIE1 Transcriptional Repressor for Degradation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinzhe; Wei, Baoye; Yuan, Rongrong; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The developmental plasticity of leaf size and shape is important for leaf function and plant survival. However, the mechanisms by which plants form diverse leaves in response to environmental conditions are not well understood. Here, we identified TIE1-ASSOCIATED RING-TYPE E3 LIGASE1 (TEAR1) and found that it regulates leaf development by promoting the degradation of TCP INTERACTOR-CONTAINING EAR MOTIF PROTEIN1 (TIE1), an important repressor of CINCINNATA (CIN)-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors, which are key for leaf development. TEAR1 contains a typical C3H2C3-type RING domain and has E3 ligase activity. We show that TEAR1 interacts with the TCP repressor TIE1, which is ubiquitinated in vivo and degraded by the 26S proteasome system. We demonstrate that TEAR1 is colocalized with TIE1 in nuclei and negatively regulates TIE1 protein levels. Overexpression of TEAR1 rescued leaf defects caused by TIE1 overexpression, whereas disruption of TEAR1 resulted in leaf phenotypes resembling those caused by TIE1 overexpression or TCP dysfunction. Deficiency in TEAR partially rescued the leaf defects of TCP4 overexpression line and enhanced the wavy leaf phenotypes of jaw-5D. We propose that TEAR1 positively regulates CIN-like TCP activity to promote leaf development by mediating the degradation of the TCP repressor TIE1. PMID:28100709

  3. Asymmetric nature of two subunits of RAD18, a RING-type ubiquitin ligase E3, in the human RAD6A-RAD18 ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuji; Suzuki, Miki; Kawai, Hidehiko; Suzuki, Fumio; Kamiya, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    RAD18, a RING-type ubiquitin ligase (E3) that plays an essential role in post-replication repair, possesses distinct domains named RING, UBZ, SAP and the RAD6-binding domain (R6BD) and forms a dimer. RAD6, an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2), stably associates with R6BD in the C-terminal portion. In this study, we established a method to distinguish between the two subunits of RAD18 by introduction of different tags, and analyzed mutant complexes. Our results, surprisingly, demonstrate that RAD6A and RAD18 form a ternary complex, RAD6A-(RAD18)(2) and the presence of only one R6BD in the two RAD18 subunits is sufficient for ternary complex formation and the ligase activity. Interestingly, ligase activity of a mutant dimer lacking both R6BDs is not restored even with large amounts of RAD6A added in solution, suggesting a requirement for precise juxtaposition via interaction with R6BD. We further show that mutations in both subunits of either RING or SAP, but not UBZ, strongly reduce ligase activity, although inactivation in only one of two subunits is without effect. These results suggest an asymmetric nature of the two RAD18 subunits in the complex.

  4. [Restoration of thumb flexion at the interphalangeal joint by transposition of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon from the ring finger].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, S; Mühldorfer-Fodor, M; van Schoonhoven, J; Prommersberger, K J

    2013-08-01

    Restoration of active thumb flexion at the distal joint. Loss of active flexion of the interphalangeal (IP) joint of the thumb if there is a transection of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon at the tendon channel of the thumb or thenar and direct suture is not possible but the tendon channel is intact, as alternative procedure to a free tendon graft if the transection is proximal to the tendon channel and the muscle of the FPL is contracted/injured or the FPL tendon is unharmed but the FPL muscle is partially or complete paralyzed. Insufficiency of the FPL tendon channel, impairment of the superficial or deep flexor tendon of the ring finger, limited passive motion of the proximal and distal thumb joints, acute local general infection and non-compliance or incapacity of the patient. The surgical technique depends on the necessity of transosseous refixation of the FDS IV at the base of the distal phalanx of the thumb or the possibility of woven sutures through the FPL proximal to the tendon channel. If the tendon channel is intact the distal part of the FPL tendon is shortened to 1 cm, the FDS IV tendon is cut distal to the chiasma of Camper, pulled through the carpal tunnel and moved into the channel of the FPL tendon and fixed transosseously through the base of the distal phalanx of the thumb. If the transection of the FPL tendon is located proximal to the tendon channel and muscle of the FPL is injured, FDS IV tendon will be woven using the Pulvertaft technique through the FPL tendon at the distal forearm. Postoperative 6 weeks motion of thumb flexion without resistance in relieved position of the thumb through a thermoplast splint and 6 weeks of functional use of the hand with increasing weight bearing. In this study 10 patients with FDS IV transposition to reconstruct an isolated rupture of the FPL tendon could be followed for an average of 4.1 years postoperatively. The active range of motion of the IP joint of the thumb averaged 65° (10-100°), 8

  5. "Yubi-wakka" (finger-ring) test: A practical self-screening method for sarcopenia, and a predictor of disability and mortality among Japanese community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomoki; Takahashi, Kyo; Akishita, Masahiro; Tsuji, Tetsuo; Iijima, Katsuya

    2017-09-12

    We developed a simple self-screening method, the "Yubi-wakka (finger-ring)" test to assess sarcopenia swiftly. This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the validity of this test as a practical method among community-dwelling older adults for identifying sarcopenia, and for predicting disability and mortality. We followed 1904 older adults, and analyzed associations between this "Yubi-wakka" test result at baseline in 2012 and sarcopenia at baseline, new-onset sarcopenia followed until 2014, and new-certification for the long-term care insurance and mortality followed until 2016. The "Yubi-wakka" test checks whether the maximum non-dominant calf circumference is bigger than the individual's own finger-ring circumference, which is formed by the thumb and forefinger of both hands. We divided participants into three groups, "bigger," "just fits" and "smaller" based on a comparison between the calf and finger-ring circumference. Of 1904 participants (mean age 72.8 ± 5.4 years), 53% were grouped as "bigger," 33% were in "just fits" and 14% were in "smaller." Relative to "bigger," the test results statistically associated with sarcopenia ("just fits" OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4-4.1 and "smaller" OR 6.6, 95% CI 3.5-13), by multivariate analyses. The test results also increased the risk of new-onset sarcopenia ("just fits" HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.8 and "smaller" HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.8-6.4). Furthermore, the "smaller" had 2.0- and 3.2-fold increased risks for needing long-term care insurance services and mortality, respectively. The "Yubi-wakka" test is an extremely practical method to identify older adults at risk of sarcopenia, disability and mortality. This test might contribute to increased primary prevention for sarcopenia by serving as an early wake-up call for older adults against becoming sarcopenic. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. The RING ubiquitin E3 RNF114 interacts with A20 and modulates NF-κB activity and T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M S; Egaña, I; Lopitz-Otsoa, F; Aillet, F; Lopez-Mato, M P; Dorronroso, A; Lobato-Gil, S; Sutherland, J D; Barrio, R; Trigueros, C; Lang, V

    2014-01-01

    Accurate regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity is crucial to prevent a variety of disorders including immune and inflammatory diseases. Active NF-κB promotes IκBα and A20 expression, important negative regulatory molecules that control the NF-κB response. In this study, using two-hybrid screening we identify the RING-type zinc-finger protein 114 (RNF114) as an A20-interacting factor. RNF114 interacts with A20 in T cells and modulates A20 ubiquitylation. RNF114 acts as negative regulator of NF-κB-dependent transcription, not only by stabilizing the A20 protein but also IκBα. Importantly, we demonstrate that in T cells, the effect of RNF114 is linked to the modulation of T-cell activation and apoptosis but is independent of cell cycle regulation. Altogether, our data indicate that RNF114 is a new partner of A2O involved in the regulation of NF-κB activity that contributes to the control of signaling pathways modulating T cell-mediated immune response. PMID:25165885

  7. Multivalent interactions of the SUMO-interaction motifs in RING finger protein 4 determine the specificity for chains of the SUMO.

    PubMed

    Keusekotten, Kirstin; Bade, Veronika N; Meyer-Teschendorf, Katrin; Sriramachandran, Annie Miriam; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Krause, Anke; Horst, Christiane; Schwarz, Günter; Hofmann, Kay; Dohmen, R Jürgen; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2014-01-01

    RNF4 (RING finger protein 4) is a STUbL [SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier)-targeted ubiquitin ligase] controlling PML (promyelocytic leukaemia) nuclear bodies, DNA double strand break repair and other nuclear functions. In the present paper, we describe that the sequence and spacing of the SIMs (SUMO-interaction motifs) in RNF4 regulate the avidity-driven recognition of substrate proteins carrying SUMO chains of variable length.

  8. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  9. Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL80 is negatively involved in phosphate mobilization and cold stress response in sufficient phosphate growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-08-07

    Phosphate (Pi) remobilization in plants is critical to continuous growth and development. AtATL80 is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized RING E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that belongs to the Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family. AtATL80 was upregulated by long-term low Pi (0-0.02 mM KH2PO4) conditions in Arabidopsis seedlings. AtATL80-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:AtATL80-sGFP) displayed increased phosphorus (P) accumulation in the shoots and lower biomass, as well as reduced P-utilization efficiency (PUE) under high Pi (1 mM KH2PO4) conditions compared to wild-type plants. The loss-of-function atatl80 mutant line exhibited opposite phenotypic traits. The atatl80 mutant line bolted earlier than wild-type plants, whereas AtATL80-overexpressors bloomed significantly later and produced lower seed yields than wild-type plants under high Pi conditions. Thus, AtATL80 is negatively correlated not only with P content and PUE, but also with biomass and seed yield in Arabidopsis. In addition, AtATL80-overexpressors were significantly more sensitive to cold stress than wild-type plants, while the atatl80 mutant line exhibited an increased tolerance to cold stress. Taken together, our results suggest that AtATL80, a PM-localized ATL-type RING E3 Ub ligase, participates in the Pi mobilization and cold stress response as a negative factor in Arabidopsis.

  10. Requirement of the C3HC4 zinc RING finger of the Arabidopsis PEX10 for photorespiration and leaf peroxisome contact with chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Uwe; Prestele, Jakob; O'Geen, Henriette; Brueggeman, Robert; Wanner, Gerhard; Gietl, Christine

    2007-01-16

    Plant peroxisomes perform multiple vital metabolic processes including lipid mobilization in oil-storing seeds, photorespiration, and hormone biosynthesis. Peroxisome biogenesis requires the function of peroxin (PEX) proteins, including PEX10, a C(3)HC(4) Zn RING finger peroxisomal membrane protein. Loss of function of PEX10 causes embryo lethality at the heart stage. We investigated the function of PEX10 with conditional sublethal mutants. Four T-DNA insertion lines expressing pex10 with a dysfunctional RING finger were created in an Arabidopsis WT background (DeltaZn plants). They could be normalized by growth in an atmosphere of high CO(2) partial pressure, indicating a defect in photorespiration. beta-Oxidation in mutant glyoxysomes was not affected. However, an abnormal accumulation of the photorespiratory metabolite glyoxylate, a lowered content of carotenoids and chlorophyll a and b, and a decreased quantum yield of photosystem II were detected under normal atmosphere, suggesting impaired leaf peroxisomes. Light and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated leaf peroxisomes of the DeltaZn plants to be more numerous, multilobed, clustered, and not appressed to the chloroplast envelope as in WT. We suggest that inactivation of the RING finger domain in PEX10 has eliminated protein interaction required for attachment of peroxisomes to chloroplasts and movement of metabolites between peroxisomes and chloroplasts.

  11. TRIM4; a novel mitochondrial interacting RING E3 ligase, sensitizes the cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Lavie, Julie; Singh, Kritarth; Lakshmi, Sripada; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Bénard, Giovanni; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    The emerging evidences suggest that posttranslational modification of target protein by ubiquitin (Ub) not only regulate its turnover through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) but is a critical regulator of various signaling pathways. During ubiquitination, E3 ligase recognizes the target protein and determines the topology of ubiquitin chains. In current study, we studied the role of TRIM4, a member of the TRIM/RBCC protein family of RING E3 ligase, in regulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death. TRIM4 is expressed differentially in human tissues and expressed in most of the analyzed human cancer cell lines. The subcellular localization studies showed that TRIM4 forms distinct cytoplasmic speckle like structures which transiently interacts with mitochondria. The expression of TRIM4 induces mitochondrial aggregation and increased level of mitochondrial ROS in the presence of H2O2. It sensitizes the cells to H2O2 induced death whereas knockdown reversed the effect. TRIM4 potentiates the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytochrome c release in the presence of H2O2. The analysis of TRIM4 interacting proteins showed its interaction with peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1), including other proteins involved in regulation of mitochondrial and redox homeostasis. TRIM4 interaction with PRX1 is critical for the regulation of H2O2 induced cell death. Collectively, the evidences in the current study suggest the role of TRIM4 in regulation of oxidative stress induced cell death.

  12. Flying saucer1 is a transmembrane RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the degree of pectin methylesterification in Arabidopsis seed mucilage.

    PubMed

    Voiniciuc, Catalin; Dean, Gillian H; Griffiths, Jonathan S; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Gillett, Alan; Dow, Graham; Western, Tamara L; Estelle, Mark; Haughn, George W

    2013-03-01

    Pectins are complex polysaccharides that form the gel matrix of the primary cell wall and are abundant in the middle lamella that holds plant cells together. Their degree of methylesterification (DM) impacts wall strength and cell adhesion since unesterified pectin regions can cross-link via Ca(2+) ions to form stronger gels. Here, we characterize flying saucer1 (fly1), a novel Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat mutant, which displays primary wall detachment, reduced mucilage extrusion, and increased mucilage adherence. These defects appear to result from a lower DM in mucilage and are enhanced by the addition of Ca(2+) or completely rescued using alkaline Ca(2+) chelators. FLY1 encodes a transmembrane protein with a RING-H2 domain that has in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. FLY1 is orthologous to TRANSMEMBRANE UBIQUITIN LIGASE1, a Golgi-localized E3 ligase involved in the quality control of membrane proteins in yeast. However, FLY1-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusions are localized in punctae that are predominantly distinct from the Golgi and the trans-Golgi network/early endosome in the seed coat epidermis. Wortmannin treatment, which induces the fusion of late endosomes in plants, resulted in enlarged FLY1-YFP bodies. We propose that FLY1 regulates the DM of pectin in mucilage, potentially by recycling pectin methylesterase enzymes in the endomembrane system of seed coat epidermal cells.

  13. Global Analysis of Ankyrin Repeat Domain C3HC4-Type RING Finger Gene Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiyang; Yu, Mingli; Su, Hongyan; Shu, Huairui; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat (ANK) C3HC4-type RING finger (RF) genes comprise a large family in plants and play important roles in various physiological processes of plant life. In this study, we identified 187 ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins from 29 species with complete genomes and named the ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins the XB3-like proteins because they are structurally related to the rice (Oryza sativa) XB3. A phylogenetic relationship analysis suggested that the XB3-like genes originated from ferns, and the encoded proteins fell into 3 major groups. Among these groups, we found that the spacing between the metal ligand position 6 and 7, and the conserved residues, which was in addition to the metal ligand amino acids, in the C3HC4-type RF were different. Using a wide range of protein structural analyses, protein models were established, and all XB3-like proteins were found to contain two to seven ANKs and a C3HC4-type RF. The microarray data for the XB3-like genes of Arabidopsis, Oryza sative, Zea mays and Glycine max revealed that the expression of XB3-like genes was in different tissues and during different life stages. The preferential expression of XB3-like genes in specified tissues and the response to phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments of Arabidopsis and Zea mays not only confirmed the microarray analysis data but also demonstrated that the XB3-like proteins play roles in plant growth and development as well as in stress responses. Our data provide a very useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of members of this gene family and also provide a new method for the genome-wide analysis of gene families. PMID:23516424

  14. A Critical Role for Muscle Ring Finger-1 in Acute Lung Injury–associated Skeletal Muscle Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Files, D. Clark; D'Alessio, Franco R.; Johnston, Laura F.; Kesari, Priya; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Simmers, Jessica L.; DeGorordo, Antonio; Murdoch, Jared; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam; Tankersley, Clarke G.; Messi, Maria L.; Liu, Chun; Delbono, Osvaldo; Furlow, J. David; Bodine, Sue C.; Cohn, Ronald D.; King, Landon S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a debilitating condition associated with severe skeletal muscle weakness that persists in humans long after lung injury has resolved. The molecular mechanisms underlying this condition are unknown. Objectives: To identify the muscle-specific molecular mechanisms responsible for muscle wasting in a mouse model of ALI. Methods: Changes in skeletal muscle weight, fiber size, in vivo contractile performance, and expression of mRNAs and proteins encoding muscle atrophy–associated genes for muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) and atrogin1 were measured. Genetic inactivation of MuRF1 or electroporation-mediated transduction of miRNA-based short hairpin RNAs targeting either MuRF1 or atrogin1 were used to identify their role in ALI-associated skeletal muscle wasting. Measurements and Main Results: Mice with ALI developed profound muscle atrophy and preferential loss of muscle contractile proteins associated with reduced muscle function in vivo. Although mRNA expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin1, was increased in ALI mice, only MuRF1 protein levels were up-regulated. Consistent with these changes, suppression of MuRF1 by genetic or biochemical approaches prevented muscle fiber atrophy, whereas suppression of atrogin1 expression was without effect. Despite resolution of lung injury and down-regulation of MuRF1 and atrogin1, force generation in ALI mice remained suppressed. Conclusions: These data show that MuRF1 is responsible for mediating muscle atrophy that occurs during the period of active lung injury in ALI mice and that, as in humans, skeletal muscle dysfunction persists despite resolution of lung injury. PMID:22312013

  15. Global analysis of ankyrin repeat domain C3HC4-type RING finger gene family in plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Shiyang; Yu, Mingli; Su, Hongyan; Shu, Huairui; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat (ANK) C3HC4-type RING finger (RF) genes comprise a large family in plants and play important roles in various physiological processes of plant life. In this study, we identified 187 ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins from 29 species with complete genomes and named the ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins the XB3-like proteins because they are structurally related to the rice (Oryza sativa) XB3. A phylogenetic relationship analysis suggested that the XB3-like genes originated from ferns, and the encoded proteins fell into 3 major groups. Among these groups, we found that the spacing between the metal ligand position 6 and 7, and the conserved residues, which was in addition to the metal ligand amino acids, in the C3HC4-type RF were different. Using a wide range of protein structural analyses, protein models were established, and all XB3-like proteins were found to contain two to seven ANKs and a C3HC4-type RF. The microarray data for the XB3-like genes of Arabidopsis, Oryza sative, Zea mays and Glycine max revealed that the expression of XB3-like genes was in different tissues and during different life stages. The preferential expression of XB3-like genes in specified tissues and the response to phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments of Arabidopsis and Zea mays not only confirmed the microarray analysis data but also demonstrated that the XB3-like proteins play roles in plant growth and development as well as in stress responses. Our data provide a very useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of members of this gene family and also provide a new method for the genome-wide analysis of gene families.

  16. BrRZFP1 a Brassica rapa C3HC4-type RING zinc finger protein involved in cold, salt and dehydration stress.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y J; Lee, I H; Nou, I S; Lee, K D; Rashotte, A M; Kang, K K

    2013-03-01

    C3HC4-type RING zinc finger proteins are known to be essential in the regulation of plant processes, including responses to abiotic stress. Here, we identify, clone and examine the first C3HC4-type RING zinc finger protein (BrRZFP1) from Brassica rapa under stress conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of BrRZFP1 revealed strong sequence similarity to C3HC4-type zinc finger proteins from Arabidopsis that are induced by abiotic stresses. Diverse environmental stresses, including salt and cold, were found to induce BrRZFP1 transcripts greater than eightfold in B. rapa. Additional strong induction was shown of the stress hormone abscisic acid, together suggesting that BrRZFP1 could play a role as a general stress modulator. Similar profiles of induction for each of these stresses was found in both root and shoot tissues, although at much higher levels in roots. Constitutive expression of BrRZFP1 in Nicotiana tabacum was conducted to further analyse how changes in gene expression levels would affect plant stress responses. BrRZFP1 overexpression conferred increased tolerance to cold, salt and dehydration stresses. This was observed in several assays examining growth status throughout development, including increased germination, fresh weight and length of shoots and roots, as well as enhanced chlorophyll retention. These results suggest that the transcription factor BrRZFP1 is an important determinant of stress response in plants and that changes in its expression level in plants could increase stress tolerance.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of a RING E3 ubiquitin ligase, conserved in eukaryotic cells and dominated by homologous components, the muskelin/RanBPM/CTLH complex.

    PubMed

    Francis, Ore; Han, Fujun; Adams, Josephine C

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification that regulates signalling and protein turnover in eukaryotic cells. Specificity of ubiquitination is driven by ubiquitin E3 ligases, many of which remain poorly understood. One such is the mammalian muskelin/RanBP9/CTLH complex that includes eight proteins, five of which (RanBP9/RanBPM, TWA1, MAEA, Rmnd5 and muskelin), share striking similarities of domain architecture and have been implicated in regulation of cell organisation. In budding yeast, the homologous GID complex acts to down-regulate gluconeogenesis. In both complexes, Rmnd5/GID2 corresponds to a RING ubiquitin ligase. To better understand this E3 ligase system, we conducted molecular phylogenetic and sequence analyses of the related components. TWA1, Rmnd5, MAEA and WDR26 are conserved throughout all eukaryotic supergroups, albeit WDR26 was not identified in Rhizaria. RanBPM is absent from Excavates and from some sub-lineages. Armc8 and c17orf39 were represented across unikonts but in bikonts were identified only in Viridiplantae and in O. trifallax within alveolates. Muskelin is present only in Opisthokonts. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses of the shared LisH and CTLH domains of RanBPM, TWA1, MAEA and Rmnd5 revealed closer relationships and profiles of conserved residues between, respectively, Rmnd5 and MAEA, and RanBPM and TWA1. Rmnd5 and MAEA are also related by the presence of conserved, variant RING domains. Examination of how N- or C-terminal domain deletions alter the sub-cellular localisation of each protein in mammalian cells identified distinct contributions of the LisH domains to protein localisation or folding/stability. In conclusion, all components except muskelin are inferred to have been present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. Diversification of this ligase complex in different eukaryotic lineages may result from the apparently fast evolution of RanBPM, differing requirements for WDR26, Armc8 or c17orf39, and the

  18. Role of a novel pathogen-induced pepper C3-H-C4 type RING-finger protein gene, CaRFPI, in disease susceptibility and osmotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2007-03-01

    Limited information is available about the roles of RING-finger proteins in plant defense. A pepper CaRFP1 encoding the C3-H-C4 type RING-finger protein that physically interacted with the basic PR-1 protein CABPR1 was isolated from pepper leaves infected by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The CaRFP1 protein has VWFA domain, and N-terminal serine-rich and C-terminal cysteine-rich regions. The CaRFP1 transcripts accumulated earlier than did those of the basic PR-1 gene CABPR1 during the incompatible interaction of pepper leaves with X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, as well as in the systemic, uninoculated pepper leaf tissues. The CaRFP1 gene also was induced in pepper leaf tissues infected by Colletotrichum coccodes. The CaRFP1 gene was strongly induced much earlier by salicylic acid, ethylene and methyl jasmonate treatments, as well as environmental stresses including methyl viologen, mannitol and NaCl treatments. Overexpression of the CaRFP1 gene in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred disease susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato infection, accompanied by reduced PR-2 and PR-5 gene expression, suggesting that the CaRFP1 acts as an E3 ligase for polyubiquitination of target PR proteins. Exogenous salicylic acid treatment also abolished PR-2 and PR-5 gene expression in the transgenic plants. Differential osmotic stress tolerance was induced by high salt and drought in the CaRFPI-overexpressing plants during germination and seedling development, which was closely correlated with abscisic acid sensitivity of Arabidopsis plants. These results suggest that the CaRFP1 gene functions as an early defense regulator controlling bacterial disease susceptibility and osmotic stress tolerance.

  19. Inactivation of the Cullin (CUL)-RING E3 ligase by the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 triggers protective autophagy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongguang; Pan, Yongfu; Jeong, Lak Shin; Liu, Jie; Jia, Lijun

    2012-11-01

    The multiunit Cullin (CUL)-RING E3 ligase (CRL) controls diverse biological processes by targeting a mass of substrates for ubiquitination and degradation, whereas its dysfunction causes carcinogenesis. Post-translational neddylation of CUL, a process triggered by the NEDD8-activating enzyme E1 subunit 1 (NAE1), is required for CRL activation. Recently, MLN4924 was discovered via a high-throughput screen as a specific NAE1 inhibitor and first-in-class anticancer drug. By blocking CUL neddylation, MLN4924 inactivates CRL and causes the accumulation of CRL substrates that trigger cell cycle arrest, senescence and/or apoptosis to suppress the growth of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Recently, we found that MLN4924 also triggers protective autophagy in response to CRL inactivation. MLN4924-induced autophagy is attributed partially to the inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (also known as mammalian target of rapamycin, MTOR) activity by the accumulation of the MTOR inhibitory protein DEPTOR, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Moreover, the blockage of autophagy response enhances apoptosis in MLN4924-treated cells. Together, our findings not only reveal autophagy as a novel cellular response to CRL inactivation by MLN4924, but also provide a piece of proof-of-concept evidence for the combination of MLN4924 with autophagy inhibitors to enhance therapeutic efficacy.

  20. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arabidopsis RING E3 Ligase XBAT32 Regulates Lateral Root Production through Its Role in Ethylene Biosynthesis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Madhulika E.; Schofield, Andrew; Lyzenga, Wendy; Liu, Hongxia; Stone, Sophia L.

    2010-01-01

    XBAT32, a member of the RING domain-containing ankyrin repeat subfamily of E3 ligases, was previously identified as a positive regulator of lateral root development. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants harboring a mutation in XBAT32 produce fewer lateral roots that wild-type plants. We found that xbat32 mutants produce significantly more ethylene than wild-type plants and that inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis or perception significantly increased xbat32 lateral root production. XBAT32 interacts with the ethylene biosynthesis enzymes AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE4 (ACS4) and ACS7 in yeast-two-hybrid assays. XBAT32 is capable of catalyzing the attachment of ubiquitin to both ACS4 and ACS7 in in vitro ubiquitination assays. These results suggest that XBAT32 negatively regulates ethylene biosynthesis by modulating the abundance of ACS proteins. Loss of XBAT32 may promote the stabilization of ACSs and lead to increased ethylene synthesis and suppression of lateral root formation. XBAT32 may also contribute to the broader hormonal cross talk that influences lateral root development. While auxin treatments only partially rescue the lateral root defect of xbat32, they completely restore wild-type levels of xbat32 lateral root production when coupled with ethylene inhibition. Abscisic acid, an antagonist of ethylene synthesis/signaling, was also found to stimulate rather than inhibit xbat32 lateral root formation, and abscisic acid acts synergistically with auxin to promote xbat32 lateral root production. PMID:20511490

  2. Synthetic lethal short hairpin RNA screening reveals that ring finger protein 183 confers resistance to trametinib in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Geng, Rong; Tan, Xin; Zuo, Zhixiang; Wu, Jiangxue; Pan, Zhizhong; Shi, Wei; Liu, Ranyi; Yao, Chen; Wang, Gaoyuan; Lin, Jiaxin; Qiu, Lin; Huang, Wenlin; Chen, Shuai

    2017-07-31

    The mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor trametinib has shown promising therapeutic effects on melanoma, but its efficacy on colorectal cancer (CRC) is limited. Synthetic lethality arises with a combination of two or more separate gene mutations that causes cell death, whereas individual mutations keep cells alive. This study aimed to identify the genes responsible for resistance to trametinib in CRC cells, using a synthetic lethal short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening approach. We infected HT29 cells with a pooled lentiviral shRNA library and applied next-generation sequencing to identify shRNAs with reduced abundance after 8-day treatment of 20 nmol/L trametinib. HCT116 and HT29 cells were used in validation studies. Stable ring finger protein 183 (RNF183)-overexpressing cell lines were generated by pcDNA4-myc/his-RNF183 transfection. Stable RNF183-knockdown cell lines were generated by infection of lentiviruses that express RNF183 shRNA, and small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down RNF183 transiently. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA expression. Western blotting, immunohistochemical analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to evaluate the protein abundance. MTT assay, colony formation assay, and subcutaneous xenograft tumor growth model were used to evaluate cell proliferation. In the primary screening, we found that the abundance of RNF183 shRNA was markedly reduced after treatment with trametinib. Trametinib induced the expression of RNF183, which conferred resistance to drug-induced cell growth repression and apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell deaths. Moreover, interleukin-8 (IL-8) was a downstream gene of RNF183 and was required for the function of RNF183 in facilitating cell growth. Additionally, elevated RNF183 expression partly reduced the inhibitory effect of trametinib on IL-8 expression. Finally, xenograft tumor model showed the synergism of RNF183

  3. RBR E3 ubiquitin ligases: new structures, new insights, new questions

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Walden, Helen; Shaw, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The RBR (RING-BetweenRING-RING) or TRIAD [two RING fingers and a DRIL (double RING finger linked)] E3 ubiquitin ligases comprise a group of 12 complex multidomain enzymes. This unique family of E3 ligases includes parkin, whose dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of early-onset Parkinson's disease, and HOIP (HOIL-1-interacting protein) and HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1), members of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). The RBR E3 ligases share common features with both the larger RING and HECT (homologous with E6-associated protein C-terminus) E3 ligase families, directly catalysing ubiquitin transfer from an intrinsic catalytic cysteine housed in the C-terminal domain, as well as recruiting thioester-bound E2 enzymes via a RING domain. Recent three-dimensional structures and biochemical findings of the RBRs have revealed novel protein domain folds not previously envisioned and some surprising modes of regulation that have raised many questions. This has required renaming two of the domains in the RBR E3 ligases to more accurately reflect their structures and functions: the C-terminal Rcat (required-for-catalysis) domain, essential for catalytic activity, and a central BRcat (benign-catalytic) domain that adopts the same fold as the Rcat, but lacks a catalytic cysteine residue and ubiquitination activity. The present review discusses how three-dimensional structures of RBR (RING1-BRcat-Rcat) E3 ligases have provided new insights into our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of these important enzymes in ubiquitin biology. PMID:24576094

  4. Rare RNF213 variants in the C-terminal region encompassing the RING-finger domain are associated with moyamoya angiopathy in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Guey, Stéphanie; Kraemer, Markus; Hervé, Dominique; Ludwig, Thomas; Kossorotoff, Manoëlle; Bergametti, Françoise; Schwitalla, Jan Claudius; Choi, Simone; Broseus, Lucile; Callebaut, Isabelle; Genin, Emmanuelle; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    Moyamoya angiopathy (MMA) is a cerebral angiopathy affecting the terminal part of internal carotid arteries. Its prevalence is 10 times higher in Japan and Korea than in Europe. In East Asian countries, moyamoya is strongly associated to the R4810K variant in the RNF213 gene that encodes for a protein containing a RING-finger and two AAA+ domains. This variant has never been detected in Caucasian MMA patients, but several rare RNF213 variants have been reported in Caucasian cases. Using a collapsing test based on exome data from 68 European MMA probands and 573 ethnically matched controls, we showed a significant association between rare missense RNF213 variants and MMA in European patients (odds ratio (OR)=2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(1.19-4.11), P=0.01). Variants specific to cases had higher pathogenicity predictive scores (median of 24.2 in cases versus 9.4 in controls, P=0.029) and preferentially clustered in a C-terminal hotspot encompassing the RING-finger domain of RNF213 (P<10(-3)). This association was even stronger when restricting the analysis to childhood-onset and familial cases (OR=4.54, 95% CI=(1.80-11.34), P=1.1 × 10(-3)). All clinically affected relatives who were genotyped were carriers. However, the need for additional factors to develop MMA is strongly suggested by the fact that only 25% of mutation carrier relatives were clinically affected.

  5. Characterization of human constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1, a RING finger ubiquitin ligase that interacts with Jun transcription factors and modulates their transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Elisabetta; Denti, Simona; Catena, Raffaella; Rossetti, Grazisa; Polo, Simona; Gasparian, Sona; Putignano, Stella; Rogge, Lars; Pardi, Ruggero

    2003-05-30

    RING finger proteins have been implicated in many fundamental cellular processes, including the control of gene expression. A key regulator of light-dependent development in Arabidopsis thaliana is the constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1 (atCOP1), a RING finger protein that plays an essential role in translating light/dark signals into specific changes in gene transcription. atCOP1 binds the basic leucine zipper factor HY5 and suppresses its transcriptional activity through a yet undefined mechanism that results in HY5 degradation in response to darkness. Furthermore, the pleiotropic phenotype of atCOP1 mutants indicates that atCOP1 may be a central regulator of several transcriptional pathways. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the human orthologue of atCOP1. Human COP1 (huCOP1) distributes both to the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells and shows a striking degree of sequence conservation with atCOP1, suggesting the possibility of a functional conservation as well. In co-immunoprecipitation assays huCOP1 specifically binds basic leucine zipper factors of the Jun family. As a functional consequence of this interaction, expression of huCOP1 in mammalian cells down-regulates c-Jun-dependent transcription and the expression of the AP-1 target genes, urokinase and matrix metalloproteinase 1. The RING domain of huCOP1 displays ubiquitin ligase activity in an autoubiquitination assay in vitro; however, suppression of AP-1-dependent transcription by huCOP1 occurs in the absence of changes in c-Jun protein levels, suggesting that this inhibitory effect is independent of c-Jun degradation. Our findings indicate that huCOP1 is a novel regulator of AP-1-dependent transcription sharing the important properties of Arabidopsis COP1 in the control of gene expression.

  6. Does the index-to-ring finger length ratio (2D:4D) differ in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Results from an international online case-control study.

    PubMed

    Parkin Kullmann, Jane Alana; Pamphlett, Roger

    2017-08-07

    The ratio of the length of the index finger (2D) to the ring finger (4D) (2D:4D) has been reported to be lower (ie, 2D<4D) in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) than non-ALS controls. This has led to suggestions that exposure to increased prenatal testosterone, which also lowers this ratio, could be a risk factor for ALS. In an attempt to test this hypothesis, we examined 2D:4Ds from large numbers of patients with ALS and controls. An online multilingual questionnaire enabling respondents to measure their own index and ring finger lengths. Of the initial 949 respondents, 572 remained for analysis after elimination for inability to straighten fingers, not answering the question, statistical outliers and aged <40 years. Respondents remaining for analysis were 202 patients with ALS (125 males, 77 females) and 370 non-ALS controls (112 males, 258 females). Unpaired t-tests with 95% CIs were used to assess differences in mean 2D:4Ds. Males had significantly lower mean 2D:4Ds than females, in both ALS and control groups, for both left and right hands. No significant differences were found in 2D:4Ds between ALS and control groups, in either males or females, for either left or right hands. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed no power for 2D:4Ds to predict ALS status in either males or females. 2D:4Ds did not differ between patients with ALS and controls in this study. This was despite the dataset being large enough to confirm the established finding of lower 2D:4Ds in males compared with females. These findings do not support the hypothesis that exposure to increased prenatal testosterone is a risk factor for ALS. A putative lower 2D:4D has been proposed to explain the link between ALS and exercise, but our results indicate that other exercise-related factors are more likely to explain this association. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  7. Regulation of presynaptic terminal organization by C. elegans RPM-1, a putative guanine nucleotide exchanger with a RING-H2 finger domain.

    PubMed

    Zhen, M; Huang, X; Bamber, B; Jin, Y

    2000-05-01

    Presynaptic terminals contain highly organized subcellular structures to facilitate neurotransmitter release. In C. elegans, the typical presynaptic terminal has an electron-dense active zone surrounded by synaptic vesicles. Loss-of-function mutations in the rpm-1 gene result in abnormally structured presynaptic terminals in GABAergic neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), most often manifested as a single presynaptic terminal containing multiple active zones. The RPM-1 protein has an RCC1-like guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) domain and a RING-H2 finger. RPM-1 is most similar to the Drosophila presynaptic protein Highwire (HIW) and the mammalian Myc binding protein Pam. RPM-1 is localized to the presynaptic region independent of synaptic vesicles and functions cell autonomously. The temperature-sensitive period of rpm-1 coincides with the time of synaptogenesis. rpm-1 may regulate the spatial arrangement, or restrict the formation, of presynaptic structures.

  8. ATLs and BTLs, plant-specific and general eukaryotic structurally-related E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2014-02-01

    Major components of the ubiquitin proteasome system are the enzymes that operate on the transfer of ubiquitin to selected target substrate, known as ubiquitin ligases. The RING finger is a domain that is present in key classes of ubiquitin ligases. This domain coordinates the interaction with a suitable E2 conjugase and the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 to protein targets. Additional domains coupled to the same polypeptide are important for modulating the function of these ubiquitin ligases. Plants contain several types of E3 ubiquitin ligases that in many cases have expanded as multigene families. Some families are specific to the plant lineage, whereas others may have a common ancestor among plants and other eukaryotic lineages. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATLs) and BCA2 zinc finger ATLs (BTLs) are two families of ubiquitin ligases that share some common structural features. These are intronless genes that encode a highly related RING finger domain, and yet during evolutionary history, their mode of gene expansion and function is rather different. In each of these two families, the co-occurrence of transmembrane helices or C2/C2 (BZF finger) domains with a selected variation on the RING finger has been subjected to strong selection pressure in order to preserve their unique domain architectures during evolution.

  9. RNF168, a new RING finger, MIU-containing protein that modifies chromatin by ubiquitination of histones H2A and H2AX.

    PubMed

    Pinato, Sabrina; Scandiuzzi, Cristina; Arnaudo, Nadia; Citterio, Elisabetta; Gaudino, Giovanni; Penengo, Lorenza

    2009-06-05

    Modulation of chromatin structure has emerged as a critical molecular device to control gene expression. Histones undergo different post-translational modifications that increase chromatin accessibility to a number of regulatory factors. Among them, histone ubiquitination appears relevant in nuclear processes that govern gene silencing, either by inhibiting or activating transcription, and maintain genome stability, acting as scaffold to properly organize the DNA damage response. Thus, it is of paramount importance the identification and the characterization of new ubiquitin ligases that address histones. We identified and characterized RNF168, a new chromatin-associated RING finger protein. We demonstrated that RNF168 is endowed with ubiquitin ligase activity both in vitro and in vivo, which targets histones H2A and H2AX, but not H2B, forming K63 polyubiquitin chains. We previously described the presence within RNF168 sequence of two MIU domains, responsible for the binding to ubiquitinated proteins. Here we showed that inactivation of the MIUs impairs ubiquitin binding ability in vitro and reduces chromatin association of RNF168 in vivo. Moreover, upon formation of DNA double strand breaks induced by chemical and physical agents, RNF168 is recruited to the DNA damage foci, where it co-localizes with gammaH2AX and 53BP1. The localization of RNF168 at the site of damage highly increases the local concentration of ubiquitinated proteins and determines the prolonged ubiquitination signal. The RING finger protein RNF168 is a new ubiquitin ligase that functions as chromatin modifier, through histone ubiquitination. We hypothesize a dual function for RNF168. In normal condition RNF168 modifies chromatin structure by modulating ubiquitination of histone H2A. Upon DNA lesions, RNF168 is recruited to DNA damage response foci where it contributes to increase the amount of ubiquitinated proteins, thereby facilitating the downstream signalling cascade.

  10. An ATL78-Like RING-H2 Finger Protein Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance through Interacting with RAV2 and CSN5B in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jianwen; Xing, Yali; Munir, Shoaib; Yu, Chuying; Song, Lulu; Li, Hanxia; Wang, Taotao; Ye, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    RING finger proteins play an important role in plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. In the present study, a wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites) cold-induced RING-H2 finger gene, ShATL78L, was isolated, which has been identified as an abiotic stress responsive gene in tomato. The results showed that ShATL78L was constitutively expressed in various tissues such as root, leaf, petiole, stem, flower, and fruit. Cold stress up-regulated ShATL78L in the cold-tolerant S. habrochaites compared to the susceptible cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Furthermore, ShATL78L expression was also regulated under different stresses such as drought, salt, heat, wound, osmotic stress, and exogenous hormones. Functional characterization showed that cultivated tomato overexpressing ShATL78L had improved tolerance to cold, drought and oxidative stresses compared to the wild-type and the knockdown lines. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of ShATL78L regulating abiotic stress responses, we performed yeast one-hybrid and two-hybrid assays and found that RAV2 could bind to the promoter of ShATL78L and activates/alters its transcription, and CSN5B could interact with ShATL78L to regulate abiotic stress responses. Taken together, these results show that ShATL78L plays an important role in regulating plant adaptation to abiotic stresses through bound by RAV2 and interacting with CSN5B. Highlight: RAV2 binds to the promoter of ShATL78L to activates/alters its transcription to adapt the environmental conditions; furthermore, ShATL78L interacts with CSN5B to regulate the stress tolerance. PMID:27621744

  11. Characterization of Arabidopsis and rice DWD proteins and their roles as substrate receptors for CUL4-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Terzaghi, William; Gusmaroli, Giuliana; Charron, Jean-Benoit F; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Chen, Haodong; He, Yizhou Joseph; Xiong, Yue; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-01-01

    A subset of WD40 proteins that contain a DWD motif (for DDB1 binding WD40) is reported to act as substrate receptors for DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 (for Damaged DNA Binding 1-Cullin 4-Regulator of Cullins 1) based E3 ubiquitin ligases in humans. Here, we report 85 Arabidopsis thaliana and 78 rice (Oryza sativa) proteins containing the conserved 16-amino acid DWD motif. We show by yeast two-hybrid and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation that 11 Arabidopsis DWD proteins directly interact with DDB1 and thus may serve as substrate receptors for the DDB1-CUL4 machinery. We further examine whether the DWD protein PRL1 (for Pleiotropic Regulatory Locus 1) may act as part of a CUL4-based E3 ligase. PRL1 directly interacts with DDB1, and prl1 and cul4cs mutants exhibited similar phenotypes, including altered responses to a variety of stimuli. Moreover, AKIN10 (for Arabidopsis SNF1 Kinase Homolog 10) was degraded more slowly in cell extracts of prl1 and cul4cs than in cell extracts of the wild type. Thus, both genetic and biochemical analyses support the conclusion that PRL1 is the substrate receptor of a CUL4-ROC1-DDB1-PRL1 E3 ligase involved in the degradation of AKIN10. This work adds a large new family to the current portfolio of plant E3 ubiquitin ligases.

  12. Characterization of Arabidopsis and Rice DWD Proteins and Their Roles as Substrate Receptors for CUL4-RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligases[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Terzaghi, William; Gusmaroli, Giuliana; Charron, Jean-Benoit F.; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Chen, Haodong; He, Yizhou Joseph; Xiong, Yue; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-01-01

    A subset of WD40 proteins that contain a DWD motif (for DDB1 binding WD40) is reported to act as substrate receptors for DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 (for Damaged DNA Binding 1–Cullin 4–Regulator of Cullins 1) based E3 ubiquitin ligases in humans. Here, we report 85 Arabidopsis thaliana and 78 rice (Oryza sativa) proteins containing the conserved 16–amino acid DWD motif. We show by yeast two-hybrid and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation that 11 Arabidopsis DWD proteins directly interact with DDB1 and thus may serve as substrate receptors for the DDB1–CUL4 machinery. We further examine whether the DWD protein PRL1 (for Pleiotropic Regulatory Locus 1) may act as part of a CUL4-based E3 ligase. PRL1 directly interacts with DDB1, and prl1 and cul4cs mutants exhibited similar phenotypes, including altered responses to a variety of stimuli. Moreover, AKIN10 (for Arabidopsis SNF1 Kinase Homolog 10) was degraded more slowly in cell extracts of prl1 and cul4cs than in cell extracts of the wild type. Thus, both genetic and biochemical analyses support the conclusion that PRL1 is the substrate receptor of a CUL4-ROC1-DDB1-PRL1 E3 ligase involved in the degradation of AKIN10. This work adds a large new family to the current portfolio of plant E3 ubiquitin ligases. PMID:18223036

  13. Systematic Characterization of the Zinc-Finger-Containing Proteins in the Mouse Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ravasi, Timothy; Huber, Thomas; Zavolan, Mihaela; Forrest, Alistair; Gaasterland, Terry; Grimmond, Sean; Hume, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Zinc-finger-containing proteins can be classified into evolutionary and functionally divergent protein families that share one or more domains in which a zinc ion is tetrahedrally coordinated by cysteines and histidines. The zinc finger domain defines one of the largest protein superfamilies in mammalian genomes;46 different conserved zinc finger domains are listed in InterPro (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/InterPro). Zinc finger proteins can bind to DNA, RNA, other proteins, or lipids as a modular domain in combination with other conserved structures. Owing to this combinatorial diversity, different members of zinc finger superfamilies contribute to many distinct cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, mRNA stability and processing, and protein turnover. Accordingly, mutations of zinc finger genes lead to aberrations in a broad spectrum of biological processes such as development, differentiation, apoptosis, and immunological responses. This study provides the first comprehensive classification of zinc finger proteins in a mammalian transcriptome. Specific detailed analysis of the SP/Krüppel-like factors and the E3 ubiquitin-ligase RING-H2 families illustrates the importance of such an analysis for a more comprehensive functional classification of large protein families. We describe the characterization of a new family of C2H2 zinc-finger-containing proteins and a new conserved domain characteristic of this family, the identification and characterization of Sp8, a new member of the Sp family of transcriptional regulators, and the identification of five new RING-H2 proteins. PMID:12819142

  14. Structural Requirements for Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II by Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) Protein E3 Ligases*

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Martin; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P.

    2012-01-01

    MARCH E3 ligases play a key role in controlling MHC class II surface expression by regulated ubiquitination of a lysine residue in the β-chain. Little is known concerning how these enzymes target their specific substrates. Here we show that recognition of HLA-DR by MARCH proteins is complex. Several features associated with the transmembrane domain and bordering regions influence the overall efficiency of receptor internalization. A cluster of residues at the interface of the lipid bilayer and the cytosol plays the most important role in MARCH8 recognition of HLA-DRβ. Variation in this sequence also determines specificity of MARCH9 for HLA-DQ. Residues located in helical face four of HLA-DRβ together with a charged residue at the boundary with the stalk region also contribute significantly to recognition. Truncation analysis suggested that a dileucine-like motif in the DRβ cytoplasmic tail influences the efficiency of co-localization of HLA-DR with MARCH8. The DRβ-encoded acceptor lysine functioned optimally when placed in its natural location relative to the bilayer. In the DRα/DRβ dimer most other amino acids in the cytoplasmic tail could be substituted for alanine with minimal influence on function. Our data support a model whereby multiple features of HLA-DR are involved in substrate recognition by MARCH8. The single most important region is located at the interface between the transmembrane domain and the cytosol. Variation in sequence in this location between different class II isotypes controls efficiency of recognition by different MARCH E3 ligases. PMID:22761441

  15. A cancer-associated RING finger protein, RNF43, is a ubiquitin ligase that interacts with a nuclear protein, HAP95.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Takeyuki; Yamaguchi, Aya; Miyamoto, Kentaro

    2008-04-15

    RNF43 is a recently discovered RING finger protein that is implicated in colon cancer pathogenesis. This protein possesses growth-promoting activity but its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, to gain insight into the biological action of RNF43 we characterized it biochemically and intracellularly. A combination of indirect immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation experiments suggests that RNF43 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as in the nuclear envelope. Sucrose density gradient fractionation demonstrates that RNF43 co-exists with emerin, a representative inner nuclear membrane protein in the nuclear subcompartment. The cell-free system with pure components reveals that recombinant RNF43 fused with maltose-binding protein has autoubiquitylation activity. By the yeast two-hybrid screening we identified HAP95, a chromatin-associated protein interfacing the nuclear envelope, as an RNF43-interacting protein and substantiated this interaction in intact cells by the co-immunoprecipitation experiments. HAP95 is ubiquitylated and subjected to a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway, however, the experiments in which 293 cells expressing both RNF43 and HAP95 were treated with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, show that HAP95 is unlikely to serve as a substrate of RNF43 ubiquitin ligase. These results infer that RNF43 is a resident protein of the ER and, at least partially, the nuclear membrane, with ubiquitin ligase activity and may be involved in cell growth control potentially through the interaction with HAP95.

  16. The Ring Finger Protein RNF6 Induces Leukemia Cell Proliferation as a Direct Target of Pre-B-cell Leukemia Homeobox 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Han, Kunkun; Tang, Xiaowen; Zeng, Yuanying; Lin, Xu; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Zubin; Cao, Biyin; Wu, Depei; Mao, Xinliang

    2016-04-29

    RNF6 is a little-studied ring finger protein. In the present study, we found that RNF6 was overexpressed in various leukemia cells and that it accelerated leukemia cell proliferation, whereas knockdown of RNF6 delayed tumor growth in xenografts. To find out the mechanism of RNF6 overexpression in leukemia, we designed a series of truncated constructs of RNF6 regulatory regions in the luciferase reporter system. The results revealed that the region between -144 and -99 upstream of the RNF6 transcription start site was critical and that this region contained a PBX1 recognition element (PRE). PBX1 modulated RNF6 expression by binding to the specific PRE. When PRE was mutated, RNF6 transcription was completely abolished. Further studies showed that PBX1 collaborated with PREP1 but not MEIS1 to modulate RNF6 expression. Moreover, RNF6 expression could be suppressed by doxorubicin, a major anti-leukemia agent, via down-regulating PBX1. This study thus suggests that RNF6 overexpression in leukemia is under the direction of PBX1 and that the PBX1/RNF6 axis can be developed as a novel therapeutic target of leukemia. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Negative Regulation of the Acetyltransferase TIP60-p53 Interplay by UHRF1 (Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING Finger Domains 1)*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Shi, Dingding; Gu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate the importance of acetylation in p53-mediated stress responses upon DNA damage. We and others previously showed that TIP60 (Tat-interacting protein of 60 kDa)-mediated acetylation of p53 at K120 is crucial for p53-dependent apoptotic responses. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how TIP60-mediated effects on p53 are dynamically regulated in vivo. Here, we report that UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING finger domains 1) interacts with TIP60 both in vitro and in vivo and induces degradation-independent ubiquitination of TIP60. Moreover, UHRF1 expression markedly suppresses the ability of TIP60 to acetylate p53. In contrast, RNAi-mediated knockdown of UHRF1 increases the endogenous levels of p53 acetylation at K120 and p53-mediated apoptosis is significantly enhanced in UHRF1-depleted cells. To elucidate the mechanisms of this regulation, we found that the interaction between TIP60 and p53 is severely inhibited in the presence of UHRF1, suggesting that UHRF1 modulates TIP60-mediated functions in both K120 acetylation-dependent and -independent manners. Consistent with this notion, UHRF1 knockdown promotes activation of p21 and PUMA but not MDM2. These findings demonstrate that UHRF1 is a critical negative regulator of TIP60 and suggest that UHRF1-mediated effects on p53 may contribute, at least in part, to its role in tumorigenesis. PMID:23677994

  18. Expression of the nuclear RING finger protein SNURF/RNF4 during rat testis development suggests a role in spermatid maturation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Hirvonen-Santti, Sirpa J; Palvimo, Jorma J; Toppari, Jorma; Jänne, Olli A

    2002-10-01

    A small nuclear RING finger protein, termed SNURF (or RNF4), is a coregulator of androgen receptor-dependent transcription. To elucidate the physiological role of SNURF in vivo, cell type-specific localization and changes in SNURF mRNA and protein accumulation were followed during testicular development and spermatogenesis of the rat. Two SNURF transcripts, approximately 3.0 and 1.6 kb in size, were detected in adult rat testis. Both mRNA species are capable of encoding full-length SNURF protein. The 3.0 kb SNURF mRNA is persistently expressed in Sertoli cells of both immature and mature testes, whereas the expression of the 1.6 kb transcript appears after day 30 of postnatal life and is restricted to step 4-11 spermatids. Increased accumulation of SNURF in step 4-11 spermatids, which do not express the androgen receptor, indicates that SNURF action is not restricted to the regulation of androgen signaling. Germ cell expression of SNURF coincides with the last transcriptional activity of the haploid genome and alterations in chromatin structure, suggesting that SNURF is involved in the regulation of processes required for late steps of spermatid maturation.

  19. Diagnostic and prognostic value of plasma and tissue ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yao; Gao, Yanfang; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 (UHRF1) has been reported to play an important role in breast carcinogenesis. This work investigated the correlation of UHRF1 DNA level in plasma with clinical characteristics of breast cancer and its clinical significance in breast cancer diagnosis. The expression of UHRF1 in primary breast cancer tissue was examined by Western blot. The UHRF1 DNA levels in plasma and UHRF1 mRNA expression in tissues were determined by accurate real-time quantitative PCR. The associations of UHRF1 levels with clinical variables were evaluated using standard statistical methods. The UHRF1 DNA in plasma of 229 breast cancer patients showed higher expression than healthy controls, which showed high specificity up to 76.2% at a sensitivity of 79.2%, and was significantly associated with c-erbB2 positive status, cancer stage and lymph node metastasis. High UHRF1 DNA level in plasma was significantly associated with short progression-free survival. The UHRF1 DNA level in plasma is highly correlative with breast cancer and its status and stage, and may be a potential independent diagnostic and prognostic factor for both breast cancer and the survival of breast cancer patients. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. A cancer-associated RING finger protein, RNF43, is a ubiquitin ligase that interacts with a nuclear protein, HAP95

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, Takeyuki Yamaguchi, Aya; Miyamoto, Kentaro

    2008-04-15

    RNF43 is a recently discovered RING finger protein that is implicated in colon cancer pathogenesis. This protein possesses growth-promoting activity but its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, to gain insight into the biological action of RNF43 we characterized it biochemically and intracellularly. A combination of indirect immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation experiments suggests that RNF43 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as in the nuclear envelope. Sucrose density gradient fractionation demonstrates that RNF43 co-exists with emerin, a representative inner nuclear membrane protein in the nuclear subcompartment. The cell-free system with pure components reveals that recombinant RNF43 fused with maltose-binding protein has autoubiquitylation activity. By the yeast two-hybrid screening we identified HAP95, a chromatin-associated protein interfacing the nuclear envelope, as an RNF43-interacting protein and substantiated this interaction in intact cells by the co-immunoprecipitation experiments. HAP95 is ubiquitylated and subjected to a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway, however, the experiments in which 293 cells expressing both RNF43 and HAP95 were treated with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, show that HAP95 is unlikely to serve as a substrate of RNF43 ubiquitin ligase. These results infer that RNF43 is a resident protein of the ER and, at least partially, the nuclear membrane, with ubiquitin ligase activity and may be involved in cell growth control potentially through the interaction with HAP95.

  1. The ancient source of a distinct gene family encoding proteins featuring RING and C(3)H zinc-finger motifs with abundant expression in developing brain and nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gray, T A; Hernandez, L; Carey, A H; Schaldach, M A; Smithwick, M J; Rus, K; Marshall Graves, J A; Stewart, C L; Nicholls, R D

    2000-05-15

    Intronless genes can arise by germline retrotransposition of a cDNA originating as mRNA from an intron-containing source gene. Previously, we described several members of a family of intronless mammalian genes encoding a novel class of zinc-finger proteins, including one that shows imprinted expression and one that escapes X-inactivation. We report here the identification and characterization of the Makorin ring finger protein 1 gene (MKRN1), a highly transcribed, intron-containing source for this family of genes. Phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that the MKRN1 gene is the ancestral founder of this gene family. We have identified MKRN1 orthologs from human, mouse, wallaby, chicken, fruitfly, and nematode, underscoring the age and conservation of this gene. The MKRN gene family encodes putative ribonucleoproteins with a distinctive array of zinc-finger motifs, including two to four C(3)H zinc-fingers, an unusual Cys/His arrangement that may represent a novel zinc-finger structure, and a highly conserved RING zinc-finger. To date, we have identified nine MKRN family loci distributed throughout the human genome. The human and mouse MKRN1 loci map to a conserved syntenic group near the T-cell receptor beta cluster (TCRB) in chromosome 7q34-q35 and chromosome 6A, respectively. MKRN1 is widely transcribed in mammals, with high levels in murine embryonic nervous system and adult testis. The ancient origin of MKRN1, high degree of conservation, and expression pattern suggest important developmental and functional roles for this gene and its expressed family members.

  2. Modulation of Phototropic Responsiveness in Arabidopsis through Ubiquitination of Phototropin 1 by the CUL3-Ring E3 Ubiquitin Ligase CRL3NPH3[W

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Diana; Pedmale, Ullas V.; Morrow, Johanna; Sachdev, Shrikesh; Lechner, Esther; Tang, Xiaobo; Zheng, Ning; Hannink, Mark; Genschik, Pascal; Liscum, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Plant phototropism is an adaptive response to changes in light direction, quantity, and quality that results in optimization of photosynthetic light harvesting, as well as water and nutrient acquisition. Though several components of the phototropic signal response pathway have been identified in recent years, including the blue light (BL) receptors phototropin1 (phot1) and phot2, much remains unknown. Here, we show that the phot1-interacting protein NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3) functions as a substrate adapter in a CULLIN3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL3NPH3. Under low-intensity BL, CRL3NPH3 mediates the mono/multiubiquitination of phot1, likely marking it for clathrin-dependent internalization from the plasma membrane. In high-intensity BL, phot1 is both mono/multi- and polyubiquitinated by CRL3NPH3, with the latter event targeting phot1 for 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. Polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation of phot1 under high-intensity BL likely represent means of receptor desensitization, while mono/multiubiquitination-stimulated internalization of phot1 may be coupled to BL-induced relocalization of hormone (auxin) transporters. PMID:21990941

  3. The Arabidopsis RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligase AtAIRP3/LOG2 Participates in Positive Regulation of High-Salt and Drought Stress Responses1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hum; Kim, Woo Taek

    2013-01-01

    Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ubiquitin ligases have been implicated in cellular responses to the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) as well as to environmental stresses in higher plants. Here, an ABA-insensitive RING protein3 (atairp3) loss-of-function mutant line in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was isolated due to its hyposensitivity to ABA during its germination stage as compared with wild-type plants. AtAIRP3 contains a single C3HC4-type RING motif, a putative myristoylation site, and a domain associated with RING2 (DAR2) domain. Unexpectedly, AtAIRP3 was identified as LOSS OF GDU2 (LOG2), which was recently shown to participate in an amino acid export system via interaction with GLUTAMINE DUMPER1. Thus, AtAIRP3 was renamed as AtAIRP3/LOG2. Transcript levels of AtAIRP3/LOG2 were up-regulated by drought, high salinity, and ABA, suggesting a role for this factor in abiotic stress responses. The atairp3/log2-2 knockout mutant and 35S:AtAIRP3-RNAi knockdown transgenic plants displayed impaired ABA-mediated seed germination and stomata closure. Cosuppression and complementation studies further supported a positive role for AtAIRP3/LOG2 in ABA responses. Suppression of AtAIRP3/LOG2 resulted in marked hypersensitive phenotypes toward high salinity and water deficit relative to wild-type plants. These results suggest that Arabidopsis RING E3 AtAIRP3/LOG2 is a positive regulator of the ABA-mediated drought and salt stress tolerance mechanism. Using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid, in vitro, and in vivo immunoprecipitation, cell-free protein degradation, and in vitro ubiquitination assays, RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION21 was identified as a substrate protein of AtAIRP3/LOG2. Collectively, our data suggest that AtAIRP3/LOG2 plays dual functions in ABA-mediated drought stress responses and in an amino acid export pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:23696092

  4. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-08-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes.

  5. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-01-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes. PMID:22827943

  6. Central Precocious Puberty That Appears to Be Sporadic Caused by Paternally Inherited Mutations in the Imprinted Gene Makorin Ring Finger 3

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Delanie B.; Abreu, Ana Paula; Reis, Ana Claudia S.; Montenegro, Luciana R.; Dauber, Andrew; Beneduzzi, Daiane; Cukier, Priscilla; Silveira, Leticia F. G.; Teles, Milena G.; Carroll, Rona S.; Junior, Gil Guerra; Filho, Guilherme Guaragna; Gucev, Zoran; Arnhold, Ivo J. P.; de Castro, Margaret; Moreira, Ayrton C.; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Brito, Vinicius N.; Antonini, Sonir R.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Loss-of-function mutations in makorin ring finger 3 (MKRN3), an imprinted gene located on the long arm of chromosome 15, have been recognized recently as a cause of familial central precocious puberty (CPP) in humans. MKRN3 has a potential inhibitory effect on GnRH secretion. Objectives: The objective of the study was to investigate potential MKRN3 sequence variations as well as copy number and methylation abnormalities of the 15q11 locus in patients with apparently sporadic CPP. Setting and Participants: We studied 215 unrelated children (207 girls and eight boys) from three university medical centers with a diagnosis of CPP. All but two of these patients (213 cases) reported no family history of premature sexual development. First-degree relatives of patients with identified MKRN3 variants were included for genetic analysis. Main Outcome Measures: All 215 CPP patients were screened for MKRN3 mutations by automatic sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed in a partially overlapping cohort of 52 patients. Results: We identified five novel heterozygous mutations in MKRN3 in eight unrelated girls with CPP. Four were frame shift mutations predicted to encode truncated proteins and one was a missense mutation, which was suggested to be deleterious by in silico analysis. All patients with MKRN3 mutations had classical features of CPP with a median age of onset at 6 years. Copy number and methylation abnormalities at the 15q11 locus were not detected in the patients tested for these abnormalities. Segregation analysis was possible in five of the eight girls with MKRN3 mutations; in all cases, the mutation was inherited on the paternal allele. Conclusions: We have identified novel inherited MKRN3 defects in children with apparently sporadic CPP, supporting a fundamental role of this peptide in the suppression of the reproductive axis. PMID:24628548

  7. Ring finger protein20 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism through protein kinase A-dependent sterol regulatory element binding protein1c degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Gha Young; Jang, Hagoon; Choe, Sung Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Kim, Jae Bum

    2014-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein1c (SREBP1c) is a key transcription factor for de novo lipogenesis during the postprandial state. During nutritional deprivation, hepatic SREBP1c is rapidly suppressed by fasting signals to prevent lipogenic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms that control SREBP1c turnover in response to fasting status are not thoroughly understood. To elucidate which factors are involved in the inactivation of SREBP1c, we attempted to identify SREBP1c-interacting proteins by mass spectrometry analysis. Since we observed that ring finger protein20 (RNF20) ubiquitin ligase was identified as one of SREBP1c-interacting proteins, we hypothesized that fasting signaling would promote SREBP1c degradation in an RNF20-dependent manner. In this work, we demonstrate that RNF20 physically interacts with SREBP1c, leading to degradation of SREBP1c via ubiquitination. In accordance with these findings, RNF20 represses the transcriptional activity of SREBP1c and turns off the expression of lipogenic genes that are targets of SREBP1c. In contrast, knockdown of RNF20 stimulates the expression of SREBP1c and lipogenic genes and induces lipogenic activity in primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase A (PKA) with glucagon or forskolin enhances the expression of RNF20 and potentiates the ubiquitination of SREBP1c via RNF20. In wild-type and db/db mice, adenoviral overexpression of RNF20 markedly suppresses FASN promoter activity and reduces the level of hepatic triglycerides, accompanied by a decrease in the hepatic lipogenic program. Here, we reveal that RNF20-induced SREBP1c ubiquitination down-regulates hepatic lipogenic activity upon PKA activation. Conclusion: RNF20 acts as a negative regulator of hepatic fatty acid metabolism through degradation of SREBP1c upon PKA activation. Knowledge regarding this process enhances our understanding of how SREBP1c is able to turn off hepatic lipid metabolism during nutritional deprivation

  8. Ectopic expression of PtaRHE1, encoding a poplar RING-H2 protein with E3 ligase activity, alters plant development and induces defence-related responses

    PubMed Central

    Mukoko Bopopi, Johnny; Vandeputte, Olivier M.; Himanen, Kristiina; Mol, Adeline; Vaessen, Quentin; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2010-01-01

    RING (really interesting new gene)-H2 domain-containing proteins are widely represented in plants and play important roles in the regulation of many developmental processes as well as in plant–environment interactions. In the present report, experiments were performed to unravel the role of the poplar gene PtaRHE1, coding for a RING-H2 protein. In vitro ubiquitination assays indicate a functional E3 ligase activity for PtaRHE1 with the specific E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH5a. The overexpression of PtaRHE1 in tobacco resulted in a pleiotropic phenotype characterized by a curling of the leaves, the formation of necrotic lesions on leaf blades, growth retardation, and a delay in floral transition. The plant gene expression response to PtaRHE1 overexpression provided evidence for the up-regulation of defence- and/or programmed cell death-related genes. Moreover, genes coding for WRKY transcription factors as well as for mitogen-activated protein kinases, such as wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK), were also found to be induced in the transgenic lines as compared with the wild type. In addition, histochemical β-glucuronidase staining showed that the PtaRHE1 promoter is induced by plant pathogens and by elicitors such as salicylic acid and cellulase. Taken together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase PtaRHE1 plays a role in the ubiquitination-mediated regulation of defence response, possibly by acting upstream of WIPK and/or in the activation of WRKY factors. PMID:19892745

  9. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2)*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)1 and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126. PMID:26253232

  10. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF A RING DOMAIN ANKYRIN REPEAT PROTEIN THAT IS HIGHLY EXPRESSED DURING FLOWER SENESCENCE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A gene encoding a RING zinc finger ankyrin repeat protein (MjXB3), a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, is highly expressed in petals of senescing four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) flowers, increasing >40 000-fold during the onset of visible senescence. The gene has homologues in many other species, and t...

  11. Ring finger protein20 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism through protein kinase A-dependent sterol regulatory element binding protein1c degradation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Gha Young; Jang, Hagoon; Choe, Sung Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Kim, Jae Bum

    2014-09-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein1c (SREBP1c) is a key transcription factor for de novo lipogenesis during the postprandial state. During nutritional deprivation, hepatic SREBP1c is rapidly suppressed by fasting signals to prevent lipogenic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms that control SREBP1c turnover in response to fasting status are not thoroughly understood. To elucidate which factors are involved in the inactivation of SREBP1c, we attempted to identify SREBP1c-interacting proteins by mass spectrometry analysis. Since we observed that ring finger protein20 (RNF20) ubiquitin ligase was identified as one of SREBP1c-interacting proteins, we hypothesized that fasting signaling would promote SREBP1c degradation in an RNF20-dependent manner. In this work, we demonstrate that RNF20 physically interacts with SREBP1c, leading to degradation of SREBP1c via ubiquitination. In accordance with these findings, RNF20 represses the transcriptional activity of SREBP1c and turns off the expression of lipogenic genes that are targets of SREBP1c. In contrast, knockdown of RNF20 stimulates the expression of SREBP1c and lipogenic genes and induces lipogenic activity in primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase A (PKA) with glucagon or forskolin enhances the expression of RNF20 and potentiates the ubiquitination of SREBP1c via RNF20. In wild-type and db/db mice, adenoviral overexpression of RNF20 markedly suppresses FASN promoter activity and reduces the level of hepatic triglycerides, accompanied by a decrease in the hepatic lipogenic program. Here, we reveal that RNF20-induced SREBP1c ubiquitination down-regulates hepatic lipogenic activity upon PKA activation. RNF20 acts as a negative regulator of hepatic fatty acid metabolism through degradation of SREBP1c upon PKA activation. Knowledge regarding this process enhances our understanding of how SREBP1c is able to turn off hepatic lipid metabolism during nutritional deprivation. Copyright

  12. RING finger protein 11 (RNF11) modulates susceptibility to 6-OHDA-induced nigral degeneration and behavioral deficits through NF-κB signaling in dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Pranski, Elaine L; Dalal, Nirjari V; Sanford, Carson Van; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Gearing, Marla; Lazo, Carlos; Miller, Gary W; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Betarbet, Ranjita S

    2013-06-01

    Chronic activation of the NF-κB pathway is associated with progressive neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Given the role of neuronal RING finger protein 11 (RNF11) as a negative regulator of the NF-κB pathway, in this report we investigated the function of RNF11 in dopaminergic cells in PD-associated neurodegeneration. We found that RNF11 knockdown in an in vitro model of PD mediated protection against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity. In converse, over-expression of RNF11 enhanced 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death. Furthermore, by directly manipulating NF-κB signaling, we showed that the observed RNF11-enhanced 6-OHDA toxicity is mediated through inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription of TNF-α, antioxidants GSS and SOD1, and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2. Experiments in an in vivo 6-OHDA rat model of PD recapitulated the in vitro results. In vivo targeted RNF11 over-expression in nigral neurons enhanced 6-OHDA toxicity, as evident by increased amphetamine-induced rotations and loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons as compared to controls. This enhanced toxicity was coupled with the downregulation of NF-κB transcribed GSS, SOD1, BCL2, and neurotrophic factor BDNF mRNA levels, in addition to decreased TNF-α mRNA levels in ventral mesenchephalon samples. In converse, knockdown of RNF11 was associated with protective phenotypes and increased expression of above-mentioned NF-κB transcribed genes. Collectively, our in vitro and in vivo data suggest that RNF11-mediated inhibition of NF-κB in dopaminergic cells exaggerates 6-OHDA toxicity by inhibiting neuroprotective responses while loss of RNF11 inhibition on NF-κB activity promotes neuronal survival. The decreased expression of RNF11 in surviving cortical and nigral tissue detected in PD patients, thus implies a compensatory response in the diseased brain to PD-associated insults. In summary, our findings demonstrate that RNF11 in neurons can modulate susceptibility to 6-OHDA toxicity through NF

  13. RING finger protein 11 (RNF11) modulates susceptibility to 6-OHDA-induced nigral degeneration and behavioral deficits through NF-κB signaling in dopaminergic cells

    PubMed Central

    Pranski, Elaine L.; Dalal, Nirjari V.; Van Sanford, Carson; Herskowitz, Jeremy H.; Gearing, Marla; Lazo, Carlos; Miller, Gary W.; Lah, James J.; Levey, Allan I.; Betarbet, Ranjita S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic activation of the NF-κB pathway is associated with progressive neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Given the role of neuronal RING finger protein 11 (RNF11) as a negative regulator of the NF-κB pathway, in this report we investigated the function of RNF11 in dopaminergic cells in PD-associated neurodegeneration. We found that RNF11 knock-down in an in vitro model of PD mediated protection against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity. In converse, over-expression of RNF11 enhanced 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death. Furthermore, by directly manipulating NF-κB signaling, we showed that the observed RNF11-enhanced 6-OHDA toxicity is mediated through inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription of TNF-α, antioxidants GSS and SOD1, and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2. Experiments in an in vivo 6-OHDA rat model of PD recapitulated the in vitro results. In vivo targeted RNF11 over-expression in nigral neurons enhanced 6-OHDA toxicity, as evident by increased amphetamine-induced rotations and loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons as compared to controls. This enhanced toxicity was coupled with down-regulation of NF-κB transcribed GSS, SOD1, BCL2, and neurotrophic factor BDNF mRNA levels, in addition to decreased TNF-α mRNA levels in ventral mesenchephalon samples. In converse, knockdown of RNF11 was associated with protective phenotypes and increased expression of above-mentioned NF-κB transcribed genes. Collectively, our in vitro and in vivo data suggest that RNF11-mediated inhibition of NF-κB in dopaminergic cells exaggerates 6-OHDA toxicity by inhibiting neuroprotective responses while loss of RNF11 inhibition on NF-κB activity promotes neuronal survival. The decreased expression of RNF11 in surviving cortical and nigral tissue detected in PD patients, thus implies a compensatory response in the diseased brain to PD-associated insults. In summary, our findings demonstrate that RNF11 in neurons can modulate susceptibility to 6-OHDA toxicity through NF

  14. The Magnaporthe oryzae Effector AvrPiz-t Targets the RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligase APIP6 to Suppress Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern–Triggered Immunity in Rice[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan-Ho; Chen, Songbiao; Shirsekar, Gautam; Zhou, Bo; Khang, Chang Hyun; Songkumarn, Pattavipha; Afzal, Ahmed J.; Ning, Yuese; Wang, Ruyi; Bellizzi, Maria; Valent, Barbara; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Although the functions of a few effector proteins produced by bacterial and oomycete plant pathogens have been elucidated in recent years, information for the vast majority of pathogen effectors is still lacking, particularly for those of plant-pathogenic fungi. Here, we show that the avirulence effector AvrPiz-t from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae preferentially accumulates in the specialized structure called the biotrophic interfacial complex and is then translocated into rice (Oryza sativa) cells. Ectopic expression of AvrPiz-t in transgenic rice suppresses the flg22- and chitin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and enhances susceptibility to M. oryzae, indicating that AvrPiz-t functions to suppress pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity in rice. Interaction assays show that AvrPiz-t suppresses the ubiquitin ligase activity of the rice RING E3 ubiquitin ligase APIP6 and that, in return, APIP6 ubiquitinates AvrPiz-t in vitro. Interestingly, agroinfection assays reveal that AvrPiz-t and AvrPiz-t Interacting Protein 6 (APIP6) are both degraded when coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of APIP6 in transgenic rice leads to a significant reduction of flg22-induced ROS generation, suppression of defense-related gene expression, and enhanced susceptibility of rice plants to M. oryzae. Taken together, our results reveal a mechanism in which a fungal effector targets the host ubiquitin proteasome system for the suppression of PAMP-triggered immunity in plants. PMID:23204406

  15. The rice RING E3 ligase, OsCTR1, inhibits trafficking to the chloroplasts of OsCP12 and OsRP1, and its overexpression confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung Don; Lee, Chanhui; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2014-05-01

    Plant growth under low water availability adversely affects many key processes with morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular consequences. Here, we found that a rice gene, OsCTR1, encoding the RING Ub E3 ligase plays an important role in drought tolerance. OsCTR1 was highly expressed in response to dehydration treatment and defense-related phytohormones, and its encoded protein was localized in both the chloroplasts and the cytosol. Intriguingly, the OsCTR1 protein was found predominantly targeted to the cytosol when rice protoplasts transfected with OsCTR1 were treated with abscisic acid (ABA). Several interacting partners were identified, which were mainly targeted to the chloroplasts, and interactions with OsCTR1 were confirmed by using biomolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). Interestingly, two chloroplast-localized proteins (OsCP12 and OsRP1) interacted with OsCTR1 in the cytosol, and ubiquitination by OsCTR1 led to protein degradation via the Ub 26S proteasome. Heterogeneous overexpression of OsCTR1 in Arabidopsis exhibited hypersensitive phenotypes with respect to ABA-responsive seed germination, seedling growth and stomatal closure. The ABA-sensitive transgenic plants also showed improvement in their tolerance against severe water deficits. Taken together, our findings lend support to the hypothesis that the molecular functions of OsCTR1 are related to tolerance to water-deficit stress via ABA-dependent regulation and related systems. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  17. Rehabilitation of single finger amputation with customized silicone prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Niharika; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Finger amputations are common in accidents at home, work, and play. Apart from trauma, congenital disease and deformity also leads to finger amputation. This results in loss of function, loss of sensation as well as loss of body image. Finger prosthesis offers psychological support and social acceptance in such cases. This clinical report describes a method to fabricate ring retained silicone finger prosthesis in a patient with partial finger loss. PMID:28163487

  18. A RING finger protein 114 (RNF114) homolog from Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) possesses immune-regulation properties via modulating RIG-I signaling pathway-mediated interferon expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiaojun; Nie, Dongsong; Wang, Jiajia; Wu, Mingjiang

    2014-12-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in immune regulation. The human RNF114 (RING finger protein 114), an ubiquitin ligase, was recently reported to be involved in immune response to double-stranded RNA in disease pathogenesis. Here, we identified a RNF114 homolog in Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) and investigated its potential role in immune response. The full-length cDNA of Chinese sturgeon RNF114 (csRNF114) contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 681 nucleotides coding a protein of 227 amino acids. csRNF114 shares the highest identity of 76% at amino acid level to other RNF114 homologs, clustering with bony fish RNF114s based on phylogenetic analysis. The main structural features of csRNF114, including a C3HC4 (Cys3-His-Cys4) RING domain, a C2HC (Cys2-His-Cys)-type zinc finger motif, a C2H2 (Cys2-His2)-type zinc finger motif, and a UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif), take csRNF114 as an ubiquitin ligase. csRNF114 mRNA was widely expressed in various tissues and significantly up-regulated in poly(I:C)-treated Chinese sturgeon. Over-expression of csRNF114 in HEK293T cells significantly promoted both basal and poly(I:C)-induced activation of interferon regulatory transcription factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) downstream retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling pathway and expression of target genes type I interferon (IFN), which was nearly abolished by knockdown of RIG-I with specific human siRNA and by mutation of the C3HC4 RING domain (C28A/C31A) in csRNF114 as well. Furthermore, csRNF114 associated with ubiquitinated proteins in HEK293T cells, for which the C3HC4 RING domain was essential. These data suggested that an ubiquitin ligase RNF114 homolog with a potential role in antiviral response possibly through modulating RIG-I signaling pathway was cloned from Chinese sturgeon, which might contribute to our understanding of the immune biology of Chinese sturgeon.

  19. Expansion and diversification of BTL ring-H2 ubiquitin ligases in angiosperms: putative Rabring7/BCA2 orthologs.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Hernández, Victor; Medina, Juliana; Aguilar-Henonin, Laura; Guzmán, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    RING finger E3 ligases are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) that mediate the transfer of ubiquitin to substrates. Single-subunit RING finger E3s binds the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and contains recognition sequences for the substrate within the same polypeptide. Here we describe the characterization of a class of RING finger E3 ligases that is conserved among eukaryotes. This class encodes a RING-H2 domain related in sequence to the ATL RING-H2 domain, another class of E3 ligases, and a C2/C2 zing finger at the amino-terminus, formerly described as BZF. In viridiplantae (green algae and land plants), we designed this family as BTL for BZF ATLs. BTLs are putative orthologs of the mammalian Rabring7/BCA2 RING-H2 E3s that have expanded in angiosperms. They are found in numbers ranging from three to thirty-one, which is in contrast to the one to three members normally found in animals, fungi, and protists. Furthermore, the number of sequence LOGOs generated in angiosperms is four times greater than that in other eukaryotes. In contrast to ATLs, which show expansion by tandem duplication, tandemly duplicated BTLs are scarce. The mode of action of Rabring7/BCA2 and BTLs may be similar since both the Rabring7/BCA2 BZF and the ath|BTL4 BZF are likely to mediate the binding of ubiquitin. This study introduces valuable information on the evolution and domain structure of the Rabring7/BCA2/BTL class of E3 ligases which may be important for core eukaryotic genes.

  20. Expansion and Diversification of BTL Ring-H2 Ubiquitin Ligases in Angiosperms: Putative Rabring7/BCA2 Orthologs

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Henonin, Laura; Guzmán, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    RING finger E3 ligases are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) that mediate the transfer of ubiquitin to substrates. Single-subunit RING finger E3s binds the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and contains recognition sequences for the substrate within the same polypeptide. Here we describe the characterization of a class of RING finger E3 ligases that is conserved among eukaryotes. This class encodes a RING-H2 domain related in sequence to the ATL RING-H2 domain, another class of E3 ligases, and a C2/C2 zing finger at the amino-terminus, formerly described as BZF. In viridiplantae (green algae and land plants), we designed this family as BTL for BZF ATLs. BTLs are putative orthologs of the mammalian Rabring7/BCA2 RING-H2 E3s that have expanded in angiosperms. They are found in numbers ranging from three to thirty-one, which is in contrast to the one to three members normally found in animals, fungi, and protists. Furthermore, the number of sequence LOGOs generated in angiosperms is four times greater than that in other eukaryotes. In contrast to ATLs, which show expansion by tandem duplication, tandemly duplicated BTLs are scarce. The mode of action of Rabring7/BCA2 and BTLs may be similar since both the Rabring7/BCA2 BZF and the ath|BTL4 BZF are likely to mediate the binding of ubiquitin. This study introduces valuable information on the evolution and domain structure of the Rabring7/BCA2/BTL class of E3 ligases which may be important for core eukaryotic genes. PMID:23951330

  1. A Bacterial Inhibitor of Host Programmed Cell Death Defenses is an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Janjusevic,R.; Abramovitch, R.; Martin, G.; Stebbins, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae protein AvrPtoB is translocated into plant cells, where it inhibits immunity-associated programmed cell death (PCD). The structure of a C-terminal domain of AvrPtoB that is essential for anti-PCD activity reveals an unexpected homology to the U-box and RING-finger components of eukaryotic E3 ubiquitin ligases, and we show that AvrPtoB has ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutation of conserved residues involved in the binding of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes abolishes this activity in vitro, as well as anti-PCD activity in tomato leaves, which dramatically decreases virulence. These results show that Pseudomonas syringae uses a mimic of host E3 ubiquitin ligases to inactivate plant defenses.

  2. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Finger Foods for Babies KidsHealth > For Parents > Finger Foods for ... will accept a new food. previous continue Finger Foods to Avoid Finger feeding is fun and rewarding ...

  3. MKRN2 is a novel ubiquitin E3 ligase for the p65 subunit of NF-κB and negatively regulates inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chanyoung; Ito, Yuma; Ichikawa, Shota; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Activation of NF-κB transcription factor is strictly regulated to prevent excessive inflammatory responses leading to immunopathology. However, it still remains unclear how NF-κB activation is negatively controlled. The PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein PDLIM2 is a nuclear ubiquitin E3 ligase targeting the p65 subunit of NF-κB for degradation, thus terminating NF-κB-mediated inflammation. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we sought to isolate PDLIM2-interacting proteins that are critical for suppressing NF-κB signaling. Here we identified MKRN2, a RING finger domain-containing protein that belongs to the makorin ring finger protein gene family, as a novel p65 ubiquitin E3 ligase. MKRN2 bound to p65 and promoted the polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of p65 through the MKRN2 RING finger domain, thereby suppressing p65-mediated NF-κB transactivation. Notably, MKRN2 and PDLIM2 synergistically promote polyubiquitination and degradation of p65. Consistently, MKRN2 knockdown in dendritic cells resulted in larger amounts of nuclear p65 and augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines in responses to innate stimuli. These results delineate a novel role of MKRN2 in negatively regulating NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses, cooperatively with PDLIM2. PMID:28378844

  4. Herpes simplex virus 1-infected cell protein 0 contains two E3 ubiquitin ligase sites specific for different E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hagglund, Ryan; Van Sant, Charles; Lopez, Pascal; Roizman, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus 1, a multifunctional ring finger protein, enhances the expression of genes introduced into cells by infection or transfection, interacts with numerous cellular and viral proteins, and is associated with the degradation of several cellular proteins. Sequences encoded by exon 2 of ICP0 (residues 20–241) bind the UbcH3 (cdc34) ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, and its carboxy terminus expresses a ubiquitin ligase activity demonstrable by polyubiquitylation of cdc34 in vitro. We report that: (i) The physical interaction of cdc34 and ICP0 leads to its degradation. Thus, substitution of ICP0 aspartate 199 with alanine attenuates the degradation of cdc34 and its binding to the ICP0 ring finger domain. (ii) Substitution of residue 620 reported to abolish the interaction with a ubiquitin-specific protease has no effect on the function of ubiquitin ligase. (iii) ICP0 contains an additional distinct E3 ligase activity specific for the UbcH5a- and UbcH6 E2-conjugating enzymes mapping to the ring finger domain. This is, to our knowledge, the first identification of a viral protein with at least two physically separated E3 ligase activities with different E2 specificities. The results suggest that each activity may target different proteins. PMID:11805320

  5. Use of twin dorsal middle phalangeal finger flaps for thumb or index finger reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Qi, W; Chen, K J

    2013-05-01

    Amputation or degloving injuries of the thumb or index finger are highly disabling. We describe the use of twin dorsal middle finger flaps harvested from the dorsal aspects of the middle and ring fingers, and based on one palmar proper digital artery, its venae comitantes, and the dorsal branches of the palmar digital nerves of the middle and ring fingers, respectively. These flaps offer advantages when large soft tissue defects of the thumb or index finger are present. In this study, twin dorsal middle finger flaps were used in nine patients (six thumbs, three index fingers). All flaps completely survived. At the mean follow-up of 20 months, the appearance of the reconstructed thumbs or index fingers was acceptable, the length was maintained, and the mean static 2-point discrimination values were 10 mm in the palmar flap and 13 mm in the dorsal flap of the reconstructed digit. All patients were satisfied with the appearance and mobility of the donor fingers. All but one donor finger showed normal finger pulp sensibility, with a static 2-point discrimination between 3 and 6 mm.

  6. Cosmetic amputation of the fourth ray as possible outcome of the traumatic amputation of the ring finger injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzini, Alessio; Calderazzi, Filippo; Bertoni, Nicola; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this work is to describe a case of traumatic amputation of the fourth finger of the left hand. In its first phase, a treatment which consisted in a disarticulation at the level of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was carried out; in the second phase, three months after this emergency treatment, a cosmetic amputation of the fourth metacarpal ray was required. Surgery was performed in accordance with the technique described by Bunnell, which consisted in the disarticulation of the fourth metacarpal, together with radial traslation of the fifth ray. Eighteen months after the operation The patient reported the absence of any subjective problems, with complete functional recovery of the hand that had been operated on. By that time she was back at her job; she also was satisfied with the cosmetic results that had been achieved.

  7. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    PubMed Central

    van den Noort, Josien C.; van Beek, Nathalie; van der Kraan, Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instructed fingers) and range of independent finger movement through the whole finger flexion trajectory in single and multi-finger movement tasks. Thirteen young healthy subjects performed single- and multi-finger movement tasks under two conditions: active flexion through the full range of movement with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed finger(s) were restrained. Finger kinematics were measured using inertial sensors (PowerGlove), to assess enslaving and range of independent finger movement. Although all fingers showed enslaving movement to some extent, highest enslaving was found in adjacent fingers. Enslaving effects in ring and little finger were increased with movement of additional, non-adjacent fingers. The middle finger was the only finger affected by restriction in movement of non-instructed fingers. Each finger showed a range of independent movement before the non-instructed fingers started to move, which was largest for the index finger. The start of enslaving was asymmetrical for adjacent fingers. Little finger enslaving movement was affected by multi-finger movement. We conclude that no finger can move independently through the full range of finger flexion, although some degree of full independence is present for smaller movements. This range of independent movement is asymmetric and variable between fingers and between subjects. The presented results provide insight into the role of finger independency for different types of tasks and populations. PMID:27992598

  8. TRIM16 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and can heterodimerize with other TRIM family members.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jessica L; Malyukova, Alena; Holien, Jessica K; Koach, Jessica; Parker, Michael W; Kavallaris, Maria; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B

    2012-01-01

    The TRIM family of proteins is distinguished by its tripartite motif (TRIM). Typically, TRIM proteins contain a RING finger domain, one or two B-box domains, a coiled-coil domain and the more variable C-terminal domains. TRIM16 does not have a RING domain but does harbour two B-box domains. Here we showed that TRIM16 homodimerized through its coiled-coil domain and heterodimerized with other TRIM family members; TRIM24, Promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein and Midline-1 (MID1). Although, TRIM16 has no classic RING domain, three-dimensional modelling of TRIM16 suggested that its B-box domains adopts RING-like folds leading to the hypothesis that TRIM16 acts as an ubiquitin ligase. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrated that TRIM16, devoid of a classical RING domain had auto-polyubiquitination activity and acted as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vivo and in vitro assays. Thus via its unique structure, TRIM16 possesses both heterodimerization function with other TRIM proteins and also has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

  9. E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 regulates peroxisome biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ronghui; Satkovich, John; Hu, Jianping

    2016-10-31

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous eukaryotic organelles that play pivotal roles in a suite of metabolic processes and often act coordinately with other organelles, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria. Peroxisomes import proteins to the peroxisome matrix by peroxins (PEX proteins), but how the function of the PEX proteins is regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we identified the Arabidopsis RING (really interesting new gene) type E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 [suppressor of plastid protein import locus 1 (ppi1) 1] as a peroxisome membrane protein with a regulatory role in peroxisome protein import. SP1 interacts physically with the two components of the peroxisomemore » protein docking complex PEX13–PEX14 and the (RING)-finger peroxin PEX2. Loss of SP1 function suppresses defects of the pex14-2 and pex13-1 mutants, and SP1 is involved in the degradation of PEX13 and possibly PEX14 and all three RING peroxins. An in vivo ubiquitination assay showed that SP1 has the ability to promote PEX13 ubiquitination. Our study has revealed that, in addition to its previously reported function in chloroplast biogenesis, SP1 plays a role in peroxisome biogenesis. The same E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes the destabilization of components of two distinct protein-import machineries, indicating that degradation of organelle biogenesis factors by the ubiquitin–proteasome system may constitute an important regulatory mechanism in coordinating the biogenesis of metabolically linked organelles in eukaryotes.« less

  10. Ubiquitination-dependent degradation of p73 by the mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades.

    PubMed

    Min, Bumki; Ryu, Jiwon; Chi, Seung-Wook; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2015-11-13

    p73 is a member of the p53 family of transcription factors which plays an essential role in tumor suppression. p73 is associated with the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy and the prognosis of many cancers. In this study, we showed the ubiquitination-dependent degradation of p73 by the mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades. First, the binding between p73 and Hades was identified by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, and it was found that the Hades RING-finger domain mediates the interaction with p73. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that p73 moves to the mitochondria and colocalizes with Hades during etoposide-induced apoptosis. By performing in vivo and in vitro ubiquitination assays, we observed that the Hades RING-finger domain promotes ubiquitination of p73. Finally, it was shown that SiRNA-mediated depletion of Hades stabilizes p73. Taken together, our results showed that Hades mediates the ubiquitination-dependent degradation of mitochondrial p73 under apoptotic conditions. These findings suggest that Hades-mediated p73 ubiquitination is a novel regulatory mechanism for the exonuclear function of p73.

  11. Robotic hand and fingers

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  12. Patterns of Dupuytren disease in fingers: studying correlations with a multivariate ordinal logit model.

    PubMed

    Lanting, Rosanne; Nooraee, Nazanin; Werker, Paul M N; van den Heuvel, Edwin R

    2014-09-01

    Dupuytren disease affects fingers in a variable fashion. Knowledge about specific disease patterns (phenotype) based on location and severity of the disease is lacking. In this cross-sectional study, 344 primary affected hands with Dupuytren disease were physically examined. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the coexistence of Dupuytren disease in pairs of fingers was calculated, and agglomerative hierarchical clustering was applied to identify possible clusters of affected fingers. With a multivariate ordinal logit model, the authors studied the correlation on severity, taking into account age and sex, and tested hypotheses on independence between groups of fingers. The ring finger was most frequently affected by Dupuytren disease, and contractures were seen in 15.1 percent of affected rays. The severity of thumb and index finger, middle and ring fingers, and middle and little fingers was significantly correlated. Occurrences in pairs of fingers were highest in the middle and ring fingers and lowest in the thumb and index finger. Correlation between the ring and little fingers and a correlation between fingers from the ulnar and radial sides could not be demonstrated. Rays on the ulnar side of the hand are predominantly affected. The middle finger is substantially correlated with other fingers on the ulnar side, and the thumb and index finger are correlated; however, there was no evidence that the ulnar side and the radial side were correlated in any way, which suggests that occurrence on one side of the hand does not predict Dupuytren disease on the other side of the hand. Risk, III.

  13. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua; Duan, Changzhu

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  14. E3 Success Story - Accelerating Adoption of E3 Recommendations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The state of Michigan, along with numerous local and state partners, formed E3 Michigan in 2010. This partnership will allow for up to 10 E3 assessments in southeast Michigan and 10 E3 assessments in western Michigan.

  15. Functional characterization of SAG/RBX2/ROC2/RNF7, an antioxidant protein and an E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Li, Hua

    2013-02-01

    SAG (Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene), also known as RBX2 (RING box protein 2), ROC2 (Regulator of Cullins 2), or RNF7 (RING Finger Protein 7), was originally cloned in our laboratory as a redox inducible antioxidant protein and later characterized as the second member of the RBX/ROC RING component of the SCF (SKP1-CUL-F-box Proteins) E3 ubiquitin ligase. When acting alone, SAG scavenges oxygen radicals by forming inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bonds, whereas by forming a complex with other components of the SCF E3 ligase, SAG promotes ubiquitination and degradation of a number of protein substrates, including c-JUN, DEPTOR, HIF-1α, IκBα, NF1, NOXA, p27, and procaspase-3, thus regulating various signaling pathways and biological processes. Specifically, SAG protects cells from apoptosis, confers radioresistance, and plays an essential and non-redundant role in mouse embryogenesis and vasculogenesis. Furthermore, stress-inducible SAG is overexpressed in a number of human cancers and SAG overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis. Finally, SAG transgenic expression in epidermis causes an early stage inhibition, but later stage promotion, of skin tumorigenesis triggered by DMBA/TPA. Given its major role in promoting targeted degradation of tumor suppressive proteins, leading to apoptosis suppression and accelerated tumorigenesis, SAG E3 ligase appears to be an attractive anticancer target.

  16. Contributions and co-ordination of individual fingers in multiple finger prehension.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, H; Kawai, S; Ikuta, K

    1995-06-01

    The contributions and co-ordination of external finger grip forces were examined during a lifting task with a precision grip using multiple fingers. The subjects (n = 10) lifted a force transducer-equipped grip apparatus. Grip force from each of the five fingers was continuously measured under different object weight (200 g, 400 g and 800 g) and surface structure (plastic and sandpaper) conditions. The effect of five-, four-, and three-finger grip modes was also examined. It was found that variation of object weight or surface friction resulted in change of the total grip force magnitude; the largest change in finger force, was that for the index finger, followed by the middle, ring, and little fingers. Percentage contribution of static grip force to the total grip force for the index, middle, ring, and little fingers was 42.0%, 27.4%, 17.6% and 12.9%, respectively. These values were fairly constant for all object weight conditions, as well as for all surface friction conditions, suggesting that all individual finger force adjustments for light loads less than 800 g are controlled comprehensively simply by using a single common scaling value. A higher surface friction provided faster lifting initiation and required lesser grip force exertion, indicating advantageous effect of a non-slippery surface over a slippery surface. The results indicate that nearly 40% force reduction can be obtained when a non-slippery surface is used. Variation in grip mode changed the total grip force, i.e., the fewer the number of fingers, the greater the total grip force. The percent value of static grip force for the index, middle, and ring fingers in the four-finger grip mode was 42.7%, 32.5%, and 24.7%, respectively, and that for the index and middle fingers in the three-finger grip mode was 43.0% and 56.9%, respectively. Therefore, the grip mode was found to influence the force contributions of the middle and ring fingers, but not of the index finger.

  17. The role and mechanism of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer and its potential therapy implications.

    PubMed

    Sang, Youzhou; Yan, Fan; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-12-15

    CRLs (Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases) are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes, which ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involved in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage response, genomic integrity, tumor suppression and embryonic development. CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, as one member of CRLs family, consists of a RING finger domain protein, cullin4 (CUL4) scaffold protein and DDB1-CUL4 associated substrate receptors. The CUL4 subfamily includes two members, CUL4A and CUL4B, which share extensively sequence identity and functional redundancy. Aberrant expression of CUL4 has been found in a majority of tumors. Given the significance of CUL4 in cancer, understanding its detailed aspects of pathogenesis of human malignancy would have significant value for the treatment of cancer. Here, the work provides an overview to address the role of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer development and progression, and discuss the possible mechanisms of CRL4 ligase involving in many cellular processes associated with tumor. Finally, we discuss its potential value in cancer therapy.

  18. The role and mechanism of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer and its potential therapy implications

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Youzhou; Yan, Fan; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-01-01

    CRLs (Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases) are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes, which ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involved in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage response, genomic integrity, tumor suppression and embryonic development. CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, as one member of CRLs family, consists of a RING finger domain protein, cullin4 (CUL4) scaffold protein and DDB1–CUL4 associated substrate receptors. The CUL4 subfamily includes two members, CUL4A and CUL4B, which share extensively sequence identity and functional redundancy. Aberrant expression of CUL4 has been found in a majority of tumors. Given the significance of CUL4 in cancer, understanding its detailed aspects of pathogenesis of human malignancy would have significant value for the treatment of cancer. Here, the work provides an overview to address the role of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer development and progression, and discuss the possible mechanisms of CRL4 ligase involving in many cellular processes associated with tumor. Finally, we discuss its potential value in cancer therapy. PMID:26460955

  19. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-01-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53. PMID:21597459

  20. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-12-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53.

  1. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A; Masuda, Claudio A; Jenkins, Brian V; Nelms, Keats A; Goodnow, Christopher C; Glynne, Richard J; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kay, Steve A

    2009-02-17

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19196968

  3. High CO2 levels cause skeletal muscle atrophy via AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), FoxO3a protein, and muscle-specific Ring finger protein 1 (MuRF1).

    PubMed

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Angulo, Martín; Lecuona, Emilia; Dada, Laura A; Welch, Lynn C; Cheng, Yuan; Gusarova, Galina; Ceco, Ermelinda; Liu, Chang; Shigemura, Masahiko; Barreiro, Esther; Patterson, Cam; Nader, Gustavo A; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2015-04-03

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute lung injury, and critical care illness may develop hypercapnia. Many of these patients often have muscle dysfunction which increases morbidity and impairs their quality of life. Here, we investigated whether hypercapnia leads to skeletal muscle atrophy. Mice exposed to high CO2 had decreased skeletal muscle wet weight, fiber diameter, and strength. Cultured myotubes exposed to high CO2 had reduced fiber diameter, protein/DNA ratios, and anabolic capacity. High CO2 induced the expression of MuRF1 in vivo and in vitro, whereas MuRF1(-/-) mice exposed to high CO2 did not develop muscle atrophy. AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a metabolic sensor, was activated in myotubes exposed to high CO2, and loss-of-function studies showed that the AMPKα2 isoform is necessary for muscle-specific ring finger protein 1 (MuRF1) up-regulation and myofiber size reduction. High CO2 induced AMPKα2 activation, triggering the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of FoxO3a, and leading to an increase in MuRF1 expression and myotube atrophy. Accordingly, we provide evidence that high CO2 activates skeletal muscle atrophy via AMPKα2-FoxO3a-MuRF1, which is of biological and potentially clinical significance in patients with lung diseases and hypercapnia. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Ring Finger Protein 34 (RNF34) Interacts with and Promotes γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type-A Receptor Degradation via Ubiquitination of the γ2 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongbing; Chiou, Tzu-Ting; Serwanski, David R.; Miralles, Celia P.; Pinal, Noelia; De Blas, Angel L.

    2014-01-01

    We have found that the large intracellular loop of the γ2 GABAA receptor (R) subunit (γ2IL) interacts with RNF34 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase), as shown by yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pulldown assays. In brain extracts, RNF34 co-immunoprecipitates with assembled GABAARs. In co-transfected HEK293 cells, RNF34 reduces the expression of the γ2 GABAAR subunit by increasing the ratio of ubiquitinated/nonubiquitinated γ2. Mutating several lysines of the γ2IL into arginines makes the γ2 subunit resistant to RNF34-induced degradation. RNF34 also reduces the expression of the γ2 subunit when α1 and β3 subunits are co-assembled with γ2. This effect is partially reversed by leupeptin or MG132, indicating that both the lysosomal and proteasomal degradation pathways are involved. Immunofluorescence of cultured hippocampal neurons shows that RNF34 forms clusters and that a subset of these clusters is associated with GABAergic synapses. This association is also observed in the intact rat brain by electron microscopy immunocytochemistry. RNF34 is not expressed until the 2nd postnatal week of rat brain development, being highly expressed in some interneurons. Overexpression of RNF34 in hippocampal neurons decreases the density of γ2 GABAAR clusters and the number of GABAergic contacts that these neurons receive. Knocking down endogenous RNF34 with shRNA leads to increased γ2 GABAAR cluster density and GABAergic innervation. The results indicate that RNF34 regulates postsynaptic γ2-GABAAR clustering and GABAergic synaptic innervation by interacting with and ubiquitinating the γ2-GABAAR subunit promoting GABAAR degradation. PMID:25193658

  5. Structure of a BMI-1-Ring1B Polycomb Group Ubiquitin Ligase Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Li,Z.; Cao, R.; Wang, M.; Myers, M.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins Bmi-1 and Ring1B are core subunits of the PRC1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of Hox gene expression, X-chromosome inactivation, tumorigenesis and stem cell self-renewal. The RING finger protein Ring1B is an E3 ligase that participates in the ubiquitination of lysine 119 of histone H2A, and the binding of Bmi-1 stimulates the E3 ligase activity. We have mapped the regions of Bmi-1 and Ring1B required for efficient ubiquitin transfer and determined a 2.5 Angstroms structure of the Bmi-1-Ring1B core domain complex. The structure reveals that Ring1B 'hugs' Bmi-1 through extensive RING domain contacts and its N-terminal tail wraps around Bmi-1. The two regions of interaction have a synergistic effect on the E3 ligase activity. Our analyses suggest a model where the Bmi-1-Ring1B complex stabilizes the interaction between the E2 enzyme and the nucleosomal substrate to allow efficient ubiquitin transfer.

  6. Spatiotemporal Patterns of RING1 Expression after Rat Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanzhang; Ji, Wei; Gong, Peipei; Liu, Chun; Duan, Chengwei; Gao, Yilu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhu, Shunxing; Gong, Leilei

    2016-12-28

    Ring finger protein 1 (RING1) is a RING domain characterized protein belonging to the RING finger family. It is an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase that mediated monoubiquitination of histone H2A and the core component of PRC1 complex, which is the repressive multiprotein complex of Polycomb group (PcG). Previous studies showed the important tumorigenic role of RING1 via promoting cell proliferation and the crucial function in maintaining transcriptional program stability during development. However, its mechanism for spinal cord injury (SCI) is still unknown. In our research, we established an acute SCI model in adult rats and studied the expression and function profiles of RING1. RING1 protein level detected by western blot peaked at day 3 after trauma and then decreased gradually. Immunohistochemistry showed the increase of RING1 expression displayed in the white matter more obviously than in the gray matter. Furthermore, increased co-expression of RING1 and GFAP confirmed activated astrocytes in injured spinal cord via double immunofluorescence staining. Meanwhile, we also found the co-localization of PCNA, a famous marker of proliferative cells, with RING1 and GFAP, which indicated RING1 might play a role in astrocyte proliferation after SCI. In vitro studies, RING1 protein level in C6 cells increased after LPS challenge and RING1 was required for astrocyte proliferation and activation induced by LPS. In summary, we took a new insight into the function of RING1 in the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of SCI.

  7. High aromatic ring-cleavage diversity in birch rhizosphere: PAH treatment-specific changes of I.E.3 group extradiol dioxygenases and 16S rRNA bacterial communities in soil.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Timo P; Keskinen, Anna-Kaisa; Akerman, Marja-Leena; Fortelius, Carola; Haahtela, Kielo; Yrjälä, Kim

    2008-09-01

    Genes encoding key enzymes of catabolic pathways can be targeted by DNA fingerprinting to explore genetic degradation potential in pristine and polluted soils. We performed a greenhouse microcosm experiment to elucidate structural and functional bacterial diversity in polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-polluted soil and to test the suitability of birch (Betula pendula) for remediation. Degradation of PAHs was analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography, DNA isolated from soil amplified and fingerprinted by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Bacterial 16S rRNA T-RFLP fingerprinting revealed a high structural bacterial diversity in soil where PAH amendment altered the general community structure as well as the rhizosphere community. Birch augmented extradiol dioxygenase diversity in rhizosphere showing a rhizosphere effect, and further pyrene was more efficiently degraded in planted pots. Degraders of aromatic compounds upon PAH amendment were shown by the changed extradiol ring-cleavage community structure in soil. The RFLP analysis grouped extradiol dioxygenase marker genes into 17 distinct operational taxonomic units displaying novel phylogenetic clusters of ring-cleavage dioxygenases representing putative catabolic pathways, and the peptide sequences contained conserved amino-acid signatures of extradiol dioxygenases. A branch of major environmental TS cluster was identified as being related to Parvibaculum lavantivorans ring-cleavage dioxygenase. The described structural and functional diversity demonstrated a complex interplay of bacteria in PAH pollution. The findings improve our understanding of rhizoremediation and unveil the extent of uncharacterized enzymes and may benefit bioremediation research by facilitating the development of molecular tools to detect and monitor populations involved in degradative processes.

  8. Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligases That Regulate Histone Protein Levels in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Gonzalez, Melanie; Kabbaj, Marie-Helene Miquel; Gunjan, Akash

    2012-01-01

    Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus) domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs) YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases) respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3 ubiquitin ligases

  9. Human 2D (index) and 4D (ring) finger lengths and ratios: cross-sectional data on linear growth patterns, sexual dimorphism and lateral asymmetry from 4 to 60 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Gillam, L; McDonald, R; Ebling, F J P; Mayhew, T M

    2008-01-01

    Human 2D:4D ratios (measures of the relative lengths of index and ring fingers) attract considerable research interest because they exhibit sexual dimorphism and are associated with various morphological, physiological and behavioural traits as well as sporting abilities and medical conditions. In an attempt to identify potential confounding factors in such studies, we have examined how relative and absolute digit lengths vary with gender and tested whether they are influenced by age, right–left asymmetry and hand preference. Participants between 4 and 60years of age were recruited from local educational sites. Hand photocopies and calliper measurement were used to obtain digit lengths. We employed linear regression analysis to examine the growth trajectories of individual digits, analyses of variance to isolate main and interaction effects of age, gender and hand preference, and paired t-tests to identify lateral asymmetries. Both digits exhibited biphasic growth with an early growth phase followed by a stable length phase. Digits in females attained their maximum length about 2.2years (dextral subjects) or 5.1years (sinistral subjects) earlier than those in males. Sexual dimorphism in 2D:4D ratios was apparent by 4years of age and age changes in ratios depended on gender, side and hand preference. Relative and absolute lengths displayed age, gender, hand-preference and age×gender interaction effects. Lengths tended to be greater in females in younger subjects and greater in males in older subjects. Ratios tended to be greater in sinistral subjects. In dextral subjects, significant lateral asymmetries in 2D lengths were seen at all ages but asymmetries in males and 4D lengths seemed to be age-dependent. We conclude that age, lateral asymmetry and hand preference are potential confounding factors and that future study designs should take account of these as well as other known confounders such as ethnicity, birth order, menstrual cycle phase and sexual

  10. Current concepts: mallet finger.

    PubMed

    Alla, Sreenivasa R; Deal, Nicole D; Dempsey, Ian J

    2014-06-01

    Loss of the extensor mechanism at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint leads to mallet finger also known as baseball finger or drop finger. This can be secondary to tendon substance disruption or to a bony avulsion. Soft tissue mallet finger is the result of a rupture of the extensor tendon in Zone 1, and a bony mallet finger is the result of an avulsion of the extensor tendon from the distal phalanx with a small fragment of bone attached to the avulsed tendon. Mallet finger leads to an imbalance in the distribution of the extensor force between the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and DIP joints. If left untreated, mallet finger leads to a swan neck deformity from PIP joint hyper extension and DIP joint flexion. Most mallet finger injuries can be managed non-surgically, but occasionally surgery is recommended for either an acute or a chronic mallet finger or for salvage of failed prior treatment.

  11. Discrimination of Finger Area of Somatosensory Cortex by NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingdi; Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji

    We carried out a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to observe the hemodynamic responses associated with cortical activation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) by finger electrical stimulation. We examined whether NIRS can assist in investigating the somatotopic arrangement of fingers on the SI hand area. We found that although relatively low in spatial resolution, NIRS can to some extent help to discriminate the representations of thumb and ring finger on the SI hand area.

  12. A novel ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 functions as a modulator of immune response against lipopolysaccharide in Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Xin, Lusheng; Liu, Conghui; Jia, Zhihao; Song, Linsheng; Zhu, Beiwei

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitination is an important post-translational protein modification and plays a crucial role in various processes such as cell cycle, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. In the present study, a novel ubiquitin (Ub)-protein ligase E3 (designed as CgE3Rv1) was identified from Crassostrea gigas, and its ubiquitination regulation in the immune response against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation was investigated. The open reading frame of CgE3Rv1 gene was of 1455 bp encoding a polypeptide of 484 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 54.89 kDa. There were two transmembrane regions and a RING-variant (RINGv) domain identified in CgE3Rv1. CgE3Rv1 shared similar C4HC3 zinc-finger-like motif with those RINGv domain Ub-protein ligases E3s identified from vertebrates and invertebrates, and it was closely clustered with the membrane-associated RING-CH2 (MARCH2) Ub-protein ligases E3s in the phylogenetic tree. The mRNA transcript of CgE3Rv1 was highest expressed in gonads and hemolymph (p < 0.05), and its mRNA expression level in hemocytes was significantly increased at 6 h (p < 0.01) after the stimulation of LPS, while the up-regulated mRNA expression was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) after acetylcholine stimulation. No significant changes of CgE3Rv1 expression were observed after peptidoglycan or mannan stimulation. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization assays revealed that CgE3Rv1 protein and mRNA were dominantly distributed in the gonad. In the hemocytes, CgE3Rv1 was mainly located around the nucleus, and slightly distributed in the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane. Recombinant CgE3Rv1 RINGv domain protein (rCgE3Rv1-RINGv) was confirmed to activate the Ub reaction system in vitro with the aid of Ub-activating enzyme E1 and Ub-conjugating enzyme E2. These results demonstrated that CgE3Rv1 was an Ub-protein ligase E3, which was involved in the immune response against LPS and the interaction with cell surface signal

  13. Toward a Phonetic Representation of Hand Configuration: The Fingers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a componential, articulatory approach to the phonetic description of the configuration of the four fingers. Abandoning the traditional holistic, perceptual approach, we propose a system of notational devices and distinctive features for the description of the four fingers proper (index, middle, ring, and pinky).…

  14. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  15. An Arginine-rich Motif of Ring Finger Protein 4 (RNF4) Oversees the Recruitment and Degradation of the Phosphorylated and SUMOylated Krüppel-associated Box Domain-associated Protein 1 (KAP1)/TRIM28 Protein during Genotoxic Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Li, Xu; Kong, Xiang-Qian; Luo, Cheng; Chang, Che-Chang; Chung, Yiyin; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Li, Keqin Kathy; Ann, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-associated box domain-associated protein 1 (KAP1) is a universal transcriptional corepressor that undergoes multiple posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including SUMOylation and Ser-824 phosphorylation. However, the functional interplay of KAP1 PTMs in regulating KAP1 turnover during DNA damage response remains unclear. To decipher the role and cross-talk of multiple KAP1 PTMs, we show here that DNA double strand break-induced KAP1 Ser-824 phosphorylation promoted the recruitment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 4 (RNF4), and subsequent RNF4-mediated, SUMO-dependent degradation. Besides the SUMO interacting motif (SIM), a previously unrecognized, but evolutionarily conserved, arginine-rich motif (ARM) in RNF4 acts as a novel recognition motif for selective target recruitment. Results from combined mutagenesis and computational modeling studies suggest that RNF4 utilizes concerted bimodular recognition, namely SIM for Lys-676 SUMOylation and ARM for Ser(P)-824 of simultaneously phosphorylated and SUMOylated KAP1 (Ser(P)-824-SUMO-KAP1). Furthermore, we proved that arginines 73 and 74 within the ARM of RNF4 are required for efficient recruitment to KAP1 or accelerated degradation of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) under stress. In parallel, results of bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays validated the role of the ARM in recognizing Ser(P)-824 in living cells. Taken together, we establish that the ARM is required for RNF4 to efficiently target Ser(P)-824-SUMO-KAP1, conferring ubiquitin Lys-48-mediated proteasomal degradation in the context of double strand breaks. The conservation of such a motif may possibly explain the requirement for timely substrate selectivity determination among a myriad of SUMOylated proteins under stress conditions. Thus, the ARM dynamically regulates the SIM-dependent recruitment of targets to RNF4, which could be critical to dynamically fine-tune the

  16. MicroRNA‑128a, BMI1 polycomb ring finger oncogene, and reactive oxygen species inhibit the growth of U‑87 MG glioblastoma cells following exposure to X‑ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lan; Yu, Guanying; Wang, Cuihong; Du, Bin; Sun, Dianshui; Liu, Junli; Qi, Tonggang; Yu, Xiaoming; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of numerous types of malignant tumors, including glioma. However, radioresistance and anti‑apoptotic mechanisms decrease the efficacy of radiotherapy in many patients with glioma. BMI1 polycomb ring finger oncogene (Bmi‑1) is an oncogene associated with radioresistance in tumor cells. MicroRNA (miRNA)‑128a is a brain-specific miRNA, which suppresses Bmi‑1 expression. The present study investigated the effects of various radiation intensities on U‑87 MG glioma cells, as well as the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Bmi‑1, and miRNA‑128a in the cellular response to radiotherapy. The response of U‑87 MG cells following exposure to X‑ray radiation was assessed using a cell growth curve and inhibition ratio. Cell cycle distribution and the levels of intracellular ROS were evaluated by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression levels of Bmi‑1 and those of miRNA‑128a in U‑87 MG cells exposed to X‑ray radiation were evaluated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. X‑ray radiation did not decrease the number of U‑87 MG cells; however, it did inhibit cellular growth in a dose‑dependent manner. Following exposure to X‑ray radiation for 24 h, cell cycle distribution was altered, with an increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase. The mRNA expression levels of Bmi‑1 were downregulated in the 1 and 2 Gy groups, and upregulated in the 6 and 8 Gy groups. The expression levels of miRNA‑128a were upregulated in the 1 and 2 Gy groups, and downregulated in the 8 Gy group. The levels of ROS were increased following exposure to ≥2 Gy, and treatment with N-acetyl cysteine was able to induce radioresistance. These results suggested that U‑87 MG cells exhibited radioresistance. High doses of X‑ray radiation increased the expression levels of Bmi‑1, which may be associated with the evasion of cellular senescence. miRNA‑128a and its downstream

  17. DNA Damage Regulates UHRF1 Stability via the SCFβ-TrCP E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Ma, Honghui; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Diao, Jianbo; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Wei, Wenyi

    2013-01-01

    UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, with PHD and RING finger domains 1) is a critical epigenetic player involved in the maintenance of DNA methylation patterns during DNA replication. Dysregulation of the UHRF1 level is implicated in cancer onset, metastasis, and tumor recurrence. Previous studies demonstrated that UHRF1 can be stabilized through USP7-mediated deubiquitylation, but the mechanism through which UHRF1 is ubiquitylated is still unknown. Here we show that proteasomal degradation of UHRF1 is mediated by the SCFβ-TrCP E3 ligase. Through bioinformatic and mutagenesis studies, we identified a functional DSG degron in the UHRF1 N terminus that is necessary for UHRF1 stability regulation. We further show that UHRF1 physically interacts with β-TrCP1 in a manner dependent on phosphorylation of serine 108 (S108UHRF1) within the DSG degron. Furthermore, we demonstrate that S108UHRF1 phosphorylation is catalyzed by casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ) and is important for the recognition of UHRF1 by SCFβ-TrCP. Importantly, we demonstrate that UHRF1 degradation is accelerated in response to DNA damage, coincident with enhanced S108UHRF1 phosphorylation. Taken together, our data identify SCFβ-TrCP as a bona fide UHRF1 E3 ligase important for regulating UHRF1 steady-state levels both under normal conditions and in response to DNA damage. PMID:23297342

  18. Skeletal muscle atrophy and the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Sue C; Baehr, Leslie M

    2014-09-15

    Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 were identified more than 10 years ago as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are increased transcriptionally in skeletal muscle under atrophy-inducing conditions, making them excellent markers of muscle atrophy. In the past 10 years much has been published about MuRF1 and MAFbx with respect to their mRNA expression patterns under atrophy-inducing conditions, their transcriptional regulation, and their putative substrates. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of both genes in the regulation of mass and other cellular functions in striated muscle. Although both MuRF1 and MAFbx are enriched in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle, this review will focus on the current understanding of MuRF1 and MAFbx in skeletal muscle, highlighting the critical questions that remain to be answered.

  19. Skeletal muscle atrophy and the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 were identified more than 10 years ago as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are increased transcriptionally in skeletal muscle under atrophy-inducing conditions, making them excellent markers of muscle atrophy. In the past 10 years much has been published about MuRF1 and MAFbx with respect to their mRNA expression patterns under atrophy-inducing conditions, their transcriptional regulation, and their putative substrates. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of both genes in the regulation of mass and other cellular functions in striated muscle. Although both MuRF1 and MAFbx are enriched in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle, this review will focus on the current understanding of MuRF1 and MAFbx in skeletal muscle, highlighting the critical questions that remain to be answered. PMID:25096180

  20. The E3 ubiquitin ligase HOS1 is involved in ethylene regulation of leaf expansion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyounghee; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as flowering, senescence, abscission, and fruit ripening. In particular, leaf expansion is also controlled by ethylene in Arabidopsis. Exogenous treatment with ethylene inhibits leaf expansion, and consistently, ethylene insensitive mutants show increased leaf area. Here, we report that the RING finger-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES 1 (HOS1) regulates leaf expansion in an ethylene signaling pathway. The HOS1-deficient mutant showed reduced leaf area and was insensitive to ethylene perception inhibitor, silver thiosulfate (STS). Accordingly, genes encoding ethylene signaling components were significantly up-regulated in hos1-3. This study demonstrates that the HOS1 protein is involved in ethylene signal transduction for the proper regulation of leaf expansion possibly under environmentally stressful conditions.

  1. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  2. E3 Sustainable Manufacturing Curriculum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A short E3 course containing three modules on Environmental Sustainability; Lean Manufacturing and Pollution Prevention; and Energy and Carbon. Each module includes slides, a facilitator's guide with handouts, activities, quizzes, and facilitator's notes.

  3. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    PubMed Central

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  4. Typing keystroke duration changed after submaximal isometric finger exercises

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Hsu (Joe); Johnson, Peter W.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Eisen, Ellen A.

    2012-01-01

    A repeated-measures laboratory experiment tested whether keystroke duration during touch-typing changes after a finger performs submaximal isometric flexion exercises. Fourteen right-handed touch-typists used right ring finger to perform three 15-min exercise conditions, two isometric exercises and a no-force condition, each on a separate day. Before and after each exercise condition, typing keystroke duration and isometric force elicited by electrical stimulation were measured for right ring finger. Keystroke duration of right ring finger decreased by 5% (6 ms, P < 0.05) immediately after the exercises but not after the no-force condition. Peak isometric finger force elicited by electrical stimulation decreased by 17–26% (P < 0.05) for the flexor digitorum superficialis and decreased by 4–8% for the extensor digitorum communis after the isometric exercises. After the finger was exposed to isometric exercises, changes in typing keystroke duration coincided with changes in the physiological state of the finger flexor and extensor muscles. PMID:18853179

  5. Typing keystroke duration changed after submaximal isometric finger exercises.

    PubMed

    Joe Chang, Che-Hsu; Johnson, Peter W; Katz, Jeffrey N; Eisen, Ellen A; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2009-01-01

    A repeated-measures laboratory experiment tested whether keystroke duration during touch-typing changes after a finger performs submaximal isometric flexion exercises. Fourteen right-handed touch-typists used right ring finger to perform three 15-min exercise conditions, two isometric exercises and a no-force condition, each on a separate day. Before and after each exercise condition, typing keystroke duration and isometric force elicited by electrical stimulation were measured for right ring finger. Keystroke duration of right ring finger decreased by 5% (6 ms, P < 0.05) immediately after the exercises but not after the no-force condition. Peak isometric finger force elicited by electrical stimulation decreased by 17-26% (P < 0.05) for the flexor digitorum superficialis and decreased by 4-8% for the extensor digitorum communis after the isometric exercises. After the finger was exposed to isometric exercises, changes in typing keystroke duration coincided with changes in the physiological state of the finger flexor and extensor muscles.

  6. A family of Salmonella virulence factors functions as a distinct class of autoregulated E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Cindy M.; Hicks, Stuart W.; Galán, Jorge E.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E3 ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E3 Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E3 ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function. PMID:19273841

  7. Transfer of tactile perceptual learning to untrained neighboring fingers reflects natural use relationships.

    PubMed

    Dempsey-Jones, Harriet; Harrar, Vanessa; Oliver, Jonathan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Spence, Charles; Makin, Tamar R

    2016-03-01

    Tactile learning transfers from trained to untrained fingers in a pattern that reflects overlap between the representations of fingers in the somatosensory system (e.g., neurons with multifinger receptive fields). While physical proximity on the body is known to determine the topography of somatosensory representations, tactile coactivation is also an established organizing principle of somatosensory topography. In this study we investigated whether tactile coactivation, induced by habitual inter-finger cooperative use (use pattern), shapes inter-finger overlap. To this end, we used psychophysics to compare the transfer of tactile learning from the middle finger to its adjacent fingers. This allowed us to compare transfer to two fingers that are both physically and cortically adjacent to the middle finger but have differing use patterns. Specifically, the middle finger is used more frequently with the ring than with the index finger. We predicted this should lead to greater representational overlap between the former than the latter pair. Furthermore, this difference in overlap should be reflected in differential learning transfer from the middle to index vs. ring fingers. Subsequently, we predicted temporary learning-related changes in the middle finger's representation (e.g., cortical magnification) would cause transient interference in perceptual thresholds of the ring, but not the index, finger. Supporting this, longitudinal analysis revealed a divergence where learning transfer was fast to the index finger but relatively delayed to the ring finger. Our results support the theory that tactile coactivation patterns between digits affect their topographic relationships. Our findings emphasize how action shapes perception and somatosensory organization.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the SINA/SIAH ubiquitin E3 ligase family in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Ian J; Van Sciver, Robert E; Tang, Amy H

    2017-08-07

    The RAS signaling pathway is a pivotal developmental pathway that controls many fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, movement and apoptosis. Drosophila Seven-IN-Absentia (SINA) is a ubiquitin E3 ligase that is the most downstream signaling "gatekeeper" whose biological activity is essential for proper RAS signal transduction. Vertebrate SINA homologs (SIAHs) share a high degree of amino acid identity with that of Drosophila SINA. SINA/SIAH is the most conserved signaling component in the canonical EGFR/RAS/RAF/MAPK signal transduction pathway. Vertebrate SIAH1, 2, and 3 are the three orthologs to invertebrate SINA protein. SINA and SIAH1 orthologs are found in all major taxa of metazoans. These proteins have four conserved functional domains, known as RING (Really Interesting New Gene), SZF (SIAH-type zinc finger), SBS (substrate binding site) and DIMER (Dimerization). In addition to the siah1 gene, most vertebrates encode two additional siah genes (siah2 and siah3) in their genomes. Vertebrate SIAH2 has a highly divergent and extended N-terminal sequence, while its RING, SZF, SBS and DIMER domains maintain high amino acid identity/similarity to that of SIAH1. But unlike vertebrate SIAH1 and SIAH2, SIAH3 lacks a functional RING domain, suggesting that SIAH3 may be an inactive E3 ligase. The SIAH3 subtree exhibits a high degree of amino acid divergence when compared to the SIAH1 and SIAH2 subtrees. We find that SIAH1 and SIAH2 are expressed in all human epithelial cell lines examined thus far, while SIAH3 is only expressed in a limited subset of cancer cell lines. Through phylogenetic analyses of metazoan SINA and SIAH E3 ligases, we identified many invariant and divergent amino acid residues, as well as the evolutionarily conserved functional motifs in this medically relevant gene family. Our phylomedicinal study of this unique metazoan SINA/SIAH protein family has provided invaluable evolution-based support towards future

  9. Finger forces in fastball baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi; Nasu, Daiki; Kadota, Koji; Matsuo, Tomoyuki; Fleisig, Glenn S

    2017-08-01

    Forces imparted by the fingers onto a baseball are the final, critical aspects for pitching, however these forces have not been quantified previously as no biomechanical technology was available. In this study, an instrumented baseball was developed for direct measurement of ball reaction force by individual fingers and used to provide fundamental information on the forces during a fastball pitch. A tri-axial force transducer with a cable having an easily-detachable connector were installed in an official baseball. Data were collected from 11 pitchers who placed the fingertip of their index, middle, ring, or thumb on the transducer, and threw four-seam fastballs to a target cage from a flat mound. For the index and middle fingers, resultant ball reaction force exhibited a bimodal pattern with initial and second peaks at 38-39ms and 6-7ms before ball release, and their amplitudes were around 97N each. The ring finger and thumb produced single-peak forces of approximately 50 and 83N, respectively. Shear forces for the index and middle fingers formed distinct peak at 4-5ms before release, and the peaks summed to 102N; a kinetic source for backspin on the ball. An additional experiment with submaximal pitching effort showed a linear relationship of peak forces with ball velocity. The peak ball reaction force for fastballs exceeded 80% of maximum finger strength measured, suggesting that strengthening of the distal muscles is important both for enhancing performance and for avoiding injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  11. Development of cylindrical-type finger force measuring system using force sensors and its characteristics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Min; Yoon, Joungwon; Shin, Hee-Suk; Kim, Gab-Soon

    2012-02-01

    Some patients cannot use their hands because of the paralysis of their fingers. Their fingers can recover with rehabilitative training, and the extent of rehabilitation can be judged by grasping a cylindrical-object with their fingers. At present, the cylindrical-object used in hospitals is only a plastic cylinder, which cannot measure grasping force of the fingers. Therefore, doctors must judge the extent of rehabilitation by watching patients' fingers as they grasp the plastic cylinder. In this paper, the development of two cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems with four force sensors for left hand and right hand were developed. The developed finger force measuring system can measure the grasping force of patients' each finger (forefinger, middle finger, ring finger and little finger), and the measured results could be used to judge the rehabilitation extent of a finger patient. The grasping force tests of men and women were performed using the developed cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems. The tests confirm that the average finger forces of right hand and left hand for men were about 194 N and 179 N, and for women, 108 N and 95 N.

  12. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  13. Finger flexion resembling focal dystonia in Isaacs' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jamora, Roland Dominic G; Umapathi, T; Tan, Louis C S

    2006-01-01

    We describe a patient with a 5-month history of gradually progressive painless flexion of the left ring finger associated with cramps in both thighs. She has severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and was on salbutamol. Serum anti-voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies was positive. Electromyography showed generalized neuromyotonia and myokymic discharges. The cramps were partially relieved by phenytoin. We would like to highlight that finger flexion resembling dystonia can be a presenting sign of Isaacs' syndrome.

  14. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients.

  15. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... textures. No longer are baby purees and mushy cereals the only things on the menu. By the ... ll still be helping out by spoon-feeding cereal and other important dietary elements. Encouraging finger feeding ...

  16. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    PubMed

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  17. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... each fingertip. Repeat ____ times for ____ seconds.  Bend the end joint of your finger, keeping the base and middle joints straight. Hold this position. Relax and then straighten the end joint. Hold this position. Repeat ____ times for ____ seconds.  ...

  18. Heterologous expression of the gourd E3 ubiquitin ligase gene LsRZF1 compromises the drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Hee; Ju, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Chung, Jung-Sung; Cho, Baik-Ho; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2014-04-01

    Protein ubiquitination is one of the major regulatory processes used by eukaryotic cells. The ubiquitin E3 ligase acts as a main determinant of substrate specificity. However, the precise roles of E3 ligase in plants to drought stress are poorly understood. In this study, a gourd family (Lagenaria siceraria) ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) gene, designated LsRZF1, was identified and characterized. LsRZF1 was reduced by abscisic acid (ABA), osmotic stress, and drought conditions. Compared to wild type, transgenic Arabidopsis plants ectopic expressing LsRZF1 were hypersensitive to ABA and osmotic stress during early seedling development, indicating that LsRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the LsRZF1 gene was very influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. Furthermore, ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and genetic data indicate that AtRZF1 and LsRZF1 function in similar pathway to control proline metabolism in Arabidopsis under drought condition. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase LsRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingjun; Zhou, Hong; Langdon, Wallace Y; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma proto-oncogene-b (Cbl-b), a RING finger E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, has been demonstrated to play a crucial role in establishing the threshold for T-cell activation and controlling peripheral T-cell tolerance via multiple mechanisms. Accumulating evidence suggests that Cbl-b also regulates innate immune responses and plays an important role in host defense to pathogens. Understanding the signaling pathways regulated by Cbl-b in innate and adaptive immune cells is therefore essential for efficient manipulation of Cbl-b in emerging immunotherapies for human disorders such as autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation, infections, and cancer. In this article, we review the latest developments in the molecular structural basis of Cbl-b function, the regulation of Cbl-b expression, the signaling mechanisms of Cbl-b in immune cells, as well as the biological function of Cbl-b in physiological and pathological immune responses in animal models and human diseases.

  20. Psh1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets the centromeric histone variant Cse4

    PubMed Central

    Hewawasam, Geetha; Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Mattingly, Mark; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Martin-Brown, Skylar; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Cse4 is a variant of histone H3 that is incorporated into a single nucleosome at each centromere in budding yeast. We have discovered an E3 ubiquitin ligase, called Psh1, which controls the cellular level of Cse4 via ubiquitylation and proteolysis. The activity of Psh1 is dependent on both its RING and Zinc finger domains. We demonstrate the specificity of the ubiquitylation activity of Psh1 toward Cse4 in vitro and map the sites of ubiquitylation. Mutation of key lysines prevents ubiquitylation of Cse4 by Psh1 in vitro and stabilizes Cse4 in vivo. While deletion of Psh1 stabilizes Cse4, elimination of the Cse4-specific chaperone Scm3 destabilizes Cse4 and the addition of Scm3 to the Psh1-Cse4 ubiquitylation reaction prevents Cse4 ubiquitylation, together suggesting Scm3 may protect Cse4 from ubiquitylation. Without Psh1, Cse4 overexpression is toxic and Cse4 is found at ectopic locations. Our results suggest Psh1 functions to prevent the mislocalization of Cse4. PMID:21070970

  1. Rines E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates MAO-A levels and emotional responses.

    PubMed

    Kabayama, Miyuki; Sakoori, Kazuto; Yamada, Kazuyuki; Ornthanalai, Veravej G; Ota, Maya; Morimura, Naoko; Katayama, Kei-ichi; Murphy, Niall P; Aruga, Jun

    2013-08-07

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), the catabolic enzyme of norepinephrine and serotonin, plays a critical role in emotional and social behavior. However, the control and impact of endogenous MAO-A levels in the brain remains unknown. Here we show that the RING finger-type E3 ubiquitin ligase Rines/RNF180 regulates brain MAO-A subset, monoamine levels, and emotional behavior. Rines interacted with MAO-A and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation. Rines knock-out mice displayed impaired stress responses, enhanced anxiety, and affiliative behavior. Norepinephrine and serotonin levels were altered in the locus ceruleus, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala in either stressed or resting conditions, and MAO-A enzymatic activity was enhanced in the locus ceruleus in Rines knock-out mice. Treatment of Rines knock-out mice with MAO inhibitors showed genotype-specific effects on some of the abnormal affective behaviors. These results indicated that the control of emotional behavior by Rines is partly due to the regulation of MAO-A levels. These findings verify that Rines is a critical regulator of the monoaminergic system and emotional behavior and identify a promising candidate drug target for treating diseases associated with emotion.

  2. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  3. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  4. Biomimetic finger extension mechanism for soft wearable hand rehabilitation devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Heo, Si-Hwan; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2017-07-01

    For the rehabilitation and assistance of the hand functions, wearable devices have been developed, and the interest in tendon driven mechanisms have especially increased since it allows light weight and compact design. The tendon driven hand rehabilitation devices provides grasping force via exo-tendons routed on the dorsal and palmar sides of the hand pulled by remotely located actuators. However, most of the devices were not able to provide natural joint extension sequence of the finger and showed hyperextension of finger joints because the tendons for extension were fixed at the fingertip, concentrating the torque at the distal interphalangeal joint. In this study, a ring-type biomimetic finger extension mechanism was developed, which mimics the origin, structure, and orientation of the extensor tendon. The biomimetic mechanism was evaluated by comparing the motion with voluntary finger extension and the motion made by other conventional tendon driven finger extension mechanisms. The biomimetic extension mechanism provided the same joint extension sequence with voluntary finger extension, and the fully extended posture was most close to the voluntary finger extension among the tendon-driven mechanisms used in the experiments. The joint angle differences between the proposed tendon mechanism and the voluntary finger extension was -1.2 °±3.4 °, -2.9°±2.0°, and -3.1°±8.0° for distal phalangeal, proximal phalangeal, and metacarpo-phalangeal joint, respectively.

  5. Finger and toenail onycholysis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, N; Escovar, S X; Zaiac, M N

    2015-05-01

    Onycholysis - the separation of the nail plate from the nail bed occurs in fingers and toenails. It is diagnosed by the whitish appearance of the separated nail plate from the nail bed. In fingers, the majority is caused by trauma, manicuring, occupational or self-induced behavior. The most common disease producing fingernail onycholysis is psoriasis and pustular psoriasis. Phototoxic dermatitis, due to drugs can also produce finger onycholysis. Once the separation occurs, the environmental flora sets up temporary colonization in the available space. Finger onycholysis is most common in women. Candida albicans is often recovered from the onycholytic space. Many reports, want to associate the yeast as cause and effect, but the data are lacking and the treatment of the candida does not improve finger onycholysis. A reasonable explanation for the frequent isolation of Candida and Pseudomonas in fingernail onycholysis in women, is the close proximity the fingers have to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract. Fifty per cent of humans harbour C. albicans in the GI tract and it is frequently carried to the vagina during hygienic practices. Finger onycholysis is best treated by drying the nail 'lytic' area with a hair blower, since all colonizing biota are moisture loving and perish in a dry environment. Toenail onycholysis has a very different etiology. It is mechanical, the result of pressure on the toes from the closed shoes, while walking, because of the ubiquitous uneven flat feet producing an asymmetric gait with more pressure on the foot with the flatter sole. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. E3 ubiquitin ligase RFWD2 controls lung branching through protein-level regulation of ETV transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Herriges, John C.; Zhang, Zhen; Young, Randee E.; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Sun, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian lung is an elaborate branching organ, and it forms following a highly stereotypical morphogenesis program. It is well established that precise control at the transcript level is a key genetic underpinning of lung branching. In comparison, little is known about how regulation at the protein level may play a role. Ring finger and WD domain 2 (RFWD2, also termed COP1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that modifies specific target proteins, priming their degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system. RFWD2 is known to function in the adult in pathogenic processes such as tumorigenesis. Here, we show that prenatal inactivation of Rfwd2 gene in the lung epithelium led to a striking halt in branching morphogenesis shortly after secondary branch formation. This defect is accompanied by distalization of the lung epithelium while growth and cellular differentiation still occurred. In the mutant lung, two E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors essential for normal lung branching, ETS translocation variant 4 (ETV4) and ETV5, were up-regulated at the protein level, but not at the transcript level. Introduction of Etv loss-of-function alleles into the Rfwd2 mutant background attenuated the branching phenotype, suggesting that RFWD2 functions, at least in part, through degrading ETV proteins. Because a number of E3 ligases are known to target factors important for lung development, our findings provide a preview of protein-level regulatory network essential for lung branching morphogenesis. PMID:27335464

  7. The role of E3 ubiquitin-ligases MuRF-1 and MAFbx in loss of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Rom, Oren; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2016-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the main regulatory mechanism of protein degradation in skeletal muscle. The ubiquitin-ligase enzymes (E3s) have a central role in determining the selectivity and specificity of the UPS. Since their identification in 2001, the muscle specific E3s, muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), have been shown to be implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle atrophy in various pathological and physiological conditions. This review aims to explore the involvement of MuRF-1 and MAFbx in catabolism of skeletal muscle during various pathologies, such as cancer cachexia, sarcopenia of aging, chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, the effects of various lifestyle and modifiable factors (e.g. nutrition, exercise, cigarette smoking, and alcohol) on MuRF-1 and MAFbx regulation will be discussed. Finally, evidence of potential strategies to protect against skeletal muscle wasting through inhibition of MuRF-1 and MAFbx expression will be explored.

  8. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ...

  9. Response to reflected-force feedback to fingers in teleoperations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, P. H.; Iatridis, J. C.; Thakor, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    Reflected-force feedback is an important aspect of teleoperations. The objective is to determine the ability of the human operator to respond to that force. Telerobotics operation is simulated by computer control of a motor-driven device with capabilities for programmable force feedback and force measurement. A computer-controlled motor drive is developed that provides forces against the fingers as well as (angular) position control. A load cell moves in a circular arc as it is pushed by a finger and measures reaction forces on the finger. The force exerted by the finger on the load cell and the angular position are digitized and recorded as a function of time by the computer. Flexure forces of the index, long and ring fingers of the human hand in opposition to the motor driven load cell are investigated. Results of the following experiments are presented: (1) Exertion of maximum finger force as a function of angle; (2) Exertion of target finger force against a computer controlled force; and (3) Test of the ability to move to a target force against a force that is a function of position. Averaged over ten individuals, the maximum force that could be exerted by the index or long finger is about 50 Newtons, while that of the ring finger is about 40 Newtons. From the tests of the ability of a subject to exert a target force, it was concluded that reflected-force feedback can be achieved with the direct kinesthetic perception of force without the use of tactile or visual clues.

  10. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  11. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  12. Radiographic assessment of the relative lengths of the bones of the fingers of the human hand.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R; Dunsmuir, R A

    2002-12-01

    The study assessed whether a relationship existed between the lengths of the phalanges of the fingers of the hand. The centres of rotation of the joints in each finger were determined by dissection of cadaveric hands. Using these data, the distances between the joint centres was determined on anteroposterior hand X-rays taken for clinical purposes. The study has shown that, for all the fingers, there is a ratio of 1 for the distance between the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint and the distance between the proximal interphalangeal joint and the finger tip. The ratio for the distances between the interphalangeal joints and the distal joint and the tip approximates to 1.3 for the index, middle and ring fingers and to 1.0 for the little finger. No evidence was found to support Littler's hypothesis that the interarticular distances of the finger follow the Fibonacci sequence.

  13. Pepper CaREL1, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, regulates drought tolerance via the ABA-signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Park, Chanmi; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Joo, Hyunhee; Hong, Eunji; Lee, Sung Chul

    2017-03-28

    Drought stress conditions in soil or air hinder plant growth and development. Here, we report that the hot pepper (C apsicum a nnuum) RING type E3 Ligase 1 gene (CaREL1) is essential to the drought stress response. CaREL1 encodes a cytoplasmic- and nuclear-localized protein with E3 ligase activity. CaREL1 expression was induced by abscisic acid (ABA) and drought. CaREL1 contains a C3H2C3-type RING finger motif, which functions in ubiquitination of the target protein. We used CaREL1-silenced pepper plants and CaREL1-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to evaluate the in vivo function of CaREL1 in response to drought stress and ABA treatment. CaREL1-silenced pepper plants displayed a drought-tolerant phenotype characterized by ABA hypersensitivity. In contrast, CaREL1-OX plants exhibited ABA hyposensitivity during the germination, seedling, and adult stages. In addition, plant growth was severely impaired under drought stress conditions, via a high level of transpirational water loss and decreased stomatal closure. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that ABA-related drought stress responsive genes were more weakly expressed in CaREL1-OX plants than in wild-type plants, indicating that CaREL1 functions in the drought stress response via the ABA-signalling pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that CaREL1 functions as a negative regulator of ABA-mediated drought stress tolerance.

  14. Finger Counting and (2D:4D) Digit Ratio in Spatial-Numerical Association.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Marco; Natale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    It is reported that a canonical and cultural finger counting habit influences the spatial-numerical association. The digit ratio (the ratio between the lengths of the index and ring fingers as a putative indicator of prenatal androgen exposure) also plays an effect on space-number representation, reflecting a stronger left-to-right number representation in people with a short index finger and longer ring finger (i.e., 2D:4D ratio). It is unknown whether the finger counting habit and digit ratio have an effect on spatial-numerical association independently from each other or whether they interact with each other. In Study 1, the digit ratio and finger counting mapping were recorded in right handers. The participants performed number-to-position, digit string bisection, and physical line bisection tasks. In the number-to-position task, a finger counting effect was found, as well as a significant interaction between factors. A digit ratio effect was observed in the digit string bisection task. In Study 2, digit ratio and finger counting mapping were recorded in right and left handers. The results showed that the finger counting habit influenced the spatial biases in both numerical tasks. A significant interaction between finger counting and digit ratio was found in both numerical tasks when only the left hand was considered. The results are discussed considering the embodied nature of the spatial-numerical association. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  16. Finger agnosia in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Shenal, Brian V; Jackson, Melissa D; Crucian, Gregory P; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn if a deficit of finger naming (finger agnosia or anomia) is a sensitive test for Alzheimer disease (AD) and the best means of testing for finger agnosia. The subjects were 38 patients with AD and 10 matched normal controls. All subjects were asked to name the thumb, index, and pinky fingers. No control subject had trouble naming any of these fingers, but 37% of the AD subjects did. When AD patients had difficulty with finger naming, they always had trouble naming the index finger. In the absence of stroke, the inability to name the index finger seems as an indicator of dementia. Although brief, this test is not extremely sensitive test for AD.

  17. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  18. Spiral viscous fingering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2006-11-01

    When a less-viscous fluid displaces a more-viscous fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell, viscous fingering pattern is believed to develop in a radial direction. We performed experiments on viscous fingering in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a polymer solution, a sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution is used as the more-viscous fluid and the trivalent iron (Fe^3+) solution is as the less-viscous fluid. The experiment was done by varying the concentration of Fe^3+, cFe3+. We have found that viscous fingering pattern develops spirally when cFe3+ is larger than a threshold value, while the pattern develops in a radial direction for small cFe3+. We confirmed from different experiments that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between SPA solution and Fe^3+ solution. The chemical reaction produces precipitation and significantly reduces the viscosity of the SPA solution. The quantity of the precipitation is increased with cFe3+. We will make a discussion on the relationship between the formation of spiral viscous fingering and the chemical reaction taking place between the two fluids.

  19. Finger Lakes LPG

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Finger Lakes LPG Storage, LLC; Two Brush Creek Blvd, Suite 200; Kansas City; Missouri 64112 (Applicant) has applied to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f et. seq (the Act), for

  20. Cullin RING Ligases: Glommed by Glomulin

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Stringer, Daniel K.; Weissman, Allan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cullin ring ligases (CRLs) constitute the largest group of RING finger ubiquitin ligases. Two recent studies in Molecular Cell describe glomulin as a CRL1 inhibitor that blocks interactions with its ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) (Duda et al., 2012; Tron et al., 2012). These findings and their significance are discussed. PMID:22883621

  1. A ring burn--electric or contact?

    PubMed

    Attalla, M F; el-Ekiabi, S; Al-Baker, A

    1990-02-01

    A circumferential band of deep burn affecting the ring finger sustained by a car electrician is presented. Although it was caused by short circuiting the car battery by a metal spanner and the ring he was wearing, the injury was purely a contact burn.

  2. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  3. Finger-specific loss of independent control of movements in musicians with focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Furuya, S; Altenmüller, E

    2013-09-05

    The loss of independent control of finger movements impairs the dexterous use of the hand. Focal hand dystonia is characterised by abnormal structural and functional changes at the cortical and subcortical regions responsible for individuated finger movements and by the loss of surround inhibition in the finger muscles. However, little is known about the pathophysiological impact of focal dystonia on the independent control of finger movements. Here we addressed this issue by asking pianists with and without focal dystonia to repetitively strike a piano key with one of the four fingers as fast as possible while the remaining digits kept the adjacent keys depressed. Using principal component analysis and cluster analysis to the derived keystroke data, we successfully classified pianists according to the presence or absence of dystonic symptoms with classification rates and cross-validation scores of approximately 90%. This confirmed the effects of focal dystonia on the individuated finger movements. Interestingly, the movement features that contributed to successful classification differed across fingers. Compared to healthy pianists, pianists with an affected index finger were characterised predominantly by stronger keystrokes, whereas pianists with affected middle or ring fingers exhibited abnormal temporal control of the keystrokes, such as slowness and rhythmic inconsistency. The selective alternation of the movement features indicates a finger-specific loss of the independent control of finger movements in focal dystonia of musicians.

  4. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result.

  5. Hemangioma of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Kodachi, K; Kojima, T; Shimbashi, T; Furusato, M

    1990-01-01

    Fingers often suffer trauma and the clinician is continuously faced with the difficult task of clarifying the distinction between a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion. This study was undertaken to examine ten cases in which a small skin mass located on a finger had been diagnosed preoperatively as hemangioma. Our results showed that seven masses were confirmed pathologically as hemangioma (five cavernous hemangiomas and two capillary hemangiomas), two as traumatic thrombosis and one varix. The clinical manifestations of the two cases of traumatic thrombosis were related to those of hemangioma. In the varix, endothelial proliferation was observed in the area of the thrombosis. This phenomenon is called "intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia", and can confuse the differential diagnosis between a vascular neoplasm and a traumatic thrombosis. Our findings demonstrate that since the traumatic lesions were firmer than the hemangiomas, hardness on physical examination may be a helpful indicator in the differential diagnosis of a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion.

  6. Lengths, girths, and diameters of children's fingers from 3 to 10 years of age.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Burkhart, K J; Rommens, P M; Prommersberger, K J; Konerding, M A

    2010-05-20

    We obtained data on the lengths, girths, and diameters of the fingers of children from 3 to 10 years of age. A total of 160 children (78 girls, 82 boys) were examined in a cross-sectional investigation. The length of each finger of the right hand of every child was measured, as were the girths of the proximal, middle, and distal phalanges, and of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joint. The average length of the thumb was 49 (35-65) mm. The index and ring fingers both averaged 69 (index, 50-88; ring, 42-96) mm in length, while the middle and little fingers averaged 72 (57-100) and 56 (40-74) mm, respectively. Average diameter, calculated from the girth measurement, was 16 (11-22) mm for the thumb, 15 mm for both the index (9-22) and middle (10-21) fingers, 14 (10-20) and 13 (8-19) mm for the ring and little fingers, respectively. The average length of each finger increased by 37% from 3 to 10 years of age, average girth by 24%, and diameter increased by 20%. We observed no differences in length, girth, and diameter between the sexes. The dimensions of children's fingers are relevant to injuries from automatic, power-operated window lifters of motor vehicles because risk of injury to a finger jammed between an ascending window and the seal entry depends upon the diameter of the finger. Additionally, short fingers of young children can be jammed over almost their entire length in the oblique design of a car window seal entry.

  7. DELLA Proteins and Their Interacting RING Finger Proteins Repress Gibberellin Responses by Binding to the Promoters of a Subset of Gibberellin-Responsive Genes in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongmoo; Nguyen, Khoa Thi; Park, Eunae; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Choi, Giltsu

    2013-01-01

    DELLA proteins, consisting of GA INSENSITIVE, REPRESSOR OF GA1-3, RGA-LIKE1 (RGL1), RGL2, and RGL3, are central repressors of gibberellin (GA) responses, but their molecular functions are not fully understood. We isolated four DELLA-interacting RING domain proteins, previously designated as BOTRYTIS SUSCEPTIBLE1 INTERACTOR (BOI), BOI-RELATED GENE1 (BRG1), BRG2, and BRG3 (collectively referred to as BOIs). Single mutants of each BOI gene failed to significantly alter GA responses, but the boi quadruple mutant (boiQ) showed a higher seed germination frequency in the presence of paclobutrazol, precocious juvenile-to-adult phase transition, and early flowering, all of which are consistent with enhanced GA signaling. By contrast, BOI overexpression lines displayed phenotypes consistent with reduced GA signaling. Analysis of a gai-1 boiQ pentuple mutant further indicated that the GAI protein requires BOIs to inhibit a subset of GA responses. At the molecular level, BOIs did not significantly alter the stability of a DELLA protein. Instead, BOI and DELLA proteins are targeted to the promoters of a subset of GA-responsive genes and repress their expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the DELLA and BOI proteins inhibit GA responses by interacting with each other, binding to the same promoters of GA-responsive genes, and repressing these genes. PMID:23482857

  8. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  9. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  10. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  11. RNF-121 is an endoplasmic reticulum-membrane E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the regulation of beta-integrin.

    PubMed

    Darom, Amir; Bening-Abu-Shach, Ulrike; Broday, Limor

    2010-06-01

    We report on the characterization of RNF-121, an evolutionarily conserved E3 ligase RING finger protein that is expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of various cells and tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. Inactivation of RNF-121 induced an elevation in BiP expression and increased the sensitivity of worms to ER stress. Genetic analysis placed RNF-121 downstream of the unfolded protein response (UPR) regulator protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK). We identify PAT-3::GFP, the beta subunit of the heterodimeric integrin receptors, as an RNF-121 substrate; whereas induction of RNF-121 expression reduced the level of PAT-3::GFP in the gonad distal tip cells, inhibition of RNF-121 led to the accumulation of stably bound PAT-3::GFP inclusions. Correspondingly, overexpression of RNF-121 during early stages of gonad development led to aberrations in germline development and gonad migration that overlap with those observed after PAT-3 inactivation. The formation of these gonad abnormalities required functional ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery. Our findings identify RNF-121 as an ER-anchored ubiquitin ligase that plays a specific role in the ERAD pathway by linking it to the regulation of the cell adhesion integrin receptors.

  12. Ubiquitylation of Rad51d Mediated by E3 Ligase Rnf138 Promotes the Homologous Recombination Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Deqiang; Liang, Junbo; Lu, Yalan; Xu, Longchang; Miao, Shiying; Lu, Lin-Yu; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation has an important role as a signal transducer that regulates protein function, subcellular localization, or stability during the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Ring domain E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF138 is recruited to DNA damage site quickly. And the recruitment is mediated through its Zinc finger domains. We further confirm that RNF138 is phosphorylated by ATM at Ser124. However, the phosphorylation was dispensable for recruitment to the DNA damage site. Our findings also indicate that RAD51 assembly at DSB sites following irradiation is dramatically affected in RNF138-deficient cells. Hence, RNF138 is likely involved in regulating homologous recombination repair pathway. Consistently, efficiency of homologous recombination decreased observably in RNF138-depleted cells. In addition, RNF138-deficient cell is hypersensitive to DNA damage insults, such as IR and MMS. And the comet assay confirmed that RNF138 directly participated in DNA damage repair. Moreover, we find that RAD51D directly interacted with RNF138. And the recruitment of RAD51D to DNA damage site is delayed and unstable in RNF138-depleted cells. Taken together, these results suggest that RNF138 promotes the homologous recombination repair pathway.

  13. E3 ubiquitin ligase Pirh2 enhances tumorigenic properties of human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Olga; Shuvalov, Oleg; Merkulov, Valeriy; Vasileva, Elena; Antonov, Alexey; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2016-01-01

    The product of RCHY1 human gene, Pirh2, is a RING-finger containing E3 ligase that modifies p53 with ubiquitin residues resulting in its subsequent degradation in proteasomes. Transcription of RCHY1 is regulated by p53 itself thus forming a negative regulatory feedback loop. Functionally, by eliminating p53, Pirh2 facilitates tumorigenesis. However, the role of Pirh2 in cancer cells lacking p53 is yet not well understood. Therefore, we decided to elucidate the role of Pirh2 in p53-negative human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells, H1299. We found that ectopic expression of Pirh2 enhanced cell proliferation, resistance to doxorubicin, and increased migration potential. Ablation of Pirh2 by specific shRNA reversed these phenotypes. Mechanistically, Pirh2 increased mRNA and protein levels of the c-Myc oncogene. The bioinformatics data indicate that co-expression of both c-Myc and Pirh2 strongly correlated with poor survival of lung cancer patients. Collectively, our results suggest that Pirh2 can be considered as a potential pharmacological target for developing anticancer therapies to treat p53-negative cancers. PMID:28191284

  14. Ubiquitylation of Rad51d Mediated by E3 Ligase Rnf138 Promotes the Homologous Recombination Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deqiang; Liang, Junbo; Lu, Yalan; Xu, Longchang; Miao, Shiying; Lu, Lin-Yu; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation has an important role as a signal transducer that regulates protein function, subcellular localization, or stability during the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Ring domain E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF138 is recruited to DNA damage site quickly. And the recruitment is mediated through its Zinc finger domains. We further confirm that RNF138 is phosphorylated by ATM at Ser124. However, the phosphorylation was dispensable for recruitment to the DNA damage site. Our findings also indicate that RAD51 assembly at DSB sites following irradiation is dramatically affected in RNF138-deficient cells. Hence, RNF138 is likely involved in regulating homologous recombination repair pathway. Consistently, efficiency of homologous recombination decreased observably in RNF138-depleted cells. In addition, RNF138-deficient cell is hypersensitive to DNA damage insults, such as IR and MMS. And the comet assay confirmed that RNF138 directly participated in DNA damage repair. Moreover, we find that RAD51D directly interacted with RNF138. And the recruitment of RAD51D to DNA damage site is delayed and unstable in RNF138-depleted cells. Taken together, these results suggest that RNF138 promotes the homologous recombination repair pathway. PMID:27195665

  15. Fibonacci-compliant finger design.

    PubMed

    El-Sheikh, Mogeeb A

    2016-11-11

    This work presents the mechanical design of 4 configurations of compliant fingers in order to address the need for commercially feasible prosthetic and robotic hands. The fingers consist of a single part and utilize a compliant mechanism to reduce the cost and control complexity. The geometric parameters of the compliant finger designs follow the Fibonacci series. The first and second compliant fingers have 2 joints and 2 degrees of freedom. The others have 3 joints and 3 degrees of freedom. The type of flexure hinges of the compliant finger are single and multiple nonsymmetrical circular hinges. The finite element method (FEM) was used to verify the range of motion of the joints in the compliant finger. In addition, the study defines the finger tip trajectory of these configurations. The multiple flexure hinges have minimum stress. This study presents affordable, single-element, compliant finger designs and their presumable hypothetical design variables are defined by the Fibonacci series. This method is faster and simpler than optimization. The study identifies the application of each finger design for either prosthetic or robotic purposes.

  16. Finger Injuries in Ball Sports.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Pham, Dang T; Staines, Kimberly Goldie

    2017-02-01

    Finger injuries are common in athletes playing in professional ball sports. Understanding the intricate anatomy of the digit is necessary to properly diagnose and manage finger injuries. Unrecognized or poorly managed finger injuries can lead to chronic deformities that can affect an athlete's performance. Multiple factors and treatment options should be considered to provide the best functional outcome and rapid return to play for an athlete. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play recommendations for common finger injuries in ball sports.

  17. The relationship of the number of Meissner's corpuscles to dermatoglyphic characters and finger size

    PubMed Central

    DILLON, YVONNE K.; HAYNES, JULIE; HENNEBERG, MACIEJ

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between the density of Meissner's corpuscles and the dermatoglyphic characteristics of human fingers. Dermatoglyphic prints and tissue samples were collected from the index (II) and ring (IV) fingers of 28 cadavers from the Medical School, University of Adelaide. Pattern types, pattern intensity, total ridge count and ridge breadth, were determined for each sample and the density of Meissner's corpuscles established by recording the mean number of Meissner's corpuscles underlying a 10 mm long line on the skin surface. No relationship was found between the density of Meissner's corpuscles and pattern type, pattern intensity or total ridge count. Negative correlations were found for the density of Meissner's corpuscles with both ridge width and size of fingers. Males were found to have significantly larger fingers, larger ridge breadth, and a lower density of Meissner's corpuscles per 10 mm compared with females. However, there was no difference between the total number of Meissner's corpuscles per finger in males and females. No significant differences were found in either the density of Meissner's corpuscles between antimeres or between the index and ring fingers. These results suggest that for both the left and right hand in males and females, there is a similar number of Meissner's corpuscles for both the index and ring fingers. PMID:11760888

  18. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with finger amputation using silicone material.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Amita; Goel, Hemant

    2015-08-01

    Finger and partial finger amputations are commonly due to traumatic injuries; digit loss may also be attributed to congenital malformations and disease. Finger prostheses are difficult to fabricate as they demand both aesthetic and function. When dealing with these types of prostheses, the only method of gaining successful retention is to sleeve the remnant stump with thin silicone. A 28-year-old man reported with a chief complaint of unaesthetic look due to amputated ring finger of left hand. In this case, the remnant stump was missing, the adjacent ring finger was splinted and an adhesive retained prosthesis instead of ring retained or glove-on prosthesis was planned. The retention was achieved by extending the prosthesis to palmar crease. This article describes the rehabilitation of a finger with prosthesis, which is simple to construct, aesthetic, retentive and easy to maintain. The prosthesis thus fabricated merged with the adjacent tissues providing desired aesthetics and psychological boost to the patient. Final prosthesis was found with adequate retention. The patient was satisfied with the aesthetic of the prosthesis. Because of the missing residual stump, functional limitations were also there. This clinical report describes a technological process of designing and manufacturing a silicone rubber prosthesis for a patient who has a finger loss caused due to trauma. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  19. Repair of webbed fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin grafts Stiffness of the fingers or toes Injuries to the blood vessels, tendons, or bones in the fingers Call your provider if you notice the following: Fever Fingers that tingle, are numb, or have a bluish ... fingers or toes to protect the repaired area from injury. Small children who had webbed finger repair may ...

  20. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  1. Differences in finger localisation performance of patients with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Kessels, Roy P C; de Haan, Edward H F; Kappelle, L Jaap; Leijten, Frans S; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2008-09-17

    Several neuropsychological studies have suggested parallel processing of somatosensory input when localising a tactile stimulus on one's own by pointing towards it (body schema) and when localising this touched location by pointing to it on a map of a hand (body image). Usually these reports describe patients with impaired detection, but intact sensorimotor localisation. This study examined three patients with a lesion of the angular gyrus with intact somatosensory processing, but with selectively disturbed finger identification (finger agnosia). These patients performed normally when pointing towards the touched finger on their own hand but failed to indicate this finger on a drawing of a hand or to name it. Similar defects in the perception of other body parts were not observed. The findings provide converging evidence for the dissociation between body image and body schema and, more importantly, reveal for the first time that this distinction is also present in higher-order cognitive processes selectively for the fingers.

  2. Finger Forecasting: A Pointer to Athletic Prowess in Women--A Preliminary Investigation by an Undergraduate Biology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latourelle, Sandra M.; Elwess, Nancy L.; Elwess, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    With all the technology today, the authors were surprised to read a recent British study that found a connection between the length of a woman's index (2D) and ring (4D) fingers to her athletic ability. Upon further investigation they found that many studies have examined the relationship between the length of the index finger (2D) to the ring…

  3. Finger Movements in Transcription Typing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-07

    learned motor movements.- DD , , 1473 00f n,.. ofo I. OV.o 95c ’ ~ 15 O,/BSOL."ETE, .[ -. 4 a/ 11L 1.5U NTARF~ SO. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ECRT AUSTRAC ...fingers. Sensory information and proprioceptive feedback from the mus- cles controlling the fingers could play a role . Neural impulses take about 70

  4. Skilled Finger Movements in Typing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Donald R.

    Six skilled typists were studied while they transcribed English text. The typists showed stable patterns of performance, but with significant individual differences among themselves. Inter-keypress latencies for two-finger digraphs (typed by two fingers on the same hand) were particularly variable among typists. Two typists showed large…

  5. Gert Finger Becomes Emeritus Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Lucuix, C.; Péron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Gert Finger has retired after almost 33 years service and he has been made the first Emeritus Physicist at ESO. An appreciation of some of his many achievements in the development of infrared instrumentation and detector controllers is given. A retirement party for Gert Finger was held in February 2016.

  6. Competition between anisotropic viscous fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecelerowicz, M.; Budek, A.; Szymczak, P.

    2014-09-01

    We consider viscous fingers created by injection of low viscosity fluid into the network of capillaries initially filled with a more viscous fluid (motor oil). Due to the anisotropy of the system and its geometry, such a setup promotes the formation of long-and-thin fingers which then grow and compete for the available flow, interacting through the pressure field. The interaction between the fingers is analyzed using the branched growth formalism of Halsey and Leibig (Phys. Rev. A 46, 7723, 1992) using a number of simple, analytically tractable models. It is shown that as soon as the fingers are allowed to capture the flow from one another, the fixed point appears in the phase space, corresponding to the asymptotic state in which the growth of one of the fingers in hindered by the other. The properties of phase space flows in such systems are shown to be remarkably insensitive to the details of the dynamics.

  7. Optimal three finger grasps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, J.; Lafferriere, G.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of optimal force distribution among three point fingers holding a planar object. A scheme that reduces the nonlinear optimization problem to an easily solved generalized eigenvalue problem is proposed. This scheme generalizes and simplifies results of Ji and Roth (1988). The generalizations include all possible geometric arrangements and extensions to three dimensions and to the case of variable coefficients of friction. For the two-dimensional case with constant coefficients of friction, it is proved that, except for some special cases, the optimal grasping forces (in the sense of minimizing the dependence on friction) are those for which the angles with the corresponding normals are all equal (in absolute value).

  8. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  9. Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps (UBAITs) identify E3 ligase binding partners.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Hazel F; Lyon, Nancy; Leung, Justin W; Agarwal, Poonam; Swaim, Caleb D; Miller, Kyle M; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new class of reagents for identifying substrates, adaptors, and regulators of HECT and RING E3s. UBAITs (Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps) are E3-ubiquitin fusion proteins and, in an E1- and E2-dependent manner, the C-terminal ubiquitin moiety forms an amide linkage to proteins that interact with the E3, enabling covalent co-purification of the E3 with partner proteins. We designed UBAITs for both HECT (Rsp5, Itch) and RING (Psh1, RNF126, RNF168) E3s. For HECT E3s, trapping of interacting proteins occurred in vitro either through an E3 thioester-linked lariat intermediate or through an E2 thioester intermediate, and both WT and active-site mutant UBAITs trapped known interacting proteins in yeast and human cells. Yeast Psh1 and human RNF126 and RNF168 UBAITs also trapped known interacting proteins when expressed in cells. Human RNF168 is a key mediator of ubiquitin signaling that promotes DNA double-strand break repair. Using the RNF168 UBAIT, we identify H2AZ--a histone protein involved in DNA repair--as a new target of this E3 ligase. These results demonstrate that UBAITs represent powerful tools for profiling a wide range of ubiquitin ligases.

  10. It takes two to tango: the structure and function of LIM, RING, PHD and MYND domains.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J M; Bhati, M; Lehtomaki, E; Mansfield, R E; Cubeddu, L; Mackay, J P

    2009-01-01

    LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3), RING (Really interesting new gene), PHD (Plant homology domain) and MYND (myeloid, Nervy, DEAF-1) domains are all zinc-binding domains that ligate two zinc ions. Unlike the better known classical zinc fingers, these domains do not bind DNA, but instead mediate interactions with other proteins. LIM-domain containing proteins have diverse functions as regulators of gene expression, cell adhesion and motility and signal transduction. RING finger proteins are generally associated with ubiquitination; the presence of such a domain is the defining feature of a class of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases. PHD proteins have been associated with SUMOylation but most recently have emerged as a chromatin recognition motif that reads the methylation state of histones. The function of the MYND domain is less clear, but MYND domains are also found in proteins that have ubiquitin ligase and/or histone methyltransferase activity. Here we review the structure-function relationships for these domains and discuss strategies to modulate their activity.

  11. E3 Financing How-to Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Financing How-to-Guide is intended to help manufacturers and their communities navigate financing and investment opportunities. While this guide provides an overview, there is no one-way to pay for E3 activities or attract investment.

  12. E3: Economy, Energy and Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    E3 is a technical assistance framework helping communities, manufacturers, and manufacturing supply chains adapt and thrive in today's green economy. Find information on pollution prevention, sustainable business practices, and energy efficiency.

  13. Sample Energy Bill for E3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    E3 – Economy, Energy, and Environment – is a coordinated federal and local technical assistance initiative that is helping manufacturers across the nation adapt and thrive in a new business era focused on sustainability.

  14. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  15. Rescue of vaccinia virus lacking the E3L gene by mutants of E3L.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H W; Uribe, L H; Jacobs, B L

    1995-01-01

    Vaccinia virus with the E3L gene deleted was able to replicate in RK-13 but not HeLa cells. This host range phenotype could be complemented by an E3L gene expressed transiently from a plasmid. Analysis of mutants of E3L indicates that the ability to complement deletion of E3L correlates with the ability of mutated proteins to bind double-stranded RNA but not with their ability to migrate to the nucleus. PMID:7666567

  16. Cullin E3 Ligases and Their Rewiring by Viral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal; Krogan, Nevan J.; Craik, Charles S.; Pick, Elah

    2014-01-01

    The ability of viruses to subvert host pathways is central in disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, a critical role for the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) in counteracting host immune factors during viral infection has emerged. This counteraction is commonly achieved by the expression of viral proteins capable of sequestering host ubiquitin E3 ligases and their regulators. In particular, many viruses hijack members of the Cullin-RING E3 Ligase (CRL) family. Viruses interact in many ways with CRLs in order to impact their ligase activity; one key recurring interaction involves re-directing CRL complexes to degrade host targets that are otherwise not degraded within host cells. Removal of host immune factors by this mechanism creates a more amenable cellular environment for viral propagation. To date, a small number of target host factors have been identified, many of which are degraded via a CRL-proteasome pathway. Substantial effort within the field is ongoing to uncover the identities of further host proteins targeted in this fashion and the underlying mechanisms driving their turnover by the UPS. Elucidation of these targets and mechanisms will provide appealing anti-viral therapeutic opportunities. This review is focused on the many methods used by viruses to perturb host CRLs, focusing on substrate sequestration and viral regulation of E3 activity. PMID:25314029

  17. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  18. [Multiple finger geodes in children].

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, J C; Oprisescu, B; Bresson, A; Ploier, R; Vidailhet, M

    1993-06-01

    Three pediatric patients with multiple geodes in the fingers are reported. This condition occurs mainly between one and three years and at seven years of age and is more common in winter. Affected fingers are swollen. Roentgenograms disclose several small lucent defects which are usually located in the middle phalanx. Several fingers are usually involved. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is increased in virtually every case. Resolution occurs spontaneously within a few weeks or months. There is no tendency towards recurrence. Although the condition is inflammatory, exposure to cold is probably a precipitating factor.

  19. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  20. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  1. Ring World

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-01

    Our robotic emissary, flying high above Saturn, captured this view of an alien copper-colored ring world. The overexposed planet has deliberately been removed to show the unlit rings alone, seen from an elevation of 60 degrees

  2. Neptune Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-29

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by NASA Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged.

  3. Ring Backdrop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-03

    Saturn moon Enceladus brightly reflects sunlight before a backdrop of the planet rings and the rings shadows cast onto the planet. NASA Cassini spacecraft captured this snapshot during its flyby of the moon on Nov. 30, 2010.

  4. Neural correlates of finger gnosis.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Tamè, Luigi; Furlan, Michele; Haggard, Patrick; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Adriani, Michela; Ferrari, Paolo; Braun, Christoph; Schwarzbach, Jens

    2014-07-02

    Neuropsychological studies have described patients with a selective impairment of finger identification in association with posterior parietal lesions. However, evidence of the role of these areas in finger gnosis from studies of the healthy human brain is still scarce. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the brain network engaged in a novel finger gnosis task, the intermanual in-between task (IIBT), in healthy participants. Several brain regions exhibited a stronger blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in IIBT than in a control task that did not explicitly rely on finger gnosis but used identical stimuli and motor responses as the IIBT. The IIBT involved stronger signal in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), bilateral precuneus (PCN), bilateral premotor cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. In all regions, stimulation of nonhomologous fingers of the two hands elicited higher BOLD signal than stimulation of homologous fingers. Only in the left anteromedial IPL (a-mIPL) and left PCN did signal strength decrease parametrically from nonhomology, through partial homology, to total homology with stimulation delivered synchronously to the two hands. With asynchronous stimulation, the signal was stronger in the left a-mIPL than in any other region, possibly indicating retention of task-relevant information. We suggest that the left PCN may contribute a supporting visuospatial representation via its functional connection to the right PCN. The a-mIPL may instead provide the core substrate of an explicit bilateral body structure representation for the fingers that when disrupted can produce the typical symptoms of finger agnosia.

  5. SAG/ROC-SCF beta-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes pro-caspase-3 degradation as a mechanism of apoptosis protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingjia; Gallegos, Jayme R; Gu, Qingyang; Huang, Yuanhui; Li, Jun; Jin, Yetao; Lu, Hua; Sun, Yi

    2006-12-01

    Skp1-cullin-F-box protein (SCF) is a multicomponent E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that ubiquitinates a number of important biologic molecules such as p27, beta-catenin, and IkappaB for proteasomal degradation, thus regulating cell proliferation and survival. One SCF component, SAG/ROC2/Rbx2/Hrt2, a RING finger protein, was first identified as a redox-inducible protein, which, when overexpressed, inhibited apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. We report here that sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), as well as its family member ROC1/Rbx1, bound to the proinactive form of caspase-3 (pro-caspase-3). Binding was likely mediated through F-box protein, beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP), which binds to the first 38 amino acids of pro-caspase-3. Importantly, beta-TrCP1 expression significantly shortened the protein half-life of pro-caspase-3, whereas expression of a dominant-negative beta-TrCP1 mutant with the F-box domain deleted extended it. An in vitro ubiquitination assay showed that SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) promoted ubiquitination of pro-caspase-3. Furthermore, endogenous levels of pro-caspase-3 were decreased by overexpression of SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) E3 Ub ligases, but increased on siRNA silencing of SAG, regulator of cullin-1 (ROC1), or beta-TrCPs, leading to increased apoptosis by etoposide and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand through increased activation of caspase-3. Thus, pro-caspase-3 appears to be a substrate of SAG/ROC-SCF(beta-TrCP) E3 Ub ligase, which protects cells from apoptosis through increased apoptosis threshold by reducing the basal level of pro-caspase-3.

  6. Muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases are involved in muscle atrophy of cancer cachexia: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Han, Jun; Meng, Qingyang; Xi, Qiulei; Zhuang, Qiulin; Jiang, Yi; Han, Yusong; Zhang, Bo; Fang, Jing; Wu, Guohao

    2015-05-01

    Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 and muscle ring-finger-1 (MuRF-1) have been identified as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle during muscle atrophy. However, the role of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases during the process of muscle atrophy of cancer cachexia remains largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 in the skeletal muscle of patients with malignant and benign disease. The possible mechanisms were studied both in a colon 26-induced cancer cachexia mouse model and in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced atrophy C2C12 cells. Our results demonstrated that atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 tended to be increased in the skeletal muscle of patients with malignant disease even before weight loss. Non-tumor body weights and gastrocnemius weights were significantly decreased while expression levels of ubiquitin proteasome pathway associated genes (atrogin-1, MuRF-1, ubiquitin and E2-14K) were upregulated in cancer cachexia mice. Significant myotube atrophy with atrogin-1 overexpression was observed in the C2C12 cells treated with TNF-α. Meanwhile, knockdown of atrogin-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) protected C2C12 cells from the adverse effect of TNF-α. In conclusion, muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases were upregulated during cancer cachexia, and atrogin-1 may be a potential molecular target for treating muscle atrophy induced by cancer cachexia.

  7. Multimodal biometric authentication based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Jun; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new multimodal biometric recognition based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry. This research shows three novelties compared to previous works. First, this is the first approach to combine the finger vein and finger geometry information at the same time. Second, the proposed method includes a new finger geometry recognition based on the sequential deviation values of finger thickness extracted from a single finger. Third, we integrate finger vein and finger geometry by a score-level fusion method based on a support vector machine. Results show that recognition accuracy is significantly enhanced using the proposed method.

  8. Losing dexterity: patterns of impaired coordination of finger movements in musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Tominaga, Kenta; Miyazaki, Fumio; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training can bring about highly-skilled action, but may also impair motor dexterity by producing involuntary movements and muscular cramping, as seen in focal dystonia (FD) and tremor. To elucidate the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms of FD, the present study addressed the organization of finger movements during piano performance in pianists suffering from the condition. Principal component (PC) analysis identified three patterns of fundamental joint coordination constituting finger movements in both patients and controls. The first two coordination patterns described less individuated movements between the “dystonic” finger and key-striking fingers for patients compared to controls. The third coordination pattern, representing the individuation of movements between the middle and ring fingers, was evident during a sequence of strikes with these fingers in controls, which was absent in the patients. Consequently, rhythmic variability of keystrokes was more pronounced during this sequence of strikes for the patients. A stepwise multiple-regression analysis further identified greater variability of keystrokes for individuals displaying less individuated movements between the affected and striking fingers. The findings suggest that FD alters dexterous joint coordination so as to lower independent control of finger movements, and thereby degrades fine motor control. PMID:26289433

  9. TRIM25 Enhances the Antiviral Action of Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein (ZAP)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Zerlina; Cheung, Pamela; Schneider, William M.; Bozzacco, Leonia; Buehler, Eugen; Takaoka, Akinori; Rice, Charles M.; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2017-01-01

    The host factor and interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) product, zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP), inhibits a number of diverse viruses by usurping and intersecting with multiple cellular pathways. To elucidate its antiviral mechanism, we perform a loss-of-function genome-wide RNAi screen to identify cellular cofactors required for ZAP antiviral activity against the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV). In order to exclude off-target effects, we carry out stringent confirmatory assays to verify the top hits. Important ZAP-liaising partners identified include proteins involved in membrane ion permeability, type I IFN signaling, and post-translational protein modification. The factor contributing most to the antiviral function of ZAP is TRIM25, an E3 ubiquitin and ISG15 ligase. We demonstrate here that TRIM25 interacts with ZAP through the SPRY domain, and TRIM25 mutants lacking the RING or coiled coil domain fail to stimulate ZAP’s antiviral activity, suggesting that both TRIM25 ligase activity and its ability to form oligomers are critical for its cofactor function. TRIM25 increases the modification of both the short and long ZAP isoforms by K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin, although ubiquitination of ZAP does not directly affect its antiviral activity. However, TRIM25 is critical for ZAP’s ability to inhibit translation of the incoming SINV genome. Taken together, these data uncover TRIM25 as a bona fide ZAP cofactor that leads to increased ZAP modification enhancing its translational inhibition activity. PMID:28060952

  10. Individual Finger Control of the Modular Prosthetic Limb using High-Density Electrocorticography in a Human Subject

    PubMed Central

    Fifer, Matthew S.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Katyal, Kapil D.; Para, Matthew P.; Armiger, Robert; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Wester, Brock A.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We used native sensorimotor representations of fingers in a brain-machine interface to achieve immediate online control of individual prosthetic fingers. Approach Using high gamma responses recorded with a high-density ECoG array, we rapidly mapped the functional anatomy of cued finger movements. We used these cortical maps to select ECoG electrodes for a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis classification scheme to predict: 1) if any finger was moving, and, if so, 2) which digit was moving. To account for sensory feedback, we also mapped the spatiotemporal activation elicited by vibrotactile stimulation. Finally, we used this prediction framework to provide immediate online control over individual fingers of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Modular Prosthetic Limb (MPL). Main Results The balanced classification accuracy for detection of movements during the online control session was 92% (chance: 50%). At the onset of movement, finger classification was 76% (chance: 20%), and 88% (chance: 25%) if the pinky and ring finger movements were coupled. Balanced accuracy of fully flexing the cued finger was 64%, and 77% had we combined pinky and ring commands. Offline decoding yielded a peak finger decoding accuracy of 96.5% (chance: 20%) when using an optimized selection of electrodes. Offline analysis demonstrated significant finger-specific activations throughout sensorimotor cortex. Activations either prior to movement onset or during sensory feedback led to discriminable finger control. Significance Our results demonstrate the ability of ECoG-based BMIs to leverage the native functional anatomy of sensorimotor cortical populations to immediately control individual finger movements in real time. PMID:26863276

  11. Individual finger control of a modular prosthetic limb using high-density electrocorticography in a human subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotson, Guy; McMullen, David P.; Fifer, Matthew S.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Katyal, Kapil D.; Para, Matthew P.; Armiger, Robert; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Wester, Brock A.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. We used native sensorimotor representations of fingers in a brain-machine interface (BMI) to achieve immediate online control of individual prosthetic fingers. Approach. Using high gamma responses recorded with a high-density electrocorticography (ECoG) array, we rapidly mapped the functional anatomy of cued finger movements. We used these cortical maps to select ECoG electrodes for a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis classification scheme to predict: (1) if any finger was moving, and, if so, (2) which digit was moving. To account for sensory feedback, we also mapped the spatiotemporal activation elicited by vibrotactile stimulation. Finally, we used this prediction framework to provide immediate online control over individual fingers of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory modular prosthetic limb. Main results. The balanced classification accuracy for detection of movements during the online control session was 92% (chance: 50%). At the onset of movement, finger classification was 76% (chance: 20%), and 88% (chance: 25%) if the pinky and ring finger movements were coupled. Balanced accuracy of fully flexing the cued finger was 64%, and 77% had we combined pinky and ring commands. Offline decoding yielded a peak finger decoding accuracy of 96.5% (chance: 20%) when using an optimized selection of electrodes. Offline analysis demonstrated significant finger-specific activations throughout sensorimotor cortex. Activations either prior to movement onset or during sensory feedback led to discriminable finger control. Significance. Our results demonstrate the ability of ECoG-based BMIs to leverage the native functional anatomy of sensorimotor cortical populations to immediately control individual finger movements in real time.

  12. Replantation (Finger, Hand, or Arm)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ...

  13. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 10- 7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close range and in real time in planetary rings.We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk) and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally confined arcs at Neptune, Saturn, and Jupiter. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.Planetary rings have shown themselves to be useful as detectors of planetary processes around them, including the planetary magnetic field and interplanetary impactors as well as the gravity of nearby perturbing moons. Experimental rings science has made great progress in recent decades, especially numerical simulations of self-gravity wakes and other processes but also laboratory investigations of coefficient of restitution and spectroscopic ground truth. The age of self-sustained ring systems is a matter of

  14. [2D:4D finger ratio and language development].

    PubMed

    Albores-Gallo, L; Fernández-Guasti, A; Hernández-Guzmán, L; List-Hilton, C

    A possible hormonal influence in language development has been suggested in the recent years. The 2D:4D finger ratio is an indirect measure for prenatal androgen exposure. It is negatively related to prenatal testosterone and positively related to prenatal estrogen, resulting in a lower ratio for men and a larger ratio for women. It can be explored in children as young as 2 years old. To study if an association exists between the 2D:4D finger ratio and language development (vocabulary) and/or language problems. The lengths of the second digit (index finger) (2D) and the fourth digit (ring finger) (4D) were measured in 97 preschoolers and the Language Development Survey was administered to the parents. A weak negative correlation between language development (vocabulary) and right 2D:4D ratio was found in both sexes for children aged 4 or less years, significant only in boys. A strong negative correlation between language articulation problems and right 2D:4D ratio in both sexes for children aged 3 or less years, and a lower negative correlation between articulation problems and right 2D:4D ratio were found for boys aged 4 or less years. Findings suggest an important role for testosterone in language development (vocabulary) and a possible influence on articulation problems, probably through higher testosterone levels.

  15. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  16. Translucent Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-08

    Although solid-looking in many images, Saturn's rings are actually translucent. In this picture, we can glimpse the shadow of the rings on the planet through (and below) the A and C rings themselves, towards the lower right hand corner. For centuries people have studied Saturn's rings, but questions about the structure and composition of the rings lingered. It was only in 1857 when the physicist James Clerk Maxwell demonstrated that the rings must be composed of many small particles and not solid rings around the planet, and not until the 1970s that spectroscopic evidence definitively showed that the rings are composed mostly of water ice. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 17 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 12, 2014 in near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.3 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 24 degrees. Image scale is 85 miles (136 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18295

  17. Review on mallet finger treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Fung, Boris; Ip, Wing Yuk

    2012-01-01

    Mallet finger is a common injury involving either an extensor tendon rupture at its insertion or an avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the terminal extensor tendon. It is usually caused by a forceful blow to the tip of the finger causing sudden flexion or a hyperextension injury. Fracture at the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanx is commonly associated with palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx. Most mallet finger injuries are recommended to be treated with immobilisation of the distal interphalangeal joint in extension by splints. There is no consensus on the type of splint and the duration of use. Most studies have shown comparable results with different splints. Surgical fixation is still indicated in certain conditions such as open injuries, avulsion fracture involving at least one third of the articular surface with or without palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx and also failed splinting treatment.

  18. Finger doses for staff handling radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Pant, Gauri S; Sharma, Sanjay K; Rath, Gaura K

    2006-09-01

    Radiation doses to the fingers of occupational workers handling 99mTc-labeled compounds and 131I for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The doses were measured at the base of the ring finger and the index finger of both hands in 2 groups of workers. Group 1 (7 workers) handled 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, and group 2 (6 workers) handled 131I for diagnosis and therapy. Radiation doses to the fingertips of 3 workers also were measured. Two were from group 1, and 1 was from group 2. The doses to the base of the fingers for the radiopharmacy staff and physicians from group 1 were observed to be 17+/-7.5 (mean+/-SD) and 13.4+/-6.5 microSv/GBq, respectively. Similarly, the dose to the base of the fingers for the 3 physicians in group 2 was estimated to be 82.0+/-13.8 microSv/GBq. Finger doses for the technologists in both groups could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 1 wk. The doses to the fingertips of the radiopharmacy worker and the physician in group 1 were 74.3+/-19.8 and 53.5+/-21.9 microSv/GBq, respectively. The dose to the fingertips of the physician in group 2 was 469.9+/-267 microSv/GBq. The radiation doses to the fingers of nuclear medicine staff at our center were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y), except for a physician who handled large quantities of 131I for treatment. Because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year, the doses to the base of the fingers or the fingertips should not exceed the prescribed annual limit of 500 mSv.

  19. Identification of a Protein Network Interacting with TdRF1, a Wheat RING Ubiquitin Ligase with a Protective Role against Cellular Dehydration1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Davide; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Lopez-Torrejon, Gema; Marzin, Stephan; Schweizer, Patrick; Stanca, Antonio Michele; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Cattivelli, Luigi; Mazzucotelli, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Plants exploit ubiquitination to modulate the proteome with the final aim to ensure environmental adaptation and developmental plasticity. Ubiquitination targets are specifically driven to degradation through the action of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Genetic analyses have indicated wide functions of ubiquitination in plant life; nevertheless, despite the large number of predicted E3s, only a few of them have been characterized so far, and only a few ubiquitination targets are known. In this work, we characterized durum wheat (Triticum durum) RING Finger1 (TdRF1) as a durum wheat nuclear ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, its barley (Hordeum vulgare) homolog was shown to protect cells from dehydration stress. A protein network interacting with TdRF1 has been defined. The transcription factor WHEAT BEL1-TYPE HOMEODOMAIN1 (WBLH1) was degraded in a TdRF1-dependent manner through the 26S proteasome in vivo, the mitogen-activated protein kinase TdWNK5 [for Triticum durum WITH NO LYSINE (K)5] was able to phosphorylate TdRF1 in vitro, and the RING-finger protein WHEAT VIVIPAROUS-INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (WVIP2) was shown to have a strong E3 ligase activity. The genes coding for the TdRF1 interactors were all responsive to cold and/or dehydration stress, and a negative regulative function in dehydration tolerance was observed for the barley homolog of WVIP2. A role in the control of plant development was previously known, or predictable based on homology, for wheat BEL1-type homeodomain1(WBLH1). Thus, TdRF1 E3 ligase might act regulating the response to abiotic stress and remodeling plant development in response to environmental constraints. PMID:22167118

  20. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  1. Chang'E-3 Science Exploration Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yongliao; Ouyang, Ziyuan

    Chang’e-3 mission is the second phase of China Lunar Exploration Program which its main science objectives is to map the landing site and the rover path, determine its surface chemical composition and study the regional geological and geochemical characteristics, map the earth’s plasmasphere and study Earth’s plasmasphere responses to solar activity and plasma behaviors in the magnetosphere, monitor the variable stars, bright active galactic nuclei ( AGN ) and survey the sky. Eight scientific payloads onboard the CE-3 probe has obtained lots of data, and this paper will introduce their exploration progresses and some new scientific results. Key words: Chang’e-3 Mission, Science Exploration Progress, Scientific Payloads

  2. Implant-retained finger prosthesis with modified retention system.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Amoroso, Andressa Paschoal; Gennari Filho, Humberto; Dekon, Stefan Fiuza de Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    Amputations affect both the physical and the psychological aspects of an individual, causing significant impact on self-esteem. The main causes of finger amputations are work-related accidents with dangerous machinery, road traffic accidents, and animal bites, as well as systemic diseases such as diabetes. This report aims to describe a simple technique for fabrication of implant-retained finger prosthesis with a modified base of the retention system. The O-Ring retention system was used with a modified hexagon-shaped base and a metallic capsule adapted to the acrylic resin to attach the prosthesis to the implant. The prosthesis was made with silicone, and after osseointegration, it was installed without complications, leading to a patient satisfied with the end result and encouraged to return to social life. Restoring self-esteem in the patient and static and functional rehabilitation.

  3. Widening Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-18

    Saturn rings and its moon Rhea are imaged before a crescent of the planet in this image captured by NASA Cassini spacecraft. The shadows of the rings continue to grow wider after their disappearing act during the planet August 2009 equinox.

  4. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  5. Ring Slicer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-06

    Saturn's moon Prometheus, seen here looking suspiciously blade-like, is captured near some of its sculpting in the F ring. Prometheus' (53 miles or 86 kilometers across) orbit sometimes takes it into the F ring. When it enters the ring, it leaves a gore where its gravitational influence clears out some of the smaller ring particles. Below Prometheus, the dark lanes interior to the F ring's bright core provide examples of previous ring-moon interactions. This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 7 degrees below the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 15, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 286,000 miles (461,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 115 degrees. Image scale is 1.7 miles (2.8 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18324

  6. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  7. Diverse functions of PHD fingers of the MLL/KMT2 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Hom, Robert A; Blakeslee, Weston; Ikenouye, Larissa; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2014-02-01

    Five members of the KMT2 family of lysine methyltransferases, originally named the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL1-5) proteins, regulate gene expression during embryogenesis and development. Each KMT2A-E contains a catalytic SET domain that methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and one or several PHD fingers. Over the past few years a growing number of studies have uncovered diverse biological roles of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, implicating them in binding to methylated histones and other nuclear proteins, and in mediating the E3 ligase activity and dimerization. Mutations in the PHD fingers or deletion of these modules are linked to human diseases including cancer and Kabuki syndrome. In this work, we summarize recently identified biological functions of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, discuss mechanisms of their action, and examine preference of these domains for histone and non-histone ligands.

  8. Green Tea Polyphenol Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Suppresses Toll-like Receptor 4 Expression via Up-regulation of E3 Ubiquitin-protein Ligase RNF216.

    PubMed

    Kumazoe, Motofumi; Nakamura, Yuki; Yamashita, Mai; Suzuki, Takashi; Takamatsu, Kanako; Huang, Yuhui; Bae, Jaehoon; Yamashita, Shuya; Murata, Motoki; Yamada, Shuhei; Shinoda, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Wataru; Toyoda, Yui; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2017-03-10

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an essential role in innate immunity through inflammatory cytokine induction. Recent studies demonstrated that the abnormal activation of TLR4 has a pivotal role in obesity-induced inflammation, which is associated with several diseases, including hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and cardiovascular disease. Here we demonstrate that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, a natural agonist of the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR), suppressed TLR4 expression through E3 ubiquitin-protein ring finger protein 216 (RNF216) up-regulation. Our data indicate cyclic GMP mediates 67LR agonist-dependent RNF216 up-regulation. Moreover, we show that the highly absorbent 67LR agonist (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-(3-O-methyl)-gallate (EGCG3″Me) significantly attenuated TLR4 expression in the adipose tissue. EGCG3″Me completely inhibited the high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS)-induced up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor α in adipose tissue and serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 increase. Furthermore, this agonist intake prevented HF/HS-induced hyperinsulinemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Taken together, 67LR presents an attractive target for the relief of obesity-induced inflammation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K; Ware, Carl F; Mace, Peter D; Riedl, Stefan J

    2016-01-28

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signalling and function. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate. The RING-between-RING (RBR) family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases. The RBR family includes Parkin and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall auto-inhibited forms are available, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely unknown. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of the fully active human HOIP RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of auto-inhibited RBRs. HOIP RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centres ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, three distinct helix-IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~ubiquitin conjugate and, surprisingly, an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases.

  10. 'Frozen finger' in anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Chintamani; Tandon, Megha; Khandelwal, Rohan

    2009-10-01

    Acute anal fissures are usually managed by various invasive and non-invasive modalities ranging from simple lifestyle changes to chemical and surgical sphincterotomies. Frozen finger, prepared using a water-filled ordinary rubber glove, was successfully used in one hundred patients, thus providing a cost-effective and simple solution to the problem.

  11. Differences in Activation Area Within Brodmann Area 2 Caused by Pressure Stimuli on Fingers and Joints

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Baek, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jung-Chul; Park, Sung-Jun; Jeong, Ul-Ho; Gim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sung-Phil; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, a constant pressure stimulus was applied on the 3 joints (first [p1], second [p2], and third [p3] joints) of 4 fingers (index, middle, ring, and little fingers), and the activation areas within Brodmann area 2 (BA 2) were compared for these different fingers and joints by using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight healthy male college students (25.4 ± 1.32 years) participated in the study. Each session was composed of 3 blocks, and each block was composed of a Control phase (30 seconds) and a Pressure phase (30 seconds). No pressure stimulus was applied in the Control phase, during which the subjects would simply lay comfortably with their eyes closed. In the Pressure phase, a pressure stimulus was applied onto one of the joints of the selected finger. For each finger and joint, BA 2 areas activated by the pressure stimulus were extracted by the region of interest method. There was a significant difference in the activation areas for the different fingers (P = .042) as well as for the different joints (P = .050). The activation area decreased in the order of the little, index, and middle fingers, as well as in the order of p1, p3, and p2. PMID:26402840

  12. OPTIMALITY VS. VARIABILITY: EFFECT OF FATIGUE IN MULTI-FINGER REDUNDANT TASKS

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaebum; Singh, Tarkeshwar; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    We used two methods to address two aspects of multi-finger synergies and their changes after fatigue of the index finger. Analytical inverse optimization (ANIO) was used to identify cost functions and corresponding spaces of optimal solutions over a broad range of task parameters. Analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to quantify co-variation of finger forces across repetitive trials that helped reduce variability of (stabilized) performance variables produced by all the fingers together. Subjects produced steady-state levels of total force and moment of force simultaneously as accurately as possible by pressing with the four fingers of the right hand. Both before- and during-fatigue, the subjects performed single trials for many force-moment combinations covering a broad range; the data were used for the ANIO analysis. Multiple trials were performed at two force-moment combinations; these data were used for analysis within the UCM hypothesis. Fatigue was induced by 1-min maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise by the index finger. Principal component (PC) analysis showed that the first two PCs explained over 90% of the total variance both before and during fatigue. Hence, it was concluded that experimental observations formed a plane in the four-dimensional finger force space both before and during fatigue conditions. Based on this conclusion, quadratic cost functions with linear terms were assumed. The dihedral angle between the plane of optimal solutions and the plane of experimental observations was very small (a few degrees); it increased during fatigue. There was an increase with fatigue of the coefficient at the quadratic term for the index finger force balanced by a drop in the coefficients for the ring and middle fingers. Within each finger pair (index-middle and ring-little), the contribution of the “central” fingers to moment production increased during fatigue. An index of antagonist moment production dropped with

  13. Optimality versus variability: effect of fatigue in multi-finger redundant tasks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaebum; Singh, Tarkeshwar; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    We used two methods to address two aspects of multi-finger synergies and their changes after fatigue of the index finger. Analytical inverse optimization (ANIO) was used to identify cost functions and corresponding spaces of optimal solutions over a broad range of task parameters. Analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to quantify co-variation of finger forces across repetitive trials that helped reduce variability of (stabilized) performance variables produced by all the fingers together. Subjects produced steady-state levels of total force and moment of force simultaneously as accurately as possible by pressing with the four fingers of the right hand. Both before and during fatigue, the subjects performed single trials for many force-moment combinations covering a broad range; the data were used for the ANIO analysis. Multiple trials were performed at two force-moment combinations; these data were used for analysis within the UCM hypothesis. Fatigue was induced by 1-min maximal voluntary contraction exercise by the index finger. Principal component (PC) analysis showed that the first two PCs explained over 90% of the total variance both before and during fatigue. Hence, experimental observations formed a plane in the four-dimensional finger force space both before and during fatigue conditions. Based on this finding, quadratic cost functions with linear terms were estimated from the experimental data. The dihedral angle between the plane of optimal solutions and the plane of experimental observations (D (ANGLE)) was very small (a few degrees); it increased during fatigue. There was an increase in fatigue of the coefficient at the quadratic term for the index finger force balanced by a drop in the coefficients for the ring and middle fingers. Within each finger pair (index-middle and ring-little), the contribution of the "central" fingers to moment production increased during fatigue. An index of antagonist moment production dropped

  14. E3 Success Story - E3 Southwest Virginia: Economy, Energy and the Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    E3 Southwest Virginia supports sustainable manufacturing in 17 counties in southwest Virginia. The MTC provides manufacturers with assessments of production processes to reduce their energy consumption and drive innovation.

  15. Finger posture modulates structural body representations

    PubMed Central

    Tamè, Luigi; Dransfield, Elanah; Quettier, Thomas; Longo, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lesions of the left posterior parietal cortex commonly fail in identifying their fingers, a condition known as finger agnosia, yet are relatively unimpaired in sensation and skilled action. Such dissociations have traditionally been interpreted as evidence that structural body representations (BSR), such as the body structural description, are distinct from sensorimotor representations, such as the body schema. We investigated whether performance on tasks commonly used to assess finger agnosia is modulated by changes in hand posture. We used the ‘in between’ test in which participants estimate the number of unstimulated fingers between two touched fingers or a localization task in which participants judge which two fingers were stimulated. Across blocks, the fingers were placed in three levels of splay. Judged finger numerosity was analysed, in Exp. 1 by direct report and in Exp. 2 as the actual number of fingers between the fingers named. In both experiments, judgments were greater when non-adjacent stimulated fingers were positioned far apart compared to when they were close together or touching, whereas judgements were unaltered when adjacent fingers were stimulated. This demonstrates that BSRs are not fixed, but are modulated by the real-time physical distances between body parts. PMID:28223685

  16. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section... Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural area...

  17. Downregulation of E3 ubiquitin ligases and mitophagy-related genes in skeletal muscle of physically inactive, frail older women: a cross-sectional comparison.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Micah J; Addison, Odessa; Brunker, Lucille; Hopkins, Paul N; McClain, Donald A; LaStayo, Paul C; Marcus, Robin L

    2014-08-01

    Reduced lean mass and physical function is a characteristic of frailty. However, it is currently unknown if proteolysis through the E3 ubiquitin ligases and the autophagic lysosomal pathway is dysregulated in inactive frail older women. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of key markers of ubiquitin-mediated and autophagic lysosomal proteolysis in inactive (N = 7) compared with active (N = 7) older women. Strength, mobility, leg lean mass, and physical activity assessment were used to characterize activity levels and frailty in older women. Vastus lateralis biopsies were collected after an overnight fast and were assessed for gene and protein targets related to E3 ubiquitin ligases and the autophagic lysosomal system. We found that AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (Thr172) was increased (p = .045), and forkhead box O3A (FOXO3A) gene expression (p = .047) was lower in inactive frail older women. Foxo3a (Ser253), Beclin1 (Ser93/96), and class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (VPS34) protein expression were not different between the groups (p > .05). Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated protein 4, muscle ring finger 1, muscle atrophy F-box, and the autophagy/mitophagy gene expression markers, Beclin1, autophagy-related-7, BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), dynamin-related protein 1, and Parkinson protein 2 (PARKIN) were lower in inactive frail older women (p < .05). Autophagy/mitophagy markers were positively correlated with the 6-minute walk and leg lean mass (p < .05). We conclude that physical inactivity in frail older women is associated with a downregulation of ubiquitin-mediated and autophagic lysosomal skeletal muscle gene expression, perhaps related to low muscle mass and poor physical function. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Dietary fish oil alleviates soleus atrophy during immobilization in association with Akt signaling to p70s6k and E3 ubiquitin ligases in rats.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Sung; Park, Mi-Na; Song, Wook; Lee, Yeon-Sook

    2010-06-01

    Reduced muscle activity leads to impaired insulin signaling, which leads to loss of contractile proteins and muscle mass via the Akt pathway. Dietary fish oil rich in long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been shown to prevent insulin signaling resistance in skeletal muscle. This study was conducted to elucidate the protective effect of dietary fish oil on disuse-induced perturbations in insulin signaling and soleus muscle atrophy. To accomplish this, rats were fed a corn-oil- (control) or fish-oil-based diet for 2 weeks, and then subjected to hindlimb immobilization while still receiving the same diets. After 10 days of immobilization, the soleus muscle mass and myosin heavy chain level had markedly decreased; however, these losses were significantly suppressed in rats fed dietary fish oil, compared with the control group. Dietary fish oil nearly completely attenuated the disturbances in activation of the Akt and p70 S6 kinase proteins, as well as the gene expression of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases (muscle atrophy F-box and muscle RING finger 1). However, insulin receptor substrate 1 associated with the p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase was not altered during immobilization. Dietary fish oil also inhibited alterations in the gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, with no additional observation of oxidative stress. Collectively, these findings indicate that dietary fish oil prior to and during immobilization may alleviate the immobilization-induced soleus muscle atrophy, at least in part, via the Akt pathway through E3 ubiquitin ligases and p70s6k.

  19. Iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy involves an Akt-forkhead box O3-E3 ubiquitin ligase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yasumasa; Imao, Mizuki; Satoh, Akiho; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Hamano, Hirofumi; Horinouchi, Yuya; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Licht; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting or sarcopenia is a critical health problem. Skeletal muscle atrophy is induced by an excess of iron, which is an essential trace metal for all living organisms. Excessive amounts of iron catalyze the formation of highly toxic hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction. However, the molecular mechanism of iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy has remained unclear. In this study, 8-weeks-old C57BL6/J mice were divided into 2 groups: vehicle-treated group and the iron-injected group (10 mg iron day(-1)mouse(-1)) during 2 weeks. Mice in the iron-injected group showed an increase in the iron content of the skeletal muscle and serum and ferritin levels in the muscle, along with reduced skeletal muscle mass. The skeletal muscle showed elevated mRNA expression of the muscle atrophy-related E3 ubiquitin ligases, atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1(MuRF1), on days 7 and 14 of iron treatment. Moreover, iron-treated mice showed reduced phosphorylation of Akt and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3a) in skeletal muscles. Inhibition of FOXO3a using siRNA in vitro in C2C12 myotube cells inhibited iron-induced upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and reversed the reduction in myotube diameters. Iron-load caused oxidative stress, and an oxidative stress inhibitor abrogated iron-induced muscle atrophy by reactivating the Akt-FOXO3a pathway. Iron-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is suggested to involve the E3 ubiquitin ligase mediated by the reduction of Akt-FOXO3a signaling by oxidative stress.

  20. Asymptomatic Papulo-nodules Localized to One Finger

    PubMed Central

    Rambhia, Kinjal D; Khopkar, Uday S

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous or deep granuloma annulare is a benign asymptomatic condition characterized by firm asymptomatic nodules in deep subcutaneous tissues that may be associated with intradermal lesions. A 53-year-old female presented with asymptomatic skin-colored, firm nodules over the right ring finger. Histopathology revealed a palisading granuloma with central degenerated collagen and mucin deposition in the dermis suggestive of granuloma annulare. Isolated and unilateral involvement of a single digit with clusters of nodules of subcutaneous granuloma annulare (GA) in an adult is rare and differentiation from its simulator rheumatoid nodule is essential. PMID:26538728

  1. Ring King

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    Saturn reigns supreme, encircled by its retinue of rings. Although all four giant planets have ring systems, Saturn's is by far the most massive and impressive. Scientists are trying to understand why by studying how the rings have formed and how they have evolved over time. Also seen in this image is Saturn's famous north polar vortex and hexagon. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 4, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 2 million miles (3 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 110 miles (180 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18278

  2. Viscous fingering of a draining suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Malambri, Frank; Lee, Sungyon

    2016-11-01

    The Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering arises when a viscous oil is withdrawn from a Hele-Shaw cell that is filled with a less viscous fluid. When particles are introduced into the draining fluid, new behaviors emerge, which are unobserved in the well-established pure oil case. We experimentally investigate the particle-modified inward fingering for varying particle concentrations. In particular, the fingering growth rate and number of fingers are experimentally quantified and are shown to be directly affected by the presence of particles. The physical mechanism of the particle-modified fingering is also discussed.

  3. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  4. Acrylic Finger Prosthesis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bandela, Vinod; M, Bharathi; S V, Giridhar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Hands basic function is to grasp, hold and manipulate items. Hand gesture is perhaps the most blatant example of non-verbal communication. Finger and partial finger amputations are most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. Common causes are traumatic injuries, congenital absence or malformations present great clinical challenges. In addition to immediate loss of grasp strength, finger absence may cause marked psychological trauma. Individuals who desire finger replacement usually have high expectation for the appearance of prosthesis. This clinical report portrays simple method to retain acrylic finger prosthesis. PMID:25302271

  5. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transient bone resorption following finger replantation: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Lucchina, Stefano; Becker, Hillary-A; Fusetti, Cesare; Shin, Alexander-Y

    2011-06-01

    Radiographic changes consisting of alterations in mineral content, osteopaenia or destructive neuropathy that occur following successful finger replantation have already been described. We report our experience about four fingers in three individuals in whom bone changes developed in the first three months postoperatively with complete "restitution ad integrum". Three patients, 21-49 years old (average 36 years) sustained a clean-cut amputation of four fingers. The first patient had an amputation at the base of the middle phalanx of the index finger and the second patient at the base of the proximal phalanx of the ring finger. The third had an amputation at the base of the first metacarpal bone and the proximal phalanx of the small finger in a five finger amputation. In the first case, two dorsal veins and two palmar digital arteries and nerves were repaired. In the second case, one palmar artery and one dorsal vein were reanastomosed. In the third case at the thumb, two dorsal veins and two palmar digital arteries and nerves were reconstructed. At the small finger, one dorsal vein, one palmar digital artery and two digital nerves were reconstructed. Bone fixation was achieved with two and three K-wires or tension-band wiring. Replantation was successful in all cases. Three weeks after replantation, the X-rays showed rapid development of osteopaenia in the juxtaarticular region and metaphyses of the bone. These changes were followed by subperiosteal, intracortical and endosteal bone resorption. No further surgical procedures or splintage were needed and hand therapy was not discontinued. At 10-13 weeks (average 12 weeks) postoperatively, the X-rays showed a complete recovery with new periosteal bone formation. We suggest that the radiographic changes after finger replantation are transient, first evident subperiosteally and progressing centrally. They may reflect small-vessel compromise and microinfarction and transient hyperemia secondary to neurovascular damage

  7. Impact of Finger Type in Fingerprint Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Bours, Patrick; Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph

    Nowadays fingerprint verification system is the most widespread and accepted biometric technology that explores various features of the human fingers for this purpose. In general, every normal person has 10 fingers with different size. Although it is claimed that recognition performance with little fingers can be less accurate compared to other finger types, to our best knowledge, this has not been investigated yet. This paper presents our study on the topic of influence of the finger type into fingerprint recognition performance. For analysis we employ two fingerprint verification software packages (one public and one commercial). We conduct test on GUC100 multi sensor fingerprint database which contains fingerprint images of all 10 fingers from 100 subjects. Our analysis indeed confirms that performance with small fingers is less accurate than performance with the others fingers of the hand. It also appears that best performance is being obtained with thumb or index fingers. For example, performance deterioration from the best finger (i.e. index or thumb) to the worst fingers (i.e. small ones) can be in the range of 184%-1352%.

  8. Multiple toe transplantations to reconstruct three amputated neighbouring distal fingers by heat press injury--a case report.

    PubMed

    Fumiaki, Shimizu; Wei, Fu-Chan; Sassu, Paolo; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Yu-Te

    2009-09-01

    Heat press injury to the finger results in severe damage. When it is difficult to recover the function in the damaged finger, amputation may be unavoidable. We present a case of three heat press-injured neighbouring fingers reconstructed by multiple toe transplantations. All transplanted toes survived successfully. Two-point discrimination was 9, 10 and 7 mm in the index, middle and ring finger, respectively. The overall motion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint was as follows: 30/130 degrees, 30/75 degrees and 30/105 degrees at the index, middle and ring finger. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint presented a claw deformity of 110 degrees, 65 degrees and 65 degrees. The ability to perform different kinds of pinches was judged fully satisfactory. We have found that toe transplantation is a good option for reconstruction of multiple amputated fingers by heat press injury. In our case, it was difficult to decide on the degree of debridement. Indeed, the reconstructed middle finger unfortunately developed secondary osteoarthritis as a result of the original heat press injury to the bone. Some may have preferred to sacrifice the joint, however, since the patient is young and highly motivated towards rehabilitation, we opted to preserve the PIP joint in the hope of providing superior function. Our principle is that great efforts should be afforded to preserve viable tissues during initial debridement if we plan to perform toe transplantation.

  9. Saturn Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-12

    Like Earth, Saturn has an invisible ring of energetic ions trapped in its magnetic field. This feature is known as a "ring current." This ring current has been imaged with a special camera on Cassini sensitive to energetic neutral atoms. This is a false color map of the intensity of the energetic neutral atoms emitted from the ring current through a processed called charged exchange. In this process a trapped energetic ion steals and electron from cold gas atoms and becomes neutral and escapes the magnetic field. The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument's ion and neutral camera records the intensity of the escaping particles, which provides a map of the ring current. In this image, the colors represent the intensity of the neutral emission, which is a reflection of the trapped ions. This "ring" is much farther from Saturn (roughly five times farther) than Saturn's famous icy rings. Red in the image represents the higher intensity of the particles, while blue is less intense. Saturn's ring current had not been mapped before on a global scale, only "snippets" or areas were mapped previously but not in this detail. This instrument allows scientists to produce movies (see PIA10083) that show how this ring changes over time. These movies reveal a dynamic system, which is usually not as uniform as depicted in this image. The ring current is doughnut shaped but in some instances it appears as if someone took a bite out of it. This image was obtained on March 19, 2007, at a latitude of about 54.5 degrees and radial distance 1.5 million kilometres (920,000 miles). Saturn is at the center, and the dotted circles represent the orbits of the moon's Rhea and Titan. The Z axis points parallel to Saturn's spin axis, the X axis points roughly sunward in the sun-spin axis plane, and the Y axis completes the system, pointing roughly toward dusk. The ion and neutral camera's field of view is marked by the white line and accounts for the cut-off of the image on the left. The

  10. Integration of tactile input across fingers in a patient with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Overvliet, Krista E; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Brenner, Eli; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2011-01-01

    Finger agnosia has been described as an inability to explicitly individuate between the fingers, which is possibly due to fused neural representations of these fingers. Hence, are patients with finger agnosia unable to keep tactile information perceived over several fingers separate? Here, we tested a finger agnosic patient (GO) on two tasks that measured the ability to keep tactile information simultaneously perceived by individual fingers separate. In experiment 1 GO performed a haptic search task, in which a target (the absence of a protruded line) needed to be identified among distracters (protruded lines). The lines were presented simultaneously to the fingertips of both hands. Similarly to the controls, her reaction time decreased when her fingers were aligned as compared to when her fingers were stretched and in an unaligned position. This suggests that she can keep tactile input from different fingers separate. In experiment two, GO was required to judge the position of a target tactile stimulus to the index finger, relatively to a reference tactile stimulus to the middle finger, both in fingers uncrossed and crossed position. GO was able to indicate the relative position of the target stimulus as well as healthy controls, which indicates that she was able to keep tactile information perceived by two neighbouring fingers separate. Interestingly, GO performed better as compared to the healthy controls in the finger crossed condition. Together, these results suggest the GO is able to implicitly distinguish between tactile information perceived by multiple fingers. We therefore conclude that finger agnosia is not caused by minor disruptions of low-level somatosensory processing. These findings further underpin the idea of a selective impaired higher order body representation restricted to the fingers as underlying cause of finger agnosia.

  11. An effective 3-fingered augmenting exoskeleton for the human hand.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, C J; Varone, B; Stella, M H; BuSha, B F

    2016-08-01

    Every year, thousands of Americans suffer from pathological and traumatic events that result in loss of dexterity and strength of the hand. Although many supportive devices have been designed to restore functional hand movement, most are very complex and expensive. The goal of this project was to design and implement a cost-effective, electrically powered exoskeleton for the human hand that could improve grasping strength. A 3-D printed thermoplastic exoskeleton that allowed independent and enhanced movement of the index, middle and ring fingers was constructed. In addition, a 3-D printed structure was designed to house three linear actuators, an Arduino-based control system, and a power supply. A single force sensing resistor was located on the lower inner-surface of the index fingertip which was used to proportionally activate the three motors, one motor per finger, as a function of finger force applied to the sensor. The device was tested on 4 normal human subjects. Results showed that the activation of the motor control system significantly reduced the muscle effort needed to maintain a sub-maximal grasp effort.

  12. Mining and characterization of ubiquitin E3 ligases expressed in the mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ubiquitin-mediated protein modification and degradation are believed to play important roles in mammalian spermatogenesis. The catalogues of ubiquitin activating enzymes, conjugating enzymes, and ligases (E3s) have been known for mammals such as mice and humans. However, a systematic characterization of E3s expressed during spermatogenesis has not been carried out. Results In present study, we set out to mine E3s from the mouse genome and to characterize their expression pattern, subcellular localization, and enzymatic activities based on microarray data and biochemical assays. We identified 398 putative E3s belonging to the RING, U-box, and HECT subfamilies and found that most genes were conserved between mice and humans. We discovered that 73 of them were highly or specifically expressed in the testes based on the microarray expression data. We selected 10 putative E3 genes to examine their mRNA expression pattern, and several genes to study their subcellular localization and E3 ligase activity. RT-PCR results showed that all the selected genes were predominately expressed in the testis. Some putative E3s were localized in the cytoplasm while others were in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Moreover, all the selected proteins were enzymatically active as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo assays. Conclusions We have identified a large number of putative E3s that are expressed during mouse spermatogenesis. Among these, a significant portion is highly or specifically expressed in the testis. Subcellular localization and enzymatic activity assays suggested that these E3s might execute diverse functions in mammalian spermatogenesis. Our results may serve as an initial guide to the field for further functional analysis. PMID:22992278

  13. Nanobody-targeted E3-ubiquitin ligase complex degrades nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ju Shin, Yeong; Kyun Park, Seung; Jung Jung, Yoo; Na Kim, Ye; Sung Kim, Ki; Kyu Park, Ok; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Ho Jeon, Sung; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.; Kee, Yun; Joon Hwang, Byung

    2015-01-01

    Targeted protein degradation is a powerful tool in determining the function of specific proteins or protein complexes. We fused nanobodies to SPOP, an adaptor protein of the Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, resulting in rapid ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of specific nuclear proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. This approach is easily modifiable, as substrate specificity is conferred by an antibody domain that can be adapted to target virtually any protein. PMID:26373678

  14. Molecular characterization and concerted evolution of two genes encoding RING-C2 type proteins in rice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Lim, Sung Don; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2012-08-15

    RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger proteins are believed to play a critical role in mediating the transfer of ubiquitin to heterogeneous substrate(s). While the two canonical types, RING-H2 and RING-HC, have been well-characterized, the molecular functions of the modified types, particularly the RING-C2 types, remain elusive. We isolated two rice genes harboring the RING-C2 domain on the distal parts of rice chromosomes 11 and 12, termed OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2, respectively. A comparison of sequence divergences between 10 duplicate pairs on the distal parts of rice chromosomes 11 and 12 and randomly selected duplicate pairs suggested that OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2 have evolved in concert via gene conversion. An in vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that both proteins possess E3 ligase activity, suggesting that the innate functions of these RING domains have not been affected by their modifications during evolution. Subcellular localizations were strikingly different; OsRINGC2-1 was found only in the cytoplasm with many punctate complexes, whereas OsRINGC2-2 was observed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. The expression patterns of both genes showed striking differences in response to salt stress, whereas plants heterogeneous for both genes mediated salt tolerance in Arabidopsis, supporting the notion of concerted evolution. These results shed light on the molecular functions of OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2 and provide insight into their molecular evolution.

  15. Viscous fingering in an elastic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, Andrew L.; Ducloué, Lucie; Juel, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the fingering instability of a flat, steadily propagating interface in a Hele-Shaw channel, where the top boundary has been replaced by an elastic membrane. In order to create a steadily propagating flat front, we exploit the reopening modes of fluid-filled elasto-rigid channels. The collapsed upper boundary reopens through the steady propagation of a wide finger, when air is injected from one end at a constant flow rate. For high levels of collapse and high finger speed, the tip of the finger becomes flat, creating a leading edge normal to the direction of propagation, which in turn is subject to a smaller scale viscous fingering instability. By modifying the cross-sectional geometry of the channel, we can actuate the finger shape to observe a variety of small-scale fingering phenomena including growth in a direction normal to the propagation and dendrite formation. The instability of the flat front exhibits constant-length fingers, very similar to the stubby fingers observed in radial compliant Hele-Shaw cells, and reminiscent of the printer's instability travel with the front. We investigate the geometry of those fingers in terms of the speed of the front, and the geometry of the reopening region. The financial support of the Leverhulme Trust is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. E3 Success Story - San Antonio E3 Case Study: UEMC “Now Hiring”

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    exas Manufacturing Assistance Center conducted an E3 assessment as part of the local Lean-Clean-Energy program in October of 2009. Overall, UEMC has reduced demand by approximately 30kw and reduced consumption by over 100,000 kwh/year.

  17. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  18. Two Distinct Types of E3 Ligases Work in Unison to Regulate Substrate Ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel C; Rhee, David Y; Duda, David M; Kelsall, Ian R; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Paulo, Joao A; de Jong, Annemieke; Ovaa, Huib; Alpi, Arno F; Harper, J Wade; Schulman, Brenda A

    2016-08-25

    Hundreds of human cullin-RING E3 ligases (CRLs) modify thousands of proteins with ubiquitin (UB) to achieve vast regulation. Current dogma posits that CRLs first catalyze UB transfer from an E2 to their client substrates and subsequent polyubiquitylation from various linkage-specific E2s. We report an alternative E3-E3 tagging cascade: many cellular NEDD8-modified CRLs associate with a mechanistically distinct thioester-forming RBR-type E3, ARIH1, and rely on ARIH1 to directly add the first UB and, in some cases, multiple additional individual monoubiquitin modifications onto CRL client substrates. Our data define ARIH1 as a component of the human CRL system, demonstrate that ARIH1 can efficiently and specifically mediate monoubiquitylation of several CRL substrates, and establish principles for how two distinctive E3s can reciprocally control each other for simultaneous and joint regulation of substrate ubiquitylation. These studies have broad implications for CRL-dependent proteostasis and mechanisms of E3-mediated UB ligation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  20. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pereyra, J Felipe; Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user.

  1. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  2. Finger lengths, 2D:4D ratios, and their relation to gender-related personality traits and the Big Five.

    PubMed

    Lippa, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Finger lengths and the ratio of index finger to ring finger length (2D:4D) may be markers of gonadal hormone exposure. The current study investigated possible associations between absolute finger lengths, 2D:4D ratios, and gender-related personality traits in over 2000 participants. Regression analyses showed no associations between men's 2D:4D ratios and gender-related personality traits and weak associations between women's 2D:4D ratios and gender-related occupational preferences. Men's absolute finger lengths were weakly associated with self-ascribed masculinity, and women's absolute finger lengths were weakly associated with masculine occupational preferences. Big Five personality traits were assessed in a subsample of over 1000 participants. Analyses showed a weak positive association between 2D:4D and extraversion and a weak negative association between 2D:4D and openness to experience. Absolute finger lengths showed a weak negative association with agreeableness and a tendency to be associated with women's but not men's openness. Overall, associations between finger-length measures and personality were weak and inconsistent.

  3. [Risk factors associated with trigger finger. Case-control study].

    PubMed

    De la Parra-Márquez, Miguel Leonardo; Tamez-Cavazos, Roberto; Zertuche-Cedillo, Luis; Martínez-Pérez, Juan José; Velasco-Rodríguez, Víctor; Cisneros-Pérez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We undertook this study to identify risk factors in our population associated with trigger finger. The study was conducted at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, UMAE 21, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. This was a case-control, retrospective, and observational study. There were 250 patients in each group. For cases, patients who were operated on for trigger finger from March 2006 to August 2006 were included. Controls included patients admitted to the Emergency Department with hand injuries that fulfilled the selection criteria. Risk factors analyzed were diabetes, hypertension, smoking, sex, age, weight, and 19 different occupations. Mean age of the cases was 52 years (SE +/- 14.19 years) with a median and mode of 53 years. The right hand was the most common with the middle, thumb, ring, index and little fingers, respectively. A significant statistical relationship was found: females (OR 7.57, 95% CI 5.07-11.31); diabetes (OR 3.72, 95% CI 2.43-5.70); obesity (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.19). With regard to occupation, a statistical relationship was found: homemaker (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.62-3.69); seamstress (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.3-21.6); and secretary (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.38-5.52). Trigger finger is a common pathology in our population and is more frequent in women >53 years old. It may be related to diabetes, body mass index (obesity) and certain occupations such as secretary, seamstress and homemaker.

  4. Composition, Roles, and Regulation of Cullin-Based Ubiquitin E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christina M.; Gray, William M.; Mooney, Sutton; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants depend on flexible regulatory systems that allow them to adequately regulate developmental and physiological processes in context with environmental cues. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which targets a great number of proteins for degradation, is cellular tool that provides the necessary flexibility to accomplish this task. Ubiquitin E3 ligases provide the needed specificity to the pathway by selectively binding to particular substrates and facilitating their ubiquitylation. The largest group of E3 ligases known in plants is represented by CULLIN-REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) E3 ligases (CRLs). In recent years, a great amount of knowledge has been generated to reveal the critical roles of these enzymes across all aspects of plant life. This review provides an overview of the different classes of CRLs in plants, their specific complex compositions, the variety of biological processes they control, and the regulatory steps that can affect their activities. PMID:25505853

  5. ZRF1 mediates remodeling of E3 ligases at DNA lesion sites during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Gracheva, Ekaterina; Chitale, Shalaka; Wilhelm, Thomas; Rapp, Alexander; Byrne, Jonathan; Stadler, Jens; Medina, Rebeca; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation elicits both the recruitment of DNA repair factors and the deposition of histone marks such as monoubiquitylation of histone H2A at lesion sites. Here, we report how a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex specific to DNA repair is remodeled at lesion sites in the global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2A-ubiquitin) is catalyzed predominantly by a novel E3 ligase complex consisting of DDB2, DDB1, CUL4B, and RING1B (UV–RING1B complex) that acts early during lesion recognition. The H2A-ubiquitin binding protein ZRF1 mediates remodeling of this E3 ligase complex directly at the DNA lesion site, causing the assembly of the UV–DDB–CUL4A E3 ligase complex (DDB1–DDB2–CUL4A-RBX1). ZRF1 is an essential factor in GG-NER, and its function at damaged chromatin sites is linked to damage recognition factor XPC. Overall, the results shed light on the interplay between epigenetic and DNA repair recognition factors at DNA lesion sites. PMID:27091446

  6. The Chang'e 3 Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlai; Liu, Jianjun; Ren, Xin; Zuo, Wei; Tan, Xu; Wen, Weibin; Li, Han; Mu, Lingli; Su, Yan; Zhang, Hongbo; Yan, Jun; Ouyang, Ziyuan

    2015-07-01

    The Chang'e 3 (CE-3) mission was implemented as the first lander/rover mission of the Chinese Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP). After its successful launch at 01:30 local time on December 2, 2013, CE-3 was inserted into an eccentric polar lunar orbit on December 6, and landed to the east of a 430 m crater in northwestern Mare Imbrium (19.51°W, 44.12°N) at 21:11 on December 14, 2013. The Yutu rover separated from the lander at 04:35, December 15, and traversed for a total of 0.114 km. Acquisition of science data began during the descent of the lander and will continue for 12 months during the nominal mission. The CE-3 lander and rover each carry four science instruments. Instruments on the lander are: Landing Camera (LCAM), Terrain Camera (TCAM), Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC), and Moon-based Ultraviolet Telescope (MUVT). The four instruments on the rover are: Panoramic Camera (PCAM), VIS-NIR Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), Active Particle induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), and Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR). The science objectives of the CE-3 mission include: (1) investigation of the morphological features and geological structures of and near the landing area; (2) integrated in-situ analysis of mineral and chemical composition of and near the landing area; and (3) exploration of the terrestrial-lunar space environment and lunar-based astronomical observations. This paper describes the CE-3 objectives and measurements that address the science objectives outlined by the Comprehensive Demonstration Report of Phase II of CLEP. The CE-3 team has archived the initial science data, and we describe data accessibility by the science community.

  7. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  8. Finger-Jointed Wood Products.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    long enough to be useful (14, 36, 38, 59, 124). Nonstructural finger joints are primarily found in molding stock, trim, siding, fascia boards, door...all beams but two in series 7 and 8 to the grain. The average modulus of be slightly higher than that for apparently was related to the joints, rupture ...inch, and a tip thickness of combinations laminated by the plant . (a)A bolt hole on tensile strength 0.031 inch. The other was classified Straight-bevel

  9. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  10. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  11. Pediatric finger fractures: which ones turn ugly?

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Roger

    2012-06-01

    The majority of pediatric finger fractures can be treated by closed means with expected excellent outcomes. However, a subset of fractures can turn "ugly," with complications such as growth arrest, malunion, and joint dysfunction if not recognized and treated appropriately. The present paper discusses several fractures in a child's fingers that can cause substantial problems if not recognized promptly, highlighting important themes in the evaluation and treatment of a child's injured finger.

  12. Comprehensive database of human E3 ubiquitin ligases: application to aquaporin-2 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Medvar, Barbara; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Pisitkun, Trairak; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is regulated in part via vasopressin-mediated changes in protein half-life that are in turn dependent on AQP2 ubiquitination. Here we addressed the question, “What E3 ubiquitin ligase is most likely to be responsible for AQP2 ubiquitination?” using large-scale data integration based on Bayes' rule. The first step was to bioinformatically identify all E3 ligase genes coded by the human genome. The 377 E3 ubiquitin ligases identified in the human genome, consisting predominant of HECT, RING, and U-box proteins, have been used to create a publically accessible and downloadable online database (https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/E3-ligases/). We also curated a second database of E3 ligase accessory proteins that included BTB domain proteins, cullins, SOCS-box proteins, and F-box proteins. Using Bayes' theorem to integrate information from multiple large-scale proteomic and transcriptomic datasets, we ranked these 377 E3 ligases with respect to their probability of interaction with AQP2. Application of Bayes' rule identified the E3 ligases most likely to interact with AQP2 as (in order of probability): NEDD4 and NEDD4L (tied for first), AMFR, STUB1, ITCH, ZFPL1. Significantly, the two E3 ligases tied for top rank have also been studied extensively in the reductionist literature as regulatory proteins in renal tubule epithelia. The concordance of conclusions from reductionist and systems-level data provides strong motivation for further studies of the roles of NEDD4 and NEDD4L in the regulation of AQP2 protein turnover. PMID:27199454

  13. Anti-Ro52 Autoantibodies from Patients with Sjögren's Syndrome Inhibit the Ro52 E3 Ligase Activity by Blocking the E3/E2 Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Alexander; Hennig, Janosch; Ambrosi, Aurélie; Anandapadmanaban, Madhanagopal; Abelius, Martina Sandberg; Sheng, Yi; Nyberg, Filippa; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Ro52 (TRIM21) is an E3 ligase of the tripartite motif family that negatively regulates proinflammatory cytokine production by ubiquitinating transcription factors of the interferon regulatory factor family. Autoantibodies to Ro52 are present in patients with lupus and Sjögren's syndrome, but it is not known if these autoantibodies affect the function of Ro52. To address this question, the requirements for Ro52 E3 ligase activity were first analyzed in detail. Scanning a panel of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, we found that UBE2D1–4 and UBE2E1–2 supported the E3 ligase activity of Ro52 and that the E3 ligase activity of Ro52 was dependent on its RING domain. We also found that the N-terminal extensions in the class III E2 enzymes affected their interaction with Ro52. Although the N-terminal extension in UBE2E3 made this E2 enzyme unable to function together with Ro52, the N-terminal extensions in UBE2E1 and UBE2E2 allowed for a functional interaction with Ro52. Anti-Ro52-positive patient sera and affinity-purified anti-RING domain autoantibodies inhibited the E3 activity of Ro52 in ubiquitination assays. Using NMR, limited proteolysis, ELISA, and Ro52 mutants, we mapped the interactions between Ro52, UBE2E1, and anti-Ro52 autoantibodies. We found that anti-Ro52 autoantibodies inhibited the E3 ligase activity of Ro52 by sterically blocking the E2/E3 interaction between Ro52 and UBE2E1. Our data suggest that anti-Ro52 autoantibodies binding the RING domain of Ro52 may be actively involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatic autoimmune disease by inhibiting Ro52-mediated ubiquitination. PMID:21862588

  14. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C.; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K.; Ware, Carl F.; Mace, Peter D.; Riedl, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signaling and function1. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate2,3. The RBR family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases4–6. The RBR family includes Parkin4 and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC)7. While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall autoinhibited forms are available8–13, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely enigmatic. Here we present the first structure of the fully active HOIP-RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP-RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of autoinhibited RBRs. HOIP-RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centers ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, surprisingly, three distinct helix–IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~Ub conjugate as well as an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP-RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  15. 2D:4D finger length ratio and skeletal biomarker of biological aging.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid; Batsevich, Valery; Kobyliansky, Eugene

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this population-based study was to evaluate the association between the index to ring (2D:4D) finger length ratio and the osseographic score (OSS), the skeletal biomarker of biological aging. A sample included 802 males and 738 females who had participated in a Chuvashian skeletal aging study. Age, sex, basic demographics, anthropometric data and X-rays of both hands were collected. Each hand was visually classified on X-ray as either Type 1 - index finger was longer than ring finger; Type 2 - equal; or Type 3 - shorter than the ring finger. OSS is a skeletal biomarker that comprises osteoporotic and osteoarthritic changes observable on a hands X-ray. The mean age of males in the studies sample was 46.98 ± 17.10 and mean age females was 48.65 ± 16.62. OSS showed significant association with age (r = 0.886, p < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) (r-0.253, p < 0.001) and sex (F = 13.771, p < 0.001). Results of one-way ANCOVA for finger length ratio types of right hand showed a significant difference in OSS (d.f. = 2, F = 7.569, p = 0.001), after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI. The posthoc comparison showed that individuals with Type 3 (2D < 4D) ratio showed significantly higher OSS scores that ones with Type 1 (p = 0.012) and Type 2 (p = 0.003). In an analysis of finger length ratio types of left hand also a significant difference in OSS was found (d.f. = 2, F = 3.290, p = 0.038). The posthoc comparison showed that individuals with Type 3 (2D < 4D) ratio showed significantly higher OSS scores that ones with Type 2 (p = 0.33) ratio. Finger length ratio is associated with an OSS, a skeletal biomarker of biological aging. Individuals with Type 3 finger length pattern showed significantly higher OSS that ones with Type 1 and Type 2.

  16. Error compensation during finger force production after oneand four-finger voluntarily fatiguing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Eric S.; Hoopes, Josh A.; Cordial, Rory J.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The effect of muscle fatigue on error compensation strategies during multi-finger ramp force production tasks was investigated. Thirteen young, healthy subjects were instructed to produce a total force with four fingers of the right hand to accurately match a visually displayed template. The template consisted of a 3-s waiting period, a 3-s ramp force production (from 0 to 30% maximal voluntary contraction, MVC), and a 3-s constant force production. A series of twelve ramp trials was performed before and after fatigue. Fatigue was induced by a 60-s maximal isometric force production with either the index finger only or with all four fingers during two separate testing sessions. The average percent of drop was 38.2% in the MVC of the index finger after index-finger fatiguing exercise and 38.3% in the MVC of all fingers after four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ability of individual fingers to compensate for each other's errors in order for the total force to match the preset template was quantified as the error compensation index (ECI), i.e. the ratio of the sum of variances of individual finger forces and the variance of the total force. By comparing pre- and post-fatigue performance during four-finger ramp force production, we observed that the variance of the total force was not significantly changed after one- or four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ECI significantly decreased after four-finger fatiguing exercise, especially during the last second of the ramp; while the ECI remained unchanged after index finger single-finger fatiguing exercise. These results suggest that the central nervous system is able to utilize the abundant degrees of freedom to compensate for partial impairment of the motor apparatus induced by muscle fatigue to maintain the desired performance. However, this ability is significantly decreased when all elements of the motor apparatus are impaired. PMID:17443316

  17. Ubiquitin Drug Discovery and Diagnostics Conference - targeting E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jennifer A

    2010-10-01

    The Ubiquitin Drug Discovery and Diagnostics Conference, held in Philadelphia, included topics covering the role of E3 ligases in disease. This conference report highlights selected presentations on E3-E2 ligase interactions, the SCF cyclin F ubiquitin ligase complex, and targeting HectH9 and KF-1 E3 ligases. Pharmaceutical research discussed includes E3 programs from Progenra and efforts to modulate the Parkin ligase at Elan Pharmaceuticals.

  18. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  19. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  20. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  1. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  2. 42 CFR 52e.3 - Who is eligible to apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who is eligible to apply? 52e.3 Section 52e.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.3 Who is eligible to apply? To...

  3. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  4. Correcting Finger Counting to Snellen Acuity.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, Rustum; Hwang, Tiffany Jean; Chen, Alexander Francis; Pouw, Andrew; Tian, Jack J; Chu, Edward R; Wang, Michelle Y; Tran, Jeffrey Show; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an online tool with which to convert and thus quantify count finger measurements of visual acuity into Snellen equivalents. It is hoped that this tool allows for the re-interpretation of retrospectively collected data that provide visual acuity in terms of qualitative count finger measurements.

  5. Correcting Finger Counting to Snellen Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Karanjia, Rustum; Hwang, Tiffany Jean; Chen, Alexander Francis; Pouw, Andrew; Tian, Jack J.; Chu, Edward R.; Wang, Michelle Y.; Tran, Jeffrey Show; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this paper, the authors describe an online tool with which to convert and thus quantify count finger measurements of visual acuity into Snellen equivalents. It is hoped that this tool allows for the re-interpretation of retrospectively collected data that provide visual acuity in terms of qualitative count finger measurements. PMID:27928408

  6. Finger Mathematics: A Method for All Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Chavez, Maria

    The instruction of finger counting and finger calculation, also known as Chisanbop, is promoted as a natural method of introducing and teaching the basic processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to children, particularly to those who are mentally and physically handicapped. The sequential process for teaching finger…

  7. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  8. Vortex Ring Interaction with a Heated Screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason; Krueger, Paul S.

    2008-11-01

    Previous examinations of vortex rings impinging on porous screens has shown the reformation of the vortex ring with a lower velocity after passing through the screen, the creation of secondary vortices, and mixing. A heated screen could, in principle, alter the vortex-screen interaction by changing the local liquid viscosity and density. In the present investigation, a mechanical piston-cylinder vortex ring generator was used to create vortex rings in an aqueous sucrose solution. The rings impinged on a screen of horizontal wires that were heated using electrical current. The flow was visualized with food color and video imaging. Tests with and without heat were conducted at a piston stroke-to-jet diameter ratio of 4 and a jet Reynolds number (Re) of 1000. The vortex rings slowed after passing through the screen, but in tests with heat, they maintained a higher fraction of their before-screen velocity due to reduction in fluid viscosity near the wires. In addition, small ``fingers'' that developed on the front of the vortex rings as they passed through the screen exhibited positive buoyancy effects in the heated case.

  9. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  10. Laplacian trees - fingered growth in channel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.; Gubiec, T.

    2009-04-01

    A variety of natural growth processes, including viscous fingering, electrodeposition, or solidification can be modeled in terms of Laplacian growth. Laplacian growth patterns are formed when the boundary of a domain moves with a velocity proportional to the gradient of a field Ψ, which satisfies the Laplace equation, ‡2Ψ = 0, outside the domain. A simple model of Laplacian growth is considered, in which the growth takes place only at the tips of long, thin fingers [1]. The evolution of the fingers is studied by conformal mapping techniques. Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for different domains and boundary conditions. In particular, a screening process is analyzed, when longer fingers suppress growth of the shorter ones. Possible geophysical applications of the model are discussed, including formation and evolution of the channels in a dissolving rock fracture. [1] T. Gubiec, P. Szymczak, Fingered growth in channel geometry: A Loewner equation approach , Phys. Rev. E, 77 , 041602, 2008

  11. Elastic fingering patterns in confined lifting flows.

    PubMed

    Fontana, João V; Miranda, José A

    2016-09-01

    The elastic fingering phenomenon occurs when two confined fluids are brought into contact, and due to a chemical reaction, the interface separating them becomes elastic. We study elastic fingering pattern formation in Newtonian fluids flowing in a lifting (time-dependent gap) Hele-Shaw cell. Using a mode-coupling approach, nonlinear effects induced by the interplay between viscous and elastic forces are investigated and the weakly nonlinear behavior of the fluid-fluid interfacial patterns is analyzed. Our results indicate that the existence of the elastic interface allows the development of unexpected morphological behaviors in such Newtonian fluid flow systems. More specifically, we show that depending on the values of the governing physical parameters, the observed elastic fingering structures are characterized by the occurrence of either finger tip splitting or side branching. The impact of the elastic interface on finger-competition events is also discussed.

  12. Fingering in Stochastic Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Aristotelous, Andreas C.; Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread use of hybrid-discrete cellular automata in modeling cancer, two simple growth models are studied on the two dimensional lattice that incorporate a nutrient, assumed to be oxygen. In the first model the oxygen concentration u(x, t) is computed based on the geometry of the growing blob, while in the second one u(x, t) satisfies a reaction-diffusion equation. A threshold θ value exists such that cells give birth at rate β(u(x, t) − θ)+ and die at rate δ(θ − u(x, t)+. In the first model, a phase transition was found between growth as a solid blob and “fingering” at a threshold θc = 0.5, while in the second case fingering always occurs, i.e., θc = 0. PMID:26430353

  13. Elastic Suppression of Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gunnar; Lister, John

    2016-11-01

    Consider peeling an elastic tape or beam away from a rigid base to which it is stuck by a film of viscous liquid. The peeling motion requires air to invade the viscous liquid and is thus susceptible to the Saffman-Taylor fingering instability. We analyse the fundamental travelling-wave solution and show that the advancing air-liquid interface remains linearly stable at higher capillary numbers than in a standard Hele-Shaw cell. A short-wavelength expansion yields an analytical expression for the growth rate which is valid for all unstable modes throughout the parameter space, allowing us to identify and quantify four distinct physical mechanisms that each help suppress the instability. Applying our method to the experiments by Pihler-Puzovic et al. (2012) reveals that the radial geometry and time-variation stabilize the system further.

  14. Fingering instability of Bingham fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Shilpa; Myers, Tim

    2005-11-01

    Contact line instabilities have been extensively studied and many useful results obtained for industrial applications. Our research in this area is to explore these instabilities for non-Newtonian fluids which has wide scope in geological, biological as well as industrial areas. In this talk, we will present an analysis of fingering instability near a contact line of the thin sheet of fluid flowing down on a moderately inclined plane. This instability has been well studied for Newtonian fluids. We explore the effect of a yield strength of the fluid on this instability. We have conveniently assumed the presence of the precussor film of small thickness ahead of the fluid film to avoid some mathematical singularities. Using a lubrication-type approximation, we perform a linear stability analysis of a straight contact line. We will show comparison with some experimental results using suspensions of kaolin in silicone oil as a yield strength fluid.

  15. Finger tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lakie, M; Mutch, W J

    1989-03-01

    Finger tremor was investigated in 20 patients (age range 54-88 yr) diagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease and six controls of a similar age and no known neurological abnormality. In nine of the patients tremor was not clinically obvious. When the tremor of these patients was recorded immediately after voluntary movement and subjected to instrumental analysis there were consistently observable differences from the controls. Such analysis may have diagnostic potential when there is clinical uncertainty. Surface EMG recordings were obtained from four patients. One patient had a large resting tremor with obvious reciprocating activity in flexors and extensors; in the others who had no symptomatic tremor there was reciprocating activity only after movement, and this died away in a few seconds as the induced tremor disappeared.

  16. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1

    PubMed Central

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Müller, Marcel A.; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PLpro), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95–144 of RCHY1 and 389–652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PLpros from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD–PLpro fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PLpro alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes. PMID:27519799

  17. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1.

    PubMed

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Hein, Marco Y; Müller, Marcel A; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-08-30

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95-144 of RCHY1 and 389-652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PL(pro)s from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD-PL(pro) fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PL(pro) alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes.

  18. Free toe pulp flap for finger pulp and volar defect reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Jyoshid R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fingertip injury requiring flap cover is very common in the modern era. The ideal cover should fulfill both functional and aesthetic improvement. Materials and Methods: From June 2015 to April 2016, we performed seven free toe pulp flaps for finger defect reconstruction. All patients were males. Five flaps were done in emergency post-traumatic cases, and two were done in elective set up. The cases included reconstruction of three thumbs, one index and one ring finger in an emergency set up and two ring fingers in the elective. Thumb reconstruction was done with great toe lateral pulp and the other digits reconstructed with second toe pulp flap. Follow-up evaluation included both functional and aesthetic assessment. Results: Five flaps survived completely, one suffered partial loss, and one flap failed completely. The median follow-up period was 9 months. The median duration of surgery was 255 min (range 210 to 300 min). The median two-point discrimination was 6.5 mm (range 4–8 mm). There was the return of temperature sensation in all patients; two had cold intolerance. The Semmes-Weinstein monofilament score varied from 3.61 to 5.07 (median filament index value 4.31/pressure value of 2 g/mm2). Three patients had delayed donor site wound healing. Conclusions: The free toe pulp flap is an efficient choice for fingertip and volar finger defects reconstruction with an excellent tissue match. PMID:27833279

  19. An effective preprocessing method for finger vein recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, JiaLiang; Li, Qiong; Wang, Ning; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2013-07-01

    The image preprocessing plays an important role in finger vein recognition system. However, previous preprocessing schemes remind weakness to be resolved for the high finger vein recongtion performance. In this paper, we propose a new finger vein preprocessing that includes finger region localization, alignment, finger vein ROI segmentation and enhancement. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme is capable of enhancing the quality of finger vein image effectively and reliably.

  20. Differing Dynamics of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Coordination: Two-finger and Four-Finger Tapping Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Kentaro; Furuyama, Nobuhiro; Inamura, Tetsunari

    2015-01-01

    Finger-tapping experiments were conducted to examine whether the dynamics of intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems can be described equally by the Haken—Kelso—Bunz model, which describes inter-limb coordination dynamics. This article reports the results of finger-tapping experiments conducted in both systems. Two within-subject factors were investigated: the phase mode and the number of fingers. In the intrapersonal experiment (Experiment 1), the participants were asked to tap, paced by a gradually hastening auditory metronome, looking at their fingers moving, using the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. In the interpersonal experiment (Experiment 2), pairs of participants performed the task while each participant used the outside hand, tapping with the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions. First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition. Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition. From these findings, different coordination dynamics were inferred between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems against prediction from the previous studies. Results were discussed according to differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems in the availability of perceptual information and the complexity in the interaction between limbs derived from a nested structure. PMID:26070119

  1. Structural and functional insights into the E3 ligase, RNF126

    PubMed Central

    Krysztofinska, Ewelina M.; Martínez-Lumbreras, Santiago; Thapaliya, Arjun; Evans, Nicola J.; High, Stephen; Isaacson, Rivka L.

    2016-01-01

    RNF126 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that collaborates with the BAG6 sortase complex to ubiquitinate hydrophobic substrates in the cytoplasm that are destined for proteasomal recycling. Composed of a trimeric complex of BAG6, TRC35 and UBL4A the BAG6 sortase is also associated with SGTA, a co-chaperone from which it can obtain hydrophobic substrates. Here we solve the solution structure of the RNF126 zinc finger domain in complex with the BAG6 UBL domain. We also characterise an interaction between RNF126 and UBL4A and analyse the competition between SGTA and RNF126 for the N-terminal BAG6 binding site. This work sheds light on the sorting mechanism of the BAG6 complex and its accessory proteins which, together, decide the fate of stray hydrophobic proteins in the aqueous cytoplasm. PMID:27193484

  2. Structural Studies of HHARI/UbcH7∼Ub Reveal Unique E2∼Ub Conformational Restriction by RBR RING1.

    PubMed

    Dove, Katja K; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Martino, Luigi; Duda, David M; Wu, Xiaoli S; Miller, Darcie J; Reiter, Katherine H; Rittinger, Katrin; Schulman, Brenda A; Klevit, Rachel E

    2017-06-06

    RING-between-RING (RBR) E3s contain RING1 domains that are structurally similar yet mechanistically distinct from canonical RING domains. Both types of E3 bind E2∼ubiquitin (E2∼Ub) via their RINGs but canonical RING E3s promote closed E2∼Ub conformations required for direct Ub transfer from the E2 to substrate, while RBR RING1s promote open E2∼Ub to favor Ub transfer to the E3 active site. This different RING/E2∼Ub conformation determines its direct target, which for canonical RING E3s is typically a substrate or substrate-linked Ub, but is the E3 active-site cysteine in the case of RBR-type E3s. Here we show that a short extension of HHARI RING1, namely Zn(2+)-loop II, not present in any RING E3s, acts as a steric wedge to disrupt closed E2∼Ub, providing a structural explanation for the distinctive RING1-dependent conformational restriction mechanism utilized by RBR E3s. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  4. Role of the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF157 as a novel downstream effector linking PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways to the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Taner; Gnad, Florian; Chan, Jocelyn; Phu, Lilian; Young, Amy; Chen, Mark J; Doll, Sophia; Stokes, Matthew P; Belvin, Marcia; Friedman, Lori S; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Hoeflich, Klaus P; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia

    2017-09-01

    The interconnected PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways are commonly perturbed in cancer. Dual inhibition of these pathways by the small-molecule PI3K inhibitor pictilisib (GDC-0941) and the MEK inhibitor cobimetinib (GDC-0973) suppresses cell proliferation and induces cell death better than either single agent in several preclinical models. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we have identified the RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF157 as a target at the intersection of PI3K and MAPK signaling. We demonstrate that RNF157 phosphorylation downstream of the PI3K and MAPK pathways influences the ubiquitination and stability of RNF157 during the cell cycle in an anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-CDH1-dependent manner. Deletion of these phosphorylation-targeted residues on RNF157 disrupts binding to CDH1 and protects RNF157 from ubiquitination and degradation. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), itself a downstream target of PI3K/MAPK signaling, leads to increased phosphorylation of RNF157 on the same residues modulated by PI3K and MAPK signaling. Inhibition of PI3K and MEK in combination or of CDK2 by their respective small-molecule inhibitors reduces RNF157 phosphorylation at these residues and attenuates RNF157 interaction with CDH1 and its subsequent degradation. Knockdown of endogenous RNF157 in melanoma cells leads to late S phase and G2/M arrest and induces apoptosis, the latter further potentiated by concurrent PI3K/MEK inhibition, consistent with a role for RNF157 in the cell cycle. We propose that RNF157 serves as a novel node integrating oncogenic signaling pathways with the cell cycle machinery and promoting optimal cell cycle progression in transformed cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Forkhead box O3 plays a role in skeletal muscle atrophy through expression of E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Hee; Lee, Hae-Ahm; Kim, Mina; Lee, Eunjo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Kim, Inkyeom

    2017-06-01

    Cushing's syndrome is caused by overproduction of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which stimulates the adrenal grand to make cortisol. Skeletal muscle wasting occurs in pathophysiological response to Cushing's syndrome. The forkhead box (FOX) protein family has been implicated as a key regulator of muscle loss under conditions such as diabetes and sepsis. However, the mechanistic role of the FOXO family in ACTH-induced muscle atrophy is not understood. We hypothesized that FOXO3a plays a role in muscle atrophy through expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle RING finger protein-1 (MuRF-1), and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome. For establishment of a Cushing's syndrome animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing ACTH (40 ng·kg(-1)·day(-1)). ACTH infusion significantly reduced muscle weight. In ACTH-infused rats, MuRF-1, atrogin-1, and FOXO3a were upregulated and the FOXO3a promoter was targeted by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Transcriptional activity and expression of FOXO3a were significantly decreased by the GR antagonist RU486. Treatment with RU486 reduced MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression in accordance with reduced enrichment of FOXO3a and Pol II on the promoters. Knockdown of FOXO3a prevented dexamethasone-induced MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression. These results indicate that FOXO3a plays a role in muscle atrophy through expression of MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 in Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Cardiac systolic dysfunction in doxorubicin-challenged rats is associated with upregulation of MuRF2 and MuRF3 E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcia Gracindo; Mattos, Elisabete; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Domitrovic, Tatiana; Galina, Antonio; Costa, Mauro W; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOXO) is an efficient and low-cost chemotherapeutic agent. The use of DOXO is limited by its side effects, including cardiotoxicity, that may progress to cardiac failure as a result of multifactorial events that have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, the effects of DOXO at two different doses were analyzed to identify early functional and molecular markers of cardiac distress. One group of rats received 7.5 mg/kg of DOXO (low-dose group) and was followed for 20 weeks. A subset of these animals was then subjected to an additional cycle of DOXO treatment, generating a cumulative dose of 20 mg/kg (high-dose group). Physiological and biochemical parameters were assessed in both treatment groups and in a control group that received saline. Systolic dysfunction was observed only in the high-dose group. Mitochondrial function analysis showed a clear reduction in oxidative cellular respiration for animals in both DOXO treatment groups, with evidence of complex I damage being observed. Transcriptional analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed an increase in atrial natriuretic peptide transcript in the high-dose group, which is consistent with cardiac failure. Analysis of transcription levels of key components of the cardiac ubiquitin-proteasome system found that the ubiquitin E3 ligase muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) was upregulated in both the low- and high-dose DOXO groups. MuRF2 and MuRF3 were also upregulated in the high-dose group but not in the low-dose group. This molecular profile may be useful as an early physiological and energetic cardiac failure indicator for testing therapeutic interventions in animal models. PMID:23620696

  7. Cracking the finger code: an interview with CCR’s Susan Mackem | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The creation of the digits in our hand—the thumb, index-middle-ring fingers and pinky—begins early in development, but little is known about the exact programming that occurs to produce the different digit types. Investigators in the Cancer and Developmental Biology Laboratory, (CDBL), provide the first genetic evidence of how the tuning of signals sets digit identity by studying the effects of dysregulation (abnormal regulation) in several mutations. Read more…

  8. Isolated Kaposi sarcoma of the finger pulp in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Aïm, F; Rosier, L; Dumontier, C

    2012-02-01

    A 63-year-old woman with long-standing AIDS and previous Kaposi sarcomas of the lower limb presented to our consultation complaining of a painful left ring finger with pulp enlargement. X-rays revealed an osteolytic lesion of the distal phalanx. We suspected an isolated osseous Kaposi sarcoma and at surgery we found a hemorrhagic lesion with bone extension into the phalanx. Bone involvement is rare in Kaposi sarcoma and even rarer in patients without a cutaneous location.

  9. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  10. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  11. Patient-Specific Prosthetic Fingers by Remote Collaboration–A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabibihan, John-John

    2011-01-01

    The concealment of amputation through prosthesis usage can shield an amputee from social stigma and help improve the emotional healing process especially at the early stages of hand or finger loss. However, the traditional techniques in prosthesis fabrication defy this as the patients need numerous visits to the clinics for measurements, fitting and follow-ups. This paper presents a method for constructing a prosthetic finger through online collaboration with the designer. The main input from the amputee comes from the Computer Tomography (CT) data in the region of the affected and the non-affected fingers. These data are sent over the internet and the prosthesis is constructed using visualization, computer-aided design and manufacturing tools. The finished product is then shipped to the patient. A case study with a single patient having an amputated ring finger at the proximal interphalangeal joint shows that the proposed method has a potential to address the patient's psychosocial concerns and minimize the exposure of the finger loss to the public. PMID:21573246

  12. A three-dimensional analysis of finger and bow string movements during the release in archery.

    PubMed

    Horsak, Brian; Heller, Mario

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine finger and bow string movements during archery by investigating a top Austrian athlete (FITA score = 1233) under laboratory conditions. Maximum lateral bow string deflection and angular displacements for index, third, and ring fingers between the full draw position and the end of the release were quantified using a motion tracking system. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether bow string deflection and finger movements are predictive for scoring. Joint ranges of motion during the shot itself were large in the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and much smaller in the metacarpophalangeal joints. Contrary to our expectations, greater deflection leads to higher scores (R2 = .18, p < .001) and the distal interphalangeal joint of the third finger weakly predicts the deflection (R2 = .11, p < .014). More variability in the joint angles of the third finger was found in bad shots than in good shots. Findings in this study let presume that maximum lateral bow string deflection does not adversely affect the archer's performance.

  13. A cobalt complex that selectively disrupts the structure and function of zinc fingers

    PubMed Central

    Louie, A. Y.; Meade, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    Zinc finger domains are structures that mediate sequence recognition for a large number of DNA-binding proteins. These domains consist of sequences of amino acids containing cysteine and histidine residues tetrahedrally coordinated to a zinc ion. In this report, we present a means to selectively inhibit a zinc finger transcription factor with cobalt(III) Schiff-base complexes. 1H NMR spectroscopy confirmed that the structure of a zinc finger peptide is disrupted by axial ligation of the cobalt(III) complex to the nitrogen of the imidazole ring of a histidine residue. Fluorescence studies reveal that the zinc ion is displaced from the model zinc finger peptide in the presence of the cobalt complex. In addition, gel-shift and filter-binding assays reveal that cobalt complexes inhibit binding of a complete zinc finger protein, human transcription factor Sp1, to its consensus sequence. Finally, a DNA-coupled conjugate of the cobalt complexes selectively inhibited Sp1 in the presence of several other transcription factors. PMID:9618469

  14. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in protein FON

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Umehara, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The zinc finger HIT domain is a sequence motif found in many proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 3 (TRIP-3), which is possibly involved in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Novel zinc finger motifs are suggested to play important roles in gene regulation and chromatin remodeling. Here, we determined the high-resolution solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in ZNHIT2 (protein FON) from Homo sapiens, by an NMR method based on 567 upper distance limits derived from NOE intensities measured in three-dimensional NOESY spectra. The structure yielded a backbone RMSD to the mean coordinates of 0.19 Å for the structured residues 12–48. The fold consists of two consecutive antiparallel β-sheets and two short C-terminal helices packed against the second β-sheet, and binds two zinc ions. Both zinc ions are coordinated tetrahedrally via a CCCC-CCHC motif to the ligand residues of the zf-HIT domain in an interleaved manner. The tertiary structure of the zinc finger HIT domain closely resembles the folds of the B-box, RING finger, and PHD domains with a cross-brace zinc coordination mode, but is distinct from them. The unique three-dimensional structure of the zinc finger HIT domain revealed a novel zinc-binding fold, as a new member of the treble clef domain family. On the basis of the structural data, we discuss the possible functional roles of the zinc finger HIT domain. PMID:17656577

  16. The effect of enslaving on perception of finger forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Leonard, Charles T

    2006-07-01

    The primary purpose was to examine the effect of enslaving on finger force perception during isometric finger force production using an ipsilateral force-matching paradigm. Fourteen subjects were instructed to produce varying levels of reference forces [10, 20, 30, and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] force using one finger (index, I or little, L) and to reproduce these forces using the same finger (homo-finger tasks, I/I and L/L) or a different finger (hetero-finger tasks, I/L and L/I). Forces of all fingers were recorded. During homo-finger tasks, no differences were found in force magnitude or relative level of force (expressed as a proportion of MVC). The index finger matching force magnitudes were greater than the little finger reference force magnitudes, with significantly lower levels of relative force during L/I tasks; while the little finger matching forces underestimated the index finger reference forces with significantly higher levels of relative force during I/L tasks. The difference in the matching and reference forces by the instructed finger(s), i.e., matching error, was larger in hetero-finger tasks than in homo-finger tasks, particularly at high reference force levels (30, 40% MVC). When forces of all fingers were considered, enslaving (uninstructed finger forces) significantly minimized matching errors of the total force during both I/L and L/I hetero-finger tasks, especially at high reference force levels. Our results show that there is a tendency to match the absolute magnitude of the total force during ipsilateral finger force-matching tasks. This tendency is likely related to enslaving effects. Our results provide evidence that all (instructed and uninstructed) finger forces are sensed, thus resulting in perception of the absolute magnitude of total finger force.

  17. Surgery for Dupuytren's contracture of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jeremy N; Becker, Giles W; Ball, Cathy; Zhang, Weiya; Giele, Henk; Hobby, Jonathan; Pratt, Anna L; Davis, Tim

    2015-12-09

    Dupuytren's disease is a benign fibroproliferative disorder that causes the fingers to be drawn into the palm via formation of new tissue under the glabrous skin of the hand. This disorder causes functional limitations, but it can be treated through a variety of surgical techniques. As a chronic condition, it tends to recur. To assess the benefits and harms of different surgical procedures for treatment of Dupuytren's contracture of the index, middle, ring and little fingers. We initially searched the following databases on 17 September 2012, then re-searched them on 10 March 2014 and on 20 May 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library, the British Nursing Index and Archive (BNI), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EMBASE, the Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE-In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, ProQuest (ABI/INFORM Global and Dissertations & Theses), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov. We reviewed the reference lists of short-listed articles to identify additional suitable studies. We included randomised clinical trials and controlled clinical trials in which groups received surgical intervention for Dupuytren's disease of the index, middle, ring or little finger versus control, or versus another intervention (surgical or otherwise). We excluded the thumb, as cords form on the radial aspect of the thumb and thus are not readily accessible in terms of angular deformity. Furthermore, thumb disease is rare. A minimum of two review authors independently reviewed search results to select studies for inclusion by using pre-specified criteria, assessed risk of bias of included studies and extracted data from included studies.We grouped outcomes into the following categories: (1) hand function, (2) other patient-reported outcomes (e.g. satisfaction, pain), (3) early objective

  18. Finger somatotopy in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Beisteiner, R; Windischberger, C; Lanzenberger, R; Edward, V; Cunnington, R; Erdler, M; Gartus, A; Streibl, B; Moser, E; Deecke, L

    2001-06-01

    Although qualitative reports about somatotopic representation of fingers in the human motor cortex exist, up to now no study could provide clear statistical evidence. The goal of the present study was to reinvestigate finger motor somatotopy by means of a thorough investigation of standardized movements of the index and little finger of the right hand. Using high resolution fMRI at 3 Tesla, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses in a group of 26 subjects were repeatedly measured to achieve reliable statistical results. The center of mass of all activated voxels within the primary motor cortex was calculated for each finger and each run. Results of all runs were averaged to yield an individual index and little finger representation for each subject. The mean center of mass localizations for all subjects were then submitted to a paired t test. Results show a highly significant though small scale somatotopy of fingerspecific activation patterns in the order indicated by Penfields motor homunculus. In addition, considerable overlap of finger specific BOLD responses was found. Comparing various methods of analysis, the mean center of mass distance for the two fingers was 2--3 mm with overlapping voxels included and 4--5 mm with overlapping voxels excluded. Our data may be best understood in the context of the work of Schieber (1999) who recently described overlapping somatotopic gradients in lesion studies with humans. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mice lacking the PSD-95–interacting E3 ligase, Dorfin/Rnf19a, display reduced adult neurogenesis, enhanced long-term potentiation, and impaired contextual fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwool; Yang, Jinhee; Kim, Ryunhee; Li, Yan; Lee, Yeunkum; Lee, Chungwoo; Park, Jongil; Lee, Dongmin; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination has a significant influence on diverse aspects of neuronal development and function. Dorfin, also known as Rnf19a, is a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, but its in vivo functions have not been explored. We report here that Dorfin is a novel binding partner of the excitatory postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95. Dorfin-mutant (Dorfin−/−) mice show reduced adult neurogenesis and enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, but normal long-term potentiation in the CA1 region. Behaviorally, Dorfin−/− mice show impaired contextual fear conditioning, but normal levels of cued fear conditioning, fear extinction, spatial learning and memory, object recognition memory, spatial working memory, and pattern separation. Using a proteomic approach, we also identify a number of proteins whose ubiquitination levels are decreased in the Dorfin−/− brain. These results suggest that Dorfin may regulate adult neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and contextual fear memory. PMID:26553645

  1. More efficient swimming by spreading your fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis; Breugem, Wim Paul; Westerweel, Jerry; Delfos, Rene; Grift, Ernst Jan

    2016-11-01

    A tantalizing question in free-style swimming is whether the stroke efficiency during the pull phase depends on spreading the fingers. It is a subtle effect-not more than a few percent-but it could make a big difference in a race. We measure the drag of arm models with increasing finger spreading in a wind tunnel and compare forces and moments to the results of immersed boundary simulations. Virtual arms were used in the simulations and their 3D-printed real versions in the experiment. We find an optimal finger spreading, accompanied by a marked increase of coherent vortex shedding. A simple actuator disk model explains this optimum.

  2. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  3. Quantitative finger dermatoglyphics in a Spanish population (Tierra de Campos).

    PubMed

    Martín, J; Portabales, D

    1986-09-01

    This study deals with the finger ridge counts and the distribution of their frequencies drawn from a Spanish sample consisting of 833 school-children (417 males and 416 females), which has been collected from the geographical area of Tierra de Campos. Paired t-test and Student-t-test were used to explore bimanual and sexual differences, respectively. The results showed: a bimanual asymmetry marked by significantly higher right hand ridge count for thumb and index pairs in both males and females, ridge counts of males are always higher than the corresponding values of females; the differences being significant excepting for right and left index and for left ring-finger. The frequency distribution of TFRC was slightly, but significantly, different from normality only in males, as Kolmogorov test showed. A great homogeneity between values for TFRC of males and females from Tierra de Campos and those of the available Spanish and Portuguese populations has been found, the values being high not only in the variation ranges of the Spanish and Portuguese populations, but also in the ranges reported for other European populations.

  4. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis of the finger caused by Exophiala spinifera.

    PubMed

    Kotylo, P K; Israel, K S; Cohen, J S; Bartlett, M S

    1989-05-01

    A patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis treated with prednisone had a painless soft tissue nodule develop on the dorsal aspect of the ring finger. She denied any history of hand trauma, animal exposure, or systemic symptoms such as fever or malaise. Fungal cultures performed on an aseptically obtained aspirate of this lesion demonstrated dark, olive-black creamy colonies on Sabouraud's agar. Slide cultures made from mold colonies produced slender conidial forms with annellations and spine-like conidiophores, features characteristic of Exophiala spinifera. The lesion was surgically excised, and the patient was successfully treated with a course of oral itraconazole. This nodular lesion has not recurred at the time of this writing. Exophiala species are difficult to differentiate, and E. spinifera may be confused with Exophiala jeanselmei. A literature review will consider Exophiala species and clinical manifestations produced by these dematiaceous fungi.

  5. Modular synthetic inverters from zinc finger proteins and small RNAs

    DOE PAGES

    Hsia, Justin; Holtz, William J.; Maharbiz, Michel M.; ...

    2016-02-17

    Synthetic zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) can be created to target promoter DNA sequences, repressing transcription. The binding of small RNA (sRNA) to ZFP mRNA creates an ultrasensitive response to generate higher effective Hill coefficients. Here we combined three “off the shelf” ZFPs and three sRNAs to create new modular inverters in E. coli and quantify their behavior using induction fold. We found a general ordering of the effects of the ZFPs and sRNAs on induction fold that mostly held true when combining these parts. We then attempted to construct a ring oscillator using our new inverters. In conclusion, our chosenmore » parts performed insufficiently to create oscillations, but we include future directions for improvement upon our work presented here.« less

  6. Modular synthetic inverters from zinc finger proteins and small RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Justin; Holtz, William J.; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Arcak, Murat; Keasling, Jay D.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2016-02-17

    Synthetic zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) can be created to target promoter DNA sequences, repressing transcription. The binding of small RNA (sRNA) to ZFP mRNA creates an ultrasensitive response to generate higher effective Hill coefficients. Here we combined three “off the shelf” ZFPs and three sRNAs to create new modular inverters in E. coli and quantify their behavior using induction fold. We found a general ordering of the effects of the ZFPs and sRNAs on induction fold that mostly held true when combining these parts. We then attempted to construct a ring oscillator using our new inverters. In conclusion, our chosen parts performed insufficiently to create oscillations, but we include future directions for improvement upon our work presented here.

  7. Electrothermal ring burn from a car battery.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Paul A; Godwin, Kenneth A

    2013-08-01

    Despite prevention efforts, burn injuries among auto mechanics are described in the literature. Electrothermal ring burns from car batteries occur by short-circuiting through the ring when it touches the open terminal or metal housing. This article describes a 34-year-old male auto mechanic who was holding a wrench when his gold ring touched the positive terminal of a 12-volt car battery and the wrench touched both his ring and the negative terminal. He felt instant pain and had a deep partial-thickness circumferential burn at the base of his ring finger. No other soft tissues were injured. He was initially managed conservatively, but after minimal healing at 3 weeks, he underwent a full-thickness skin graft. The graft incorporated well and healed by 4 weeks postoperatively. He had full range of motion. The cause of ring burns has been controversial, but based on reports similar to the current patient's mechanism, they are most likely electrothermal burns. Gold, a metal with high thermal conductivity, can heat up to its melting point in a matter of seconds. Many treatments have been described, including local wound care to split- and full-thickness skin grafts. Because most burns are preventable, staff should be warned and trained about the potential risks of contact burns. All jewelry should be removed, and the live battery terminal should be covered while working in the vicinity of the battery. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Modeling the finger joint moments in a hand at the maximal isometric grip: the effects of friction.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Dong, Ren G; McDowell, Thomas W; Welcome, Daniel E

    2009-12-01

    The interaction between the handle and operator's hand affects the comfort and safety of tool and machine operations. In most of the previous studies, the investigators considered only the normal contact forces. The effect of friction on the joint moments in fingers has not been analyzed. Furthermore, the observed contact forces have not been linked to the internal musculoskeletal loading in the previous experimental studies. In the current study, we proposed a universal model of a hand to evaluate the joint moments in the fingers during grasping tasks. The hand model was developed on the platform of the commercial software package AnyBody. Only four fingers (index, long, ring, and little finger) were included in the model. The anatomical structure of each finger is comprised of four phalanges (distal, middle, proximal, and metacarpal phalange). The simulations were performed using an inverse dynamics technique. The joint angles and the normal contact forces on each finger section reported by previous researchers were used as inputs, while the joint moments of each finger were predicted. The predicted trends of the dependence of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint moments on the cylinder diameter agree with those of the contact forces on the fingers observed in the previous experimental study. Our results show that the DIP and PIP joint moments reach their maximums at a cylinder diameter of about 31mm, which is consistent with the trend of the finger contact forces measured in the experiments. The proposed approach will be useful for simulating musculoskeletal loading in the hand for occupational activities, thereby optimizing tool-handle design.

  9. E3: Economy - Energy - Environment; Supporting Manufacturing Leadership through Sustainability

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The E3 initiative is designed to help you thrive in a new business era focused on sustainability and, working together, to promote sustainable manufacturing and economic growth throughout the United States. Within the E3 framework, we can: - Drive Innovation - Increase Manufacturing Productivity - Boost Local Economies - Reduce Environmental Impacts - Foster Development - Conserve Energy and Resources This website provides information and tools for E3, including fact sheets, contacts, and calculators.

  10. Effects of the Index Finger Position and Force Production on the Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Moment Arms at the Metacarpophalangeal Joints- an Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging to measure the moment arm of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon about the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers when the position and force production level of the index finger was altered. A secondary goal was to create regression models using anthropometric data to predict moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis about the metacarpophalangeal joint of each finger. Methods The hands of subjects were scanned using a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger was placed in: flexion, neutral, and extension. For each joint configuration subjects produced no active force (passive condition) and exerted a flexion force to resist a load at the fingertip (active condition). Results The following was found: (1) The moment arm of the flexor digitorum superficialis at the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger (a) increased with the joint flexion and stayed unchanged with finger extension; and (b) decreased with the increase of force at the neutral and extended finger postures and did not change at the flexed posture. (2) The moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon of the middle, ring, and little fingers (a) did not change when the index metacarpophalangeal joint position changed (p > 0.20); and (b) The moment arms of the middle and little fingers increased when the index finger actively produced force at the flexed metacarpophalangeal joint posture. (4) The moment arms showed a high correlation with anthropometric measurements. Interpretation Moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis change due to both changes in joint angle and muscle activation; they scale with various anthropometric measures. PMID:22192658

  11. Finger blood flow in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Elkington, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. Finger blood flow was estimated, by strain-gauge plethysmography, before and during a 1 hr immersion in ice water, on twenty-five men throughout a year at Wilkes, Antarctica. A total of 121 satisfactory immersions were made. 2. Blood flow before and during immersion decreased significantly in the colder months of the year, and the increase caused by cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) became less as the year progressed. The time of onset, blood flow at onset, and frequency of the cycles of CIVD showed no significant relation to the coldness of the weather (as measured by mean monthly wind chill) or the time in months. Comparisons of blood flow before and after five field trips (average duration 42 days), on which cold exposure was more severe than at Wilkes station, gave similar results. 3. The results suggest that vasoconstrictor tone increased. This interpretation agrees with previous work on general acclimatization in Antarctica, but contrasts with work elsewhere on local acclimatization of the hands. PMID:5684034

  12. Structure of the Siz/PIAS SUMO E3 Ligase Siz1 and Determinants Required for SUMO Modification of PCNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-01-12

    Siz1 is a founding member of the Siz/PIAS RING family of SUMO E3 ligases. The X-ray structure of an active Siz1 ligase revealed an elongated tripartite architecture comprised of an N-terminal PINIT domain, a central zinc-containing RING-like SP-RING domain, and a C-terminal domain we term the SP-CTD. Structure-based mutational analysis and biochemical studies show that the SP-RING and SP-CTD are required for activation of the E2SUMO thioester, while the PINIT domain is essential for redirecting SUMO conjugation to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at lysine 164, a nonconsensus lysine residue that is not modified by the SUMO E2 in the absence of Siz1. Mutational analysis of Siz1 and PCNA revealed surfaces on both proteins that are required for efficient SUMO modification of PCNA in vitro and in vivo.

  13. The mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 is required for Drp1 dependent mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Karbowski, Mariusz; Neutzner, Albert; Youle, Richard J

    2007-07-02

    We identify a mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase, MARCH5, as a critical regulator of mitochondrial fission. MARCH5 RING mutants and MARCH5 RNA interference induce an abnormal elongation and interconnection of mitochondria indicative of an inhibition of mitochondrial division. The aberrant mitochondrial phenotypes in MARCH5 RING mutant-expressing cells are reversed by ectopic expression of Drp1, but not another mitochondrial fission protein Fis1. Moreover, as indicated by abnormal clustering and mitochondrial accumulation of Drp1, as well as decreased cellular mobility of YFP-Drp1 in cells expressing MARCH5 RING mutants, MARCH5 activity regulates the subcellular trafficking of Drp1, likely by impacting the correct assembly at scission sites or the disassembly step of fission complexes. Loss of this activity may account for the observed mitochondrial division defects. Finally, MARCH5 RING mutants and endogenous Drp1, but not wild-type MARCH5 or Fis1, co-assemble into abnormally enlarged clusters in a Drp1 GTPase-dependent manner, suggesting molecular interactions among these proteins. Collectively, our data suggest a model in which mitochondrial division is regulated by a MARCH5 ubiquitin-dependent switch.

  14. Trajectory of the index finger during grasping.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jason; Flash, Tamar

    2009-07-01

    The trajectory of the index finger during grasping movements was compared to the trajectories predicted by three optimization-based models. The three models consisted of minimizing the integral of the weighted squared joint derivatives along the path (inertia-like cost), minimizing torque change, and minimizing angular jerk. Of the three models, it was observed that the path of the fingertip and the joint trajectories, were best described by the minimum angular jerk model. This model, which does not take into account the dynamics of the finger, performed equally well when the inertia of the finger was altered by adding a 20 g weight to the medial phalange. Thus, for the finger, it appears that trajectories are planned based primarily on kinematic considerations at a joint level.

  15. [Ligament injuries of fingers and thumbs].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic ligament lesions of the carpometacarpal joints frequently occur at the thumb ray, whereas the carpometacarpal amphiarthrosis of other finger rays are rarely affected. The metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the thumb and fingers are stabilized by bilaterally running collateral ligaments and palmar plates. At the base of the metacarpophalangeal joints, several ligaments of the extensor hoods guide the extensor tendons and coordinate the fine motoric skills of phalangeal flexing and extending. Several annular and cruciform ligaments hold the flexor tendons close to the finger skeleton. Other than at the wrist, differentiation between dynamic and static instability patterns is possible by physical examination. This review article presents the ligaments of the thumb and the fingers, the traumatic and degenerative lesions as well as the diagnostic capability of x‑rays, cinematography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography.

  16. Spreading and fingering in spin coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Kristi E.; Habdas, Piotr; Semsarillar, Naeim; Burfitt, Kim; de Bruyn, John R.

    2007-04-01

    We study the spreading and fingering of drops of silicone oil on a rotating substrate for a range of rotation speeds and drop volumes. The spreading of the drop prior to the onset of fingering is found to follow the theoretically predicted time dependence, but with a large shift in time scale. For the full range of experimental parameters studied, the contact line becomes unstable and fingers develop when the radius of the drop becomes sufficiently large. We study the growth of perturbations around the perimeter of the drop and find the growth rate of the most unstable mode to agree well with the predictions of lubrication theory. The number of fingers which form around the perimeter of the drop is found to be a function of both rotation speed and drop volume, and is also in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions.

  17. Repair of webbed fingers - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Syndactyly is the abnormal development of the hand, such that the fingers are fused. The number of ... second surgery, depending on the complexity of the syndactyly. Hospital stays of 1 or 2 days are ...

  18. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-01-01

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis. PMID:23988821

  19. Salt-finger convection under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to differential diffusion rates. Because of the fact that the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number (the ratio of thermal diffusivity to solute diffusivity) salt-finger convection can be generated at very much reduced gravity levels. This effect may be of importance in the directional solidification of binary alloys carried out in space. The transport of solute and heat by salt-finger convection at microgravity conditions is considered; instability arising from surface tension gradients, the Marangoni instability, is discussed, and the possible consequences of combined salt-finger and Marangoni instability are considered.

  20. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  1. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  2. Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative warning of wind chill. Indeed, guidance on the risk of finger freezing is important not only to safeguard the finger, but also because it pertains more closely to susceptible facial features, such as the nose, than if only the risk of cheek freezing was provided. The importance of blood flow to the finger and the modeling of vaso-constriction are demonstrated through cooling predictions that agree reasonably well with several reported observations. Differences in the prediction between the present physiologic-based model and the engineering model used to develop the wind chill index are also discussed. New wind chill charts are presented that tabulate the mean cooling rates and corresponding onset times to freezing of the finger for various combinations of air temperature and wind speed. Results indicate that the surface of the finger cools to its freezing point in approximately one-eighth of the time predicted for the cheek. For combinations that result in the same wind chill temperature (WCT), the rate of finger cooling is faster at the higher wind speed. This asymmetry was previously disclosed through the application of the model to cheek cooling, and it reiterates the ambiguity associated with the reporting of WCT. It is further emphasized that the reporting of onset times to freezing, or safe exposure limits, is a more logical and meaningful alternative to the WCT.

  3. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-04-02

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  4. Reverse Pressure Capable Finger Seal (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the typical solution for locations requiring reverse capable sealing are labyrinth seals which can exhibit significantly higher leakage...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0215 REVERSE PRESSURE CAPABLE FINGER SEAL (PREPRINT) Nathan Gibson and Joe Yanof Honeywell International, Inc...AND SUBTITLE REVERSE PRESSURE CAPABLE FINGER SEAL (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-09-D-2925-0003 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  5. Improved DNA binding specificity from polyzinc finger peptides by using strings of two-finger units

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Klug, Aaron; Choo, Yen

    2001-01-01

    Multizinc finger peptides are likely to reach increased prominence in the search for the “ideal” designer transcription factor for in vivo applications such as gene therapy. However, for these treatments to be effective and safe, the peptides must bind with high affinity and, more importantly, with great specificity. Our previous research has shown that zinc finger arrays can be made to bind 18 bp of DNA with picomolar affinity, but also has suggested that arrays of fingers also may bind tightly to related sequences. This work addresses the question of zinc finger DNA binding specificity. We show that by changing the way in which zinc finger arrays are constructed—by linking three two-finger domains rather than two three-finger units—far greater target specificity can be achieved through increased discrimination against mutated or closely related sequences. These new peptides have the added capability of being able to span two short gaps of unbound DNA, although still binding with picomolar affinity to their target sites. We believe that this new method of constructing zinc finger arrays will offer greater efficacy in the fields of gene therapy and in the production of transgenic organisms than previously reported zinc finger arrays. PMID:11171969

  6. Viscous fingering in a microfluidic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budek, Agnieszka; Garstecki, Piotr; Samborski, Adam; Szymczak, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    We study experimentally and numerically two-phase flow in a rectangular network of microfluidic channels. If the pressure gradient is oriented along the lattice, growth of long and thin dendrites ('thin fingers') is promoted. The dynamics of thin finger growth is of interest due to their appearance in a variety of other pattern forming systems, such as the growth of dendrites in electrochemical deposition experiments, channeling in dissolving rocks or side-branches growth in crystallization. Due to their simplicity, thin finger models are also attractive for theoretical analysis. A characteristic feature of these systems is a strong competition between the fingers which is a reflection of Saffman-Taylor instability acting in a nonlinear regime. Surprisingly, the case of miscible fluids turns out to be different, with the competition between the fingers hindered due to the strong lateral currents of the displaced fluid, which eventually cut off the heads of the advancing fingers, thus preventing their further growth. The heads continue to move through the system, preserving their shapes, thus forming the 'miscible droplets'. In immiscible case this process is hindered by the presence of the surface tension. A detailed analysis of this phenomenon is given with a particular emphasis on the scaling properties of the system.

  7. New Finger Biometric Method Using Near Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eui Chul; Jung, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeoul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new finger biometric method. Infrared finger images are first captured, and then feature extraction is performed using a modified Gaussian high-pass filter through binarization, local binary pattern (LBP), and local derivative pattern (LDP) methods. Infrared finger images include the multimodal features of finger veins and finger geometries. Instead of extracting each feature using different methods, the modified Gaussian high-pass filter is fully convolved. Therefore, the extracted binary patterns of finger images include the multimodal features of veins and finger geometries. Experimental results show that the proposed method has an error rate of 0.13%. PMID:22163741

  8. Finger multibiometric cryptosystems: fusion strategy and template security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jialiang; Li, Qiong; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2014-03-01

    We address two critical issues in the design of a finger multibiometric system, i.e., fusion strategy and template security. First, three fusion strategies (feature-level, score-level, and decision-level fusions) with the corresponding template protection technique are proposed as the finger multibiometric cryptosystems to protect multiple finger biometric templates of fingerprint, finger vein, finger knuckle print, and finger shape modalities. Second, we theoretically analyze different fusion strategies for finger multibiometric cryptosystems with respect to their impact on security and recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of finger multibiometric cryptosystems at different fusion levels is investigated on a merged finger multimodal biometric database. The comparative results suggest that the proposed finger multibiometric cryptosystem at feature-level fusion outperforms other approaches in terms of verification performance and template security.

  9. Scattering Removal for Finger-Vein Image Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy. PMID:22737028

  10. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy.

  11. Role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, Barbara C; de Wilt, Leonie HAM; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2013-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are a large family of proteins that catalyze the ubiquitination of many protein substrates for targeted degradation by the 26S proteasome. Therefore, E3 ubiquitin ligases play an essential role in a variety of biological processes including cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. E3 ubiquitin ligases are often found overexpressed in human cancers, including lung cancer, and their deregulation has been shown to contribute to cancer development. However, the lack of specific inhibitors in clinical trials is a major issue in targeting E3 ubiquitin ligases with currently only one E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor being tested in the clinical setting. In this review, we focus on E3 ubiquitin ligases that have been found deregulated in lung cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the processes in which they are involved and evaluate them as potential anti-cancer targets. By better understanding the mechanisms by which E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate biological processes and their exact role in carcinogenesis, we can improve the development of specific E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitors and pave the way for novel treatment strategies for cancer patients. PMID:23936758

  12. Role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Snoek, Barbara C; de Wilt, Leonie Ham; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2013-08-10

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are a large family of proteins that catalyze the ubiquitination of many protein substrates for targeted degradation by the 26S proteasome. Therefore, E3 ubiquitin ligases play an essential role in a variety of biological processes including cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. E3 ubiquitin ligases are often found overexpressed in human cancers, including lung cancer, and their deregulation has been shown to contribute to cancer development. However, the lack of specific inhibitors in clinical trials is a major issue in targeting E3 ubiquitin ligases with currently only one E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor being tested in the clinical setting. In this review, we focus on E3 ubiquitin ligases that have been found deregulated in lung cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the processes in which they are involved and evaluate them as potential anti-cancer targets. By better understanding the mechanisms by which E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate biological processes and their exact role in carcinogenesis, we can improve the development of specific E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitors and pave the way for novel treatment strategies for cancer patients.

  13. Role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ya-Chao; Deng, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-21

    E3 ubiquitin ligases have an important role in carcinogenesis and include a large family of proteins that catalyze the ubiquitination of many protein substrates for targeted degradation by the 26S proteasome. So far, E3 ubiquitin ligases have been reported to have a role in a variety of biological processes including cell cycle regulation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, several kinds of E3 ubiquitin ligases were demonstrated to be generally highly expressed in gastric cancer (GC) tissues and to contribute to carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and information about the clinical significance of E3 ubiquitin ligases in GC. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, encouraged the evaluation of other components of the ubiquitin proteasome system for pharmaceutical intervention. The clinical value of novel treatment strategies targeting aberrant E3 ubiquitin ligases for GC are discussed in the review.

  14. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  15. The Ring Sculptor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-08

    Prometheus zooms across the Cassini spacecraft field of view, attended by faint streamers and deep gores in the F ring. This movie sequence of five images shows the F ring shepherd moon shaping the ring inner edge

  16. Beyond Bright Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-30

    The tiny moon Pandora appears beyond the bright disk of Saturn rings in this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft. Pandora orbits outside the F ring and, in this image, is farther from Cassini than the rings are.

  17. Finger Muscle Attachments for an OpenSim Upper-Extremity Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Jindrich, Devin L.

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements. PMID:25853869

  18. Finger muscle attachments for an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S; Dennerlein, Jack T; Jindrich, Devin L

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements.

  19. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  20. Targeting the mTOR-DEPTOR Pathway by CRL E3 Ubiquitin Ligases: Therapeutic Application1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals and serves as a central regulator of cell metabolism, growth, proliferation, survival, and autophagy. The mTOR pathway is frequently activated in many human cancers, mainly resulting from alterations in the upstream regulators, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation, PTEN loss or dysregulation of mTOR-negative regulators (e.g., TSC1/2), leading to uncontrolled proliferation. Thus, inhibiting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways is widely considered as an effective approach for targeted cancer therapy. Recently, we and others found that DEPTOR, a naturally occurring inhibitor of both mTORC1 and mTORC2, was degraded by SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F box proteins) E3 ubiquitin ligase, the founding member of cullin-RING-ligases (CRLs), resulting in mTOR activation and cell proliferation. In addition to DEPTOR, previous studies have demonstrated that several other negative regulators of mTOR pathway are also substrates of CRL/SCF E3s. Thus, targeting CRL/SCF E3s is expected to cause the accumulation of these mTOR signal inhibitors to effectively block the mTOR pathway. In this review, we will discuss mTOR signaling pathway, how DEPTOR regulates mTOR/AKT axis, thus acting as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in some cases, how DEPTOR is ubiquitinated and degraded by SCFβ-TrCP E3, and how MLN4924, a small-molecule indirect inhibitor of CRL/SCF E3 ligases through blocking cullin neddylation, might be useful as a novel approach of mTOR pathway targeting for cancer therapy. PMID:22745582

  1. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-08-20

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously.

  2. Probes of Ubiquitin E3 ligases distinguish different stages of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Stanley, Mathew; Han, Cong; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Murphy, Paul; Balk, Kristin; Wood, Nicola T.; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Muqit, Miratul M.K.; Virdee, Satpal

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligases represent an important class of enzymes, yet there are currently no chemical probes to profile their activity. We develop a new class of activity-based probe by reengineering of a ubiquitin-charged E2 conjugating enzyme and demonstrate their utility by profiling the transthiolation activity of the RING-in-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligase Parkin in vitro and in cellular extracts. Our study provides valuable insight into the roles, and cellular hierarchy, of distinct phosphorylation events in Parkin activation. We also profile Parkin patient disease-associated mutations and strikingly demonstrate that they largely mediate their effect by altering transthiolation activity. Furthermore, our probes enable direct and quantitative measurement of endogenous Parkin activity revealing that endogenous Parkin is activated in neuronal cell lines (≥75 %) in response to mitochondrial depolarization. This new technology also holds promise as a novel biomarker of PINK1-Parkin signalling as demonstrated by compatibility with Parkinson’s disease patient-derived samples. PMID:26928937

  3. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ...

  4. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  5. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record ‘three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals. PMID:25366032