Science.gov

Sample records for ring hera measurements

  1. SC correction coils and magnets for the HERA proton ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, C.; Geerinck, J.; Moeller, H.; Heller, R.; Schmueser, P.; Bracke, P.

    1986-05-01

    The design, manufacture and performance of correction elements of the HERA proton ring is described. The quadrupole and sextupole correction coils are mounted on the cold beam pipe inside the main dipole magnets. Superferric dipole magnets for orbit correction are located adjacent to the main quadrupole magnets in a common cryostat which also contains the beam monitor.

  2. Precision QCD measurements in DIS at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    New and recent results on QCD measurements from the H1 and ZEUS experiments at the HERA ep collider are reviewed. The final results on the combined deep-inelastic neutral and charged current cross-sections are presented and their role in the extractions of parton distribution functions (PDFs) is studied. The PDF fits give insight into the compatibility of QCD evolution and heavy flavor schemes with the data as a function of kinematic variables such as the scale Q2. Measurements of jet production cross-sections in ep collisions provide direct proves of QCD and extractions of the strong coupling constants are performed. Charm and beauty cross-section measurements are used for the determination of the heavy quark masses. Their role in PDF fits is investigated. In the regime of diffractive DIS and photoproduction, dijet and prompt photon production cross-sections provide insights into the process of factorization and the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  3. Measurement of beauty production at HERA using events with muons and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, Olaf

    2005-10-06

    Several new measurements of beauty production at HERA have been presented at this conference. In this talk we report about the H1 measurement using events with a muon associated to a jet. This is the first beauty analysis at HERA, where both the long lifetime and the large mass of b-flavoured hadrons are exploited to identify the beauty events, leading to an improved signal separation. Differential cross sections are measured both in photoproduction and in deep inelastic scattering. The measured data are found to be somewhat higher then perturbative QCD calculations to next-to-leading order. A significant excess is observed in certain corners of the kinematic phase space. At the end of this report new and recent beauty measurements are summarised.

  4. Physics at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1993-12-31

    HERA is the first electron-proton colliding beam facility and the big news about it is that it works, despite concerns both about the reproducibility of the magnetic field in the proton ring magnets at injection and about the e-p beam-beam interaction. It is, however, a complex accelerator facility that will take a few years to bring up to full and efficient operation. With the present center of mass energy of 296 GeV, it extends the energy range for photoproduction studies by an order of magnitude over fixed target experiments and deep-inelastic e-p scattering up to momentum transfer values approaching 10{sup 5} GeV{sup 2} in both neutral and charged current interactions. At reasonable Q{sup 2}, and so with the present luminosity, events with Bjorken x down to a few times 10{sup {minus}5} are being studied. Two powerful general-purpose detectors -- H1 and ZEUS -- have been constructed to address these physics challenges and both collaborations have made new and interesting measurements as presented at this and other recent HEP conferences. The experimental program started in July 1992 and we are on a steep learning curve both with HERA and with the detectors.

  5. Proposal to measure spin-structure functions and semi-exclusive asymmetries for the proton and neutron at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.; Hansen, J.O.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    Nucleon spin physics will be studied in the HERMES experiment, that will use polarized internal targets of essentially pure atomic H, D, and {sup 3}He in the HERA electron storage ring at DESY. A series of measurements of spin-dependent properties of the nucleon and few-body nuclei will be made; the spin structure function g{sub 1}(x) of the proton and neutron will be measured to test the Bjorken sum rule and study the fraction of the nucleon spin carried by quarks; the spin structure function g{sub 2}W, sensitive to quark-gluon correlations, and the structure functions b{sub 1}(x), and {Delta}(x), sensitive to nuclear binding effects, will be measured; and, using the particle identification capability of the HERMES detector, pions will be detected in coincidence with the scattered electrons. The coincident hadron measurements represent the most important extension that can be made at this time to the existing measurements on the nucleon spin structure functions because they provide information about the flavor-dependence of the quark spin distribution in the nucleon. Argonne is providing the Cerenkov counter to be used for particle identification and developing the drifilm coating technique for the ultrathin target cell required for this experiment. The HERMES collaboration intends to use polarized targets with the highest available figures of merit, and the Argonne laser-driven source offers the most promise for a significant advance in present-day targets.

  6. Measurement of exclusive dijet production in diffractive DIS with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Gach, Grzegorz

    2015-04-10

    The exclusive production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic lepton–proton scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA with an integrated luminosity of 372 pb{sup −1}. Jets have been reconstructed in the photon–Pomeron rest frame using the exclusive k{sub T} algorithm. The shape of the differential cross-section as a function of the angle between the plane spanned by the incoming and scattered lepton momenta and the plane spanned by the virtual photon and jets momenta is presented. The shape is determined by the jet production mechanism and provides information about the Pomeron structure.

  7. What HERA May Provide?

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hannes; De Roeck, Albert; Bartels, Jochen; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; Brodsky, Stanley; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Deak, Michal; Devenish, Robin; Diehl, Markus; Gehrmann, Thomas; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gustafson, Gosta; Khoze, Valery; Knutsson, Albert; Klein, Max; Krauss, Frank; Kutak, Krzysztof; Laenen, Eric; Lonnblad, Leif; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  8. Beam Measurements in Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Albert

    1996-05-01

    Beam measurements in storage rings are made to diagnose performance limitations and to gain knowledge of the beam behavior in view of improvements and to the benefit for other machines. In beam optics the measurement of the orbit or the trajectory with beam position monitors distributed around the ring reveals deflection errors. The overall focusing is checked by measuring the betatron frequency (tune) using a pulse or continuous excitation of the oscillation. Observing this oscillation with all the beam position monitors around the ring the beta function and the betatron phase advance are obtained. This measurement done for different momenta, i.e. RF-frequencies, gives the local chromaticity and its correction. The tune dependence on quadrupole strength gives the value of the local beta function. Synchrotron radiation is a powerful diagnostics tool and can give the beam cross section. Beam instabilities are investigated with similar methods. The growth or damping rates and frequencies of betatron and synchrotron oscillations, observed as a function of intensity, give a convolution of the resistive and reactive part of the transverse and longitudinal impedance with the spectrum of the oscillation mode. Coupled bunch instabilities are caused by narrow band impedances at particular frequencies while single traversal effects, including energy loss and bunch lengthening, are due to a broad band impedance. A model of the impedance can be constructed from such measurements done with different bunch lengths, tunes and other parameters. In some cases the element causing an instability can be identified. The dependence of the orbit and phase advance around the ring on intensity can give the location of impedances. To probe the impedance at very high frequencies the effects on very short bunches or the energy loss of a continuous beam due to its Schottky noise are measured. The beam energy, usually known from magnetic measurements, can be obtained directly with high

  9. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  10. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-09-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  11. A rich multiplicity veto for the hera-b experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husemann, U.; Adams, M.; Bocker, M.; Bruggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cruse, C.; Kolotaev, Y.

    2003-08-01

    We present the design and commissioning of a new multiplicity veto for the HERA-B detector, a fixed-target spectrometer originally designed to study the physics of B mesons in proton-nucleus interactions. The HERA-B trigger is a message-driven multi-level track trigger. The first level trigger (FLT) consists of custom-made electronics, and the higher trigger levels are implemented as PC farms. The multiplicity veto has been designed to reject high-multiplicity events before they enter the trigger chain. A veto signal is generated based on the comparison of the number of photons in part of the HERA-B ring-imaging Cherenkov counter (RICH) with a programmable threshold. The RICH Multiplicity Veto is a modular system. First the hits in 256 detector channels are summed by Base Sum Cards (BSC), then FED Sum Cards (FSC) sum the subtotals of up to eight BSCs. Finally the Veto Board (VB) takes the veto decision based on the sum of up to 14 FSCs. The RICH Multiplicity Veto has been successfully installed and commissioned in HERA-B. The measured veto efficiency is (99.9991+/-0.0001)%, and the system is used in the routine data-taking of the HERA-B experiment.

  12. Measuring Gaps In O-Ring Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Scott E.

    1990-01-01

    Technique enables measurement of leakage areas created by small obstructions in O-ring seals. With simple fixture, gaps measured directly. Compresses piece of O-ring by amount determined by spacers. Camera aimed through clear plastic top plate records depression made in O-ring by obstruction. Faster, easier, more accurate than conventional estimation.

  13. The silicon vertex detector of HERA-B

    SciTech Connect

    Moshous, Basil

    1998-02-01

    HERA-B is an experiment to study CP violation in the B system using an internal target at the DESY HERA proton ring(820 GeV). The main goal is to measure the asymmetry in the 'gold plated' decays of B{sup 0}, B-bar{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} yielding a measurement of the angle {beta} of the unitarity triangle. From the semileptonic decay channels of the b, b-bar-hadron produced in association with the B{sup 0},B-bar{sup 0} can be used to tag the flavor of the B{sup 0}. The purpose of the Vertex Detector System is to provide the track coordinates for reconstructing the J/{psi}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} secondary decay vertices and the impact parameters of all tagging particles.

  14. Beauty production at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Yagues, A.

    2009-12-17

    Beauty quark production in ep collisions is being studied at HERA. The latest results in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction (PHP) regime performed by the ZEUS and HI experiments are presented here. The first measurement exploits the potential of the ZEUS mi-crovertex detector to identify beauty in PHP dijet events in an inclusive analysis. In the second measurement, beauty quarks were identified through their decays into muons. Finally, two measurements of the beauty contribution to the proton structure function, F{sub 2}{sup b???b}, in DIS are presented. The four measurements are consistent with previous results and are reasonably well described by QCD predictions.

  15. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) in deep inelastic exclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    The exclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of ψ (2 S) and J / ψ (1 S) at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 317 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the kinematic range 2 HERA I running period and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 114 pb-1. The data for 5 HERA I and HERA II periods and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 468 pb-1. The decay modes analysed were μ+μ- and J / ψ (1 S)π+π- for the ψ (2 S) and μ+μ- for the J / ψ (1 S). The cross-section ratio σ ψ (2 S) /σ J / ψ (1 S) has been measured as a function of Q2 , W and t. The results are compared to predictions of QCD-inspired models of exclusive vector-meson production.

  16. Capturing Control Room Simulator Data with the HERA Database

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Boring; April Whaley; Bruce Hallbert; Karin Laumann; Per Oivind Braarud; Andreas Bye; Erasmia Lois; Yung Hsien James Chang

    2007-08-01

    The Human Event Repository and Analysis (HERA) system has been developed as a tool for classifying and recording human performance data extracted from primary data sources. This paper reviews the process of extracting data from simulator studies for use in HERA. Simulator studies pose unique data collection challenges, both in types and quality of data measures, but such studies are ideally suited to gather operator performance data, including the full spectrum of performance shaping factors used in a HERA analysis. This paper provides suggestions for obtaining relevant human performance data for a HERA analysis from a control room simulator study and for inputting those data in a format suitable for HERA.

  17. Tune measurement in the APS ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sellyey, W.; Kahana, E.; Wang, X.

    1993-07-01

    The APS system will contain three rings. The first is a positron accumulator ring (PAR). Its function is to coalesce 24, 30-ns-long positron bunches into one 290-ps bunch. The second is the injector synchrotron (IS). It accelerates the 450-MeV positron bunches to 7 Gev for injection into the storage ring (SR). Betatron and synchrotron motion frequently occurs in circular machines, without any deliberate excitation. However, the amplitudes of this motion cannot be predicted. Therefore, it is desirable to have controlled ways to excite these modes. Two types of devices will be used to excite the beam. One will be a magnetic kicker or bumper. All rings already have these devices planned for the horizontal direction for injecting and extracting beams. Some of these magnets will be used for exiting horizontal betatron motion. In the storage ring, a special kicker will be installed to produce up to 1 mm amplitude motion in the vertical direction. Two 8.4-in striplines (SL) (1/4 wavelength at 352 MHz) will be installed on all rings. One stripline in each ring will be used to drive all three tunes, and the other stripline will be used as a pickup. In the PAR and IS, the pickup stripline will be in a dispersive region. This will allow observation of both betatron and synchrotron motions. In the SR, the stripline will be in a nondispersive region because it is not practical to install it in a dispersive region. To do synchrotron tune measurements in the SR, one of the button BPMs located in a dispersive region will be used. To minimize development effort, as much of the BPM system electronics as possible will be used in the tune measurement system. The BPM electronics uses the AMP/PM conversion technique. This system operates at 352 MHz. Thus, tune measurement components were also designed to operate at 352 MHz.

  18. Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2007-05-22

    Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

  19. Microstrip Ring Resonator for Soil Moisture Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Li, Eric S.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate determination of spatial soil moisture distribution and monitoring its temporal variation have a significant impact on the outcomes of hydrologic, ecologic, and climatic models. Development of a successful remote sensing instrument for soil moisture relies on the accurate knowledge of the soil dielectric constant (epsilon(sub soil)) to its moisture content. Two existing methods for measurement of dielectric constant of soil at low and high frequencies are, respectively, the time domain reflectometry and the reflection coefficient measurement using an open-ended coaxial probe. The major shortcoming of these methods is the lack of accurate determination of the imaginary part of epsilon(sub soil). In this paper a microstrip ring resonator is proposed for the accurate measurement of soil dielectric constant. In this technique the microstrip ring resonator is placed in contact with soil medium and the real and imaginary parts of epsilon(sub soil) are determined from the changes in the resonant frequency and the quality factor of the resonator respectively. The solution of the electromagnetic problem is obtained using a hybrid approach based on the method of moments solution of the quasi-static formulation in conjunction with experimental data obtained from reference dielectric samples. Also a simple inversion algorithm for epsilon(sub soil) = epsilon'(sub r) + j(epsilon"(sub r)) based on regression analysis is obtained. It is shown that the wide dynamic range of the measured quantities provides excellent accuracy in the dielectric constant measurement. A prototype microstrip ring resonator at L-band is designed and measurements of soil with different moisture contents are presented and compared with other approaches.

  20. Accelerator physics measurements at the damping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkin, L.; Delahaye, J. P.; Wille, K.; Allen, M. A.; Bane, K.; Fieguth, T.; Hofmann, A.; Button, A.; Lee, M.; Linebarger, W.

    1985-05-01

    Besides the optics measurements described elsewhere, machine experiments were done at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping ring to determine some of its parameters. The synchrotron radiation energy loss which gives the damping rates was measured by observing the RF-voltage dependence of the synchronous phase angle. The emittance was obtained from the synchrotron light monitor, scraper measurements and by extracting the beam through a doublet and measuring its size for different quadrupole settings. Current dependent effects such as parasitic mode losses, head tail instabilities, synchrotron and betatron frequency shifts were measured to estimate the impedance. RF-cavity beam loading and its compensation were also studied and ion collection was investigated. All results agree reasonably well with expectations and indicate no limitations to the design performance.

  1. Luminosity determination at HERA-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; De Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. AA.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, S.; Somov, A.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2007-11-01

    A detailed description of an original method used to measure the luminosity accumulated by the HERA-B experiment for a data sample taken during the 2002-2003 HERA running period is reported. We show that, with this method, a total luminosity measurement can be achieved with a typical precision, including overall systematic uncertainties, at a level of 5% or better. We also report evidence for the detection of δ-rays generated in the target and comment on the possible use of such delta rays to measure luminosity.

  2. In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Gruen, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 70 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  3. Galileo in-situ dust measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Grün, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  4. Measurement of D{plus-minus} and D{sup 0} production in deep Inelastic scattering using a lifetime tag at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Nicholass, D.; High Energy Physics; ZEUS Collboration

    2009-10-01

    The production of D{sup {+-}}- and D{sup 0}-mesons has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 133.6 pb{sup -1}. The measurements cover the kinematic range 5 < Q{sup 2} < 1000 GeV{sup 2}, 0.02 < y < 0.7, 1.5 < p T{sup D} < 15 GeV and |{eta}{sup D}| < 1.6. Combinatorial background to the D-meson signals is reduced by using the ZEUS microvertex detector to reconstruct displaced secondary vertices. Production cross sections are compared with the predictions of next-to-leading-order QCD, which is found to describe the data well. Measurements are extrapolated to the full kinematic phase space in order to obtain the open-charm contribution, F{sub 2}{sup c{bar c}} to the proton structure function, F{sub 2}.

  5. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Gruen, E.

    Jupiter's ring system consists of at least three components: the inner main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s) further out. The small moons Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring and are believed to be the sources of gossamer ring material. A very faint ring extension has also been observed beyond Thebe's orbit. On 5 November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed Jupiter's gossamer ring system for the first time. High-resolution dust data were obtained with the dust detector on board down to 2.33 R_J , i.e. well inside Amalthea's orbit. A second ring passage occurred on 21 September 2003, a few hours before Galileo impacted Jupiter. This time, dust data were successfully received down to Amalthea's orbit at 2.5 R_J , however, with much reduced time-resolution. Several thousand dust impacts were counted during both ring passages, and the full data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 dust impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly measure dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. Our as yet preliminary analysis %of the gossamer ring data implies particle sizes in the sub-micron and micron range. The size distribution -- increasing towards smaller particles -- is similar in the Thebe ring and the ring's outer extension, whereas in the Amalthea ring it is steeper. Dust number densities are about 104 - 106 km-3 . Our dust data allow for the first time to compare in-situ measurements with the results optical obtained from the inversion of optical images. It appears that small sub-micron grains dominate the number density whereas larger particles with at least a few micron radii contribute most to the optical depth. The dust density shows previously unrecognised fine-structure in the ring between

  6. Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; HERA

    2015-01-01

    end of the Dark Ages.This paper will present a summary of the current understanding of the signal characteristics and measurements and describe the funded and planned HERA telescope to be built to detect and characterize the EoR power spectrum.

  7. Geophysical Measurements Using a Ring Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Low frequency infrasound from weather related events has been studied for a number of years. In this poster, the results from using a large active ring laser as an infrasound detector are presented. A slightly modified cavity design enhances the interferometer's sensitivity to infrasound. Our results qualitatively agree with several findings from a long term study of weather generated infrasound by NOAA. On April 27, 2014, the 66 km track of an EF-4 tornado passed within 21 km of the ring laser interferometer. An FFT of the ring laser interferometer output revealed a steady tornado generated frequency of 0.94 Hz. The track also passed close to the US Array Transportable Station W41B. This provided the opportunity to examine both the infrasound and ground motion generated by the tornado. Infrasound from three other tornadoes is also included. In all cases the infrasound was detected approximately 30 minutes before the tornado funnel was observed. This work is generously supported by the National Science Foundation and NASA/Arkansas Space Grant.

  8. Nuclear effects at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    The development of a nuclear beam facility at HERA would allow the study of fundamental features of quark and gluon interactions in QCD. I briefly review the physics underlying nuclear shadowing and anti-shadowing as well as other diffractive and jet fragmentation processes that can be studies in high energy electron-nucleus collisions.

  9. AXAF VETA-I mirror ring focus measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Zhao, P.

    1994-01-01

    The AXAF VETA-I mirror ring focus measurements were made with an HRI (microchannel plate) X-ray detector. The ring focus is a sharply focused ring formed by X-rays before they reach the VEAT-I focal plane. It is caused by spherical aberrations due to the finite source distance and the despace in the VETA-I test. The ring focus test reveals some aspects fo the test system distortions and the mirror surface figure which are difficult or impossible to detect at the focal plane. The test results show periodic modulations of the ring radius and width which could be caused by gravity, thermal, and/or epoxy shrinkage distortions. The strongest component of the modulation had a 12-fold symmetry, because these distortions were exerted on the mirror through 12 flexures of the VETA-I mount. Ring focus models were developed to simulate the ring image. The models were compared with the data to understand the test system distortions and the mirror glass imperfection. Further studies will be done to complete this work. The ring focus measurement is a very powerful test. We expect that a similar test for the finally assembled mirror of AXAD-I will be highly valuable.

  10. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-02

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  11. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-01

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  12. A measuring tool for tree-rings analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilov, Oleg; Kanatjev, Alexander; Kasatkina, Elena

    2013-04-01

    A special tool has been created for the annual tree-ring widths measurement and analysis. It consists of professional scanner, computer system and software. This created complex in many aspects does not yield the similar systems (LINTAB, WinDENDRO), but in comparison to manual measurement systems, it offers a number of advantages: productivity gain, possibility of archiving the results of the measurements at any stage of the processing, operator comfort. It has been developed a new software, allowing processing of samples of different types (cores, saw cuts), including those which is difficult to process, having got a complex wood structure (inhomogeneity of growing in different directions, missed, light and false rings etc.). This software can analyze pictures made with optical scanners, analog or digital cameras. The complex software program was created on programming language C++, being compatible with modern operating systems like Windows X. Annual ring widths are measured along paths traced interactively. These paths can have any orientation and can be created so that ring widths are measured perpendicular to ring boundaries. A graphic of ring-widths in function of the year is displayed on a screen during the analysis and it can be used for visual and numerical cross-dating and comparison with other series or master-chronologies. Ring widths are saved to the text files in a special format, and those files are converted to the format accepted for data conservation in the International Tree-Ring Data Bank. The created complex is universal in application that will allow its use for decision of the different problems in biology and ecology. With help of this complex it has been reconstructed a long-term juniper (1328-2004) and pine (1445-2005) tree-ring chronologies on the base of samples collected at Kola Peninsula (northwestern Russia).

  13. The method for detecting diffusion ring diameter in Hemagglutinin measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wenbo; Liu, Xue; Duan, Jin; Wang, Xiao-man

    2014-11-01

    The diffuser ring diameter measurement is the most critical in hemagglutinin Measuring. The traditional methods, such as a vernier caliper or high-definition scanned images are subjective and low for the measurement data reliability. Propose high-resolution diffusion ring image for drop-resolution processing, adaptive Canny operator and local detection method to extract complete and clear diffusion ring boundaries, and finally make use of polynomial interpolation algorithm to make diffusion ring outer boundary pixel coordinates achieve sub-pixel accuracy and the least-squares fitting circle algorithm to calculate the precise center of the circle and the diameter of the diffuser ring. Experimental results show that the method detection time is only 63.61ms, which is a faster speed; diffuser ring diameter estimation error can achieve 0.55 pixel, high stability in experimental data. This method is adapted to the various types of influenza vaccine hemagglutinin content measurements, and has important value in the influenza vaccine quality detection.

  14. Charm, beauty and top at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, O.; Geiser, A.; Lisovyi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Results on open charm and beauty production and on the search for top production in high-energy electron-proton collisions at HERA are reviewed. This includes a discussion of relevant theoretical aspects, a summary of the available measurements and measurement techniques, and their impact on improved understanding of QCD and its parameters, such as parton density functions and charm- and beauty-quark masses. The impact of these results on measurements at the LHC and elsewhere is also addressed.

  15. Microgravity Diode Laser Spectroscopy Measurements in a Reacting Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.; VanderWal, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The technique of Diode Laser Spectroscopy (DLS) with wavelength modulation is utilized to measure the concentration of methane in reacting vortex rings under microgravity conditions. From the measured concentration of methane, other major species such as water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen can be easily computed under the assumption of equilibrium chemistry with an iterative method called ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry). The conserved scalar approach in modelling the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion is utilized to represent the unknown variables in terms of the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate in conjunction with ITAC. Post-processing of the DLS and the method used to compute the species concentration are discussed. From the flame luminosity results, ring circulation appears to increase the fuel consumption rate inside the reacting vortex ring and the flame height for cases with similar fuel volumes but different ring circulations. The concentrations of methane, water, and carbon dioxide agree well with available results from numerical simulations.

  16. The Hera Saturn entry probe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Frampton, R.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Fletcher, L. N.; Hueso, R.; Amato, M. J.; Colaprete, A.; Ferri, F.; Stam, D.; Wurz, P.; Atreya, S.; Aslam, S.; Banfield, D. J.; Calcutt, S.; Fischer, G.; Holland, A.; Keller, C.; Kessler, E.; Leese, M.; Levacher, P.; Morse, A.; Muñoz, O.; Renard, J.-B.; Sheridan, S.; Schmider, F.-X.; Snik, F.; Waite, J. H.; Bird, M.; Cavalié, T.; Deleuil, M.; Fortney, J.; Gautier, D.; Guillot, T.; Lunine, J. I.; Marty, B.; Nixon, C.; Orton, G. S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an M-class mission led by ESA with a contribution from NASA. It consists of one atmospheric probe to be sent into the atmosphere of Saturn, and a Carrier-Relay spacecraft. In this concept, the Hera probe is composed of ESA and NASA elements, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is delivered by ESA. The probe is powered by batteries, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is powered by solar panels and batteries. We anticipate two major subsystems to be supplied by the United States, either by direct procurement by ESA or by contribution from NASA: the solar electric power system (including solar arrays and the power management and distribution system), and the probe entry system (including the thermal protection shield and aeroshell). Hera is designed to perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic compositions as well as the dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere using a single probe, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and evolution of Saturn, the giant planets and their satellite systems, with extrapolation to extrasolar planets. Hera's aim is to probe well into the cloud-forming region of the troposphere, below the region accessible to remote sensing, to the locations where certain cosmogenically abundant species are expected to be well mixed. By leading to an improved understanding of the processes by which giant planets formed, including the composition and properties of the local solar nebula at the time and location of giant planet formation, Hera will extend the legacy of the Galileo and Cassini missions by further addressing the creation, formation, and chemical, dynamical, and thermal evolution of the giant planets, the entire solar system including Earth and the other terrestrial planets, and formation of other planetary systems.

  17. Magnetoresistance measurement of permalloy thin film rings with triangular fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Mei-Feng; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Liao, Chun-Neng; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2010-01-01

    Magnetization reversals in permalloy rings controlled by nucleation sites using triangular fins at the same side and diagonal with respect to the field direction are demonstrated by magnetoresistance measurement and micromagnetic simulation. In the ring with triangular fins at the same side, there exists two-step reversal from onion to flux-closure state (or vortex state) and then from flux-closure (or vortex state) to reverse onion state; in the ring with diagonal triangular fins, one-step reversal occurs directly from onion to reverse onion state. The reversal processes are repeatable and controllable in contrast to an ideal ring without triangular fins where one-step and two-step reversals occur randomly in sweep-up and sweep-down processes.

  18. A Temperature-Monitoring Vaginal Ring for Measuring Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Peter; Desjardins, Delphine; Kumar, Sandeep; Fetherston, Susan M.; Le-Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Helgadóttir, Berglind; Bjarnason, Ásgeir; Narasimhan, Manjula; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Product adherence is a pivotal issue in the development of effective vaginal microbicides to reduce sexual transmission of HIV. To date, the six Phase III studies of vaginal gel products have relied primarily on self-reporting of adherence. Accurate and reliable methods for monitoring user adherence to microbicide-releasing vaginal rings have yet to be established. Methods A silicone elastomer vaginal ring prototype containing an embedded, miniature temperature logger has been developed and tested in vitro and in cynomolgus macaques for its potential to continuously monitor environmental temperature and accurately determine episodes of ring insertion and removal. Results In vitro studies demonstrated that DST nano-T temperature loggers encapsulated in medical grade silicone elastomer were able to accurately and continuously measure environmental temperature. The devices responded quickly to temperature changes despite being embedded in different thickness of silicone elastomer. Prototype vaginal rings measured higher temperatures compared with a subcutaneously implanted device, showed high sensitivity to diurnal fluctuations in vaginal temperature, and accurately detected periods of ring removal when tested in macaques. Conclusions Vaginal rings containing embedded temperature loggers may be useful in the assessment of product adherence in late-stage clinical trials. PMID:25965956

  19. The Hera TGIP Sample Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, M. A.; Sears, D. W. G.; Roe, L.; Buffington, J.; Venechuk, E.; Azouggagh-McBride, S.

    2004-11-01

    We are entering a phase of solar system exploration in which sample return is playing an increasingly important role. Many sample collectors have been developed or proposed, depending on the nature of the surface to be sampled and the complexity and cost of the mission. A collector for low-cost missions to bodies with regoliths is now being developed by the University of Arkansas as a touch-and-go-impregnable-pad (TGIP). TGIP is the collector on the Hera near-Earth asteroid sample return Discovery mission recently proposed to NASA. TGIP consists of a 1 cm deep layer of silicone grease, a high viscosity version of the oil used by NASA's cosmic dust collection program. The grease is encased within a retractable aluminum ring. A 12 cm disk can collect on the order of 100 g of material, ranging from dust to centimeter-sized fragments. By stacking collectors, the collected sample is protected from physical and chemical alteration until processing in the laboratory. We have recently completed collection, temperature, vacuum, impact, and radiation tests on this collector. The TGIP has a high collection efficiency, satisfactory vacuum performance, can withstand impacts of 2000 g (equivalent to direct re-entry without a parachute),and exposure to 640 times the radiation dose expected on a six-year mission. We are now developing procedures for processing the returned collectors, based on those used for the cosmic dust program.

  20. Measuring the winding number instability in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollo, Anthony; Petkovic, Ivana; Devoret, Michel; Glazman, Leonid; Harris, Jack

    In equilibrium, a flux-biased superconducting ring occupies a state that is characterized by the integer winding number of its complex order parameter. Transitions between states of differing winding number occur via phase slips of the order parameter. A number of aspects of these phase slips remain poorly understood, including the particular value of flux bias at which the transition occurs, and the particular state into which the system relaxes. We use cantilever torque magnetometry to address these questions by measuring the equilibrium supercurrent in arrays of isolated aluminum rings over a wide range of applied flux and temperature. We fit the measured supercurrent using one-dimensional stationary Ginzburg Landau theory over the entire field range -Bc 3 < B rings' finite circumference. We find that in all instances the winding number changes by unity; this may be because the dynamics of the switching events are overdamped in these rings.

  1. E ring dust sources: Implications from Cassini's dust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Frank; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Kempf, Sascha; Krivov, Alexander V.; Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seiß, Martin; Miodrag Sremčević

    2006-08-01

    The Enceladus flybys of the Cassini spacecraft are changing our understanding of the origin and sustainment of Saturn's E ring. Surprisingly, beyond the widely accepted dust production caused by micrometeoroid impacts onto the atmosphereless satellites (the impactor-ejecta process), geophysical activities have been detected at the south pole of Enceladus, providing an additional, efficient dust source. The dust detector data obtained during the flyby E11 are used to identify the amount of dust produced in the impactor-ejecta process and to improve related modeling [Spahn, F., Schmidt, J., Albers, N., Hörning, M., Makuch, M., Seiß, M., Kempf, S., Srama, R., Dikarev, V.V., Helfert, S., Moragas-Klostermeyer, G., Krivov, A.V., Sremčević, M., Tuzzolino, A., Economou, T., Grün, E., 2006. Cassini dust measurements at Enceladus: implications for Saturn's E ring. Science, in press]. With this, we estimate the impact-generated dust contributions of the other E ring satellites and find significant differences in the dust ejection efficiency by two projectile families - the E ring particles (ERPs) and the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Together with the Enceladus south-pole source, the ERP impacts play a crucial role in the inner region, whereas the IDP impacts dominate the particle production in the outer E ring, possibly accounting for its large radial extent. Our results can be verified in future Cassini flybys of the E ring satellites. In this way poorly known parameters of the dust particle production in hypervelocity impacts can be constrained by comparison of the data and theory.

  2. Emittance measurement at the NSLS x-ray ring

    SciTech Connect

    Safranek, J.; Stefan, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    A pinhole camera for imaging x-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the NSLS X-Ray Ring. The pinhole camera detector is a 0.5 mm thick YAG phosphor screen viewed by a video camera. Both the theoretical pinhole diffraction pattern and the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the phosphor and camera have been deconvolved from the measured profile in order to derive the true transverse profile of the electron beam. This profile was then fit to a 2-dimensional Gaussian. The electron beam emittance as a function of the phase space acceptance of the pinhole camera has been derived, so the horizontal and vertical electron emittances can be deduced from the major and minor sigmas of the fit Gaussian. In the X-Ray Ring, the vertical emittance is kept small to maximize the synchrotron radiation brightness. The ratio of the measured vertical to horizontal emittance is 0.001.

  3. Magnetic response measurements of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik

    The main part of this thesis reports three experiments on the magnetic response of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings using a scanning SQUID microscope. The first experiment explores the magnetic response and fluxoid transitions of superconducting, mesoscopic bilayer aluminum rings in the presence of two coupled order parameters arising from the layered structure. For intermediate couplings, metastable states that have different phase winding numbers around the ring in each of the two order parameters were observed. Larger coupling locks the relative phase, so that the two order parameters are only manifest in the temperature dependence of the response. With increasing proximitization, this signature gradually disappears. The data can be described with a two-order-parameter Ginzburg-Landau theory. The second experiment concentrates on fluxoid transitions in similar, but single-layer rings. Near the critical temperature, the transitions, which are induced by applying a flux to the ring, only admit a single fluxoid at a time. At lower temperatures, several fluxoids enter or leave at once, and the final state approaches the ground state. Currently available theoretical frameworks cannot quantitatively explain the data. Heating and quasiparticle diffusion are likely important for a quantitative understanding of this experiment, which could provide a model system for studying the nonlinear dynamics of superconductors far from equilibrium. The third and most important scanning SQUID study concerns 33 individual mesoscopic gold rings. All measured rings show a paramagnetic linear susceptibility and a poorly understood anomaly around zero field, both of which are likely due to unpaired defect spins. The response of sufficiently small rings also has a component that is periodic in the flux through the ring, with a period close to h/e. Its amplitude varies in sign and magnitude from ring to ring, and its typical value and temperature dependence agree with

  4. Measurement of electric dipole moments at storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörg Pretz JEDI Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) is a fundamental property of a particle, like mass, charge and magnetic moment. What makes this property in particular interesting is the fact that a fundamental particle can only acquire an EDM via {P} and {T} violating processes. EDM measurements contribute to the understanding of the matter over anti-matter dominance in the universe, a question closely related to the violation of fundamental symmetries. Up to now measurements of EDMs have concentrated on neutral particles. Charged particle EDMs can be measured at storage ring. Plans at Forschungszentrum Jülich and results of first test measurements at the COoler SYnchrotron COSY will be presented.

  5. Commissioning and Science Forecasts for the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Aaron; HERA Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The HERA is a low-frequency radio interferometer aiming to make precise measurements of the power spectrum of fluctuations in 21cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization at z=13—6. This project was recently awarded development funding under the 2014 cycle of the National Science Foundation's Mid-Scale Innovations Program (MSIP). We present initial results from the commissioning and testing of the 19-element HERA prototype in South Africa, including measurements of the performance of HERA's 14-m dish and feed via reflectometry, beam mapping, and on-sky commissioning tests. We then forecast the science results that HERA will deliver once it reaches its full size of 352 elements. These forecasts include constraints on the 21cm power spectrum, the impact of these constraints on parametrized models of ionization, and their relevance to cosmological models. Construction of HERA-352 is pending the outcome of the 2016 NSF MSIP cycle.

  6. Microgravity Diode Laser Spectroscopy Measurements in a Reacting Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.

    2001-01-01

    The technique of Diode Laser Spectroscopy (DLS) with wavelength modulation is utilized to measure the concentration of methane in reacting vortex rings under microgravity conditions. From the measured concentration of methane, other major species such as water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen can be easily computed under the assumption of equilibrium chemistry with the method of Interactive Temperature with Assumed Chemistry (ITAC). The conserved scalar approach in modelling the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion is utilized to represent the unknown variables in terms of the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate in conjunction with ITAC. Post-processing of the DLS measurements and the method of ITAC used in computing the species concentration are discussed. From the flame luminosity results, the increase in ring circulation appears to increase the fuel consumption rate inside the reacting vortex ring and the flame height for cases with similar fuel volumes. Preliminary results and application of ITAC show some potential capabilities of ITAC in DLS. The measured concentration of methane, and computed concentrations of water and carbon dioxide agree well with available results from numerical simulations.

  7. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Bhat; John P. Marriner

    2003-06-10

    The Recycler Ring (RR) is a new 8Gev antiproton storage ring at Fermilab. Presently, this machine is being commissioned using protons from the Booster. It uses barrier buckets for stacking, un-stacking and storing the beam. At any given time, the RR is capable of storing proton or antiproton beams in multiple segments azimuthally. These segments of the beam may have widely differing longitudinal emittance and beam intensities and bunch lengths. It is highly essential to be able to measure the longitudinal emittance and keep track of the longitudinal dynamics at various stages of the operation of the RR. In this paper, the authors discuss a few methods of longitudinal emittance measurements in barrier buckets and discuss their merits and demerits

  8. Measurements of the electron cloud in the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, K. C.

    1999-04-16

    Synchrotron radiation interacting with the vacuum chamber walls in a storage ring produce photoelectrons that can be accelerated by the beam, acquiring sufficient energy to produce secondary electrons in collisions with the walls. If the secondary-electron yield (SEY) coefficient of the wall material is greater than one, as is the case with the aluminum chambers in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, a runaway condition can develop. As the electron cloud builds up along a train of stored positron or electron bunches, the possibility exists that a transverse perturbation of the head bunch will be communicated to trailing bunches due to interaction with the cloud. In order to characterize the electron cloud, a special vacuum chamber was built and inserted into the ring. The chamber contains 10 rudimentary electron-energy analyzers, as well as three targets coated with different materials. Measurements show that the intensity and electron energy distribution are highly dependent on the temporal spacing between adjacent bunches and the amount of current contained in each bunch. Furthermore, measurements using the different targets are consistent with what would be expected based on the SEY of the coatings. Data for both positron and electron beams are presented.

  9. Charm and Beauty in Photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobre, Monica

    2014-04-01

    The photoproduction of beauty and charm quarks at the ep collider HERA are presented. The b-quarks production was investigated in the bb → eeX' channel and the differential production cross section was measured as a function of the average transverse momentum of the beauty quarks down to the threshold. The cross section of D* meson decaying in the golden channel was determined both inclusively and in D*-tagged dijet events. Exploiting the characteristics of the heavy-flavoured hadron decays, beauty and charm quark cross sections were also measured in dijet events using secondary vertices or semi-muonic decays.

  10. Impact of Saturn Main Ring Mass on interpretation of Pioneer 11 and Cassini SOI Radiation Measurements Across the Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.; Sturner, Steven J.; Sittler, Edward C., Jr.; Kollmann, Peter; Roussos, Elias; Johnson, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    The Pioneer 11 (1979) and Cassini Orbiter (2004) missions measured the energetic particle and gamma ray flux environments across the A, B, and outer C rings of Saturn. This radiation originates as secondary proton, neutron, electron, and gamma ray emissions from the interaction of high-energy (> 20 GeV) galactic cosmic ray protons and other ions with bulk ice material in the rings and is sensitive to the surface mass density of the rings. The Pioneer 11 analysis from the University of Chicago High Energy Telescope, published in 1985, was consistent with a average surface density of about 50 g/cm2, assuming pure water ice, and a total ring mass of 2.7x10-8 Saturn masses (MS). This independently-derived value confirmed the post-Voyager result of 3x10-8 MS from radio and stellar occultations, and from observed damping of density waves in the rings. Although some later ring models in the Cassini mission era (2004 - present) allow for a greater mass by an order of magnitude, the latest density wave analysis from Cassini indicates that the Pioneer-Voyager value may be correct. GEANT radiation transport simulations have been performed to update the ring radiation model and enable ongoing assessments of the Pioneer 11 HET and Cassini MIMI/LEMMS responses to this radiation. The O2 gas production by radiation chemistry within the ring material is also estimated as a function of ring mass for comparison to Cassini and earlier measurements of the ring atmosphere and ionosphere. More massive rings would produce more O2.

  11. In-situ permittivity measurements using ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.

    2012-06-01

    Proper development of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology requires a unique understanding of the electromagnetic (EM) properties of targets and background media. Thus, electromagnetic characterization of targets and backgrounds is fundamental to the success or failure of UWB GPR as a threat detection technique. In many cases, threats are buried in soil. Soil properties directly affect the radar signature of targets and determine the depth at which they can be detected by radar. One such property is permittivity. A portable system recently developed at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory measures permittivity in-situ with minimal disturbance of the dielectric sample. The measurement technique uses ring resonators. Design equations and physical dimensions are presented for fabricating resonators at frequencies between 600 MHz and 2 GHz. Only a handheld vector network analyzer, coaxial cabling, and the ring resonators are necessary for each measurement. Lookup curves generated in simulation are referenced to calculate the complex permittivity of the sample. The permittivity measurement is explained step-by-step, and data is presented for samples of soils from Ft. Irwin, California and Yuma, Arizona.

  12. Rotational Raman scattering (Ring effect) in satellite backscatter ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; McPeters, Richard D.; Park, Hongwoo

    1995-07-01

    A detailed radiative transfer calculation has been carried out to estimate the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) on satellite measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation. Raman-scattered light is shifted in frequency from the incident light, which causes filling in of solar Fraunhofer lines in the observed backscattered spectrum (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of the rotational Raman scattering filling in is a function of wavelength, solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, surface pressure, and instrument spectral resolution. The filling in predicted by our model is found to be in agreement with observations from the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer and the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer.

  13. Heavy Quark Production and Spectroscopy at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshon, Uri

    2002-06-01

    Production of final states containing open charm (c) and beauty (b) quarks at HERA is reviewed. Photoproduction (PHP) of the charm meson resonances D*, D0 and Ds, as well as D* production in the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) regime, are measured and compared to QCD predictions. The excited charm mesons D1)0(2420, D2) *0(2460 and Ds1)+/-(2536) have been observed and the rates of charm quarks hadronising to these mesons were extracted. A search for radially excited charm mesons has been performed. PHP and DIS beauty cross sections are higher than expected in next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD.

  14. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, Bruno

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  15. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1; ZEUS Collaborations,

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  16. Proceedings of the Ringberg Workshop New Trends in HERA Physics 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindhammer, G.; Ochs, W.; Kniehl, B. A.; Kramer, G.

    2006-04-01

    1. Proton structure. Proton structure measurements at high Q2 and large x / Katarzyna Wichmann. Electroweak physics at HERA / Joachim Meyer. Inclusive low Q2 measurements at HERA / Victor Lendermann. Resummed perturbative evolution at high energy / Richard Ball. Colour dipole phenomenology / Graham Shaw -- 2. Spin physics. Exclusive reactions at HERMES / Frank Ellinghaus. Transverse spin effects in single and double hadron electroproduction at HERMES / Benedikt Zihlmann. Present understanding of the nucleon spin structure in view of recent experiments / Andreas Metz -- 3. Production of Hadrons and Jets. Measurements of [symbol] and parton distribution functions using HERA jet data / Amanda Cooper-Sarkar. A new parton shower algorithm: shower evolution, matching at leading and next-to-leading order level / Zóltan Nagy. Jet production at HERA / Dan Traynor. Multi-jet production in lepton-proton scattering with next-to-leading order accuracy / Zóltan Trócsányi. Dijet rates with symmetric [symbol] cuts / Andrea Banfi. QCD dynamics from forward hadron and jet measurements / Lidia Goerlich. Light-hadron electroproduction at next-to-leading order and implications / Bernd Kniehl. Particle production and fragmentation / David Saxon. Soft gluon logarithmic resummation and hadron mass effects in single hadron inclusive production / Simon Albino -- 4. Heavy-flavour production. Heavy-flavour photo- and electroproduction at NLO / Ingo Schienbein. Physics with charm quarks at HERA / John Loizides. Beauty production at HERA / Olaf Behnke. J/[symbol] photoproduction at next-to-leading order / Luminita Mihaila. J/[symbol] photoproduction at large z in soft collinear effective theory / Sean Fleming -- 5. Diffractive ep Scattering. Exclusive and inclusive diffraction at HERA / Henri Kowalski. Diffractive production of vector mesons and the gluon at small x / Thomas Teubner. Inclusive diffraction / Laurent Favart. From factorization to its breaking in diffractive dijet production

  17. Measuring mercury and other elemental components in tree rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillan, C.; Hollerman, W.A.; Doyle, T.W.; Lewis, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in measuring heavy metal pollution, such as mercury, using tree ring analysis. Since 1970, this method has provided a historical snapshot of pollutant concentrations near hazardous waste sites. Traditional methods of analysis have long been used with heavy metal pollutants such as mercury. These methods, such as atomic fluorescence and laser ablation, are sometimes time consuming and expensive to implement. In recent years, ion beam techniques, such as Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE), have been used to measure large numbers of elements. Most of the existing research in this area has been completed for low to medium atomic number pollutants, such as titanium, cobalt, nickel, and copper. Due to the reduction of sensitivity, it is often difficult or impossible to use traditional low energy (few MeV) PIXE analysis for pollutants with large atomic numbers. For example, the PIXE detection limit for mercury was recently measured to be about 1 ppm for a spiked Southern Magnolia wood sample [ref. 1]. This presentation will compare PIXE and standard chemical concentration results for a variety of wood samples. Copyright 2004 by ISA.

  18. Measuring mercury and other elemental components in tree rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillan, C.; Hollerman, W.A.; Doyle, T.W.; Lewis, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in measuring heavy metal pollution, such as mercury, using tree ring analysis. Since 1970, this method has provided a historical snapshot of pollutant concentrations near hazardous waste sites. Traditional methods of analysis have long been used with heavy metal pollutants such as mercury. These methods, such as atomic fluorescence and laser ablation, are sometimes time consuming and expensive to implement. In recent years, ion beam techniques, such as Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE), have been used to measure large numbers of elements. Most of the existing research in this area has been completed for low to medium atomic number pollutants, such as titanium, cobalt, nickel, and copper. Due to the reduction of sensitivity, it is often difficult or impossible to use traditional low energy (few MeV) PIXE analysis for pollutants with large atomic numbers. For example, the PIXE detection limit for mercury was recently measured to be about 1 ppm for a spiked Southern Magnolia wood sample [ref. 1]. This presentation will compare PIXE and standard chemical concentration results for a variety of wood samples.

  19. Absolute beam energy measurements in e+e- storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The CERN Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) was dedicated to the measurement of the mass Mz and the width Γz of the Z0 resonance during the LEP1 phase which terminated in September 1995. The Storage Ring operated in Energy Scan mode during the 1993 and 1995 physics runs by choosing the beam energy Ebeam to correspond to a center-of-mass (CM) energy at the interaction points (IPs) ECMpeak±1762 MeV. After a short review of the techniques usually adopted to set and control the beam energy, this paper describes in more detail two methods adopted at LEP for precise beam energy determination that are essential to reduce the contribution to the systematic error on Mz and Γz. The positron beam momentum was initially determined at the 20-GeV injection energy by measuring the speed of a less relativistic proton beam circulating on the same orbit, taking advantage of the unique opportunity to inject two beams into the LEP at short time intervals. The positron energy at the Z0 peak was in this case derived by extrapolation. Once transverse polarization became reproducible, the Resonant Depolarization (RD) technique was implemented at the Z0 operating energies, providing a ⩽2×10-5 instantaneous accuracy. RD Beam Energy Calibration has been adopted during the LEP Energy Scan campaigns as well as in Accelerator Physics runs for accurate measurement of machine parameters.

  20. Measurement of storage ring motion at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The mechanical stability of the Advanced Light Source storage ring is examined over a period of 1.5 years from the point of view of floor motion. The storage ring beam position monitor stability is examined under various operating conditions.

  1. Optical measurements of paired luminous rings in capacitive radio-frequency hydrogen discharges.

    PubMed

    Sakawa, Y; Hori, M; Shoji, T; Sato, T

    1999-11-01

    Optical measurements of paired luminous rings separated by a narrow dark gap have been conducted in capacitive radio-frequency (rf) hydrogen discharges. The lines of molecular H(2) are strongly excited at the ring emission compared with a weaker emission of the H(alpha) line. The number of ring pairs increases with gas pressure, and the outermost ring pairs near the electrodes start to appear earlier than the inner ones. Each ring emission is turning on and off with the applied rf frequency, i.e., the left-side (right-side) ring of a paired ring is on when the left-side (right-side) electrode is biased positively. The axial light intensity profile, which is time resolved with the applied rf frequency, indicates that the emission profiles are similar to those of dc glow discharges, and the luminous rings correspond to the standing striations at the positive column. PMID:11970506

  2. Preservation of beam loss induced quenches, beam lifetime and beam loss measurements with the HERAp beam-loss-monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenburg, Kay

    1994-06-01

    The beam-loss-monitors (BLMs) in the HERA-proton-ring (HERAp) must fulfill the following requirements: They have to measure losses sensitive and fast enough to prevent the superconducting magnets from beam loss induced quenching; the dynamic range of the monitors must exceed several decades in order to measure losses during beam lifetimes of hundreds of hours as well as the much stronger losses that may quench superconducting magnets; they have to be insensitive to the synchrotron radiation of the adjacent electron-ring (HERAe); and their radiation hardness must allow a monitor-lifetime of a few years of HERA operation. These requirements are well satisfied by the HERAp-BLM-System.

  3. On the synthesis, measurement and applications of octanuclear heterometallic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, T. B.

    Inorganic macrocycles have stimulated interest in recent years for their magnetic properties, their associated host-guest chemistry and their aesthetically appealing structures. These characteristics have led to suggestions that they could be exploited for the purposes of ion recognition, catalysis, as single molecule magnets, MRI agents, antibacterial agents and as part of larger architectures in a molecular machine. This thesis explores the properties of a group of chromium(III) macrocycles, with functionality tailored towards different pursuits. Firstly the magnetic properties of a newly synthesised family of ring dimers are investigated. The nature of magnetic exchange within each ring leads to a net electronic spin which, it has been proposed, could represent a quantum binary digit within a quantum information processing system. By linking together pairs of rings, the degree of inter-ring communication can be determined. Such interactions are important for the correlation of spin as initiation of quantum entanglement, a pre-requisite for quantum computing. The rings can also act as fluoro-metallocrown, hosting the molecule which templated their formation. A range of rings with different guests are synthesised and their solid and solution state structures are explored. On templating about bulky dialykyl amines hybrid organic-inorganic rotaxanes are formed where the guest is fixed. In contrast when using small amines and alkali metals, exchange of guests is possible. The dynamics of all of these systems are investigated with proton NMR, quite remarkable for such highly paramagnetic complexes.

  4. Experimental measurement of noncovalent interactions between halogens and aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Adams, Harry; Cockroft, Scott L; Guardigli, Claudio; Hunter, Christopher A; Lawson, Kevin R; Perkins, Julie; Spey, Sharon E; Urch, Christopher J; Ford, Rhonan

    2004-05-01

    Chemical double mutant cycles have been used to quantify the interactions of halogens with the faces of aromatic rings in chloroform. The halogens are forced over the face of an aromatic ring by an array of hydrogen-bonding interactions that lock the complexes in a single, well-defined conformation. These interactions can also be engineered into the crystal structures of simpler model compounds, but experiments in solution show that the halogen-aromatic interactions observed in the solid state are all unfavourable, regardless of whether the aromatic rings contain electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents. The halogen-aromatic interactions are repulsive by 1-3 kJ mol(-1). The interactions with fluorine are slightly less favourable than with chlorine and bromine.

  5. Planning and Prototyping for a Storage Ring Measurement of the Proton Electric Dipole Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Talman, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Electron and proton EDM's can be measured in "frozen spin" (with the beam polarization always parallel to the orbit, for example) storage rings. For electrons the "magic" kinetic energy at which the beam can be frozen is 14.5 MeV. For protons the magic kinetic energy is 230 MeV. The currently measured upper limit for the electron EDM is much smaller than the proton EDM upper limit, which is very poorly known. Nevertheless, because the storage ring will be an order of magnitude cheaper, a sensible plan is to first build an all-electric electron storage ring as a prototype. Such an electron ring was successfully built at Brookhaven, in 1954, as a prototype for their AGS ring. This leaves little uncertainty concerning the cost and performance of such a ring. (This is documentedin one of the Physical Review papers mentioned above.)

  6. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M. R.

    2006-04-11

    A number of the most recent results from the wealth of precision HERA data on high transverse energy jet production in deep inelastic scattering are reviewed. These measurements are confronted with predictions from next-to-leading order (NLO) Quantum Chromodynamics and allow the extraction of the strong coupling constant, {alpha}s, and have been used in QCD fits of the parton distribution functions in the proton.

  7. Charm and bottom photoproduction at HERA with MC@NLO

    SciTech Connect

    Toll T.; Frixione, S.

    2011-12-01

    We apply the MC@NLO formalism to the production of heavy-quark pairs in pointlike photon-hadron collisions. By combining this result with its analogue relevant to hadron-hadron collisions, we obtain NLO predictions matched to parton showers for the photoproduction of Q{bar Q} pairs. We compare MC{at}NLO results to the measurements of c- and b-flavored hadron observables performed by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA.

  8. Enhanced ring lasers: a new measurement tool for Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, K. U.; Kluegel, T.; Wells, J.-P.; Holdaway, J.; Gebauer, A.; Velikoseltsev, A.

    2012-11-01

    We report the progress in the technology of fabrication of large ring lasers that has resulted in an increase in instrumental rotation sensitivity by as much as a factor of 3, to δΩ = 1.2 × 10-11 rad s-1 Hz-1/2, which makes the domain of changes in the angular velocity of Earth's rotation, ΔΩ/Ω ≈ 10-9, accessible to a local rotation sensor. New studies show that the largest contribution to the observed deviation in sensor performance with respect to the computed shot noise limit is caused by the micro-seismic background activity of the Earth. Our efforts have been concentrated on the improvement of sensor stability, including correction of drift effects, which are caused by the aging of the laser gas, fixing scale factor instabilities induced by atmospheric pressure variations, and minimising the temperature variations resulting from corresponding adiabatic expansion and compression of the local air around the instrument. To achieve this, we have recently introduced a pressure-stabilising vessel with dimensions slightly larger than the ring laser apparatus, such that it encloses the entire structure. By monitoring the optical frequency in the ring laser cavity continuously and stabilising the scale factor in a closed loop system with the pressure-stabilising vessel, it has become possible to extend the range of sensor stability from the short term (1 — 3 days) to well into the mid-term regime (>40 days), and possibly even well beyond that. Once a sufficiently long timeseries of the ring laser data has been recorded, we will be able to define the range of temporal stability in more detail. The extension of the regime of stability gives access to geophysical signals at frequencies substantially lower than previously observable with ring lasers.

  9. Enhanced ring lasers: a new measurement tool for Earth sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, K U; Kluegel, T; Wells, J.-P.; Holdaway, J; Gebauer, A; Velikoseltsev, A

    2012-11-30

    We report the progress in the technology of fabrication of large ring lasers that has resulted in an increase in instrumental rotation sensitivity by as much as a factor of 3, to {delta}{Omega} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} rad s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2}, which makes the domain of changes in the angular velocity of Earth's rotation, {Delta}{Omega}/{Omega} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9}, accessible to a local rotation sensor. New studies show that the largest contribution to the observed deviation in sensor performance with respect to the computed shot noise limit is caused by the micro-seismic background activity of the Earth. Our efforts have been concentrated on the improvement of sensor stability, including correction of drift effects, which are caused by the aging of the laser gas, fixing scale factor instabilities induced by atmospheric pressure variations, and minimising the temperature variations resulting from corresponding adiabatic expansion and compression of the local air around the instrument. To achieve this, we have recently introduced a pressure-stabilising vessel with dimensions slightly larger than the ring laser apparatus, such that it encloses the entire structure. By monitoring the optical frequency in the ring laser cavity continuously and stabilising the scale factor in a closed loop system with the pressure-stabilising vessel, it has become possible to extend the range of sensor stability from the short term (1 - 3 days) to well into the mid-term regime (>40 days), and possibly even well beyond that. Once a sufficiently long timeseries of the ring laser data has been recorded, we will be able to define the range of temporal stability in more detail. The extension of the regime of stability gives access to geophysical signals at frequencies substantially lower than previously observable with ring lasers. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  10. Comparison of beam transport simulations to measurements at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C.; Neri, F.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Blind, B.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Sander, O.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1997-10-01

    The ability to model and simulate beam behavior in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an important diagnostic and predictive tool. This paper gives the results of an effort to model the ring apertures and lattice and use beam simulation programs to track the beam. The results are then compared to measured activation levels from beam loss in the ring. The success of the method determines its usefulness in evaluating the effects of planned upgrades to the Proton Storage Ring.

  11. Ring current electron dynamics during geomagnetic storms based on the Van Allen Probes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Baker, D. N.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B. A.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    Based on comprehensive measurements from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron Mass Spectrometer Ion Spectrometer, Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope, and Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment instruments on the Van Allen Probes, comparative studies of ring current electrons and ions are performed and the role of energetic electrons in the ring current dynamics is investigated. The deep injections of tens to hundreds of keV electrons and tens of keV protons into the inner magnetosphere occur frequently; after the injections the electrons decay slowly in the inner belt but protons in the low L region decay very fast. Intriguing similarities between lower energy protons and higher-energy electrons are also found. The evolution of ring current electron and ion energy densities and energy content are examined in detail during two geomagnetic storms, one moderate and one intense. The results show that the contribution of ring current electrons to the ring current energy content is much smaller than that of ring current ions (up to ~12% for the moderate storm and ~7% for the intense storm), and <35 keV electrons dominate the ring current electron energy content at the storm main phases. Though the electron energy content is usually much smaller than that of ions, the enhancement of ring current electron energy content during the moderate storm can get to ~30% of that of ring current ions, indicating a more dynamic feature of ring current electrons and important role of electrons in the ring current buildup. The ring current electron energy density is also shown to be higher at midnight and dawn while lower at noon and dusk.

  12. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements and the Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Moissl, R.; Gruen, E.

    2007-12-01

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter, the Galileo spacecraft flew twice through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During the ring passages, the Galileo impact-ionization dust detector counted a few thousand impacts but only about 100 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. The instrument verified the outward extension of the gossamer ring beyond Thebe's orbit and measured a major reduction in particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring material is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2007). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. Finally, Galileo also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. Recent modelling (Hamilton & Krueger, Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically

  13. Measuring the Particle Size Distribution in the Saturnian Rings by Diffraction of Starlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbison, Rebecca A.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-10-01

    Occultations of Saturn's rings have proven to be a useful way to measure the particle-size distribution of the bodies making up the ring. The Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn, has been measuring stellar occultations with the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), with a total of 74 observed during the period 2004-2009. During these occultations, we have observed 'gap overshoots': places near a sharp edge of the rings, such as the gaps in the C Ring, Cassini Division, and A Ring, and at the outer edges of the A and B Rings, where the transmission of starlight appears to exceed unity. This excess light is due to starlight forward-scattered from the nearby ring into the detector. In this work, we model these 'overshoots' in terms of a truncated power law particle-size distribution. Due to the geometry of the observations and the observation wavelength of 2.92 microns, chosen to minimize reflected ringlight, our observations are most sensitive to particles from 1 to 10 cm, and due to the exquisite time resolution, we are able to sample smaller regions of the rings than other types of occultation experiments. We observe the trans-Keeler region of the A ring as having a steeper particle-size distribution from the regions inward of the Keeler Gap, correcting preliminary results presented in 2011. We also measure the power-law index of the particle-size distribution as being nearly constant across the Cassini Division (from the Barnard and Bessel gaps at 120,300 km to the Huygens Gap at 117,900 km) and around the Dawes, Maxwell and Colombo in the C Ring.

  14. RESONANCE METHOD OF ELECTRIC-DIPOLE-MOMENT MEASUREMENTS IN STORAGE RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ORLOV, Y.F.; MORSE, W.M.; SEMERTZIDIS, Y.K.

    2006-05-10

    A ''resonance method'' of measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in storage rings is described, based on two new ideas: (1) Oscillating particles velocities in resonance with spin precession, and (2) alternately producing two sub-beams with different betatron tunes--one sub-beam to amplify and thus make it easier to correct ring imperfections that produce false signals imitating EDM signals, and the other to make the EDM measurement.

  15. Resonance Method of Electric-Dipole-Moment Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Yuri F.; Morse, William M.; Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2006-06-02

    A 'resonance method' of measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in storage rings is described, based on two new ideas: (1) Oscillating particles' velocities in resonance with spin precession, and (2) alternately producing two sub-beams with different betatron tunes--one sub-beam to amplify and thus make it easier to correct ring imperfections that produce false signals imitating EDM signals, and the other to make the EDM measurement.

  16. HERA: Chasing Our Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David; Bowman, J. D.; Jacobs, D.; Parsons, A.; Liu, A.; Werthimer, D.; Ali, Z.; Carilli, C. L.; Chiang, C.; Sievers, J. L.; Furlanetto, S. R.; Hewitt, J. N.; Tegmark, M.; Dillon, J. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Moore, D.; Aguirre, J. E.; Bernardi, G.; Walbrugh, W.; Morales, M. F.; Pober, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA) roadmap is a staged program that uses the unique properties of the 21-cm line from neutral hydrogen to probe the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the preceding Dark Ages. During these epochs, roughly 0.3-1 Gyr after the Big Bang, the first stars and black holes heated and reionized the Universe following cosmic recombination. Direct observation of the large scale structure of reionization and its evolution with time will have a profound impact on our understanding of the birth of the first galaxies and black holes, their influence on the intergalactic medium (IGM), and cosmology. Detecting, characterizing and ultimately imaging this epoch is a key goal for the community and was the top priority in the Radio, Millimeter, and Sub-millimeter category of recommended new facilities for mid-scale funding in the most recent decadal survey. Current projects (PAPER, MWA, LOFAR, GMRT) are striving to make the first detection of the statistical power spectrum of the signal, but current best limits still fall above even optimistic predictions of its intrinsic strength. While these projects are still taking data, it is recognized that an optimized array based on our new understanding of the signal characteristics is needed to make a strong detection and begin to characterize this signal over multiple scales and redshifts. The HERA collaboration is chasing this signal by selectively expanding the sensitivity at these frequencies with a new array to be constructed in South Africa, at the current location of PAPER. As the area increases, so do the data and pipeline needs. This paper will outline the telescope and discuss its processing needs.

  17. Measurement of D0, D+, Ds + and D*+ production in fixed target 920 GeV proton nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, T. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, A.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, L.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Y.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Y.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. A. A.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Škrk, D.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Y.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2007-11-01

    The inclusive production cross sections of the charmed mesons D0,D+,Ds + and D*+ have been measured in interactions of 920 GeV protons on C, Ti, and W targets with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. Differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and Feynman’s x variable are given for the central rapidity region and for transverse momenta up to pT=3.5 GeV/ c. The atomic mass number dependence and the leading to non-leading particle production asymmetries are presented as well.

  18. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2008-09-01

    Galileo was the first articfiial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The highly sensitive impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage { on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter - dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2:33RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2:5RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth (Krüger et al, Icarus, submitted). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are approximately 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle ux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits with inclinations up to 20°. Finally, the faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to

  19. Measurements of carbon-14 with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartt, A. D.; Ognibene, T.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method for quantitation of 14C in biological samples. This technology has been used in a variety of low dose, human health related studies over the last 20 years when very high sensitivity was needed. AMS helped pioneer these scientific methods, but its expensive facilities and requirements for highly trained technical staff have limited their proliferation. Quantification of 14C by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) offers an approach that eliminates many of the shortcomings of an accelerator-based system and would supplement the use of AMS in biomedical research. Our initial prototype, using a non-ideal wavelength laser and under suboptimal experimental conditions, has a 3.5-modern, 1- σ precision for detection of milligram-sized, carbon-14-elevated samples. These results demonstrate proof of principle and provided a starting point for the development of a spectrometer capable of biologically relevant sensitivities.

  20. Biomarkers and biometric measures of adherence to use of ARV-based vaginal rings

    PubMed Central

    Stalter, Randy M; Moench, Thomas R; MacQueen, Kathleen M; Tolley, Elizabeth E; Owen, Derek H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Poor adherence to product use has been observed in recent trials of antiretroviral (ARV)-based oral and vaginal gel HIV prevention products, resulting in an inability to determine product efficacy. The delivery of microbicides through vaginal rings is widely perceived as a way to achieve better adherence but vaginal rings do not eliminate the adherence challenges exhibited in clinical trials. Improved objective measures of adherence are needed as new ARV-based vaginal ring products enter the clinical trial stage. Methods To identify technologies that have potential future application for vaginal ring adherence measurement, a comprehensive literature search was conducted that covered a number of biomedical and public health databases, including PubMed, Embase, POPLINE and the Web of Science. Published patents and patent applications were also searched. Technical experts were also consulted to gather more information and help evaluate identified technologies. Approaches were evaluated as to feasibility of development and clinical trial implementation, cost and technical strength. Results Numerous approaches were identified through our landscape analysis and classified as either point measures or cumulative measures of vaginal ring adherence. Point measurements are those that give a measure of adherence at a particular point in time. Cumulative measures attempt to measure ring adherence over a period of time. Discussion Approaches that require modifications to an existing ring product are at a significant disadvantage, as this will likely introduce additional regulatory barriers to the development process and increase manufacturing costs. From the point of view of clinical trial implementation, desirable attributes would be high acceptance by trial participants, and little or no additional time or training requirements on the part of participants or clinic staff. We have identified four promising approaches as being high priority for further development

  1. An Experimental Measurement of Lubrication Behavior of Piston Rings in a Spark Ignition Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungwoo; Choi, Sangmin; Bae, Choongsik

    Friction forces of a piston ring pack for a typical SI engine were measured using a floating liner system, in which the effects of cylinder pressure, oil starvation and piston secondary motion were excluded. Friction patterns of each individual ring, represented by measured friction forces, were classified into five frictional modes with regard to the combination of predominant lubrication regimes (boundary, mixed and hydrodynamic lubrication) and stroke regions (mid-stroke and dead centers). Those modes were identified on a Stribeck diagram of the dimensionless bearing parameter and friction coefficients; the coefficients were evaluated at mid-stroke and at dead centers. Frictional modes were evaluated by varying operation parameters (such as engine speed and cylinder wall temperature). Compression rings operated in the mode in which hydrodynamic lubrication was dominant at mid-stroke, while mixed lubrication was dominant at dead centers in steady conditions. However, oil control rings operated in the mode in which mixed lubrication was dominant throughout the entire stroke.

  2. Electrostatic design of the barrel CRID (Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector) and associated measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va'Vra, J. Williams, H. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US

    1990-04-01

    We report on the electrostatic design and related measurements of the barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector for the Stanford Large Detector experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Linear Collider. We include test results of photon feedback in TMAE-laden gas, distortion measurements in the drift boxes and corona measurements. 13 refs., 21 figs.

  3. Galileo in-situ dust measurements in Jupiter’s gossamer rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2009-09-01

    Galileo was the first artificial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage—on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter—dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2.33 RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2.5 RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth. Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging [Showalter, M.R., de Pater, I., Verbanac, G., Hamilton, D.P., Burns, J.A., 2008. Icarus 195, 361-377; de Pater, I., Showalter, M.R., Macintosh, B., 2008. Icarus 195, 348-360]. The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle flux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits

  4. Small size probe for inner profile measurement of pipes using optical fiber ring beam device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Machi, Kizuku; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2012-11-01

    The requirements of inner profile measurement of pipes and holes become recently larger and larger, and applications of inner profile measurement have rapidly expanded to medical field as well as industrial fields such as mechanical, automobile and heavy industries. We have proposed measurement method by incorporating a ring beam device that produces a disk beam and have developed various probes for different inner profile measurement. To meet request for applying to smaller diameter pipes, we tried to improve the ring beam light source using a conical mirror, optical fiber collimator and a laser diode. At this moment a probe with the size of 5 mm in diameter has been realized.

  5. Measuring the Thickness of a Transparent Ring with a Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Alfred F.

    2007-01-01

    There seems to be no reasonable way to measure the thickness of a narrow-mouth glass bottle. One can measure the outer and inner diameters of the mouth with a ruler or a pair of calipers and then calculate the thickness. However, this measurement might be interfered with by the threads at the mouth. Furthermore, it is uncertain whether the…

  6. Storage ring cross section measurements for electron impact ionization of Fe8+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Novotný, O.; Pindzola, M. S.; Repnow, R.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, D. W.

    2016-04-01

    We have measured electron impact ionization (EII) for Fe8+ forming Fe9+ from below the ionization threshold to 1200 eV. These measurements were carried out at the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The objective of using a storage ring is to store the ion beam initially so that metastable levels decay, thereby allowing for measurements on a well-defined ground-level ion beam. In this case, however, some metastable levels were too long lived to be removed. We discuss several methods for quantifying the metastable fraction, which we estimate to be ∼30%–40%. Although metastables remain problematic, the present storage ring work improves upon other experimental geometries by limiting the metastable contamination to only a few long-lived excited levels. We discuss some future prospects for obtaining improved measurements of Fe8+ and other ions with long-lived metastable levels.

  7. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.; Strikman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk.

  8. Hera - The HEASARC's New Data Analysis Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pence, William

    2006-01-01

    Hera is the new computer service provided by the HEASARC at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that enables qualified student and professional astronomical researchers to immediately begin analyzing scientific data from high-energy astrophysics missions. All the necessary resources needed to do the data analysis are freely provided by Hera, including: * the latest version of the hundreds of scientific analysis programs in the HEASARC's HEASOFT package, as well as most of the programs in the Chandra CIAO package and the XMM-Newton SAS package. * high speed access to the terabytes of data in the HEASARC's high energy astrophysics Browse data archive. * a cluster of fast Linw workstations to run the software * ample local disk space to temporarily store the data and results. Some of the many features and different modes of using Hera are illustrated in this poster presentation.

  9. Exclusive vector meson production at HERA from QCD with saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Marquet, C.; Peschanski, R.; Soyez, G.

    2007-08-01

    Following recent predictions that the geometric scaling properties of deep inelastic scattering data in inclusive {gamma}*p collisions are expected also in exclusive diffractive processes, we investigate the diffractive production of vector mesons. Using analytic results in the framework of the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation at nonzero momentum transfer, we extend to the nonforward amplitude a QCD-inspired forward saturation model including charm, following the theoretical predictions for the momentum transfer dependence of the saturation scale. We obtain a good fit to the available HERA data and make predictions for deeply virtual Compton scattering measurements.

  10. Beauty photoproduction using decays into electrons at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.

    2008-10-01

    Photoproduction of beauty quarks in events with two jets and an electron associated with one of the jets has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb{sup -1}. The fractions of events containing b quarks, and also of events containing c quarks, were extracted from a likelihood fit using variables sensitive to electron identification as well as to semileptonic decays. Total and differential cross sections for beauty and charm production were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations and Monte Carlo models.

  11. Organization of FtsZ Filaments in the Bacterial Division Ring Measured from Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Si, Fangwei; Busiek, Kimberly; Margolin, William; Sun, Sean X.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis in bacteria is accomplished by a ring-shaped cell-division complex (the Z-ring). The primary component of the Z-ring is FtsZ, a filamentous tubulin homolog that serves as a scaffold for the recruitment of other cell-division-related proteins. FtsZ forms filaments and bundles. In the cell, it has been suggested that FtsZ filaments form the arcs of the ring and are aligned in the cell-circumferential direction. Using polarized fluorescence microscopy in live Escherichia coli cells, we measure the structural organization of FtsZ filaments in the Z-ring. The data suggest a disordered organization: a substantial portion of FtsZ filaments are aligned in the cell-axis direction. FtsZ organization in the Z-ring also appears to depend on the bacterial species. Taken together, the unique arrangement of FtsZ suggests novel unexplored mechanisms in bacterial cell division. PMID:24209842

  12. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-30

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for m{sub n}u<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than deltap/p<10{sup -5}, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(10{sup 18}) decays.

  13. Measuring neutrino mass with radioactive ions in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    We propose a method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. Then, by counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for m ν <0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δ p/ p<10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least mathcal{O}(10^{18}) decays.

  14. Measuring neutrino mass with radioactive ions in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. Then, by counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for mν < 0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δp/p < 10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least Script O(1018) decays.

  15. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for mν<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δp/p<10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(1018) decays.

  16. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  17. THE COLOR GLASS CONDENSATE, RHIC AND HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    2002-04-30

    In this talk, I discuss a universal form of matter, the Color Glass Condensate. It is this matter which composes the low x part of all hadronic wavefunctions. The experimental programs at RHIC and HERA, and future programs at LHC and eRHIC may allow us to probe and study the properties of this matter.

  18. Amphibious hearing in ringed seals (Pusa hispida): underwater audiograms, aerial audiograms and critical ratio measurements.

    PubMed

    Sills, Jillian M; Southall, Brandon L; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2015-07-01

    Ringed seals (Pusa hispida) are semi-aquatic marine mammals with a circumpolar Arctic distribution. In this study, we investigate the amphibious hearing capabilities of ringed seals to provide auditory profiles for this species across the full range of hearing. Using psychophysical methods with two trained ringed seals, detection thresholds for narrowband signals were measured under quiet, carefully controlled environmental conditions to generate aerial and underwater audiograms. Masked underwater thresholds were measured in the presence of octave-band noise to determine critical ratios. Results indicate that ringed seals possess hearing abilities comparable to those of spotted seals (Phoca largha) and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), and considerably better than previously reported for ringed and harp seals. Best sensitivity was 49 dB re. 1 µPa (12.8 kHz) in water, and -12 dB re. 20 µPa (4.5 kHz) in air, rivaling the acute hearing abilities of some fully aquatic and terrestrial species in their respective media. Critical ratio measurements ranged from 14 dB at 0.1 kHz to 31 dB at 25.6 kHz, suggesting that ringed seals--like other true seals--can efficiently extract signals from background noise across a broad range of frequencies. The work described herein extends similar research on amphibious hearing in spotted seals recently published by the authors. These parallel studies enhance our knowledge of the auditory capabilities of ice-living seals, and inform effective management strategies for these and related species in a rapidly changing Arctic environment. PMID:25987727

  19. Amphibious hearing in ringed seals (Pusa hispida): underwater audiograms, aerial audiograms and critical ratio measurements.

    PubMed

    Sills, Jillian M; Southall, Brandon L; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2015-07-01

    Ringed seals (Pusa hispida) are semi-aquatic marine mammals with a circumpolar Arctic distribution. In this study, we investigate the amphibious hearing capabilities of ringed seals to provide auditory profiles for this species across the full range of hearing. Using psychophysical methods with two trained ringed seals, detection thresholds for narrowband signals were measured under quiet, carefully controlled environmental conditions to generate aerial and underwater audiograms. Masked underwater thresholds were measured in the presence of octave-band noise to determine critical ratios. Results indicate that ringed seals possess hearing abilities comparable to those of spotted seals (Phoca largha) and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), and considerably better than previously reported for ringed and harp seals. Best sensitivity was 49 dB re. 1 µPa (12.8 kHz) in water, and -12 dB re. 20 µPa (4.5 kHz) in air, rivaling the acute hearing abilities of some fully aquatic and terrestrial species in their respective media. Critical ratio measurements ranged from 14 dB at 0.1 kHz to 31 dB at 25.6 kHz, suggesting that ringed seals--like other true seals--can efficiently extract signals from background noise across a broad range of frequencies. The work described herein extends similar research on amphibious hearing in spotted seals recently published by the authors. These parallel studies enhance our knowledge of the auditory capabilities of ice-living seals, and inform effective management strategies for these and related species in a rapidly changing Arctic environment.

  20. Beam profile measurement with flying wires at the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Pishchalnikov, Yu.; Krider, J.; Hu, M.; Lorman, E.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Wilson, P.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Flying wires were installed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring for transverse beam profile measurement for both proton and antiproton beams. The following note describes the system configuration, calibration and resolution of the flying wire system, interactions between the wires and the beam, as well as analysis of the transverse beam profile in the presence of a stochastic cooling system.

  1. Measurement of the typical persistent current in gold rings at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Dustin; Petkovic, Ivana; Lollo, Anthony; Harris, Jack

    2014-03-01

    Theory has long predicted the existence a dissipationless persistent current (PC) in rings made of a normal (i.e., non-superconducting) conductor. The PC is usually detected via its magnetic moment (i.e., without connection to leads or deliberate excitation) and therefore provides an important testbed for understanding the equilibrium properties of conductors. At low magnetic fields, the PC is predicted to be a sensitive probe of electron-electron interactions, non-equilibrium effects, and variety of other interesting phenomena. In contrast, at high magnetic fields the PC is expected to be accurately described by a simple single-electron theory. Previously, our group used a torque magnetometry technique to measure PC in aluminum rings in the presence of a strong magnetic field, and found good agreement with the single-electron theory of PC. In this talk we describe new measurements of very large arrays of gold rings. We will present measurements of these rings in high magnetic fields, where we find good agreement with the single-electron theory (including Zeeman and spin-orbit coupling effects). We will also describe the prospect for measuring these arrays at low magnetic field, where many-body and non-equilibrium effects may dramatically alter the PC. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grant #1205861.

  2. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T. Peter

    2015-09-01

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  3. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  4. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces. PMID:26374026

  5. Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Splitter, Derek A; Burrows, Barry Clay; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The present manuscript consists of proof of concept experiments involving direct measurements and detailed chemical speciation from the top ring zone of a running engine. The work uses a naturally aspirated single cylinder utility engine that has been modified to allow direct liquid sample acquisition from behind the top ring. Samples were analyzed and spectated using gas chromatographic techniques. Results show that the liquid mixture in the top ring zone is neither neat lubricant nor fuel but a combination of the two with unique chemical properties. At the tested steady state no-load operating condition, the chemical species of the top ring zone liquid were found to be highly dependent on boiling point, where both low reactivity higher boiling point fuel species and lubricant are observed to be the dominant constituents. The results show that at least for the tested condition, approximately 25% of the top ring zone is comprised of gasoline fuel like molecules, which are dominated by high octane number aromatic species, while the remainder of the liquid is comprised of lubricant like species.

  6. Observations And Measurements of Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.K.; Li, J.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    Anomalous hollow electron beams have been recently observed in the Duke storage ring. With a single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, a hollow beam can be created. This beam consists of a solid core beam inside and a large ring beam outside. In this paper, we report the measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern and spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wakefield and lattice nonlinearity. The hollow beam can also be used as a tool to study linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  7. Latest on polarization in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The field of beam polarization in electron storage rings is making rapid progress in recent several years. This report is an attempt to summarize some of these developments concerning how to produce and maintain a high level of beam polarization. Emphasized will be the ideas and current thoughts people have on what should and could be done on electron rings being designed at present such as HERA, LEP and TRISTAN. 23 references.

  8. Quantitative measurements of Jupiter, Saturn, their rings and satellites made from Voyager imaging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, S. A.; Bunker, A. S.

    1983-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft cameras use selenium-sulfur slow scan vidicons to convert focused optical images into sensible electrical signals. The vidicon-generated data thus obtained are the basis of measurements of much greater precision than was previously possible, in virtue of their superior linearity, geometric fidelity, and the use of in-flight calibration. Attention is given to positional, radiometric, and dynamical measurements conducted on the basis of vidicon data for the Saturn rings, the Saturn satellites, and the Jupiter atmosphere.

  9. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    observations: direct measurement of the still-unknown ring mass; direct in-situ sampling of ring particle composition (targeting the iron- or carbon-based red nonicy component); and radar backscattering observations. Cuzzi, J. N. et al. (2010) An Evolving View of Saturn's Dynamic Rings; Science (Inv. Review) 19 March 2010: 327. no. 5972, pp. 1470 - 1475

  10. Heavy Quark Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, I.

    2006-11-17

    Collisions of electrons with protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV are being recorded by the two experiments H1 and ZEUS at the ep accelerator HERA at DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Measurements involving beauty and charm quarks, performed by these experiments, provide a good environment to test perturbative QCD predictions as the large quark mass supplies a hard scale. Recent measurements of beauty and charm production in ep collisions are presented here. QCD predictions at next-to-leading order are found to generally agree with the measurements. Beauty measurements however are sometimes slightly higher than the predicted cross sections. Beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure were also measured and are well described by QCD predictions.

  11. GINGER (Gyroscopes IN General Relativity), a ring lasers array to measure the Lense-Thirring effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Virgilio, Angela D. V.

    The purpose of the GINGER is to perform the first test of general relativity (not considering the gravitational redshift measurements) in a terrestrial laboratory, using light as a probe. The experiment will complement the ones in space, performed or under way, with an entirely different technique and at a far lower cost. The methodology is based on ring-lasers, which are extremely accurate rotation sensors and can not only sense purely kinematical rotations (Sagnac effect accounting for the Earth rotation, polar motion of the terrestrial axis, local rotational movements of the laboratory due to the Earth crust dynamics...), but also general relativistic contributions such as the de Sitter effect (coupling between the gravito-electric field of the earth and the kinematical rotation) and the Lense-Thirring effect (inertial frame dragging due to the angular momentum of the earth). In order to reveal the latter effects, ring-laser response must be improved to be able to measure the effective rotation vector (kinematic plus GR terms) with an accuracy of 1 part in 109 or better. This is a challenging technological aspect, which however has been accurately taken into account by designing a system of ring lasers that will be implemented in this project. A ring laser have been installed inside the underground laboratory of GranSasso, with the purpose to see if an underground location is the right choice for GINGER. The apparatus and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  12. Measurement of inner and/or outer profiles of pipes using ring beam devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, T.; Yoshizawa, T.

    2009-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and industry. Here we propose a measurement method for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without any contact probe. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In the hitherto-tried experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been highly evaluated and usability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disklike light beam sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated in a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose an improved method for measuring the external profile in addition to the internal profile. In our arrangement, one pair of concaved conical mirrors is used for the external profile measurement. In combination with the inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of the inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of newly proposed principle. Now we are aiming to realize simultaneous measurement of the internal

  13. Saturn's G and D Rings Provide Nearly Complete Measured Scattering Phase Functions of Nearby Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, Matthew M.; Stark, Christopher C.

    2015-09-01

    The appearance of debris disks around distant stars depends upon the scattering/phase function (SPF) of the material in the disk. However, characterizing the SPFs of these extrasolar debris disks is challenging because only a limited range of scattering angles are visible to Earth-based observers. By contrast, Saturn’s tenuous rings can be observed over a much broader range of geometries, so their SPFs can be much better constrained. Since these rings are composed of small particles released from the surfaces of larger bodies, they are reasonable analogs to debris disks and so their SPFs can provide insights into the plausible scattering properties of debris disks. This work examines two of Saturn’s dusty rings: the G ring (at 167,500 km from Saturn’s center) and the D68 ringlet (at 67,600 km). Using data from the cameras on board the Cassini spacecraft, we are able to estimate the rings’ brightnesses at scattering angles ranging from 170° to 0.°5. We find that both of the rings exhibit extremely strong forward-scattering peaks, but for scattering angles above 60° their brightnesses are nearly constant. These SPFs can be well approximated by a linear combination of three Henyey-Greenstein functions, and are roughly consistent with the SPFs of irregular particles from laboratory measurements. Comparing these data to Fraunhofer and Mie models highlights several challenges involved in extracting information about particle compositions and size distributions from SPFs alone. The SPFs of these rings also indicate that the degree of forward scattering in debris disks may be greatly underestimated.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of internal and external profiles using a ring beam device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2008-08-01

    A ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is available to form a disk-like beam sheet. We have shown measurement result of an inner diameter of pipes and holes and have developed a compact inner profile measuring instrument up to now. The ring beam device and a miniature CCD camera are incorporated in a glass tube. Validity of this instrument was shown by checking the inner profile of the references. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only an internal but also external inspection should be measured. Surely the pattern projection method conventionally used in 3D profile measurement may be useful for high speed and high precision measurement of various objects, but it is not always appropriate to measure an object with steeply inclined surface profile such as a bevel gear. In this paper, we propose a method for measurement of the external profile in addition to the internal profile. In our arrangement, one pair of concaved conical mirrors is used for the external profile measurement. When combined with our inner profile measurement method, simultaneous measurement of the inner and outer profiles becomes possible. A measurement result on a bevel gear showed availability of our proposal. We are aiming to realize simultaneous measurement of the internal and external profiles.

  15. Entanglement propagation and typicality of measurements in the quantum Kac ring

    SciTech Connect

    Oberreuter, Johannes M. Homrighausen, Ingo; Kehrein, Stefan

    2014-09-15

    We study the time evolution of entanglement in a new quantum version of the Kac ring, where two spin chains become dynamically entangled by quantum gates, which are used instead of the classical markers. The features of the entanglement evolution are best understood by using knowledge about the behavior of an ensemble of classical Kac rings. For instance, the recurrence time of the quantum many-body system is twice the length of the chain and “thermalization” only occurs on time scales much smaller than the dimension of the Hilbert space. The model thus elucidates the relation between the results of measurements in quantum and classical systems: While in classical systems repeated measurements are performed over an ensemble of systems, the corresponding result is obtained by measuring the same quantum system prepared in an appropriate superposition repeatedly.

  16. Measurements of the normal state persistent current in Au rings at high and low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Ivana; Ngo, Dustin; Lollo, Anthony; Harris, Jack

    2014-03-01

    Flux biased normal metal rings smaller than the phase coherence length can sustain persistent current (PC). We employ cantilever torque magnetometry to detect PC with high sensitivity, efficient background rejection, and in an electromagnetically clean environment. Previously, our group focused on the high magnetic field regime, where the PC is well described by single-particle theory. However at low magnetic field (few flux quanta) interaction effects are expected to be dominant. Previous low field studies by other groups employing SQUID and resonator-based techniques have found that Au, Ag, Cu, and GaAs rings show a large diamagnetic average PC, indicative of attractive e-e interactions. One possible explanation is that the superconductivity that would normally arise from this interaction is suppressed by a small number of magnetic impurities (~ 1 ppm), while the interaction-enhanced persistent current is not. In this talk we will describe measurements of Au rings. We have fabricated arrays of 100,000 rings with 125 nm radius on ultrasensitive silicon cantilevers. At high magnetic fields, we find that the PC agrees with single-particle theory. We also describe the results at low field, expected to give further insight into the many body ground state of this system. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grant #1205861.

  17. Measurement of the Beam Longitudinal Profile in a Storage Ring by Non-Linear Laser Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid-state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of un trapped particles, and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets ("ghost bunches").

  18. Measurement of the beam longitudinal profile in a storage ring bynon-linear laser mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-05-03

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of untrapped particles and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets (''ghostbunches'').

  19. Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

    2008-10-09

    Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

  20. Mass Measurements of Proton-rich Nuclides at the Cooler Storage Ring at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. H.; Xu, H. S.; Wang, M.; Zhou, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Hu, Z. G.; Huang, W. X.; Liu, Y.; Ma, X.; Mao, R. S.; Mei, B.; Sun, Z. Y.; Wang, J. S.; Xiao, G. Q.; Yan, X. L.; Yang, J. C.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; and others

    2011-11-30

    Recent results and progress of mass measurements of proton-rich nuclei using isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) are reported. The nuclei under investigation were produced via fragmentation of relativistic energy heavy ions of {sup 78}Kr and {sup 58}Ni. After in-flight separation by the fragment separator RIBLL-2, the nuclei were injected and stored in the experimental storage ring CSRe, and their masses were determined from measurements of the revolution times. The impact of these measurements on the stellar nucleosynthesis in the rp-process is discussed.

  1. Frequency noise measurement of diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Win, Moe Zaw

    1990-01-01

    The combined frequency noise spectrum of two model 120-01A nonplanar ring oscillator lasers was measured by first heterodyne detecting the IF signal and then measuring the IF frequency noise using an RF frequency discriminator. The results indicated the presence of a 1/f-squared noise component in the power-spectral density of the frequency fluctuations between 1 Hz and 1 kHz. After incorporating this 1/f-squared into the analysis of the optical phase tracking loop, the measured phase error variance closely matches the theoretical predictions.

  2. Spectrally resolved cavity ring down measurement of high reflectivity mirrors using a supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Schmidl, Gabriele; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Schippel, Stefan; Heyer, Hartmut

    2009-12-10

    We investigate a cavity ring down setup that offers the possibility to measure the spectrally resolved reflectivities of high reflectivity mirrors. The setup consists of a resonator (ring down cavity) and an intensified CCD camera system combined with a spectrograph for spectral resolution. A commercial supercontinuum laser (350-1750 nm) is applied as a compact excitation source. It is based on a photonic crystal fiber that is pumped by a q-switched microchip laser (1.6 ns pulse duration, 25 kHz repetition rate). This combination allows simultaneously recording the transmittance of the cavity over a wide wavelength range determined by the excitation source and the spectral sensitivity of the detector. The photon lifetimes inside the cavity (ring down times) are measured with high spectral resolution by means of an intensified camera system. Subsequently shifting the "gate" of the image intensifier from short to long delay times after the excitation pulse allows calculation of the reflectivity spectrum of the mirrors. Comparison of these results with measurements using a conventional setup (laser diode 675 nm and photomultiplier tube) clearly shows the high potential of the method due to the multichannel excitation and the detection scheme. PMID:20011015

  3. Working Group I: Parton distributions: Summary report for the HERA LHC Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmar, M.; Forte, S.; Glazov, A.; Moch, S.; Alekhin, S.; Altarelli, G.; Andersen, Jeppe R.; Ball, R.D.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Carli, T.; Ciafaloni, M.; Colferai, D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Corcella, G.; Del Debbio, L.; Dissertori, G.; Feltesse, J.; Guffanti, A.; Gwenlan, C.; Huston, J.; /Zurich, ETH /DESY, Zeuthen /Serpukhov, IHEP /CERN /Rome III U. /INFN, Rome3 /Cambridge U. /Edinburgh U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Oxford U. /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Michigan State U. /Uppsala U. /Barcelona U., ECM /Podgorica U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Fermilab /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II

    2005-11-01

    We provide an assessment of the impact of parton distributions on the determination of LHC processes, and of the accuracy with which parton distributions (PDFs) can be extracted from data, in particular from current and forthcoming HERA experiments. We give an overview of reference LHC processes and their associated PDF uncertainties, and study in detail W and Z production at the LHC.We discuss the precision which may be obtained from the analysis of existing HERA data, tests of consistency of HERA data from different experiments, and the combination of these data. We determine further improvements on PDFs which may be obtained from future HERA data (including measurements of F{sub L}), and from combining present and future HERA data with present and future hadron collider data. We review the current status of knowledge of higher (NNLO) QCD corrections to perturbative evolution and deep-inelastic scattering, and provide reference results for their impact on parton evolution, and we briefly examine non-perturbative models for parton distributions. We discuss the state-of-the art in global parton fits, we assess the impact on them of various kinds of data and of theoretical corrections, by providing benchmarks of Alekhin and MRST parton distributions and a CTEQ analysis of parton fit stability, and we briefly presents proposals for alternative approaches to parton fitting. We summarize the status of large and small x resummation, by providing estimates of the impact of large x resummation on parton fits, and a comparison of different approaches to small x resummation, for which we also discuss numerical techniques.

  4. A Statistical Reconstruction of Bivariate Climate from Tree Ring Width Measurements Using Scientifically Motivated Process Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipton, J.; Hooten, M.; Pederson, N.; Tingley, M.; Bishop, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to reconstruct historical climate is important to understanding how climate has changed in the past. The instrumental record of temperature and precipitation only spans the most recent centuries. Thus, reconstructions of the climate features are typically based on proxy archives. The proxy archives integrate climate information through biological, geological, physical, and chemical processes. Tree ring widths provide one of the most spatially and temporally rich sources of high quality climate proxy data. However, the statistical reconstruction of paleoclimate from tree ring widths is quite challenging because the climate signal is inherently multi-dimensional while tree ring widths are a one dimensional data source. We propose a Bayesian Hierarchical model using a non-linear, scientifically motivated tree ring growth models to reconstruct multivariate climate (i.e., temperature and precipitation) in the Hudson Valley region of New York. Our proposed model extends and enhances former methods in a number of ways. We allow for species-specific responses to climate, which further constrains the many-to-one relationship between tree rings and climate. The resulting model allows for prediction of reasonable climate scenarios given tree ring widths. We explore a natural model selection framework that weighs the influence of multiple candidate growth models in terms of their predictive ability. To enable prediction backcasts, the climate variables are modeled with an underlying continuous time latent process. The continuous time process allows for added flexibility in the climate response through time at different temporal scales and enables investigation of differences in climate between the reconstruction period and the instrumental period. Validation of the model's predictive abilities is achieved through a pseudo-proxy simulation experiment where the quality of climate predictions are measured by out of sample performance based on a proper local scoring

  5. [INVITED] Multiwavelength operation of erbium-doped fiber-ring laser for temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, S.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, simultaneous lasing at up to eight wavelengths is demonstrated in a multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser previously reported. This is achieved by introducing a feedback fiber loop in a fiber ring cavity. Eight-wavelength laser emission lines were obtained simultaneously in single-longitudinal mode operation showing a power instability lower than 0.8 dB, and an optical signal-to-noise ratio higher than 42 dB for all the emitted wavelengths. The fiber Bragg gratings give this source the possibility to be also used as sensor-network multiplexing scheme. The application of this system for remote temperature measurements has been demonstrated obtaining good time stability results.

  6. Optical tweezers assisted imaging of the Z-ring in Escherichia coli: measuring its radial width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmon, G.; Kumar, P.; Feingold, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using single-beam, oscillating optical tweezers we can trap and rotate rod-shaped bacterial cells with respect to the optical axis. This technique allows imaging fluorescently labeled three-dimensional sub-cellular structures from different, optimized viewpoints. To illustrate our method we measure D, the radial width of the Z-ring in unconstricted Escherichia coli. We use cells that express FtsZ-GFP and have their cytoplasmic membrane stained with FM4-64. In a vertically oriented cell, both the Z-ring and the cytoplasmic membrane images appear as symmetric circular structures that lend themselves to quantitative analysis. We found that D ≅ 100 nm, much larger than expected.

  7. Measurement of optical nonlinearity by antiresonant ring interferometric nonlinear spectroscopic (ARINS) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, B.

    2016-08-01

    We have reported the measurement of third-order optical nonlinearity by antiresonant ring interferometric nonlinear spectroscopic (ARINS) technique and discussed its usefulness over other popular measuring techniques such as Z-scan, degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) and third harmonic generation (THG). The measurement has been simulated theoretically by taking different numerical values as well as sign of δ, which is a key parameter of ARINS. The technique has been benchmarked using toluene and the theoretical simulation has been substantiated experimentally by measuring the nonlinear optical coefficients ( n 2 and β) of two different samples. The disadvantages of the technique have also been discussed. However, a number of advantages of ARINS override its disadvantages and therefore, ARINS may be preferred over other measuring techniques for the measurement of nonlinear optical parameters.

  8. Cavity Ring-Down System for Density Measurement of Negative Hydrogen Ion on Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Haruhisa; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Shibuya, Masayuki; Kisaki, Masashi; Ikeda, Katsunori; Osakabe, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu; Asano, Eiji; Kondo, Tomoki; Sato, Mamoru; Komada, Seiji; Sekiguchi, Haruo; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Fantz, Ursel

    2011-09-26

    A Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) system was applied to measure the density of negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) in vicinity of extraction surface in the H{sup -} source for the development of neutral beam injector on Large Helical Device (LHD). The density measurement with sampling time of 50 ms was carried out. The measured density with the CRD system is relatively good agreement with the density evaluated from extracted beam-current with applying a similar relation of positive ion sources. In cesium seeded into ion-source plasma, the linearity between an arc power of the discharge and the measured density with the CRD system was observed. Additionally, the measured density was proportional to the extracted beam current. These characteristics indicate the CRD system worked well for H{sup -} density measurement in the region of H{sup -} and extraction.

  9. Measuring Centimeter-Sized Particles in the Saturnian Rings by Diffraction of Starlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbison, R. A.; Nicolson, P. D.

    2011-10-01

    Occultations of Saturn's rings have proven to be a useful way to measure the particle-size distribution of ring particles observed when in wavelength regimes where particles of different sizes behave differently. Studies of spacecraft-based radio occultations[1], Earthbased stellar occultations[2], and spacecraft-based solar occultations (Harbison et al., in prep.) have produced an understanding of the distributions of decimeter and meter-sized particles, and upper limits on the presence of micron-sized dust, but centimeter and millimeter-sized particles are less constrained. French and Nicholson also noticed in their stellar occultation work the presence of 'overshoots', places near a sharp edge of the rings, such as the Colombo, Maxwell, Huygens and Encke Gaps, where the transmission of starlight appears to exceed unity. They attributed this to starlight forward-scattered from the nearby ring into their detector. The Cassini spacecraft, in orbit about Saturn, has also been measuring stellar occultations with the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), with a total of 74 observed during the period 2004-2009. Similar overshoots ˜are seen in these data. Given that these overshoots are observed over ˜40 km from a typical distance of ˜ 400, 000 km, subtending an angle of 0.1 milliradian, at a wavelength of 2.92 μm, the particles that produce them must be of a size of ˜ ?/? or ˜ 3 cm. Thus, in this work, we are modeling these overshoots to learn the size distribution of millimeter and centimeter sized particles.

  10. Recent Results of Nuclear Mass Measurements at Storage Ring in IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. S.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2014-09-01

    Recent commissioning of the Cooler Storage Ring at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) has allowed us for direct mass measurements at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A series of isochronous mass measurements have been carried out in the past few years using 78Kr, 86Kr, 58Ni, and 112Sn beams. The main results and the present status are presented in this talk, and the implications of these results with respect to nuclear structures and nucleosynthesis in the rp-process of x-ray bursts are discussed.

  11. Storage Ring Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact Ionization of Fe7+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured electron impact ionization for Fe7+ from the ionization threshold up to 1200 eV. The measurements were performed using the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The ions were stored long enough prior to measurements to remove most metastables, resulting in a beam of 94% ground-level ions. Comparing with the previously recommended atomic data, we find that the Arnaud & Raymond cross section is up to about 40% larger than our measurement, with the largest discrepancies below about 400 eV. The cross section of Dere agrees to within 10%, which is about the magnitude of the experimental uncertainties. The remaining discrepancies between our measurement and the Dere calculations are likely due to shortcomings in the theoretical treatment of the excitation-autoionization contribution.

  12. STORAGE RING CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 7+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Lestinsky, M.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured electron impact ionization for Fe{sup 7+} from the ionization threshold up to 1200 eV. The measurements were performed using the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The ions were stored long enough prior to measurements to remove most metastables, resulting in a beam of 94% ground-level ions. Comparing with the previously recommended atomic data, we find that the Arnaud and Raymond cross section is up to about 40% larger than our measurement, with the largest discrepancies below about 400 eV. The cross section of Dere agrees to within 10%, which is about the magnitude of the experimental uncertainties. The remaining discrepancies between our measurement and the Dere calculations are likely due to shortcomings in the theoretical treatment of the excitation-autoionization contribution.

  13. Development of an inner profile measurement instrument using a ring beam device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, T.; Wakayama, T.

    2010-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and other industrial applications. Here we describe recent development of our measurement principle for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without using any contact type stylus. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In our hitherto trial experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been evaluated in many cases and availability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disk-like light sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument at this point. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated into a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose potentially possible method for measurement of external profile at the same time with internal profile. If one pair of concave mirrors are used in our arrangement, external profile is captured. In combination with inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of here proposed

  14. Multi-Target Operation at the HERA-B Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliev, Yu.; Aushev, V.; Ehret, K.; Funcke, M.; Sever, S.I.; Pavlenko, Yu.; Pugatch, V.; Spratte, S.; Symalla, M.; Tkatch, N.; Wegener, D.

    2000-12-31

    The HERA-B internal target consists of eight target ribbons arranged around the beam. Each target can be moved in the radial direction independently in sub-micron steps, allowing to compensate relative beam shifts and to steer for the desired interaction rate. The experimental constraints require a stable interaction rate equally distributed over all inserted targets. The actual equalization is based on a measurement of charge originated from the beam-target interaction. The system shows a good linearity with the interaction rate and allows a reasonable distribution of the interaction rate among several wires. To cross check the performance of the multi-wire steering, the reconstructed tracks and primary vertices in the silicon vertex detector were used.

  15. The new H1 luminosity system for HERA II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Boudry, V.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Levonian, S.; Moreau, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Yu.; Specka, A.; Usik, A.

    2002-11-01

    At HERA, luminosity is determined on-line and bunch by bunch by measuring the bremsstrahlung spectrum from e-p collisions. The H1 collaboration has built a completely new luminosity system in order to sustain the harsh running conditions after the four-fold luminosity increase. Namely, the higher synchrotron radiation doses and the increased event pile-up have governed the design of the two major components, a radiation-resistant quartz-fiber electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a fast readout electronics with on-line energy histogramming at a rate of 500 kHz. An overview of the different components of the new luminosity system is given, and the commissioning status is reported.

  16. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  17. Continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy for velocity distribution measurements in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    McCarren, D.; Scime, E.

    2015-10-15

    We report the development of a continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopic (CW-CRDS) diagnostic for real-time, in situ measurement of velocity distribution functions of ions and neutral atoms in plasma. This apparatus is less complex than conventional CW-CRDS systems. We provide a detailed description of the CW-CRDS apparatus as well as measurements of argon ions and neutrals in a high-density (10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} < plasma density <10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}) plasma. The CW-CRDS measurements are validated through comparison with laser induced fluorescence measurements of the same absorbing states of the ions and neutrals.

  18. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  19. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A D; Karnewar, A K; Holikatti, A C; Yadav, S; Puntambekar, T A; Singh, G; Singh, P

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  20. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the significance of planetary shadowing in shaping Jupiter's gossamer ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Gruen, Eberhard

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter in 2002 and 2003, the Galileo spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe, with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During both ring passages the impact ionisation dust detector on board Galileo successfully recorded dust impacts and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages but only 110 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The particle size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The instrument also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. The faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to at least 5 RJ (Jovian radius RJ = 71, 492 km), indicating that grains attain higher eccentricities than previously thought. Finally, Galileo measured a major reduction in

  1. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

    2008-06-18

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  2. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density In The Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Krasnykh, A.K; Byrd, J.; Santis, S.De; Sonnad, K.G.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; /CERN

    2008-07-03

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  3. In-situ measurements of Saturn's dusty rings based on dust impact signals detected by Cassini RPWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.-Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    2016-11-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument can detect dust particles when voltage pulses induced by the dust impacts are observed in the wideband receiver. The size of the voltage pulse is proportional to the mass of the impacting dust particle. In this paper, we show RPWS measurements of dust particles in Saturn's dusty rings. The differential size distribution of the dust particles can be characterized as a power law dn/dr∝rμ, where μ ∼ - 4 and r is the particle radius. The observed particle radius ranged from 0.2 to 10 μm. The dust density profiles of the dusty rings are derived from the impact rates measured by the RPWS wideband receiver. The radial density profiles show peaks near Enceladus' orbit and the G ring. The region around the G ring is found to be a very thin layer of dust particles with no observable vertical offset of the peak density from the ring plane. The vertical scale height of the E ring varies with the radial distance from Saturn with a local minimum at Enceladus' orbit. The vertical density profiles of the E ring show dips at the equatorial plane near Enceladus' orbit and vertical offsets of the peak locations away from Enceladus' orbit. These observations are consistent with previous modeling studies and measurements by other instruments onboard Cassini.

  4. HERA BEAM TAIL SHAPING BY TUNE MODULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2003-05-19

    To study CP violation, the HEM-B experiment uses an internal wire target in the transverse halo of the stored HERA proton beam. Operational experience shows that the resulting interaction rates are extremely sensitive to tiny orbit jitter amplitudes. Various methods have been studied to stabilize these interaction rates by increasing diffusion in the transverse proton beam tails without affecting the luminosity at the electron-proton collider experiments ZEUS and H1. Tune modulation was found to be a promising method for this task. Experiments performed in recent years will be reported.

  5. Measurement and optimization of the lattice functions in the debuncher ring at Fermilab.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaslaev, V.; Gollwitzer, K.; Lebedev, V.; Valishev, A.; Sajaev, V.; Accelerator Systems Division; FNAL

    2006-01-01

    A goal of the Tevatron Run-II upgrade requires substantial increase of antiproton production. The central step towards this goal is increasing the Debuncher ring admittance. Detailed understanding of the Debuncher's optics, aperture limitations and lattice functions is necessary. The method of the response matrix optimization has been used to determine quadrupole errors and corrections to the design functions. The measurement accuracy is about 5% due to the Beam Position Monitor system resolution and the small number of steering elements in the machine. We have used these accurate measurements to redesign the machine optics to maximize the acceptance of the Debuncher where the main limiting apertures are the stochastic cooling pickups and kickers. Accuracy of the measurements and the limitations are discussed as well as details of the optics modification.

  6. Characteristics and measurement of supersonic projectile shock waves by a 32-microphone ring array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho; Wu, Yan-Chyuan; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses about the characteristics of supersonic projectile shock wave in muzzle region during firing of high explosive anti-tank (HEAT) and high explosive (HE) projectiles. HEAT projectiles are fired horizontally at a muzzle velocity of Mach 3.5 from a medium caliber tank gun equipped with a newly designed multi-perforated muzzle brake, whereas HE projectiles are fired at elevation angles at a muzzle velocity of Mach 2 from a large caliber howitzer equipped with a newly designed double-baffle muzzle brake. In the near field, pressure signatures of the N-wave generated from projectiles are measured by 32-microphone ring array wrapped by cotton sheath. Records measured by the microphone array are used to demonstrate several key characteristics of the shock wave of supersonic projectile. All measurements made in this study can be a significant reference for developing guns, tanks, or the chassis of fighting vehicles.

  7. Recent developments in measurement and tracking of the APS storage ring beam emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingxin; Lumpkin, Alex H.; Emery, Louis; Borland, Michael

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray pinhole camera is used at the APS storage ring to measure the beam emittance. The measured data are archived during user operation. At 1 Hz bandwidth, we have achieved better than 1 μm stability in the measured horizontal beam size, typically of 143 μm, corresponding to 8 nmṡrad. During user runs, beam size variations up to 2.5 μm were observed (corresponding to emittance variations of 0.4 nmṡrad), which were strongly correlated and attributed to the variation of electron energy loss in the insertion devices. In other words, the user-initiated insertion device gap changes are the major factor in observed beam emittance variations during user runs.

  8. Fiber ring laser incorporating a pair of rotary long-period fiber gratings for torsion measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leilei; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Fangyuan; Chiang, Kinseng; Rao, Yunjiang

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a fiber ring laser for high-resolution torsion measurement, where the laser cavity consists of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) formed with a pair of long-period fiber gratings written in a twisted single-mode fiber (SMF) by a CO2 laser. The emitting wavelength of the laser provides a measure of the rate of the torsion applied to the grating pair, while the direction of the wavelength shift indicates the sense direction of the applied torsion. The narrow linewidth and the large side-mode suppression ratio of the laser can provide a much more precise measurement of torsion, compared with passive fiber-optic torsion sensors. The torsion sensitivity achieved is 0.084 nm/(rad/m) in the torsion range +/-100 rad/m, which corresponds to a torsion resolution of 0.12 rad/m, assuming a wavelength resolution of 10 pm for a typical optical spectrum analyzer.

  9. Investigation of non-uniform radiation damage observed in the ZEUS Beam Pipe Calorimeter at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet, I.; Fricke, U.; Surrow, B.; Wick, K.

    1999-08-01

    The ZEUS Beam Pipe Calorimeter (BPC) is a small tungsten/scintillator sampling calorimeter. It is positioned at a distance of approximately 4 cm from the HERA beams and approximately 3 m from the interaction point. The accumulated doses measured at the front side of the BPC during the HERA runs 1995, 1996 and 1997 were 12 kGy, 11 kGy and 2.5 kGy, respectively. The radiation dose influenced the optical components of the BPC. The degradation of some of the scintillators due to radiation damage has been examined using different monitoring systems. A simulation code was developed which describes quantitatively the effects of non-uniform radiation damage. The following report describes the radiation monitoring, the effects on the scintillator material and the impact on the energy linearity of the BPC.

  10. Review of searches for rare processes and physics beyond the Standard Model at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, David M.; Turcato, Monica

    2016-06-01

    The electron-proton collisions collected by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA comprise a unique particle physics data set, and a comprehensive range of measurements has been performed to provide new insight into the structure of the proton. The high centre of mass energy at HERA has also allowed rare processes to be studied, including the production of W and Z0 bosons and events with multiple leptons in the final state. The data have also opened up a new domain to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model including contact interactions, leptoquarks, excited fermions and a number of supersymmetric models. This review presents a summary of such results, where the analyses reported correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 1 fb^{-1}, representing the complete data set recorded by the H1 and ZEUS experiments.

  11. Airborne Measurements of NOx, NOy, and O3 Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzana, K. J.; Wild, R. J.; Thompson, C. R.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Womack, C. C.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dube, W. P.; Ryerson, T. B.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    NO and NO2 (=NOx) have a large effect on air quality and chemistry. Oxidation reactions transform NOx into other reactive nitrogen species such as PAN, HNO3, organic nitrates and N2O5, which can act either as sinks or reservoirs of NOx. Together with NOx, the sum of these oxidized reactive nitrogen species is termed NOy. Ozone serves as a principal oxidant source for many of these reactions, and it is also produced or destroyed during subsequent chemical cycles. Therefore, simultaneous measurements of all four species (NO, NO2, NOy, and O3) are desirable. Previous measurements of these species have principally been made by converting the compound of interest to NO, which is then detected using chemiluminescence. Alternatively, these species can be converted to NO2, which can then be detected using absorption spectroscopy. The use of a cavity ring down instrument allows for the accurate and rapid detection of NO2 in a compact and robust platform suitable for field deployments on numerous platforms, including vehicles and airplanes. In this work we describe the first aircraft deployment of a four-channel cavity ring-down instrument capable of simultaneously measuring NO2, NO, NOy, and O3. This deployment took place during the 2015 Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in the western United States. The instrument flew in tandem with a chemiluminescence instrument, which measured the same set of compounds. A separate instrument that measured NO2 by a related absorption technique, broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy (BBCES) was also on board the aircraft. An intercomparison between these instruments will be presented, as well as data from the SONGNEX flights that illustrate the capabilities of the CRDS insrument.

  12. The Future is Hera! Analyzing Astronomical Over the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, L. A.; Chai, P.; Pence, W.; Shafer, R.; Snowden, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hera is the data processing facility provided by the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for analyzing astronomical data. Hera provides all the pre-installed software packages, local disk space, and computing resources need to do general processing of FITS format data files residing on the users local computer, and to do research using the publicly available data from the High ENergy Astrophysics Division. Qualified students, educators and researchers may freely use the Hera services over the internet of research and educational purposes.

  13. Microstrip ring resonator technique for measuring microwave attenuation in high-Tc superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, June H.; Oshita, Floyd K.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Kobrin, Paul; Sovero, Emilio

    1989-10-01

    Microwave attenuation of high-Tc superconducting (HTS) films sputtered on MgO and ZrO2 were measured using a microstrip ring resonator circuit. The results for Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O resonators were compared to those for gold-plated resonators of identical design. The losses of superconducting and gold-plated films were determined from unloaded Q-factor measurements. The attenuation of Y-Ba-Cu-O film on an MgO substrate is approximately 31 percent lower than that of gold films at 6.6 GHz and 33 percent lower at 19.2 GHz for temperatures below 50 K. The approach of using microstrips to characterize microwave losses shows the usefulness of HTS films in integrated circuit technology.

  14. Comparisons of ring resonator relative permittivity measurements to ground penetrating radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishel, Marie; Koehn, Phillip; Rosen, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Field experience has shown that soil conditions can have large effects on the ability of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect buried targets of interest. The relative permittivity of the soil determines the attenuation of the radar signal. The contrast between the relative permittivity of the soil and the target is critical to determining the strength of the reflection from the target. In this paper, to measure the relative permittivity of the soil and various target fill materials, a microstrip ring resonator is placed in contact with a material medium. The real and imaginary parts of the relative permittivity are determined from (1) changes in resonant frequencies (between 600 MHz and 2 GHz) and (2) the quality factor of the resonator, respectively. Measurement results are compared to data collected by a GPR.

  15. Optical Measurements of 14CO2 Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David A.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of radiocarbon (14C) provide a unique platform in order to determine the age of a material or alternatively for source attribution between biogenic and petrochemical sources. We describe a cavity ring-down spectrometer which uses an infrared quantum cascade laser to probe the fundamental of 14CO2. This instrument offers one of the highest sensitivities which has been reported in the mid-infrared and has fully automated spectral scanning for continuous data acquisition. Despite the ultra-low abundance of 14CO2 in the atmosphere (1.2 pmol/mol relative to 12CO2) we have been able to rapidly record the 14CO2 transition and determine the origin of carbon dioxide samples. Our experimental approach and future improvements to the instrument will be discussed as well as selected measurement targets.

  16. Longitudinal beam-transfer-function measurements at the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.G.; Zimmermann, F.

    1997-05-01

    A longitudinal single-bunch instability in the damping rings at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is thought to contribute to pulse-to-pulse orbit variations in downstream accelerator sections. To better understand this instability, the authors measured the beam phase and bunch length under harmonic modulations of the rf phase and rf voltage. For small phase-modulations the measured response can be explained by interaction of the beam with the cavity fundamental mode. For larger excitations, they observed bifurcation and hysteresis effects. The response to an rf voltage modulation revealed two peaks near the quadrupole-mode frequency, one of which appears to be related to the longitudinal instability. In this paper they present the experimental results.

  17. Effects of the O-ring used for sealing in high-pressure balances on measurements of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, S. Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Choi, I. M.; Kim, B. S.; Shin, H. H.

    2002-08-01

    An oil-operated pressure balance is standard equipment widely used in the field of pressure metrology. Most of the commonly used pressure balances are in a simple piston-cylinder configuration where the piston and the cylinder can deform freely under pressure. This simple piston-cylinder assembly has an O-ring chamber on the cylinder bottom to seal the cylinder. The effects of this O-ring seal on the effective area are not well known. This paper demonstrates by the numerical method using finite element method and the experimental method that, when performing precise measurements of pressure using a pressure balance, the cylinder will be deformed by the oil pressure exerted on the bottom of the cylinder surrounded by the O-ring, causing a non-linearity in the change of effective area, and that, when the piston-cylinder assembly is used in the body with different diameters of O-ring, the effective area, i.e. the pressure, can be significantly changed. The effects of O-ring seals on the effective area of a DH5306 oil-operated pressure balance were investigated using two piston-cylinder assemblies with nominal effective areas of 2 mm2 over the pressure range of 100-300 MPa. Three different sizes of O-ring, 4.8, 8.0 and 11.7 mm in diameter, were used. The maximum change of the effective area can reach 30 ppm at 300 MPa and 18 ppm at 100 MPa due to the change of O-ring. Therefore, for precise pressure measurement, the correct understanding of the O-ring under the cylinder is required along with checking of the size of the O-ring under the cylinder whenever calibrating the piston-cylinder assembly.

  18. Single Scattering Albedo of fresh biomass burning aerosols measured using cavity ring down spectroscopy and nephelometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bililign, Solomon; Singh, Sujeeta; Fiddler, Marc; Smith, Damon; Bililign Research Group Team

    An accurate measurement of optical properties of aerosols is critical for quantifying the effect of aerosols on climate. Uncertainties still persist and measurement results vary significantly. The factors that affect measurement accuracy and the resulting uncertainties of the extinction-minus-scattering method are evaluated using a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and integrating nephelometry and applied to measure the optical properties of fresh soot (size 300 and 400 nm) produced from burning of pine, red oak and cedar. We have demonstrated a system that allows measurement of optical properties at a wide range of wavelengths, which can be extended over most of the solar spectrum to determine ``featured'' absorption cross sections as a function of wavelength. SSA values measured were nearly flat ranging from 0.45 to 0.6. The result also demonstrates that SSA of fresh soot is nearly independent of wavelength of light in the 500-680 wavelength range with a slight increase at longer wavelength. The values are within the range of measured values both in the laboratory and in field studies for fresh soot The work is supported by the Department of Defense Grant W911NF-11-1-0188.

  19. The Hera Entry Probe Mission to Saturn, an ESA M-class mission proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K.

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Additionally, the atmospheres of the giant planets serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets in the solar system including Earth, offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems,and have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. Remote sensing observations are limited when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the value of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. Representing the only method providing ground-truth to connect the remote sensing inferences with physical reality, in situ measurements have only been accomplished twice in the history of outer solar system exploration, via the Galileo probe for Jupiter and the Huygens probe for Titan. In situ measurements provide access to atmospheric regions that are beyond the reach of remote sensing, enabling the dynamical, chemical and aerosol-forming processes at work from the thermosphere to the troposphere below the cloud decks to be studied. A proposal for a Saturn entry probe mission named Hera was recently submitted to the European Space Agency Medium Class mission announcement of

  20. Getting saturated hydraulic conductivity from surface Ground-Penetrating Radar measurements inside a ring infiltrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, E.; Saintenoy, A.; Coquet, Y.

    2013-12-01

    fixed time steps, during an infiltration of 5 cm of water, inside a ring infiltrometer. We used the ring to demarcate the infiltration area, and to create reflexions at known depths. GPR reflexions coming from the wetting front as well as the buried edges of the cylinder were recorded. Modeling of the infiltration were made using SWMS-2D, GPR data of the infiltration were computed using GprMax suite programs. We generated 2D water content profiles associated with a saturated hydraulic conductivity value, at each experimental time step with SWMS-2D. Then we convert those profiles to 2D permittivity profiles using the Complex Refractive Index Method relation, to compute the reflexion time of the wetting front. We found the saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil by minimizing the differences between experimental and simulated data. Our retrieved saturated hydraulic conductivity from GPR data was compared to disk infiltrometer measurements.

  1. Airborne Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Extinction and Scattering During the Aerosol IOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Ricci, K.; Provencal, R.; Schmid, B.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Arnott, P.

    2003-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300 Mm-1 with an estimated precision of 0.1 Min-1 for 1550 nm light and 0.2 Mm-1 for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects.= We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those friom a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  2. Distance between Anterior Commissure and the First Tracheal Ring: An Important New Clinical Laryngotracheal Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Khadivi, Ehsan; Zaringhalam, Mohammad Ali; Khazaeni, Kamran; Bakhshaee, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The distance between the anterior commissure of the larynx and the first tracheal ring (AC.T. distance) is of great importance in laryngotracheal surgeries. The amount of narrowing of the subglottic airway is used as a quantitative mean to determine whether the lesion is subglottic or has extended to the trachea and therefore helps in the prediction of the final prognosis. Materials and Methods: In this study, the larynx was exposed by direct laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. The case was considered to be difficult because the exposure did not optimally reveal the anterior commissure, therefore a cricoid tape or anterior commissure laryngoscope was used. A zero degree Hopkins lens was used to view the anterior commissure and the first tracheal ring. Special markers were used to mark the two points with the distance between those being considered as the AC.T. distance. The relationship between AC.T. distance and the patient's age, sex, BMI, and laryngeal exposure condition during laryngoscopy was also studied. Results: Eighty-two patients participated in this study. The mean AC.T. distance was measured and was found to be 32.67±3.34 mm in males and 29.80± 3.00 mm in females. This difference was statistically significant between the two groups (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between BMI, age, laryngeal exposure condition, and the AC.T. distance. Conclusion: The AC.T. distance was measured to be around 3 cm; with males measuring greater than females. However, future studies may lead to a more accurate practical scale for laryngotracheal surgeries due to possible technical or human errors, in addition to racial differences. PMID:26082900

  3. Dissociative recombination measurements of NH{sup +} using an ion storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Berg, M.; Bing, D.; Buhr, H.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Krantz, C.; Mendes, M. B.; Nordhorn, C.; Repnow, R.; Schwalm, D.; Yang, B.; Wolf, A.; Geppert, W.

    2014-09-10

    We have investigated dissociative recombination (DR) of NH{sup +} with electrons using a merged beams configuration at the TSR heavy-ion storage ring located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We present our measured absolute merged-beams recombination rate coefficient for collision energies from 0 to 12 eV. From these data, we have extracted a cross section, which we have transformed to a plasma rate coefficient for the collisional plasma temperature range from T {sub pl} = 10 to 18,000 K. We show that the NH{sup +} DR rate coefficient data in current astrochemical models are underestimated by up to a factor of approximately nine. Our new data will result in predicted NH{sup +} abundances lower than those calculated by present models. This is in agreement with the sensitivity limits of all observations attempting to detect NH{sup +} in interstellar clouds.

  4. Schottky Mass Measurements of Cooled Proton-Rich Nuclei at the GSI Experimental Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Radon, T.; Schlitt, B.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Hausmann, M.; Irnich, H.; Klepper, O.; Kluge, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kraus, G.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nickel, F.; Nolden, F.; Patyk, Z.; Reich, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schwab, W.; Steck, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Kerscher, T.; Beha, T.; Loebner, K.E.; Fujita, Y.; Jung, H.C.; Wollnik, H.; Novikov, Y.

    1997-06-01

    High-precision mass measurements of proton-rich isotopes in the range of 60{le}Z{le}84 were performed using the novel technique of Schottky spectrometry. Projectile fragments produced by {sup 209}Bi ions at 930{ital A} MeV were separated with the magnetic spectrometer FRS and stored and cooled in the experimental storage ring (ESR). A typical mass resolving power of 350000 and a precision of 100keV were achieved in the region A{approx}200 . Masses of members of {alpha} chains linked by precise Q{sub {alpha}} values but not yet connected to the known masses were determined. In this way it is concluded that {sup 201}Fr and {sup 197}At are proton unbound. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, Rene; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas S.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5 M/m). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  6. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  7. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Measurements of Electric Propulsion Device Life Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalin, Azer

    2004-11-01

    For many electric propulsion devices, wear due to sputter erosion is the primary determinant of device lifetime. As progressively longer electric propulsion missions are being considered, the need for accelerated lifetime assessments is becoming increasingly acute. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) is an ultra-sensitive laser based absorption technique capable of measuring very low particle number densities, and is thus potentially well suited to this need. In CRDS, the absorbing sample (in this case sputtered material) is housed within a high finesse optical cavity, and the decay rate of light within the cavity is recorded, from which the sample number density can be inferred. We have recently developed CRDS as a diagnostic to quantify sputter erosion. Initial demonstrations of the technique have involved measuring the number density of sputtered molybdenum and titanium. In terms of assessing erosion, a very germane quantity is the flux of sputtered particles, which requires knowledge of both particle number density and velocity. The latter may be found from sputter modeling or other measurement techniques such as laser induced fluorescence, but we are also exploring the use of CRDS to infer particle velocity. Our CRDS velocity measurement approach is based on Doppler effects (shifts and broadenings) in the measured spectral lineshape. In this submission we detail the status of our recent CRDS research to study wear erosion by sputtering. We present results of number density measurements of sputtered particles, including comparisons with a simple sputter model. We discuss progress on velocity measurements. In order to address implementation strategies for using CRDS to study actual EP devices, we also present proposed testing schemes for thrusters including numerical modeling of expected signals for various materials of interest.

  8. A cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time Hall thruster erosion measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, B C; Huang, W; Tao, L; Yamamoto, N; Gallimore, A D; Yalin, A P

    2014-05-01

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time measurements of sputtered boron from Hall thrusters has been developed. The sensor uses a continuous-wave frequency-quadrupled diode laser at 250 nm to probe ground state atomic boron sputtered from the boron nitride insulating channel. Validation results from a controlled setup using an ion beam and target showed good agreement with a simple finite-element model. Application of the sensor for measurements of two Hall thrusters, the H6 and SPT-70, is described. The H6 was tested at power levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 kW. Peak boron densities of 10 ± 2 × 10(14) m(-3) were measured in the thruster plume, and the estimated eroded channel volume agreed within a factor of 2 of profilometry. The SPT-70 was tested at 600 and 660 W, yielding peak boron densities of 7.2 ± 1.1 × 10(14) m(-3), and the estimated erosion rate agreed within ~20% of profilometry. Technical challenges associated with operating a high-finesse cavity in the presence of energetic plasma are also discussed.

  9. On Physical Interpretation of the In-Site Measurement of Earth Rotation by Ring Laser Gyrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    2004-01-01

    Large ring laser gyrometers under development have demonstrated the capability of detecting minute ground motions and deformations on a wide range of timescales. The next challenge and goal is to measure the Earth's rotation variations to a precision that rivals that of the present space-geodesy techniques, thus providing an in-situ (and cost effective alternatives of Earth rotation measurement for geophysical research and geodetic applications. Aside from thermal and mechanical instabilities, "undesirable" ground motion and tilt that appear in the signal will need to be removed before any variation in Earth rotation can be detected. Removal of these signals, some of them are larger than the sought rotation signals, has been a typical procedure in many precise geophysical instruments, such as gravimeters, seismometers, and tiltmeters. The remaining Earth rotation signal resides in both the spin around the axis and in the orientation of the axis. In the case of the latter, the in-situ measurement is complementary to the space-geodetic observables in terms of polar motion and nutation, a fact to be exploited.

  10. A cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time Hall thruster erosion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B. C.; Huang, W.; Tao, L.; Yamamoto, N.; Yalin, A. P.; Gallimore, A. D.

    2014-05-15

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time measurements of sputtered boron from Hall thrusters has been developed. The sensor uses a continuous-wave frequency-quadrupled diode laser at 250 nm to probe ground state atomic boron sputtered from the boron nitride insulating channel. Validation results from a controlled setup using an ion beam and target showed good agreement with a simple finite-element model. Application of the sensor for measurements of two Hall thrusters, the H6 and SPT-70, is described. The H6 was tested at power levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 kW. Peak boron densities of 10 ± 2 × 10{sup 14} m{sup −3} were measured in the thruster plume, and the estimated eroded channel volume agreed within a factor of 2 of profilometry. The SPT-70 was tested at 600 and 660 W, yielding peak boron densities of 7.2 ± 1.1 × 10{sup 14} m{sup −3}, and the estimated erosion rate agreed within ∼20% of profilometry. Technical challenges associated with operating a high-finesse cavity in the presence of energetic plasma are also discussed.

  11. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Sonnad, K.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; Krasnykh, A.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-10

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  12. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  13. DISSOCIATIVE RECOMBINATION MEASUREMENTS OF HCl{sup +} USING AN ION STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Novotný, O.; Stützel, J.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Buhr, H.; Domesle, C.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Repnow, R.; Schwalm, D.; Yang, B.; Wolf, A.; Geppert, W.; Spruck, K.

    2013-11-01

    We have measured dissociative recombination (DR) of HCl{sup +} with electrons using a merged beams configuration at the TSR heavy-ion storage ring located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We present the measured absolute merged beams recombination rate coefficient for collision energies from 0 to 4.5 eV. We have also developed a new method for deriving the cross section from the measurements. Our approach does not suffer from approximations made by previously used methods. The cross section was transformed to a plasma rate coefficient for the electron temperature range from T = 10 to 5000 K. We show that the previously used HCl{sup +} DR data underestimate the plasma rate coefficient by a factor of 1.5 at T = 10 K and overestimate it by a factor of three at T = 300 K. We also find that the new data may partly explain existing discrepancies between observed abundances of chlorine-bearing molecules and their astrochemical models.

  14. Contact angle and surface tension measurements of a five-ring polyphenyl ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Contact angle measurements were performed for a five-ring polyphenyl ether isomeric mixture on M-50 steel in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Two different techniques were used: (1) a tilting plate apparatus, and (2) a sessile drop apparatus. Measurements were made for the temperature range 25 to 190 C. Surface tension was measured by a differential maximum bubble pressure technique over the range 23 to 220C in room air. The critical surface energy of spreading (gamma (sub c)) was determined for the polyphenyl ether by plotting the cosine of the contact angle (theta) versus the surface tension (gamma (sub LV)). The straight line intercept at cosine theta = 1 is defined as gamma (sub c). Gamma (sub c) was found to be 30.1 dyn/cm for the tilting plate technique and 31.3 dyn/cm for the sessile drop technique. These results indicate that the polyphenyl ether is inherently autophobic (i.e., it will not spread on its own surface film until its surface tension is less than gamma (sub c). This phenomenon is discussed in light of the wettability and wear problems encountered with this fluid.

  15. SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FOR TIN COATING ON THE STAINLESS STEEL OF SNS ACCUMULATOR RING VACUUM CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.HSEUH,H.C.TODD,R.J.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    BNL is responsible for the design and construction of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Titanium Nitride (TiN) coating on the stainless steel vacuum chamber of the SNS accumulator ring is needed to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) and the undesirable resonant multiplication of electrons. The total SEY of TiN coated stainless steel material has been measured after coating samples were exposed to air and after electron and ion bombardment. We report here about TiN coating system setup at BNL and SEY measurements results at CERN, SLAC and KEK. We also present some simulation results of SNS accumulator ring electron-cloud effects using different SEY values.

  16. Measurement of charged hadron spectra at the Z{sup 0} with Cherenkov ring imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, T.

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation attempts to probe hadronization, the process by which the fundamental quarks described by quantum chromodynamics produce the jets of hadrons that the author observed in experiments. The measurements are made using e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), operating at the Z{sup 0} resonance with the SLC Large Detector (SLD), and the unique capabilities of the SLC/SLD facility are exploited. First, the spectra of charged hadrons ({pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p/{bar p}) are measured. This is accomplished with the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID), one of a first generation of devices that have been developed for efficient particle identification over a wide momentum range. The use of the CRID is central to this dissertation, and its design and performance are described in detail here. The measured spectra agree with other measurements at the Z{sup 0} and extend the momentum coverage. Next, the excellent spatial resolution of the SLD tracking systems, along with the small and stable beam spots of the SLC, is employed to identify jets produced from heavy b or c quarks and to separate them from the remaining light-quark (uds) jets. This removes the effects of heavy quark fragmentation and decays of heavy-quark hadrons from the study of hadronization. The first measurements of particle spectra in light-quark jets are then presented. Finally, the highly-polarized incident electron beam of the SLC, together with the electroweak asymmetries of the quarks, is exploited to separate quark and antiquark jets. Significant differences in quark-antiquark production of protons and of kaons are observed at high momenta. This signal suggests a leading particle effect, where the particles containing the primary quark of a jet are more likely to populate the high-momentum phase space than are other hadrons.

  17. Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) Development for Ambient Measurements of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N. A.; Ferracci, V.; Cassidy, N.; Hoffnagle, J.; Leggett, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Regulating ammonia atmospheric abundances is important for reducing particle emissions of PM2.5 and PM10. A recent study employing three chemical transport models found an underestimation of the formation of ammonium particles, and concluded that the role of NH3 on particulate matter is larger than originally thought. Monitoring of NH3, on a large scale, is often carried out using low-cost diffusive samplers, active sampling with denuders, and a number of optical spectroscopic techniques. Although denuders are currently considered to be an unofficial "reference method", they suffer from a few limitations, including low accuracy. They also do not provide rapid measurements in real-time, require complex post-exposure analysis by wet chemical techniques, and must be deployed over extended periods of up to one month to achieve the required sensitivity. These devices deliver only average concentration data, and their validation by traceable methods is not presently extensive. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) is a rapid on-line monitoring technique, which has regularly been employed for trace gas measurements, including that of dry ammonia gas mixtures. One of the goals of this work is, therefore, to extend the technology to enable more accurate ambient measurements of NH3 to be made in the field where the sampled atmosphere contains a wide range of concentrations and is also humid. We describe the implementation of this by adjustment of the CRDS instrument for the undesirable effects of cross interference due to water vapor (H2O). Water vapor influences such spectroscopic measurements through the presence of absorption features close to that of ammonia and through differences in matrix broadening effects. We also detail the establishment of metrological traceability of the measurements via new stable NH3 Primary Standard Gas Mixtures (PSMs), prepared by gravimetry, and subsequent dilution to typical ambient concentrations (parts per billion).

  18. HERA: an atmospheric probe to unveil the depths of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David H.; Amato, Michael; Aslam, Shahid; Atreya, Sushil K.; Blanc, Michel; Bolton, Scott J.; Brugger, Bastien; Calcutt, Simon; Cavalié, Thibault; Charnoz, Sébastien; Coustenis, Athena; DELEUIL, Magali; Ferri, Francesca; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Guillot, Tristan; Hartogh, Paul; Holland, Andrew; Hueso, Ricardo; Keller, Christoph; Kessler, Ernst; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; leese, Mark; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Levacher, Patrick; Marty, Bernard; Morse, Andrew; Nixon, Conor; Reh, Kim R.; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Schmider, François-Xavier; Sheridan, Simon; Simon, Amy A.; Snik, Frans; Spilker, Thomas R.; Stam, Daphne M.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Vernazza, Pierre; Waite, J. Hunter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an M-class mission led by ESA with a significant collaboration with NASA. It consists of a Saturn atmospheric probe and a Carrier-Relay spacecraft. Hera will perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic compositions as well as the dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and evolution of Saturn, the giant planets and their satellite systems, with extrapolation to extrasolar planets.The primary science objectives will be addressed by an atmospheric entry probe that would descend under parachute and carry out in situ measurements beginning in the stratosphere to help characterize the location and properties of the tropopause, and continue into the troposphere to pressures of at least 10 bars. All of the science objectives, except for the abundance of oxygen, which may be only addressed indirectly via observations of species whose abundances are tied to the abundance of water, can be achieved by reaching 10 bars. As in previous highly successful collaborative efforts between ESA and NASA, the proposed mission has a baseline concept based on a NASA-provided carrier/data relay spacecraft that would deliver the ESA-provided atmospheric probe to the desired atmospheric entry point at Saturn. ESA's proposed contribution should fit well into the M5 Cosmic Vision ESA call cost envelope.A nominal mission configuration would consist of a probe that detaches from the carrier one to several months prior to probe entry. Subsequent to probe release, the carrier trajectory would be deflected to optimize the over-flight phasing of the probe descent location for both probe data relay as well as performing carrier approach and flyby science, and would allow multiple retransmissions of the probe data for redundancy. The Saturn atmospheric entry probe would in many respects resemble the Jupiter Galileo probe. It is anticipated that the probe architecture for

  19. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaolong; Xu, Haojun; Li, Jianhai; Lin, Min; Su; Chen

    2015-05-01

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density ( N e ) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm3 without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N e achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N e of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10-50 Pa, power in 300-700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4-5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  20. Hera: Multiple Near-Earth Asteroid Sample Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Brownlee, D. D.; Pieters, C.; Lindstrom, M. L.; Britt, D.; Clark, B. C.; Gefert, L.; Gorevan, S.; Preble, J. C.

    2000-10-01

    With the discovery of large numbers of Near-Earth Asteroids and the successful Deep Space 1 and Shoemaker NEAR missions, multiple sample return from NEA is now technically feasible. We have designed a mission to take three samples from three NEA and return them to Earth. The mission is named Hera, after the mother of the Three Graces. The target asteroids will be chosen on the basis of their spectra and the sampling sites will be chosen from orbit. Sufficient material will be returned for all qualified investigators to obtain samples. One trajectory identified to date is a follows. Hera would be launched on 15 Jan 2006 by a Boeing Delta 7925-10 and reach asteroids AO10 on 3 Aug 2006, 2000 AG6 on 10 Nov 2006, and 1989 UQ on 7 Mar 2009. Stay periods would be 99 days, 98 days and 205 days, respectively. Hera would return the samples to Earth on 13 Nov 2010 using Stardust procedures. Hera is equipped with gallium arsenide solar panels capable of producing 6 kWe, and three ion thrusters similar to those on Deep Space 1 (for deep space) and hydrazine thrusters (for asteroid operations). Hera's dryweight is 650 kg, and the fuel weight is 350 kg Xe and 60 kg hydrazine. The sampling device is an auger bit on a universal coupling housed inside a conical collector. The device is deployed without landing the spacecraft. Nine independent compartments house the samples for return. The amount and quality of science data produced by Hera will be higher than any mission since Apollo. The depth and breadth of analysis on Earth far exceeds that possible by in situ methods and samples can be archived for future research. Furthermore, seven of the eleven goals in the NASA Strategic Plan for Space Science can be uniquely addressed by Hera and the samples it returns. These involve a variety of fundamental planetary science issues, mitigation of impact effects, HEDS and resource utilization.

  1. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karhu, J; Nauta, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-06-28

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν1+ν2+ν3+ν4 (1)+ν5 (-1) in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm(-1), the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm(-1), and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10(-6) cm(-1), where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits. PMID:27369508

  2. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karhu, J; Nauta, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-06-28

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν1+ν2+ν3+ν4 (1)+ν5 (-1) in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm(-1), the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm(-1), and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10(-6) cm(-1), where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  3. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsälä, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-06-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν 1 + ν 2 + ν 3 + ν4 1 + ν5 - 1 in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm-1, the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm-1, and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10-6 cm-1, where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  4. Identification, measurement and interpretation of tree rings in woody species from mediterranean climates.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Paolo; Gartner, Barbara L; Tognetti, Roberto; Bräker, Otto U; Schoch, Werner; Innes, John L

    2003-02-01

    We review the literature dealing with mediterranean climate, vegetation, phenology and ecophysiology relevant to the understanding of tree-ring formation in mediterranean regions. Tree rings have been used extensively in temperate regions to reconstruct responses of forests to past environmental changes. In mediterranean regions, studies of tree rings are scarce, despite their potential for understanding and predicting the effects of global change on important ecological processes such as desertification. In mediterranean regions, due to the great spatio-temporal variability of mediterranean environmental conditions, tree rings are sometimes not formed. Often, clear seasonality is lacking, and vegetation activity is not always associated with regular dormancy periods. We present examples of tree-ring morphology of five species (Arbutus unedo, Fraxinus ornus, Quercus cerris, Q. ilex, Q. pubescens) sampled in Tuscany, Italy, focusing on the difficulties we encountered during the dating. We present an interpretation of anomalies found in the wood structure and, more generally, of cambial activity in such environments. Furthermore, we propose a classification of tree-ring formation in mediterranean environments. Mediterranean tree rings can be dated and used for dendrochronological purposes, but great care should be taken in selecting sampling sites, species and sample trees. PMID:12620063

  5. Method and apparatus for elemental and isotope measurements and diagnostics-microwave induced plasma-cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher; Duan, Yixiang

    2006-05-30

    Provided is a novel system for conducting elemental measurements using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The present invention provides sensitivity thousands of times improved over conventional devices and does so with the advantages of low power, low plasma flow rate, and the ability being sustained with various gases.

  6. Absolute measurements of total peroxy nitrate mixing ratios by thermal dissociation blue diode laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dipayan; Osthoff, Hans D

    2010-08-01

    Peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) have long been recognized as important trace gas constituents of the troposphere. Here, we describe a blue diode laser thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer for rapid and absolute measurements of total peroxyacyl nitrate (SigmaPAN) abundances at ambient concentration levels. The PANs are thermally dissociated and detected as NO2, whose mixing ratios are quantified by optical absorption at 405 nm relative to a reference channel kept at ambient temperature. The effective NO2 absorption cross-section at the diode laser emission wavelength was measured to be 6.1 x 10(-19) cm2 molecule(-1), in excellent agreement with a prediction based on a projection of a high-resolution literature absorption spectrum onto the laser line width. The performance, i.e., accuracy and precision of measurement and matrix effects, of the new 405 nm thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer was evaluated and compared to that of a 532 nm thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer using laboratory-generated air samples. The new 405 nm spectrometer was considerably more sensitive and compact than the previously constructed version. The key advantage of laser thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy is that the measurement can be considered absolute and does not need to rely on external calibration.

  7. Potential for measurement of the tensor polarizabilities of nuclei in storage rings by the frozen spin method

    SciTech Connect

    Silenko, Alexander J.

    2009-10-15

    The frozen spin method can be effectively used for a high-precision measurement of the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the deuteron and other nuclei in storage rings. For the deuteron, this method would provide the determination of the deuteron's polarizabilities with absolute precision of the order of 10{sup -43} cm{sup 3}.

  8. Coagulation of particles in Saturn's rings - Measurements of the cohesive force of water frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D. N. C.; Sachtjen, S.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the sticking force of water ice particles which are indicative of the role that the cohesive properties of such particles could play in the dynamics of Saturn ring particles. Sticking forces are dependent on particle impact velocities; a 'Velcro' model is devised to describe the surface structure involved in sticking. The data indicate that below the critical impact velocity of about 0.03 cm/sec, particle cohesion always occurs. Due to the optical depth of micron-sized grains in the Saturn rings, particles are hypothesized to be coated with a layer of frost which will render cohesion an important ring-dynamics process.

  9. Coagulation of particles in Saturn's rings - Measurements of the cohesive force of water frost

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzes, A.P.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D.N.C.; Sachtjen, S. McDonald Observatory, Austin, TX )

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the sticking force of water ice particles which are indicative of the role that the cohesive properties of such particles could play in the dynamics of Saturn ring particles. Sticking forces are dependent on particle impact velocities; a Velcro model is devised to describe the surface structure involved in sticking. The data indicate that below the critical impact velocity of about 0.03 cm/sec, particle cohesion always occurs. Due to the optical depth of micron-sized grains in the Saturn rings, particles are hypothesized to be coated with a layer of frost which will render cohesion an important ring-dynamics process. 14 refs.

  10. On the determination of {alpha}{sub s} from differential jet rates at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Marc

    1997-04-20

    A measurement of the differential 2+1 jet rate in deep inelastic scattering at HERA in the kinematic range Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2} is presented. The jets are found using the JADE jet algorithm. Jet distributions measured with the H1 detector are compared to QCD model expectations. The differential 2+1 jet rate is unfolded to remove hadronization and detector effects, and is compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations. The value of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} is extracted, and contributions to its systematic error are discussed.

  11. From HERA to the Tevatron: A scaling law in hard diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.; CDF

    1997-12-04

    Results on hard diffraction from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The predictions are generally larger than the measured rates by a factor of {approximately} 6, suggesting a breakdown of conventional factorization. Correct predictions are obtained by scaling the rapidity gap probability distribution of the diffractive structure function to the total integrated gap probability. The scaling of the gap probability is traced back to the pomeron flux renormalization hypothesis, which was introduced to unitarize the soft diffraction amplitude.

  12. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chuji

    2004-12-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMP-CRDS for ultra-trace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10-13 g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRD S technology for isobaric measurements, such as 238U and 238Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMPCRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs.

  13. An interdisciplinary framework for measuring and supporting adherence in HIV prevention trials of ARV-based vaginal rings

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, Kathleen M; Tolley, Elizabeth E; Owen, Derek H; Amico, K Rivet; Morrow, Kathleen M; Moench, Thomas; Friend, David R; Friedland, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Product adherence and its measurement have emerged as a critical challenge in the evaluation of new HIV prevention technologies. Long-acting ARV-based vaginal rings may simplify use instructions and require less user behaviour, thereby facilitating adherence. One ARV-based ring is in efficacy trials and others, including multipurpose rings, are in the pipeline. Participant motivations, counselling support and measurement challenges during ring trials must still be addressed. In previous HIV prevention trials, this has been done largely using descriptive and post-hoc methods that are highly variable and minimally evaluated. We outline an interdisciplinary framework for systematically investigating promising strategies to support product uptake and adherence, and to measure adherence in the context of randomized, blinded clinical trials. Discussion The interdisciplinary framework highlights the dual use of adherence measurement (i.e. to provide feedback during trial implementation and to inform interpretation of trial findings) and underscores the complex pathways that connect measurement, adherence support and enacted adherence behaviour. Three inter-related approaches are highlighted: 1) adherence support – sequential efforts to define motivators of study product adherence and to develop, test, refine and evaluate adherence support messages; 2) self-reported psychometric measures – creation of valid and generalizable measures based in easily administered scales that capture vaginal ring use with improved predictive ability at screening, baseline and follow-up that better engage participants in reporting adherence; and 3) more objective measurement of adherence – real-time adherence monitoring and cumulative measurement to correlate adherence with overall product effectiveness through innovative designs, models and prototypes using electronic and biometric technologies to detect ring insertion and/or removal or expulsion. Coordinating research

  14. The effect of Gibbs ringing artifacts on measures derived from diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Daniele; Aelterman, Jan; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Jeurissen, Ben; Philips, Wilfried; Leemans, Alexander

    2015-10-15

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a unique method to investigate microstructural tissue properties noninvasively and is one of the most popular methods for studying the brain white matter in vivo. To obtain reliable statistical inferences with diffusion MRI, however, there are still many challenges, such as acquiring high-quality DW-MRI data (e.g., high SNR and high resolution), careful data preprocessing (e.g., correcting for subject motion and eddy current induced geometric distortions), choosing the appropriate diffusion approach (e.g., diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), or diffusion spectrum MRI), and applying a robust analysis strategy (e.g., tractography based or voxel based analysis). Notwithstanding the numerous efforts to optimize many steps in this complex and lengthy diffusion analysis pipeline, to date, a well-known artifact in MRI--i.e., Gibbs ringing (GR)--has largely gone unnoticed or deemed insignificant as a potential confound in quantitative DW-MRI analysis. Considering the recent explosion of diffusion MRI applications in biomedical and clinical applications, a systematic and comprehensive investigation is necessary to understand the influence of GR on the estimation of diffusion measures. In this work, we demonstrate with simulations and experimental DW-MRI data that diffusion estimates are significantly affected by GR artifacts and we show that an off-the-shelf GR correction procedure based on total variation already can alleviate this issue substantially.

  15. Measurements of the APS Storage Ring Beam Stability at 225 mA

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Yang, B.X.; Borland, M.

    2004-11-10

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation hard x-ray user facility that operates nominally at 100-mA stored beam current. As part of our probing of future operation regimes we have run at 130 mA for a user run, and we are on the path to test operations at up to 300 mA. Our most recent experiments have been at 225 mA in December 2003. One sector in the ring is dedicated to diagnosing the electron beam transverse and longitudinal parameters. We use a combination of imaging tools, including an x-ray pinhole camera and optical streak camera for the bending magnet source and x-ray monochromator measurements of divergence on the insertion device source. The onset of longitudinal instabilities due to rf cavity higher-order modes (HOMs) is one of the limitations in going to higher currents. These effects are seen in the horizontal plane of the pinhole camera images since the dipole source is at a dispersive point in the lattice. We observed about a factor of two increase in horizontal beam size and integrated bunch length in the unstable condition. By correlating the size changes with the temperature readouts of the 16 rf cavity cells, we identified the source of the instability. The cavity temperature set points were adjusted to avoid an HOM.

  16. Overview of the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neigut, J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Human Research Program at NASA began developing a new confinement analog specifically for conducting research to investigate the effects of confinement on the human system. The HERA (Human Exploration Research Analog) habitat has been used for both 7 and 14 day missions to date to examine and mitigate exploration risks to enable safe, reliable and productive human space exploration. This presentation will describe how the Flight Analogs Project developed the HERA facility and the infrastructure to suit investigator requirements for confinement research and in the process developed a new approach to analog utilization and a new state of the art analog facility. Details regarding HERA operations will be discussed including specifics on the mission simulation utilized for the current 14-day campaign, the specifics of the facility (total volume, overall size, hardware), and the capabilities available to researchers. The overall operational philosophy, mission fidelity including timeline, schedule pressures and cadence, and development and implementation of mission stressors will be presented. Research conducted to date in the HERA has addressed risks associated with behavioral health and performance, human physiology, as well as human factors. This presentation will conclude with a discussion of future research plans for the HERA, including infrastructure improvements and additional research capabilities planned for the upcoming 30-day missions in 2016.

  17. Hera: Using NASA Astronomy Data in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochner, James C.; Mitchell, S.; Pence, W. D.

    2006-12-01

    Hera is a free internet-based tool that provides students access to both analysis software and data for studying astronomical objects such as black holes, binary star systems, supernovae, and galaxies. Students use a subset of the same software, and experience the same analysis process, that an astronomer follows in analyzing data obtained from an orbiting satellite observatory. Hera is accompanied by a web-based tutorial which steps students through the science background, procedures for accessing the data, and using the Hera software. The web pages include a lesson plan in which students explore data from a binary star system containing a normal star and a black hole. The objective of the lesson is for students to use plotting, estimation, and statistical techniques to determine the orbital period. Students may then apply these techniques to a number of data sets and draw conclusions on the natures of the systems (for example, students discover that one system is an eclipsing binary). The web page tutorial is self-guided and contains a number of exercises; students can work independently or in groups. Hera has been use with high school students and in introductory astronomy classes in community colleges. This poster describes Hera and its web-based tutorial. We outline the underlying software architecture, the development process, and its testing and classroom applications. We also describe the benefits to students in developing skills which extend basic science and math concepts into real applications.

  18. Large radius of curvature measurement based on virtual quadratic Newton rings phase-shifting moiré-fringes measurement method in a nonnull interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongming; Wang, Kailiang; Cheng, Jinlong; Gao, Zhishan; Yuan, Qun

    2016-06-10

    We have proposed a virtual quadratic Newton rings phase-shifting moiré-fringes measurement method in a nonnull interferometer to measure the large radius of curvature for a spherical surface. In a quadratic polar coordinate system, linear carrier testing Newton rings interferogram and virtual Newton rings interferogram form the moiré fringes. It is possible to retrieve the wavefront difference data between the testing and standard spherical surface from the moiré fringes after low-pass filtering. Based on the wavefront difference data, we deduced a precise formula to calculate the radius of curvature in the quadratic polar coordinate system. We calculated the retrace error in the nonnull interferometer using the multi-configuration model of the nonnull interferometric system in ZEMAX. Our experimental results indicate that the measurement accuracy is better than 0.18% for a spherical mirror with a radius of curvature of 41,400 mm.

  19. The balloon ring: a high-performance low-cost instrumentation platform for measuring atmospheric turbulence profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrazis, Demos T.; Eaton, Frank D.; Black, Don G.; Black, Wiley T.; Black, Alastair

    2009-08-01

    Balloons, similar to those used for meteorological observations, are commonly used to carry a small instrumentation package for measuring optical turbulence in the atmosphere as a function of altitude. Two temperature sensors, one meter apart, measure a single point of the temperature structure function. The raw data is processed to provided the value of CT2, and the results transmitted to a ground receiving site. These data are converted to the index of refraction structure constant, Cn2. The validity of these measurements depend on the correctness of a number of assumptions. These include local isotropy of the turbulence and the existence of the Kolmogorov inertial subrange, and that the data is not contaminated by the wake of the ascending balloon. A variety of experiments on other platforms, and in the laboratory, demonstrate that the assumptions upon which these balloon measurements are made are not valid for a large percentage of the above described flights. In order to collect data whose interpretation did not require preconceived assumptions, the balloon ring instrumentation system was developed. The ring is 8.69 meters in diameter, with a cross-sectional diameter of 14 cm. The ring is hung just below the balloon, so that the wake goes through the center of the ring, and the sensors are mounted tangent to the circumference of the ring. The raw data is transmitted to the ground with a bandwidth extending to 1.25 kHz. A sample of the measurements taken during a flight at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. is presented.

  20. Development of a versatile rotating ring-disc electrode for in situ pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Zimer, Alexsandro Mendes; Medina da Silva, Marina; Machado, Eduardo G; Varela, Hamilton; Mascaro, Lucia Helena; Pereira, Ernesto Chaves

    2015-10-15

    There are some electrocatalytic reactions in which the key parameter explaining their behavior is a local change in pH. Therefore, it is of utter importance to develop an electrode that could quantify this parameter in situ, but also be customizable to be used in different systems. The purpose of this work is to build a versatile rotating ring/disc electrode (RRDE) with IrOx deposited on a glass tube as a ring and any kind of material as disc. As the IrOx is sensitive to pH variation, the reactions promoted on the disc can trigger proportional pH shifts on the ring. In such assembly, the IrOx ring presents a fast response time even during the pH transients due to the small thickness of the ring (approximately 10 μm), which enables the detection of interfacial pH changes. The ring electrode was tested toward the interfacial pH shift observed during the electrolytic reduction of water on the disc and also characterized by acid-base titration to determine the response time. As the main conclusions, fast response and durable RRDE were obtained, and this assembly could be used to revisit many electrocatalytic reactions in order to test the importance of local pH on the process. PMID:26515001

  1. Two-channel method for measuring losses in a ring optical resonator at a wavelength of 632.8 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, V. V.; Bessonov, A. S.; Bondarev, A. L.; Makeev, A. P.; Petrukhin, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    A two-channel method is proposed for measuring losses in an optical ring resonator (RR), in which eigenmodes (counterpropagating waves) are excited by means of a Zeeman ring He – Ne laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The measured frequency splitting of the laser counterpropgating waves is used to determine the absolute value of losses in an exemplary RR. The value of losses in the measured RR is determined by comparing the resonance width of the output radiation intensity with the resonance width of the radiation intensity for an exemplary resonator. The algorithm of intensity resonance processing takes into account the distortions caused by the dynamic effect, which allows a significant increase in the accuracy (up to 1% – 2%) and sensitivity of the proposed method. The measured losses in the RR with a perimeter of 28 cm constitute 80 – 5000 ppm.

  2. Two-channel method for measuring losses in a ring optical resonator at a wavelength of 632.8 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, V. V.; Bessonov, A. S.; Bondarev, A. L.; Makeev, A. P.; Petrukhin, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    A two-channel method is proposed for measuring losses in an optical ring resonator (RR), in which eigenmodes (counterpropagating waves) are excited by means of a Zeeman ring He - Ne laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The measured frequency splitting of the laser counterpropgating waves is used to determine the absolute value of losses in an exemplary RR. The value of losses in the measured RR is determined by comparing the resonance width of the output radiation intensity with the resonance width of the radiation intensity for an exemplary resonator. The algorithm of intensity resonance processing takes into account the distortions caused by the dynamic effect, which allows a significant increase in the accuracy (up to 1% - 2%) and sensitivity of the proposed method. The measured losses in the RR with a perimeter of 28 cm constitute 80 - 5000 ppm.

  3. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong, Wei; Haojun, Xu; Min, Lin; Chen, Su; Jianhai, Li

    2015-05-28

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density (N{sub e}) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm{sup 3} without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N{sub e} achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N{sub e} of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10–50 Pa, power in 300–700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4–5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  4. How Many Muons Do We Need to Store in a Ring For Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements?

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2011-07-14

    Analytical estimate of the number of muons that must decay in the straight section of a storage ring to produce a neutrino & anti-neutrino beam of sufficient intensity to facilitate cross-section measurements with a statistical precision of 1%. As we move into the era of precision long-baseline {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} measurements there is a growing need to precisely determine the {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-sections in the relevant energy range, from a fraction of 1 GeV to a few GeV. This will require {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} beams with precisely known fluxes and spectra. One way to produce these beams is to use a storage ring with long straight sections in which muon decays ({mu}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub e} if negative muons are stored, and {nu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} if positive muons are stored) produce the desired beam. The challenge is to capture enough muons in the ring to obtain useful neutrino and anti-neutrino fluxes. Early proposals to use a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments were based upon injecting 'high energy' charged pions into the ring which then decayed to create stored muons. These proposals were hampered by lack of sufficient intensity to pursue the physics. The Neutrino Factory proposal in 1997 was designed to fix this problem by using a Muon Collider class 'low energy' muon source to capture many more pions at low energy, allow them to decay in an external decay channel, manipulate their phase space to capture as many muons as possible within the acceptance of an accelerator, and then accelerate to the energy of choice before injecting into a specially designed ring with long straight sections. All this technology would do a wonderful job in fixing the intensity problem, but at a price that excludes this solution from being realized in the short term. The question that we are now

  5. Hera - an ESA M-class Saturn Entry Probe Mission Proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Mousis, O.; Spilker, T. R.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Additionally, the atmospheres of the giant planets serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets in the solar system including Earth, offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems, and have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. Remote sensing observations are limited when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the value of in situ measurements is provided by measurements of Jupiter's noble gas abundances and helium mixing ratio by the Galileo probe. In situ measurements provide direct access to atmospheric regions that are beyond the reach of remote sensing, enabling the dynamical, chemical and aerosol-forming processes at work from the thermosphere to the troposphere below the cloud decks to be studied. Studies for a newly proposed Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission named Hera is being prepared for the upcoming European Space Agency Medium Class (M5) mission announcement of opportunity. A solar powered mission, Hera will take approximately 8 years to reach Saturn and will carry instruments to measure the composition, structure, and dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Saturn, the Hera Saturn probe will provide critical measurements of composition

  6. A Long-term Ring Current Measure Created by Using the VMO MANGO Service Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.; King, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    A set of computational routines called MANGO (Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geomagnetic Observatories) is utilized to calculate a new measure of magnetic storm activity for the years 1932 to the near present. The MANGO routines are part of an effort to enhance data services available to users of the Heliophysics VxOs, specifically for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). The community can utilize MANGO to derive value-added data products and images suitable for publication via the VMO web site. MANGO routines will be demonstrated through their application to study magnetic storms, a field of research that began in 1828 when von Humboldt launched an investigation of observations taken simultaneously from magnetic field stations spread around the Earth. The defining signature of magnetic storms is a worldwide decrease of the horizontal component of the magnetic field caused by fluctuations in the strength of the ring current. In the 1940's, Bartel pushed for deriving an index to measure the strength of magnetic storms. Progress intensified during the International Geophysical Year leading to the definition of the Dst index. The definitive Dst index is calculated at WDC-C2 for Geomagnetism in Kyoto by using a derivation scheme certified by Division V of IAGA. The Dst index time series spans the years 1957 to present with a cadence equal to 1-hr. The new data set we will present is a magnetic storm measure that is similar to the Dst index though it is calculated by using MANGO and a method that differs slightly from the official scheme. The MANGO data service package is based on a set of IDL routines that decompose ground magnetic field observations to isolate secular, diurnal, and disturbance variations of the magnetic field station-by-station. Each MANGO subroutine has been written in modular fashion to allow "plug and play"- style flexibility and each has been designed to account for failure modes and noisy data so that the programs will run to

  7. SATURN’S G AND D RINGS PROVIDE NEARLY COMPLETE MEASURED SCATTERING PHASE FUNCTIONS OF NEARBY DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hedman, Matthew M.; Stark, Christopher C. E-mail: cstark@stsci.edu

    2015-09-20

    The appearance of debris disks around distant stars depends upon the scattering/phase function (SPF) of the material in the disk. However, characterizing the SPFs of these extrasolar debris disks is challenging because only a limited range of scattering angles are visible to Earth-based observers. By contrast, Saturn’s tenuous rings can be observed over a much broader range of geometries, so their SPFs can be much better constrained. Since these rings are composed of small particles released from the surfaces of larger bodies, they are reasonable analogs to debris disks and so their SPFs can provide insights into the plausible scattering properties of debris disks. This work examines two of Saturn’s dusty rings: the G ring (at 167,500 km from Saturn’s center) and the D68 ringlet (at 67,600 km). Using data from the cameras on board the Cassini spacecraft, we are able to estimate the rings’ brightnesses at scattering angles ranging from 170° to 0.°5. We find that both of the rings exhibit extremely strong forward-scattering peaks, but for scattering angles above 60° their brightnesses are nearly constant. These SPFs can be well approximated by a linear combination of three Henyey–Greenstein functions, and are roughly consistent with the SPFs of irregular particles from laboratory measurements. Comparing these data to Fraunhofer and Mie models highlights several challenges involved in extracting information about particle compositions and size distributions from SPFs alone. The SPFs of these rings also indicate that the degree of forward scattering in debris disks may be greatly underestimated.

  8. Deep Inelastic Scattering results from the first year of HERA operation

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, S.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first year of operation of the HERA electron-proton collider has resulted in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) Physics results from both the H1 and ZEUS experiments. Reported here are the H1 and ZEUS measurements of the proton structure function F{sub 2} at higher Q{sup 2} and lower x than previously reported from fixed target experiments. Also included are the results of QCD studies on hadronic final states and jets, and the observation of high Q{sup 2} charged current events from both experiments. Finally, the observation of events with large rapidity gaps by the ZEUS collaboration is also reported.

  9. Electron deuteron scattering with HERA, a letter of intent for an experimental programme with the H1 detector

    SciTech Connect

    T. Alexopoulos; et. al.

    2003-12-01

    This document outlines the case for a program of electron-deuteron scattering measurements at HERA using the H1 detector. The goals of the e D program are to map the partonic structure of the nucleon at large Q2 and low x, to explore the valence quark distributions at the highest x values, to provide a precise measurement of the strong coupling constant and to investigate the parton recombination phenomena revealed in shadowing and their relationship to diffraction. The importance of these measurements for the understanding of the perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of QCD thought to be responsible for nucleon structure is discussed, as is the significance of the measurements for future experimental programs. Some modifications to both the H1 apparatus and the HERA accelerator are necessary to realize this program; these are presented in the document. Mention is also made of questions that will remain unanswered following the completion of the above program and the potential role of HERA and of H1 in investigating these questions is outlined. Physicists and Institutes interested in supporting this project are asked to inform Max Klein (klein@ifh.de) and Tim Greenshaw (green@hep.ph.liv.ac.uk) that they would like to have their names on the Letter of Intent by Wednesday 30th April 2003.

  10. Cold atoms in one-dimensional rings: a Luttinger liquid approach to precision measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragole, Stephen; Taylor, Jacob

    Recent experiments have realized ring shaped traps for ultracold atoms. We consider the one-dimensional limit of these ring systems with a moving weak barrier, such as a blue-detuned laser beam. In this limit, we employ Luttinger liquid theory and find an analogy with the superconducting charge qubit. In particular, we find that strongly-interacting atoms in such a system could be used for precision rotation sensing. We compare the performance of this new sensor to the state of the art non-interacting atom interferometry. Funding provided by the Physics Frontier Center at the JQI and by DARPA QUASAR.

  11. Optimizing Thomson's jumping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjossem, Paul J. H.; Brost, Elizabeth C.

    2011-04-01

    The height to which rings will jump in a Thomson jumping ring apparatus is the central question posed by this popular lecture demonstration. We develop a simple time-averaged inductive-phase-lag model for the dependence of the jump height on the ring material, its mass, and temperature and apply it to measurements of the jump height for a set of rings made by slicing copper and aluminum alloy pipe into varying lengths. The data confirm a peak jump height that grows, narrows, and shifts to smaller optimal mass when the rings are cooled to 77 K. The model explains the ratio of the cooled/warm jump heights for a given ring, the reduction in optimal mass as the ring is cooled, and the shape of the mass resonance. The ring that jumps the highest is found to have a characteristic resistance equal to the inductive reactance of the set of rings.

  12. Searches for New Phenomena at the Tevatron and at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Arnd

    2006-10-01

    Recent results on searches for new physics at Run II of the Tevatron and highlights from HERA are reported. The searches cover many different final states and a wide range of models. All analyses have at this point led to negative results, but some interesting anomalies have been found.

  13. New Morphometric Measurements of Peak-Ring Basins on Mercury and the Moon: Results from the Mercury Laser Altimeter and Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David M. H.; Head, James W.; Prockter, Louise M.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Oberst, Juergen; Preusker, Frank; Gwiner, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Peak-ring basins (large impact craters exhibiting a single interior ring) are important to understanding the processes controlling the morphological transition from craters to large basins on planetary bodies. New image and topography data from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft have helped to update the catalogs of peak-ring basins on Mercury and the Moon [1,2] and are enabling improved calculations of the morphometric properties of these basins. We use current orbital altimeter measurements from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) [3] and the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) [4], as well as stereo-derived topography [5], to calculate the floor depths and peak-ring heights of peak-ring basins on Mercury and the Moon. We present trends in these parameters as functions of rim-crest diameter, which are likely to be related to processes controlling the onset of peak rings in these basins.

  14. Using split-ring resonators to measure the electromagnetic properties of materials: An experiment for senior physics undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobowski, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    A spilt-ring resonator experiment suitable for senior physics undergraduates is described and demonstrated in detail. The apparatus consists of a conducting hollow cylinder with a narrow slit along its length and can be accurately modelled as a series LRC circuit. The resonance frequency and quality factor of the split-ring resonator are measured when the apparatus is suspended in air, submerged in water, and submerged in an aqueous solution of various concentrations of NaCl. The experimental results are used to extract the dielectric constant of water and to investigate the dependence of the resonator quality factor on the conductivity of the NaCl solution. The apparatus provides opportunities to experimentally examine radiative losses, complex permittivity, the electromagnetic skin depth, and cutoff frequencies of rf propagation in cylindrical waveguides, which are all concepts introduced in an undergraduate course in electrodynamics. To connect with current research, the use of split-ring resonators as a tool to precisely measure the electromagnetic properties of materials is emphasized.

  15. Structure of self-gravity wakes in Saturn's A ring as measured by Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, C.; Brooks, S.; Edgington, S.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Spilker, L.

    2009-01-01

    The CIRS infrared spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft has scanned Saturn's A ring azimuthally from several viewing angles since its orbit insertion in 2004. A quadrupolar asymmetry has been detected in this ring at spacecraft elevations ranging between 16° to 37°. Its fractional amplitude decreases from 22% to 8% from 20° to 37° elevations. The patterns observed in two almost complete azimuthal scans at elevations 20° and 36° strongly favor the self-gravity wakes as the origin of the asymmetry. The elliptical, infinite cylinder model of Hedman et al. [Hedman, M.M., Nicholson, P.D., Salo, H., Wallis, B.D., Buratti, B.J., Baines, K.H., Brown, R.H., Clark, R.N., 2007. Astron. J. 133, 2624-2629] can reproduce the CIRS observations well. Such wakes are found to have an average height-to-spacing ratio H/λ=0.1607±0.0002, a width-over-spacing W/λ=0.3833±0.0008. Gaps between wakes, which are filled with particles, have an optical depth τ=0.1231±0.0005. The wakes mean pitch angle Φ is 70.70°±0.07°, relative to the radial direction. The comparison of ground-based visible data with CIRS observations constrains the A ring to be a monolayer. For a surface mass density of 40 g cm -2 [Tiscarino, M.S., Burns, J.A., Nicholson, P.D., Hedman, M.M., Porco, C.C., 2007. Icarus 189, 14-34], the expected spacing of wakes is λ≈60 m. Their height and width would then be H≈10 m and W≈24 m, values that match the maximum size of particles in this ring as determined from ground-based stellar occultations [French, R.G., Nicholson, P.D., 2000. Icarus 145, 502-523].

  16. Cassini dust measurements at Enceladus and implications for the origin of the E ring.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Frank; Schmidt, Jürgen; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Makuch, Martin; Seiss, Martin; Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Krivov, Alexander V; Sremcevic, Miodrag; Tuzzolino, Anthony J; Economou, Thanasis; Grün, Eberhard

    2006-03-10

    During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on 14 July 2005, the High Rate Detector of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer registered micron-sized dust particles enveloping this satellite. The dust impact rate peaked about 1 minute before the closest approach of the spacecraft to the moon. This asymmetric signature is consistent with a locally enhanced dust production in the south polar region of Enceladus. Other Cassini experiments revealed evidence for geophysical activities near Enceladus' south pole: a high surface temperature and a release of water gas. Production or release of dust particles related to these processes may provide the dominant source of Saturn's E ring.

  17. Structure of the hexameric HerA ATPase reveals a mechanism of translocation-coupled DNA-end processing in archaea.

    PubMed

    Rzechorzek, Neil J; Blackwood, John K; Bray, Sian M; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca; Robinson, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    The HerA ATPase cooperates with the NurA nuclease and the Mre11-Rad50 complex for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks in thermophilic archaea. Here we extend our structural knowledge of this minimal end-resection apparatus by presenting the first crystal structure of hexameric HerA. The full-length structure visualizes at atomic resolution the N-terminal HerA-ATP synthase domain and a conserved C-terminal extension, which acts as a physical brace between adjacent protomers. The brace also interacts in trans with nucleotide-binding residues of the neighbouring subunit. Our observations support a model in which the coaxial interaction of the HerA ring with the toroidal NurA dimer generates a continuous channel traversing the complex. HerA-driven translocation would propel the DNA towards the narrow annulus of NurA, leading to duplex melting and nucleolytic digestion. This system differs substantially from the bacterial end-resection paradigms. Our findings suggest a novel mode of DNA-end processing by this integrated archaeal helicase-nuclease machine.

  18. A double-cusp type electrostatic analyzer for high-cadence ring current ion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, K.; Allegrini, F.; Burch, J. L.; Desai, M. I.; Ebert, R. W.; Goldstein, J.; John, J. M.; Livi, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed observations of a variety of ion species at a sufficiently high temporal resolution are essential to understanding the loss and acceleration processes of ring current ions. For example, CRESS/MICS observations indicated that the energy density of suprathermal O+ exceeds that of H+ in large magnetic storms (Daglis et al., 1997), while the H+ energy density dominates under quiet conditions. However, the primary ion loss processes during the storm recovery phase are still incompletely understood. The mechanisms to accelerate upflowing ions, regularly observed with energies of a few keV at ~1000 km altitude, up to the 100s-keV range in the geospace are also not fully understood. Our novel electrostatic analyzer (ESA) employs a toroidal double-shell structure to cover the entire ring current ion range of ~3-250 keV/Q with high temporal resolution (<1 minute with a necessary counting statistics for the quiet time), while saving significant resources in mass and size. In this presentation, we discuss the operation principle and the proof of concept study of the ESA in terms of numerical calculations and ion beam calibration activities. This presentation comprehensively covers the expected sensor performance important for the in-flight capabilities, such as sensor parameters (G-factor, K-factor, and energy resolution), cross-shell contaminations, and UV background counts.

  19. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  20. STORAGE RING MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRON IMPACT IONIZATION FOR Mg{sup 7+} FORMING Mg{sup 8+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Wolf, A.

    2010-04-01

    We report electron impact ionization cross section measurements for Mg{sup 7+} forming Mg{sup 8+} at center of mass energies from approximately 200 eV to 2000 eV. The experimental work was performed using the heavy-ion storage ring TSR located at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. We find good agreement with distorted wave calculations using both the GIPPER code of the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Code suite and using the Flexible Atomic Code.

  1. Long term changes in Intrinsic Water Use Efficiency, the palaoe record derived from stable carbon isotope measurements from tree rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagen, Mary; McCarroll, Danny; Loader, Neil; Young, Giles; Robertson, Iain

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope (δ13C) measurements from the annual rings of trees are increasingly used to explore long term changes in plant-carbon-water relations, via changes in intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE); the ratio of photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance. Many studies report a significant increase in iWEU since industrialisation, which tracks rising global atmospheric CO2. Such changes are logical are trees are known to change their stomatal geometry, number and action in response to rising CO2. However, which increasing iWUE suggests physiological changes which should lead to increased growth increasing iWUE is rarely matched by enhanced tree growth when tree rings are measured, despite increases of up to 30% in iWUE over the recent past (van der Sleen et al 2015). Explanations for the mismatch between iWUE and tree growth records encompass questions over the veracity of δ13C records for recording physiological change (Silva and Howarth 2013), suggestions that moisture stress in warming climates becomes a limit to growth and prevents opportunistic use of rising CO2 by trees (Andreu-Hayles et al 2011) and questions regarding the use of tree ring width, which does not record tree height gain, to record growth. Here we present an extensive range of long term iWUE records, derived broadly from the temperate, high latitude and one tropical forest site to explore the palaeoclimatic perspective on the iWUE-fertilization conundrum in a spatio temporally extensive manner.

  2. Real-time measurement of nitrogen dioxide in vehicle exhaust gas by mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Sumizawa, H.; Yamada, H.; Tonokura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The application of pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) was demonstrated for the measurement of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in automotive exhaust gas. The transition of the ν 3 vibrational band assigned to the antisymmetric stretching mode of NO2 was probed with a thermoelectrically cooled, pulsed, mid-infrared, distributed feedback, quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 6.13 μm. The measurement of NO2 in the exhaust gas from two diesel vehicles equipped with different aftertreatment devices was demonstrated using a CRDS-based NO2 sensor, which employs a HEPA filter and a membrane gas dryer to remove interference from water as well as particulates in the exhaust gas. Stable and sensitive measurement of NO2 in the exhaust gas was achieved for more than 30 minutes with a time resolution of 1 s.

  3. Real-Tme Boron Nitride Erosion Measurements of the HiVHAc Thruster via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Brian C.; Yalin, Azer P.; Gallimore, Alec; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to make real-time erosion measurements from the NASA High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster. The optical sensor uses 250 nm light to measure absorption of atomic boron in the plume of an operating Hall thruster. Theerosion rate of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster was measured for discharge voltages ranging from 330 to 600 V and discharge powers ranging from 1 to 3 kW. Boron densities as high as 6.5 x 10(exp 15) per cubic meter were found within the channel. Using a very simple boronvelocity model, approximate volumetric erosion rates between 5.0 x 10(exp -12) and 8.2 x 10(exp -12) cubic meter per second were found.

  4. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using zone plate optics and undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.

    1997-10-01

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source storage ring were measured using zone-plate optics and undulator radiation. A gold Fresnel zone plate (3.5 {micro}m thick) located 33.9 meters from the x-ray source focused radiation of 18 keV, selected by a cryogenically cooled Si(111) crystal in horizontal deflection, and formed a source image in a transverse plane 2.41 m downstream. The sizes of the source image were determined from measured intensity profiles of x-ray fluorescence from a smooth nickel edge (1.5 {micro}m thick), fabricated using a lithographic technique, while the nickel edge was scanned across over the beam in the transverse plane. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were 60 {+-} 4.3 {micro}m and 300 {+-} 13 {micro}m, respectively, in reasonable agreement with the expected values.

  5. Tests of QCD at HERA: determination of the gluon density

    SciTech Connect

    Repond, J.

    1996-12-31

    An overview is given of the various methods available to the colliding beam experiments at HERA to determine the gluon density of the proton. The article includes a description of fits to the structure function F{sub 2}, of studies of dijet and open charm production in deep inelastic scattering, of elastic and inelastic {psi} photoproduction, and of inclusive diffractive scattering. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Classification of soils based on double ring measured permeability in Zarrineh-Roud Delta, western Azarbayejan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Alipour, S

    2007-08-01

    A physical method of soil classification based on soil permeability as a preliminary quick way prior to slow and expensive chemical conventional method was conducted in regional scale using 40 test stations. Double ring method used for permeability measurements in the area. The results clearly differentiated development of various soil types and quality in the area under investigation. The results clearly indicate the physical method of double ring measurement permeability is able to identify various soil types in regional scale and the later chemical methods could be used in local scale for detailed classification. NaCl content of soils was reflected by the amount of infiltration rate. Permeability ranged as high, medium and low, corresponded with loamy sand, loamy and clay soils respectively. Permeability in the vicinity of the higher water flows was high due to leaching of NaCl in the soil. NaCl is considered to be the main factor of impermeability reduction in the area associated with clay and soil textures.

  7. Minimally destructive, Doppler measurement of a quantized flow in a ring-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Anderson, N.; Phillips, W. D.; Eckel, S.; Campbell, G. K.; Stringari, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Doppler effect, the shift in the frequency of sound due to motion, is present in both classical gases and quantum superfluids. Here, we perform an in situ, minimally destructive measurement, of the persistent current in a ring-shaped, superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate using the Doppler effect. Phonon modes generated in this condensate have their frequencies Doppler shifted by a persistent current. This frequency shift will cause a standing-wave phonon mode to be ‘dragged’ along with the persistent current. By measuring this precession, one can extract the background flow velocity. This technique will find utility in experiments where the winding number is important, such as in emerging ‘atomtronic’ devices.

  8. Parameter-specific electronic measurement and analysis of sources of variation using ring oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lynn T.-N.; Pang, Liang-Teck; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Nikolić, Borivoje

    2009-03-01

    Parameter-specific and simulation-calibrated ring oscillator (RO) inverter layouts are described for identifying and quantitatively modeling sources of circuit performance variation from source/drain stress, shallow trench isolation (STI) stress, lithography, etch, and misalignment. This paper extends the RO approach by adding physical modeling/simulation of the sources of variability to tune the layouts of monitors for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Poly and diffusion layout choices have been guided by fast-CAD pattern matching. The accuracy of the fast-CAD estimate from the Pattern Matcher for these lithography issues is corroborated by simulations in Mentor Graphics Calibre. Generic conceptual results are given based on the experience from preparing of proprietary layouts that pass DRC check for a 45 nm test chip with ST Micro. Typical improvements in sensitivity of 2 fold are possible with layouts for lithography focus. A layout monitor for poly to diffusion misalignment based on programmable off-sets shows a 0.8% change in RO frequency per 1nm poly to diffusion off-set. Layouts are also described for characterizing stress effects associated with diffusion area size, asymmetry, vertical spacing, and multiple gate lengths.

  9. Absorption measurements in liquid core waveguides using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bescherer, Klaus; Barnes, Jack A; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2013-05-01

    Short liquid core waveguides (LCWs) were included into a fiber-loop cavity ring-down absorption spectrometer to reduce the detection limit over, both, single pass absorption in a LCW and cavity-enhanced absorption using a conventional fiber-loop cavity. LCWs of 5 and 10 cm length were interfaced with a pressure-flow system and a multimode fiber-loop cavity using concave fiber lenses with matching numerical apertures and diameters. Two red dyes, Allura Red AC and Congo Red, were detected with a 532 nm pulsed laser at a 5 nM limit of detection in a detection volume of less than 1 μL, corresponding to a minimal detectable absorbance of less than 4 × 10(-4) cm(-1) and a minimal detectable change in absorption cross section, σ(min) = V(det) × ε × C(LOD), of about 14 μm(2) (Allura Red AC) and 37 μm(2) (Congo Red). PMID:23480430

  10. The New Web-Based Hera Data Processing System at the HEASARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pence, W.

    2011-01-01

    The HEASARC at NASA/GSFC has provide an on-line astronomical data processing system called Hera for several years. Hera provides a complete data processing environment, including installed software packages, local data storage, and the CPU resources needed to process the user's data. The original design of Hera, however, has 2 requirements that has limited it's usefulness for some users, namely, that 1) the user must download and install a small helper program on their own computer before using Hera, and 2) Hera requires that several computer ports/sockets be allowed to communicate through any local firewalls on the users machine. Both of these restrictions can be problematic for some users, therefore we are now migrating Hera into a purely Web based environment which only requires a standard Web browser. The first release of Web Hera is now publicly available at http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/webheara/. It currently provides a standard graphical interface for running hundreds of different data processing programs that are available in the HEASARC's ftools software package. Over the next year we to add more features to Web Hera, including an interactive command line interface, and more display and line capabilities.

  11. Portable low power cavity ring-down spectrometer for precise measurement of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagle, John; Tan, Sze; He, Yonggang

    2016-05-01

    The necessity for monitoring of changing levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is clearly evident now more than ever. This has led to large deployments of analytical devices to most remote locations as well as the most densely populated regions around the world. Both large and small scale projects have forced new and old technologies to be pushed to their limits to obtain the highest performing measurements while maintaining a cost effective way to remotely monitor changes in atmospheric concentrations. In order to accomplish these strict guidelines, we present a low-power cavity ring-down spectrometer that measures Carbon Dioxide, Methane and water vapor which can achieve measurements with precisions lower than 20ppb of CO2 and 50ppt of CH4. Comparing to hundreds of watts needed in conventional CRDS design, we demonstrate that the high performance can be achieved with less than 25W. Stability of these measurements has allowed for averaging times of up to 3hr, yielding measurements of methane concentrations with precisions down to 40ppt. This is accomplished utilizing an FSR based frequency scale to determine an absolute frequency scale for these absorption features. Taking advantage of this faster, and less costly measurement technique of CRDS shows future promise with applications spanning scientific and industrial analyses, from isotopes to trace gases.

  12. Diode laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy for in situ measurement of NO3 radical in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Hu, Renzhi; Xie, Pinhua; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Qin, Min; Ling, Liuyi; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Hao; Xing, XingBiao; Zhu, Guoliang; Wu, Jun; Duan, Jun; Lu, Xue; Shen, Lanlan

    2015-11-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument for measuring atmospheric NO3 radical developed in our laboratory is presented in detail. Light from a red laser diode (661.85 nm) is coupled on-axis into an optical cavity formed by a pair of high-reflectivity mirrors (R≥99.9985%) to achieve an effective absorption path length of approximately 20 km. The detection limit of the NO3 radical determined by Allan variance for the field observation with high particles is approximately 3.2 pptv (2σ, 10 s). The transmission efficiency of the NO3 radical in the system is calibrated, including the filter loss and surface loss. Moreover, measurable interferences from NO2, O3 and water vapor are also discussed. Considering the influence of inlet transmission efficiency and other factors, the instrument accuracy for NO3 radical measurement is approximately ±8% (1σ). The measurement of NO3 radical was performed at a suburb site in Beijing under the situation of high particles concentration (PM2.5 approximately several tens to 150 μg/m3) from October 26 to November 11, 2014. The NO3 radical concentration during the period is relatively low with the maximum value of 38 pptv. The observation results on October 29, combining NO2, O3 and NO data, are briefly analyzed. The experimental results demonstrate that this compact CRDS instrument has the potential for NO3 radical measurements in the field with high particles.

  13. Two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering: measurements at the VEPP-3 storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachek, I. A.; Arrington, J.; Dmitriev, V. F.; Gauzshtein, V. V.; Gramolin, A. V.; Holt, R. J.; Kaminskiy, V. V.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Muchnoi, N. Yu; Neufeld, V. V.; Nikolenko, D. M.; Sadykov, R. Sh; Shestakov, Yu V.; Stibunov, V. N.; Toporkov, D. K.; de Vries, H.; Zevakov, S. A.; Zhilich, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    A striking discrepancy between the results for the ratio of electric and magnetic form factors of the proton obtained by two approaches: the Rosenbluth extraction from the unpolarized cross section and the double-polarization measurements has led to a serious re-examination of the role played by two-photon exchange diagrams. The evaluation of such diagrams could not be done in model-independent way, which means an experimental verification is required. One of the direct ways to do this is to measure the ratio of positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross-sections for identical kinematics. Such a measurement has been performed at the VEPP-3 storage ring at Novosibirsk. There were two runs at beam energies of 1.6 and 1.0 GeV at several ranges of scattering angle. The measurements covered the transferred momentum Q2 up to 1.5 GeV2 and the virtual photon polarization parameter ɛ down to 0.2 . The VEPP-3 experimental approach is described and the results of the measurements are presented.

  14. Planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the Rings of Saturn from the Pioneer spacecraft, discovery of the Ring of Jupiter, ground based polarimetry of the Rings of Saturn and some theoretical studies may be combined to markedly advance our understanding of the Rings of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. In particular, narrow rings can be self-gravitatingly stable inside Roche's limit and outside another closer limit. They can be created from a satellite which evolves across its Roche limit either by inward tidal drift or by growth of the planet by accretion. These considerations suggest that Neptune may well be surrounded by one or more narrow rings like those of Uranus.

  15. Effects of Particles on Trace-Gas Measurement Using Open-Path Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchale, L.; Shadman, S.; Yalin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Open-path Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy offers many potential advantages over traditional closed-path configurations for the measurement of atmospheric trace gasses. Removal of the vacuum pump and flow system may enable more compact instruments suitable for remote and mobile deployments as well as real time measurement of 'sticky' gases. However, open path operation introduces new challenges including exposure of high reflectivity mirrors to ambient air and aerosols, the need to measure wider (pressure broadened) spectral peaks and possible signal interferences due to optical extinction by aerosol particles in the cavity laser beam. The present submission focuses on the effects of aerosol particles on open-path CRDS using a near-infrared (1742 nm) methane gas measurement system as a test bed. A simple purge enclosure system was developed to prevent aerosol deposition on the cavity high-reflectors. The purge uses ambient air pulled in with a micro-pump through a hepa filter and maintained mirror reflectivity R>0.99996 over 100 hours of use in the presence of high aerosol loading. Optical extinction due to ambient aerosols can change the cavity loss and influence the recorded ring-down times. We observed relatively large fluctuations due to supermicron particles and a near-constant baseline shift due to smaller submicron particles. The fluctuations correspond to absorption on the order of 10-8-10-7 cm-1, comparable to the amplitude of the targeted methane absorption features, causing significant interference. Simple software filter approaches were developed to counter these fluctuations without a priori knowledge of the ambient aerosols. The filters exploit the statistical distribution of signals as well as the expected absorption lineshape. Using these filters, noise-equivalent sensitivities within a factor of ~3 of closed-path systems were obtained (4x10-10cm-1Hz-1/2). Outdoor open-path measurements were validated with side-by-side measurements with a commercial

  16. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  17. Further studies of the photoproduction of isolated photons with a jet at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-08-01

    In this extended analysis using the ZEUS detector at HERA, the photoproduction of isolated photons together with a jet is measured for different ranges of the fractional photon energy, x {/γ meas}, contributing to the photon-jet final state. Cross sections are evaluated in the photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 6 < E {/T γ } < 15 GeV and -0 .7 < η γ < 0 .9, and for jet transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4 < E {/T jet} < 35 GeV and -1 .5 < η jet < 1 .8, for an integrated luminosity of 374 pb-1. The kinematic observables studied comprise the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the photon and the jet, the azimuthal difference between them, the fraction of proton energy taking part in the interaction, and the difference between the pseudorapidities of the photon and the jet. Higher-order theoretical calculations are compared to the results.

  18. Recent results from low-x and forward physics at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Goerlich, Lidia; Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    The production of forward jets in inclusive as well as diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA is studied with the H1 detector. For inclusive DIS events at low Q{sup 2} with a forward jet, produced close to the proton remnant, differential cross sections and normalised distributions are measured as a function of the azimuthal angle difference between the forward jet and the scattered positron. Results on dijet production cross sections are also presented for diffractive DIS events in which the final state proton is tagged in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. Two topologies are investigated by either requiring the two jets being produced centrally or by requiring that one of the jets is going in the forward direction. The data are compared with NLO QCD predictions as well as leading order Monte Carlo models.

  19. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  20. A measurement of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, together with NO₂, NO, and O₃ via cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wild, Robert J; Edwards, Peter M; Dubé, William P; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S; Quinn, Patricia K; Roberts, James M; Rollins, Andrew W; Veres, Patrick R; Warneke, Carsten; Williams, Eric J; Yuan, Bin; Brown, Steven S

    2014-08-19

    We present a sensitive, compact detector that measures total reactive nitrogen (NOy), as well as NO2, NO, and O3. In all channels, NO2 is directly detected by laser diode based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) at 405 nm. Ambient O3 is converted to NO2 in excess NO for the O3 measurement channel. Likewise, ambient NO is converted to NO2 in excess O3. Ambient NOy is thermally dissociated at ∼700 °C to form NO2 or NO in a heated quartz inlet. Any NO present in ambient air or formed from thermal dissociation of other reactive nitrogen compounds is converted to NO2 in excess O3 after the thermal converter. We measured thermal dissociation profiles for six of the major NOy components and compared ambient measurements with other instruments during field campaigns in Utah and Alabama. Alabama measurements were made in a rural location with high biogenic emissions, and Utah measurements were made in the wintertime in unusual conditions that form high ozone levels from emissions related to oil and gas production. The NOy comparison in Alabama, to an accepted standard measurement method (a molybdenum catalytic converter/chemiluminescence instrument), agreed to within 12%, which we define as an upper limit to the accuracy of the NOy channel. The 1σ precision is <30 pptv at 1 s and <4 pptv at 1 min time resolution for all measurement channels. The accuracy is 3% for the NO2 and O3 channels and 5% for the NO channel. The precision and accuracy of this instrument make it a versatile alternative to standard chemiluminescence-based NOy instruments.

  1. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  2. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  3. Pooled versus separate tree-ring δD measurements, and implications for reconstruction of the Arctic Oscillation in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; An, Wenling; Treydte, Kerstin; Wang, Wenzhi; Xu, Guobao; Zeng, Xiaomin; Wu, Guoju; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xuanwen

    2015-04-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) in tree rings are an attractive but still rarely explored terrestrial archive of past climatic information. Because the preparation of the cellulose nitrate for δD measurements requires more wood and a longer preparation time than preparation techniques for other isotopes in cellulose (δ18O or δ13C), it is challenging to obtain high-resolution records, especially for slow-growing trees at high elevations and in boreal regions. Here, we tested whether annually pooled samples of Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom.) trees from northwestern China provided results similar to those derived as the mean of individual measurements of the same trees and whether the resulting chronologies recorded useful climate information. Inter-tree variability of δD was higher than that of measured ring width for the same trees. We found higher and significant coherence between pooled and mean isotope chronologies than that among the individual series. It showed a logarithmic relationship between ring mass and δD; however, accounting for the influence of ring mass on δD values only slightly improved the strength of climatic signals in the pooled records. Tree-ring δD was significantly positively correlated with the mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures during the previous winter and with maximum temperature during the current August, and significantly negatively correlated with precipitation in the previous November to January and the current July. The winter climate signal seems to dominate tree-ring δD through the influence of large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, i.e. the Arctic Oscillation. These results will facilitate reconstruction of winter atmospheric circulation patterns over northwestern China based on a regional tree-ring δD networks.

  4. Pooled versus separate tree-ring δD measurements, and implications for reconstruction of the Arctic Oscillation in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; An, Wenling; Treydte, Kerstin; Wang, Wenzhi; Xu, Guobao; Zeng, Xiaomin; Wu, Guoju; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Xuanwen

    2015-04-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) in tree rings are an attractive but still rarely explored terrestrial archive of past climatic information. Because the preparation of the cellulose nitrate for δD measurements requires more wood and a longer preparation time than preparation techniques for other isotopes in cellulose (δ18O or δ13C), it is challenging to obtain high-resolution records, especially for slow-growing trees at high elevations and in boreal regions. Here, we tested whether annually pooled samples of Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom.) trees from northwestern China provided results similar to those derived as the mean of individual measurements of the same trees and whether the resulting chronologies recorded useful climate information. Inter-tree variability of δD was higher than that of measured ring width for the same trees. We found higher and significant coherence between pooled and mean isotope chronologies than that among the individual series. It showed a logarithmic relationship between ring mass and δD; however, accounting for the influence of ring mass on δD values only slightly improved the strength of climatic signals in the pooled records. Tree-ring δD was significantly positively correlated with the mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures during the previous winter and with maximum temperature during the current August, and significantly negatively correlated with precipitation in the previous November to January and the current July. The winter climate signal seems to dominate tree-ring δD through the influence of large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, i.e. the Arctic Oscillation. These results will facilitate reconstruction of winter atmospheric circulation patterns over northwestern China based on a regional tree-ring δD networks. PMID:25590539

  5. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  6. The application of a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measurements of ambient ammonia using traceable primary standard gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas A.; Ferracci, Valerio; Cassidy, Nathan; Hoffnagle, John A.

    2016-08-01

    A correction for the undesirable effects of direct and indirect cross-interference from water vapour on ammonia (NH3) measurements was developed using an optical laser sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This correction relied on new measurements of the collisional broadening due to water vapour of two NH3 spectral lines in the near infra-red (6548.6 and 6548.8 cm-1), and on the development of novel stable primary standard gas mixtures (PSMs) of ammonia prepared by gravimetry in passivated gas cylinders at 100 μmol mol-1. The PSMs were diluted dynamically to provide calibration mixtures of dry and humidified ammonia atmospheres of known composition in the nmol mol-1 range and were employed as part of establishing a metrological traceability chain to improve the reliability and accuracy of ambient ammonia measurements. The successful implementation of this correction will allow the extension of this rapid on-line spectroscopic technique to exposure chamber validation tests under controlled conditions and ambient monitoring in the field.

  7. Isotopic Seawater Analysis Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy: Method for Reducing the Effect of Salts on the Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Hak, D.; Normandeau, C.; Winkler, R.; Huang, K.; Kerrigan, L.

    2015-12-01

    High-salinity waters such as Seawater poses an operational and maintenance challenge to the measurements of water stable isotopes via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy. As liquid samples are evaporated in the vaporizer peripheral before being sent to the CRDS analyzer, salt precipitates accumulate in the vaporizer chamber. As a result, the sample-to-sample memory performance degrades over time and frequent cleaning is required to maintain the peripheral performance and integrity. To address this issue, earlier work showed that adding a metallic mesh liner into the injection port of the vaporizer could capture salt solids and protect the vaporizer chamber without affecting the sample's isotopic composition and the measurement performance. Additional long-term tests have been recently conducted with the new commercially available Salt Liner accessory to assess its efficacy. We demonstrated the longer stability of the sample-to-sample memory performance on various brine water measurements when compared to a system without the Salt Liner. We also established the guidelines in using, replacing, and cleaning the Salt Liner.

  8. Storage-ring measurements of hyperfine induced transition rates in berylliumlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schippers, Stefan

    2013-07-11

    The status of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of the hyperfine induced 2s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}2s{sup 21}S{sub 0} transition rate in Be-like ions is reviewed. Possible reasons, such as external electromagnetic fields and competing E1M1 two-photon transitions, for presently existing significant discrepancies between experiment and theory are discussed. Finally, directions for future research are outlined.

  9. RadWorks Project. ISS REM - to - BIRD - to - HERA: The Evolution of a Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of particle detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. One such device, the TimePix, is being developed at CERN, and is providing the technology basis for the most recent line of radiation detection devices being developed by the NASA AES RadWorks project. The most fundamental of these devices, an ISS-Radiation Environment Monitor (REM), is installed as a USB device on ISS where it is monitoring the radiation environment on a perpetual basis. The second generation of this TimePix technology, the BIRD (Battery-operated Independent Radiation Detector), was flown on the NASA EFT-1 flight in December 2014. Data collected by BIRD was the first data made available from the Trapped Belt region of the Earth's atmosphere in over 40 years. The 3rdgeneration of this technology, the HERA (Hybrid Electronic Radiation Assessor), is planned to be integrated into the Orion EM-1, and EM-2 vehicles where it will monitor the radiation environment. For the EM-2 flight, HERA will provide Caution and Warning notification for SPEs as well as real time dose measurements for crew members. The development of this line of radiation detectors provide much greater information and characterization of charged particles in the space radiation environment than has been collected in the past, and in the process provide greater information to inform crew members of radiation related risks, while being very power and mass efficient.

  10. Measurements of Total Alkyl and Peroxy Nitrate Abundance by Thermal Dissociation Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (TD-CRDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, D.; Furgeson, A.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2009-05-01

    The oxides of nitrogen (NOx = NO + NO2) regulate many atmospheric processes, including production and destruction of tropospheric ozone. Processes that affect NOx abundance are hence of interest. Organic nitrates in the form of peroxy nitrates, RO2NO2, and alkyl nitrates, RONO2, may act as NOx reservoirs but can also act as NOx sinks. Many aspects of organic nitrate chemistry in ambient air remain uncertain, warranting further research. Organic nitrates are frequently quantified by gas chromatography (GC); the main disadvantage of this technique is its low acquisition speed. Recently, high- temporal resolution measurements of total peroxy (ΣPN) and alkyl nitrate (ΣAN) abundances were made by thermal dissociation to NO2, which was quantified by laser-induced fluorescence (TD-LIF). Here, we describe a Thermal Dissociation Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (TD-CRDS) for measurements of ΣPN and ΣAN. The thermal dissociation product NO2 is quantified by optical absorption at 532 nm using a Nd:YAG laser pulsed at 20 Hz repetition rate. The organic nitrates are quantified by difference relative to NO2 measured in a reference channel at room temperature. The inlet temperatures for ΣPN and ΣAN were set to 264 C and 480 C, respectively. Under these conditions, conversion of organic nitrates to NO2 was quantitative for a variety of laboratory-generated samples and over a wide range of mixing ratios. The conversion efficiency was verified by simultaneous measurements of NOy (= NOx + NO3 + 2N2O5 + ΣPN + ΣAN + HNO3 + ...) using a commercial NO-O3 chemiluminescence detector. Unlike TD-LIF, TD-CRDS may thus not need to rely on external calibration to quantify organic nitrates. At present, the ΣAN and ΣPN measurement precision of the TD-CRDS is ± 100 pptv (1σ) in a 1 s integration time.

  11. J/ψ-PRODUCTION Mechanisms and Determination of the Gluon Density at Hera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Schuler, G. A.; Terron, J.

    We discuss photo- and leptoproduction of J/ψ mesons at energies ranging from those of fixed-target experiments up to those of HERA. Elastic and diffractive production as well as various inelastic processes are studied. We investigate the range in which J/ψ production is described by photon-gluon fusion in the color-singlet model. We show how inelastic J/ψ production at HERA can be used to extract the gluon density. We estimate an accessible range of 3×10-4HERA.

  12. Measurements of extinction by aerosol particles in the near-infrared using continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mellon, Daniel; King, Simon J; Kim, Jin; Reid, Jonathan P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2011-02-10

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy using a fiber-coupled continuous wave distributed feedback laser at a wavelength of 1520 nm has been used to measure extinction of light by samples of nearly monodisperse aerosol particles <1 μm in diameter. A model is tested for the analysis of the sample extinction that is based on the Poisson statistics of the number of particles within the intracavity laser beam: variances of measured extinction are used to derive values of the scattering cross section for size-selected aerosol particles, without need for knowledge of the particle number density or sample length. Experimental parameters that influence the performance of the CRD system and the application and limitations of the statistical model are examined in detail. Determinations are reported of the scattering cross sections for polystyrene spheres (PSSs), sodium chloride, and ammonium sulfate, and, for particles greater than 500 nm in diameter, are shown to be in agreement with the corresponding values calculated using Mie theory or Discrete Dipole Approximation methods. For smaller particles, the experimentally derived values of the scattering cross section are larger than the theoretical predictions, and transmission of a small fraction of larger particles into the cavity is argued to be responsible for this discrepancy. The effects of cubic structure on the determination of optical extinction efficiencies of sodium chloride aerosol particles are examined. Values are reported for the real components of the refractive indices at 1520 nm of PSS, sodium chloride, and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles.

  13. A Diode Laser Based Cavity Ring-Down Instrument for Simultaneous, Compact, Sensitive, Rapid Measurement of NO2 and NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N.; Fuchs, H.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    NO2 and NOx (=NO2+NO) measurements are essential for monitoring air-quality. Cavity ring- down spectroscopy (CRDS) is a highly sensitive technique to detect small concentrations of atmospheric trace gases such as NO2. Laser diode light sources enable the development of compact, lightweight instruments with minimal requirements for power and consumables. NO2 can be detected directly by absorption near 405 nm where ozone absorption and water absorption, which are the major concerns with respect to interferences, are small compared to that of NO2. Here, NOx is detected in a second cavity in addition to ambient NO2 by oxidation of ambient NO with excess ozone so that the sum of NO2 and NO is measured as NO2. This presentation will compare the performance of the CRDS instrument for NO and NO2 detection to standard instruments based on chemiluminescence for sensitivity, accuracy, linearity and dynamic range, and potential interferences using data from both laboratory and in-field comparisons.

  14. Measurement and analysis of a microwave oscillator stabilized by a sapphire dielectric ring resonator for ultra-low noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Saunders, Jon

    1990-01-01

    Phase-noise measurements are presented for a microwave oscillator whose frequency is stabilized by a whispering-gallery sapphire ring resonator with Q of 200,000. This mode involves little metallic conduction and allows nearly full use of the very low dielectric loss in sapphire. Several mode families have been identified, in good agreement with frequency calculations. For a 5-cm wheel resonator in a 7.6-cm container, Q values above 100,000 were found at room temperature for all of the modes in this sequence. Coupling Q-values for these same modes ranged from 10,000 (n = 5) to 100,000 (n = 10) for a WR112 waveguide port at the center of the cylinder wall of the containing can. Phase noise measurements for a transistor oscillator locked to the n = 10 (7.84-GHz) mode showed a 1/f cubed dependence for low offset frequencies, and a value of L(f) = -55 dB/Hz at an offset of 10 Hz from the carrier.

  15. Measurement and analysis of a microwave oscillator stabilized by a sapphire dielectric ring resonator for ultra-low noise.

    PubMed

    Dick, G J; Saunders, J

    1990-01-01

    Phase-noise measurements are presented for a microwave oscillator whose frequency is stabilized by a whispering gallery mode sapphire ring resonator with Q of 2x10(5). The nature of the mode, which involves little metallic conduction, allows nearly full use of the very low dielectric loss in sapphire. Several mode families have been identified with good agreement with calculated frequency predictions. Waveguide coupling parameters have been characterized for the principal (lowest frequency) mode family, for n=5 to n =10 full waves around the perimeter. For a 5-cm wheel resonator in a 7.6-cm container, Q-values of above 10(5) were found at room temperature for all of the modes in this sequence. Coupling Q-values for the same modes ranged from 10(4) (n =5) to 10(5) (n=10) for a WR112 waveguide port at the center of the cylinder wall of the containing can. Phase noise measurements for a transistor oscillator locked to the n=10 (7.84-GHz) mode showed a 1/f(3) dependence for low offset frequencies, and a value of L(f)=-55 dB/Hz at an offset of 10 Hz from the carrier. The oscillator shows phase noise below the previously reported for any X-band source. PMID:18285050

  16. Measurement and analysis of a microwave oscillator stabilized by a sapphire dielectric ring resonator for ultra-low noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G. John; Saunders, Jon

    1990-09-01

    Phase-noise measurements are presented for a microwave oscillator whose frequency is stabilized by a whispering-gallery sapphire ring resonator with Q of 200,000. This mode involves little metallic conduction and allows nearly full use of the very low dielectric loss in sapphire. Several mode families have been identified, in good agreement with frequency calculations. For a 5-cm wheel resonator in a 7.6-cm container, Q values above 100,000 were found at room temperature for all of the modes in this sequence. Coupling Q-values for these same modes ranged from 10,000 (n = 5) to 100,000 (n = 10) for a WR112 waveguide port at the center of the cylinder wall of the containing can. Phase noise measurements for a transistor oscillator locked to the n = 10 (7.84-GHz) mode showed a 1/f cubed dependence for low offset frequencies, and a value of L(f) = -55 dB/Hz at an offset of 10 Hz from the carrier.

  17. Hera: Engineering Web Applications Using Semantic Web-based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sluijs, Kees; Houben, Geert-Jan; Leonardi, Erwin; Hidders, Jan

    In this chapter, we consider the contribution of models and model-driven approaches based on Semantic Web for the development of Web applications. The model-driven web engineering approach, that separates concerns on different abstraction level in the application design process, allows for more robust and structural design of web applications. This is illustrated by the use of Hera, an approach from the class of Web engineering methods that relies on models expressed using RDF(S) and an RDF(S) query language. It illustrates how models and in particular models that fit with the ideas and concepts from the Semantic Web allow to approach the design and engineering of modern, open and heterogeneous Web based systems. In the presented approach, adaptation and personalization are a main aspect and it is illustrated how they are expressed using semantic data models and languages. Also specific features of Hera are discussed, like interoperability between applications in user modeling, aspect orientation in Web design and graphical tool support for Web application design.

  18. Resolution Performance of HERA-B Lead-Glass Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, Anthony; Brash, Edward; Thomas, Jordan; Ayerbe-Gayoso, Carlos; Burton, Matthew; Perdisat, Charles; Jones, Mark; Punjabi, Vina; Hast, Carsten; Szalata, Zenon

    2013-10-01

    In preparation of upcoming 12 GeV experiments at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility it is necessary to upgrade existing systems or install new detectors. As part of this effort, an array of lead-glass sampling calorimeters is need for use in the GEP-5 experiment. A sampling calorimeter can be used to determine the energy and spatial position of a high energy particle that enters it while simultaneously stopping the particle. To determine the appropriate construction to meet the needs of upcoming experiments, it was necessary to take an existing model and confirm its energy and position resolution. This model could then be confirmed as an option for the final construction, or used as a starting point to design a better detector. For our test we obtained ten lead-glass calorimeters used in HERA-B and tested them in End Station A at SLAC. I will report on our findings for the HERA-B lead-glass sampling calorimeters. I will cover the results of both the energy and position resolutions as well as the methods used to determine these quantities.

  19. Measurement of strut chordal forces of the tricuspid valve using miniature C ring transducers.

    PubMed

    Troxler, Lauren G; Spinner, Erin M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-04-01

    Tricuspid valve (TV) leaflets, papillary muscles (PM), and tendinous chords must work together to ensure proper coaptation. Alterations in valvular mechanics, including chordal forces, may lead to improper coaptation resulting in tricuspid regurgitation. Little is known about TV mechanics as right-sided heart diseases have been overlooked. We sought to fill this gap by understanding the role of TV strut chords with the objective to understand how strut chordal force varies depending on papillary muscle (PM) origin and leaflet attachment in the normal state. Additionally we investigated how these forces are altered with abnormal geometry. Porcine TVs (n=18) were studied in a right-heart simulator capable of reproducing physiological and pathological conditions. Miniature force transducers were placed on strut chords to measure forces throughout the cardiac cycle. In the normal state, chordal force depended upon PM attachment in which chords branching from the septal PM (SPM) carried significantly less force compared to those branching from the anterior PM (APM) (p≤0.05). Annular dilatation resulted in significant increase in chordal force (p≤0.05) on all strut chords. Severe PM displacement led to increased chordal force in chords attaching the APM to the posterior leaflet as well as chords attaching the PPM to the septal leaflet. Elevated chordal force due to isolated annular dilatation was further increased only with addition of apical displacement of the APM. These results provide initial knowledge of TV chordal force mechanics and may be applied to future studies on TV repair techniques. PMID:22284427

  20. Mapping Ring Particle Cooling across Saturn's Rings with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L. J.; Edgington, S. G.; Pilorz, S. H.; Deau, E.

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the rings' thermal inertia, a measure of their response to changes in the thermal environment, varies from ring to ring. Thermal inertia can provide insight into the physical structure of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths. Low thermal inertia and quick temperature responses are suggestive of ring particles that have more porous or fluffy regoliths or that are riddled with cracks. Solid, coherent particles can be expected to have higher thermal inertias (Ferrari et al. 2005). Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded millions of spectra of Saturn's rings since its arrival at Saturn in 2004 (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation between 10 and 600 cm-1 (16.7 and 1000 µm) at focal plane 1 (FP1), which has a field of view of 3.9 mrad. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks in this wavelength range. FP1 spectra can be used to infer ring temperatures. By tracking how ring temperatures vary, we can determine the thermal inertia of the rings. In this work we focus on CIRS observations of the shadowed portion of Saturn's rings. The thermal budget of the rings is dominated by the solar radiation absorbed by its constituent particles. When ring particles enter Saturn's shadow this source of energy is abruptly cut off. As a result, ring particles cool as they traverse Saturn's shadow. From these shadow observations we can create cooling curves at specific locations across the rings. We will show that the rings' cooling curves and thus their thermal inertia vary not only from ring to ring, but by location within the individual rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  1. Direct measurement of the plasma loss width in an optimized, high ionization fraction, magnetic multi-dipole ring cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. M.; Weisberg, D. B.; Khalzov, I.; Milhone, J.; Flanagan, K.; Peterson, E.; Wahl, C.; Forest, C. B.

    2016-10-01

    The loss width of plasma in the WiPAL multi-dipole magnetic ring cusp [Cooper et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 13505 (2014); Forest et al., J. Plasma Phys. 81, 345810501 (2015)] has been directly measured using a novel array of probes embedded in the insulating plasma limiters. The large plasma volume ( ˜10 m3), small loss area associated with strong rare earth permanent magnets ( Bo˜2.23 kG at face), and large heating power ( ≤200 kW) produces a broad range of electron temperatures ( 2 measured. This plasma regime, accessible with high magnetic fields, differs from previous devices: the cusp loss width is much larger than the Debye length and electron gyroradius and comparable to the collision length. Plasma parameters measured at the surface of ceramic limiter tiles covering the magnets and along radial chords in the cusp magnetic field indicate that electron density and temperature are nearly constant on magnetic field lines and that the mirror forces play little role in confining the plasma other than to constrict the loss area. Particle balance modeling is used to determine the cross field diffusion coefficient base on the measured losses to the limiters. The experimentally determined cross field diffusion coefficient (which determines the cusp loss width) is consistent with ambipolar diffusion across five orders of magnitude. The ambipolar diffusion across a given field line is set primarily by the electron-neutral collisions in the region where the magnetic field is the weakest, even though these plasmas can have ionization fractions near 1.

  2. Ring flips revisited: (13)C relaxation dispersion measurements of aromatic side chain dynamics and activation barriers in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Modig, Kristofer; Akke, Mikael

    2014-07-22

    Intramolecular motions of proteins are critical for biological function. Transient structural fluctuations underlie a wide range of processes, including enzyme catalysis, ligand binding to buried sites, and generic protein motions, such as 180° rotation of aromatic side chains in the protein interior, but remain poorly understood. Understanding the dynamics and molecular nature of concerted motions requires characterization of their rates and energy barriers. Here we use recently developed (13)C transverse relaxation dispersion methods to improve our current understanding of aromatic ring flips in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). We validate these methods by benchmarking ring-flip rates against the three previously characterized cases in BPTI, namely, Y23, Y35, and F45. Further, we measure conformational exchange for one additional aromatic ring, F22, which can be interpreted in terms of a flip rate of 666 s(-1) at 5 °C. Upon inclusion of our previously reported result that Y21 also flips slowly [Weininger, U., et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 9241-9247], the (13)C relaxation dispersion experiments thus reveal relatively slow ring-flip rates for five of eight aromatic residues in BPTI. These results are in contrast with previous reports, which have estimated that all rings, except Y23, Y35, and F45, flip with a high rate at ambient temperature. The (13)C relaxation dispersion data result in an updated rank order of ring-flip rates in BPTI, which agrees considerably better with that estimated from a recent 1 ms molecular dynamics trajectory than do previously published NMR data. However, significant quantitative differences remain between experiment and simulation, in that the latter yields flip rates that are in many cases too fast by 1-2 orders of magnitude. By measuring flip rates across a temperature range of 5-65 °C, we determined the activation barriers of ring flips for Y23, Y35, and F45. Y23 and F45 have identical activation parameters

  3. Phase-space measurement of stored electron beam at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring using a combination of slit array and CCD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; Gluskin, E.; Dejus, R.; Ilinski, P. )

    1995-02-01

    A new technique for fast phase-space measurement has been developed and tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. A measurement time of a few seconds was obtained by using a slit array and a high-resolution position sensitive detector system. The detector system consists of a CdWO[sub 4] scintillation crystal, an optical imaging system, and a CCD detector. The short measurement time increases the measurement accuracy by reducing the effects from the instabilities of the electron beam in storage ring. The vertical emittance at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring in single-bunch and low-current mode was measured, and reasonable agreement with the expected values for both source size and source divergence were obtained ([sigma][sub [ital y

  4. Study on real-time wear measurement of piston-ring and cylinder-bore in an engine using thin layer activation method.

    PubMed

    Donghui, Huang; Pingsheng, Wang; Weizhi, Tian; Dequan, Zhao; Guangzhou, Cao; Bangfa, Ni; Xiuhua, Zhang; Lin, Li; Guiying, Zhang; Cunxiong, Liu; Dehong, Li

    2008-08-01

    The instantaneous wear rates for both the top compression piston-ring and the cylinder-bore, in a ZS1105 diesel engine, were measured in situ using the method of thin layer activation (TLA). The experimental arrangement and methods for calibrating the test specimens are described. During a 300 s counting interval, the minimum detectable wear depths for the cylinder-bore and piston-ring were 9 and 75 nm, respectively. These values reflect average recession depths and may not reflect localized differences in wear damage. Nevertheless, such in situ techniques can be usefully employed in engine development. PMID:18424051

  5. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CPS-CRDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Yixiang; Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-06-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMP-CRDS for ultratrace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10{sup -13} g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRDS technology for isobaric measurements, such as {sup 238}U and {sup 238}Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMP-CRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs.

  6. Electron-ion recombination of Si IV forming Si III: Storage-ring measurement and multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E. W.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Hoffmann, J.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Orlov, D. A.; Wolf, A.; Lukic, D.; Savin, D. W.

    2007-09-15

    The electron-ion recombination rate coefficient for Si IV forming Si III was measured at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR. The experimental electron-ion collision energy range of 0-186 eV encompassed the 2p{sup 6}nln{sup '}l{sup '} dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 3s{yields}nl core excitations, 2s2p{sup 6}3snln{sup '}l{sup '} resonances associated with 2s{yields}nl (n=3,4) core excitations, and 2p{sup 5}3snln{sup '}l{sup '} resonances associated with 2p{yields}nl (n=3,...,{infinity}) core excitations. The experimental DR results are compared with theoretical calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method for DR via the 3s{yields}3pn{sup '}l{sup '} and 3s{yields}3dn{sup '}l{sup '}(both n{sup '}=3,...,6) and 2p{sup 5}3s3ln{sup '}l{sup '} (n{sup '}=3,4) capture channels. Finally, the experimental and theoretical plasma DR rate coefficients for Si IV forming Si III are derived and compared with previously available results.

  7. A Beam Shape Oscillation Monitor for HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, O. V.; Baluev, A. B.; Gubrienko, K. I.; Merker, E. A.; Wittenburg, K.; Krouptchenkow, I.

    2006-11-20

    The perfect matching of the injecting beam phase space with the accelerator lattice is a very important problem. Its successful solution allows excluding possible mismatch emittance blow-up and worsening of the beam characteristics, that is necessary to get the highest possible luminosity in hadron accelerators. The mismatch can be controlled by measuring sizes oscillation on the first revolutions of the injected beam at a certain orbit point. Designed for this purpose the construction, acquisition electronics, software controlling of the operation and data processing of such a monitor are described. A first test result with beam is presented.

  8. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  9. H2S interference on CO2 isotopic measurements using a Picarro G1101-i cavity ring-down spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowany, K.; Stix, J.; Van Pelt, A.; Lucic, G.

    2015-06-01

    Cavity ring-down spectrometers (CRDS) have the capacity to make isotopic measurements of CO2 where concentrations range from atmospheric (~ 400 ppm) to 6000 ppm. Following field trials, it has come to light that the spectrographic lines used for CO2 have an interference with elevated (higher than ambient) amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which causes significant depletions in the δ13C measurement by the CRDS. In order to deploy this instrument in environments with elevated H2S concentrations (i.e., active volcanoes), we require a robust method for eliminating this interference. Controlled experiments using a Picarro G1101-i optical spectrometer were done to characterize the H2S interference at varying CO2 and H2S concentrations. The addition of H2S to a CO2 standard gas reveals an increase in the 12CO2 concentration and a more significant decrease in the 13CO2 concentration, resulting in a depleted δ13C value. Reacting gas samples containing H2S with copper prior to analysis can eliminate this effect. However, experiments also revealed that the addition of H2S to CO2 results in the formation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2), causing a decrease in the overall CO2 concentration without affecting the δ13C value. It is important for future work with CRDS, particularly in volcanic regions where H2S is abundant, to be aware of the H2S interference on the CO2 spectroscopic lines and to remove all H2S prior to analysis. We suggest employing a scrub composed of copper to remove H2S from all gas samples that have concentrations in excess of 1 ppb.

  10. H2S interference on CO2 isotopic measurements using a Picarro G1101-i cavity ring-down spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowany, K.; Stix, J.; Van Pelt, A.; Lucic, G.

    2015-10-01

    Cavity ring-down spectrometers (CRDSs) have the capacity to make isotopic measurements of CO2 where concentrations range from atmospheric (~ 400 ppm) to 6000 ppm. Following field trials, it has come to light that the spectrographic lines used for CO2 have an interference with elevated (higher than ambient) amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which causes significant depletions in the δ13C measurement by the CRDSs. In order to deploy this instrument in environments with elevated H2S concentrations (i.e., active volcanoes), we require a robust method for eliminating this interference. Controlled experiments using a Picarro G1101-i optical spectrometer were done to characterize the H2S interference at varying CO2 and H2S concentrations. The addition of H2S to a CO2 standard gas reveals an increase in the 12CO2 concentration and a more significant decrease in the 13CO2 concentration, resulting in a depleted δ13C value. Reacting gas samples containing H2S with copper prior to analysis can eliminate this effect. Models post-dating the G1101-i carbon isotope analyzer have maintained the same spectral lines for CO2 and are likely to have a similar H2S response at elevated H2S concentrations. It is important for future work with CRDS, particularly in volcanic regions where H2S is abundant, to be aware of the H2S interference on the CO2 spectroscopic lines and to remove all H2S prior to analysis. We suggest employing a scrub composed of copper to remove H2S from all gas samples that have concentrations in excess of 1 ppb.

  11. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  12. Combined QCD and electroweak analysis of HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A simultaneous fit of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and electroweak parameters to HERA data on deep inelastic scattering is presented. The input data are the neutral current and charged current inclusive cross sections which were previously used in the QCD analysis leading to the HERAPDF2.0 PDFs. In addition, the polarization of the electron beam was taken into account for the ZEUS data recorded between 2004 and 2007. Results on the vector and axial-vector couplings of the Z boson to u - and d -type quarks, on the value of the electroweak mixing angle and the mass of the W boson are presented. The values obtained for the electroweak parameters are in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  13. Measurement of atmospheric NO2 and NOx by a small, sensitive diode laser based cavity ring-down detector at 404 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Wagner, N. L.; Williams, E. J.; Brown, S. S.

    2009-04-01

    A new, cavity ring-down detector was developed for the detection of atmospheric NO2 and NOx. NO2 is directly measured by laser diode based cavity ring-down spectroscopy at 404 nm. In contrast to the indirect detection in most commonly used chemiluminescence detectors, the direct measurement of NO2 may be useful especially in cases where NO to NO2 ratios are large such as in freshly emitted plumes from combustion processes. The extinction of ambient air is dominated by the absorption of NO2 so that the instrument does not exhibit significant interferences due to other absorbers such as ozone or water vapor. The limit of detection is 22 pptv (2σ precision) for NO2 at 1 s time resolution. The accuracy of the NO2 measurement is given by the uncertainty of the NO2 absorption cross section to

  14. High Variability of the Metal Content of Tree Growth Rings as Measured by Synchrotron Micro X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Martin,R.; Naftel, S.; Macfie, S.; Jones, K.; Feng, H.; Trembley, C.

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation analysis was used to investigate the metal content of tree rings collected from paper birch, Betula papyrifera Marsh, on transects downwind from two metal smelters (nickel and copper). Individual trees reflected changes in ring metal content with time, which may be presumed to represent changes in local metal bioavailability. However, between-tree variations were large and no statistically significant differences in metal content as a function of time were found within or between sites. Although concentrations of both total and exchangeable copper and nickel in the soil increased with proximity to the respective smelter, this pattern was reflected only in the nickel content of rings near the nickel smelter; copper content did not vary with distance from either smelter. The sites did differ with respect to lead, manganese and zinc content of the rings, which may be related to pH. In conclusion, the variability between trees at each site suggests that dendroanalysis is a poor method for evaluating metal exposure at a large (site) scale. Tree ring metal content may be used to evaluate the metal uptake by individual trees but metal mobility in the stem makes it difficult to establish a reliable chronology.

  15. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  16. Comparison of different mass spectrometry techniques in the measurement of L-[ring-(13)C6]phenylalanine incorporation into mixed muscle proteins.

    PubMed

    Zabielski, Piotr; Ford, G Charles; Persson, X Mai; Jaleel, Abdul; Dewey, Jerry D; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2013-02-01

    Precise measurement of low enrichment of stable isotope labeled amino-acid tracers in tissue samples is a prerequisite in measuring tissue protein synthesis rates. The challenge of this analysis is augmented when small sample size is a critical factor. Muscle samples from human participants following an 8 h intravenous infusion of L-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine and a bolus dose of L-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine in a mouse were utilized. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), gas chromatography (GC) MS/MS and GC/MS were compared to the GC-combustion-isotope ratio MS (GC/C/IRMS), to measure mixed muscle protein enrichment of [ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine enrichment. The sample isotope enrichment ranged from 0.0091 to 0.1312 molar percent excess. As compared with GC/C/IRMS, LC/MS/MS, GC/MS/MS and GC/MS showed coefficients of determination of R(2)= 0.9962 and R(2) = 0.9942, and 0.9217 respectively. However, the precision of measurements (coefficients of variation) for intra-assay are 13.0%, 1.7%, 6.3% and 13.5% and for inter-assay are 9.2%, 3.2%, 10.2% and 25% for GC/C/IRMS, LC/MS/MS, GC/MS/MS and GC/MS, respectively. The muscle sample sizes required to obtain these results were 8 µg, 0.8 µg, 3 µg and 3 µg for GC/C/IRMS, LC/MS/MS, GC/MS/MS and GC/MS, respectively. We conclude that LC/MS/MS is optimally suited for precise measurements of L-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine tracer enrichment in low abundance and in small quantity samples. PMID:23378099

  17. Comparison of different mass spectrometry techniques in the measurement of L-[ring-(13)C6]phenylalanine incorporation into mixed muscle proteins.

    PubMed

    Zabielski, Piotr; Ford, G Charles; Persson, X Mai; Jaleel, Abdul; Dewey, Jerry D; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2013-02-01

    Precise measurement of low enrichment of stable isotope labeled amino-acid tracers in tissue samples is a prerequisite in measuring tissue protein synthesis rates. The challenge of this analysis is augmented when small sample size is a critical factor. Muscle samples from human participants following an 8 h intravenous infusion of L-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine and a bolus dose of L-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine in a mouse were utilized. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), gas chromatography (GC) MS/MS and GC/MS were compared to the GC-combustion-isotope ratio MS (GC/C/IRMS), to measure mixed muscle protein enrichment of [ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine enrichment. The sample isotope enrichment ranged from 0.0091 to 0.1312 molar percent excess. As compared with GC/C/IRMS, LC/MS/MS, GC/MS/MS and GC/MS showed coefficients of determination of R(2)= 0.9962 and R(2) = 0.9942, and 0.9217 respectively. However, the precision of measurements (coefficients of variation) for intra-assay are 13.0%, 1.7%, 6.3% and 13.5% and for inter-assay are 9.2%, 3.2%, 10.2% and 25% for GC/C/IRMS, LC/MS/MS, GC/MS/MS and GC/MS, respectively. The muscle sample sizes required to obtain these results were 8 µg, 0.8 µg, 3 µg and 3 µg for GC/C/IRMS, LC/MS/MS, GC/MS/MS and GC/MS, respectively. We conclude that LC/MS/MS is optimally suited for precise measurements of L-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine tracer enrichment in low abundance and in small quantity samples.

  18. Saturn ring temperature changes before and after ring equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Flandes, Alberto; Morishima, Ryuji; Leyrat, Cedric; Altobelli, Nicolas; Ferrari, Cecile; Brooks, Shawn; Pilorz, Stu

    2010-05-01

    The Cassini Composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) retrieved the temperatures of Saturn's main rings at solar elevations ranging from 24 degrees to zero degrees at equinox (August 2009) as the sun traversed from the south to north side of the rings. Over this broad range of solar elevation the CIRS data show that the ring temperatures vary as much as 29K- 38K for the A ring, 22K-34K for the B ring and 18K-23K for the C ring. Interestingly the unlit sides of the rings show a similar decrease in temperature with the decreasing solar elevation. As equinox approached, the main rings cooled to their lowest temperatures measured to date. At equinox the solar input is very small and the primary heat sources for the rings are Saturn thermal and visible energy. Temperatures are almost identical for similar geometries on the north and south sides of the rings. The ring temperatures at equinox were: C ring, 55-75 K; B ring, 45-60 K; Cassini Division, 45 - 58 K; and A ring, 43 - 52 K. After Saturn equinox the solar elevation angle began to increase again and the temperatures on both the lit (north) and unlit (south) sides of the rings have begun to increase as well. Ring thermal models developed by Flandes and Morishima are able to reproduce most of the equinox temperatures observed by CIRS. Results before and after equinox will be presented. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  19. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-12-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  20. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  1. Jupiter's ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    First evidence of a ring around the planet Jupiter is seen in this photograph taken by Voyager 1 on March 4, 1979. The multiple exposure of the extremely thin faint ring appears as a broad light band crossing the center of the picture. The edge of the ring is 1,212,000 km from the spacecraft and 57,000 km from the visible cloud deck of Jupiter. The background stars look like broken hair pins because of spacecraft motion during the 11 minute 12 second exposure. The wavy motion of the star trails is due to the ultra-slow natural oscillation of the spacecraft (with a period of 78 seconds). The black dots are geometric calibration points in the camera. The ring thickness is estimated to be 30 km or less. The photograph was part of a sequence planned to search for such rings in Jupiter's equatorial plane. The ring has been invisible from Earth because of its thinness and its transparency when viewed at any angle except straight on. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  2. Simultaneous, In-situ Measurement of NO3, N2O5 and NO2 via Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy aboard an Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, W. P.; Brown, S. S.; Osthoff, H. D.; Ciciora, S. J.; Paris, M. W.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    This contribution describes improvements to an existing instrument for aircraft measurements of NO3 and N2O5 in the troposphere via cavity ring-down spectroscopy [Brown, et al., 2002; Dubé, et al., 2006]. The instrument was specifically designed and constructed for operation on the NOAA WP-3. The improvements include the incorporation of two additional cavity ring-down channels, reduced residence time for more rapid sampling and reduced inlet losses; higher reflectivity mirrors to improve instrument sensitivity; and a calibration system based on the conversion of NO3 and N2O5 to NO2. The instrument now consists of a total of four measurement channels, three at 662 nm for measuring NO3, N2O5, and a reference channel to track background changes on a rapid time scale, and one at 532 nm for measurement of NO2 [Osthoff, et al., 2006]. This paper describes the specifics of these design changes, the resultant improvements in the measurement and the performance of the instrument during the TexAQS/GoMACCS campaign in Houston, TX in 2006. Brown, S. S., H. Stark, S. J. Ciciora, R. J. McLaughlin, and A. R. Ravishankara (2002), Simultaneous in-situ detection of atmospheric NO3 and N2O5 via cavity ring-down spectroscopy, Rev. Sci. Instr., 73, 3291-3301. Dube, W. P., S. S. Brown, H. D. Osthoff, M. R. Nunley, S. J. Ciciora, M. W. Paris, R. J. McLaughlin, and A. R. Ravishankara (2006), Aircraft instrument for simultaneous, in-situ measurements of NO3 and N2O5 via cavity ring-down spectroscopy, Rev. Sci. Instr., 77, 034101. Osthoff, H. D., S. S. Brown, T. B. Ryerson, T. J. Fortin, B. M. Lerner, E. J. Williams, A. Pettersson, T. Baynard, W. P. Dube, S. J. Ciciora, and A. R. Ravishankara (2006), Measurement of atmospheric NO2 by pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy, J. Geophys. Res., D12305, doi:10.1029/2005JD006942.

  3. Development of dual-wavelength fiber ring laser and its application to step-height measurement using self-mixing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, S; Xie, F; Chen, L; Wang, Y Z; Dong, L L; Zhao, K Q

    2016-03-21

    A dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber (EDF) ring laser was developed and its application to step-height measurement using two-wavelength self-mixing interferometry (SMI) was demonstrated. The fiber laser can emit two different wavelengths without any laser mode competition. It is composed of two EDF laser cavities and employs fiber Bragg gratings to determine which wavelengths are emitted. The step heights can be measured using SMI of the two wavelengths, and the maximum height that can be measured is half the synthetic wavelength of the two wavelengths. A step height of 1mm was constructed using two gauge blocks and then measured using the laser. The measurement was repeated ten times, and the standard deviation of the measurements was 2.4nm. PMID:27136766

  4. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  5. Luminosity measurements at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we discuss luminosity measurements at Tevatron and HERA as well as plans for luminosity measurements at LHC. We discuss luminosity measurements using the luminosity detectors of the experiments as well as measurements by the machine. We address uncertainties of the measurements, challenges and lessons learned.

  6. News from the proton - recent DIS results from HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.

    1997-01-01

    Recent results from the two large general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS at HERA (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) are presented. Emphasis is given to the analysis of deep inelastic scattering defined by the observation of the scattered electron or positron in the main calorimeters. Results on purely inclusive cross sections lead to a determination of the charged (quarks) parton distribution F{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}). Access to the electrically neutral parton content (gluons) is obtained indirectly by an analysis of the expected scaling violation behavior of F{sub 2} or directly from multijet rates originating from well-defined initial parton configurations. Finally, the recently uncovered subclass of large rapidity gap (LRG) events has been analyzed in terms of F{sub 2}. The result supports the concept of a color neutral object (Pomeron IP) being probed by a hard scattering electron. Evidence for factorization of the Pomeron radiation process as well as for scaling in the inclusive IP structure functions has been found.

  7. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The axial motion of a piston ring in the piston ring groove

    SciTech Connect

    Brownawell, M E

    1983-06-01

    The piston ring axial motion model developed by Furuhama, Dowson and Hoult was modified using the parallel plate squeeze equation to account for oil in the ring grooves. The improved model was used to predict ring motion and the ring transition time from one ring land to the other. The ring axial motion was measured in detail on an engine with a clear plexiglas cylinder using a high-speed motion picture camera. The observed ring motion and transit times were compared to those predicted by the new model. The model was found to correctly predict the motion of the rings and the scaling with lubricant viscosity and engine speed.

  9. Research support for plasma diagnostics on Elmo Bumpy Torus: study of diamagnetic measurements for the electron rings and development of a ferromagnetic resonance magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, K.H.; daSilva, M.K.

    1981-10-01

    The bumpy cylinder MHD equilibrium code which was compared to the concentric current sheet model for the EBT electron rings in a previous report has been subjected to additional numerical tests which confirm the validity of the previous work. Further analysis of the current sheet model as a means of calibration of the EBT diamagnetic diagnostic for perpendicular energy shows the model's simplicity is not the limiting factor in accuracy of the calibration. The fluctuations of the currents in the vacuum field coils were observed as voltage signals from the generator shunts. Significant low frequency components were observed that cannot be removed from diamagnetic signals by low pass filtering alone. A YIG magnetometer was developed and used to make test measurements of the diamagnetic field of the electron rings on EBT. The field values observed were on the order of 1 Gauss in a region where the vacuum field was about 600 Gauss. These values agree with the perpendicular energy diamagnetic flux diagnostic with reasonable assumptions for ring geometry.

  10. Comparison of tissue heat balance- and thermal dissipation-derived sap flow measurements in ring-porous oaks and a pine.

    PubMed

    Renninger, Heidi J; Schäfer, Karina V R

    2012-01-01

    Sap flow measurements have become integral in many physiological and ecological investigations. A number of methods are used to estimate sap flow rates in trees, but probably the most popular is the thermal dissipation (TD) method because of its affordability, relatively low power consumption, and ease of use. However, there have been questions about the use of this method in ring-porous species and whether individual species and site calibrations are needed. We made concurrent measurements of sap flow rates using TD sensors and the tissue heat balance (THB) method in two oak species (Quercus prinus Willd. and Quercus velutina Lam.) and one pine (Pinus echinata Mill.). We also made concurrent measurements of sap flow rates using both 1 and 2-cm long TD sensors in both oak species. We found that both the TD and THB systems tended to match well in the pine individual, but sap flow rates were underestimated by 2-cm long TD sensors in five individuals of the two ring-porous oak species. Underestimations of 20-35% occurred in Q. prinus even when a "Clearwater" correction was applied to account for the shallowness of the sapwood depth relative to the sensor length and flow rates were underestimated by up to 50% in Q. velutina. Two centimeter long TD sensors also underestimated flow rates compared with 1-cm long sensors in Q. prinus, but only at large flow rates. When 2-cm long sensor data in Q. prinus were scaled using the regression with 1-cm long data, daily flow rates matched well with the rates measured by the THB system. Daily plot level transpiration estimated using TD sap flow rates and scaled 1 cm sensor data averaged about 15% lower than those estimated by the THB method. Therefore, these results suggest that 1-cm long sensors are appropriate in species with shallow sapwood, however more corrections may be necessary in ring-porous species.

  11. Comparison of Tissue Heat Balance- and Thermal Dissipation-Derived Sap Flow Measurements in Ring-Porous Oaks and a Pine

    PubMed Central

    Renninger, Heidi J.; Schäfer, Karina V. R.

    2012-01-01

    Sap flow measurements have become integral in many physiological and ecological investigations. A number of methods are used to estimate sap flow rates in trees, but probably the most popular is the thermal dissipation (TD) method because of its affordability, relatively low power consumption, and ease of use. However, there have been questions about the use of this method in ring-porous species and whether individual species and site calibrations are needed. We made concurrent measurements of sap flow rates using TD sensors and the tissue heat balance (THB) method in two oak species (Quercus prinus Willd. and Quercus velutina Lam.) and one pine (Pinus echinata Mill.). We also made concurrent measurements of sap flow rates using both 1 and 2-cm long TD sensors in both oak species. We found that both the TD and THB systems tended to match well in the pine individual, but sap flow rates were underestimated by 2-cm long TD sensors in five individuals of the two ring-porous oak species. Underestimations of 20–35% occurred in Q. prinus even when a “Clearwater” correction was applied to account for the shallowness of the sapwood depth relative to the sensor length and flow rates were underestimated by up to 50% in Q. velutina. Two centimeter long TD sensors also underestimated flow rates compared with 1-cm long sensors in Q. prinus, but only at large flow rates. When 2-cm long sensor data in Q. prinus were scaled using the regression with 1-cm long data, daily flow rates matched well with the rates measured by the THB system. Daily plot level transpiration estimated using TD sap flow rates and scaled 1 cm sensor data averaged about 15% lower than those estimated by the THB method. Therefore, these results suggest that 1-cm long sensors are appropriate in species with shallow sapwood, however more corrections may be necessary in ring-porous species. PMID:22661978

  12. The effects of smiling or crying facial expressions on grip strength, measured with a hand dynamometer and the bi-digital O-ring test.

    PubMed

    Ozerkan, K N

    2001-01-01

    The effects of smiling or crying facial expressions on grip strength and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test were evaluated in this study. Ten right-handed basketball players (age group 18-28) were included in the study. Grip strength was measured with a Riester hand dynamometer and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test successively, after the players had looked at the drawing of a "crying face" for 5 seconds from a distance of 40 cm at the eye level. Immediately afterwards they were shown the drawing of a "smiling face" and were asked to grip with the same condition. Once all 10 players carried out this experiment, the order in which the drawings were shown was reversed. We then proceeded to measure the same variables, using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. The statistics obtained thereby were subjected to Pearsons correlation coefficient and paired t-test. Using a hand dynamometer and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, it was found that, in both tests, the "smiling face" drawing (first crying, then smiling face: with hand dynamometer, it increased from 8.34+/-0.97 kg to 9.18+/-0.9 kg; t=5.39,p=0.0001) increased the grip strength of the basketball players, and the "crying face" drawing (first smiling face, then crying face: with hand dynamometer it decreased from 9.35 +/- 0.90 kg to 8.51+/- 0.96 kg; t=9.81, p=0.0001) decreased the grip strength. Exposure to the smiling face drawing increased the grip strength, and exposure to the crying face decreased it, in every subject tested in this group. Similar effects were observed with the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (first crying, then smiling: it increased from -2.80 +/- 1.13 to 2.20 +/- 1.32; t=33.54, p=0.0001; first smiling then crying: it decreased from 2.40 +/- 1.34 to -2.20 +/- 1.62; t = 15.06, p=0.0001).

  13. Using Tree Rings, CO2 Fluxes, and Long-Term Measurements to Understand Carbon Dynamics in an Alaskan Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Anderson, C.; Crump, A.; Stegen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Decadal and centennial processes are usually poorly constrained by data, but many opportunities exist to combine disparate data sources such as tree rings, greenhouse gas fluxes from the soil to atmosphere, and long-term tree inventories. At high northern latitudes, permafrost (and its current degradation across large scales) is presumed to exert a strong control on long-term ecosystem carbon uptake and storage. We integrate a variety of data from both Canada and Alaska, focusing on two years of observations across a permafrost gradient in a black spruce Alaskan watershed (the Caribou/Poker Creek Research Watershed ~50 km northeast of Fairbanks, AK, USA). Permafrost depth changes were strongly associated with changes in vegetation and leaf morphology, as well as soil greenhouse fluxes (0.1-2.0 μmol/m2/s, with strong spatial dependencies) and aboveground net primary production (60-550 gC/m2/yr). We use tree-ring data covering the last century to examine how tree response to climate variability changes with elevation and permafrost depth, both along small-scale transects and across the entire 104 km2 watershed. A weakness is that these results are from a single site and point in successional time; we quantify potential variability in this area using 16 years of observations from a Canadian boreal chronosequence. We emphasize that both short and long term observations and experiments, using multiple approaches, are necessary to constrain ecosystem carbon uptake and storage.

  14. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  15. "DIAGNOSTIC" PULSE FOR SINGLE-PARTICLE-LIKE BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS DURING ACCUMULATION/PRODUCTION MODE IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Baily, Scott A.; Bjorklund, Eric A.; Bolme, Gerald O.; Hall, Michael J.; Kwon, Sung I.; Martinez, Martin P.; Prokop, Mark S.; Shelley, Fred E. Jr.; Torrez, Phillip A.

    2012-05-14

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are the primary diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). When injecting one turn, the transversemotion is approximated as a single particle with initial betatron position and angle {rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0}. With single-turn injection, we fit the betatron tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset ({rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0} at the injection point) to the turn-by-turn beam position. In production mode, we accumulate multiple turns, the transverse phase space fills after 5 injections (horizontal and vertical fractional betatron tunes {approx}0.2) resulting in no coherent betatron motion, and only the CO may be measured. The injection offset, which determines the accumulated beam size and is very sensitive to steering upstream of the ring, is not measurable in production mode. We describe our approach and ongoing efforts to measure the injection offset during production mode by injecting a 'diagnostic' pulse {approx}50 {micro}s after the accumulated beam is extracted. We also study the effects of increasing the linac RF gate length to accommodate the diagnostic pulse on the production beam position, transverse size, and loss.

  16. A Measurement of the ψ‧ to J/ψ production ratio in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, T. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, A.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, L.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Y.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Y.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. Aa.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2007-01-01

    Ratios of the ψ‧ over the J/ψ production cross sections in the dilepton channel for C, Ti and W targets have been measured in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. The ψ‧ and J/ψ states were reconstructed in both the μ+μ- and the e+e- decay modes. The measurements covered the kinematic range -0.35≤xF≤0.1 with transverse momentum pT≤4.5 GeV/c. The angular dependence of the ratio has been used to measure the difference of the ψ‧ and J/ψ polarization. All results for the muon and electron decay channels are in good agreement: their ratio, averaged over all events, is Rψ‧(μ)/Rψ‧(e)=1.00±0.08±0.04. This result constitutes a new, direct experimental constraint on the double ratio of branching fractions, (B‧(μ)B(e))/(B(μ)B‧(e)), of ψ‧ and J/ψ in the two channels. The ψ‧ to J/ψ production ratio is almost constant in the covered xF range and shows a slow increase with pT.

  17. Saturn ring temperature variations with approaching ring equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L.; Leyrat, C.; Flandes, A.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.

    2009-04-01

    Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired a wide-ranging set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at solar elevations ranging from less than one degree to 24 degrees. At Saturn equinox in August the solar elevation angle will reach zero as the sun traverses from the south to north side of the rings. For the data acquired to date, temperatures were retrieved for the lit and unlit rings over a variety of ring geometries that include solar elevation, as well as spacecraft elevation, phase angle and local hour angle. To first order, the largest temperature changes on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation and local time are a secondary effect. Decreasing ring temperature with decreasing solar elevation are observed for both the lit and unlit faces of the rings after phase angle and local time effects are taken into account. As the solar elevation continues to decrease, the ring temperatures are decreasing in a non-linear fashion. The difference in temperature between the lit and unlit sides of the rings is decreasing also with decreasing solar elevation. Using ring thermal models developed by Leyrat we extrapolate to the expected minimum ring temperatures at equinox for our planned CIRS ring observations. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". Copyright 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  18. Development of a 150 000 channel MSGC tracking system for the experiment HERA-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeuner, T.

    1997-02-01

    The universities of Heidelberg, Siegen and Zürich are preparing the inner tracker of the HERA-B experiment at DESY designed to measure CP violation in B meson decays. The system consists of 200 MSGC chambers of sizes up to 30 × 30 cm 2 with a total of 150 000 electronic channels. Rates up to 10 4 s -1 mm -2 have to be handled. The gold electrodes (300 μm pitch) are produced by a lift-off process on an alkali-free glass (300 μm thick). The glass is CVD coated with amorphous carbon with a surface resistivity of 10 14ω/□. It provides the required lifetime of 5 years with an integrated charge of 30 mC per cm of the anode length. Gains > 5000 are obtained. The efficiency is greater than 99% with negligible noise rate. Measures to avoid deterioration of the anodes by discharges caused by heavy ionizing particles are discussed. The MSGC detectors are connected to hybrid electronics via Kapton foils. A special bonding machine has been built which allows the adjustment by a video system and the chariots moved by micrometer screws and contains electronically steered glue dispenser and pressure pistons. Members of the collaboration are: T. Beckmann, C. Bresch, H.-B. Dreis, F. Eisele, S. Feuerstack, S. Hausmann, A. Hölscher, T. Hott, A. Lange, A. Maag, V. Myalitsin, P. Robmann, B. Schmidt, S. Schmidt, S. Steiner, U. Straumann, P. Truöl, S. Visbeck, A.-H. Walenta, T. Walter, U. Werthenbach, G. Zech and T. Zeuner.

  19. Spectroscopy and Kinetics of Organic Peroxy Radicals Measured Using a Laser Photolysis / CW Cavity Ring-down Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    A new type of reactor system is used to examine the spectra and gas phase reaction kinetics of atmospherically relevant organic peroxy radicals (RO2). The reactor uses the recently developed continuous wave laser excitation cavity ring-down (CWCRD) spectroscopic technique to detect the near-infrared (NIR) absorptions of peroxy radicals produced by laser photolysis. Preliminary spectroscopic and kinetic results for the methyl peroxy (CH3O2) and ethyl peroxy (C2H5O2) radicals are presented. Organic peroxy radicals are formed as reaction intermediates in the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Peroxy radicals react with NO, NO2, HO2, or other organic peroxy radicals in the troposphere to produce a variety of atmospherically important products, including ozone. The reactor uses the conventional slow flow/photolysis approach and is capable of accessing pressures between 5 and 1000 torr and temperatures between 275 and 400 K. Methyl or ethyl radicals are generated from suitable precursors via 193nm laser photolysis, and are reacted with excess oxygen to form methyl peroxy or ethyl peroxy radicals respectively. The peroxy radical concentrations are then monitored by their NIR absorptions near 1.3μ m using CWCRD spectroscopy. The spectra are consistent with those originally published [Hunziker and Wendt, 1976] and with the more recently reported results implementing the pulsed cavity ring-down technique [Pushkarsky et al., 2000]. The kinetics of the radical's self-reactions, the oxidation reaction with nitric oxide, and the prototypical cross-reaction between methyl peroxy and ethyl peroxy will be presented. All rate coefficients obtained to date are in good agreement with recommended values, lending credence to the new methodology. Hunziker, H.E., and Wendt, H.R., Electronic Absorption Spectra of Organic Peroxy Radical in the Near-Infrared, J. Chem. Phys., 64, 3488-3490, 1976. Pushkarsky, M.B., Zalyubovsky, S.J., and

  20. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  1. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  2. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-04-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about ten years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  3. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Xueref-Rémy, I.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-09-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  4. Frequency-agile, rapid scanning cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FARS-CRDS) measurements of the (30012)←(00001) near-infrared carbon dioxide band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. A.; Wójtewicz, S.; Miller, C. E.; Hodges, J. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present new high accuracy measurements of the (30012)←(00001) CO2 band near 1575 nm recorded with a frequency-agile, rapid scanning cavity ring-down spectrometer. The resulting spectra were fit with the partially correlated, quadratic-speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile with line mixing. Significant differences were observed between the fitted line shape parameters and those found in existing databases, which are based upon more simplistic line profiles. Absolute transition frequencies, which were referenced to an optical frequency comb, are given, as well as the other line shape parameters needed to model this line profile. These high accuracy measurements should allow for improved atmospheric retrievals of greenhouse gas concentrations by current and future remote sensing missions.

  5. Sub-MHz accuracy measurement of the S(2) 2-0 transition frequency of D2 by Comb-Assisted Cavity Ring Down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Sala, T.; Romanini, D.; Gatti, D.; Campargue, A.

    2016-08-01

    The line position of the very weak S(2) transition of deuterium in the 2-0 band has been measured with a Comb-Assisted Cavity Ring Down spectrometer. The high sensitivity spectra were recorded at 5 and 10 mbar with a Noise Equivalent Absorption, αmin, of 8 × 10-11 cm-1. The line positions at 5 and 10 mbar were measured with sub-MHz accuracy (460 and 260 kHz, respectively). After correction of the line pressure-shift, the frequency at zero pressure of the S(2) transition of the first overtone band was determined to be 187 104 299.51 ± 0.50 MHz. This value agrees within 1.7 MHz with the frequency obtained from the best available ab initio calculations and corresponds to only 15% of the claimed theoretical uncertainty.

  6. Measurement of Large Dipolar Couplings of a Liquid Crystal with Terminal Phenyl Rings and Estimation of the Order Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R V Sudheer; Ramanathan, Krishna V

    2015-07-20

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful means of studying liquid-crystalline systems at atomic resolutions. Of the many parameters that can provide information on the dynamics and order of the systems, (1) H-(13) C dipolar couplings are an important means of obtaining such information. Depending on the details of the molecular structure and the magnitude of the order parameters, the dipolar couplings can vary over a wide range of values. Thus the method employed to estimate the dipolar couplings should be capable of estimating both large and small dipolar couplings at the same time. For this purpose, we consider here a two-dimensional NMR experiment that works similar to the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) experiment in solution. With the incorporation of a modification proposed earlier for experiments with low radio frequency power, the scheme is observed to enable a wide range of dipolar couplings to be estimated at the same time. We utilized this approach to obtain dipolar couplings in a liquid crystal with phenyl rings attached to either end of the molecule, and estimated its local order parameters. PMID:26014117

  7. COMPLETION OF SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET PRODUCTION AT BNL FOR THE HERA LUMINOSITY UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.ANERELLA,M.ESCALLIER,J.GHOSH,A.JAIN,A.MARONE,A.MURATORE,J.PARKER,A.PRODELL,A.THOMPSON,P.WU,K.C.

    2001-09-24

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed production of the superconducting multi-function magnets that are now installed as part of the HERA luminosity upgrade at DESY. The magnets, cryostats, and lead assemblies were designed and built at BNL. To fit inside the existing detectors, the coils plus cryostat structure had to meet a challenging radial budget (e.g., 39 mm horizontally). Two types of magnets were needed and three of each type were built. Each magnet contained normal and skew quadrupole, normal and skew dipole, and sextupole coils. The magnets operate in the {approx}1.5 T solenoid field of a detector. The quadrupole coils produce gradients up to 13 T/m. The dipole coils generate fields up to 0.3 T. Coils were wound under computer control using either seven-strand round cable or a single strand. To simultaneously avoid excessive synchrotron radiation background scattered from the beam pipe and yet have a small cryostat, one type of magnet used a tapered coil structure. The cryogenic system incorporates cooling with both 40 K helium and supercritical helium. All of the coils were tested in liquid helium in a vertical dewar. Quench test results have been excellent. The field quality of the magnets has met the stringent requirements imposed on interaction region magnets. One magnet of each type was tested at BNL as a completed assembly to verify the performance of the leads and cryostats. Two of each type were tested at DESY and then installed in the Zeus and H1 experiments. The remaining magnets are spares. Final results of quench testing, field quality measurements and cryogenic performance are reported.

  8. Beauty, charm, and F{sub L} at HERA: New data vs. Early predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, N. N.; Zoller, V. R.

    2010-04-15

    One of the well-known effects of the asymptotic freedom is splitting of the leading-log BFKL pomeron into a series of isolated poles in complex angular momentum plane. Following our earlier works we explore the phenomenological consequences of the emerging BFKL-Regge factorized expansion for the small-x charm (F{sub 2}{sup c}) and beauty (F{sub 2}{sup b}) structure functions of the proton. As we found earlier, the colordipole approach to the BFKL dynamics predicts uniquely decoupling of subleading hard BFKL exchanges from F{sub 2}{sup c} at moderately large Q{sup 2}. We predicted precocious BFKL asymptotics of F{sub 2}{sup c} (x,Q{sup 2}) with intercept of the rightmost BFKL pole {alpha}{sub P}(0) - 1 = {Delta}{sub P} {approx} 0.4. High-energy open beauty photo- and electroproduction probes the vacuum exchange at much smaller distances and detects significant corrections to the BFKL asymptotics coming from the subleading vacuum poles. In view of the accumulation of the experimental data on small -xF{sub 2}{sup c} and F{sub 2}{sup b} we extended our early predictions to the kinematical domain covered by new HERA measurements. Our structure functions obtained in 1999 agree well with the determination of both F{sub 2}{sup c} and F{sub 2}{sup b} by the H1 published in 2006 but contradict very recent (2008, preliminary)H1 results on F{sub 2}{sup b}. We present also comparison of our early predictions for the longitudinal structure function F{sub L} with recent H1 data (2008) taken at very low Bjorken x. We comment on the electromagnetic corrections to the Okun-Pomeranchuk theorem.

  9. Development of a high time resolution measurement of NO2 and HCHO concentration in the atmosphere using high repetition rate cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, A.; Nakamura, K.; Kajii, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    Many chemical species with light absorption band at 300 ~ 350 nm are contained in the atmosphere, however these trace gases have important role in the atmosphere. The sun light is absorbed by these trace gases then free radicals cause the photochemistry in the atmosphere are formed by photolysis of these trace gases. Both hydrogen and formylradicals which will be converted into HO2 radicals in the atmosphere are generated in the photolysis of formaldehyde in the atmosphere. NO2 is important precursor for O3 in the troposphere that strongly control oxidation capacity of the air because OH radicals are formed in the photolysis of ozone. It is important to measure concentrations of these photoactive species precisely to reveal the atmospheric chemistry. These trace gases have short lifetimes and the forming process are complicated then these trace gases have wide fluctuations of concentrations. In this study, we developed a measurement system of NO2 and H2CO with high time resolution and high sensitivity using UV laser absorption system. The Cavity ring-down system was employed with high repetition rate laser system (10kHz). The ring-down time of N2 was measured to be 2.9×0.9, 3.0×0.1, 2.90×0.01 μs with the averaging time of 1 (0.1 ms), 50 (5ms) and 100000 (1s) shots, respectively. The uncertainty was decreasing to increase average times and the limit of detection was drastically decreasing. For example of NO2, the limit of detection was improved from 1.4 ppm to 3 ppb. The intercomparison measurement of the sample gases containing NO2 was performed under the several NO2 concentrations with this CRDS system and NOx analyser (MODEL 42i: Thermo Electron Corporation) employed cemiluminescense. The correlation factor was calculated to be 0.975. Measurement values from CRDS system was ensured. H2CO absorbs the UV light around 350~360 nm. The concentration was determined using the absorption band. The limit of detection was about 10 ppb of H2CO. In January 2012, ambient

  10. A Experimental Study of Viscous Vortex Rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziedzic, Mauricio

    Motivated by the role played by vortex rings in the process of turbulent mixing, the work is focused on the problem of stability and viscous decay of a single vortex ring. A new classification is proposed for vortex rings which is based on extensive hot-wire measurements of velocity in the ring core and wake and flow visualization. Vortex rings can be classified as laminar, wavy, turbulence-producing, and turbulent. Prediction of vortex ring type is shown to be possible based on the vortex ring Reynolds number. Linear growth rates of ring diameter with time are observed for all types of vortex rings, with different growth rates occurring for laminar and turbulent vortex rings. Data on the viscous decay of vortex rings are used to provide experimental confirmation of the accuracy of Saffman's equation for the velocity of propagation of a vortex ring. Experimental data indicate that instability of the vortex ring strongly depends on the mode of generation and can be delayed by properly adjusting the generation parameters. A systematic review of the literature on vortex-ring interactions is presented in the form of an appendix, which helps identify areas in which further research may be fruitful.

  11. High-Precision Measurement of 13C/12C Isotopic Ratio Using Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Kuramoto, D. S.; Haase, C.; Crosson, E.; Tan, S.; Zare, R. N.

    2009-12-01

    Light stable isotope analysis, and in particular, compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA), is a valuable tool to elucidate pathways and provide a better insight into biological, ecological, and geological systems. We present here the results of compound-specific isotopic carbon analysis of short chain hydrocarbons using the world’s first combination of gas chromatography, combustion interface, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (GC-C-CRDS). Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) is a highly sensitive optical spectroscopy, one application of which is to measure the stable isotopic ratios in small molecules. Because it uses a highly reflective optical cavity with many kilometers effective path length, CRDS provides some of the most sensitive and precise optical absorption measurements. Most optical spectroscopy isotopic analysis measures the quantities of each isotopologue independently using their distinct ro-vibrational spectra. The most common isotopes measured with optical spectroscopy are 13C and 12C in carbon dioxide. However, the isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur have also been measured. Unlike isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), optical spectroscopy can distinguish among isobars, which have essentially identical m/z ratios. The combination of chemical separation, chemical conversion, and CRDS makes a nearly universal tool for isotopic analysis of mixtures. In addition, CRDS can tolerate a variety of compounds mixed with the target. For example, CRDS can measure carbon dioxide and its isotopic 13C/12C ratio in the presence of oxygen. Using the novel GC-C-CRDS system, we injected a 75-microliter mixture of approximately equal quantities of methane, ethane, and propane into a gas chromatograph using helium as carrier gas. The methane, ethane, and propane were separated in time by 100 to 200 seconds after the chromatograph. Oxygen gas was added, and the hydrocarbons were combusted in a catalytic combustor with platinum and nickel, held at 1150oC. The

  12. The Saturn Ring Observer: In situ studies of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Spilker, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey recently undertaken by the NRC's Space Studies Board for the National Academy of Sciences, studies were commissioned for a number of potential missions to outer planet targets. One of these studies examined the technological feasibility of a mission to carry out in situ studies of Saturn's rings, from a spacecraft placed in a circular orbit above the ring plane: the Saturn Ring Observer. The technical findings and background are discussed in a companion poster by T. R. Spilker et al. Here we outline the science goals of such a mission. Most of the fundamental interactions in planetary rings occur on spatial scales that are unresolved by flyby or orbiter spacecraft. Typical particle sizes in the rings of Saturn are in the 1 cm - 10 m range, and average interparticle spacings are a few meters. Indirect evidence indicates that the vertical thickness of the rings is as little as 5 - 10 m, which implies a velocity dispersion of only a few mm/sec. Theories of ring structure and evolution depend on the unknown characteristics of interparticle collisions and on the size distribution of the ring particles. The SRO could provide direct measurements of both the coefficient of restitution -- by monitoring individual collisions -- and the particles’ velocity dispersion. High-resolution observations of individual ring particles should also permit estimates of their spin states. Numerical simulations of Saturn’s rings incorporating both collisions and self-gravity predict that the ring particles are not uniformly distributed, but are instead clustered into elongated structures referred to as “self-gravity wakes”, which are continually created and destroyed on an orbital timescale. Theory indicates that the average separation between wakes in the A ring is of order 30-100 m. Direct imaging of self-gravity wakes, including their formation and subsequent dissolution, would provide critical validation of these models. Other

  13. The rare-RI ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, A.; Uesaka, T.; Wakasugi, M.; Rare-RI Ring Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    We describe the rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RI Beam Factory (RIBF). The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of very neutron-rich nuclei, the production rates of which are very small (hence ‘rare RI’) and the lifetimes of which are predicted to be very short. In the rare-RI ring, there are two innovative pieces of apparatus: individual injection, which can realize the injection of 200 A MeV rare RIs one by one, and a cyclotron-like storage ring, which allows high isochronous magnetic fields with large angular and momentum acceptances. With these devices, we will achieve a 10-6 mass resolution, and will be able to access rare RIs, the production rate of which is down to 1 event/day/pnA. Construction of the rare-RI ring started in fiscal year 2012.

  14. High-accuracy measurements of N2O concentration and isotopic composition of low and high concentration samples with small volume injections using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Nabil; Palmer, Melissa; Huang, Kuan

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) gas is among the major contributors to global warming and ozone depletion in stratosphere. Quantitative estimate of N2O production in various pathways and N2O fluxes across different reservoirs is the key to understanding the role of N2O in the global change. To achieve this goal, accurate and concurrent measurement of both N2O concentration ([N2O]) and its associated isotopic ratios (δ 15Nα , δ 15{N}β & δ 18O) is desired. Recent developments in Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have enabled high-precision measurements of [N2O] and Site-Preference-δ 15N (SP-δ 15N) and δ 18O of a continuous gas flow. However, many N2O samples are discrete with limited volume ( 2 ppm), and are not suitable for direct continuous measurements by CRDS. Here we present results of a small sample introduction and handling device, labelled as Small Sample Isotope Module (SSIM), coupled to and automatically coordinated with a Picarro isotopic N2O CRDS analyzer to handle and measure high concentration and/or small volume samples. The SSIM requires 20 ml of sample volume per analysis at STP, and transfers the sample to the CRDS for high-precision concentration and isotope ratio measurements. When the injected sample is

  15. Measurement of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity on fractured rock outcrops near Altamura (Southern Italy) with an adjustable large ring infiltrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, M.C.; de Carlo, L.; Masciopinto, C.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, field studies set up to measure field-saturated hydraulic conductivity to evaluate contamination risks, have employed small cylinders that may not be representative of the scale of measurements in heterogeneous media. In this study, a large adjustable ring infiltrometer was designed to be installed on-site directly on rock to measure its field-saturated hydraulic conductivity. The proposed device is inexpensive and simple to implement, yet also very versatile, due to its large adjustable diameter that can be fixed on-site. It thus allows an improved representation of the natural system's heterogeneity, while also taking into consideration irregularities in the soil/rock surface. The new apparatus was tested on an outcrop of karstic fractured limestone overlying the deep Murge aquifer in the South of Italy, which has recently been affected by untreated sludge disposal, derived from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants. The quasi-steady vertical flow into the unsaturated fractures was investigated by measuring water levels during infiltrometer tests. Simultaneously, subsurface electrical resistivity measurements were used to visualize the infiltration of water in the subsoil, due to unsaturated water flow in the fractures. The proposed experimental apparatus works well on rock outcrops, and allows the repetition of infiltration tests at many locations in order to reduce model uncertainties in heterogeneous media. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  16. The vinyl radical (Ã2A″←X˜2A') spectrum between 530 and 415 nm measured by cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pibel, Charles D.; McIlroy, Andrew; Taatjes, Craig A.; Alfred, Sterling; Patrick, Katina; Halpern, Joshua B.

    1999-01-01

    High resolution (0.008 nm) transient absorption spectra have been measured for the vinyl radical (C2H3) Ã 2A″←X˜2A' transition between 530 and 415 nm using cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy. This is over 200 times better resolution than the only previous recorded spectrum of vinyl in this wavelength region by Hunziker, Kneppe, McLean, Siegbahn, and Wendt [Can J. Chem. 61, 993 (1983)]. With the improved resolution in the present study, new vibrational bands are detected, and some rotational structure of the bands is resolved. A calculation of the envelope of the origin band was carried out, using a model for a c-type transition of an asymmetric top. For a best fit to the data, the model requires a 1 cm-1 Lorentzian linewidth, which suggests a short-lived excited state.

  17. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  18. STUDY OF THE STABILITY OF PARTICLE MOTION IN STORAGE RINGS. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jack J. Shi

    2012-09-07

    During this period, our research was concentrated on the study of beam-beam effects in large storage-ring colliders and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in light sources. Our group was involved in and made significant contribution to several international accelerator projects such as the US-LHC project for the design of the LHC interaction regions, the luminosity upgrade of Tevatron and HERA, the design of eRHIC, and the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) for the future LHC luminosity upgrade.

  19. Measurement of the emission linewidth of a single-frequency semiconductor laser with a ring fibre interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Trikshev, A I; Kurkov, Andrei S; Tsvetkov, V B; Pyrkov, Yu N; Paramonov, V N

    2011-07-31

    A simple scanning interferometer is implemented for measuring the emission linewidth of single-frequency semiconductor lasers. The free dispersion region of the interferometer is 28 MHz, the spectral resolution being 470 kHz. (laser spectroscopy)

  20. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Lite: A Low Power Analyzer for measuring Carbon Dioxide, Methane and Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagle, John; Tan, Sze; He, Yonggang

    2016-04-01

    Greenhouse gas accumulation has contributed to the changes in environments across the globe. Monitoring these fluctuations on global and local scales will allow scientists to better understand contributions that are made from nature and humans. This has led to the deployment of analytical instrumentation of all types to the most remote areas as well as the most densely populated areas. This however requires instruments to be precise, versatile, robust, and most importantly have power requirements that are as not limited by location, i.e. low enough power consumption to run off of batteries or even solar array. Here we present a full greenhouse gas analyzer that utilizes a new method of CRDS to measure carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor that consumes only 25W and still maintains long term stability to allow for averaging time of over 3 hours. Measurements have a 1-σ precision of 30 ppb for CO2 and 300 ppt of CH4 with 5 minutes of averaging; and with measurements of 3 hour averages reaching precisions down to 40ppt of methane. Additionally this new flavor of CRDS has allowed for an overall increase in measurement dynamic range from traditional CW-CRDS measuring methane up to 1000ppm and carbon dioxide up to several percent. We will present supplemental data acquired using this <11 kg analyzer, including soil respirations using closed static chambers and 10m tower measurements from Santa Clara, CA.

  1. Device For Testing Compatibility Of An O-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.

    1995-01-01

    Fixture designed for use in exposing compressed elastomeric O-ring or other ring seal to test fluid. Made of metal or plastic, with threaded recess into which O-ring placed. Opposite threaded end is opening through which test fluid introduced and placed in contact with O-ring. After exposure, compression set and swell or shrinkage of ring measured. Fixture set to compress ring by selected amount, providing for reproducible compression.

  2. Measurements of the Propagation of EM Waves through the Vacuum Chamber of the PEP-II Low Energy Ring for Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John Michael; De Santis, S.; Pivi, MTF; /SLAC

    2008-01-23

    We present the results of our measurements of the electron cloud density in the PEP-II low energy ring (LER) by propagating a TE wave into the beam pipe. By connecting a signal generator to a beam position monitor button we can excite a signal above the vacuum chamber cut-off frequency and measure its propagation through the beam pipe with a spectrum analyzer connected to another button about 50 meters away. The measurement can be performed with different beam conditions and also at different settings of the solenoids used to reduce the build up of electrons. The presence of a modulation in the TE wave transmission, synchronous with the beam revolution frequency, which appear to increase in depth when the solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the region between the two BPM's. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Interaction Region 12 straight of the LER during 2006 and the first part of 2007.

  3. Entrainment in interacting vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shami, Rammah; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of entrainment in single vortex rings has been examined by various studies in the literature. These studies have shown that this efficiency is greatly increased for smaller stroke-time to nozzle-diameter ratios, L/D. However, no clear consensus exists regarding the effect on the entrainment process for the sectioned delivery of the vortex forming impulse. In the present work the entrainment mechanism associated with the interaction between two co-axially separated vortex rings is explored. Planar, time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements are taken of a interacting vortex flow field. Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) extracted from the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields are employed to determine the vortex boundaries of the interacting rings and is then used to measure entrainment. Preliminary results indicate that whilst the most efficient entrainment of ambient fluid by the ring pairs occurs at larger separations, the rate and overall mass transport increase can be controlled by altering the spatial/temporal separation between successive rings and is higher at smaller ring spacing. Variation in mass transport behaviour for different ring strengths (L/D) and Reynolds numbers will also be discussed.

  4. First Continuous High Frequency in Situ Measurements of CO2 and CH4 in Rwanda Using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasore, J.; DeWitt, L. H.; Prinn, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Recent IPCC reports emphasize the lack of ground measurements of greenhouse gases on the African continent, despite Africa's significant emissions from agriculture and biomass burning as well as ongoing land use changes. We have established a greenhouse gas monitoring station in northern Rwanda that will be part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), a global network of high frequency long-term remote atmospheric measurement stations. Using a Picarro G2401 cavity ring-down analyzer, continuous measurements of CO2, CH4, and CO at a frequency of five seconds are being captured at this equatorial East African site. The measurement site is located near the Virunga mountains, a volcanic range in North-West Rwanda, on the summit of Mt. Mugogo (2507 m above sea level). Mt. Mugogo is located in a rural area 70km away from Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, and about 13km from the nearest town. From HYSPLIT 7-day back-trajectory calculations, we have determined that the station measures air masses originating from East and Central Africa, the Indian Ocean and occasionally from Southern Asia. Depending on the wind direction and local boundary layer height, measurements taken at Mt Mugogo are occasionally influenced by local sources, including emissions from the nearby city and wood fires from small rural settlements around the station. Here we present the first greenhouse gas measurement data from this unique and understudied location in Africa. Using the lagrangian transport and dispersion model FLEXPART, we derive the relationship between the observed mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 and our current knowledge of their sources and sinks, across this large African footprint.

  5. Measuring the Dust Flux and Dust Particle Mass Distribution in the Saturn Rings with HRD Dust Instrument on the Cassini Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    In July 2004, the Cassini spacecraft will go into the Saturn orbit and start a 4 year intensive investigation of the planet itself, its multiple satellites and its rings with a multinational instrument payload. The High Rate Detectors (HRD) instrument provided by the Laboratory of Astrophysics and Space Research of the University of is part of the German Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) and its main scientific objective is to provide quantitative measurements and mass distributions of dust particles in the rings of Saturn in the 10-11 to 10-4 grams mass range. The HRD instrument consists of two dust detectors -- a 20 and a 200 cm2 polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors -- and an electronic box that contains all the analog and digital electronics and in addition provides interface between the HRD and CDA instrument. The CDA stores all the HRD data in its memory and transmits the data to Earth. The HRD weighs 1.7 kg and consumes 1.8 W of power [1]. The HRD instrument was fully calibrated through the entire mass range using two dust particle accelerators at Heidelberg and Munich in Germany. The HRD electronics is very fast and it will provide spatial and time distributions of up to 0.1 second. It can handle rates up to 104 counts/sec expected to be encountered during the Saturn ring crossings without any dead time. The HRD instrument operated successfully during all of the time that it was under power and detected many interplanetary dust particles. Almost all of these particles were close to the lowest mass threshold. References 1 A.J. TUZZOLINO, T.E. ECONOMOU, R.B. MCKIBBEN, J.A. SIMPSON, J.A.M. MCDONNELL, M.J. BURCHELL, B.A.M. VAUGHAN, P. TSOU, M.S. HANNER, B.C. CLARK AND D.E. BROWNLEE. THE DUST FLUX MONITOR INSTRUMENT FOR THE STARDUST MISSION TO COMET WILD-2, J. GEOPHYS. RES., 108, DOI:10.1029/2003JE002091, 2003.

  6. HERA-B results on heavy flavour production in 920 GeV proton nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolanoski, Hermann; HERA-B Collaboration

    2005-06-01

    In this report, recent results from the HERA-B experiment on heavy flavour production in proton-nucleus interactions using a 920 GeV proton beam are presented. The topics include the production of the charmonium states J/ψ, ψ' and χc, of the D-meson states D0, D±, D*, the open beauty production cross section (b\\skew{-4}\\barb production) and the Υ production cross section. The nuclear dependence for the differential cross sections of charmonium production is discussed. The results are mainly preliminary. The report closes with a summary of the HERA-B search for pentaquark states with strangeness, which yielded quite stringent upper limits for the production of such states in hadronic environments.

  7. Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA) Database Description and Preliminary User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Auflick, J.L.

    1999-08-12

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavioral science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database (db) of analytical operational events, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. This report documents the initial development efforts for HERA.

  8. Human events reference for ATHEANA (HERA) database description and preliminary user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Auflick, J.L.; Hahn, H.A.; Pond, D.J.

    1998-05-27

    The Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA) is a newly developed human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology that aims to facilitate better representation and integration of human performance into probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling and quantification by analyzing risk-significant operating experience in the context of existing behavioral science models. The fundamental premise of ATHEANA is that error-forcing contexts (EFCs), which refer to combinations of equipment/material conditions and performance shaping factors (PSFs), set up or create the conditions under which unsafe actions (UAs) can occur. Because ATHEANA relies heavily on the analysis of operational events that have already occurred as a mechanism for generating creative thinking about possible EFCs, a database, called the Human Events Reference for ATHEANA (HERA), has been developed to support the methodology. This report documents the initial development efforts for HERA.

  9. Measurements of total peroxy and alkyl nitrate abundances in laboratory-generated gas samples by thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dipayan; Furgeson, Amanda; Osthoff, Hans D

    2009-11-01

    A novel measurement technique, thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS), for rapid (1 s time resolution) and sensitive (precision approximately 100 parts per trillion by volume (10(-12); pptv)) quantification of total peroxy nitrate (SigmaPN) and total alkyl nitrate (SigmaAN) abundances in laboratory-generated gas mixtures is described. The organic nitrates are dissociated in a heated inlet to produce NO(2), whose concentration is monitored by pulsed-laser CRDS at 532 nm. Mixing ratios are determined by difference relative to a cold inlet reference channel. Conversion of laboratory-generated mixtures of AN in zero air (at an inlet temperature of 450 degrees C) is quantitative over a wide range of mixing ratios (0-100 parts per billion by volume (10(-9), ppbv)), as judged from simultaneous measurements of NO(y) using a commercial NO-O(3) chemiluminescence monitor. Conversion of PN is quantitative up to about 4 ppbv (at an inlet temperature of 250 degrees C); at higher concentrations, the measurements are affected by recombination reactions of the dissociation products. The results imply that TD-CRDS can be used as a generic detector of dilute mixtures of organic nitrates in air at near-ambient concentration levels in laboratory experiments. Potential applications of the TD-CRDS technique in the laboratory are discussed.

  10. Measurements of mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of Na + ions in Ne, Ar, and CH4 at room temperature by a continuous guard-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, K.; Takebe, M.; Satoh, Y.; Seto, K.

    1983-10-01

    The mobility of Na+ ions has been measured at 313 K in Ne, at 314.5 K in Ar, and at 311 K in CH4 in the pressure range 0.05-1.2 Torr, over the E/N range 3-123 Td in Ne, 6-409 Td in Ar, and 13-520 Td in CH4 (E is the electric field strength, N the neutral gas number density, and 1 Td=10-17 V cm2). The measurements were made with a continuous guard-ring system which is different from conventional thin or thick type. The zero-field reduced mobilities are found to be 7.90±0.19 in Ne, 3.01±0.07 in Ar, and 2.58±0.06 cm2/V s in CH4, which are about +17.3%, +6.24%, and -8.53% higher than the Langevin polarization-limit mobilities, respectively. The mobility data in Ne and Ar have been compared with those of others over the whole E/N range. The longitudinal diffusion coefficients were also measured and compared with the data compiled by Ellis et al. and the theoretical values calculated by the generalized Einstein relations.

  11. Filter-free integrated sensor array based on luminescence and absorbance measurements using ring-shaped organic photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Abel, Tobias; Sagmeister, Martin; Lamprecht, Bernhard; Kraker, Elke; Köstler, Stefan; Ungerböck, Birgit; Mayr, Torsten

    2012-12-01

    An optical waveguiding sensor array featuring monolithically integrated organic photodiodes as integrated photo-detector, which simplifies the readout system by minimizing the required parts, is presented. The necessity of any optical filters becomes redundant due to the proposed platform geometry, which discriminates between excitation light and sensing signal. The sensor array is capable of measuring luminescence or absorption, and both sensing geometries are based on the identical substrate. It is demonstrated that background light is virtually non-existent. All sensing and waveguide layers, as well as in- and out-coupling elements are assembled by conventional screen-printing techniques. Organic photodiodes are integrated by layer-by-layer vacuum deposition onto glass or common polymer foils. The universal and simple applicability of this sensor chip is demonstrated by sensing schemes for four different analytes. Relative humidity, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are measured in gas phase using luminescence-based sensor schemes; the latter two analytes are also measured by absorbance-based sensor schemes. Furthermore, oxygen and pH in aqueous media were enabled. The consistency of calibration characteristics extending over different sensor chips is verified.

  12. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  13. Asymmetry distributions and mass effects in dijet events at a polarized HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maul, M.; Schäfer, A.; Mirkes, E.; Rädel, G.

    1998-09-01

    The asymmetry distributions for several kinematic variables are considered for finding a systematic way to maximize the signal for the extraction of the polarized gluon density. The relevance of mass effects for the corresponding dijet cross section is discussed and the different approximations for including mass effects are compared. We also compare via the programs Pepsi and Mepjet two different Monte Carlo (MC) approaches for simulating the expected signal in the dijet asymmetry at a polarized HERA.

  14. Rates for inclusive deep-inelastic electroproduction of charm quarks at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemersma, S.; Smith, J.; van Neerven, W. L.

    1995-02-01

    The coefficient functions for heavy flavour production in deeply inelastic electron hadron scattering have been calculated previously. These functions are so long that no analytic expressions could be published. Therefore we have tabulated them as two-dimensional arrays as is often done for the scale dependent parton densities. Using this computer program we present event rates for charm production at HERA in bins of x and Q2. These rates are insensitive to variations in the factorization and renormalization scale μ.

  15. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings at 380 microns

    SciTech Connect

    Roellig, T.L.; Werner, M.W.; Becklin, E.E.

    1988-03-01

    Two different techniques have been used to derive the Saturn disk's ring brightness temperatures from 380-micron observations: (1) comparisons of these wide-beam observation disk-ring system results with those obtained for an earlier epoch, when the rings were edge-on, then differencing the two measurements to obtain a value for the rings' contribution; and (2) ring contribution resolution during scanning along the disk-ring plane, to yield a B-ring brightness temperature of 39 + or - 8 K at 380 microns. The results obtained indicate a gradual decrease of observed ring brightness temperature from the IR to the radio wavelength range. 24 references.

  16. Magnetic measurement data of the 0.8-m prototype quadrupole magnets for the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.

    1995-07-01

    From magnetic measurement data of the two 0.8-m prototype quadrupole magnets (P-SRQ-1 and P-SRQ-2) and the study of the geometries for the pole-end bevels and pole chamfers, the following conclusions have been made. Mechanical stability of the magnet poles has been achieved by modification of the weld procedures between two quadrants of the magnets. Stability of the magnet-pole positions was measured optically and was also concluded from the fact that the allowed coefficients, mainly sextupole and octupole terms, were independent of the magnet excitation currents. Unallowed multipole field coefficients for the second magnet, without correction of the magnet-pole positions, are smaller than for the first magnet. The field gradient integrals of the two magnets at 400A differ by less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for r = 2.5 cm. This indicates that an acceptable magnet assembly procedure has been established. The 2-D calculations and ``body`` measurements for allowed coefficients after the main field, b{sub 5} and b{sub 9}, agree within 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at r = 2.5 cm. This implies that the 2-D design geometry is basically correct and acceptable. As expected for a magnet with long and narrow poles, saturation effects of pole shims have been observed. In order to reduce fabrication cost for the end-plates, the geometries for the pole-end bevels and pole chamfers have been studied. By choosing a bevel angle of 61{degree}, instead of 45{degree}, it is possible to have acceptable allowed coefficients with dimensions of pole-chamfers up to 16.5 mm. This allows the design of the end-plate as one piece without removable pole-tip.

  17. Supersymmetric interpretation of high-Q{sup 2} DESY HERA events and other related issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.E. |; Ko, P.

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation, the high-Q{sup 2} DESY HERA events can be interpreted as the s-channel production of a single top-squark of M{sub {tilde t}{sub 1}}{approx}200 GeV, whose dominant decay modes are assumed to be the R-parity violating e{sup +}+d and the R-parity conserving {chi}{sup +}+b. Assuming only one coupling {ovr {lambda}{sup {prime}}{sub 131}} is nonzero of order {approximately}0.04{minus}0.12, we find that (i) the high-Q{sup 2} HERA events can be understood as an s-channel top squark production with a subsequent decay into e{sup +}+(singlejet), and (ii) the ALEPH 4-jet events can be understood in the scenario suggested by Carena {ital et al.} We briefly discuss other physics signals of this scenario at other places such as HERA, CERN LEP200, and Fermilab Tevatron. The best test for our scenario is to observe the top squark decay into {chi}{sup +}+b followed by {chi}{sup +}{r_arrow}{tilde e}{sup +}+{nu}{sub e} and {tilde e}{sup +}{r_arrow}q+{bar q}{prime} via the R-parity violating coupling. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. A compact diode laser cavity ring-down spectrometer for atmospheric measurements of NO3 and N2O5 with automated zeroing and calibration.

    PubMed

    Odame-Ankrah, Charles A; Osthoff, Hans D

    2011-11-01

    A compact rack-mounted cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) for simultaneous measurements of the nocturnal nitrogen oxides NO(3) and N(2)O(5) in ambient air is described. The instrument uses a red diode laser to quantify mixing ratios of NO(3) (at its absorption maximum at 662 nm) and of N(2)O(5) following its thermal dissociation to NO(3) in a second detection channel. The spectrometer is equipped with an automated zeroing and calibration setup to determine effective NO(3) absorption cross-sections and NO(3) and N(2)O(5) inlet transmission efficiencies. The instrument response was calibrated using simultaneous measurements of NO(2), generated by thermal dissociation of N(2)O(5) and/or by titration of NO(3) with excess NO, using blue diode laser CRDS at 405 nm. When measuring ambient air, the (2σ, 10 s) precision of the red diode CRDS varied between 5 and 8 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv), which sufficed to quantify N(2)O(5) concentrations under moderately polluted conditions. Sample N(2)O(5) measurements made on a rooftop on the University of Calgary campus in August 2010 are presented. A maximum N(2)O(5) mixing ratio of 130 pptv was observed, corresponding to a steady-state lifetime of less than 50 min. The NO(3) mixing ratios were below the detection limit, consistent with their predicted values based on equilibrium calculations. During the measurement period, the instrument response for N(2)O(5) was 70% of the theoretical maximum, rationalized by a slight mismatch of the laser diode output with the NO(3) absorption line and a N(2)O(5) inlet transmission efficiency less than unity. Advantages and limitations of the instrument's compact design are discussed.

  19. Intercomparison of two cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers for atmospheric 13CO2 / 12CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Jiaping; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin; Huang, Kuan

    2016-08-01

    Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) permits continuous in situ measurement of CO2 isotopic composition under ambient conditions. Previous studies have mainly focused on single IRIS instrument performance; few studies have considered the comparability among different IRIS instruments. In this study, we carried out laboratory and ambient measurements using two Picarro CO2δ13C analyzers (G1101-i and G2201-i (newer version)) and evaluated their performance and comparability. The best precision was 0.08-0.15 ‰ for G1101-i and 0.01-0.04 ‰ for G2201-i. The dependence of δ13C on CO2 concentration was 0.46 ‰ per 100 ppm and 0.09 ‰ per 100 ppm, the instrument drift ranged from 0.92-1.09 ‰ and 0.19-0.37 ‰, and the sensitivity of δ13C to the water vapor mixing ratio was 1.01 ‰ / % H2O and 0.09 ‰ / % H2O for G1101-i and G2201-i, respectively. The accuracy after correction by the two-point mixing ratio gain and offset calibration method ranged from -0.04-0.09 ‰ for G1101-i and -0.13-0.03 ‰ for G2201-i. The sensitivity of δ13C to the water vapor mixing ratio improved from 1.01 ‰ / % H2O before the upgrade of G1101-i (G1101-i-original) to 0.15 ‰ / % H2O after the upgrade of G1101-i (G1101-i-upgraded). Atmospheric δ13C measured by G1101-i and G2201-i captured the rapid changes in atmospheric δ13C signals on hourly to diurnal cycle scales, with a difference of 0.07 ± 0.24 ‰ between G1101-i-original and G2201-i and 0.05 ± 0.30 ‰ between G1101-i-upgraded and G2201-i. A significant linear correlation was observed between the δ13C difference of G1101-i-original and G2201-i and the water vapor concentration, but there was no significant correlation between the δ13C difference of G1101-i-upgraded and G2201-i and the water vapor concentration. The difference in the Keeling intercept values decreased from 1.24 ‰ between G1101-i-original and G2201-i to 0.36 ‰ between G1101-i-upgraded and G2201-i, which indicates the importance of consistency

  20. Oxygen ions observed near Saturn's A ring.

    PubMed

    Waite, J H; Cravens, T E; Ip, W-H; Kasprzak, W T; Luhmann, J G; McNutt, R L; Niemann, H B; Yelle, R V; Mueller-Wodarg, I; Ledvina, S A; Scherer, S

    2005-02-25

    Ions were detected in the vicinity of Saturn's A ring by the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) instrument onboard the Cassini Orbiter during the spacecraft's passage over the rings. The INMS saw signatures of molecular and atomic oxygen ions and of protons, thus demonstrating the existence of an ionosphere associated with the A ring. A likely explanation for these ions is photoionization by solar ultraviolet radiation of neutral O2 molecules associated with a tenuous ring atmosphere. INMS neutral measurements made during the ring encounter are dominated by a background signal.

  1. Variations in Ring Particle Cooling across Saturn's Rings with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S. G.; Déau, E.; Altobelli, N.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded over two million of spectra of Saturn's rings in the far infrared since arriving at Saturn in 2004. CIRS records far infrared radiation between 10 and 600 cm-1 ( 16.7 and 1000 μ {m} ) at focal plane 1 (FP1), which has a field of view of 3.9 mrad. Thermal emission from Saturn’s rings peaks in this wavelength range. Ring temperatures can be inferred from FP1 data. By tracking how ring temperatures vary, we can determine the thermal inertia of the rings. Previous studies have shown that the rings' thermal inertia, a measure of their response to changes in the thermal environment, varies from ring to ring. Thermal inertia can provide insight into the physical structure of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths. Low thermal inertia and rapidly changing temperatures are suggestive of ring particles that have more porous or fluffy regoliths or that are riddled with cracks. Solid particles can be expected to have higher thermal inertias. Ferrari et al. (2005) fit thermal inertia values of 5218 {Jm)-2 {K}-1 {s}-1/2 to their B ring data and 6412 {Jm)-2 {K}-1 {s}-1/2 to their C ring data. In this work we focus on CIRS observations of the shadowed portion of Saturn's rings. The rings’ thermal budget is dominated by its absorption of solar radiation. As a result, ring particles abruptly cool as they traverse Saturn's shadow. From these shadow observations we can create cooling curves at specific locations across the rings. We will show that the rings' cooling curves and thus their thermal inertia vary not only from ring to ring, but by location within the individual rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  2. STORAGE RING CROSS-SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT SINGLE AND DOUBLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 9+} AND SINGLE IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 10+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Repnow, R.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.

    2012-11-20

    We have measured electron impact ionization from the ground state of Fe{sup 9+} and Fe{sup 10+} over the relative electron-ion collision energy ranges 200-1900 eV and 250-1800 eV, respectively. The ions were confined in an ion storage ring long enough for essentially all metastable levels to radiatively relax to the ground state. For single ionization, we find a number of discrepancies between the existing theoretical cross sections and our results. The calculations appear to neglect some excitation-autoionization (EA) channels, particularly from n = 3 to n' excitations, which are important near threshold, and those from n = 2 {yields} 3 excitations, which contribute at about 650 eV. Conversely, at higher energies the calculations appear to overestimate the importance of EA channels due to excitation into levels where n {>=} 4. The resulting experimental rate coefficients agree with the most recent theory for Fe{sup 9+} to within 16% and for Fe{sup 10+} to within 19% at temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in collisional ionization equilibrium. We have also measured double ionization of Fe{sup 9+} forming Fe{sup 11+} in the energy range 450-3000 eV and found that although there is an appreciable cross section for direct double ionization, the dominant mechanism appears to be through direct ionization of an inner shell electron producing an excited state that subsequently stabilizes through autoionization.

  3. Real-time in situ δ13C Methane Measurements with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer at Four Corners to Discriminate Biogenic and Thermogenic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, C.; Dubey, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    We characterized the performance of a new cavity ring-down δ13C isotopic CH4 spectrometer (Picarro G2123-i) in the laboratory. Our Allan variance plots show that the instrument can integrate 1-second measurements over 5 minutes to yield a precision better than ± 1 per mil. We subsequently deployed it at a field site at Four Corners (FC), New Mexico, where we had observed large sustained CH4 enhancements (2-8 ppm peaks for hours) at night. Potential sources of this large CH4 signal at FC include (1) fugitive emissions from coal mining and gas processing that are thermogenic and isotopically heavy and (2) Emissions from agriculture, ruminants, fires, and landfills that are biogenic and isotopically light. We analyze our measurements of δ13C of CH4 during spring and summer of 2012 to distinguish these two types of sources. We find CH4 plumes that are both isotopically heavy and light at our site. Keeling plots show two distinct limiting δ13C source compositions of -40 per mil and -60 per mil that we attribute to thermogenic and biogenic sources respectively. We use our results to quantify the contributions of these two sources and combine them with meteorological data to identify their sources in the Four Corners regions.

  4. Measurement of the ratio of C3+ and O4+ ions produced by ECRIS to prepare a laser cooling experiment at storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. L.; Wen, W. Q.; Ma, X.; Li, J. Y.; Feng, W. T.; Zhang, R. T.; Wang, Enliang; Yan, S.; Guo, D. L.; Hai, B.; Qian, D. B.; Zhang, P.; Xu, S.; Zhao, D. M.; Yang, J.; Zhang, D. C.; Li, B.; Gao, Y.; Huang, Z. K.; Wang, H. B.

    2014-11-01

    To prepare the upcoming laser cooling of relativistic C3+ ion beams at the experimental Cooler Storage Ring (CSRe), a novel experiment was performed using a reaction microscope to determine the ratio of C3+ ions in mixed ion beams of C3+ and O4+ that are produced by an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS). The mixed ion beams at an energy of 4 keV/u were directed to collide on a supersonic helium gas target. Using the single-electron capture channel and the coincidence technique, the fractions of C3+ and O4+ ions in the primary beam were obtained. Using different injection gases for ECRIS, including O2, CO, CO2, and CH4, at a fixed radio-frequency power of 300 W, the measured results showed that the fraction of C3+ ions was greater than 70% for the injection gases of CO and CO2. These measured results are very important and helpful for the upcoming laser cooling experiments.

  5. Ring Equinox Temperature Variations from Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Ferrari, C.; Morishima, R.; Flandes, A.; Altobelli, N.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S.

    2010-10-01

    Cassini's Composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) retrieved the temperatures of Saturn's main rings at equinox as the sun traversed from the south to north side of the rings. At equinox the solar input is very small and the primary heat sources for the rings are Saturn thermal and visible energy. The main rings cooled to their lowest temperatures measured to date. The ring temperatures at equinox were: C ring, 55-75 K; B ring, 45-60 K; Cassini Division, 45 - 58 K; and A ring, 43 - 52 K. The equinox geometry is unique because Saturn heating dominates, contrasted to earlier in the mission when the primary heat source is light from the sun. Equinox temperatures are almost identical for similar geometries on the north and south sides of the main rings. Overall, the temperatures decrease with increasing distance from the planet as expected but each ring displays a slightly different behavior. For the C ring the temperature varies slightly with the Saturn local time on the particle while the temperature for the densest part of the B ring does not vary with changing geometry. Equinox results will be presented. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the CNES and CEA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  6. Researches on the Piston Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  7. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  8. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  9. The rings of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of theories concerning the rings of Saturn. Particular attention is given to ring structure, noting its thinness, the separations between rings, and observed variations in brightness. Data gathered via infrared, radio and radar techniques are described in terms of ring particle composition and size. Hypotheses about ring origin and evolution are outlined, including the tidal disruption model, calculations of Saturn's gravitational contraction history, grazing, and meteoroid bombardment. Prospects for future observations of Saturn's rings are reviewed, such as the variation in their radar reflectivity as a function of the tilt of the ring plane.

  10. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  11. Storage Ring Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact Single and Double Ionization of Fe13 + and Single Ionization of Fe16 + and Fe17 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-04-01

    We report measurements of electron impact ionization for Fe13 +, Fe16 +, and Fe17 + over collision energies from below threshold to above 3000 eV. The ions were recirculated using an ion storage ring. Data were collected after a sufficiently long time that essentially all the ions had relaxed radiatively to their ground state. For single ionization of Fe13 +, we find that previous single pass experiments are more than 40% larger than our results. Compared to our work, the theoretical cross section recommended by Arnaud & Raymond is more than 30% larger, while that of Dere is about 20% greater. Much of the discrepancy with Dere is due to the theory overestimating the contribution of excitation-autoionization via n = 2 excitations. Double ionization of Fe13 + is dominated by direct ionization of an inner shell electron accompanied by autoionization of a second electron. Our results for single ionization of Fe16 + and Fe17 + agree with theoretical calculations to within the experimental uncertainties.

  12. An integrated approach to individualized optimal dose estimation of medication by means of dosing adjustment measures and Bi-Digital O-Ring Test.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Omura, Yoshiaki; Lu, Wniston I

    2014-01-01

    Posology concerns science and system of dosage. Conventionally the dosage systems of measurement are the apothecaries' and metric systems and the dosage calculation for each individual patient has been suggested according to several available methods, namely Clark's Rule, Fried's Rule, Young's Rule, body surface area, or mg/kg, etc. There are many factors affect the availability of a drug to its site of action in the body, and their relation to the time course of drug action and variation in each drug response with or without the other drugs taken simultaneously. The correct dosage requires meticulous and accurate calculation. In busy offices, some may feel the dosage calculation is tedious. This article reviews the conventional methods of dosage calculations and the allergy tests, followed by describing a simple way to determine the proper dosage for each patient by simplifying the Clark's concept based on the body weight and verify the optimum dosage with Bi-Digital O-Ring Test minimize the adverse drug reactions and to increase safety for drug administration. PMID:24909015

  13. Mechanism of Cytokinetic Contractile Ring Constriction in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Stachowiak, Matthew R.; Laplante, Caroline; Chin, Harvey F.; Guirao, Boris; Karatekin, Erdem; Pollard, Thomas D.; O’Shaughnessy, Ben

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytokinesis involves constriction of a contractile actomyosin ring. The mechanisms generating ring tension and setting the constriction rate remain unknown, since the organization of the ring is poorly characterized, its tension was rarely measured, and constriction is coupled to other processes. To isolate ring mechanisms we studied fission yeast protoplasts, where constriction occurs without the cell wall. Exploiting the absence of cell wall and actin cortex, we measured ring tension and imaged ring organization, which was dynamic and disordered. Computer simulations based on the amounts and biochemical properties of the key proteins showed that they spontaneously self-organize into a tension-generating bundle. Together with rapid component turnover, the self-organization mechanism continuously reassembles and remodels the constricting ring. Ring constriction depended on cell shape, revealing that the ring operates close to conditions of isometric tension. Thus, the fission yeast ring sets its own tension, but other processes set the constriction rate. PMID:24914559

  14. Radar Imaging of Saturn's Rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Campbell, D. B.; French, R. G.; Margot, J.-L.; Black, G. J.; Nolan, M.

    2002-09-01

    The first radar echoes from Saturn's rings were obtained at a wavelength of 12.6 cm by Goldstein and Morris (1973). In October 1999 we used a frequency-stepped technique similar to that used in the mid-70s by Ostro etal. (1982) to make the first true radar images of the rings. In November 2000 and again in December 2001 we repeated this experiment, using the Arecibo S-band radar. With a pulse length of 70 msec, the range resolution of these data is 10,000 km; the Doppler spectra were processed to a frequency resolution of 2 kHz, corresponding to a radial resolution at the ring ansae of 2000 km. To date we have obtained images at ring opening angles B of -19.9, -23.6 and -25.9 deg. Images from all three years show a pronounced azimuthal asymmetry in the ring reflectivity, which is seen in both circular polarizations. The analogous phenomenon at visual wavelengths is ascribed to gravitational `wakes' generated by individual large ring particles, which are distorted by keplerian shear into elongated structures trailing at angles of 70 deg from the radial direction (Franklin and Colombo 1978). Such wakes are diagnostic of the rings' gravitational stability parameter, Q, and are expected to have characteristic length scales of 30-100 m in the A ring. To the radar, the rings appear brighter when the wakes are seen sideways, and fainter when they are viewed end-on. Fits of a numerical model by Salo and Karjalainen (1999) to our data show that the asymmetry is concentrated in the A ring, where its amplitude is 25% of the average reflectivity. This is twice the model prediction --- which is based on a dynamical simulation employing a realistic ring particle size distribution used as input to a Monte Carlo light scattering code --- and about three times the amplitude measured in HST images obtained at a wavelength of 439 nm and the same opening angle. The large amplitude of the radar asymmetry is difficult to reproduce with current models, although the phase of the asymmetry

  15. Soot volume fraction measurement in low-pressure methane flames by combining laser-induced incandescence and cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Effect of pressure on soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.; Lefort, B.; Lemaire, R.; Therssen, E.; Pauwels, J.F.

    2008-10-15

    Soot volume fraction (f{sub v}) profiles are recorded in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flat flames using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are performed from 20 to 28 kPa in flames having the same equivalence ratio (2.32). Calibration is performed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and indicates a very weak soot volume fraction (0.066 ppb at 21.33 kPa and 0.8 ppb at 26.66 kPa in the burnt gases). Soot volume fraction is found to increase continuously after a given distance above the burner (HAB) and tends to level off in the burnt gases. The reaction time resolution available in low-pressure flames makes it possible to examine the early steps of soot formation. The variation of the LII signal with laser energy before the LII ''plateau'' region is much weaker at the beginning of soot formation than after a given reaction time. The LII time decays are nearly constant within the first millimetres, whereas an increase in the decay, correlated with the growth of the primary soot particle, is observed later. The growth of soot volume fraction is then analysed by considering the variation of the derivative function df{sub v}/dt with f{sub v}. Three regimes having respectively a positive slope, a constant slope, and a negative slope are observed and are interpreted with respect to the soot inception process. Finally, a very important sensitivity of f{sub v} with pressure P (at 30 mm HAB) is observed, leading to a power law, f{sub v}=KP{sup 11}, confirmed by extinction measurements (by CRDS). The observed dependence of f{sub v} with pressure could be a result of the prominence of the early soot inception process in the investigated low-pressure flames. (author)

  16. On the magnetization relaxation of ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films as determined by superconducting quantum interference device measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Ziemann, Paul; Radovan, Henri A.; Herzog, Thomas

    1998-09-01

    By using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the temporal relaxation of the magnetization was determined for ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films at various temperatures between 10 K and 80 K in magnetic fields ranging from 2 mT to 0.3 T. Based on these data, a detailed analysis has been performed related to the following methods or models: (1) Fitting the data to the thermally activated flux motion and collective pinning model; (2) Applying the Generalized Inversion Scheme to extract the temperature dependence of the unrelaxed critical current density jc( T) and pinning potential Uc( T); (3) Testing a modified Maley's method to obtain the current dependent activation energy for flux motion; (4) 2D vortex glass scaling. It is found that, for low fields (2 mT, 10 mT, 40 mT) the experimental data can be described by an elastic flux motion, most probably due to 3D single vortex creep. At higher fields (0.1 T, 0.2 T, 0.3 T), the observed behavior can be interpreted in terms of plastic flux motion which is probably governed by dislocation mediated flux creep. These high field data can also be consistently described by the 2D vortex glass scaling with scaling parameters ν2D, T0 and p being consistent with those derived from corresponding transport measurement. Also, results are presented demonstrating the importance of optimizing the scan length of the sample in a moving sample SQUID magnetometer to avoid artifacts.

  17. Recent HERA Results on Leptoquarks and other SUSY-related Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Stefan

    2008-11-23

    The HERA ep collider and the experiments H1 and ZEUS operated from 1994-2007. A total integrated luminosity of almost 1 fb{sup -1} was collected at centre-of-mass energies up to 320 GeV. Results from searches for leptoquarks and squarks, final states with an isolated lepton and missing transverse momentum and final states with multi-leptons are presented. The leptoquark limits are interpreted in terms of limits on squark production in SUSY models with R-parity violating couplings.

  18. Application of cavity ring-down spectroscopy for in situ, real-time measurements of properties of oceanographic interest in the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuan; Ma, Jian; Winkler, Renato; Dennis, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In situ, real-time measurements of chemical properties, e.g., dissolved CO2 and its carbon isotopic compositions, dissolved inorganic carbon, water isotopes, etc., are highly desired for understanding various physical and biogeochemical processes in the surface ocean. Due to its high sensitivity, stability and portability, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been increasingly used as a core technique for shipboard systems that automatically measure properties of oceanographic interest at high spatial-temporal resolution. These systems typically require front-end components that convert the sample into a continuous gas flow that can be continuously sampled by the CRDS. Here, we review the progress in the development of CRDS-based systems for shipboard, high-frequency measurements of various properties in the surface ocean, including pCO2, δ13C-CO2, pCH4, δ13C-CH4, and water isotopes. In most systems, gas extraction devices are keys to the sample preparation units that are coupled with the CRDS analyzers. In our present work, we summarize the major gas extraction techniques used in these methods (e.g. the showerhead-type equilibration, the bubbling equilibration, the high-porosity membrane contactor extraction, the expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-based extraction, etc.), present examples how these techniques are coupled with CRDS analyzers, and evaluate the major factors that determine the overall performance (precision, accuracy, response time, etc.) of the systems. Based on the working principles and field data generated by these systems, we were able to identify the major factors that affect the system performance, including the efficiency (completeness) of gas extraction, magnitude and stability of isotopic fractionation during the gas extraction, internal volume of the system (e.g., the volume of the equilibration chamber and that of the CRDS cavity) and the carrier gas flow rate. Finally, we make recommendations, for each type of system, the optimal

  19. Internal comparison between deuterium oxide (D2O) and L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine for acute measurement of muscle protein synthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Cegielski, Jessica; Phillips, Bethan E; Boereboom, Catherine; Lund, Jonathan N; Atherton, Philip J; Smith, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope tracer methodologies are becoming increasingly widespread in metabolic research; yet a number of factors restrict their implementation, such as, i.v infusions, multiple cannulae, tissue samples, and significant cost. We recently validated the sensitivity of the orally administered stable isotope tracer deuterium oxide (D2O) for quantifying day-to-day changes in muscle protein synthesis (MPS). This method is less invasive, restrictive, and more cost-effective than traditional amino acid (AA) tracer techniques. In the present study, we hypothesized the sensitivity of our analytical techniques (GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS) would permit D2O-derived measurements of MPS over much shorter periods (i.e., hours) usually only possible using AA-tracer techniques. We recruited nine males (24 ± 3 year, BMI: 25 ± 3 kg·m−²) into an internally controlled comparison of D2O versus 13C AA-tracers. The day before the acute study subjects consumed 400 mL D2O, and on the study day, received a primed (0.3 mg·kg−1) continuous (0.6 mg·kg·h−1) i.v infusion of L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine to quantify MPS under both: (1) basal [postabsorptive] and; (2) stimulated [postprandial] that is, consumption of 20 g EAA, conditions. Measures of MPS yielded indistinguishable technique differences with respect to EAA, 13C: 0.065 ± 0.004 to 0.089 ± 0.006%·h−1 (P < 0.05) and D2O: 0.050 ± 0.007 to 0.088 ± 0.008%·h−1 (P < 0.05) with qualitatively similar increases. Our findings reveal that acute measurement of MPS, usually only possible using AA-tracers, are feasible over shorter periods with orally administered D2O when used in tandem with GC-Pyrolysis-IRMS. We conclude that this D2O approach provides a less invasive, cost-effective, and flexible means by which to quantify MPS acutely over several hours. PMID:26149278

  20. Vascular ring (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ring is a term used to describe a number of abnormal formations of the aorta, the large artery ... the pulmonary artery. The abnormal vessel(s) forms a ring, which encircles and may press down on the ...

  1. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-01

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings. PMID:16601188

  2. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-01

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  3. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  4. The Friction of Piston Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischbein, Hans W

    1945-01-01

    The coefficient of friction between piston ring and cylinder liner was measured in relation to gliding acceleration, pressure, temperature, quantity of oil and quality of oil. Comparing former lubrication-technical tests, conclusions were drawn as to the state of friction. The coefficients of friction as figured out according to the hydrodynamic theory were compared with those measured by tests. Special tests were made on "oiliness." The highest permissible pressure was measured and the ratio of pressure discussed.

  5. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness.

  6. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  7. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  8. Future plans for the small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev

    2005-05-01

    The Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) has been operational at Michigan State University since December 2003. It has been used for experimental studies of the beam dynamics in high-intensity isochronous cyclotrons and synchrotrons at the transition energy. Operational experience with SIR has demonstrated that the ring can be successfully used to study space charge effects in accelerators. The low velocity of beam particles in the ring allowed longitudinal profile measurements with an accuracy that would be difficult to achieve in full-size accelerators. The experimental data obtained in the ring was used for validation of the multi-particle, space-charge codes CYCO and WARP3D. Encouraged by the success of SIR in the isochronous regime, we consider options for expanding the scope of the beam physics studied in the ring. In this paper, we outline possible future experiments and discuss required modifications of the ring optics and hardware.

  9. Simultaneous measurements of CO2, CO and CH4 at an urban site of western India using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, N. C.; Sethuraman, V.; Lal, S.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric levels of CO2 and CH4 are mainly governed by emissions from several anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources. Anthropogenic sources have different emission characteristics, and emit CO2, CH4 with various other trace gases like CO, NOx, SO2... etc in different ratios. CO is a useful tracer for differentiating between natural and anthropogenic emissions, as the natural source does not affect its levels significantly. Therefore the interrelations of CO2, CH4 with CO and other co-emitted species can be useful for identifying the relative role of emission sectors on the total emission of CO2 and CH4. Simultaneous measurements of CO2, CO and CH4 were made over Ahmedabad (23.03oN, 72.58oE, 55m AMSL), a semi-arid urban site of western India, during the period of autumn (November 2013), winter (December 2013-February 2014) and Monsoon (July 2014) using an online analyser based on the cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique. The measurements show that atmospheric CO correlates well with CO2 during the autumn and winter. The slope of CO and CO2 (∆CO/∆CO2) is found to be in the range of 0.02 and 0.03 which agrees well with the emission ratio for India as per Asian inventory proposed by Street et al., (2003) and connote the influence of mixed sources (fossil fuel as well as biomass burning) during this period. In July , CO doesn't correlate well with CO2 (r2 =0.14), but the slope is around 0.005, indicates the dominance of fossil fuel during this time. The correlation and slope (slope ~ 0.02 and r2 ~ 0.55) of CH4 with CO2 remain fairly constant which demonstrate that the study area does not have significant changes in the source of these gases throughout the study period. Details of the levels, amplitude of diurnal variations of CO2, CO, CH4 as well as their mutual interrelationship will be presented.

  10. Localization of groundwater infiltration in the combined sewers of Brussels by stable isotopes measurements (δ18O, δD) by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bondt, Kevin; Claeys, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    In the last 20 years research has been conducted to quantify the infiltration of groundwater into the sewers. This groundwater, called parasitic water, increases the volume of waste-water to be treated and consequently the cost of this treatment. Moreover, in the case of combined sewer systems, the parasitic water also limits the sewer capacity and indirectly increases the risks of combined sewer overflows and floods. The infiltration of groundwater occurs trough cracks, sewer collapses and from direct connections with old springs. Different methods quantify the intrusion of parasitic water. Among these, the use of the stable isotopes of water (δ18O & δD) shows good result in catchments or cities close to Mountainous regions (example from Lyon, Zurich), where isotopic signals vary significantly because of continental and altitude effects. However many cities, such as Brussels, are located in more oceanic settings and theoretically offer less potential for the application of the stable isotopes method. In the case of Brussels, river-water from the Meuse is used to produce domestic-water. The catchment of this river extends into the Ardennes, which are affected by slightly different climatic conditions. δ18O & δD analyzes of groundwater from the main aquifer (Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian) and domestic-water from the Callois reservoir fed by the Meuse River show sufficient isotopic differences in the south of Brussels, but only during the summer. The discrimination potential is better with δD than with δ18O. The improvement of δD measurements (precision, costs,...) brought by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy largely contributes to the potential of using stable isotopes method to trace water in Brussels. The first campaigns in the sewers also show a little enrichment (in heavy isotopes) of the waste-water in comparison with the reservoir waters and tap waters. This increases the potential of the method but constrains the sampling to pure waste-water in sewer segments

  11. Boom and Bust Cycles in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Albers, N.

    2010-10-01

    7/16/10 12:23 PM UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn's F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations perturbed by Mimas and Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. The maximum clumping lags the moon by π in the forcing frame. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the aggregate mean size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. For realistic values of the parameters this creates a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the boom-bust economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons at both these locations in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material allows fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. These more persistent objects would then orbit at the Kepler rate. Such processes can create the equinox objects seen at the B ring edge and in the F ring, explain the ragged nature of those ring regions and allow for rare events to aggregate ring particles into solid objects, recycling the ring material and extending the ring lifetime. 7/16/10 12:23 PM 7/16/10 12:23 PM

  12. Boom and Bust Cycles in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Albers, N.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn’s F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations perturbed by Mimas and Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. The maximum clumping lags the moon by roughly π in the forcing frame. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the aggregate mean size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. For realistic values of the parameters this creates a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the boom-bust economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag roughly consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons at both these locations in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material allows fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. These more persistent objects would then orbit at the Kepler rate. Such processes can create the equinox objects seen at the B ring edge and in the F ring, explain the ragged nature of those ring regions and allow for rare events to aggregate ring particles into solid objects, recycling the ring material and extending the ring lifetime.

  13. Lessons Learned from Dependency Usage in HERA: Implications for THERP-Related HRA Methods

    SciTech Connect

    April M. Whaley; Ronald L. Boring; Harold S. Blackman; Patrick H. McCabe; Bruce P. Hallbert

    2007-08-01

    Dependency occurs when the probability of success or failure on one action changes the probability of success or failure on a subsequent action. Dependency may serve as a modifier on the human error probabilities (HEPs) for successive actions in human reliability analysis (HRA) models. Discretion should be employed when determining whether or not a dependency calculation is warranted: dependency should not be assigned without strongly grounded reasons. Human reliability analysts may sometimes assign dependency in cases where it is unwarranted. This inappropriate assignment is attributed to a lack of clear guidance to encompass the range of scenarios human reliability analysts are addressing. Inappropriate assignment of dependency produces inappropriately elevated HEP values. Lessons learned about dependency usage in the Human Event Repository and Analysis (HERA) system may provide clarification and guidance for analysts using first-generation HRA methods. This paper presents the HERA approach to dependency assessment and discusses considerations for dependency usage in HRA, including the cognitive basis for dependency, direction for determining when dependency should be assessed, considerations for determining the dependency level, temporal issues to consider when assessing dependency, (e.g., considering task sequence versus overall event sequence, and dependency over long periods of time), and diagnosis and action influences on dependency.

  14. Development of a Net Flux Radiometer for the Hera Saturn Probe Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Amato, Michael; Atkinson, David; Mousis, Olivier; Nixon, Conor; Simon, Amy A.; Hera Probe Mission Team

    2016-10-01

    In situ exploration of all the giant planets in the outer solar system is an imperative and a Saturn probe is the next compelling step beyond Galileo's in situ exploration of Jupiter, the remote investigation of its interior, gravity, and magnetic fields by the Juno mission, and the Cassini spacecraft's similar orbital reconnaissance of Saturn. One such proposed future mission is "HERA: an international atmospheric probe to unveil the depths of Saturn" a nominal configuration is a combined ESA/Class-M probe mission accompanied by a launch vehicle and carrier relay spacecraft provided by NASA. One of the instruments being considered for inclusion on the probe is a Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) to unravel the vertical structure and properties of Saturn's cloud and haze layers. A NFR concept is presented that can be included in an atmospheric structure instrument suite for the Hera mission. The current design has two spectral channels i.e., a solar channel (0.4-to-5 µm) and a thermal channel (4-to-50 µm). The NFR is capable of viewing five distinct viewing angles during the descent. Non-imaging Winston cones with window and filter combinations define the spectral channels with a 5° Field-Of View (FOV). Uncooled thermopile detectors are used in each spectral channel and are read out using a custom designed radiation-hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC).

  15. The Excess of HERA High-Q2 Events and Leptoquarks in a Left-Right Symmetric Preon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, M.; Wada, H.; Ishida, S.

    1998-04-01

    An interpretation that the HERA excess events are due to intermediate production and decay of composite leptoquarks in the left-right symmetric preon model is given. Because of the preon-line rule, expected to be valid, the event-ratio of neutral to charged current interactions is predicted to be 1.

  16. The liquid metal slip ring experiment for the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The experiment is designed to demonstrate liquid metal slip ring (LMSR) performance in a space environment. An evaluation was made of the features of the LMSR where improvement in performance over conventional slip rings was expected. The primary measurements to be made in the experiment will allow a determination of the slip ring electrical resistance, between ring insulation and ring cleanliness.

  17. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  18. The Structure of the Uranian Rings and the Search for Rings Around Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The nine narrow rings of Uranus, presently the only confirmed features of this system, have been observed with the diffraction-limited resolution (3.5 km) of ground-based occultations since their discovery in 1977. These data have been used to establish an orbit model, from which the five Keplerian orbit parameters for each ring, the pole of the mean ring plane, and the gravitational harmonic coefficients J sub 2 and J sub 4 have been determined. The rings are typically a few kilometers wide with eccentricities of about 0.001 and inclinations of a few hundredths of a degree, although a few have no measurable eccentricity or inclination. Interesting Voyager investigations would include probing the structure of the rings at higher spatial resolution, searching for new rings in the system (including inter-ring material), locating the postulated shepherd satellites, and searching for satellites inside the orbit of Miranda that might have dynamical influence on the rings. The high precision (approx 2 km) of the ring orbits might prove useful for spacecraft navigation. For Neptune, occultation searches have revealed no rings to a limit of a few hundreths optical depth, within a few hundred kilometers from the top of the planet's atmosphere (for equatorial rings).

  19. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  20. Cassini CIRS Observations of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Pilorz, Stuart H.; Wallis, Brad D.; Brooks, Shawn M.; Edgington, Scott G.; Flasar, F. Michael; Pearl, John C.; Showalter, Mark R.; Ferrari, Cecile; Achterberg, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    In the spring of 2004, during Cassini s approach to Saturn, the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) began acquiring thermal spectra of Saturn s rings. CIRS is a Fourier-transform spectrometer that measures radiation in the thermal infrared from 7 microns to 1 millimeter (1400 to 10/cm). CIRS has a set of 21 detectors, consisting of two 1 x 10 linear arrays with a pixel size of 0.3 mrad, and one 4 mrad circular detector. Just after the completion of the Saturn orbit insertion (SOI) burn, CIRS performed an especially high spatial resolution scan of portions of Saturn s A, B and C rings. In the months following SOI, additional ring measurements have been obtained, including radial scans on the lit and unlit sides of the rings, and azimuthal scans across the shadowed regions of the A, B and C rings.

  1. Cassini Radio Occultation Results for Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Wong, K.; Thomson, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft completed a set of eight radio occultation observations of Saturn's rings during the period May 2 to September 5, 2005. The observation geometry was optimized to provide multiple ring longitude measurements at three radio wavelengths (0.94, 3.6, 13 cm; Ka-, X-, and S-band, respectively). A normal optical depth profile, a phase shift profile, as well as spectrogram of the near-forward scattered signal are constructed at each observation longitude and wavelength. High spatial resolution X-band optical depth profiles (up to 400 m so far) reveal for the first time detailed structure of Ring B, Saturn's most massive ring feature, as well as structure of many dynamical ring features including density and bending waves driven by exterior satellites, wakes due to embedded satellites, ring gaps, narrow eccentric gap-embedded ringlets, sharp ring edges, among others. Remarkable variability of ring structure with longitude is observed, including prominent asymmetry in Ring A. The Ka/X/S optical depth observations are used to characterize variability in the abundance of particle sizes that populate observed structure over the millimeters to centimeters radius range. Combined, the Ka/X/S optical depth and spectrograms of the near-forward scattered signal provide complementary information about the abundance of the meters size particles and their spatial distribution, including potential crowding, clustering, and preferred orientations.

  2. Minidisk against ring infiltrometer measurements to assess the saturated hydraulic conductivity in Mediterranean vineyards (Vitis vinifera L.) under Tillage and No-Tillage managements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguet, Maria; Di Prima, Simone; Prosdocimi, Massimo; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    is also found in forest and degraded soils. The aim of our work was to test two different ks measuring methodologies -the ring infiltrometer and the mini-disc infiltrometer (Decagon Devices, Pullman, WA.2005), in order to check how the differences in measuring affects to the ks calculations. This would give an idea of which methodology would be more appropriate to use regarding the time-consume, effort and costs of the measuring material. The measurements were carried out during November 2015 at El Celler del Roure, a 25-years old vineyard located in Les Alcusses (Moixent, Spain). The soil managements selected for the study were Conventional Tillage (CT) and No Tillage (NT). A total of 18 infiltration measurements were performed (9 for CT and 9 for NT). In order to homogenize the measuring times, the measuring time for each methodology lasted 1 hour. ks values were calculated derived from Green and Ampt's (1911) and Horton's (1941) equations in order to discuss the impact of the methodologies applied. Statistically significant differences (p=.000) were found when applying both methodologies between CT and NT at both time and measures. However, there is still a need to understand how both methodologies influence in the variation of the parameters used for the Green and Ampt's (1911) and Horton's (1941) models. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603498 (RECARE project). References: Cammeraat, E., Cerdà, A. and Imeson, A.C. 2010. Ecohydrological adaptation of soils following land abandonment in a semiarid environment. Ecohydrology, 3: 421-430. doi:10.1002/eco.161 Cerdà, A. 1997. Seasonal changes of the infiltration rates in a mediterranean scrubland on limestone. Journal of Hydrology, 198: 209-225. doi:10.1016/S0022-1694(96)03295-7 Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under

  3. Minidisk against ring infiltrometer measurements to assess the saturated hydraulic conductivity in Mediterranean vineyards (Vitis vinifera L.) under Tillage and No-Tillage managements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguet, Maria; Di Prima, Simone; Prosdocimi, Massimo; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    is also found in forest and degraded soils. The aim of our work was to test two different ks measuring methodologies -the ring infiltrometer and the mini-disc infiltrometer (Decagon Devices, Pullman, WA.2005), in order to check how the differences in measuring affects to the ks calculations. This would give an idea of which methodology would be more appropriate to use regarding the time-consume, effort and costs of the measuring material. The measurements were carried out during November 2015 at El Celler del Roure, a 25-years old vineyard located in Les Alcusses (Moixent, Spain). The soil managements selected for the study were Conventional Tillage (CT) and No Tillage (NT). A total of 18 infiltration measurements were performed (9 for CT and 9 for NT). In order to homogenize the measuring times, the measuring time for each methodology lasted 1 hour. ks values were calculated derived from Green and Ampt's (1911) and Horton's (1941) equations in order to discuss the impact of the methodologies applied. Statistically significant differences (p=.000) were found when applying both methodologies between CT and NT at both time and measures. However, there is still a need to understand how both methodologies influence in the variation of the parameters used for the Green and Ampt's (1911) and Horton's (1941) models. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603498 (RECARE project). References: Cammeraat, E., Cerdà, A. and Imeson, A.C. 2010. Ecohydrological adaptation of soils following land abandonment in a semiarid environment. Ecohydrology, 3: 421-430. doi:10.1002/eco.161 Cerdà, A. 1997. Seasonal changes of the infiltration rates in a mediterranean scrubland on limestone. Journal of Hydrology, 198: 209-225. doi:10.1016/S0022-1694(96)03295-7 Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under

  4. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness. PMID:26835762

  5. Design and implementation of three-dimensional ring-scanning equipment for optimized measurements of near-infrared diffuse optical breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jhao-Ming; Pan, Min-Cheng; Hsu, Ya-Fen; Chen, Liang-Yu; Pan, Min-Chun

    2015-07-01

    We propose and implement three-dimensional (3-D) ring-scanning equipment for near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical imaging to screen breast tumors under prostrating examination. This equipment has the function of the radial, circular, and vertical motion without compression of breast tissue, thereby achieving 3-D scanning; furthermore, a flexible combination of illumination and detection can be configured for the required resolution. Especially, a rotation-sliding-and-moving mechanism was designed for the guidance of source- and detection-channel motion. Prior to machining and construction of the system, a synthesized image reconstruction was simulated to show the feasibility of this 3-D NIR ring-scanning equipment; finally, this equipment is verified by performing phantom experiments. Rather than the fixed configuration, this addressed screening/diagnosing equipment has the flexibilities of optical-channel expansion for spatial resolution and the dimensional freedom for scanning in reconstructing optical-property images.

  6. New Horizons Imaging of Jupiter's Main Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Hamilton, D. P.; Weaver, Harold A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Catherine B.; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    New Horizons took roughly 520 visible-light images of Jupiter's ring system during its 2007 flyby, using the spacecraft's Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). These observations were taken over nine days surrounding Jupiter close-approach. They span a range in distance of 30 - 100 RJ, and a phase angle range of 20 - 174 degrees. The highest resolution images -- more than 200 frames -- were taken at a resolution approaching 20 km/pix.We will present an analysis of this dataset, much of which has not been studied in detail before. Our results include New Horizons' first quantitative measurements of the ring's intrinsic brightness and variability. We will also present results on the ring's azimuthal and radial structure. Our measurements of the ring's phase curve will be used to infer properties of the ring's dust grains.Our results build on the only previous analysis of the New Horizons Jupiter ring data set, presented in Showalter et al (2007, Science 318, 232-234), which detected ring clumps and placed a lower limit on the population of undetected ring-moons.This work was supported by NASA's OPR program.

  7. On multiple Einstein rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M. C.; An, J.; Evans, N. W.

    2008-12-01

    A number of recent surveys for gravitational lenses have found examples of double Einstein rings. Here, we analytically investigate the occurrence of multiple Einstein rings. We prove, under very general assumptions, that at the most one Einstein ring can arise from a mass distribution in a single plane lensing a single background source. Two or more Einstein rings can therefore only occur in multiplane lensing. Surprisingly, we show that it is possible for a single source to produce more than one Einstein ring. If two point masses, or two isothermal spheres, in different planes are aligned with observer and source on the optical axis, we show that there are up to three Einstein rings. We also discuss the image morphologies for these two models if axisymmetry is broken, and give the first instances of magnification invariants in the case of two-lens planes.

  8. Apse-Alignment of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    An explanation of the dynamical mechanism for apse-alignment of the eccentric Uranian rings is necessary before observations can be used to determine properties such as ring masses, particle sizes, and elasticities. The leading model relies on the ring self-gravity to accomplish this task, yet it yields equilibrium masses which are not in accord with Voyager radio measurements. We explore possible solutions such that the self-gravity and the collisional terms are both involved in the process of apse-alignment. We consider limits that correspond to a hot and a cold ring, and show that pressure terms may play a significant role in the equilibrium conditions for the narrow Uranian rings. In the cold ring case, where the scale height of the ring near periapse is comparable to the ring particle size, we introduce a new pressure correction pertaining to a region of the ring where the particles are locked in their relative positions and jammed against their neighbors, and the velocity dispersion is so low that the collisions are nearly elastic. In this case, we find a solution such that the ring self-gravity maintains apse-alignment against both differential precession (m = 1 mode) and the fluid pressure. We apply this model to the Uranian alpha ring, and show that, compared to the previous self-gravity model, the mass estimate for this ring increases by an order of magnitude. In the case of a hot ring, where the scale height can reach a value as much as fifty times larger than a particle size, we find velocity dispersion profiles that result in pressure forces which act in such a way as to alter the ring equilibrium conditions, again leading to a ring mass increase of an order of magnitude; however, such a velocity dispersion profile would require a different mechanism than is currently envisioned for establishing heating/cooling balance in a finite-sized, inelastic particle ring. Finally, we introduce an important correction to the model of Chiang and Goldreich.

  9. Saturn Ring Temperatures at Equinox with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Flandes, A.; Morishima, R.; Altobelli, N.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C. C.; Edgington, S.; Brooks, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini Composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) retrieved the temperatures of Saturn’s main rings at equinox for the first time, as the sun traversed from the south to north side of the rings. At equinox the rings are edge-on as seen from the sun and essentially edge-on (maximum ring opening of only about 2.5 degrees) as seen from the Earth, so it is not possible to measure the main ring temperatures from Earth. The main rings cooled to their lowest temperatures measured to date. At equinox the solar input is very small and the primary heat sources for the rings are Saturn thermal and visible energy. Temperatures are almost identical for similar geometries on the north and south sides of the rings. The ring temperatures at equinox were: C ring, 55-75 K; B ring, 45-60 K; Cassini Division, 45 - 58 K; and A ring, 43 - 52 K. CIRS has acquired a wide-ranging set of thermal measurements of Saturn’s main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at solar elevations from zero to 24 degrees. The equinox geometry is unique because Saturn heating dominates, contrasted to earlier in the mission when the primary heat source is visible-wavelength energy from the sun. When the sun is the dominant heat source the ring temperature varies between the lit and unlit sides of the A and B rings. As the solar elevation decreased the last few degrees, the ring temperatures on the lit and unlit sides of the rings decreased in a non-linear fashion. The thermal model by Morishima et al. (2009) is able to reproduce most of the equinox temperatures observed by CIRS. Equinox results will be presented. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  10. Temperatures of Saturn's rings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The 20-micron brightness temperatures of the rings were determined using the 224-cm telescope of the Mauna Kea Observatory, and the standard University of Hawaii radiometer with a 17- to 25-micron filter. The observations were made on the nights of Aug. 20 and 21, and Sept. 26 and 27, 1972. The brightness temperatures of the A, B, and C rings are, respectively, 89 plus or minus 3 K, 94 plus or minus 2 K, and 89 plus or minus 4 K. A possible explanation of the relatively high temperature of the C ring is that Saturn has radiation belts and the inner ring is heated by particle bombardment.

  11. Saturn Ring Equinox Temperature Variations Retrieved by Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Ferrari, C. C.; Morishima, R.; Flandes, A.; Altobelli, N.; Deau, E.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Showalter, M.; Edgington, S. G.; Brooks, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    As the sun traversed from the south to north side of Saturn’s main rings during equinox, Cassini’s Composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) retrieved the ring temperatures on both sides of the rings. At equinox the solar input is negligible and the primary heat sources for the rings are Saturn thermal and visible energy. As equinox approached, the main rings cooled to their lowest temperatures measured to date. The ring temperatures at equinox were: C ring, 55-75 K; B ring, 45-60 K; Cassini Division, 45 - 58 K; and A ring, 43 - 52 K. Saturn heating dominates the equinox geometry, contrasted to earlier in the mission when the primary heat source is light from the sun. Equinox temperatures are almost identical for similar geometries on the north and south sides of the main rings. Overall, the ring temperatures decrease with increasing distance from the planet as expected but each ring displays a slightly different behavior. The C ring temperatures vary slightly with the Saturn local time on the particle while the temperatures for the densest part of the B ring do not appear to vary with changing Saturn local time. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the CNES and CEA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  12. Micro Ring Grating Spectrometer with Adjustable Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spectrometer includes a micro-ring grating device having coaxially-aligned ring gratings for diffracting incident light onto a target focal point, a detection device for detecting light intensity, one or more actuators, and an adjustable aperture device defining a circular aperture. The aperture circumscribes a target focal point, and directs a light to the detection device. The aperture device is selectively adjustable using the actuators to select a portion of a frequency band for transmission to the detection device. A method of detecting intensity of a selected band of incident light includes directing incident light onto coaxially-aligned ring gratings of a micro-ring grating device, and diffracting the selected band onto a target focal point using the ring gratings. The method includes using an actuator to adjust an aperture device and pass a selected portion of the frequency band to a detection device for measuring the intensity of the selected portion.

  13. Ring Around a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  14. Inclusive K(S);(0)K(S);(0) resonance production in ep collisions at HERA.

    PubMed

    Chekanov, S; Derrick, M; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cindolo, F; Corradi, M; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Antonelli, S; Basile, M; Bindi, M; Cifarelli, L; Contin, A; De Pasquale, S; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H-P; Jüngst, M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Samson, U; Schönberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bołd, T; Grabowska-Bołd, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycień, M; Suszycki, L; Kotański, A; Słomiński, W; Behrens, U; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Fang, S; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hüttmann, A; Januschek, F; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Namsoo, T; Notz, D; Parenti, A; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Yagües Molina, A G; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Drugakov, V; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Forrest, M; Rosin, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Stadie, H; Turcato, M; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Borodin, M; Kadenko, I; Kozulia, A; Libov, V; Lisovyi, M; Lontkovskyi, D; Makarenko, I; Sorokin, Iu; Verbytskyi, A; Volynets, O; Son, D; de Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jimenez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terrón, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Schwartz, J; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Gladkov, D; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Golubkov, Yu A; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Abt, I; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Reisert, B; Schmidke, W B; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Ferrando, J; Foster, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Oliver, K; Robertson, A; Uribe-Estrada, C; Walczak, R; Bertolin, A; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Bellan, P; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Stern, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Stewart, T P; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinski, P; Eisenberg, Y; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kçira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2008-09-12

    Inclusive K_{S};{0}K_{S};{0} production in ep collisions at the DESY ep collider HERA was studied with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 0.5 fb;{-1}. Enhancements in the mass spectrum were observed and are attributed to the production of f_{2}(1270)/a_{2};{0}(1320), f_{2};{'}(1525) and f_{0}(1710). Masses and widths were obtained using a fit which takes into account theoretical predictions based on SU(3) symmetry arguments, and are consistent with the Particle Data Group values. The f_{0}(1710) state, which has a mass consistent with a glueball candidate, was observed with a statistical significance of 5 standard deviations. However, if this state is the same as that seen in gammagamma-->K_{S};{0}K_{S};{0}, it is unlikely to be a pure glueball state.

  15. Radar Scans of the Saturn Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Richard D.; Janssen, Michael A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Anderson, Yanhua; Hamilton, Gary; Cassini Radar Team

    2016-10-01

    The Cassini mission is now heading into its last year of observations. Part of the mission plan includes orbits that bring the spacecraft close to Saturn's rings prior to deorbiting into Saturn's atmosphere. These orbits are providing a unique opportunity to obtain backscatter measurements and relatively high-resolution brightness temperature measurements from the rings. We plan to scan the rings with the radar central beam and obtain backscatter measurements as a function of radial distance with some variation of incidence angle. Active mode radar scans are planned for four of the final high inclination orbits that bring the spacecraft close to the rings. These radar observations will be designed to sweep the A through C rings with varying bandwidth chirps selected to optimize the tradeoff between radial resolution and measurement variance. Pulse compression will deliver radial resolutions varying from about 200 m to around 4 km depending on the bandwidth used. These measurements will provide a 1-D profile of backscatter obtained at 2.2 cm wavelength that will complement similar passive profiles obtained at optical, infrared, and microwave wavelengths. This presentation will summarize the detailed designs and tradeoffs made for these observations. Such measurements will further constrain and inform models of the composition and structure of the ring particle distributions. This work is supported by the NASA Cassini Program at JPL - CalTech.

  16. Piston ring conformability in a distorted bore

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanik, E.

    1996-09-01

    Some different equations to calculate the maximum deformation that a given ring can conform to, are found in the bibliography. These equations do not consider the ring end gap and ovality, gas pressure acting on it, nor the actual bore shape, but only the maximum amplitude for a given term (from a fourier Series that describes the bore shape). A more exact prediction can be done with Finite Element tools or specific codes for piston ring simulation; those approaches are not usually carried out, except in special cases or in more fundamental studies. Experimental measurements were carried out to verify the simple conformability criteria. Deformed shapes were produced in a static jig and areas of non contact, between ring and the deformed bore shapes, were measured. Based on these measurements, a semi-empirical equation is proposed to calculate the limit of piston ring conformability. The proposed equation is simple enough to be calculated in the initial engine design phases (where the required inputs to more detailed methods are not available) or on a day-by-day basis. If bore deformation surpasses the ring conformability, the percentage of ring periphery contacting the bore can be estimated, in a first approximation, by the linear regression empirically found in the experiments.

  17. Physical Properties of Saturn's Rings from Cassini Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; Wong, K.; McGhee, C.; Anabtawi, A.

    2008-09-01

    Twenty-four one-sided Cassini radio occultation observations have been successfully completed. Two types of observations provide information about physical ring properties. The first is differential extinction of three sinusoidal signals simultaneously transmitted through the rings (0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm-wavelength). The observations reveal remarkable variability among the three main rings, A, B, and C, and across local features within each ring. Assuming "classical” ring model and solid water ice composition, comparison of observed differential optical depth with theoretical predictions based on a power-law size distribution constrains the power law index and the minimum radius of abundant particle sizes. In particular, the smallest particle radius in most of Ring C, inner Ring B, and outer ring A appear to be limited to about 4 to 5 mm, and in regions B2 and B4 of Ring B, and in the inner region of Ring A to be greater than few tens of centimeters. The second observation type is the near-forward scattered signal. The measured spectrograms provide characterization of the collective diffraction pattern of the particles and particle clusters. In ring regions where gravitational wakes are likely absent, inversion of the spectral measurement yields the size distribution of particles of radius > about 1 m. The results are consistent with the Voyager results, showing sharp upper size cutoff in the few to several meters radius range. In regions of gravitational wakes, we constrain physical ring properties using comparisons of the observations with predictions of Monte-Carlo simulations of extinction and near-forward diffraction by randomly blocked diffraction screen ring models. The comparisons constrain particle cluster sizes, spatial density, orientation, and ring vertical thickness. The simulations also allow for investigation of physical ring models that account in a self-consistent manner for observed variation of optical depth and forward scattering with ring

  18. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  19. Lower esophageal ring (Schatzki)

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowed area to stretch the ring. Sometimes, a balloon is placed in the area and inflated, to help widen the ring. Outlook (Prognosis) Swallowing problems may return. You may need repeat treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you ...

  20. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  1. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  2. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  3. δ13C and δD Measurement using Cavity Ring-down and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry by Gas Chromatography/Combustion/Pyrolysis and Off-line Processing of Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culp, R.; Pan, H.; Saad, N.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison was made between various stable isotope measurement techniques for the purpose of quantifying each methods capability for use in hydrocarbon analyses applicable to fields such as geochemistry, agriculture, forensics and authenticity testing. Measurement techniques include: (1) Cavity Ring-down spectrometry (CRDS) using a Picarro 2120-A interfaced with a combustion module (CM) to facilitate conversion of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide and water (2) Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) using a Thermo 253 IRMS with gas chromatographic separation prior to combustion to carbon dioxide or high temperature pyrolysis to hydrogen for isotope ratio measurement. Also, off line combustion to carbon dioxide and water with further reduction to hydrogen and dual-inlet measurement by IRMS. IRMS techniques have proven track records for measurement accuracy and precision but require independent analyses of carbon and hydrogen since one needs to oxidize carbon but reduce water to hydrogen prior to measurement or pyrolyze hydrocarbons directly into hydrogen after gas chromatographic separation. Cavity ring-down spectrometry can measure carbon dioxide and water simultaneously eliminating the need for two separate measurements of carbon and hydrogen isotopes. Although the CRDS suffers from memory effects following combustion and transfer of gases early on, new technology has reduced this to acceptable levels for accurate determinations of carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios. In this study, various hydrocarbon materials were used over an extended period of time to determine the best combination of sample size, replicate analyses and combustion column composition and life. The data presented here indicates isotopic measurements by CM-CRDS, for both solid and volatile liquid samples, compare well with GC/IRMS and off-line dual inlet methods of analysis.

  4. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  5. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. F Ring Mini-Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attree, N.; Murray, C.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G.

    2012-12-01

    Mini-jets are small, (~50 km) linear features observed in Cassini images to be emanating from Saturn's F ring; they are believed to be produced by collisions with a local population of moonlets. An analysis of one such feature, observed over the course of a ~7.5 h sequence as its length changed from ~75 km to ~250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse back into the core, supports the collisional theory of their origin [1]. Orbit determination suggests that this mini-jet consisted of ring material displaced by a ~1 m/s collision with a nearby object, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. The colliding object itself is likely to be too small to resolve in these images but represents just one member of a population of F ring moonlets. Such a population has been investigated by UVIS occultations [2], and other methods, but generally remains unresolved in Cassini images. Collisional features such as this mini-jet therefore provide an additional tracer for the region's moonlet population. In this talk we will present the results of recent work in measuring and describing a subset of ~350 catalogued mini-jets, applying knowledge gained from the original mini-jet feature. Their distribution in space and time, proximity to Prometheus and evolution are all examined in an effort to place constraints on the properties of the underlying population of colliding objects. References [1] N. O. Attree, C. D. Murray, N. J. Cooper, and G. A. Williams. Detection of low velocity collisions in Saturn's F ring. Ap. J. Lett. (In press). [1] B. K. Meinke, L. W. Esposito, N. Albers, and M. Sremevi. Classification of F ring features observed in cassini UVIS occultations. Icarus, 218(1):545 - 554, 2012.

  7. CASSINI UVIS STELLAR OCCULTATION OBSERVATIONS OF SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Pettis, D.; Bradley, E. T.; Esposito, L. W.; Sremcevic, M.

    2010-12-15

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high-speed photometer (HSP) that has observed more than 100 stellar occultations by Saturn's rings. Here, we document a standardized technique applied to the UVIS-HSP ring occultation datasets delivered to the Planetary Data System as higher level data products. These observations provide measurements of ring structure that approaches the scale of the largest common ring particles ({approx}5 m). The combination of multiple occultations at different viewing geometries enables reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure of the rings. This inversion of the occultation data depends on accurate calibration of the data so that occultations of different stars taken at different times and under different viewing conditions can be combined to retrieve ring structure. We provide examples of the structure of the rings as seen from several occultations at different incidence angles to the rings, illustrating changes in the apparent structure with viewing geometry.

  8. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  9. Microwave Observations on Saturn's Main Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhimeng; Hayes, Alexander; Janssen, Michael A.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; de Pater, Imke; Dunn, David; Hedman, Matthew M.; Estrada, Paul R.

    2016-10-01

    Despite considerable study, Saturn's rings continue to challenge current theories for their provenance. Water ice comprises the bulk of Saturn's rings, yet it is the small fraction of non-icy material that is arguably more valuable in revealing clues about the system's origin and age. Herein, we present new measurements of the non-icy material fraction in Saturn's main rings, determined from microwave observations obtained by Cassini Radar and EVLA.Our Cassini Radar observations in the C Ring show an exceptionally high brightness at near-zero azimuthal angles, suggesting a high porosity of 70%-75% for the particles. Furthermore, most regions in the C ring contain about 1-2% silicates while with an enhanced abundance concentrated in the middle C ring reaching a maximum of 6%-11%. We proposed that the C ring has been continuously polluted by meteoroid bombardment for 15-90Myr, while the middle C ring was further contaminated by an incoming Centaur disrupted by Saturn tidal force. Owing to the B ring's high opacity, the particles there are likely to have 85% - 90% porosity, with corresponding non-icy material fractions of ~ 0.3% - 0.5% in the inner and outer B ring, and ~0.1% - 0.2% in the middle regions. For the A ring interior to the Encke gap, the derived non-icy material is ~0.2% - 0.3% everywhere for porosities ranging from 55% - 90%. Finally, our results for the Cassini Division indicate a non-icy material fraction of ~1% - 2% similar to most regions in the C ring, except that the Cassini Division particles are more likely to contain ~ 90% porosity due to the high opacity there. Our results here further support the idea that Saturn's rings may be less than 150 Myr old suggesting an origin scenario in which the rings are derived from the relatively recent breakup of an icy moon.Furthermore, we calibrated and analyzed multi-wavelengths EVLA observation at wavelengths ranging from 0.7cm to 13cm. As the array operates in a wavelength regime where the absorption

  10. Heteroepitaxial gold (111) rings on mica substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.W.; Chen, N.F.; Yan, F.; Goedel, Werner A.

    2005-05-16

    Two-dimensionally arranged gold rings were prepared by depositing a polymeric membrane bearing a dense array of uniform pores onto a mica substrate, filling the pores with a solution of a gold precursor, evaporation of the solvent and calcinations. The epitaxy of gold rings is confirmed by x-ray diffraction measurements, and the epitaxial relationship between gold rings and the mica was found to be Au(111)[1-10] parallel mica(001)[010]. The polar and azimuthal angular spreads are 0.3 deg. and 1 deg., respectively, which is at least equal to or better than the quality of the corresponding epitaxial gold-film on mica.

  11. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  12. Dynamics of narrow rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The ring models described here were developed to account for the dynamical problems posed by the narrow rings of Uranus. Some of these rings are now known to be eccentric, inclined, nonuniform in width, optically thick, and narrow, with very sharp edges. The eccentric rings have common pericenters and large, positive eccentricity gradients. The theory of shepherding satellites successfully accounts for most of these features and can also account for some features of the narrow Saturnian rings, in particular, waves, kinks, and periodic variations in brightness. Outstanding problems include the putative relation between eccentricity and inclination displayed by eight of the nine Uranian rings, and the magnitudes of the tidal torques acting on the shepherding satellites. The horseshoe-orbit model, although viable, probably has more application to the narrow rings from which the Saturnian coorbital satellites formed. The angular momentum flow rate due to particle collisions is a minimum at the Lagrangian equilibrium points L(4) and L(5), and one can expect accretion to be rapid at these points.

  13. A dynamic, rotating ring current around Saturn.

    PubMed

    Krimigis, S M; Sergis, N; Mitchell, D G; Hamilton, D C; Krupp, N

    2007-12-13

    The concept of an electrical current encircling the Earth at high altitudes was first proposed in 1917 to explain the depression of the horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field during geomagnetic storms. In situ measurements of the extent and composition of this current were made some 50 years later and an image was obtained in 2001 (ref. 6). Ring currents of a different nature were observed at Jupiter and their presence inferred at Saturn. Here we report images of the ring current at Saturn, together with a day-night pressure asymmetry and tilt of the planet's plasma sheet, based on measurements using the magnetospheric imaging instrument (MIMI) on board Cassini. The ring current can be highly variable with strong longitudinal asymmetries that corotate nearly rigidly with the planet. This contrasts with the Earth's ring current, where there is no rotational modulation and initial asymmetries are organized by local time effects.

  14. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  15. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  16. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  17. Conversion of a Continuous Flow Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to Measure 13C in CO2 Using Static Analyses of Small Volume Grab Samples (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, T.; Jordanova, K.; Berryman, E.; van Pelt, A. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Laser-based analyses of concentration and isotopic content allow unprecedented temporal resolution for a number of important atmospheric constituents. Perhaps overlooked is the potential for these tools to also provide analyses in a more traditional "mass spectrometric" mode that is readily deployable in a field setting. Certain sampling regimes (e.g. soil profiles) are not appropriate for continuous sampling due to their slow change and disturbance of gradients caused by frequent/continuous sampling. We have modified the inlet and plumbing system of a commercial continuous flow cavity ring-down spectrometer in a manner that allows for 13C analyses of CO2 from syringe samples at volumes as small as 25 ml of air with ambient concentrations of CO2. The method employs an external high vacuum pump and a series of programmable micro-valves that allow for evacuation of the long-pass ring-down cell followed by controlled filling, via syringe, of the cavity to optimal sampling pressure and subsequent static analysis of CO2 concentration and 13C /13C ratios. The set-up is field deployable with modest power requirements and allows for near real time analysis in a variety of sampling environments and on-the-fly determination of sampling protocol. In its current configuration, the system provides precision of 1% for CO2 concentration and 0.3 permil for δ13C in replicate analyses of reference air. We have deployed the system to a field laboratory in central New Mexico near a controlled tree mortality research site where post-mortality ecosystem CO2 evolution is being studied. Results from the first field season will be presented and discussed.

  18. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  19. Fiber Ring Optical Gyroscope (FROG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a one meter diameter fiber ring optical gyro, using 1.57 kilometers of single mode fiber, are described. The various noise components: electronic, thermal, mechanical, and optical, were evaluated. Both dc and ac methods were used. An attempt was made to measure the Earth rotation rate; however, the results were questionable because of the optical and electronic noise present. It was concluded that fiber ring optical gyroscopes using all discrete components have many serious problems that can only be overcome by discarding the discrete approach and adapting an all integrated optic technique that has the laser source, modulator, detector, beamsplitters, and bias element on a single chip.

  20. Drag of buoyant vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S-K; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015)], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  1. Storage Ring EDM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Dedicated storage ring electric dipole moment (EDM) methods show great promise advancing the sensitivity level by a couple orders of magnitude over currently planned hadronic EDM experiments. We describe the present status and recent updates of the field.

  2. Highlights in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, Carolyn C.

    1995-07-01

    There is a rich phenomenology within the planetary rings surrounding the giant planets, most of it discovered by the Voyagers during their historic tours of t he outer solar system in the 1980s. In the last decade, there have been two detailed IUGG reviews of planetary rings. Cuzzi [1983] covered the time period from 1979-1983 which included the Pioneer 11 encounter with Saturn (1979), the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters with Jupiter (1979) and with Saturn (1980 and 1981). Nicholson and Dones [1991] reviewed the developments in the field between 1984 and 1991, a period of time which included the Voyager 2 Uranus (1986) and Neptune (1989) encounters. (References t o additional reviews of planetary rings and related fields can be found in Nicholson and Dones [1991].) Rather than being comprehensive in nature, this review will concentrate on only those areas of ring research in which particularly promising developments have occurred in the last half decade.

  3. Heating Saturn's Clumpy Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Neal J.; Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    We model Cassini CIRS data using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer -- thermal balance technique first developed for protostellar disks, with the goals of:1. Exploring whether the A- and B-ring temperatures' variation with viewing angle is consistent with the wake structures suggested by the observed azimuthal asymmetry in optical depth, by analytic arguments, and by numerical N-body modeling.2. Better constraining the shape, size, spacing and optical depths of substructure in the A-ring, using the unexpectedly high temperatures observed at equinox. If the wake features have high enough contrast, Saturn-shine may penetrate the gaps between the wakes and heat thering particles both top and bottom.3. Determining how much of the heating of the A- and B-rings' unlit sides is due to radiative transport and how much is due to particle motions, especially vertical motions. This will help in constraining the rings' surface densities and masses.

  4. Saturn's egg-shaped E ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Schmidt, J.; Spahn, F.; Horanyi, M.

    2012-04-01

    Saturn's diffuse E ring is unique in many ways. Not only its enormous size encompassing the icy moons Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea and even Titan is remarkable, but also its unique property to be composed of narrowly size-distributed grains centered in the interval between 0.3 and 3 microns. Cassini measurements revealed that the ring is primarily fed by water ice grains emerging from the geologically active south pole region of the ring moon Enceladus. Recent data acquired by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) revealed another unique property of this enigmatic ring: the morphology of the inner dense E ring shows a pronounced dependence on the local time. Towards the Sun (i.e noon) the radial density profile of the ring is compressed inwards, while at local midnight the radial density profile flares out. This implies that the E ring does not have circular, disk-like morphology but has an egg-shaped appearance. Also the particle size distribution seems to depend on the local time. Observations by the Cassini camera ISS are consistent with the CDA conclusion.

  5. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  6. Nardo Ring, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Nardo Ring is a striking visual feature from space, and astronauts have photographed it several times. The Ring is a race car test track; it is 12.5 kilometers long and steeply banked to reduce the amount of active steering needed by drivers. The Nardo Ring lies in a remote area on the heel of Italy's 'boot,' 50 kilometers east of the naval port of Taranto. The Ring encompasses a number of active (green) and fallow (brown to dark brown) agricultural fields. In this zone of intensive agriculture, farmers gain access to their fields through the Ring via a series of underpasses. Winding features within the southern section of the Ring appear to be smaller, unused race tracks.

    The image covers an area of 18.8 x 16.4 km, was acquired on August 17. 2007, and is located at 49.3 degrees north latitude, 17.8 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  8. A bipolar DNA helicase gene, herA, clusters with rad50, mre11 and nurA genes in thermophilic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Constantinesco, F.; Forterre, P.; Koonin, E. V.; Aravind, L.; Elie, C.

    2004-01-01

    We showed previously that rad50 and mre11 genes of thermophilic archaea are organized in an operon-like structure with a third gene (nurA) encoding a 5′ to 3′ exonuclease. Here, we show that the rad50, mre11 and nurA genes from the hyperthermo philic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius are co-transcribed with a fourth gene encoding a DNA helicase. This enzyme (HerA) is the prototype of a new class of DNA helicases able to utilize either 3′ or 5′ single-stranded DNA extensions for loading and subsequent DNA duplex unwinding. To our knowledge, DNA helicases capable of translocating along the DNA in both directions have not been identified previously. Sequence analysis of HerA shows that it is a member of the TrwB, FtsK and VirB4/VirD4 families of the PilT class NTPases. HerA homologs are found in all thermophilic archaeal species and, in all cases except one, the rad50, mre11, nurA and herA genes are grouped together. These results suggest that the archaeal Rad50–Mre11 complex might act in association with a 5′ to 3′ exonuclease (NurA) and a bipolar DNA helicase (HerA) indicating a probable involvement in the initiation step of homologous recombination. PMID:14990749

  9. Effect of end-ring stiffness on buckling of pressure-loaded stiffened conical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Williams, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Buckling studies were conducted on truncated 120 deg conical shells having large end rings and many interior reinforcing rings that are typical of aeroshells used as spacecraft decelerators. Changes in base-end-ring stiffness were accomplished by simply machining away a portion of the base ring between successive buckling tests. Initial imperfection measurements from the test cones were included in the analytical model.

  10. Examining visual measures of coat and body condition in wild ring-tailed lemurs at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Millette, James B; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P

    2015-01-01

    Coat and body mass status provide a potential noninvasive way to assess primate health status as well as the effects of seasonality, resource use and reproductive state. Coat and body condition were scored visually for 36 wild Lemur catta at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, from July 2012 to March 2013. Coat quality generally increased during the wet season when resource availability increased, in contrast to that observed during the resource-depleted dry season. Alopecia frequency increased from June to December and declined between January and March. Sex differences for coat condition were only observed in January, when males had superior coat scores. Body condition did not vary by month or sex except in February, when males were larger than females. Females that birthed infants were of lower body size than individuals who did not for November and from January to March. Our results indicate visual methods effectively detect variability in coat and body condition related to seasonality and reproductive status. Such methods present a noninvasive means for assessing the impact of seasonal resource availability, stresses of infant care and reproductive state on ring-tailed lemurs, and may be useful for assessing the impacts of these factors on general health status. PMID:26022300

  11. Gibbs Ringing in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Veraart, Jelle; Fieremans, Els; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Knoll, Florian; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study and reduce the effect of Gibbs ringing artifact on computed diffusion parameters. Methods We reduce the ringing by extrapolating the k-space of each diffusion weighted image beyond the measured part by selecting an adequate regularization term. We evaluate several regularization terms and tune the regularization parameter to find the best compromise between anatomical accuracy of the reconstructed image and suppression of the Gibbs artifact. Results We demonstrate empirically and analytically that the Gibbs artifact, which is typically observed near sharp edges in magnetic resonance images, has a significant impact on the quantification of diffusion model parameters, even for infinitesimal diffusion weighting. We find the second order total generalized variation to be a good choice for the penalty term to regularize the extrapolation of the k-space, as it provides a parsimonious representation of images, a practically full suppression of Gibbs ringing, and the absence of staircasing artifacts typical for total variation methods. Conclusions Regularized extrapolation of the k-space data significantly reduces truncation artifacts without compromising spatial resolution in comparison to the default option of window filtering. In particular, accuracy of estimating diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging parameters improves so much that unconstrained fits become possible. PMID:26257388

  12. Dedicated storage rings for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of internal targets in circulating beams of electron storage and stretcher rings has been widely discussed recently as a method of achieving high luminosity under conditions of low background, and good energy resolution, with minimal demands for beam from an injecting accelerator. In the two critical areas of the technology, ring design and target development, research is very active, and the prospects for major advances are very bright. Reasonable extrapolations of the current state of the art suggest for many problems in nuclear physics, particularly polarization physics of the nucleon and few body nuclei, internal target measurement may be the optimum experimental technique. This paper, discusses the comparative merit of internal target rings and external beam experiments, reviews briefly current research efforts in the critical areas of the technology, and establishes one goal for the discussions at the workshop. It appears that storage rings dedicated to internal target physics may offer a powerful option for future advances in nuclear physics.

  13. Retaining-Ring Installation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, S.

    1983-01-01

    New tool eliminates damage to ring through improper tool use. Tool installs spiral-wound retaining rings quickly, reliably, and safely. Tool inserts rings in splined or irregularly shaped bores, bores at bottom of deep ring and slides it along bore until it nests in groove. Pistons are moved by variety of linkages.

  14. Reconciling J/ψ production at HERA, RHIC, Tevatron, and LHC with nonrelativistic QCD factorization at next-to-leading order.

    PubMed

    Butenschön, Mathias; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2011-01-14

    We calculate the cross section of inclusive direct J/ψ hadroproduction at next-to-leading order within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics, including the full relativistic corrections due to the intermediate 1S(0)[8], 3S(1)[8], and 3P(J)[8] color-octet states. We perform a combined fit of the color-octet long-distance matrix elements to the transverse-momentum (p(T)) distributions measured by CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron and H1 at DESY HERA and demonstrate that they also successfully describe the p(T) distributions from PHENIX at BNL RHIC and CMS at the CERN LHC as well as the photon-proton c.m. energy and (with worse agreement) the inelasticity distributions from H1. This provides a first rigorous test of nonrelativistic QCD factorization at next-to-leading order. In all experiments, the color-octet processes are shown to be indispensable. PMID:21405222

  15. Thermodynamic black di-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi

    2010-10-15

    Previously the five dimensional S{sup 1}-rotating black rings have been superposed in a concentric way by some solitonic methods, and regular systems of two S{sup 1}-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions 'black di-rings'). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings is shown, in which both isothermality and isorotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

  16. Heterometallic Rings: Their Physics and use as Supramolecular Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Eric J L; Timco, Grigore A; Whitehead, George F S; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2015-11-23

    An enormous family of heterometallic rings has been made. The first were Cr7 M rings where M = Ni(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), and rings have been made with as many as fourteen metal centers in the cyclic structure. They are bridged externally by carboxylates, and internally by fluorides or a penta-deprotonated polyol. The size of the rings is controlled through templates which have included a range of ammonium or imidazolium ions, alkali metals and coordination compounds. The rings can be functionalized to act as ligands, and incorporated into hybrid organic-inorganic rotaxanes and into molecules containing up to 200 metal centers. Physical studies reported include: magnetic measurements, inelastic neutron scattering (including single crystal measurements), electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (including measurements of phase memory times), NMR spectroscopy (both solution and solid state), and polarized neutron diffraction. The rings are hence ideal for understanding magnetism in elegant exchange-coupled systems.

  17. Actin Depolymerization Drives Actomyosin Ring Contraction during Budding Yeast Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Inês Mendes; Rubinstein, Boris; Kucharavy, Andrei; Unruh, Jay R.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Actin filaments and myosin-II are evolutionarily conserved force generating components of the contractile ring during cytokinesis. Here we show that in budding yeast actin filament depolymerization plays a major role in actomyosin ring constriction. Cofilin mutation or chemically stabilizing actin filaments attenuates actomyosin ring constriction. Deletion of myosin-II motor domain or the myosin regulatory light chain reduced the contraction rate and also the rate of actin depolymerization in the ring. We constructed a quantitative microscopic model of actomyosin ring constriction via filament sliding driven by both actin depolymerization and myosin-II motor activity. Model simulations based on experimental measurements supports the notion that actin depolymerization is the predominant mechanism for ring constriction. The model predicts invariability of total contraction time irrespective of the initial ring size as originally reported for C elegans embryonic cells. This prediction was validated in yeast cells of different sizes due to having different ploidies. PMID:22698284

  18. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  19. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  20. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  1. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  2. Two F Ring Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    These views, taken two hours apart, demonstrate the dramatic variability in the structure of Saturn's intriguing F ring.

    In the image at the left, ringlets in the F ring and Encke Gap display distinctive kinks, and there is a bright patch of material on the F ring's inner edge. Saturn's moon Janus (181 kilometers, or 113 miles across) is shown here, partly illuminated by reflected light from the planet.

    At the right, Prometheus (102 kilometers, or 63 miles across) orbits ahead of the radial striations in the F ring, called 'drapes' by scientists. The drapes appear to be caused by successive passes of Prometheus as it reaches the greatest distance (apoapse) in its orbit of Saturn. Also in this image, the outermost ringlet visible in the Encke Gap displays distinctive bright patches.

    These views were obtained from about three degrees below the ring plane.

    The images were taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 29, 2005, when Cassini was about 1.5 million kilometers (900,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is about 9 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel.

  3. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may

  4. Prompt photon photoproduction at HERA within the framework of the quark Reggeization hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleev, V. A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons within the framework of the quasi-multi-Regge-kinematic approach, applying the quark Reggeization hypothesis. We describe accurately and without free parameters the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity spectra of prompt photons in the inclusive photoproduction at the HERA Collider. It is shown that the main mechanism of the inclusive prompt photon production in the γp collisions is the fusion of a Reggeized quark (antiquark) from the proton and a collinear antiquark (quark) from the photon into a photon, via the effective Reggeon-quark-gamma vertex. The fragmentation of the quark, which is produced via the gamma-Reggeon-quark and quark-Reggeon-quark vertices, into a photon is strongly suppressed by the isolation cone condition and it gives a significant contribution in the region of a large negative pseudorapidity only. At the stage of numerical calculations we use the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription for unintegrated quark and gluon distribution functions, with the following collinear parton densities as input: Martin-Roberts-Stirling-Thorne for a proton and Glück-Reya-Vogt for a photon.

  5. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  6. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  7. Double Ring Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A faint double ring crater is seen at upper right in this picture of Mercury (FDS 166601) taken one hour and 40 minutes before Mariner 10's second rendezvous with the planet September 21. Located 35 degrees S. Lat. The outer ring is 170 kilometers (10 miles) across. Double ring craters are common features on Mercury. This particular feature and the bright rayed crater to its left were seen from a different viewing angle in pictures taken by Mariner 10 during its first Mercury flyby last March 29.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  8. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  9. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e- waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (˜107 s-1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ˜1-2 nm).

  10. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5–7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp–Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e– waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (∼107 s‑1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ∼1–2 nm).

  11. Child sex rings.

    PubMed

    Wild, N J; Wynne, J M

    1986-07-19

    Details of 11 child sex rings identified in one working class community were obtained by interviewing investigating police officers and examining health and social services records. The rings contained 14 adult male perpetrators and 175 children aged 6-15 years. Most perpetrators used child ringleaders to recruit victims; others became a "family friend" or obtained a position of authority over children. Secrecy was encouraged and bribery, threats, and peer pressure used to induce participation in sexual activities. Offences reported included fondling, masturbation, pornography, and oral, vaginal, and anal intercourse. Eleven perpetrators were successfully prosecuted; all but one received a sentence of three years or less. Behavioural problems were common among those children who had participated for a long time. Child sex rings are difficult to detect and may be common. Many children are seriously abused as a consequence of them. PMID:3730803

  12. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  13. Sliding-Ring Catenanes.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Isurika R; Frasconi, Marco; Wu, Yilei; Liu, Wei-Guang; Wasielewski, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-08-17

    Template-directed protocols provide a routine approach to the synthesis of mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), in which the mechanical bonds are stabilized by a wide variety of weak interactions. In this Article, we describe a strategy for the preparation of neutral [2]catenanes with sliding interlocked electron-rich rings, starting from two degenerate donor-acceptor [2]catenanes, consisting of a tetracationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) cyclophane (CBPQT(4+)) and crown ethers containing either (i) hydroquinone (HQ) or (ii) 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) recognition units and carrying out four-electron reductions of the cyclophane components to their neutral forms. The donor-acceptor interactions between the CBPQT(4+) ring and both HQ and DNP units present in the crown ethers that stabilize the [2]catenanes are weakened upon reduction of the cyclophane components to their radical cationic states and are all but absent in their fully reduced states. Characterization in solution performed by UV-vis, EPR, and NMR spectroscopic probes reveals that changes in the redox properties of the [2]catenanes result in a substantial decrease of the energy barriers for the circumrotation and pirouetting motions of the interlocked rings, which glide freely through one another in the neutral states. The solid-state structures of the fully reduced catenanes reveal profound changes in the relative dispositions of the interlocked rings, with the glycol chains of the crown ethers residing in the cavities of the neutral CBPQT(0) rings. Quantum mechanical investigations of the energy levels associated with the four different oxidation states of the catenanes support this interpretation. Catenanes and rotaxanes with sliding rings are expected to display unique properties. PMID:27398609

  14. Ring laser gyroscope anode

    SciTech Connect

    Ljung, B.H.

    1981-03-17

    An anode for a ring laser gyroscope which provides improved current stability in the glow discharge path is disclosed. The anode of this invention permits operation at lower currents thereby allowing a reduction of heat dissipation in the ring laser gyroscope. The anode of one embodiment of this invention is characterized by a thumbtack appearance with a spherical end where the normal sharp end of the thumbtack would be located. The stem of the anode extends from the outside of the gyroscope structure to the interior of the structure such that the spherical end is substantially adjacent to the laser beam.

  15. The covariant chiral ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, Antoine; Troost, Jan

    2016-03-01

    We construct a covariant generating function for the spectrum of chiral primaries of symmetric orbifold conformal field theories with N = (4 , 4) supersymmetry in two dimensions. For seed target spaces K3 and T 4, the generating functions capture the SO(21) and SO(5) representation theoretic content of the chiral ring respectively. Via string dualities, we relate the transformation properties of the chiral ring under these isometries of the moduli space to the Lorentz covariance of perturbative string partition functions in flat space.

  16. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  17. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  18. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  19. Hydropower and Environmental Resource Assessment (HERA): a computational tool for the assessment of the hydropower potential of watersheds considering engineering and socio-environmental aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, T. M.; Kelman, R.; Metello, M.; Ciarlini, A.; Granville, A. C.; Hespanhol, P.; Castro, T. L.; Gottin, V. M.; Pereira, M. V. F.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroelectric potential of a river is proportional to its head and water flows. Selecting the best development alternative for Greenfield projects watersheds is a difficult task, since it must balance demands for infrastructure, especially in the developing world where a large potential remains unexplored, with environmental conservation. Discussions usually diverge into antagonistic views, as in recent projects in the Amazon forest, for example. This motivates the construction of a computational tool that will support a more qualified debate regarding development/conservation options. HERA provides the optimal head division partition of a river considering technical, economic and environmental aspects. HERA has three main components: (i) pre-processing GIS of topographic and hydrologic data; (ii) automatic engineering and equipment design and budget estimation for candidate projects; (iii) translation of division-partition problem into a mathematical programming model. By integrating an automatic calculation with geoprocessing tools, cloud computation and optimization techniques, HERA makes it possible countless head partition division alternatives to be intrinsically compared - a great advantage with respect to traditional field surveys followed by engineering design methods. Based on optimization techniques, HERA determines which hydro plants should be built, including location, design, technical data (e.g. water head, reservoir area and volume, engineering design (dam, spillways, etc.) and costs). The results can be visualized in the HERA interface, exported to GIS software, Google Earth or CAD systems. HERA has a global scope of application since the main input data area a Digital Terrain Model and water inflows at gauging stations. The objective is to contribute to an increased rationality of decisions by presenting to the stakeholders a clear and quantitative view of the alternatives, their opportunities and threats.

  20. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  1. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  2. Localized Perturbations in Saturn's C Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitale, Joseph N.; Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    2016-10-01

    Years of high-resolution imaging of Saturn's rings have revealed many examples of perturbations arising from local causes. For example, the presence of 100-m-scale and smaller moonlets is inferred in the A ring based on the propeller-shaped disturbances that they create (Tiscareno et al. 2006, 2010); the F ring is shaped by regular collisions with its shepherd Prometheus, as well as with other smaller bodies orbiting in the vicinity (Murray et al. 2005, 2008); the "wisps" on the outer edge of the Keeler gap (Porco et al. 2005) may mark the locations of small moonlets that have emerged from the A ring (Tiscareno and Arnault 2015); wakes in the Huygens ringlet imply the presence of two multi-km bodies, and the irregular shape of its inner edge suggests the presence of many smaller bodies (Spitale and Hahn 2016); based on shadow measurements, the B ring contains an embedded 300-m object that produces a small propeller-shaped disturbance (Spitale and Porco 2010; Spitale and Tiscareno 2012).Here, we present evidence for localized perturbations in the C ring. The ringlet embedded in the Bond gap, near 1.470 Saturn radii, shows discrete clumps orbiting at the Keplerian rate in images spanning about eight years. The clumps are not detected in all image sequences at the expected longitudes. The Dawes ringlet, near 1.495 Saturn radii, has an irregular edge that does not appear as a simple superposition of low-wavenumber normal modes.

  3. Collisional Features in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attree, Nicholas Oliver; Murray, Carl; Cooper, Nicholas; Williams, Gareth

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's highly dynamic F ring contains a population of small (radius ~ 1 km) moonlets embedded within its core or on nearby orbits. These objects interact, both gravitationally and collisionally, with the ring producing a range of features, some of which are unique to it. Here we present a brief overview of F ring collisional processes, investigated using a combination of Cassini imaging, simulations and orbital dynamics. Collisions produce linear debris clouds, known as 'jets' and 'mini-jets', which evolve, due to differential orbital motion, over periods ranging from hours to months. Mini-jet-forming collisions occur daily in the F ring whilst larger, more dramatic, events are rarer but produce jets that persist for many months, 'wrapping around' the ring to form almost parallel strands. Measuring jet properties, such as formation rates and relative orbits, allows us to infer a local population of order hundreds of objects colliding at relative velocities of a few metres per second. N-body modelling of the collisions shows good agreement with observations when two aggregates are allowed to impact and partially fragment (as opposed to a solid moonlet encountering dust), implying massive objects both in the core and nearby. Multiple, repeated collisions by the same, or fragments of the same, object are also important in explaining some jet morphology, showing that many objects survive the collisions. The F ring represents a natural laboratory for observing low-velocity collisions between icy objects as well as the ongoing aggregation and accretion that most-likely forms them.

  4. Prediscovery evidence of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, W. I.

    1980-01-01

    The discoveries of the Uranian and Jovian ring systems were surprising events to most of the scientific community. However, as far back as 1787 reports of observations of rings about a planet other than Saturn were made; Herschel, the discoverer of Uranus, thought he had detected rings about that planet on several occasions. Although Herschel's observations were almost certainly due to defects in the optical system of his telescope, several valid observations and predictions have been made in the last two hundred years. This paper focuses on such prediscovery evidence for the Uranian and Jovian rings and for the newly designated F ring of Saturn. Some new work of the author on the structure of the Saturnian rings is included which is relevant to the F ring. The prospects for rings about Neptune and Pluto and a ring close to the Sun are also reviewed. The relevance of the prediscovery evidence to aspects of scientific methodology is discussed.

  5. The performance of the Duke FEL storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Burnham, B.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    1995-12-31

    The commissioning of the Duke FEL storage ring has been completed. During commissioning, we have conducted a series of performance measurements on the storage ring lattice and the electron beam parameters. In this paper, we will discuss the techniques used in the measurements, present measurement results, and compare the measured parameters with the design specifications. In addition, we will present the expected OK-4 FEL performance based on the measured beam parameters.

  6. Modeling Saturnshine in Cassini Images of the Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dones, Henry C.; Weiss, J. W.; Porco, C. C.; DiNino, D.; Skinner, R.

    2013-10-01

    In some viewing geometries, such as large solar phase angles or small solar elevation angles, the light reflected by or transmitted through Saturn's rings can be dominated by Saturnshine, i.e., illumination of the rings by the planet. Saturnshine results in longitudinal variations in the reflectivity of the rings. In addition, Saturn's A Ring and, to a lesser extent, B Ring, show intrinsic longitudinal variations ("azimuthal asymmetry") due to self-gravity wakes. Any attempt to infer physical properties of ring particles and their spatial distribution using ring photometry must consider both Saturnshine and self-gravity wakes. "Ringshine," in turn, complicates photometry of Saturn itself [1]. We have improved the Saturnshine model in [2], which applies a ray-tracing code to N-body simulations of a patch of Saturn's rings, by incorporating measurements of the planet's reflectivity in Cassini images taken in a range of viewing geometries through a number of broadband filters. We will compare the results of our photometric model with measurements of the I/F of the main rings, and will attempt to constrain the intrinsic properties of ring particles, such as their coefficients of restitution in collisions and internal densities. We thank the Cassini project for support. [1] Skinner, R.W., and Weiss, J.W. (2011). http://serc.carleton.edu/cismi/undergrad_research/posters/52679.html [2] Porco, C.C., et al. (2008). Astron J. 136, 2172-2200

  7. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  8. Flushing Ring for EDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earwood, L.

    1985-01-01

    Removing debris more quickly lowers cutting time. Operation, cutting oil and pressurized air supplied to ring placed around workpiece. Air forces oil through small holes and agitates oil as it flows over workpiece. High flow rate and agitation dislodge and remove debris. Electrical discharge removes material from workpiece faster.

  9. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  10. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  11. Ring laser scatterometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  12. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  13. Neptune may have polar rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.; Borderies, N. J.

    1989-08-01

    Perturbations from Neptune's highly inclined satellite Triton can maintain rings passing nearly over Neptune's poles. These hypothetical polar rings are nearly perpendicular to Triton's orbit as well, and lie within several degrees of the plane of Voyager II's trajectory through the Neptunian system. Polar rings can coexist with equatorial rings at different radii. A randomly oriented torus of debris around Neptune has a probability of several percent to settle into a polar ring. Voyager II stands a significant chance of encountering a polar ring.

  14. Narrow rings - Observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C. C.

    Voyager 1 and 2 observations have revealed that within the rings of Saturn lies a set of narrow, eccentric rings resembling those of Uranus. Voyager 2 observations have proven crucial in refining the Uranian ring orbit models to a remarkable level of precision. All these rings share some common structural and kinematical characteristics, such as spatially variable radial widths and uniform precession; however, interesting differences exist which provoke attention and may be related to the differing dynamical environments in which these rings dwell. The current state of the knowledge of the shape, behavior, and confinement of narrow rings is discussed.

  15. Impact of saturn ring particles on pioneer 11.

    PubMed

    Humes, D H; O'neal, R L; Kinard, W H; Alvarez, J M

    1980-01-25

    The particle flux measured by the meteoroid detectors on Pioneer 11 increased greatly while the spacecraft was near the rings of Saturn. The data suggest that the particles were associated with the rings and were not interplanetary meteoroids concentrated near the planet by gravitational focusing. The data also suggest that the E ring may be 1800 kilometers thick with an optical thickness greater than 10(-8).

  16. Vortex ring structure at late stages of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Liepmann, D.

    1997-09-01

    High resolution DPIV measurements are made of a vortex ring formed by a piston/cylinder mechanism (Reynolds number 3700 and 7500). A complex ring structure is identified. The stopping condition of the piston leads to vortical fluid collecting near the forward stagnation point of the ring. In addition, the roll-up of the core produces a vorticity distribution that departs from a simple Gaussian profile. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  18. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  19. Atmospheric, Ionospheric, and Energetic Radiation Environments of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Kollmann, P.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Johnson, R. E.; Sturner, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary magnetospheric and high-energy cosmic ray interactions with Saturn's rings were first explored in-situ during the Pioneer 11 flyby in 1979. The following Voyager flybys produced a wealth of new information on ring structure and mass, and on spatial structure of the radiation belts beyond the main rings. Next came the Cassini Orbiter flyover of the rings during Saturn Orbital Insertion in 2004 with the first in-situ measurements of the ring atmosphere and plasma ionosphere. Cassini has since fully explored the radiation belt and magnetospheric plasma region beyond the main rings, discovering how Enceladus acts as a source of water group neutrals and water ions for the ion plasma. But do the main rings also substantially contribute by UV photolysis to water group plasma (H+, O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+, O2+) and neutrals inwards from Enceladus? More massive rings, than earlier inferred from Pioneer 11 and Voyager observations, would further contribute by bulk ring ice radiolysis from interactions of galactic cosmic ray particles. Products of these interactions include neutron-decay proton and electron injection into the radiation belts beyond the main rings. How does radiolysis from moon and ring sweeping of the radiation belt particles compare with direct gas and plasma sources from the main rings and Enceladus? Can the magnetospheric ion and electron populations reasonably be accounted for by the sum of the ring-neutron-decay and outer magnetospheric inputs? Pioneer 11 made the deepest radial penetration into the C-ring, next followed by Cassini SOI. What might Cassini's higher-inclination proximal orbits reveal about the atmospheric, ionospheric, and energetic radiation environments in the D-ring and the proximal gap region? Recent modeling predicts a lower-intensity innermost radiation belt extending from the gap to the inner D-ring. Other remaining questions include the lifetimes of narrow and diffuse dust rings with respect to plasma and energetic particle

  20. Characterisation and first application of a cavity ring-down instrument for measurements of NO3 and N2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrade, Stephanie; Bachner, Mathias; Kubik, Kamil; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    A new instrument was built for atmospheric measurements using the cavity ringdown technique for a simultaneous measurement of nitrate radicals (NO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) using a red laser diode at 662 nm. The instrument consists of two channels: The inlet and the cavity of the first one is heated up to 120 °C to force the thermal equlibrium of N2O5 and NO3 to the side of NO3, so that this channel measures the sum NO3 and N2O5. The other channel stays at ambient temperature to measure NO3 only. To prevent aerosol extinction, a filter is installed upstream of the cavities. The detection limit is within the range of a few ppt at 1 s time resolution. Measurements have an accuracy of 15 %. Instrument losses were characterized by a titration method using the conversion of NO3 to NO2 by adding NO. Two addition points where chosen, right before and after the NO3 intrument.The NO2 concentration was measured downstream of the instrument with another CRDS intrument using a blue laser diode at 405 nm. Estimated losses are within the range of 40 % due two a high point loss on the used filter housing. First application took place at the SAPHIR simulation chamber at Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH. Experiments were made by injecting known concentrations of NO2 and ozone into the dark chamber filled with pure synthetic air to analyse the behavior of NO3 and N2O5 in the clean chamber. Possible losses were estimated from the steady-state lifetime of NO3, which can be calculated from measured NO3, NO2 and ozone concentrations. Estimated lifetimes of NO3 and N2O5 were within the range of 19 min and 44 min, respetively. During futher experiments organic compounds (isoprene, β-pinene, limonene) were additionally injected, in order to test the applicability of chamber experiments for the invertigation of oxidation processes by NO3.

  1. Cassini First Diametric Radio Occultation of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; Kliore, A.; Flasar, M.; Nagy, A.; Ambrosini, R.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Barbinis, E.; Goltz, G.; Thomson, F.; Wong, K.

    2005-05-01

    We present preliminary results expected from the first planned Cassini radio occultation observation of Saturn's rings, to be conducted on May 3rd, 2005. The path of Cassini as seen from Earth (the occultation track) has been designed to cross the rings from the west to the east ansa almost diametrically, allowing for occultation of all major ring features at two widely separated longitudes (about 180 deg apart). The duration of the geometric occultation is about 1.5 hours on each side. During the occultation, Cassini transmits through the rings three coherent monochromatic radio signals of wavelength 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-band respectively), a capability unique to Cassini. The perturbed signals received at the Earth are recorded at the NASA DSN complexes at Goldstone and Canberra. Both direct and forward-scattered components of the signal may be identified in spectrograms of the received signals. The time history of the extinction of the direct signal is expected to yield high-spatial-resolution optical depth and phase shift profiles of ring structure. The timing of the occultation was optimized to allow probing the rings when the ring-opening-angle B (the angle between the line-of-sight and the ring plane) is relatively large (B = 23 deg), hence maximizing chances of measuring for the first time the structure of the relatively optically thick Ring B. In a similar experiment by Voyager in 1980, excessive signal attenuation along the long path within the nearly closed rings (B = 5.9 deg) limited the utility of the observations in relatively thick ring regions, in particular the main Ring B. For the Cassini optimized occultation geometry, a large B, slow radial velocity along the occultation track, and much improved phase stability of the reference ultrastable oscillator (USO) on board Cassini combine to promise achievable radial resolution approaching 100 m over a good fraction of the rings. Measurement of the amplitude and phase of the diffracted

  2. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  3. Noncircular features in Saturn's rings II: The C ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; French, Richard G.; McGhee-French, Colleen A.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Marouf, Essam A.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Lonergan, Katherine; Sepersky, Talia

    2014-10-01

    eccentricity but lies near two strong resonances: the Mimas 3:1 inner vertical resonance (IVR) at 88702.2 km and the Prometheus 2:1 ILR at 88713.1 km. We find no measurable perturbation from the Mimas IVR, but a clear m=2 signature of the appropriate phase and pattern speed for the Prometheus ILR on the outer edge of the ringlet, along with free ILR-type normal modes with wave numbers m=3,4, 5, 6 and 7. The Dawes gap, located at 90,210 km, and its associated embedded ringlet, also show both free and forced perturbations, and as in the case of the Maxwell gap, the outer edge of the Dawes gap appears to be sympathetically forced by the nearby ringlet. The pattern of newly identified normal modes coexisting on the sharp edges of ringlets and gaps is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions, with ILR-type modes on outer ringlet (and inner gap) edges and OLR-type modes on inner ringlet (and outer gap) edges, representing standing waves between the resonance locations and the ring edges. Modes with larger |m| generally have narrower resonant cavities, and of the dozens of detected normal modes, none has been identified with a resonance radius that falls outside the ring material.

  4. Demonstration of a novel cavity ring down spectrometer for NO2 measurement during Discover AQ (July, 2011) where column profiles in the troposphere were collected over the mid Atlantic region of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; Stehr, J. W.; Thorn, W.; Leen, J.; Gupta, M.; Luke, W. T.; Kelley, P.; Ren, X.; He, H.; Arkinson, H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Pusede, S. E.; Cohen, R. C.; Dickerson, R. R.; Discover AQ science Team

    2011-12-01

    Real time, atmospheric NO2 column profiles from the Mid-Atlantic region, during the NASA Discover AQ air campaign, demonstrate that cavity ring down spectroscopy, with a LED light source, is a suitable technique for the detection NO2 in the boundary layer and lower free troposphere. Preliminary results from this air campaign indicate that 0.5 to 30 ppb of NO2 can be observed and that the results were similar to NO2 measurements obtained via laser induced fluorescence and chemiluminescence. The cavity ringdown instrument is relatively inexpensive, weighs 40 lbs, and relies on a built in zeroing method to account for drift with respect to time and altitude. Follow on collaboration with NOAA and NIST will consist of side by side ambient air comparison and calibration. In this field experiment the NOAA modified Thermo 42s which uses a UV light source to selectively convert NO2 to NO and chemiluminecsent detection, and a NIST Thermo 42I with a molybdenum NO2 to NO converter and chemiluminescent detection will be compared to NO2 measured by the Los Gatos Research cavity ringdown detector. Part of the calibration procedure will include testing for interferences of nitric acid, n-propyl nitrate and HONO. The altitude integral of NO2 concentrations provide column content suitable for comparison to measurements made from space and for remotely sensing spectrometers. This data helps in the understanding of transport and is necessary for drawing policy relevant conclusions with respect to pollution control.

  5. On the evolution of vortex rings with swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Naitoh, Takashi; Okura, Nobuyuki; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Yusuke

    2014-06-15

    A laminar vortex ring with swirl, which has the meridional velocity component inside the vortex core, was experimentally generated by the brief fluid ejection from a rotating outlet. The evolution of the vortex ring was investigated with flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in order to find the influence of swirling flow in particular upon the transition to turbulence. Immediately after the formation of a vortex ring with swirl, a columnar strong vortex along the symmetric axis is observed in all cases of the present experiment. Then the characteristic fluid discharging from a vortex ring with swirl referred to as “peeling off” appears. The amount of discharging fluid due to the “peeling off” increases with the angular velocity of the rotating outlet. We conjectured that the mechanism generating the “peeling off” is related to the columnar strong vortex by close observations of the spatio-temporal development of the vorticity distribution and the cutting 3D images constructed from the successive cross sections of a vortex ring. While a laminar vortex ring without swirl may develop azimuthal waves around its circumference at some later time and the ring structure subsequently breaks, the swirling flow in a vortex ring core reduces the amplification rate of the azimuthal wavy deformation and preserved its ring structure. Then the traveling distance of a vortex ring can be extended using the swirl flow under certain conditions.

  6. UV Reflectance of Saturn's Rings from the Cassini UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2005-08-01

    We investigate the composition of Saturn's rings using spatially resolved ultraviolet spectra taken by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS). UVIS observations span shorter wavelengths (111-191 nm) than near-ultraviolet Hubble observations of the rings. UVIS observations also have higher spectral and spatial resolution than Voyager and IUE UV measurements of the rings. The best spatial resolutions of 150 km occurred during Saturn Orbital Insertion. We have a wide range of phase angles, from 0o to 145o. We observe the water absorption edge at 160 nm, and we see most of our signal at 160-191 nm. We determine the ring reflectance longward of the water absorption edge and then use a radiative transfer model to find the particle albedos. We find a reflectance of 0.11 in the A ring at 180 nm and a phase angle of 10o, compared to 0.18 in the B ring and 0.05 in the Cassini Division. We also observe variations in particle albedo within each ring. These albedo variations indicate varying amounts of dark material mixed in with water ice across the rings. We discuss the UV reflectance and spectra of the rings and their implications for composition and ring evolution.

  7. Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

    2005-01-03

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  8. O-Ring-Testing Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James E.; Mccluney, D. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Fixture used to evalute properties of O-rings of various materials. Hydraulic actuator positions plug in housing, creating controlled, variable gap in O-ring glands formed by grooves in plug and by inner wall of housing. Creates controlled axial and radial gaps between sealing surfaces around ring so effectiveness of material in maintaining seal determined under dynamic conditions.

  9. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  10. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  11. Vortex Rings in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamri, Sultan Z.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2008-11-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of large-scale vortex rings in superfluid helium. These large-scale vortex rings consists of many discrete (quantized) vortex filaments which interact with each other moving according to the Biot-Savart law. Lifetime, structural stability and speed of large-scale vortex rings will be discussed and compared to experimental results.

  12. Uranus: the rings are black.

    PubMed

    Sinton, W M

    1977-11-01

    An upper limit of 0.05 is established for the geometric albedo of the newly discovered rings of Uranus. In view of this very low albedo, the particles of the rings cannot be ice-covered as are those of rings A and B of Saturn.

  13. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  14. STORAGE RING CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 12+} FORMING Fe{sup 13+} AND Fe{sup 14+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2011-07-10

    We report electron impact ionization cross section measurements for electron impact single ionization of Fe{sup 12+} forming Fe{sup 13+} and electron impact double ionization of Fe{sup 12+} forming Fe{sup 14+}. These are the first electron impact ionization data for any Si-like ion uncontaminated by an unknown metastable fraction. Recent distorted wave calculations agree with our single ionization results to within {approx}15%. Double ionization is dominated by inner shell ionization of a 2l electron resulting in autoionization of a second electron as the inner shell hole is filled.

  15. Prediction of Saturn's rings temperatures during the 2009 Equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyrat, C.; Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Flandes, A.; Edgington, S.

    2008-12-01

    The thermal emission of Saturn's rings has been intensively observed over the past 4 years with the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer instrument CIRS. The Sun elevation above the ring plane has progressively decreased from -26 deg in July 2004 to -4 deg in September 2008, which implied a seasonal variation of the ring temperature, as the mutual shadowing between icy particles in rings became more important. The equinox, which will occur in August 2009, will provide a unique opportunity to study the thermal contrast between the North and South sides of the rings at this particular geometry, and the heating rate of the newly lit North side. Ring particles will reach their minimum temperature as the solar heating will reach its minimum. Several observations will be dedicated to measuring the temperature on both lit and unlit side of the rings with the CIRS instrument around the equinox, at different geometries (phase angle, spacecraft elevation, spacecraft azimuth). Modeling the ring temperature during the equinox will provide some insights on the vertical structure of the rings and the dynamic of particles. We first present the predicted temperature of rings obtained with a simple model assuming that the ring temperature is mainly driven by the albedo, the distance from Saturn and the structure of rings (isolated particles or slab). This will give us an approximation of what we could see in 2009. We then present a new model that couples N-body dynamical simulations and thermal modeling in order to study the effect of the vertical structure of the rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2008 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  16. The recycler ring beam life time

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswamy Gounder et al.

    2001-07-20

    We study the Fermilab Recycler Ring beam life time due to various physical processes associated with beam-gas interactions. This includes single coulomb scattering, electronic excitations, nuclear and multiple scattering processes. We compare the measured life time with those obtained from theoretical estimations. The results indicate additional processes are also contributing to the actual beam life time.

  17. News from the CSR storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Xu, H. S.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, X. D.; Meng, L. J.; Wang, M.; Tu, X. L.; Liu, H. P.; Hu, Z. G.; Zhu, X. L.; Mao, R. S.; Zhang, D. C.; Mao, L. J.; Li, J.; Li, G. H.; Liu, Y.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Cai, X. H.; Zheng, J. H.; Yang, X. T.; Xiao, G. Q.; Zhan, W. L.

    2009-11-01

    Testing runs of experiments were performed at the Cooler Storage Ring in Lanzhou. The recombination of bare argon ions and electron was observed at the electron. The masses of radioactive nuclei produced by projectile fragmentation were measured in isochronous mode. An overview of the most recent experiments will be presented.

  18. Correction magnets for the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    James T Volk et al.

    2003-05-27

    In the commissioning of the Fermilab Recycler ring the need for higher order corrector magnets in the regions near beam transfers was discovered. Three types of permanent magnet skew quadrupoles, and two types of permanent magnet sextupoles were designed and built. This paper describes the need for these magnets, the design, assembly, and magnetic measurements.

  19. Oligomeric ferrocene rings.

    PubMed

    Inkpen, Michael S; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J P; Winter, Rainer F; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category-differently sized rings comprising only 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e(-) waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (∼10(7) s(-1)), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ∼1-2 nm). PMID:27554408

  20. Which Ringed Planet...!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Don't worry - you are not the only one who thought this was a nice amateur photo of planet Saturn, Lord of the Rings in our Solar System! But then the relative brightness and positions of the moons may appear somewhat unfamiliar... and the ring system does look unusually bright when compared to the planetary disk...?? Well, it is not Saturn, but Uranus , the next giant planet further out, located at a distance of about 3,000 million km, or 20 times the distance between the Sun and the Earth. The photo shows Uranus surrounded by its rings and some of the moons, as they appear on a near-infrared image that was obtained in the K s -band (at wavelength 2.2 µm) with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile) . The exposure was made on November 19, 2002 (03:00 hrs UT) during a planetary research programme. The observing conditions were excellent (seeing 0.5 arcsec) and the exposure lasted 5 min. The angular diameter of Uranus is about 3.5 arcsec. The observers at ISAAC were Emmanuel Lellouch and Thérése Encrenaz of the Observatoire de Paris (France) and Jean-Gabriel Cuby and Andreas Jaunsen (both ESO-Chile). The rings The rings of Uranus were discovered in 1977, from observations during a stellar occultation event by astronomer teams at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Perth Observatory (Australia). Just before and after the planet moved in front of the (occulted) star, the surrounding rings caused the starlight to dim for short intervals of time. Photos obtained from the Voyager-2 spacecraft in 1986 showed a multitude of very tenuous rings. These rings are almost undetectable from the Earth in visible light. However, on the present VLT near-infrared picture, the contrast between the rings and the planet is strongly enhanced. At the particular wavelength at which this observation was made, the infalling sunlight is almost completely absorbed by gaseous methane present in the planetary atmosphere