Science.gov

Sample records for ring pf-ar front-end

  1. Performance of the front end electronics and data acquisition system for the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Hoeflich, J.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Marshall, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Oxoby, G.; Pavel, T.J.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Stiles, P.; Toge, N.; Va'vra, J

    1991-11-01

    The front end electronics and data acquisition system for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) are described. This electronics must provide a 1% charge division measurement with a maximum acceptable noise level of 2000 electrons (rms). Noise and system performance results are presented for the initial SLD engineering run data.

  2. ARIEL front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Baartman, R. A.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF will greatly expand the variety and availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) (Laxdal, Nucl Inst Methods Phys Res B 204:400-409, 2003). The ARIEL front end connects the two ARIEL target stations to the existing ISAC facility to expand delivery to two and eventually three simultaneous RIB beams with up to two simultaneous accelerated beams (Laxdal et al. 2008). The low-energy beam transport lines and mass separators are designed for maximum flexibility to allow a variety of operational modes in order to optimize the radioactive ion beam delivery. A new accelerator path is conceived for high mass delivery from an EBIS charge state breeder. The front-end design utilizes the experience gained in 15 years of ISAC beam delivery.

  3. Construction of Two New In-vacuum Type Undulators for the Non-equilibrium Dynamics Project at the PF-AR

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Kimichika; Shioya, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2007-01-19

    Two new in-vacuum type undulators (U no. NW14-36 and U no. NW14-20) have been constructed at the 6.5-GeV Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) for the non-equilibrium dynamics project. U no. NW14-36 was installed in the PF-AR in summer 2005. Its operation started from fall 2005, whereas U no. NW14-20 will be installed in summer 2006.

  4. New Front End Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D; Jovanovic, I; Comaskey, B J

    2001-02-01

    The next generation of Petawatt class lasers will require the development of new laser technology. Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) holds a potential to increase the peak power level to >10 PW with existing grating technology through ultrashort pulses. Furthermore, by utilizing a new type of front-end system based on optical parametric amplification, pulses can be produced with substantially higher contrast than with Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier technology. We performed extensive study of OPCPA using a single crystal-based OPA. We developed a replacement for Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier for high peak power lasers based on OPCPA, with an output of 30 mJ, at 10 Hz repetition rate and 16.5 nm spectral bandwidth. We developed a 3D numerical model for OPCPA and we performed a theoretical study of influences of pump laser beam quality on optical parametric amplification. Our results indicate that OPCPA represents a valid replacement for Ti:sapphire in the front end of high energy short pulse lasers.

  5. Align the Front End First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of management styles and front-end analysis focuses on a review of Douglas McGregor's theories. Topics include Theories X, Y, and Z; leadership skills; motivational needs of employees; intrinsic and extrinsic rewards; and faulty implementation of instructional systems design processes. (LRW)

  6. Functional description of APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-02-01

    Traditional synchrotron sources were designed to produce bending magnet radiation and have proven to be an essential scientific tool. Currently, a new generation of synchrotron sources is being built that will be able to accommodate a large number of insertion device (ID) and high quality bending magnet (BM) sources. One example is the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The research and development effort at the APS is designed to fully develop the potential of this new generation of synchrotron sources. Of the 40 straight sections in the APS storage ring, 34 will be available for IDs. The remaining six sections are reserved for the storage ring hardware and diagnostics. Although the ring incorporates 80 BMs, only 40 of them can be used to extract radiation. The accelerator hardware shadows five of these 40 bending magnets, so the maximum number of BM sources on the lattice is 35. Generally, a photon beamline consists of four functional sections. The first section is the ID or the BM, which provides the radiation source. The second section, which is immediately outside the storage ring but inside a concrete shielding tunnel, is the front end, which is designed to control, define, and/or confine the x-ray beam. In the case of the APS, the front ends are designed to confine the photon beam. The third section, just outside the concrete shielding tunnel and on the experimental floor, is the first optics enclosure, which contains optics to filter and monochromatize the photon beam. The fourth section of a beamline consists of beam transports, additional optics, and experiment stations to do the scientific investigations. This document describes only the front ends of the APS beamlines.

  7. Conceptual Design of Front Ends for the Advanced Photon Source Multi-bend Achromats Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Jaski, Y.; Westferro, F.; Lee, S. H.; Yang, B.; Abliz, M.; Ramanathan, M.

    2016-07-27

    The proposed Advanced Photon Source (APS) upgrade from a double-bend achromats (DBA) to multi-bend achromats (MBA) lattice with ring energy change from 7 GeV to 6 GeV and beam current from 100 mA to 200 mA poses new challenges for front ends. All front ends must be upgraded to fulfill the following requirements: 1) handle the high heat load from two insertion devices in either inline or canted configuration, 2) include a clearing magnet in the front end to deflect and dump any electrons in case the electrons escape from the storage ring during swap-out injection with the safety shutters open, 3) incorporate the next generation x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) into the front end to meet the new stringent beam stability requirements. This paper presents the evaluation of the existing APS front ends and standardizes the insertion device (ID) front ends into two types: one for the single beam and one for the canted beams. The conceptual design of high heat load front end (HHLFE) and canted undulator front end (CUFE) for APS MBA upgrade is presented.

  8. L-Band Front End SAW Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    design of L-band SAW Filters for the Global - Positioning System ( GPS ) RF front end is described. Filters on lithium niobate with loss as low as 4.5 dB at...INTRODUCTION The performance of the Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver may be greatly improved by incorporation of L-Band Surface Acoustic Wave...SAW) filters. The RF front end of the GPS system is shown in Figure 1. Microwave power incident on the GPS antenna is amplified and diplexed. Signals

  9. Motivation and Front-End Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, Joe

    1978-01-01

    Relates Front-End Analysis (FEA) to motivation by categorizing it as either Diagnostic FEA or Planning FEA. The former is used to diagnose existing problems and prescribe motivational programs; the latter assumes that motivational programs must be implemented, along with other programs, to build the optimum environment to support the performance.…

  10. ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter front end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, N. J.; Chen, L.; Gingrich, D. M.; Liu, S.; Chen, H.; Damazio, D.; Densing, F.; Duffin, S.; Farrell, J.; Kandasamy, S.; Kierstead, J.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; Ma, H.; Makowiecki, D.; Muller, T.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Ruggiero, R.; Takai, H.; Wolniewicz, K.; Ghazlane, H.; Hoummada, A.; Hervas, L.; Hott, T.; Wilkens, H. G.; Ban, J.; Boettcher, S.; Brooijmans, G.; Chi, C.-Y.; Caughron, S.; Cooke, M.; Copic, K.; Dannheim, D.; Gara, A.; Haas, A.; Katsanos, I.; Parsons, J. A.; Simion, S.; Sippach, W.; Zhang, L.; Zhou, N.; Eckstein, P.; Kobel, M.; Ladygin, E.; Auge, E.; Bernier, R.; Bouchel, M.; Bozzone, A.; Breton, D.; de la Taille, C.; Falleau, I.; Fournier, D.; Imbert, P.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Perus, A.; Richer, J. P.; Seguin Moreau, N.; Serin, L.; Tocut, V.; Veillet, J.-J.; Zerwas, D.; Colas, J.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Massol, N.; Perrodo, P.; Perrot, G.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Escalier, M.; Hubaut, F.; Laforge, B.; LeDortz, O.; Schwemling, Ph; Collot, J.; Dzahini, D.; Gallin-Martel, M.-L.; Martin, P.; Cwienk, W. D.; Fent, J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Citterio, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Tartarelli, F.; Bansal, V.; Boulahouache, C.; Cleland, W.; Liu, B.; McDonald, J.; Paolone, V.; Rabel, J.; Savinov, V.; Zuk, G.; Benslama, K.; Borgeaud, P.; de la Broïse, X.; Delagnes, E.; LeCoguie, A.; Mansoulié, B.; Pascual, J.; Teiger, J.; Dinkespiler, B.; Liu, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Ye, J.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Hansson, P.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Chu, M. L.; Lee, S.-C.; Su, D. S.; Teng, P. K.; Braun, H. M.

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS detector has been designed for operation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. ATLAS includes a complex system of liquid argon calorimeters. This paper describes the architecture and implementation of the system of custom front end electronics developed for the readout of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters.

  11. Performance of Front-End Readout System for PHENIX RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.; Hamagaki, H.; Nishimura, S.; Shigaki, K.; Hayano, R.S.; Hibino, M.; Kametani, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Matsumoto, T.; Sakaguchi, T.; Ebisu, K.; Hara, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Ushiroda, T.; Moscone, C.G.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R.

    1999-11-15

    A front-end electronics system has been developed for the Ring Imaging Cerenkov (RICH) detector of the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). A high speed custom back-plane with source synchronous bus architecture, a full custom analog ASIC, and board modules with FPGA's and CPLD's were developed for high performance real time data acquisition. The transfer rate of the back-lane has reached 640 MB/s with 128 bits data bus. Total transaction time is estimated to be less than 30 {micro}s per event. The design specifications and test results of the system are presented in this paper.

  12. AFEII Analog Front End Board Design Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinov, Paul; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This document describes the design of the 2nd iteration of the Analog Front End Board (AFEII), which has the function of receiving charge signals from the Central Fiber Tracker (CFT) and providing digital hit pattern and charge amplitude information from those charge signals. This second iteration is intended to address limitations of the current AFE (referred to as AFEI in this document). These limitations become increasingly deleterious to the performance of the Central Fiber Tracker as instantaneous luminosity increases. The limitations are inherent in the design of the key front end chips on the AFEI board (the SVXIIe and the SIFT) and the architecture of the board itself. The key limitations of the AFEI are: (1) SVX saturation; (2) Discriminator to analog readout cross talk; (3) Tick to tick pedestal variation; and (4) Channel to channel pedestal variation. The new version of the AFE board, AFEII, addresses these limitations by use of a new chip, the TriP-t and by architectural changes, while retaining the well understood and desirable features of the AFEI board.

  13. Universal Millimeter-Wave Radar Front End

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-optical front end allows any arbitrary polarization to be transmitted by controlling the timing, amplitude, and phase of the two input ports. The front end consists of two independent channels horizontal and vertical. Each channel has two ports transmit and receive. The transmit signal is linearly polarized so as to pass through a periodic wire grid. It is then propagated through a ferrite Faraday rotator, which rotates the polarization state 45deg. The received signal is propagated through the Faraday rotator in the opposite direction, undergoing a further 45 of polarization rotation due to the non-reciprocal action of the ferrite under magnetic bias. The received signal is now polarized at 90deg relative to the transmit signal. This signal is now reflected from the wire grid and propagated to the receive port. The horizontal and vertical channels are propagated through, or reflected from, another wire grid. This design is an improvement on the state of the art in that any transmit signal polarization can be chosen in whatever sequence desired. Prior systems require switching of the transmit signal from the amplifier, either mechanically or by using high-power millimeter-wave switches. This design can have higher reliability, lower mass, and more flexibility than mechanical switching systems, as well as higher reliability and lower losses than systems using high-power millimeter-wave switches.

  14. Front-end electronics development at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1995-09-01

    AT BNL the monolithic front-end electronics development effort is an outgrowth of work in discrete and hybrid circuits over the past 30 years. BNL`s area of specialization centers on circuits for precision amplitude measurement, with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1 and calibration to the same level of precision. Circuits are predominantly classical, continuous-time implementation of the functions now performed by hybrids, with little or no loss of performance. Included in this category are charge and current-sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shapers, sample/hold, multiplexing, and associated calibration and control circuits. Presently integration densities are limited to 16 channels per chip. Two examples are presented to illustrate the techniques needed to adopt hybrid circuits to the constraints of monolithic CMOS technology. They are programmable pulse shapes and a charge-sensitive preamp for very low detector capacitance.

  15. The upgraded CDF front end electronics for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, G.; Frei, D.; Hahn, S.R.; Nelson, C.A.; Segler, S.L.; Stuermer, W.

    1991-11-01

    The front end electronics used in the calorimetry of the CDF detector has been upgraded to meet system requirements for higher expected luminosity. A fast digitizer utilizing a 2 {mu}Sec, 16 bit ADC has been designed and built. Improvements to the front end trigger circuitry have been implemented, including the production of 900 new front end modules. Operational experience with the previous system is presented, with discussion of the problems and performance goals.

  16. Front End Spectroscopy ASIC for Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Eric

    Large-area, tracking, semiconductor detectors with excellent spatial and spectral resolution enable exciting new access to soft (0.2-5 MeV) gamma-ray astrophysics. The improvements from semiconductor tracking detectors come with the burden of high density of strips and/or pixels that require high-density, low-power, spectroscopy quality readout electronics. CMOS ASIC technologies are a natural fit to this requirement and have led to high-quality readout systems for all current semiconducting tracking detectors except for germanium detectors. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), formerly NCT, at University of California Berkeley and the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) at Goddard Space Flight Center utilize germanium cross-strip detectors and are on the forefront of NASA's Compton telescope research with funded missions of long duration balloon flights. The development of a readout ASIC for germanium detectors would allow COSI to replace their discrete electronics readout and would enable the proposed Gamma-Ray Explorer (GRX) mission utilizing germanium strip-detectors. We propose a 3-year program to develop and test a germanium readout ASIC to TRL 5 and to integrate the ASIC readout onto a COSI detector allowing a TRL 6 demonstration for the following COSI balloon flight. Our group at NRL led a program, sponsored by another government agency, to produce and integrate a cross-strip silicon detector ASIC, designed and fabricated by Dr. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The ASIC was designed to handle the large (>30 pF) capacitance of three 10 cm^2 detectors daisy-chained together. The front-end preamplifier, selectable inverter, shaping times, and gains make this ASIC compatible with a germanium cross-strip detector as well. We therefore have the opportunity and expertise to leverage the previous investment in the silicon ASIC for a new mission. A germanium strip detector ASIC will also require precise timing of the signals at

  17. Bringing the Fuzzy Front End into Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.F.; Boyack, K.W.; Bray, O.H.; Siemens, W.D.

    1999-03-03

    Technology planning is relatively straightforward for well-established research and development (R and D) areas--those areas in which an organization has a history, the competitors are well understood, and the organization clearly knows where it is going with that technology. What we are calling the fuzzy front-end in this paper is that condition in which these factors are not well understood--such as for new corporate thrusts or emerging areas where the applications are embryonic. While strategic business planning exercises are generally good at identifying technology areas that are key to future success, they often lack substance in answering questions like: (1) Where are we now with respect to these key technologies? ... with respect to our competitors? (2) Where do we want or need to be? ... by when? (3) What is the best way to get there? In response to its own needs in answering such questions, Sandia National Laboratories is developing and implementing several planning tools. These tools include knowledge mapping (or visualization), PROSPERITY GAMES and technology roadmapping--all three of which are the subject of this paper. Knowledge mapping utilizes computer-based tools to help answer Question 1 by graphically representing the knowledge landscape that we populate as compared with other corporate and government entities. The knowledge landscape explored in this way can be based on any one of a number of information sets such as citation or patent databases. PROSPERITY GAMES are high-level interactive simulations, similar to seminar war games, which help address Question 2 by allowing us to explore consequences of various optional goals and strategies with all of the relevant stakeholders in a risk-free environment. Technology roadmapping is a strategic planning process that helps answer Question 3 by collaboratively identifying product and process performance targets and obstacles, and the technology alternatives available to reach those targets.

  18. PERFORMANCE OF THE SNS FRONT END AND WARM LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Pelaia II, Tom; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P; Stockli, Martin P; Zhang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The accelerator complex consists of an H{sup -} injector, capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate with 38 mA peak current, a 1 GeV linear accelerator, an accumulator ring and associated transport lines. The 2.5 MeV beam from the Front End is accelerated to 87 MeV in the Drift Tube Linac, then to 186 MeV in a Coupled-Cavity Linac and finally to 1 GeV in the Superconducting Linac. With the completion of beam commissioning, the accelerator complex began operation in June 2006 and beam power is being gradually ramped up toward the design goal. Operational experience with the injector and linac will be presented including chopper performance, longitudinal beam dynamics study, and the results of a beam loss study.

  19. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  20. Advanced Oxy-Fuel-Fired Front-End System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-01

    Oxy-gas-fired front-end technology promises significantly reduced energy usage. The glass industry is widely recognized as one of the most energy-intensive manufacturing industries in the United States.

  1. The Front-End of the NOEMA Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenu, Jean-Yves; Navarrini, Alessandro; Bortolotti, Yves; Butin, Gilles; Fontana, Anne Laure; Mahieu, Sylvain; Maier, Doris; Mattiocco, Francois; Serres, Patrice; Berton, Marylene; Garnier, Olivier; Moutote, Quentin; Parioleau, Magali; Pissard, Bruno; Reverdy, Julien

    2016-03-01

    The IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) is being upgraded to a new powerful millimeter-wave radio astronomy facility called the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) which will double the number of the 15-m diameter antennas from six to 12. All antennas will be equipped with a new generation of dual-polarization Front-End covering the 72-373-GHz frequency range with four independent receivers integrated into a single cryostat. All receivers utilize sideband separating (2SB) superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers, each of which delivers two ~7.7-GHz-wide intermediate frequency (IF) outputs per polarization channel, thus increasing the total IF bandwidth which can be processed with a single setting of the interferometer from 8 GHz (2 × 4 GHz delivered by the existing PdBI Front-End) to ~31 GHz (4 × 7.7 GHz delivered by the NOEMA Front-End). The first of the new NOEMA antennas (Ant. 7) has recently been completed and the first NOEMA Front-End successfully developed and installed in it. For the coming years, our goal is to upgrade all of the Front-Ends currently installed on the six existing PdBI antennas to the new NOEMA standard and to build six additional ones (plus one spare) for the new NOEMA antennas. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and assembly of the Front-End we have developed for NOEMA Antenna 7. The instrument has state-of-the-art performance and sets a new standard in the post-ALMA generation technology.

  2. HINS Linac front end focusing system R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Carcagno, R.H.; Dimarco, J.; Huang, Y.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Page, T.M.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-08-01

    This report summarizes current status of an R&D program to develop a focusing system for the front end of a superconducting RF linac. Superconducting solenoids will be used as focusing lenses in the low energy accelerating sections of the front end. The development of focusing lenses for the first accelerating section is in the production stage, and lens certification activities are in preparation at FNAL. The report contains information about the focusing lens design and performance, including solenoid, dipole corrector, and power leads, and about cryogenic system design and performance. It also describes the lens magnetic axis position measurement technique and discusses scope of an acceptance/certification process.

  3. The Front-End System For MARE In Milano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, Claudio; Pessina, Gianluigi

    2009-12-01

    The first phase of MARE consists of 72 μ-bolometers composed each of a crystal of AgReO4 readout by Si thermistors. The spread in the thermistor characteristics and bolometer thermal coupling leads to different energy conversion gains and optimum operating points of the detectors. Detector biasing levels and voltage gains are completely remote-adjustable by the front end system developed, the subject of this paper, achieving the same signal range at the input of the DAQ system. The front end consists of a cold buffer stage, a second pseudo differential stage followed by a gain stage, an antialiasing filter, and a battery powered detector biasing set up. The DAQ system can be used to set all necessary parameters of the electronics remotely, by writing to a μ-controller located on each board. Fiber optics are used for the serial communication between the DAQ and the front end. To suppress interference noise during normal operation, the clocked devices of the front end are maintained in sleep-mode, except during the set-up phase of the experiment. An automatic DC detector characterization procedure is used to establish the optimum operating point of every detector of the array. A very low noise level has been achieved: about 3nV/□Hz at 1 Hz and 1 nV/□Hz for the white component, high frequencies.

  4. 25. FRONT END LOADERS MOMENTARILY IN REPOSE IN THE ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. FRONT END LOADERS MOMENTARILY IN REPOSE IN THE ORE STORAGE YARD. AN ORE BRIDGE THAT FORMERLY TRANSFERRED ORE WITHIN THE STORAGE YARD WAS DESTROYED BY A BLIZZARD IN 1978. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. Reviewed approach to defining the Active Interlock Envelope for Front End ray tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.; Shaftan, T.

    2015-09-24

    To protect the NSLS-II Storage Ring (SR) components from damage from synchrotron radiation produced by insertion devices (IDs) the Active Interlock (AI) keeps electron beam within some safe envelope (a.k.a Active Interlock Envelope or AIE) in the transverse phase space. The beamline Front Ends (FEs) are designed under assumption that above certain beam current (typically 2 mA) the ID synchrotron radiation (IDSR) fan is produced by the interlocked e-beam. These assumptions also define how the ray tracing for FE is done. To simplify the FE ray tracing for typical uncanted ID it was decided to provide the Mechanical Engineering group with a single set of numbers (x,x’,y,y’) for the AIE at the center of the long (or short) ID straight section. Such unified approach to the design of the beamline Front Ends will accelerate the design process and save valuable human resources. In this paper we describe our new approach to defining the AI envelope and provide the resulting numbers required for design of the typical Front End.

  6. A Front End Filter Subsystem for an Adaptive Radar Signal Processor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-12

    Miscellaneous Front End Module Functions 39 3. PROGRAMMING THE FRONT END SUBSYSTEM 47 3.1 Configuring the FIR Filters 47 3.2 The Discrete Control Register...Front end filter address definition. 48 24 Discrete Control Register address definition. 56 25 Beamformer dual-port RAM address definition. 58 ix LIST...Front End Module Identification Bits 41 8 Decoding the A100 Select Field 41 9 Front End Module Memory Map 43 10 Format of the Discrete Control Register 44

  7. Physics design of front ends for superconducting ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Superconducting (SC) technology is the only option for CW linacs and is also an attractive option for pulsed linacs. SC cavities are routinely used for proton and H{sup -} beam acceleration above 185 MeV. Successful development of SC cavities covering the lower velocity range (down to 0.03c) is a very strong basis for the application of SC structures in the front ends of high energy linacs. Lattice design and related high-intensity beam physics issues in a {approx}400 MeV linac that uses SC cavities will be presented in this talk. In particular, axially-symmetric focusing by SC solenoids provides strong control of beam space charge and a compact focusing lattice. As an example, we discuss the SC front end of the H{sup -} linac for the FNAL Proton Driver.

  8. Physics design of front ends for superconducting ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Carneiro, J.P.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) technology is the only option for CW linacs and is also an attractive option for pulsed linacs. SC cavities are routinely used for proton and H{sup -} beam acceleration above 185 MeV. Successful development of SC cavities covering the lower velocity range (down to 0.03c) is a very strong basis for the application of SC structures in the front ends of high energy linacs. Lattice design and related high-intensity beam physics issues in a {approx}400 MeV linac that uses SC cavities will be presented in this talk. In particular, axially-symmetric focusing by SC solenoids provides strong control of beam space-charge and a compact focusing lattice. As an example, we discuss the SC front-end of the H{sup -} linac for the FNAL Proton Driver.

  9. Test of ATLAS RPCs Front-End electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aielli, G.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Stante, L.; Liberti, B.; Paoloni, A.; Pastori, E.; Santonico, R.

    2003-08-01

    The Front-End Electronics performing the ATLAS RPCs readout is a full custom 8 channels GaAs circuit, which integrates in a single die both the analog and digital signal processing. The die is bonded on the Front-End board which is completely closed inside the detector Faraday cage. About 50 000 FE boards are foreseen for the experiment. The complete functionality of the FE boards will be certificated before the detector assembly. We describe here the systematic test devoted to check the dynamic functionality of each single channel and the selection criteria applied. It measures and registers all relevant electronics parameters to build up a complete database for the experiment. The statistical results from more than 1100 channels are presented.

  10. Frequency to Voltage Converter Analog Front-End Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos; Raines, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The frequency to voltage converter analog front end evaluation prototype (F2V AFE) is an evaluation board designed for comparison of different methods of accurately extracting the frequency of a sinusoidal input signal. A configurable input stage is routed to one or several of five separate, configurable filtering circuits, and then to a configurable output stage. Amplifier selection and gain, filter corner frequencies, and comparator hysteresis and voltage reference are all easily configurable through the use of jumpers and potentiometers.

  11. A Life Cycle Assessment of a Magnesium Automotive Front End

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit; Dubreuil, Alain; Bushi, Lindita; Tharumarajah, Ambalavanar

    2009-01-01

    The Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project under the sponsorship of Canada, China and USA aims to develop key technologies and a knowledge base for increased use of magnesium in automobile. The goal of this life cycle assessment (LCA) study is to compare the energy and potential environmental impacts of advanced magnesium based front end parts of a North America built 2007 GM-Cadillac CTS with the standard carbon steel based design. This LCA uses the 'cradle-to-grave' approach by including primary material production, semi-fabrication production, autoparts manufacturing and assembly, transportation, use phase and end-of-life processing of autoparts. This LCA study was done in compliance with international standards ISO 14040:2006 and ISO 14044:2006. Furthermore, the LCA results for aluminum based front end autopart are presented. While weight savings result in reductions in energy use and carbon dioxide emissions during the use of the car, the impacts of fabrication and recycling of lightweight materials are substantial in regard to steel. Pathways for improving sustainability of magnesium use in automobiles through material management and technology improvements including recycling are also discussed.

  12. Holographic optical receiver front end for wireless infrared indoor communications.

    PubMed

    Jivkova, S; Kavehrad, M

    2001-06-10

    Multispot diffuse configuration (MSDC) for indoor wireless optical communications, utilizing multibeam transmitter and angle diversity detection, is one of the most promising ways of achieving high capacities for use in high-bandwidth islands such as classrooms, hotel lobbies, shopping malls, and train stations. Typically, the optical front end of the receiver consists of an optical concentrator to increase the received optical signal power and an optical bandpass filter to reject the ambient light. Using the unique properties of holographic optical elements (HOE), we propose a novel design for the receiver optical subsystem used in MSDC. With a holographic curved mirror as an optical front end, the receiver would achieve more than an 10-dB improvement in the electrical signal-to-noise ratio compared with a bare photodetector. Features such as multifunctionality of the HOE and the receiver's small size, light weight, and low cost make the receiver front end a promising candidate for a user's portable equipment in broadband indoor wireless multimedia access.

  13. Passive front-ends for wideband millimeter wave electronic warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastram, Nathan Joseph

    This thesis presents the analysis, design and measurements of novel passive front ends of interest to millimeter wave electronic warfare systems. However, emerging threats in the millimeter waves (18 GHz and above) has led to a push for new systems capable of addressing these threats. At these frequencies, traditional techniques of design and fabrication are challenging due to small size, limited bandwidth and losses. The use of surface micromachining technology for wideband direction finding with multiple element antenna arrays for electronic support is demonstrated. A wideband tapered slot antenna is first designed and measured as an array element for the subsequent arrays. Both 18--36 GHz and 75--110 GHz amplitude only and amplitude/phase two element direction finding front ends are designed and measured. The design of arrays using Butler matrix and Rotman lens beamformers for greater than two element direction finding over W band and beyond using is also presented. The design of a dual polarized high power capable front end for electronic attack over an 18--45 GHz band is presented. To combine two polarizations into the same radiating aperture, an orthomode transducer (OMT) based upon a new double ridge waveguide cross section is developed. To provide greater flexibility in needed performance characteristics, several different turnstile junction matching sections are tested. A modular horn section is proposed to address flexible and ever changing operational requirements, and is designed for performance criteria such as constant gain, beamwidth, etc. A multi-section branch guide coupler and low loss Rotman lens based upon the proposed cross section are also developed. Prototyping methods for the herein designed millimeter wave electronic warfare front ends are investigated. Specifically, both printed circuit board (PCB) prototyping of micromachined systems and 3D printing of conventionally machined horns are presented. A 4--8 GHz two element array with

  14. CPRF/ZTH front-end torus design and fabrication status

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, E.O.; Baker, C.; Gomez, T.; Prince, P.P.; Smith, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Design of the ZTH front-end torus has been completed for a new generation Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) machine to be assembled at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 92. The Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) houses the ZTH front-end. The ZTH torus consists of an Inconel 625 vacuum vessel supported by an external electrically conducting 304L stainless steel shell. Interspace support rings support the vacuum vessel to the shell and also provide accurate radial support for the interspace electrical diagnostics. The shell also supports 48 toroidal field coils that are mounted to the shell's external surface. The shell consists of an explosion bonded stainless steel-copper composite with water-cooling tube assemblies attached to the outer surface. The 0.135-in. thick copper is on the inside surface of the shell, and provides an electrically conducting path with the required electrical time constant of 50 ms. The shell plate will be formed to the required toroidal configuration, after which the poloidal and toroidal flanges will be welded to the structure and machined. The Inconel vacuum vessel consists of bellows segments, armor support rings, and diagnostic stations welded together to form the complete vacuum vessel assembly. The necessity for accurate positioning of the vacuum vessel within the shell requires that the shell and vacuum vessel be fabricated with major diameter tolerances within 0.050-in. true position of the nominal diameters of 188.0-in. and 188.820-in., respectively. 7 figs.

  15. Non-Electronic Radio Front-End (NERF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    electro - optic field sensor. The absence of metallic interconnects and the charge isolation provided by the optics removes the soft spots in a traditional receiver. In the proof-of concept experiment, detection of C band electromagnetic signals at 7.38 GHz with a sensitivity of 4.3x10 -3 V/m.Hz(exp 1/2) is demonstrated. The dielectric approach has an added benefit: it reduces physical size of the front end an important benefit in mobile applications. DIELECTRIC RESONATOR ANTENNA, PHOTONICALLY ISOLATED ANTENNA RECEIVER, ELECTRO - OPTIC DIELECTRIC ANTENNA,

  16. Thermal diagnostics front-end electronics for LISA Pathfinder.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, J; Lobo, A; Nofrarias, M; Ramos-Castro, J; Riu, P J

    2007-10-01

    Precision temperature measurements are required in the LTP, the LISA technology package, for various diagnostics objectives. In this article, we describe in detail the front-end electronics design and the associated temperature sensors to achieve the LTP requirements: noise equivalent temperature of 10 microK Hz(-12) in the frequency range from 1 to 30 mHz at room temperature. We designed an ac Wheatstone bridge and a subsequent digital demodulation to minimize 1/f noise. We show experimental results where the required sensitivity in the measurement bandwidth is fulfilled.

  17. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  18. Front-end electronics for the LZ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morad, James; LZ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    LZ is a second generation direct dark matter detection experiment with 5.6 tonnes of liquid xenon active target, which will be instrumented as a two-phase time projection chamber (TPC). The peripheral xenon outside the active TPC (``skin'') will also be instrumented. In addition, there will be a liquid scintillator based outer veto surrounding the main cryostat. All of these systems will be read out using photomultiplier tubes. I will present the designs for front-end electronics for all these systems, which have been optimized for shaping times, gains, and low noise. Preliminary results from prototype boards will also be presented.

  19. Wideband monolithically integrated front-end subsystems and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mruk, Joseph Rene

    This thesis presents the analysis, design, and measurements of passive, monolithically integrated, wideband recta-coax and printed circuit board front-end components. Monolithic fabrication of antennas, impedance transformers, filters, and transitions lowers manufacturing costs by reducing assembly time and enhances performance by removing connectors and cabling between the devices. Computational design, fabrication, and measurements are used to demonstrate the capabilities of these front-end assemblies. Two-arm wideband planar log-periodic antennas fed using a horizontal feed that allows for filters and impedance transformers to be readily fabricated within the radiating region of the antenna are demonstrated. At microwave frequencies, low-cost printed circuit board processes are typically used to produce planar devices. A 1.8 to 11 GHz two-arm planar log-periodic antenna is designed with a monolithically integrated impedance transformer. Band rejection methods based on modifying the antenna aperture, use of an integrated filter, and the application of both methods are investigated with realized gain suppressions of over 25 dB achieved. The ability of standard circuit board technology to fabricate millimeter-wave devices up to 110 GHz is severely limited. Thin dielectrics are required to prevent the excitation of higher order modes in the microstrip substrate. Fabricating the thin line widths required for the antenna aperture also becomes prohibitively challenging. Surface micro-machining typically used in the fabrication of MEMS devices is capable of producing the extremely small features that can be used to fabricate antennas extending through W-band. A directly RF fed 18 to 110 GHz planar log-periodic antenna is developed. The antenna is fabricated with an integrated impedance transformer and additional transitions for measurement characterization. Singly terminated low-loss wideband millimeter-wave filters operating over V- and W- band are developed. High

  20. Front-end electronics for the FAZIA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, F.; Edelbruck, P.; Brulin, G.; Borderie, B.; Richard, A.; Rivet, M. F.; Verde, G.; Wanlin, E.; Boiano, A.; Tortone, G.; Poggi, G.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Barlini, S.; Pasquali, G.; Valdré, S.; Petcu, M.; Bougault, R.; Le Neindre, N.; Alba, R.; Bonnet, E.; Bruno, M.; Chbihi, A.; Cinausero, M.; Dell'Aquila, D.; De Préaumont, H.; Duenas, J. A.; Fable, Q.; Fabris, D.; Francalanza, L.; Frankland, J. D.; Galichet, E.; Gramegna, F.; Gruyer, D.; Guerzoni, M.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; La Torre, R.; Lombardo, I.; Lopez, O.; Mabiala, J.; Maiolino, C.; Marchi, T.; Maurenzig, P.; Meoli, A.; Merrer, Y.; Morelli, L.; Nannini, A.; Olmi, A.; Ordine, A.; Pârlog, M.; Pastore, G.; Piantelli, S.; Rosato, E.; Santonocito, D.; Scarlini, E.; Spadacini, G.; Stefaninni, A.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-01-01

    FAZIA is a multidetector specifically designed to optimize A and Z reaction product identification in heavy-ion collision experiments. This multidetector is modular and based on three-layer telescopes made of two silicon detectors followed by a thick (10 cm) CsI(Tl) scintillator read-out by a photodiode. Its electronics is fully digital. The goal to push at maximum identification capability while preserving excellent energy resolution, can be achieved by using pulse-shape analysis techniques and by making an intensive use of high-speed flash ADCs. This paper presents the front-end part of the electronics.

  1. Understanding the Manager of the Project Front-End

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Imprescia, Cliff (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Historical data and new findings from interviews with managers of major National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) projects confirm literature reports about the criticality of the front-end phase of project development, where systems engineering plays such a key role. Recent research into the management of ten contemporary NASA projects, combined with personal experience of the author in NASA, provide some insight into the relevance and importance of the project manager in this initial part of the project life cycle. The research findings provide evidence of similar approaches taken by the NASA project manager.

  2. AiGERM: A logic programming front end for GERM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashim, Safaa H.

    1990-01-01

    AiGerm (Artificially Intelligent Graphical Entity Relation Modeler) is a relational data base query and programming language front end for MCC (Mission Control Center)/STP's (Space Test Program) Germ (Graphical Entity Relational Modeling) system. It is intended as an add-on component of the Germ system to be used for navigating very large networks of information. It can also function as an expert system shell for prototyping knowledge-based systems. AiGerm provides an interface between the programming language and Germ.

  3. FRONT-END ASIC FOR A SILICON COMPTON TELESCOPE.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; FRIED, J.; FROST, E.; PHLIPS, B.; VERNON, E.; WULF, E.A.

    2007-10-27

    We describe a front-end application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) developed for a silicon Compton telescope. Composed of 32 channels, it reads out signals in both polarities from each side of a Silicon strip sensor, 2 mm thick 27 cm long, characterized by a strip capacitance of 30 pF. Each front-end channel provides low-noise charge amplification, shaping with a stabilized baseline, discrimination, and peak detection with an analog memory. The channels can process events simultaneously, and the read out is sparsified. The charge amplifier makes uses a dual-cascode configuration and dual-polarity adaptive reset, The low-hysteresis discriminator and the multi-phase peak detector process signals with a dynamic range in excess of four hundred. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) below 200 electrons was measured at 30 pF, with a slope of about 4.5 electrons/pF at a peaking time of 4 {micro}s. With a total dissipated power of 5 mW the channel covers an energy range up to 3.2 MeV.

  4. Studies of the front end of a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Sessler, Andrew; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2001-05-30

    A neutrino factory employs muons which are produced, collected, cooled, accelerated and then stored so that their eventual decay produces an intense neutrino beam. A general description may be found in the paper by Geer [S. Geer, Phys. Rev. D, 57, 1 (1998)], and two upcoming Comments on Nuclear and Particle Physics articles [S. Geer, ''Future prospects for muon facilities'', see http://www-mucool.fnal.gov/mcnotes/muc0154.ps; also A. M. Sessler, ''Neutrino Factories: The Facility'', http://www-mucool.fnal.gov/mcnotes/muc0155.pdf]. In this contribution, we use analytic and numerical tools to investigate the performance of the front end of a neutrino factory. This region starts just after the target and ends just prior to the recirculating accelerators. Extensive previous work has resulted in designs used in the Fermilab Study of 1999-2000 and the Brookhaven Study of 2000-2001. Here we explore variations away from these particular designs, seeking possible improvements in final muon output, risk reduction, and ultimate cost. Our studies include changes in the overall front end geometry through optimization of the induction linac design and variations of the rf frequency in the cooling channel acceleration, and initial exploration of the use of helical wiggler fields to increase the range of initial muon energies that are captured.

  5. Front end design of the RIA driver LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomiets, A. A.; Asseev, V. N.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Pardo, R. C.; Physics; ITEP

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the front end design for the RIA driver linac which is able to select, separate and accelerate in the RFQ the required ion species of one- or two-charge states. The front end consists of an ECR ion source located on a 100 kV platform, LEBT, RFQ and MEBT. The first section of the LEBT is an achromatic bending system for charge-to-mass analysis and selection. For the heaviest ions with masses above 180, the transport system is able to deliver to the entrance of the first buncher a two-charge-state beam with similar Twiss parameters for both charge states. In order to match two-charge-state ions with different mass to charge ratios, the straight section of the LEBT upstream of the RFQ will be placed on a high-voltage platform. A voltage /spl sim/30 kV is required in order to match velocities of ions with mass to charge ratio less than the design value and to maintain the possibility accelerating two charge states simultaneously. Several beam matching schemes in the transitions LEBT-RFQ and RFQ-MEBT have been studied.

  6. 40 CFR 63.492 - Batch front-end process vents-reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... causes a Group 2 batch front-end process vent to become a Group 1 batch front-end process vent, the owner..., as defined in § 63.488(i)(1), is made that causes a Group 2 batch front-end process vent with annual... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batch front-end process...

  7. 40 CFR 63.487 - Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology. 63.487 Section 63.487 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 63.487 Batch front-end process vents—reference control technology. (a) Batch front-end process...

  8. DESIGN OF MEDICAL RADIOMETER FRONT-END FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE.

    PubMed

    Klemetsen, O; Birkelund, Y; Jacobsen, S K; Maccarini, P F; Stauffer, P R

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of building a singleband Dicke radiometer that is inexpensive, small-sized, stable, highly sensitive, and which consists of readily available microwave components. The selected frequency band is at 3.25-3.75 GHz which provides a reasonable compromise between spatial resolution (antenna size) and sensing depth for radiometry applications in lossy tissue. Foreseen applications of the instrument are non-invasive temperature monitoring for breast cancer detection and temperature monitoring during heating. We have found off-the-shelf microwave components that are sufficiently small (< 5 mm × 5 mm) and which offer satisfactory overall sensitivity. Two different Dicke radiometers have been realized: one is a conventional design with the Dicke switch at the front-end to select either the antenna or noise reference channels for amplification. The second design places a matched pair of low noise amplifiers in front of the Dicke switch to reduce system noise figure.Numerical simulations were performed to test the design concepts before building prototype PCB front-end layouts of the radiometer. Both designs provide an overall power gain of approximately 50 dB over a 500 MHz bandwidth centered at 3.5 GHz. No stability problems were observed despite using triple-cascaded amplifier configurations to boost the thermal signals. The prototypes were tested for sensitivity after calibration in two different water baths. Experiments showed superior sensitivity (36% higher) when implementing the low noise amplifier before the Dicke switch (close to the antenna) compared to the other design with the Dicke switch in front. Radiometer performance was also tested in a multilayered phantom during alternating heating and radiometric reading. Empirical tests showed that for the configuration with Dicke switch first, the switch had to be locked in the reference position during application of microwave heating to avoid damage to the active components

  9. Performance of the NA62 LAV front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, A.; Corradi, G.; Gonnella, F.; Moulson, M.; Paglia, C.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Tagnani, D.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Costantini, F.; Fantechi, R.; Mannelli, I.; Raffaelli, F.; Leonardi, E.; Palladino, V.; Valente, P.

    2013-01-01

    The NA62 experiment [1] will measure the BR(K+→π+νbar nu) to within about 10%. To reject the dominant background from final state photons, the large-angle vetoes (LAVs) must detect particles with better than 1 ns time resolution and 10% energy resolution over a very large energy range. A low threshold, large dynamic range, Time-over-threshold based solution has been developed for the LAV front end electronics. Our custom 32 channel 9U board uses a pair of low threshold discriminators for each channel to produce LVDS logic signals. The achieved time resolution obtained in laboratory, coupled to an HPTDC based readout board, is ~ 150 ps.

  10. 177-207 GHz Radiometer Front End: Single Sideband Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galin, I.; Schnitzer, C. A.; Dengler, R. J.; Quintero, O.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty years of progress in 200 GHz receivers for spaceborne remote sensing has yielded a 180-220 GHz technology with maturing characteristics, as evident by increasing availability of relevant hardware, paralleled by further refinement in receiver performance requirements at this spectrum band. The 177-207 GHz superheterodyne receiver, for the Earth observing system (EOS) microwave limb sounder (MLS), effectively illustrates such technology developments. This MLS receiver simultaneously detects six different signals, located at sidebands below and above its 191.95 GHZ local-oscillator (LO). The paper describes the MLS 177-207 GHz receiver front-end (RFE), and provides measured data for its lower and upper sidebands. Sideband ratio data is provided as a function of IF frequency, at different LO power drive, and for variation in the ambient temperature.

  11. Fact Sheet for KM200 Front-end Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas

    2015-07-08

    The KM200 device is a versatile, configurable front-end electronics boards that can be used as a functional replacement for Canberra’s JAB-01 boards based on the Amptek A-111 hybrid chip, which continues to be the preferred choice of electronics for large number of the boards in junction boxes of multiplicity counters that process the signal from an array of 3He detectors. Unlike the A-111 chip’s fixed time constants and sensitivity range, the shaping time and sensitivity of the new KM200 can be optimized for demanding applications such as spent fuel, and thus could improve the safeguards measurements of existing systems where the A-111 or PDT electronics does not perform well.

  12. Shielding design for the front end of the CERN SPL.

    PubMed

    Magistris, Matteo; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    CERN is designing a 2.2-GeV Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) with a beam power of 4 MW, to be used for the production of a neutrino superbeam. The SPL front end will initially accelerate 2 x 10(14) negative hydrogen ions per second up to an energy of 120 MeV. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was employed for shielding design. The proposed shielding is a combined iron-concrete structure, which also takes into consideration the required RF wave-guide ducts and access labyrinths to the machine. Two beam-loss scenarios were investigated: (1) constant beam loss of 1 Wm(-1) over the whole accelerator length and (2) full beam loss occurring at various locations. A comparison with results based on simplified approaches is also presented.

  13. Front-end system for Yb : YAG cryogenic disk laser

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V

    2015-05-31

    A new front-end system for a cryogenic Yb : YAG laser is designed. The system consists of a femtosecond source, a stretcher and a regenerative amplifier with an output energy of 25 μJ at a pulse repetition rate of 49 kHz, a pulse duration of ∼2 ns and a bandwidth of ∼1.5 nm. After increasing the pump power of the regenerative amplifier, it is expected to achieve a pulse energy of ∼1 mJ at the input to cryogenic amplification stages, which will allow one to obtain laser pulses with a duration of several picoseconds at the output of the cryogenic laser after compression. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  14. Neural-network front ends in unsupervised learning.

    PubMed

    Pedrycz, W; Waletzky, J

    1997-01-01

    Proposed is an idea of partial supervision realized in the form of a neural-network front end to the schemes of unsupervised learning (clustering). This neural network leads to an anisotropic nature of the induced feature space. The anisotropic property of the space provides us with some of its local deformation necessary to properly represent labeled data and enhance efficiency of the mechanisms of clustering to be exploited afterwards. The training of the network is completed based upon available labeled patterns-a referential form of the labeling gives rise to reinforcement learning. It is shown that the discussed approach is universal and can be utilized in conjunction with any clustering method. Experimental studies are concentrated on three main categories of unsupervised learning including FUZZY ISODATA, Kohonen self-organizing maps, and hierarchical clustering.

  15. Focusing solenoids for the HINS Linac front end

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Appollinari, G.; Di-Marco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Rabehl, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The low energy part of a linac for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project at Fermilab will use superconducting solenoids as beam focusing elements (lenses). While the lenses for the conventional DTL-type accelerating section of the front end require individual cryostats, in the superconducting accelerating sections solenoids will be installed inside RF cryomodules. Some of the lenses in the conventional and in the superconducting sections are equipped with horizontal and vertical steering dipoles. Lenses for the DTL section are in the stage of production with certification activities ongoing at Fermilab. For the superconducting sections of the linac, a prototype lens has been built and tested. Each lens will be installed in the transport channel of the accelerator so that its magnetic axis is on the beamline. Corresponding technique has been developed at Fermilab and is used during the certification process. This report summarizes design features, parameters, and test results of the focusing lenses.

  16. Evolutionary algorithm for the neutrino factory front end design

    SciTech Connect

    Poklonskiy, Alexey A.; Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory is an important tool in the long-term neutrino physics program. Substantial effort is put internationally into designing this facility in order to achieve desired performance within the allotted budget. This accelerator is a secondary beam machine: neutrinos are produced by means of the decay of muons. Muons, in turn, are produced by the decay of pions, produced by hitting the target by a beam of accelerated protons suitable for acceleration. Due to the physics of this process, extra conditioning of the pion beam coming from the target is needed in order to effectively perform subsequent acceleration. The subsystem of the Neutrino Factory that performs this conditioning is called Front End, its main performance characteristic is the number of the produced muons.

  17. Redesign and Reconstruction of the Equipment Protection Systems for the Upgrading Front Ends and Beamlines at BSRF

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Shenshou; Tan Yinglei; Wu Xuehui

    2007-01-19

    The BEPC(Beijing Electron-Positron Collider) is upgraded to be BEPCII, a two-ring Electron-Positron collider. Due to the construction of the BEPCII and upgrade of the existing front ends and beamlines, all the existing EPSs(Equipment Protection Systems) have to be redesigned and reconstructed at BSRF. All the redesigned EPSs for the upgrading front ends and beamlines are a PLC- and SCADA-based equipment protection and control and monitoring system. The EPSs are used to protect BEPCII two storage rings vacuum against vacuum failures in a beamline, as well as to protect the front-end and beamline components from being damaged by synchrotron radiation. For the high-power wiggler beam lines, a fast movable mask is used to protect the blade of a fast-closing valve from damage when the fast-closing valve is triggered to close, which does not need to dump the electron beam running in BEPCII outer ring. In addition, all redesigned PLC- based EPSs are used to communicate with the same centralized monitoring computer to monitor a variety of parameters from all PLC- based EPS systems. The monitoring computer runs the SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) software with its own web server. Graphical HMI interfaces are used to display a few overall views of all front-end equipment operation status and the further detailed information for each EPS in a different pop-up window. On the web services, the SCADA-based centralized monitoring system provides a web browse function, etc. The design of the reconstructed systems is described in this paper.

  18. Design and Fabrication of Safety Shutter for Indus-2 Synchrotron Front-ends

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Dhamgaye, V.; Kumar, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2010-06-23

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of safety shutter for the Indus-2 synchrotron source on bending magnet front-ends. The purpose of the safety shutter is to absorb Bremsstrahlung radiation generated due to scattering of electron beam from residual gas ions and components of the storage ring. The safety shutter consists of a radiation absorber actuated inside a rectangular ultra high vacuum chamber by pneumatic actuator. A water-cooled copper block is mounted before the absorber block to protect it from the incident heat load due to synchrotron radiation. The top flanges of the chamber are made with rectangular knife edge sealing which is found to be better than wire seal at higher temperature. The physics aspect of safety shutter is designed using simulation code Electron Gamma Shower EGS-4 code.

  19. Performance of the front-end electronics of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Chaleil, Th.; Charvis; Chiarusi, T.; Chon Sen, N.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; de Botton, N.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Druillole, F.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Fehr, F.; Feinstein, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fopma, J.; Fratini, K.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hoffmann, C.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Le Provost, H.; Le van Suu, A.; Lefèvre, D.; Legou, T.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Monmarthe, E.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Olivetto, Ch.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvăla, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Pineau, J.-P.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Réthoré, F.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J. P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    ANTARES is a high-energy neutrino telescope installed in the Mediterranean Sea at a depth of 2475 m. It consists of a three-dimensional array of optical modules, each containing a large photomultiplier tube. A total of 2700 front-end ASICs named analogue ring samplers (ARS) process the phototube signals, measure their arrival time, amplitude and shape as well as perform monitoring and calibration tasks. The ARS chip processes the analogue signals from the optical modules and converts information into digital data. All the information is transmitted to shore through further multiplexing electronics and an optical link. This paper describes the performance of the ARS chip; results from the functionality and characterization tests in the laboratory are summarized and the long-term performance in the apparatus is illustrated.

  20. Compact Receiver Front Ends for Submillimeter-Wave Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich T.; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Peralta, Alejandro; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John J.; Gulkis, Samuel; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2012-01-01

    The current generation of submillimeter-wave instruments is relatively mass and power-hungry. The receiver front ends (RFEs) of a submillimeter instrument form the heart of the instrument, and any mass reduction achieved in this subsystem is propagated through the instrument. In the current implementation, the RFE consists of different blocks for the mixer and LO circuits. The motivation for this work is to reduce the mass of the RFE by integrating the mixer and LO circuits in one waveguide block. The mixer and its associated LO chips will all be packaged in a single waveguide package. This will reduce the mass of the RFE and also provide a number of other advantages. By bringing the mixer and LO circuits close together, losses in the waveguide will be reduced. Moreover, the compact nature of the block will allow for better thermal control of the block, which is important in order to reduce gain fluctuations. A single waveguide block with a 600- GHz RFE functionality (based on a subharmonically pumped Schottky diode pair) has been demonstrated. The block is about 3x3x3 cubic centimeters. The block combines the mixer and multiplier chip in a single package. 3D electromagnetic simulations were carried out to design the waveguide circuit around the mixer and multiplier chip. The circuit is optimized to provide maximum output power and maximum bandwidth. An integrated submillimeter front end featuring a 520-600-GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300-GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity was tested. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional metal-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB (double sideband) mixer noise temperature of 2,360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer is between 30 and 50 mW.

  1. Circuit techniques for cognitive radio receiver front-ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhu, Bodhisatwa

    This thesis discusses the design of the receiver front-end for software defined radio (SDR) based cognitive radio applications. Two aspects of SDRs for cognitive radios are distinguished: signaling and spectrum sensing. Narrowband wide tuning signaling architectures and instantaneous wideband spectrum sensing architectures are identified as candidates for feasible SDR implementations. Several architectures and circuit implementations are reviewed. Wide tuning range, low phase noise frequency synthesizers for signaling, and RF samplers and signal processors for spectrum sensing are identified as critical circuit design blocks. A number of voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) techniques for wide-tuning range, and low phase noise frequency synthesis techniques are developed. Wide-tuning range techniques based on switched inductors are proposed as a way to design inductor-capacitor (LC) VCOs with wide-tuning ranges that maintain a good phase noise and power dissipation performance over the entire tuning range. Switched inductor VCOs are analyzed in detail, and a design framework is developed. Optimized capacitor array design techniques for wide-tuning ranges are discussed. Based on these techniques, measurements from two prototype designs are presented, that achieve tuning ranges of 87% and 157% in measurement. They also maintain good phase noise, power consumption, and figure of merit (FOM) over the entire tuning range. In addition, a new family of VCOs that achieve superior phase noise is introduced. This set of novel topologies are based on linearized transconductance using capacitive feedback techniques. They achieve higher amplitudes of oscillation, and consequently, a superior phase noise performance. A wide tuning range is also maintained. The VCOs are analyzed, and detailed measurement results from a design prototype are presented. For spectrum sensing, the design of CRAFT (Charge Re-use Analog Fourier Transform): an RF front-end channelizer for software defined

  2. Results of the SNS front end commissioning at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ratti, A.; Ayers, J.J.; Doolittle, L.; Greer, J.B.; Keller, R.; Lewis, S.; Lionberger, C.; Monroy, M.; Pruyn, J.; Staples, J.W.; Syversrude, D.; Thomae, R.; Virostek, S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Shea, T.; SNS Accelerator Physics Group; SNS Beam Diagnostics Collaboration

    2002-08-16

    The Front-End Systems (FES) for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project comprise an rf-driven H{sup -} ion source, an electrostatic 2-lens LEBT, a 2.5 MeV RFQ, followed by a 14-quadrupole, 4-rebuncher MEBT including traveling-wave fast choppers. The nominal 2.5 MeV H{sup -} beam has a current of 38 mA at a repetition rate of 60 Hz and 1 ms pulse length, for a macro duty-factor of 6%, and is chopped at a rate of approximately 1 MHz with a mini duty-factor of 68%. The normalized rms beam emittance at the MEBT exit, matching the first tank of a 402.5 MHz Alvarez linac, is measured to be approximately 0.3 {pi} mm mrad. Diagnostic elements include wire scanners, BPMs, fast current monitors, a slit-harp emittance device and RFQ field monitoring probes. The results of the beam commissioning and the operation of the RFQ and diagnostic instrumentation are reported. The entire FES was shut down at LBNL at the end of May 2002 and will be recommissioned at ORNL prior to installation of the drift-tube linac.

  3. Neural networks in front-end processing and control

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, J.B.; Schnurrenberger, H.; Staeheli, N.; Stockhammer, N.; Duperrex, P.A.; Moret, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    Research into neural networks has gained a large following in recent years. In spite of the long term timescale of this Artificial Intelligence research, the tools which the community is developing can already find useful applications to real practical problems in experimental research. One of the main advantages of the parallel algorithms being developed in AI is the structural simplicity of the required hardware implementation, and the simple nature of the calculations involved. This makes these techniques ideal for problems in which both speed and data volume reduction are important, the case for most front-end processing tasks. In this paper the authors illustrate the use of a particular neural network known as the Multi-Layer Perceptron as a method for solving several different tasks, all drawn from the field of Tokamak research. The authors also briefly discuss the use of the Multi-Layer Perceptron as a non-linear controller in a feedback loop. The authors outline the type of problem which can be usefully addressed by these techniques, even before the large-scale parallel processing hardware currently under development becomes cheaply available. The authors also present some of the difficulties encountered in applying these networks.

  4. Front end design of smartphone-based mobile health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Changfan; He, Lingsong; Gao, Zhiqiang; Ling, Cong; Du, Jianhao

    2015-02-01

    Mobile health has been a new trend all over the world with the rapid development of intelligent terminals and mobile internet. It can help patients monitor health in-house and is convenient for doctors to diagnose remotely. Smart-phone-based mobile health has big advantages in cost and data sharing. Front end design of it mainly focuses on two points: one is implementation of medical sensors aimed at measuring kinds of medical signal; another is acquisition of medical signal from sensors to smart phone. In this paper, the above two aspects were both discussed. First, medical sensor implementation was proposed to refer to mature measurement solutions with ECG (electrocardiograph) sensor design taken for example. And integrated chip using can simplify design. Then second, typical data acquisition architecture of smart phones, namely Bluetooth and MIC (microphone)-based architecture, were compared. Bluetooth architecture should be equipped with an acquisition card; MIC design uses sound card of smart phone instead. Smartphone-based virtual instrument app design corresponding to above acquisition architecture was discussed. In experiments, Bluetooth and MIC architecture were used to acquire blood pressure and ECG data respectively. The results showed that Bluetooth design can guarantee high accuracy during the acquisition and transmission process, and MIC design is competitive because of low cost and convenience.

  5. Digital Front End for Wide-Band VLBI Science Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre; Sigman, Elliott; Navarro, Robert; Goodhart, Charles; Rogstad, Steve; Chandra, Kumar; Finley, Sue; Trinh, Joseph; Soriano, Melissa; White, Les; Proctor, Robert; Rayhrer, Benno

    2006-01-01

    An upgrade to the very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) science receiver (VSR) a radio receiver used in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) is currently being implemented. The current VSR samples standard DSN intermediate- frequency (IF) signals at 256 MHz and after digital down-conversion records data from up to four 16-MHz baseband channels. Currently, IF signals are limited to the 265-to-375-MHz range, and recording rates are limited to less than 80 Mbps. The new digital front end, denoted the Wideband VSR, provides improvements to enable the receiver to process wider bandwidth signals and accommodate more data channels for recording. The Wideband VSR utilizes state-of-the-art commercial analog-to-digital converter and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) integrated circuits, and fiber-optic connections in a custom architecture. It accepts IF signals from 100 to 600 MHz, sampling the signal at 1.28 GHz. The sample data are sent to a digital processing module, using a fiber-optic link for isolation. The digital processing module includes boards designed around an Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) industry-standard backplane. Digital signal processing implemented in FPGAs down-convert the data signals in up to 16 baseband channels with programmable bandwidths from 1 kHz to 16 MHz. Baseband samples are transmitted to a computer via multiple Ethernet connections allowing recording to disk at rates of up to 1 Gbps.

  6. Front-end electronics and trigger systems - status and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Spieler, Helmuth G

    2007-08-21

    The past quarter century has brought about a revolution in front-end electronics for large-scale detector systems. Custom integrated circuits specifically tailored to the requirements of large detector systems have provided unprecedented performance and enabled systems that once were deemed impossible. The evolution of integrated circuit readouts in strip detectors is summarized, the present status described, and challenges posed by the sLHC and ILC are discussed. Performance requirements increase, but key considerations remain as in the past: power dissipation, material, and services. Smaller CMOS feature sizes will not provide the required electronic noise at lower power, but will improve digital power efficiency. Significant improvements appear to be practical in more efficient power distribution. Enhanced digital electronics have provided powerful trigger processors that greatly improve the trigger efficiency. In data readout systems they also improve data throughput, while reducing power requirements. Concurrently with new developments in high energy physics, detector systems for cosmology and astrophysics have made great strides. As an example, a large-scale readout for superconducting bolometer arrays is described.

  7. AC-coupled front-end for biopotential measurements.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Pallàs-Areny, Ramon; Mayosky, Miguel Angel

    2003-03-01

    AC coupling is essential in biopotential measurements. Electrode offset potentials can be several orders of magnitude larger than the amplitudes of the biological signals of interest, thus limiting the admissible gain of a dc-coupled front end to prevent amplifier saturation. A high-gain input stage needs ac input coupling. This can be achieved by series capacitors, but in order to provide a bias path, grounded resistors are usually included, which degrade the common mode rejection ratio (CMRR). This paper proposes a novel balanced input ac-coupling network that provides a bias path without any connection to ground, thus resulting in a high CMRR. The circuit being passive, it does not limit the differential dc input voltage. Furthermore, differential signals are ac coupled, whereas common-mode voltages are dc coupled, thus allowing the closed-loop control of the dc common mode voltage by means of a driven-right-leg circuit. This makes the circuit compatible with common-mode dc shifting strategies intended for single-supply biopotential amplifiers. The proposed circuit allows the implementation of high-gain biopotential amplifiers with a reduced number of parts, thus resulting in low power consumption. An electrocardiogram amplifier built according to the proposed design achieves a CMRR of 123 dB at 50 Hz.

  8. Highly scalable digital front end architectures for digital printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staas, David

    2011-01-01

    HP's digital printing presses consume a tremendous amount of data. The architectures of the Digital Front Ends (DFEs) that feed these large, very fast presses have evolved from basic, single-RIP (Raster Image Processor) systems to multirack, distributed systems that can take a PDF file and deliver data in excess of 3 Gigapixels per second to keep the presses printing at 2000+ pages per minute. This paper highlights some of the more interesting parallelism features of our DFE architectures. The high-performance architecture developed over the last 5+ years can scale up to HP's largest digital press, out to multiple mid-range presses, and down into a very low-cost single box deployment for low-end devices as appropriate. Principles of parallelism pervade every aspect of the architecture, from the lowest-level elements of jobs to parallel imaging pipelines that feed multiple presses. From cores to threads to arrays to network teams to distributed machines, we use a systematic approach to move bottlenecks. The ultimate goals of these efforts are: to take the best advantage of the prevailing hardware options at our disposal; to reduce power consumption and cooling requirements; and to ultimately reduce the cost of the solution to our customers.

  9. Front-end electronics for the Muon Portal project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garozzo, S.; Marano, D.; Bonanno, G.; Grillo, A.; Romeo, G.; Timpanaro, M. C.; Lo Presti, D.; Riggi, F.; Russo, V.; Bonanno, D.; La Rocca, P.; Longhitano, F.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Fallica, G.; Valvo, G.

    2016-10-01

    The Muon Portal Project was born as a joint initiative between Italian research and industrial partners, aimed at the construction of a real-size working detector prototype to inspect the content of traveling containers by means of secondary cosmic-ray muon radiation and recognize potentially dangerous hidden materials. The tomographic image is obtained by reconstructing the incoming and outgoing muon trajectories when crossing the inspected volume, employing two tracker planes located above and below the container under inspection. In this paper, the design and development of the front-end electronics of the Muon Portal detector is presented, with particular emphasis being devoted to the photo-sensor devices detecting the scintillation light and to the read-out circuitry which is in charge of processing and digitizing the analog pulse signals. In addition, the remote control system, mechanical housing, and thermal cooling system of all structural blocks of the Muon Portal tracker are also discussed, demonstrating the effectiveness and functionality of the adopted design.

  10. Loran digital phase-locked loop and RF front-end system error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccall, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the system performance of the digital phase locked loops (DPLL) and RF front end that are implemented in the MINI-L4 Loran receiver is presented. Three of the four experiments deal with the performance of the digital phase locked loops. The other experiment deals with the RF front end and DPLL system error which arise in the front end due to poor signal to noise ratios. The ability of the DPLLs to track the offsets is studied.

  11. Fully Integrated Biopotential Acquisition Analog Front-End IC.

    PubMed

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-09-30

    A biopotential acquisition analog front-end (AFE) integrated circuit (IC) is presented. The biopotential AFE includes a capacitively coupled chopper instrumentation amplifier (CCIA) to achieve low input referred noise (IRN) and to block unwanted DC potential signals. A DC servo loop (DSL) is designed to minimize the offset voltage in the chopper amplifier and low frequency respiration artifacts. An AC coupled ripple rejection loop (RRL) is employed to reduce ripple due to chopper stabilization. A capacitive impedance boosting loop (CIBL) is designed to enhance the input impedance and common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) without additional power consumption, even under an external electrode mismatch. The AFE IC consists of two-stage CCIA that include three compensation loops (DSL, RRL, and CIBL) at each CCIA stage. The biopotential AFE is fabricated using a 0.18 μm one polysilicon and six metal layers (1P6M) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The core chip size of the AFE without input/output (I/O) pads is 10.5 mm². A fourth-order band-pass filter (BPF) with a pass-band in the band-width from 1 Hz to 100 Hz was integrated to attenuate unwanted signal and noise. The overall gain and band-width are reconfigurable by using programmable capacitors. The IRN is measured to be 0.94 μVRMS in the pass band. The maximum amplifying gain of the pass-band was measured as 71.9 dB. The CIBL enhances the CMRR from 57.9 dB to 67 dB at 60 Hz under electrode mismatch conditions.

  12. Fully Integrated Biopotential Acquisition Analog Front-End IC

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    A biopotential acquisition analog front-end (AFE) integrated circuit (IC) is presented. The biopotential AFE includes a capacitively coupled chopper instrumentation amplifier (CCIA) to achieve low input referred noise (IRN) and to block unwanted DC potential signals. A DC servo loop (DSL) is designed to minimize the offset voltage in the chopper amplifier and low frequency respiration artifacts. An AC coupled ripple rejection loop (RRL) is employed to reduce ripple due to chopper stabilization. A capacitive impedance boosting loop (CIBL) is designed to enhance the input impedance and common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) without additional power consumption, even under an external electrode mismatch. The AFE IC consists of two-stage CCIA that include three compensation loops (DSL, RRL, and CIBL) at each CCIA stage. The biopotential AFE is fabricated using a 0.18 µm one polysilicon and six metal layers (1P6M) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The core chip size of the AFE without input/output (I/O) pads is 10.5 mm2. A fourth-order band-pass filter (BPF) with a pass-band in the band-width from 1 Hz to 100 Hz was integrated to attenuate unwanted signal and noise. The overall gain and band-width are reconfigurable by using programmable capacitors. The IRN is measured to be 0.94 µVRMS in the pass band. The maximum amplifying gain of the pass-band was measured as 71.9 dB. The CIBL enhances the CMRR from 57.9 dB to 67 dB at 60 Hz under electrode mismatch conditions. PMID:26437404

  13. Realization of Miniaturized Multi-/Wideband Microwave Front-Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Shamaileh, Khair A.

    The ever-growing demand toward designing microwave front-end components with enhanced access to the radio spectrum (e.g., multi-/wideband functionality) and improved physical features (e.g., miniaturized circuitry, ease and cost of fabrication) is becoming more paramount than ever before. This dissertation proposes new design methodologies, simulations, and experimental validations of passive front-ends (i.e., antennas, couplers, dividers) at microwave frequencies. The presented design concepts optimize both electrical and physical characteristics without degrading the intended performance. The developed designs are essential to the upcoming wireless technologies. The first proposed component is a compact ultra-wideband (UWB) Wilkinson power divider (WPD). The design procedure is accomplished by replacing the uniform transmission lines in each arm of the conventional single-frequency divider with impedance-varying profiles governed by a truncated Fourier series. While such non-uniform transmission lines (NTLs) are obtained through the even-mode analysis, three isolation resistors are optimized in the odd-mode circuit to achieve proper isolation and output ports matching over the frequency range of interest. The proposed design methodology is systematic, and results in single-layered and compact structures. For verification purposes, an equal split WPD is designed, simulated, and measured. The obtained results show that the input and output ports matching as well as the isolation between the output ports are below --10 dB; whereas the transmission parameters vary between --3.2 dB and --5 dB across the 3.1--10.6 GHz band. The designed divider is expected to find applications in UWB antenna diversity, multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) schemes, and antenna arrays feeding networks. The second proposed component is a wideband multi-way Bagley power divider (BPD). Wideband functionality is achieved by replacing the single-frequency matching uniform microstrip lines in

  14. 40 CFR 63.485 - Continuous front-end process vent provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.485... continuous front-end process vent with an organic HAP concentration less than 50 parts per million by volume (ppmv) to become a Group 2 continuous front-end process vent with an organic HAP concentration of...

  15. 40 CFR 63.486 - Batch front-end process vent provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... technology requirements for Group 1 batch front-end process vents in § 63.487, the monitoring requirements in... Group 2 batch front-end process vents shall comply with the applicable reference control technology... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins §...

  16. Front End Software for Online Database Searching. Part 2: The Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Louise R.; Hawkins, Donald T.

    1986-01-01

    This article analyzes the front end software marketplace and discusses some of the complex forces influencing it. Discussion covers intermediary market; end users (library customers, scientific and technical professionals, corporate business specialists, consumers); marketing strategies; a British front end development firm; competitive pressures;…

  17. PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

    2012-05-20

    The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

  18. A Numerical Algorithm to Calculate the Pressure Distribution of the TPS Front End Due to Desorption Induced by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, I. C.; Kuan, C. K.; Chen, Y. T.; Yang, J. Y.; Hsiung, G. Y.; Chen, J. R.

    2010-06-01

    The pressure distribution is an important aspect of a UHV subsystem in either a storage ring or a front end. The design of the 3-GeV, 400-mA Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) foresees outgassing induced by photons and due to a bending magnet and an insertion device. An algorithm to calculate the photon-stimulated absorption (PSD) due to highly energetic radiation from a synchrotron source is presented. Several results using undulator sources such as IU20 are also presented, and the pressure distribution is illustrated.

  19. The Parkes front-end controller and noise-adding radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunzie, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new front-end controller (FEC) was installed on the 64-m antenna in Parkes, Australia, to support the 1989 Voyager 2 Neptune encounter. The FEC was added to automate operation of the front-end microwave hardware as part of the Deep Space Network's Parkes-Canberra Telemetry Array. Much of the front-end hardware was refurbished and reimplemented from a front-end system installed in 1985 by the European Space Agency for the Uranus encounter; however, the FEC and its associated noise-adding radiometer (NAR) were new Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) designs. Project requirements and other factors led to the development of capabilities not found in standard Deep Space Network (DSN) controllers and radiometers. The Parkes FEC/NAR performed satisfactorily throughout the Neptune encounter and was removed in October 1989.

  20. Built-in Test Equipment (BITE) to improve front-end-loader productivity. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    This Topical Report describes an equipment system being developed to improve the availability and productivity of large front-end loaders used in surface-mining operations. The equipment is mounted on the front end loader and includes an operator display and keypad, a microcomputer, machine sensors and a signal conditioner. Safety and machine performance problems are displayed to the operator and a report is printed for the maintenance shop. The BITE equipment, environment and system operation are described.

  1. Front-End Analysis Methods for the Noncommissioned Officer Education System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Research Report 1964 Front-End Analysis Methods for the Noncommissioned Officer Education System Marisa L. Miller U.S...2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Front-End Analysis Methods for the Noncommissioned Officer Education System 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER W5J9CQ-11-D...The Noncommissioned Officer Education System plays a crucial role in Soldier development by providing both institutional training and structured-self

  2. Control and Interlocking System for Bending Magnet Front-end at Indus-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Sanjeev R.; Garg, Chander Kant; Nandedkar, R. V.

    2007-01-01

    We present control and interlock system developed for Indus-2 bending magnet front-end. The paper describes in detail the control of various signals associated with the front-end and the interlocking scheme implemented for the installed front-end. The number of signals associated with each front-end is ˜ 75. A control system is designed for monitoring temperature, pressure, airflow, water flow and control of vacuum gauges, fast shutter, water cooled shutter, safety shutter, pneumatic gate valves, sputter ion pump power supplies, beam position monitor etc. Two independent signals are generated for critical components that are used for software interlock and hard-wired interlock. The front-end control system is VME based and window 2000/XP workstation as an operator console. The CPU used is Motorola 68000-processor board of the VME bus having OS-9 real time operating system. One VME crate serves a cluster of 2-3 front ends. The communication between the VME and the workstation is linked over RS232 serial communication. The sputter ion power supplies are connected over isolated RS485 network. Critical protection features are implemented so that no single failure can render the system unsafe. This is implemented by providing two independent chains of protection (1) Hard wired in which relay logic is used and (2) Software. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) is developed using Lab view Version 7.0.

  3. Single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS front-end system for real-time volumetric IVUS and ICE imaging.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-μm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-μm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single- chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 μm and 251 μm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex vivo chicken heart at 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce realtime volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter-based clinical applications.

  4. Single-Chip CMUT-on-CMOS Front-End System for Real-Time Volumetric IVUS and ICE Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of CMUT arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-µm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-µm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single-chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex-vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 µm and 251 µm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex-vivo chicken heart with 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce real-time volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter based clinical applications. PMID:24474131

  5. Magnet Misalignment Studies for the Front-end of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, G.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Stratakis, D.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; Rogers, C.

    2013-06-01

    In the Neutrino Factory front-end the muon beam coming from the interaction of a high-power (4 MW) proton beam on a mercury jet target is transformed through a buncher, a phase rotator and an ionization cooling channel before entering the downstream acceleration system. The muon front-end channel is densely packed with solenoid magnets, normal conducting radio-frequency cavities and absorber windows for the cooling section. The tolerance to the misalignment of the different components has to be determined in order on one hand to set the limits beyond which the performance of the front-end channel would be degraded; on the other hand to optimize the design and assembly of the front-end cells such that the component alignment can be checked and corrected for where crucial for the performance of the channel. In this paper we show the results of some of the simulations of the front-end channel performance where the magnetic field direction has been altered compared to the baseline.

  6. An 8.4-GHz dual-maser front-end system for Parkes reimplementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, D. L.; Loreman, J. R.; Brunzie, T. J.; Quinn, R.

    1990-02-01

    An 8.4-GHz front-end system consisting of a feedhorn, a waveguide feed assembly, dual masers, and downconverters was reimplemented at Parkes as part of the Parkes Canberra Telemetry Array for the Voyager Neptune encounter. The front-end system was originally assembled by the European Space Agency and installed on the Parkes antenna for the Giotto project. It was also used on a time-sharing basis by the Deep Space Network as part of the Parkes Canberra Telemetry Array to enhance the data return from the Voyager Uranus encounter. At the conclusion of these projects in 1986, part of the system was then shipped to JPL on loan for reimplementation at Parkes for the Voyager Neptune encounter. New design and implementation required to make the system operable at Parkes included new microwave front-end control cabinets, closed-cycle refrigeration monitor system, noise-adding radiometer system, front-end controller assembly, X81 local oscillator multiplier, and refurbishment of the original dual 8.4-GHz traveling-wave masers and waveguide feed system. The front-end system met all requirements during the encounter and was disassembled in October 1989 and returned to JPL.

  7. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  8. A low noise CMOS RF front-end for UWB 6-9 GHz applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhou; Ting, Gao; Fei, Lan; Wei, Li; Ning, Li; Junyan, Ren

    2010-11-01

    An integrated fully differential ultra-wideband CMOS RF front-end for 6-9 GHz is presented. A resistive feedback low noise amplifier and a gain controllable IQ merged folded quadrature mixer are integrated as the RF front-end. The ESD protected chip is fabricated in a TSMC 0.13 μm RF CMOS process and achieves a maximum voltage gain of 23-26 dB and a minimum voltage gain of 16-19 dB, an averaged total noise figure of 3.3-4.6 dB while operating in the high gain mode and an in-band IIP3 of -12.6 dBm while in the low gain mode. This RF front-end consumes 17 mA from a 1.2 V supply voltage.

  9. Trends in the design of front-end systems for room temperature solid state detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, Pier F.; Re, Valerio

    2003-10-07

    The paper discusses the present trends in the design of low-noise front-end systems for room temperature semiconductor detectors. The technological advancement provided by submicron CMOS and BiCMOS processes is examined from several points of view. The noise performances are a fundamental issue in most detector applications and suitable attention is devoted to them for the purpose of judging whether or not the present processes supersede the solutions featuring a field-effect transistor as a front-end element. However, other considerations are also important in judging how well a monolithic technology suits the front-end design. Among them, the way a technology lends itself to the realization of additional functions, for instance, the charge reset in a charge-sensitive loop or the time-variant filters featuring the special weighting functions that may be requested in some applications of CdTe or CZT detectors.

  10. Report on the value engineering workshop on APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-01-01

    A formal value engineering evaluation process was developed to address the front end components of the beamlines for the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This process (described in Section 2) involved an information phase, a creative phase, a judgment phase, a development phase, and a recommendation phase. Technical experts from other national laboratories and industry were invited to a two-day Value Engineering Workshop on November 5-6, 1992. The results of this Workshop are described in Section 4. Following the Workshop, various actions by the APS staff led to the redesign of the front end components, which are presented in Sections 5 and 6. The cost benefit analysis is presented in Section 7. It is important of realize that an added benefit of the Workshop was to obtain numerous design evaluations and enhancements of the front end components by experts in the field. As the design work proceeds to Title II completion, the APS staff is including many of these suggestions.

  11. CW Room Temperature Re-Buncher for the Project X Front End

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed H.; Chen, Meiyu; Gonin, Ivan V.; Kazakov, Sergey; Kostin, Roman; Lebedev, Valeri; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-09

    At Fermilab there is a plan to construct the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) facility - a prototype of the front end of the Project X, a multi-MW proton source based on superconducting linac. The construction and successful operations of this facility will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing the primary technical risk element within the Project. The room temperature front end of the linac contains an ion source, an RFQ accelerator and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section comprising a high bandwidth bunch selective chopper. The MEBT length is about 10 m, so three re-bunching CW cavities are used to support the beam longitudinal dynamics. The paper reports a RF design of the re-bunchers along with preliminary beam dynamic and thermal analysis of the cavities.

  12. An ECG recording front-end with continuous-time level-crossing sampling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjia; Mansano, Andre L; Yuan, Yuan; Zhao, Duan; Serdijn, Wouter A

    2014-10-01

    An ECG recording front-end with a continuous- time asynchronous level-crossing analog-to-digital converter (LC-ADC) is proposed. The system is a voltage and current mixed-mode system, which comprises a low noise amplifier (LNA), a programmable voltage-to-current converter (PVCC) as a programmable gain amplifier (PGA) and an LC-ADC with calibration DACs and an RC oscillator. The LNA shows an input referred noise of 3.77 μVrms over 0.06 Hz-950 Hz bandwidth. The total harmonic distortion (THD) of the LNA is 0.15% for a 10 mVPP input. The ECG front-end consumes 8.49 μW from a 1 V supply and achieves an ENOB up to 8 bits. The core area of the proposed front-end is 690 ×710 μm2, fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS technology.

  13. Measures of the Environmental Footprint of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brett Carlsen; Emily Tavrides; Erich Schneider

    2010-08-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. Section 2 of this report provides a summary of historical estimates. This study revises existing empirical correlations and their underlying assumptions to fit to a more complete set of existing data. This study also addresses land transformation, water withdrawals, and occupational and public health impacts associated with the processes of the front end of the once-through nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication. Metrics are developed to allow environmental impacts to be summed across the full set of front end processes, including transportation and disposition of the resulting depleted uranium.

  14. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS Design of an analog front-end for ambulatory biopotential measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiazhen, Wang; Jun, Xu; Lirong, Zheng; Junyan, Ren

    2010-10-01

    A continuously tunable gain and bandwidth analog front-end for ambulatory biopotential measurement systems is presented. The front-end circuit is capable of amplifying and conditioning different biosignals. To optimize the power consumption and simplify the system architecture, the front-end only adopts two-stage amplifiers. In addition, careful design eliminates the need for chopping circuits. The input-referred noise of the system is only 1.19 μVrms (0.48-2000 Hz). The chip is fabricated via a SMIC 0.18 μm CMOS process. Although the power consumption is only 32.1 μW under a 3 V voltage supply, test results show that the chip can successfully extract biopotential signals.

  15. Front end energy deposition and collimation studies for IDS-NF

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The function of the Neutrino Factory front end is to reduce the energy spread and size of the muon beam to a manageable level that will allow reasonable throughput to subsequent system components. Since the Neutrino Factory is a tertiary machine (protons to pions to muons), there is an issue of large background from the pion-producing target. The implications of energy deposition in the front end lattice for the Neutrino Factory are addressed. Several approaches to mitigating the effect are proposed and discussed, including proton absorbers, chicanes, beam collimation, and shielding.

  16. Flight test of 4-Hz and 30-Hz Omega receiver front-end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L.

    1976-01-01

    In-flight information was gathered on two Omega receiver analog modules, one having a 4-Hz bandwidth and the other a 30-Hz bandwidth. The Mini-O receiver was also monitored. An improved signal-to-noise characteristic of the narrower bandwidth front-end with negligible loss in dynamic range indicates that the 4-Hz front-end is the more desirable for the prototype Omega receivers. The Mini-O receiver was found to function quite satisfactorily on its second test flight, and has a very real potential for a low-cost, low-power, compact and light-weight Omega receiver.

  17. Front-End Types. Automotive Mechanics. Steering & Suspension. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automotive steering and suspension, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with automobile front-end types. Covered in the module are three common types of passenger car front suspension systems and their major components as well as two types…

  18. 40 CFR 63.489 - Batch front-end process vents-monitoring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Batch front-end process vents-monitoring equipment. 63.489 Section 63.489 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... installed in the gas stream immediately before and after the catalyst bed. (2) Where a flare is used,...

  19. Commissioning and Operation of the FNAL Front end Injection Line and Ion Sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Karns, Patrick R.

    2015-09-01

    This thesis documents the efforts made in commissioning and operating the RFQ Injection Line (RIL) as a replacement for the Cockcroft Walton front end. The Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) was assembled and tested with multiwire position and emittance monitor measurements. The Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) commissioning was completed with the same measurements as well as output beam energy measurements that showed it initially accelerated beam only to 700 keV, which was 50 keV lower than the design energy. Working with the manufacturer solutions were found and instituted to continue testing. The Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) was then connected as the RIL was installed as the new front end of Linac. Testing gave way to operation when the new front end was used as the source of all High Energy Physics (HEP) beam for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The magnetron ion source that provides the H- beam for the front end required several changes and eventual upgrades to operate well; such as new source operating points for vacuum pressure and cesium admixture, and new materials for critical source components. Further research was conducted on the cathode geometry and nitrogen doping of the hydrogen gas as well as using solid state switches for the extractor system high voltage.

  20. 75 FR 70703 - Humana Insurance Company a Division of Carenetwork, Inc. Front End Operations and Account...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... of Humana Insurance Company, a Division of CareNetwork, Inc., Front End Operations and Account Installation- Product Testing Groups, Green Bay, Wisconsin, to apply for Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA). On... De Pere, and not Green Bay, Wisconsin. Accordingly, the subject workers are workers at...

  1. Front-end Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM). Prototype Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Ryan C.; Morris, Scott J.; Smith, Leon E.; Keller, Daniel T.

    2015-09-16

    The IAEA has requested that PNNL perform an initial set of tests on front-end electronics for unattended measurement (FEUM) prototypes. The FEUM prototype test plan details the tests to be performed, the criteria for evaluation, and the procedures used to execute the tests.

  2. 40 CFR 63.487 - Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins...) of this section. Compliance may be based on either organic HAP or TOC. (1) For each batch front-end process vent, reduce organic HAP emissions using a flare. (i) The owner or operator of the...

  3. Testing and Feedback Effects on Front-End Control over Later Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ruthann C.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2 experiments, we explored differences in cognitive control at retrieval on a final test to better understand the mechanisms underlying the powerful boost in recall of previously tested information. Memory retrieval can be enhanced by front-end control processes that regulate the scope of retrieval or by later processes that monitor retrieval…

  4. A sub-mW fully-integrated pulse oximeter front-end.

    PubMed

    Glaros, Konstantinos N; Drakakis, Emmanuel M

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the first fully integrated pulse oximeter front-end with a power consumption lower than 1 mW. This is enabled by system- and block-level noise optimisation, also detailed in the manuscript. The proposed design features an analogue feedback loop that enables fast and accurate regulation of the detected photocurrent level and a serial-to-parallel interface allowing for extensive programmability of several operation parameters. The front-end was fabricated in the AMS 0.35 μm technology and occupies an area of 1.35 mm(2). Extensive measured results, both electrical and physiological from human subjects are reported, demonstrating an estimated SNR of 39 dB and ability to detect 2% changes in SpO2, similar to commercial pulse oximeters. This is despite the constrained power consumption which amounts to 0.31 mW for the LEDs and 0.53 mW for the rest of the front-end from a 3.3 V supply. Statistical results from 20 chips verify good matching across the Red and Infrared channels of the front-end and the accurate operation of the proposed analogue feedback loop.

  5. A Minicomputer as Front End Processor for an Automated Library System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, R. J.; Schuegraf, Ernst J.

    Because the cost of computers has decreased significantly in the last few years and their capabilities have increased significantly, a minicomputer is proposed as the front end processor for an automated library system of a medium sized library. The local library processor is to be connected to a larger computer which hosts the data base and…

  6. 40 CFR 63.487 - Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ducted to a halogen reduction device that reduces overall emissions of hydrogen halides and halogens by at least 99 percent before discharge to the atmosphere. (2) A halogen reduction device may be used to reduce the halogen atom mass emission rate to less than 3,750 kg/yr for batch front-end process vents...

  7. 40 CFR 63.487 - Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ducted to a halogen reduction device that reduces overall emissions of hydrogen halides and halogens by at least 99 percent before discharge to the atmosphere. (2) A halogen reduction device may be used to reduce the halogen atom mass emission rate to less than 3,750 kg/yr for batch front-end process vents...

  8. 40 CFR 63.487 - Batch front-end process vents-reference control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ducted to a halogen reduction device that reduces overall emissions of hydrogen halides and halogens by at least 99 percent before discharge to the atmosphere. (2) A halogen reduction device may be used to reduce the halogen atom mass emission rate to less than 3,750 kg/yr for batch front-end process vents...

  9. Front-end multiplexing—applied to SQUID multiplexing: Athena X-IFU and QUBIC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prele, D.

    2015-08-01

    As we have seen for digital camera market and a sensor resolution increasing to "megapixels", all the scientific and high-tech imagers (whatever the wave length - from radio to X-ray range) tends also to always increases the pixels number. So the constraints on front-end signals transmission increase too. An almost unavoidable solution to simplify integration of large arrays of pixels is front-end multiplexing. Moreover, "simple" and "efficient" techniques allow integration of read-out multiplexers in the focal plane itself. For instance, CCD (Charge Coupled Device) technology has boost number of pixels in digital camera. Indeed, this is exactly a planar technology which integrates both the sensors and a front-end multiplexed readout. In this context, front-end multiplexing techniques will be discussed for a better understanding of their advantages and their limits. Finally, the cases of astronomical instruments in the millimeter and in the X-ray ranges using SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) will be described.

  10. 40 CFR 63.489 - Batch front-end process vents-monitoring equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-monitoring equipment. 63.489 Section 63.489 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 63.489 Batch front-end process vents—monitoring equipment. (a) General requirements. Each owner or... comply with the requirements in § 63.487(a)(2) or § 63.487(b)(2) shall install the monitoring...

  11. Comparison of amplified spontaneous emission pulse cleaners for use in chirped pulse amplification front end lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Siders, C; Phan, H; Kanz, V; Barty, C

    2007-07-02

    We compare various schemes for removing amplified spontaneous emission from seed laser pulses. We focus on compact schemes that are compatible with fiber laser front end systems with pulse energies in the 10nJ-1{micro}J range and pulse widths in the 100fs-10ps range. Pre-pulse contrast ratios greater than 10{sup 9} have been measured.

  12. Radiation hardness improvement of analog front-end microelectronic devices for particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, A. G.; Rodin, A. S.; Bakerenkov, A. S.; Felitsyn, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Series of schematic techniques for increasing radiation hardness of the current mirrors is developed. These techniques can be used for the design of analog front-end microelectronic devices based on the operational amplifiers. The circuit simulation of radiation degradation of current transmission coefficients was performed for various circuit solutions in LTSpice software.

  13. A comparison of signal-processing front ends for automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, C. R., Jr.; Vo, H.-D. H.; Lippmann, R. P.

    1994-07-01

    The first stage of any system for automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a signal-processing front end that converts a sampled speech waveform into a more suitable representation for later processing. Several front ends are compared, three of which are based on knowledge about the human auditory system. The performance of an ASR system with these front ends was compared to a control mel filter bank (MFB)-based cepstral representation in clean speech and with speech degraded by noise and spectral variability. Using the TI-105 isolated word data base, it was found that auditory front ends performed comparably to MFB cepstra, sometimes slightly better in noise. With MFB cepstral recognition error rates ranging from 0.5% to 26.9%, depending on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), auditory models could perform as high as four percentage points better. With speech degraded by linear filtering, where MFB cepstra showed error rates ranging from 0.5% to 3.1%, auditory outputs could improve performance by as much as 0.4% for conditions with high baseline error rates. This performance gain comes at a significant computational expense-approximately one-third real time for MFB cepstra as opposed to as much as over 100 times real time for auditory models. These results disagree with previous studies that suggest considerably more improvement with auditory models. However, these earlier studies used a linear predictive coding (LPC)-based control front end, which is shown to perform significantly worse than MFB cepstra under noisy conditions (e.g., 2.7% error rate with mel-cepstra vs. 25.3% with LPC at 18-dB SNR). Data-reduction techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were also evaluated. PCA provided no gain in noise and slight gain with spectral variability.

  14. General-Purpose Front End for Real-Time Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2007-01-01

    FRONTIER is a computer program that functions as a front end for any of a variety of other software of both the artificial intelligence (AI) and conventional data-processing types. As used here, front end signifies interface software needed for acquiring and preprocessing data and making the data available for analysis by the other software. FRONTIER is reusable in that it can be rapidly tailored to any such other software with minimum effort. Each component of FRONTIER is programmable and is executed in an embedded virtual machine. Each component can be reconfigured during execution. The virtual-machine implementation making FRONTIER independent of the type of computing hardware on which it is executed.

  15. Development of a front end controller/heap manager for PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, M.N.; Allen, M.D.; Musrock, M.S.; Walker, J.W.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    A controller/heap manager has been designed for applicability to all detector subsystem types of PHENIX. the heap manager performs all functions associated with front end electronics control including ADC and analog memory control, data collection, command interpretation and execution, and data packet forming and communication. Interfaces to the unit consist of a timing and control bus, a serial bus, a parallel data bus, and a trigger interface. The topology developed is modular so that many functional blocks are identical for a number of subsystem types. Programmability is maximized through the use of flexible modular functions and implementation using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Details of unit design and functionality will be discussed with particular detail given to subsystems having analog memory-based front end electronics. In addition, mode control, serial functions, and FPGA implementation details will be presented.

  16. Front-end module readout and control electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, M.N.; Allen, M.D.; Boissevain, J.

    1997-11-01

    Front-end module (FEM) readout and control are implemented as modular, high-density, reprogrammable functions in the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector. FEM control is performed by the heap manager, an FPGA-based circuit in the FEM unit. Each FEM has 256 channels of front-end electronics, readout, and control, all located on an MCM. Data readout, formatting, and control are performed by the heap manager along with 4 interface units that reside outside the MVD detector cylinder. This paper discusses the application of a generic heap manager and the addition of 4 interface module types to meet the specific control and data readout needs of the MVD. Unit functioning, interfaces, timing, data format, and communication rates will be discussed in detail. In addition, subsystem issues regarding mode control, serial architecture and functions, error handling, and FPGA implementation and programming will be presented.

  17. Software-defined radio with flexible RF front end for satellite maritime radio applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budroweit, Jan

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the concept of a software-defined radio with a flexible RF front end. The design and architecture of this system, as well as possible application examples will be explained. One specific scenario is the operation in maritime frequency bands. A well-known service is the Automatic Identification System (AIS), which has been captured by the DLR mission AISat, and will be chosen as a maritime application example. The results of an embedded solution for AIS on the SDR platform are presented in this paper. Since there is an increasing request for more performance on maritime radio bands, services like AIS will be enhanced by the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA). The new VHF Data Exchange Service (VDES) shall implement a dedicated satellite link. This paper describes that the SDR with a flexible RF front end can be used as a technology demonstration platform for this upcoming data exchange service.

  18. All-Dielectric Photonic-Assisted Radio Front-End Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayazi, Hossein Ali

    The threats to civil society posed by high-power electromagnetic weapons are viewed as a grim but real possibility in the world after 11 September 2001. These weapons produce a power surge capable of destroying or damaging sensitive circuitry in electronic systems. Unfortunately, the trend towards circuits with smaller sizes and voltages renders modern electronics highly susceptible to such damage. Radiofrequency communication systems are particularly vulnerable, because the antenna provides a direct port of entry for electromagnetic radiation. In this work, we present a novel type of radiofrequency receiver front end featuring a complete absence of electronic circuitry and metal interconnects, the traditional 'soft spots' of a conventional radiofrequency receiver. The device exploits a dielectric resonator antenna to capture and deliver the radiofrequency signal onto a whispering-gallery mode electro-optic field sensor. The dielectric approach has an added benefit in that it reduces the physical size of the front end, an important benefit in mobile applications.

  19. Mitigating RF Front-End Nonlinearity of Sensor Nodes to Enhance Spectrum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lin; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The cognitive radio wireless sensor network (CR-WSN) has gained worldwide attention in recent years for its potential applications. Reliable spectrum sensing is the premise for opportunistic access to sensor nodes. However, as a result of the radio frequency (RF) front-end nonlinearity of sensor nodes, distortion products can easily degrade the spectrum sensing performance by causing false alarms and degrading the detection probability. Given the limitations of the widely-used adaptive interference cancellation (AIC) algorithm, this paper develops several details to avoid these limitations and form a new mitigation architecture to alleviate nonlinear distortions. To demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, verification tests for both simulations and actual RF front-end measurements are presented and discussed. The obtained results show that distortions can be suppressed significantly, thus improving the reliability of spectrum sensing. Moreover, compared to AIC, the proposed algorithm clearly shows better performance, especially at the band edges of the interferer signal. PMID:27897992

  20. The PRISMA hyperspectral imaging spectrometer: detectors and front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, Massimo; Mancini, Mauro; Fossati, Enrico; Battazza, Fabrizio; Formaro, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    Two detectors, SWIR and VNIR, and relevant front-end electronics were developed in the frame of the PRISMA(Precursore Iperspettrale della Missione Applicativa) project, an hyperspectral instrument for the earth observation. The two detectors were of the MCT type and, in particular, the VNIR was realized by Sofradir by using the CZT(Cadmium Zinc Telluride substrate of the PV diodes) substrate removal to obtain the sensitivity in the visible spectral range. The use of the same ROIC permitted to design an unique front-end electronics. Two test campaigns were carried out: by Sofradir, only on the detectors, and by Selex ES, by using the PRISMA flight electronics. This latter tests demonstrated that was possible to obtain the same detector performance, with respect of those ones obtained by a ground setup, with a flight hardware in terms of noise, linearity and thermal stability.

  1. Microwave integrated circuit radiometer front-ends for the Push Broom Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, R. F.; Hearn, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Microwave integrated circuit front-ends for the L-band, S-band and C-band stepped frequency null-balanced noise-injection Dicke-switched radiometer to be installed in the NASA Langley airborne prototype Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) are described. These front-ends were developed for the fixed frequency of 1.413 GHz and the variable frequencies of 1.8-2.8 GHz and 3.8-5.8 GHz. Measurements of the noise temperature of these units were made at 55.8 C, and the results of these tests are given. While the overall performance was reasonable, improvements need to be made in circuit losses and noise temperatures, which in the case of the C-band were from 1000 to 1850 K instead of the 500 K specified. Further development of the prototypes is underway to improve performance and extend the frequency range.

  2. Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Stephen D.; Forsmark, Joy H.; Osborne, Richard

    2016-07-01

    This project is the final phase (designated Phase III) of an extensive, nine-year effort with the objectives of developing a knowledge base and enabling technologies for the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of magnesium-intensive automotive front-end substructures intended to partially or completely replace all-steel comparators, providing a weight savings approaching 50% of the baseline. Benefits of extensive vehicle weight reduction in terms of fuel economy increase, extended vehicle range, vehicle performance and commensurate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are well known. An exemplary vehicle substructure considered by the project is illustrated in Figure 1, along with the exterior vehicle appearance. This unibody front-end “substructure” is one physical objective of the ultimate design and engineering aspects established at the outset of the larger collective effort.

  3. A MEMS-Based Power-Scalable Hearing Aid Analog Front End.

    PubMed

    Deligoz, I; Naqvi, S R; Copani, T; Kiaei, S; Bakkaloglu, B; Sang-Soo Je; Junseok Chae

    2011-06-01

    A dual-channel directional digital hearing aid front end using microelectromechanical-systems microphones, and an adaptive-power analog processing signal chain are presented. The analog front end consists of a double differential amplifier-based capacitance-to-voltage conversion circuit, 40-dB variable gain amplifier (VGA) and a power-scalable continuous time sigma delta analog-to-digital converter (ADC), with 68-dB signal-to-noise ratio dissipating 67 μ W from a 1.2-V supply. The MEMS microphones are fabricated using a standard surface micromachining technology. The VGA and power-scalable ADC are fabricated on a 0.25-μ m complementary metal-oxide semciconductor TSMC process.

  4. Front-End Electronics Characterization, Production, and QA for the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, Sophia; Majorana Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay ββ (0 ν) of the isotope 76Ge. In anticipation of the future tonne-scale experiments, its goal is to demonstrate a path forward to a background rate of one cnt/(ROI-t-y) in a 4 keV region around the Q-value of the 76Ge ββ (0 ν) . Such a background requirement significantly constrains the design of the front end electronics. Low background and low noise qualifications are a necessity. This poster first presents the characterization and noise performance in single and multi detector systems of the front end electronics developed for Majorana. The poster next reviews the full production process and finally describes the Quality Assurance tests developed for the electronics before installation in the experiment. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay ββ (0 ν) of the isotope 76Ge. In anticipation of the future tonne-scale experiments, its goal is to demonstrate a path forward to a background rate of one cnt/(ROI-t-y) in a 4 keV region around the Q-value of the 76Ge ββ (0 ν) . Such a background requirement significantly constrains the design of the front end electronics. Low background and low noise qualifications are a necessity. This poster first presents the characterization and noise performance in single and multi detector systems of the front end electronics developed for Majorana. The poster next reviews the full production process and finally describes the Quality Assurance tests developed for the electronics before installation in the experiment. We acknowledge support from the Office of Nuclear Physics in the DOE Office of Science, the Particle and Nuclear Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.

  5. Digital front-end electronics for a tagged neutron inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Cester, D.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.

    2013-04-19

    In this paper, we shall present a simple VME front-end system that employs the FADC CAEN V1720 8- channel 12-bit 250-MS/s digitizer. This system produces coincidence spectra between the trigger particle and other detectors and it replaces the traditional technique of chaining analog electronics. Tests have been performed using a pulser working at different frequencies as well as employing a {sup 252}Cf source in concert with an array of detectors.

  6. Front End Readout Electronics of the MicroBooNE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; De Geronimo, G.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Thorn, C.; Yu, B.

    MicroBooNE experiment is to build a ˜170 tons Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector that will observe interactions of neutrinos from the on-axis Booster Neutrino Beam and off-axis NuMI Beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment will address the low energy excess observed by the MiniBooNE experiment, measure low energy neutrino cross sections, and serve as the necessary next step in a phased program towards massive Liquid Argon TPC detectors. MicroBooNE TPC will have 3 readout wire planes with 8,256 wires/signal channels. All the signals will be pre-amplified, shaped, digitized and pre-processed online before recording for offline analysis of a wide variety of physics programs. To optimize the detector performance and signal-to-noise ratio, analog front end ASIC designed in 180 nm CMOS technology will be deployed and operated in LAr. Pre-amplified and shaped detector signals will be differentially driven to ADC boards operated in detector hall where signals are digitized and prepared for online data pre-processing in FPGAs. This article is an overview of the front end readout architecture of the MicroBooNE experiment, which describes the development of the front end readout electronics and preliminary test results.

  7. Physical Optics Analysis of the ALMA Band 5 Front End Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, Mark; Trappe, Neil; Belitsky, Victor

    2008-04-01

    The Atacama Large Millimetre Array will be a ground based millimetre to submillimetre band interferometer. The instrument will be comprised of up to 50 high precision 12m Cassegrain antennas. Each antenna will cover a frequency range from 30 to 950 GHz, which will be split into 10 observing channels/bands. Each frequency channel will have its own specifically designed front end optics to couple radiation from the secondary reflector focal plane to the accompanying receiver. We present a full electromagnetic analysis of the band 5 front end optics system using physical optics, which covers a range from 163 to 211 GHz. This band is being developed by the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD) at Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden. Two software packages are utilised for this analysis; the industry standard reflector antenna software package GRASP9 developed by TICRA and a new optical software package MODAL (Maynooth Optical Design Analysis Laboratory) developed at NUI Maynooth, Ireland. Electromagnetic predictions of beam patterns are presented at the Cassegrain focal plane and at the subreflector vertex. The basis of the analysis is primarily to determine optical performance and efficiency and the effects of beam truncation by the off-axis reflectors of the front end optics. Three levels of beam truncation are modelled varying rim diameter.

  8. Web-based DAQ systems: connecting the user and electronics front-ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenzi, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Web technologies are quickly evolving and are gaining in computational power and flexibility, allowing for a paradigm shift in the field of Data Acquisition (DAQ) systems design. Modern web browsers offer the possibility to create intricate user interfaces and are able to process and render complex data. Furthermore, new web standards such as WebSockets allow for fast real-time communication between the server and the user with minimal overhead. Those improvements make it possible to move the control and monitoring operations from the back-end servers directly to the user and to the front-end electronics, thus reducing the complexity of the data acquisition chain. Moreover, web-based DAQ systems offer greater flexibility, accessibility, and maintainability on the user side than traditional applications which often lack portability and ease of use. As proof of concept, we implemented a simplified DAQ system on a mid-range Spartan6 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) development board coupled to a digital front-end readout chip. The system is connected to the Internet and can be accessed from any web browser. It is composed of custom code to control the front-end readout and of a dual soft-core Microblaze processor to communicate with the client.

  9. ESPRESSO front end guiding algorithms: from design phase to implementation and validation toward the commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoni, M.; Riva, M.; Pepe, F.; Aliverti, M.; Cabral, A.; Calderone, G.; Cirami, R.; Cristiani, S.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Genoni, M.; Mégevand, D.; Moschetti, M.; Oggioni, L.; Pariani, G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we will review the ESPRESSO guiding algorithm for the Front End subsystem. ESPRESSO, the Echelle Spectrograph for Rocky Exoplanets and Stable Spectroscopic Observations, will be installed on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The Front End Unit (FEU) is the ESPRESSO subsystem which collects the light coming from the Coudè Trains of all the Four Telescope Units (UTs), provides Field and Pupil stabilization better than 0.05'' via piezoelectric tip tilt devices and inject the beams into the Spectrograph fibers. The field and pupil stabilization is obtained through a re-imaging system that collects the halo of the light out of the Injection Fiber and the image of the telescope pupil. In particular, we will focus on the software design of the system starting from class diagram to actual implementation. A review of the theoretical mathematical background required to understand the final design is also reported. We will show the performance of the algorithm on the actual Front End by adoption of telescope simulator exploring various scientific requirements.

  10. Front end design of a multi-GeV H-minus linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Shepard, K. W.; Foster, G. W.; Gonin, I. V.; Romanov, G. V.; Physics; FNAL

    2005-01-01

    The proposed 8-GeV driver at FNAL [1] is based on {approx} 430 independently phased SC resonators. Significant cost savings are expected by using an rf power fan-out from high-power klystrons to multiple cavities. Successful development of superconducting (SC) multi-spoke resonators operating at {approx} 345-350 MHz provides a strong basis for their application in the front end of multi-GeV linear accelerators. Such a front-end operating at 325 MHz would enable direct transition to high-gradient 1300 MHz SC TESLA-style cavities at {approx} 400 MeV. The proposed front end consists of 5 sections: a conventional RFQ, room-temperature (RT) cross-bar H-type (CH) cavities, single-, double-and triple-spoke superconducting resonators. It is effective to use short RT CH-cavities between the RFQ and SC sections in the energy range 3-10 MeV as is discussed below.

  11. FBI Fingerprint Image Capture System High-Speed-Front-End throughput modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rathke, P.M.

    1993-09-01

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has undertaken a major modernization effort called the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFISS). This system will provide centralized identification services using automated fingerprint, subject descriptor, mugshot, and document processing. A high-speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (FICS) is under development as part of the IAFIS program. The FICS will capture digital and microfilm images of FBI fingerprint cards for input into a central database. One FICS design supports two front-end scanning subsystems, known as the High-Speed-Front-End (HSFE) and Low-Speed-Front-End, to supply image data to a common data processing subsystem. The production rate of the HSFE is critical to meeting the FBI`s fingerprint card processing schedule. A model of the HSFE has been developed to help identify the issues driving the production rate, assist in the development of component specifications, and guide the evolution of an operations plan. A description of the model development is given, the assumptions are presented, and some HSFE throughput analysis is performed.

  12. Resource intensities of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.; Phathanapirom, U.; Eggert, R.; Collins, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents resource intensities, including direct and embodied energy consumption, land and water use, associated with the processes comprising the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication and depleted uranium de-conversion. To the extent feasible, these impacts are calculated based on data reported by operating facilities, with preference given to more recent data based on current technologies and regulations. All impacts are normalized per GWh of electricity produced. Uranium extraction is seen to be the most resource intensive front end process. Combined, the energy consumed by all front end processes is equal to less than 1% of the electricity produced by the uranium in a nuclear reactor. Land transformation and water withdrawals are calculated at 8.07 m{sup 2} /GWh(e) and 1.37x10{sup 5} l/GWh(e), respectively. Both are dominated by the requirements of uranium extraction, which accounts for over 70% of land use and nearly 90% of water use.

  13. Allowable aperture size of the front end for the high-heat-load undulator beamlines of SPring-8.

    PubMed

    Oura, M; Sakae, H; Sakurai, Y; Kitamura, H

    1998-05-01

    A systematic study to determinine the allowable aperture size of the front end for the SPring-8 high-heat-load undulator beamlines has been performed, from the viewpoint of protecting the front-end Be window from thermomechanical failure, and based on the results of ANSYS finite-element analyses. These results have revealed that the allowable aperture size of the front end ranges approximately from 1.06 mm(2) to 3.2 mm(2) depending on the K-parameter and the filter thickness.

  14. Performance of a 2.5 THz Receiver Front-End for Spaceborne Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaidis, Michael C.; Pickett, H. M.; Siegel, P. H.; Smith, C. D.; Smith, R. P.; Martin, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    The OH radical plays a significant role in a great many of the known ozone destruction cycles, and has become the focus of an important radiometer development effort for NASA's Earth Observing System Chem I satellite, which will monitor and study many tropospheric and stratospheric gases and is scheduled for launch in 2002. Here we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a receiver front end used to detect the OH signals at 2.5 THz. This is to be the first Terahertz heterodyne receiver to be flown in space. The challenges of producing the necessary high-performance mixers are numerous, but for this application, there is the added challenge of designing a robust receiver which can withstand the environmental extremes of a rocket launch and five years in space. The receiver front-end consists of the following components: a four-port dual-polarization diplexer, off-axis elliptical feed mirrors, mixers for horizontal and vertical polarization, support structures allowing simple and rugged alignment, low noise IF amplification from 7.7 to 21.1 GHz, and mixer DC bias circuitry. The front-end design, alignment, and operation will be covered in depth, followed by a discussion of the most recent results in receiver noise and dual-mode horn beam patterns. JPL MOMED mixers are employed, and have resulted in receiver noise temperatures of 14,500 K, DSB with LO frequency 2.522 GHz and IF of 12.8 GHz. Horn beam patterns correspond well with theory, with no significant sidelobes above the -25 dB level. Considering the high-quality beam of this receiver, these results are competitive with the best reported in the literature.

  15. A miniaturized HTS microwave receiver front-end subsystem for radar and communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yongbo; Guo, Jin; Gao, Changzheng; Li, Chunguang; Li, Hong; Wang, Jia; Cui, Bin; He, Xiaofeng; Li, Chao; Li, Na; Li, Guoqiang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Xueqiang; Meng, Jibao; He, Yusheng

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a miniaturized high performance high temperature superconducting (HTS) microwave receiver front-end subsystem, which uses a mini stirling cryocooler to cool a high selective HTS filter and a low noise amplifier (LNA). The HTS filter was miniaturized by using specially designed compact resonators and fabricating with double-sided YBCO films on LAO substrate which has a relatively high permittivity. The LNA was specially designed to work at cryogenic temperature with noise figure of 0.27 dB at 71 K. The mini cryocooler, which is widely used in infrared detectors, has a smaller size (60 mm × 80 mm × 100 mm) and a lighter weight (340 g) than the stirling cryocoolers commonly used in other HTS filter subsystem. The whole front-end subsystem, including a HTS filter, a LNA, a cryocooler and the vacuum chamber, has a size of only φ120 mm × 175 mm and a weight of only 3.3 kg. The microwave devices inside the subsystem are working at 71.8 K with a consumed cooling power of 0.325 W. The center frequency of this subsystem is 925.2 MHz and the bandwidth is 2.7 MHz (which is a fractional bandwidth of 0.2%), with the gain of 19.75 dB at center frequency and the return loss better than -18.11 dB in the pass band. The stop band rejection is more than 60 dB and the skirt slope is exceeding 120 dB MHz -1. The noise figure of this subsystem is less than 0.8 dB. This front-end subsystem can be used in radars and communication systems conveniently due to it’s compact size and light weight.

  16. First test results from the Front-End Board with Cyclone V as a test high-resolution platform for the Auger-Beyond-2015 Front End Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the first results from the Front- End Board (FEB) with the biggest Cyclone{sup R} V E FPGA 5CEFA9F31I7N, supporting 8 channels sampled up to 250 MSps at 14-bit resolution. Considered sampling for the SD is 120 MSps, however, the FEB has been developed with external anti-aliasing filters to keep a maximal flexibility. Six channels are targeted to the SD, two the rest for other experiments like: Auger Engineering Radio Array and additional muon counters. More channels and higher sampling generate larger size of registered events. We used the standard radio channel for a radio transmission from the detectors to the Central Data Acquisition Station (CDAS) to avoid at present a significant modification of a software in both sides: the detector and the CDAS (planned in a future for a final design). Seven FEBs have been deployed in the test detectors on a dedicated Engineering Array in a hexagon. Several variants of the FPGA code were tested for 120, 160, 200 and even 240 MSps DAQ. Tests confirmed a stability and reliability of the FEB design in real pampas conditions with more than 40 deg. C daily temperature variation and a strong sun exposition with a limited power budget only from a single solar panel. (authors)

  17. The front end test stand high performance H- ion source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, D C; Lawrie, S; Letchford, A P; Gabor, C; Wise, P; Whitehead, M; Wood, T; Westall, M; Findlay, D; Perkins, M; Savage, P J; Lee, D A; Pozimski, J K

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the front end test stand (FETS) project is to demonstrate that chopped low energy beams of high quality can be produced. FETS consists of a 60 mA Penning Surface Plasma Ion Source, a three solenoid low energy beam transport, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, a chopper, and a comprehensive suite of diagnostics. This paper details the design and initial performance of the ion source and the laser profile measurement system. Beam current, profile, and emittance measurements are shown for different operating conditions.

  18. Computer Aided Design of Microwave Front-End Components and Antennas for Ultrawideband Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalkawi, Mohammad J.

    This dissertation contributes to the development of novel designs, and implementation techniques for microwave front-end components and packaging employing both transmission line theory and classical circuit theory. For compact realization, all the presented components have been implemented using planar microstrip technology. Recently, there has been an increase in the demand for compact microwave front-ends which exhibit advanced functions. Under this trend, the development of multiband front-end components such as antennas with multiple band-notches, dual-band microwave filters, and high-Q reconfigurable filters play a pivotal role for more convenient and compact products. Therefore, the content of this dissertation is composed of three parts. The first part focuses on packaging as an essential process in RF/microwave integration that is used to mitigate unwanted radiations or crosstalk due to the connection traces. In printed circuit board (PCB) interconnects, crosstalk reduction has been achieved by adding a guard trace with/without vias or stitching capacitors that control the coupling between the traces. In this research, a new signal trace configuration to reduce crosstalk without adding additional components or guard traces is introduced. The second part of this dissertation considers the inherent challenges in the design of multiple-band notched ultrawideband antennas that include the integration of multilayer antennas with RF front-ends and the realization of compact size antennas. In this work, a compact UWB antenna with quad band-notched frequency characteristics was designed, fabricated, and tested demonstrating the desired performance. The third part discusses the design of single- and dual-band dual-mode filters exhibiting both symmetric and asymmetric transfer characteristics. In dual-mode filters, the numbers of resonators that determine the order of a filter are reduced by half while maintaining the performance of the actual filter order. Here, in

  19. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter front-end electronics for the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.

    2017-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5–7 times greater luminosities than assumed in the original detector design. An improved trigger system requires an upgrade of the readout electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter cells at 40–80 MHz and 16-bit dynamic range and the developments of radiation-tolerant, low-noise, low-power, and high-bandwidth front-end electronic components, including preamplifiers and shapers, 14-bit ADCs, and 10-Gb/s laser diode array drivers, are presented in this paper.

  20. Testing of the front-end hybrid circuits for the CMS Tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadek, T.; Blanchot, G.; Honma, A.; Kovacs, M.; Raymond, M.; Rose, P.

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the CMS Tracker for the HL-LHC requires the design of new double-sensor, silicon detector modules, which implement Level 1 trigger functionality in the increased luminosity environment. These new modules will contain two different, high-density front-end hybrid circuits, equipped with flip-chip ASICs, auxiliary electronic components and mechanical structures. The hybrids require qualification tests before they are assembled into modules. Test methods are proposed together with the corresponding test hardware and software. They include functional tests and signal injection in a cold environment to find possible failure modes of the hybrids under real operating conditions.

  1. Effect of vehicle front end profiles leading to pedestrian secondary head impact to ground.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Yang, King H

    2013-11-01

    Most studies of pedestrian injuries focus on reducing traumatic injuries due to the primary impact between the vehicle and the pedestrian. However, based on the Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS), some researchers concluded that one of the leading causes of head injury for pedestrian crashes can be attributed to the secondary impact, defined as the impact of the pedestrian with the ground after the primary impact of the pedestrian with the vehicle. The purpose of this study is to understand if different vehicle front-end profiles can affect the risk of pedestrian secondary head impact with the ground and thus help in reducing the risk of head injury during secondary head impact with ground. Pedestrian responses were studied using several front-end profiles based off a mid-size vehicle and a SUV that have been validated previously along with several MADYMO pedestrian models. Mesh morphing is used to explore changes to the bumper height, bonnet leading-edge height, and bonnet rear reference-line height. Simulations leading up to pedestrian secondary impact with ground are conducted at impact speeds of 40 and 30 km/h. In addition, three pedestrian sizes (50th, 5th and 6yr old child) are used to enable us to search for a front-end profile that performs well for multiple sizes of pedestrians, not just one particular size. In most of the simulations, secondary ground impact with pedestrian head/neck/shoulder region occurred. However, there were some front-end profiles that promoted secondary ground impact with pedestrian lower extremities, thus avoiding pedestrian secondary head impact with ground. Previous pedestrian safety research work has suggested the use of active safety methods, such as 'pop up hood', to reduce pedestrian head injury during primary impact. Accordingly, we also conducted simulations using a model with the hood raised to capture the effect of a pop-up hood. These simulations indicated that even though pop-up hood helped reducing the head injury

  2. THz semiconductor-based front-end receiver technology for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Advances in the design and fabrication of very low capacitance planar Schottky diodes and millimeter-wave power amplifiers, more accurate device and circuit models for commercial 3-D electromagnetic simulators, and the availability of both MEMS and high precision metal machining, have enabled RF engineers to extend traditional waveguide-based sensor and source technologies well into the TI-Iz frequency regime. This short paper will highlight recent progress in realizing THz space-qualified receiver front-ends based on room temperature semiconductor devices.

  3. The front end test stand high performance H{sup -} ion source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Wise, P.; Whitehead, M.; Wood, T.; Westall, M.; Findlay, D.; Perkins, M.; Savage, P. J.; Lee, D. A.; Pozimski, J. K.

    2010-02-15

    The aim of the front end test stand (FETS) project is to demonstrate that chopped low energy beams of high quality can be produced. FETS consists of a 60 mA Penning Surface Plasma Ion Source, a three solenoid low energy beam transport, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, a chopper, and a comprehensive suite of diagnostics. This paper details the design and initial performance of the ion source and the laser profile measurement system. Beam current, profile, and emittance measurements are shown for different operating conditions.

  4. OPCPA front end and contrast optimization for the OMEGA EP kilojoule, picosecond laser

    DOE PAGES

    Dorrer, C.; Consentino, A.; Irwin, D.; ...

    2015-09-01

    OMEGA EP is a large-scale laser system that combines optical parametric amplification and solid-state laser amplification on two beamlines to deliver high-intensity, high-energy optical pulses. The temporal contrast of the output pulse is limited by the front-end parametric fluorescence and other features that are specific to parametric amplification. The impact of the two-crystal parametric preamplifier, pump-intensity noise, and pump-signal timing is experimentally studied. The implementation of a parametric amplifier pumped by a short pump pulse before stretching, further amplification, and recompression to enhance the temporal contrast of the high-energy short pulse is described.

  5. Analog Signal Correlating Using an Analog-Based Signal Conditioning Front End

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman; Krasowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This innovation is capable of correlating two analog signals by using an analog-based signal conditioning front end to hard-limit the analog signals through adaptive thresholding into a binary bit stream, then performing the correlation using a Hamming "similarity" calculator function embedded in a one-bit digital correlator (OBDC). By converting the analog signal into a bit stream, the calculation of the correlation function is simplified, and less hardware resources are needed. This binary representation allows the hardware to move from a DSP where instructions are performed serially, into digital logic where calculations can be performed in parallel, greatly speeding up calculations.

  6. A front-end ASIC design for non-uniformity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Ding, R. J.; Lin, J. M.; Liu, F.

    2008-12-01

    A front-end design of an ASIC that implements calibration and correction for IRFPA non-uniformity is presented. An algorithm suitable for ASIC implementation is introduced, and one kind of architecture that implements this algorithm has been designed. We map the architecture to TSMC 0.25um process. After evaluating the chip area and operation speed, we confirm that this architect will also be effective when the FPA scale in enlarged to 1Kby1K. Finally the flow of circuit implementation and method of verification are introduced briefly.

  7. Simulation and fabrication of monolithically integrated MSM/PHEMT 850 nm optical receiver front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chao; Chen, Tang-Sheng; Jiao, Shi-Long; Liu, Lin; Chen, Zhen-Long; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wu, Yun-Feng; Ye, Yu-Tang

    2007-12-01

    An 850 nm monolithically integrated optical receiver front end has been simulated by ATLAS and developed based on 0.5 μm GaAs PHEMT process, which comprises a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector and a distributed amplifier.The output eye diagrams for 2.5 Gb/s and 5Gb/s NRZ pseudorandom binary sequence are attained. Compared to the characteristics of actual device, this contribution details a simulation strategy for accurate prediction of the unilluminated performances of the devices.

  8. Characterization of front-end electronics for CZT based handheld radioisotope identifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombigit, L.; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Yussup, Nolida; Yazid, Khairiah; Jaafar, Zainudin

    2016-01-01

    A radioisotope identifier device based on large volume Co-planar grid CZT detector is current under development at Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This device is planned to be used for in-situ identification of radioisotopes based on their unique energies. This work reports on electronics testing performed on the front-end electronics (FEE) analog section comprising charge sensitive preamplifier-pulse shaping amplifier chain. This test involves measurement of charge sensitivity, pulse parameters and electronics noise. This report also present some preliminary results on the spectral measurement obtained from gamma emitting radioisotopes.

  9. A cryogenic seven-element HEMT front end for DSS 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, J.; Neff, D.

    1993-01-01

    A cryogenically cooled Ka-band (33.6-GHz), seven-element front-end array for the DSN was built and tested. This system uses seven high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers cooled by a two-stage closed-cycle refrigerator. All system components from the polarizers to the output isolators are cooled to a physical temperature between 18 and 35 K. The noise temperatures of the individual elements range from 64 to 84 K over a 2.75-GHz bandwidth.

  10. Characterization of front-end electronics for CZT based handheld radioisotope identifier

    SciTech Connect

    Lombigit, L.; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Yussup, Nolida; Yazid, Khairiah; Jaafar, Zainudin

    2016-01-22

    A radioisotope identifier device based on large volume Co-planar grid CZT detector is current under development at Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This device is planned to be used for in-situ identification of radioisotopes based on their unique energies. This work reports on electronics testing performed on the front-end electronics (FEE) analog section comprising charge sensitive preamplifier-pulse shaping amplifier chain. This test involves measurement of charge sensitivity, pulse parameters and electronics noise. This report also present some preliminary results on the spectral measurement obtained from gamma emitting radioisotopes.

  11. Estimation of radiation effects in the front-end electronics of an ILC electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, V.; Postranecky, M.; Targett-Adams, C.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.

    2008-08-01

    The front-end electronics of the electromagnetic calorimeter of an International Linear Collider detector are situated in a radiation environment. This requires the effect of the radiation on the performance of the electronics, specifically FPGAs, to be examined. In this paper we study the flux, particle spectra and deposited doses at the front-end electronics of the electromagnetic calorimeter of a detector at the ILC. We also study the occupancy of the electromagnetic calorimeter. These estimates are compared with measurements, e.g. of the radiation damage of FPGAs, done elsewhere. The outcome of the study shows that the radiation doses and the annual flux is low enough to allow today's FPGAs to operate. The Single Event Upset rate, however, lies between 14 min and 12 h depending on the FPGA used and therefore needs to be considered in the design of the data acquisition system of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The occupancy is about 0.002 per bunch train not taking into account the effect of noise which depends on the choice of the detector.

  12. A compact dual-band RF front-end and board design for vehicular platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharawi, Mohammad S.; Aloi, Daniel N.

    2012-03-01

    Modern vehicular platforms include several wireless systems that provide navigation, entertainment and road side assistance, among other services. These systems operate at different frequency bands and thus careful system-level design should be followed to minimise the interference between them. In this study, we present a compact dual-band RF front-end module for global positioning system (GPS) operating in the L1-band (1574.42-1576.42 MHz) and satellite digital audio radio system (SDARS) operating in the S-band (2320-2345 MHz). The module provides more than 26 dB of measured gain in both bands and low noise figure values of 0.9 and 1.2 dB in SDARS and GPS bands, respectively. The front-end has interference suppression capability from the advanced mobile phone system and personal communication service cellular bands. The module is designed on a low-cost FR-4 substrate material and occupies a small size of 62 × 29 × 1.3 mm3. It dissipates 235 mW in the SDARS section and 100 mW in the GPS section. Three prototypes have been built to verify a repeatable performance.

  13. An ultra low-power front-end IC for wearable health monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Yu-Pin Hsu; Zemin Liu; Hella, Mona M

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a low-power front-end IC for wearable health monitoring systems. The IC, designed in a standard 0.13μm CMOS technology, fully integrates a low-noise analog front-end (AFE) to process the weak bio-signals, followed by an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to digitize the extracted signals. An AC-coupled driving buffer, that interfaces between the AFE and the ADC is introduced to scale down the power supply of the ADC. The power consumption decreases by 50% compared to the case without power supply scaling. The AFE passes signals from 0.5Hz to 280Hz and from 0.7Hz to 160Hz with a simulated input referred noise of 1.6μVrms and achieves a maximum gain of 35dB/41dB respectively, with a noise-efficiency factor (NEF) of the AFE is 1. The 8-bit ADC achieves a simulated 7.96-bit resolution at 10KS/s sampling rate under 0.5V supply voltage. The overall system consumes only 0.86μW at dual supply voltages of 1V (AFE) and 0.5 V (ADC).

  14. Development of a front end ASIC for Dark Matter directional detection with MIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, J. P.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Grignon, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D.

    2010-08-01

    A front end ASIC (BiCMOS-SiGe 0.35μm) has been developed within the framework of the MIMAC detector project, which aims at directional detection of non-baryonic Dark Matter. This search strategy requires 3D reconstruction of low energy (a few keV) tracks with a gaseous μTPC. The development of this front end ASIC is a key point of the project, allowing the 3D track reconstruction. Each ASIC monitors 16 strips of pixels with charge preamplifiers and their time over threshold is provided in real time by current discriminators via two serializing LVDS links working at 320 MHz. The charge is summed over the 16 strips and provided via a shaper. These specifications have been chosen in order to build an auto triggered electronics. An acquisition board and the related software were developed in order to validate this methodology on a prototype chamber. The prototype detector presents an anode where 2×96 strips of pixels are monitored.

  15. EXPERIENCE WITH FPGA-BASED PROCESSOR CORE AS FRONT-END COMPUTER.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    The RHIC control system architecture follows the familiar ''standard model''. LINUX workstations are used as operator consoles. Front-end computers are distributed around the accelerator, close to equipment being controlled or monitored. These computers are generally based on VMEbus CPU modules running the VxWorks operating system. I/O is typically performed via the VMEbus, or via PMC daughter cards (via an internal PCI bus), or via on-board I/O interfaces (Ethernet or serial). Advances in FPGA size and sophistication now permit running virtual processor ''cores'' within the FPGA logic, including ''cores'' with advanced features such as memory management. Such systems offer certain advantages over traditional VMEbus Front-end computers. Advantages include tighter coupling with FPGA logic, and therefore higher I/O bandwidth, and flexibility in packaging, possibly resulting in a lower noise environment and/or lower cost. This paper presents the experience acquired while porting the RHIC control system to a PowerPC 405 core within a Xilinx FPGA for use in low-level RF control.

  16. An inductorless multi-mode RF front end for GNSS receiver in 55 nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanbin, Luo; Chengyan, Ma; Yebing, Gan; Min, Qian; Tianchun, Ye

    2015-10-01

    An inductorless multi-mode RF front end for a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver is presented. Unlike the traditional topology of a low noise amplifier (LNA), the inductorless current-mode noise-canceling LNA is applied in this design. The high-impedance-input radio frequency amplifier (RFA) further amplifies the GNSS signals and changes the single-end signal path into fully differential. The passive mixer down-converts the signals to the intermediate frequency (IF) band and conveys the signals to the analogue blocks. The local oscillator (LO) buffer divides the output frequency of the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and generates 25%-duty-cycle quadrature square waves to drive the mixer. Our measurement results display that the implemented RF front end achieves good overall performance while consuming only 6.7 mA from 1.2 V supply. The input return loss is better than -26 dB and the ultra low noise figure of 1.43 dB leads to high sensitivity of the GNSS receiver. The input 1 dB compression point is -43 dBm at the high gain of 48 dB. The designed circuit is fabricated in 55 nm CMOS technology and the die area, which is much smaller than traditional circuit, is around 220 × 280 μm2.

  17. Front-end Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM). Results of Prototype Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Ryan C.; Keller, Daniel T.; Morris, Scott J.; Smith, Leon E.

    2015-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) deploys unattended monitoring systems to provide continuous monitoring of nuclear material within safeguarded facilities around the world. As the number of unattended monitoring instruments increases, the IAEA is challenged to become more efficient in the implementation of those systems. In 2010, the IAEA initiated the Front-End Electronics for Unattended Measurement (FEUM) project with the goals of greater flexibility in the interfaces to various sensors and data acquisition systems, and improved capabilities for remotely located sensors (e.g., where sensor and front-end electronics might be separated by tens of meters). In consultation with the IAEA, a technical evaluation of a candidate FEUM device produced by a commercial vendor has been performed. This evaluation assessed the device against the IAEA’s original technical specifications and a broad range of important parameters that include sensor types, cable lengths and types, industrial electromagnetic noise that can degrade signals from remotely located detectors, and high radiation fields. Testing data, interpretation, findings and recommendations are provided.

  18. Front-end electronics for DEPFET pixel detectors at SuperBelle (BELLE II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Hans; Depfet Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    This article gives an overview of the front-end electronics development for the DEPFET pixel vertex detector at the Super KEK-B experiment (BELLE II). The planned upgrade of the KEK-B factory will lead to a peak luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2 s-1. This increase in luminosity (×50 compared to the existing experiment) will make high demands on the performance of the vertex detector. The proposed two layer vertex detector consists of 'all-silicon' modules: the read-out and control ASICs will be bump bonded on the rigid edges of the DEPFET substrate whereas in the region of the active pixel matrix the substrate will be thinned down to 50 μm. The front-end electronics is subdivided in three different ASIC types: one chip will provide up to 20 V output swing for the control voltages of the DEPFET matrix (SWITCHER), the current signals are being digitized by a multichannel ADC chip (DCD) and the processing of the digital data and module control functionality is implemented in a data handling chip (DHP). An overview of the module concept and the status of the developments including results of current prototype chips will be given.

  19. Concept Design for a 1-Lead Wearable/Implantable ECG Front-End: Power Management

    PubMed Central

    George, Libin; Gargiulo, Gaetano Dario; Lehmann, Torsten; Hamilton, Tara Julia

    2015-01-01

    Power supply quality and stability are critical for wearable and implantable biomedical applications. For this reason we have designed a reconfigurable switched-capacitor DC-DC converter that, aside from having an extremely small footprint (with an active on-chip area of only 0.04 mm2), uses a novel output voltage control method based upon a combination of adaptive gain and discrete frequency scaling control schemes. This novel DC-DC converter achieves a measured output voltage range of 1.0 to 2.2 V with power delivery up to 7.5 mW with 75% efficiency. In this paper, we present the use of this converter as a power supply for a concept design of a wearable (15 mm × 15 mm) 1-lead ECG front-end sensor device that simultaneously harvests power and communicates with external receivers when exposed to a suitable RF field. Due to voltage range limitations of the fabrication process of the current prototype chip, we focus our analysis solely on the power supply of the ECG front-end whose design is also detailed in this paper. Measurement results show not just that the power supplied is regulated, clean and does not infringe upon the ECG bandwidth, but that there is negligible difference between signals acquired using standard linear power-supplies and when the power is regulated by our power management chip. PMID:26610497

  20. Concept Design for a 1-Lead Wearable/Implantable ECG Front-End: Power Management.

    PubMed

    George, Libin; Gargiulo, Gaetano Dario; Lehmann, Torsten; Hamilton, Tara Julia

    2015-11-19

    Power supply quality and stability are critical for wearable and implantable biomedical applications. For this reason we have designed a reconfigurable switched-capacitor DC-DC converter that, aside from having an extremely small footprint (with an active on-chip area of only 0.04 mm²), uses a novel output voltage control method based upon a combination of adaptive gain and discrete frequency scaling control schemes. This novel DC-DC converter achieves a measured output voltage range of 1.0 to 2.2 V with power delivery up to 7.5 mW with 75% efficiency. In this paper, we present the use of this converter as a power supply for a concept design of a wearable (15 mm × 15 mm) 1-lead ECG front-end sensor device that simultaneously harvests power and communicates with external receivers when exposed to a suitable RF field. Due to voltage range limitations of the fabrication process of the current prototype chip, we focus our analysis solely on the power supply of the ECG front-end whose design is also detailed in this paper. Measurement results show not just that the power supplied is regulated, clean and does not infringe upon the ECG bandwidth, but that there is negligible difference between signals acquired using standard linear power-supplies and when the power is regulated by our power management chip.

  1. Insulating electrodes: a review on biopotential front ends for dielectric skin-electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Enrique; Haberman, Marcelo

    2010-10-01

    Insulating electrodes, also known as capacitive electrodes, allow acquiring biopotentials without galvanic contact with the body. They operate with displacement currents instead of real charge currents, and the electrolytic electrode-skin interface is replaced by a dielectric film. The use of insulating electrodes is not the end of electrode interface problems but the beginning of new ones: coupling capacitances are of the order of pF calling for ultra-high input impedance amplifiers and careful biasing, guarding and shielding techniques. In this work, the general requirements of front ends for capacitive electrodes are presented and the different contributions to the overall noise are discussed and estimated. This analysis yields that noise bounds depend on features of the available devices as current and voltage noise, but the final noise level also depends on parasitic capacitances, requiring a careful shield and printed circuit design. When the dielectric layer is placed on the skin, the present-day amplifiers allow achieving noise levels similar to those provided by wet electrodes. Furthermore, capacitive electrode technology allows acquiring high quality ECG signals through thin clothes. A prototype front end for capacitive electrodes was built and tested. ECG signals were acquired with these electrodes in direct contact with the skin and also through cotton clothes 350 µm thick. They were compared with simultaneously acquired signals by means of wet electrodes and no significant differences were observed between both output signals.

  2. Top Ten Reasons for DEOX as a Front End to Pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    B.R. Westphal; K.J. Bateman; S.D. Herrmann

    2007-11-01

    A front end step is being considered to augment chopping during the treatment of spent oxide fuel by pyroprocessing. The front end step, termed DEOX for its emphasis on decladding via oxidation, employs high temperatures to promote the oxidation of UO2 to U3O8 via an oxygen carrier gas. During oxidation, the spent fuel experiences a 30% increase in lattice structure volume resulting in the separation of fuel from cladding with a reduced particle size. A potential added benefit of DEOX is the removal of fission products, either via direct release from the broken fuel structure or via oxidation and volatilization by the high temperature process. Fuel element chopping is the baseline operation to prepare spent oxide fuel for an electrolytic reduction step. Typical chopping lengths range from 1 to 5 mm for both individual elements and entire assemblies. During electrolytic reduction, uranium oxide is reduced to metallic uranium via a lithium molten salt. An electrorefining step is then performed to separate a majority of the fission products from the recoverable uranium. Although DEOX is based on a low temperature oxidation cycle near 500oC, additional conditions have been tested to distinguish their effects on the process.[1] Both oxygen and air have been utilized during the oxidation portion followed by vacuum conditions to temperatures as high as 1200oC. In addition, the effects of cladding on fission product removal have also been investigated with released fuel to temperatures greater than 500oC.

  3. High Performances and Low Cost Front-End Electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P.; Nayman, P.; Toussenel, F.; Delagnes, E.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Hermann, G.

    2008-12-24

    The current Imaging Arrays of Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) show that this technique is mature. Front-end electronics based on analogue pipelines become a popular readout solution. Slow noise and low power consumption ASICs were developed with improved dynamical range and linearity. A large bandwidth preserves the characteristics of the signal and fast readout reduces dead time. Next generation of IACT should reach an order of magnitude in sensitivity in a wide energy band, ranging from 10 GeV to more than 100 TeV. This goal can be reached with an array of 50-100 telescopes of various sizes at various spacings. With about 2 000 channels per camera a significant effort must be done to lower the overall cost and improve the performances of the electronics. Mass production will be determinant for lowering the overall cost. A gain in cost and performances can be obtained by maximising the integration of the front-end electronics in an ASIC. The amplifiers, analogue memories, digitization and first level buffering can be embedded in the same component. The first stage of the first level trigger should be also considered in this integration. Integrated electronics leads to a more compact camera and an easier maintenance on site.

  4. Single event effect hardness for the front-end ASICs in the DAMPE satellite BGO calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Di; Feng, Chang-Qing; Xi, Kai; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a Chinese scientific satellite designed for cosmic ray studies with a primary scientific goal of indirect detection of dark matter particles. As a crucial sub-detector, the BGO calorimeter measures the energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. In order to implement high-density front-end electronics (FEE) with the ability to measure 1848 signals from 616 photomultiplier tubes on the strictly constrained satellite platform, two kinds of 32-channel front-end ASICs, VA160 and VATA160, are customized. However, a space mission period of more than 3 years makes single event effects (SEEs) become threats to reliability. In order to evaluate SEE sensitivities of these chips and verify the effectiveness of mitigation methods, a series of laser-induced and heavy ion-induced SEE tests were performed. Benefiting from the single event latch-up (SEL) protection circuit for power supply, the triple module redundancy (TMR) technology for the configuration registers and the optimized sequential design for the data acquisition process, 52 VA160 chips and 32 VATA160 chips have been applied in the flight model of the BGO calorimeter with radiation hardness assurance. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-4) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WK2030040048)

  5. Status and specifications of a Project X front-end accelerator test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Steimel, J.; Webber, R.; Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Evans-Peoples, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the construction and operational status of an accelerator test facility for Project X. The purpose of this facility is for Project X component development activities that benefit from beam tests and any development activities that require 325 MHz or 650 MHz RF power. It presently includes an H- beam line, a 325 MHz superconducting cavity test facility, a 325 MHz (pulsed) RF power source, and a 650 MHz (CW) RF power source. The paper also discusses some specific Project X components that will be tested in the facility. Fermilab's future involves new facilities to advance the intensity frontier. In the early 2000's, the vision was a pulsed, superconducting, 8 GeV linac capable of injecting directly into the Fermilab Main Injector. Prototyping the front-end of such a machine started in 2005 under a program named the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS). While the HINS test facility was being constructed, the concept of a new, more versatile accelerator for the intensity frontier, now called Project X, was forming. This accelerator comprises a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac with an associated experimental program, followed by a pulsed 8 GeV superconducting linac to feed the Main Injector synchrotron. The CW Project X design is now the model for Fermilab's future intensity frontier program. Although CW operation is incompatible with the original HINS front-end design, the installation remains useful for development and testing many Project X components.

  6. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, II, D. G.; Poon, A. W.P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolution performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.

  7. FERMI: a digital Front End and Readout MIcrosystem for high resolution calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexanian, H.; Appelquist, G.; Bailly, P.; Benetta, R.; Berglund, S.; Bezamat, J.; Blouzon, F.; Bohm, C.; Breveglieri, L.; Brigati, S.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Dadda, L.; David, J.; Engström, M.; Genat, J. F.; Givoletti, M.; Goggi, V. G.; Gong, S.; Grieco, G. M.; Hansen, M.; Hentzell, H.; Holmberg, T.; Höglund, I.; Inkinen, S. J.; Kerek, A.; Landi, C.; Ledortz, O.; Lippi, M.; Lofstedt, B.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Maloberti, F.; Mutz, S.; Nayman, P.; Piuri, V.; Polesello, G.; Sami, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwemling, P.; Stefanelli, R.; Sundblad, R.; Svensson, C.; Torelli, G.; Vanuxem, J. P.; Yamdagni, N.; Yuan, J.; Ödmark, A.; Fermi Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    We present a digital solution for the front-end electronics of high resolution calorimeters at future colliders. It is based on analogue signal compression, high speed {A}/{D} converters, a fully programmable pipeline and a digital signal processing (DSP) chain with local intelligence and system supervision. This digital solution is aimed at providing maximal front-end processing power by performing waveform analysis using DSP methods. For the system integration of the multichannel device a multi-chip, silicon-on-silicon multi-chip module (MCM) has been adopted. This solution allows a high level of integration of complex analogue and digital functions, with excellent flexibility in mixing technologies for the different functional blocks. This type of multichip integration provides a high degree of reliability and programmability at both the function and the system level, with the additional possibility of customising the microsystem to detector-specific requirements. For enhanced reliability in high radiation environments, fault tolerance strategies, i.e. redundancy, reconfigurability, majority voting and coding for error detection and correction, are integrated into the design.

  8. Characterization of RF front-ends by long-tail pulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.

    2010-04-01

    The recognition of unauthorized communications devices at the entry-point of a secure location is one way to guard against the compromise of sensitive information by wireless transmission. Such recognition may be achieved by backscatter x-ray and millimeter-wave imaging; however, implementation of these systems is expensive, and the ability to image the contours of the human body has raised privacy concerns. In this paper, we present a cheaper and less-invasive radio-frequency (RF) alternative for recognizing wireless communications devices. Characterization of the device-under-test (DUT) is accomplished using a stepped-frequency radar waveform. Single-frequency pulses excite resonance in the device's RF front-end. Microsecond periods of zero-signal are placed between each frequency transition to listen for the resonance. The stepped-frequency transmission is swept through known communications bands. Reception of a long-tail decay response between active pulses indicates the presence of a narrowband filter and implies the presence of a front-end circuit. The frequency of the received resonance identifies its communications band. In this work, cellular-band and handheld-radio filters are characterized.

  9. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    DOE PAGES

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; ...

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolutionmore » performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.« less

  10. Multichannel analog front-end and analog-to-digital converter ICs for silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Y. I.; Butuzov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Integrated circuit (IC) of multichannel analog front-end and a mixed-signal chip of multichannel analog-to-digital converter are presented. A chipset of these two ICs is intended for readout, analog preprocessing and analog to digital conversion of silicon photomultiplier array signals. The number of channels of the analog front-end IC as well as the types of their input stages depends on the application. The current test version of the chip contains three current-input channels and three voltage-input channels. Each of the channels includes a programmable pre-amplifier, integrator with baseline-holder, code-controlled amplifier, amplitude discriminator, two programmable timers, pulse-shaping low-pass filter, peak detector, and an output buffer with baseline tuning circuitry. The analog IC has code-configurable architecture. The mixed-signal IC includes nine main channels and one auxiliary channel, containing 10-bit analog-to-digital converter in each channel. It also has a buffer memory and a voltage reference. The chip features low power consumption, which is less than 0.5 mW per channel at a sampling rate of 100 kHz. Both ICs are implemented in 0.35 μm CMOS technology.

  11. The next generation Front-End Controller for the Phase-I Upgrade of the CMS Hadron Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, F.; Behrens, U.; Campbell, A.; Karakaya, T.; Martens, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. A.; Sahin, M. O.

    2017-03-01

    The next generation Front-End Controller (ngFEC) is the system responsible for slow and fast control within the Phase-I Upgrade of the CMS Hadron Calorimeters. It is based on the FC7, a μTCA compatible Advanced Mezzanine Card developed at CERN and built around the Xilinx Kintex®-7 FPGA. The ngFEC decodes the 40.0788 MHz LHC clock and the synchronization signals received from the backplane and distributes them to the front-end electronics through six GBT links. The latency of the fast control signals is fixed across power cycles. Even if the direct link to a front-end module is broken, a redundancy scheme ensures a successful communication using the link to the neighboring front-end module. Thanks to the ngFEC all front-end modules can be remotely programmed using the JTAG standard protocol. The CCM server software interfaces the ngFEC to the Detector Control System which constantly monitors voltages and temperatures on the front-end electronics. This document reviews the characteristics and the development status of the ngFEC.

  12. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-09-02

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an "MR reader" stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5-2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm², while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is -0.79-0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is -0.68-0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement error is within

  13. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an “MR reader” stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5–2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm2, while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is −0.79–0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is −0.68–0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement

  14. A new ATLAS pixel front-end IC for upgraded LHC luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, M.; Arutinov, D.; Beccherle, R.; Darbo, G.; Ely, R.; Fougeron, D.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gnani, D.; Hemperek, T.; Karagounis, M.; Kluit, R.; Kostioukhine, V.; Mekkaoui, A.; Menouni, M.; Schipper, J.-D.

    2009-06-01

    A new pixel Front-End (FE) IC is being developed in a 130 nm technology for use in the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector. The new pixel FE will be made of smaller pixels (50×250 μm vs. 50×400 μm for the present FE, FE-I3), a much improved active area over inactive area ratio, and a new analog pixel chain tuned for low power and new detector input capacitance. The higher luminosity for which this IC is tuned implies a complete redefinition of the digital architecture logic, which will not be based on End-of-Column data buffering but on local pixel logic and local pixel data storage. An overview of the new FE is given with particular emphasis on the new digital logic architecture and possible architecture variations.

  15. Front-end electronics for the tagger of the BGO-OD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messi, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    The BGO-OD experiment is intended for the systematic investigation of the photo-production of mesons off the nucleon. The experiment will use bremsstrahlung photons from an e- beam incident upon a thin radiator. The photon energy will be measured via the deflection of the electrons in the magnetic field of a photon tagger. The B-FrED is a 16 channel double-threshold discriminator and shaper board designed as Front-End Electronics for the new Tagger detector of the experiment. It is a 6U-VME form factor card. The analog input stage has 1.7 GHz bandwidth. The output stage provides two LVDS signals with an expected jitter of ∼ 8 ps with respect to the input signal. The threshold settings are managed by a micro-controller which is remotely accessible through Ethernet.

  16. HDI flexible front-end hybrid prototype for the PS module of the CMS tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, M.; Blanchot, G.; Gadek, T.; Honma, A.; Koliatos, A.

    2017-02-01

    The CMS tracker upgrade for the HL-LHC relies on different module types, depending on the position of the respective module. They are built with high-density interconnection flexible circuits that are wire bonded to silicon strip and pixel-strip sensors. The Front-End hybrids will contain several flip-chip bonded readout ASICs that are still under development. Mock-up prototypes are used to qualify the advanced flexible circuit technology and the parameters of the hybrids. This paper presents the Pixel-Strip (PS) mock-up hybrid in terms of testing, interconnection, fold-over, thermal properties and layout feasibility. Plans for circuit testing at operating temperature (-30o) are also presented.

  17. Radiation Protection Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Front End Enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Vollaire, J.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; Leitner, M.Santana; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Front End Enclosure (FEE) of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a shielding housing located between the electron dump area and the first experimental hutch. The upstream part of the FEE hosts the commissioning diagnostics for the FEL beam. In the downstream part of the FEE, two sets of grazing incidence mirror and several collimators are used to direct the beam to one of the experimental stations and reduce the bremsstrahlung background and the hard component of the spontaneous radiation spectrum. This paper addresses the beam loss assumptions and radiation sources entering the FEE used for the design of the FEE shielding using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The beam containment system prevents abnormal levels of radiations inside the FEE and ensures that the beam remains in its intended path is also described.

  18. Radiation damage testing of transistors for SSC front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.; Ekenberg, T.; Stevens, A. ); Kraner, H.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S. ); Kerns, S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Over the ten year expected lifetime of a typical SSC detector operating at the design luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, the front-end electronics at large pseudorapidities may receive total doses as high as 20 MRad(Si) of ionizing radiation and 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. Discrete JFETs and monolithic MOS and bipolar transistors have been irradiated at 10 MRad(Si) and 10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, and the effect on transfer characteristics and noise performance have been measured. All transistors were still functional after irradiation but suffered increased noise and the MOS transistors showed significant threshold shifts and increased leakage currents. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Ionization Readout Electronics for SuperCDMS SNOLAB Employing a HEMT Front-End

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, R.

    2014-09-01

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment seeks to deploy 200 kg of cryogenic Ge detectors employing phonon and ionization readout to identify dark matter interactions. One of the design challenges for the experiment is to provide amplification of the high impedance ionization signal while minimizing power dissipation and noise. This paper describes the design and expected performance of the ionization readout being developed for an engineering model of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB Ge Tower System. The readout features the use of a low-noise HEMT front end transistor operating at 4 K to achieve a power dissipation of 100 W per channel, local grounding to minimize noise injection, and biasing circuitry that allows precise control of the HEMT operating point.

  20. FAME, a microprocessor based front-end analysis and modeling environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, J. D.; Kutin, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    Higher order software (HOS) is a methodology for the specification and verification of large scale, complex, real time systems. The HOS methodology was implemented as FAME (front end analysis and modeling environment), a microprocessor based system for interactively developing, analyzing, and displaying system models in a low cost user-friendly environment. The nature of the model is such that when completed it can be the basis for projection to a variety of forms such as structured design diagrams, Petri-nets, data flow diagrams, and PSL/PSA source code. The user's interface with the analyzer is easily recognized by any current user of a structured modeling approach; therefore extensive training is unnecessary. Furthermore, when all the system capabilities are used one can check on proper usage of data types, functions, and control structures thereby adding a new dimension to the design process that will lead to better and more easily verified software designs.

  1. Integration and alignment through mechanical measurements: the example of the ESPRESSO front-end units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Matteo; Pariani, Giorgio; Moschetti, Manuele; Riva, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Traditional techniques usually rely on optical feedback to align optical elements over all the degrees of freedom needed. This strongly iterative process implies the use of bulky and/or flexible adjustable mountings. Another solution under study consists in the characterization of every optomechanical elements and the integration of the parts without any optical feedback. The characterization can be performed using different 3D Coordinate Measuring Machines (like Laser Tracker, Articulated Arms and Cartesian ones) and referencing different parts like the optomechanical mounts or the optical surfaces. The alignment of the system is done adjusting the six degrees of freedom of every element with metallic shims. Those calibrated elements are used to correct the interfaces position of the semikinematic system composed by 3 screws and 3 pins. In this paper, the integration and alignment of the ESPRESSO Front End Units (FEUs) will be used as pathfinder to test different alignment methods and evaluate their performances.

  2. Ka-Band SiGe Receiver Front-End MMIC for Transponder Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, Jaikrishna; Mysoor, Narayan R.; Hashemi, Hassein; Aflatouni, Firooz

    2010-01-01

    A fully integrated, front-end Ka-band monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) was developed that houses an LNA (low noise amplifier) stage, a down-conversion stage, and output buffer amplifiers. The MMIC design employs a two-step quadrature down-conversion architecture, illustrated in the figure, which results in improved quality of the down-converted IF quadrature signals. This is due to the improved sensitivity of this architecture to amplitude and phase mismatches in the quadrature down-conversion process. Current sharing results in reduced power consumption, while 3D-coupled inductors reduce the chip area. Improved noise figure is expected over previous SiGe-based, frontend designs

  3. An electron front end for the Fermilab multi-species 8 GeV SCRF linac

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe R.-G. Piot; G W Foster

    2004-07-08

    Fermilab is considering a 8 GeV superconducting linac whose primary mission is to serve as an intense H{sup -} injector for the main injector. This accelerator is also planned to be used for accelerating various other species (e.g. electrons, protons and muons). In the present paper we investigate the possibility of such a linac to accelerate high-brightness electron beam up to {approx} 7 GeV. We propose a design for the electron front end based on a photoinjector and consider the electron beam dynamics along the linac. Start-to-end simulations of the full accelerator for electrons are presented. Finally the potential applications of such an electron beam are outlined.

  4. Stray light assessment and mitigation for the DESI front-end optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy N.; Lampton, Michael; Besuner, Robert W.; Sholl, Michael J.; Liang, Ming; Ellis, Scott

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe, using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique and the growth of structure using redshift-space distortions (RSD). The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 square degrees will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We will describe modeling and mitigation of stray light within the front end of DESI, consisting of the Mayall telescope and the corrector assembly. This includes the creation of a stray light model, quantitative analysis of the unwanted light at the corrector focal surface, identification of the main scattering sources, and a description of mitigation strategies to remove the sources.

  5. PDP-11 front-end for a VAX-11/780

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, M.J.; Granieri, C.; Sherden, D.J.; Weaver, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    An unpublicized feature of the VAX-11/780 is the provision for attaching a PDP-11 to the VAX UNIBUS Adapter. Doing this can give significantly improved I/O performance for applications which are limited by overhead in the VAX I/O driver rather than by the transfer speed of the UNIBUS itself. Such a system was implemented by using a PDP-11/04 as a front-end to a CAMAC data acquisition system. Both the PDP and the VAX have full access to the UNIBUS. That portion of the PDP address space that does not have UNIBUS memory can be mapped to buffers in the VAX memory; this approach allows the PDP to access VAX memory and to initiate DMA transfers directly to the VAX. The VAX also has full access to the PDP memory; a convenient means for developing and downloading the PDP software is thus provided. 5 figures.

  6. Optimizing the front end test stand high performance H{sup -} ion source at RAL

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D.; Lawrie, S.; Gabor, C.; Letchford, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wood, T.; Perkins, M.

    2012-02-15

    The aim of the front end test stand project is to demonstrate that chopped low energy H{sup -} beams of high quality can be produced. The beam line currently consists of the ion source, a 3 solenoid low energy beam transport and a suite of diagnostics. A brief status report of the radio frequency quadrupole is given. This paper details the work to optimize the ion source performance. A new high power pulsed discharge power supply with greater reliability has been developed to allow long term, stable operation at 50 Hz with a 60 A, 2.2 ms discharge pulse and up to 100 A at 1.2 ms. The existing extraction power supply has been modified to operate up to 22 kV. Results from optical spectroscopy measurements and their application to source optimization are summarized. Source emittances and beam currents of 60 mA are reported.

  7. Low material budget microfabricated cooling devices for particle detectors and front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, A.; Catinaccio, A.; Daguin, J.; van Lintel, H.; Nuessle, G.; Petagna, P.; Renaud, P.

    2011-06-01

    Novel cooling systems with very low material budget are being fabricated and studied. They consist of silicon wafers in which microchannels are etched and closed by bonding another wafer. This cooling option is being considered for future HEP detectors of the sLHC and linear colliders. It is currently under investigation as an option for the cooling of the NA62 Gigatracker silicon pixel detector and its front-end electronics where the microfabricated cooling plate would stand directly in the beam. In this particular case, microchannel cooling meets both the very aggressive X 0 (0.15%) specifications and the anticipated 2 W/cm 2 power dissipation by the active electronics.

  8. Multi-channel front-end board for SiPM readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Kreslo, I.; Lorca, D.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Sinclair, J.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    We describe a novel high-speed front-end electronic board (FEB) for interfacing an array of 32 Silicon Photo-multipliers (SiPM) with a computer. The FEB provides individually adjustable bias for the SiPMs, and performs low-noise analog signal amplification, conditioning and digitization. It provides event timing information accurate to 1.3 ns RMS. The signal-to-noise ratio of 12 is attained for the first photo-electron peak. The back-end data interface is realized on the basis of 100 Mbps Ethernet. The design allows daisy-chaining of up to 256 units into one network interface, thus enabling compact and efficient readout schemes for multi-channel scintillating detectors, using SiPMs as photo-sensors.

  9. Design of fast signal processing readout front-end electronics implemented in CMOS 40 nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleczek, Rafal

    2016-12-01

    The author presents considerations on the design of fast readout front-end electronics implemented in a CMOS 40 nm technology with an emphasis on the system dead time, noise performance and power dissipation. The designed processing channel consists of a charge sensitive amplifier with different feedback types (Krummenacher, resistive and constant current blocks), a threshold setting block, a discriminator and a counter with logic circuitry. The results of schematic and post-layout simulations with randomly generated input pulses in a time domain according to the Poisson distribution are presented and analyzed. Dead time below 20 ns is possible while keeping noise ENC ≈ 90 e- for a detector capacitance CDET = 160 fF.

  10. The first photon shutter development for APS insertion device beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Deming; Nian, H.L.T.; Wang, Zhibi; Collins, J.T.; Ryding, D.G.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most critical components on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) beamline front ends is the first photon shutter. It operates in two modes to fully intercept the high total power and high-heat flux ID photon beam in seconds (normal mode) or in less than 100 ms (emergency fast mode). It is designed to operate in ultra high vacuum (UHV). The design incorporates a multi-channel rectangular bar, bent in a hockey stick'' configuration, with two-point suspension. The flanged end is an articulated bellows with rolling hinges. The actuation end is a spring-assisted, pneumatic fail-safe flexural pivot type. The coolant (water) channels incorporate brazed copper foam to enhance the heat transfer, a tube technology particular to the APS. The design development, and material aspects, as well as the extensive thermal and vibrational analyses in support of the design, are presented in this paper.

  11. The first photon shutter development for APS insertion device beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Deming; Nian, H.L.T.; Wang, Zhibi; Collins, J.T.; Ryding, D.G.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-09-01

    One of the most critical components on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) beamline front ends is the first photon shutter. It operates in two modes to fully intercept the high total power and high-heat flux ID photon beam in seconds (normal mode) or in less than 100 ms (emergency fast mode). It is designed to operate in ultra high vacuum (UHV). The design incorporates a multi-channel rectangular bar, bent in a ``hockey stick`` configuration, with two-point suspension. The flanged end is an articulated bellows with rolling hinges. The actuation end is a spring-assisted, pneumatic fail-safe flexural pivot type. The coolant (water) channels incorporate brazed copper foam to enhance the heat transfer, a tube technology particular to the APS. The design development, and material aspects, as well as the extensive thermal and vibrational analyses in support of the design, are presented in this paper.

  12. ANALOG FRONT-END ELECTRONICS FOR BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENT ON THE BEAM HALO MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. SHURTER; T.J. COTE; J.D. GILPATRICK

    2001-06-01

    Enhancements have been made to the log-ratio analog front-end electronics based on the Analog Devices 8307 logarithmic amplifier as used on the LEDA accelerator. The dynamic range of greater than 85 dB, has been extended to nearly the full capability of the AD8307 from the previous design of approximately 65 dB through the addition of a 350 MHz band-pass filter, careful use of ground and power plane placement, signal routing, and power supply bypassing. Additionally, selection of high-isolation RF switches (55dB) has been an integral part of a new calibration technique, which is fully described in another paper submitted to this conference. Provision has also been made for insertion of a first-stage low-noise amplifier for using the circuit under low-signal conditions.

  13. Onboard calibration circuit for the DAMPE BGO calorimeter front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Liang; Feng, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Bin; Wang, Qi; Ma, Si-Yuan; Shen, Zhong-Tao; Jiang, Di; Gao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yun-Long; Guo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-05-01

    DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite which is mainly aimed at indirectly searching for dark matter in space. One critical sub-detector of the DAMPE payload is the BGO (bismuth germanium oxide) calorimeter, which contains 1848 PMT (photomultiplier tube) dynodes and 16 FEE (Front-End Electronics) boards. VA160 and VATA160, two 32-channel low power ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), are adopted as the key components on the FEEs to perform charge measurement for the PMT signals. In order to monitor the parameter drift which may be caused by temperature variation, aging, or other environmental factors, an onboard calibration circuit is designed for the VA160 and VATA160 ASICs. It is mainly composed of a 12-bit DAC (Digital to Analog Converter), an operational amplifier and an analog switch. Test results showed that a dynamic range of 0-30 pC with a precision of 5 fC (Root Meam Square, RMS) was achieved, which covers the VA160’s input range. It can be used to compensate for the temperature drift and test the trigger function of the FEEs. The calibration circuit has been implemented for the front-end electronics of the BGO Calorimeter and verified by all the environmental tests for both Qualification Model and Flight Model of DAMPE. The DAMPE satellite was launched at the end of 2015 and the calibration circuit will operate periodically in space. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-4), and National Basic Research Program (973 Program) of China (2010CB833002) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11273070)

  14. Scintillation counter and wire chamber front end modules for high energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; DalMonte, Lou; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    This document describes two front-end modules developed for the proposed MIPP upgrade (P-960) experiment at Fermilab. The scintillation counter module was developed for the Plastic Ball detector time and charge measurements. The module has eight LEMO 00 input connectors terminated with 50 ohms and accepts negative photomultiplier signals in the range 0.25...1000 pC with the maximum input voltage of 4.0 V. Each input has a passive splitter with integration and differentiation times of {approx}20 ns. The integrated portion of the signal is digitized at 26.55 MHz by Analog Devices AD9229 12-bit pipelined 4-channel ADC. The differentiated signal is discriminated for time measurement and sent to one of the four TMC304 inputs. The 4-channel TMC304 chip allows high precision time measurement of rising and falling edges with {approx}100 ps resolution and has internal digital pipeline. The ADC data is also pipelined which allows deadtime-less operation with trigger decision times of {approx}4 {micro}s. The wire chamber module was developed for MIPP EMCal detector charge measurements. The 32-channel digitizer accepts differential analog signals from four 8-channel integrating wire amplifiers. The connection between wire amplifier and digitizer is provided via 26-wire twist-n-flat cable. The wire amplifier integrates input wire current and has sensitivity of 275 mV/pC and the noise level of {approx}0.013 pC. The digitizer uses the same 12-bit AD9229 ADC chip as the scintillator counter module. The wire amplifier has a built-in test pulser with a mask register to provide testing of the individual channels. Both modules are implemented as a 6Ux220 mm VME size board with 48-pin power connector. A custom europack (VME) 21-slot crate is developed for housing these front-end modules.

  15. Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System

    SciTech Connect

    Mighton, Steven, J.

    2007-08-06

    Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the company’s global facility environmental footprint.

  16. The front-end chip of the SuperB SVT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, F.; Comotti, D.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Fabbri, L.; Gabrielli, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Sbarra, C.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Bevan, A.; Wilson, F.; Beck, G.; Morris, J.; Ganaway, F.; Cenci, R.; Bombelli, L.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fiorini, C.; Liberali, V.; Monti, M.; Nasri, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stabile, A.; Balestri, G.; Batignani, G.; Bernardelli, A.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morsani, F.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Petragnani, G.; Profeti, A.; Rizzo, G.; Soldani, A.; Walsh, J.; Gaioni, L.; Manazza, A.; Quartieri, E.; Ratti, L.; Zucca, S.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fontana, G.; Pancheri, L.; Povoli, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Bosisio, L.; Lanceri, L.; Rashevskaya, I.; Stella, C.; Vitale, L.

    2013-08-01

    The asymmetric e+e- collider SuperB is designed to deliver a high luminosity, greater than 1036cm-2s-1, with moderate beam currents and a reduced center of mass boost with respect to earlier B-Factories. The innermost detector is the Silicon Vertex Tracker which is made of 5 layers of double sided silicon strip sensors plus a layer 0, that can be equipped with short striplets detectors in a first phase of the experiment. In order to achieve an overall track reconstruction efficiency above 98% it is crucial to optimize both analog and digital readout circuits. The readout architecture being developed for the front-end chips will be able to cope with the very high rates expected in the first layer. The digital readout will be optimized to be fully efficient for hit rates up to 2 MHz/strip, including large margins on the maximum expected background rates, but can potentially accommodate higher rates with a proper tuning of the buffer depth. The readout is based on a triggered architecture where each of the 128 strip channel is provided with a dedicated digital buffer. Each buffer collects the digitized charge information by means of a 4-bit TOT, storing it in conjunction with the related time stamp. The depth of buffers was dimensioned considering the expected trigger latency and hit rate including suitable safety margins. Every buffer is connected to a highly parallelized circuit handling the trigger logic, rejecting expired data in the buffers and channeling the parallel stream of triggered hits to the common output of the chip. The presented architecture has been modeled by HDL language and investigated with a Monte Carlo hit generator emulating the analog front-end behavior. The simulations showed that even applying the highest stressing conditions, about 2 MHz per strip, the efficiency of the digital readout remained above 99.8%.

  17. Toward a fully integrated neurostimulator with inductive power recovery front-end.

    PubMed

    Mounaïm, Fayçal; Sawan, Mohamad

    2012-08-01

    In order to investigate new neurostimulation strategies for micturition recovery in spinal cord injured patients, custom implantable stimulators are required to carry-on chronic animal experiments. However, higher integration of the neurostimulator becomes increasingly necessary for miniaturization purposes, power consumption reduction, and for increasing the number of stimulation channels. As a first step towards total integration, we present in this paper the design of a highly-integrated neurostimulator that can be assembled on a 21-mm diameter printed circuit board. The prototype is based on three custom integrated circuits fabricated in High-Voltage (HV) CMOS technology, and a low-power small-scale commercially available FPGA. Using a step-down approach where the inductive voltage is left free up to 20 V, the inductive power and data recovery front-end is fully integrated. In particular, the front-end includes a bridge rectifier, a 20-V voltage limiter, an adjustable series regulator (5 to 12 V), a switched-capacitor step-down DC/DC converter (1:3, 1:2, or 2:3 ratio), as well as data recovery. Measurements show that the DC/DC converter achieves more than 86% power efficiency while providing around 3.9-V from a 12-V input at 1-mA load, 1:3 conversion ratio, and 50-kHz switching frequency. With such efficiency, the proposed step-down inductive power recovery topology is more advantageous than its conventional step-up counterpart. Experimental results confirm good overall functionality of the system.

  18. Measures of the environmental footprint of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (FEFC) have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. This work builds upon reports from operating facilities and other primary data sources to build a database of front end environmental impacts. This work also addresses land transformation and water withdrawals associated with the processes of the FEFC. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, depleted uranium disposition, and transportation. To allow summing the impacts across processes, all impacts were normalized per tonne of natural uranium mined as well as per MWh(e) of electricity produced, a more conventional unit for measuring environmental impacts that facilitates comparison with other studies. This conversion was based on mass balances and process efficiencies associated with the current once-through LWR fuel cycle. Total energy input is calculated at 8.7 x 10- 3 GJ(e)/MWh(e) of electricity and 5.9 x 10- 3 GJ(t)/MWh(e) of thermal energy. It is dominated by the energy required for uranium extraction, conversion to fluoride compound for subsequent enrichment, and enrichment. An estimate of the carbon footprint is made from the direct energy consumption at 1.7 kg CO2/MWh(e). Water use is likewise dominated by requirements of uranium extraction, totaling 154 L/MWh(e). Land use is calculated at 8 x 10- 3 m2/MWh(e), over 90% of which is due to uranium extraction. Quantified impacts are limited to those resulting from activities performed within the FEFC process facilities (i.e. within the plant gates). Energy embodied in material inputs such as process chemicals and fuel cladding is identified but not explicitly quantified in this study. Inclusion of indirect energy associated with embodied energy as well as construction and decommissioning of facilities could increase the FEFC energy intensity estimate by a factor of up

  19. A generic firmware core to drive the Front-End GBT-SCAs for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Caplan, C.; Gaspar, C.; Jacobsson, R.; Wyllie, K.

    2015-02-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity. The entire Front-End electronics will be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancy, higher data rate and to work in a complete trigger-less fashion. In this paper, we describe a novel way to transmit slow control information to the Front-End electronics, by profiting from bidirectional optical connections and the GBT and GBT-SCA chipset capabilities. The implementation and preliminary validation tests are shown as well.

  20. The Virtual Learning Commons: Supporting the Fuzzy Front End of Scientific Research with Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D. D.; Gandara, A.; Gris, I.

    2012-12-01

    The Virtual Learning Commons (VLC), funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Cyberinfrastructure CI-Team Program, is a combination of Semantic Web, mash up, and social networking tools that supports knowledge sharing and innovation across scientific disciplines in research and education communities and networks. The explosion of scientific resources (data, models, algorithms, tools, and cyberinfrastructure) challenges the ability of researchers to be aware of resources that might benefit them. Even when aware, it can be difficult to understand enough about those resources to become potential adopters or re-users. Often scientific data and emerging technologies have little documentation, especially about the context of their use. The VLC tackles this challenge by providing mechanisms for individuals and groups of researchers to organize Web resources into virtual collections, and engage each other around those collections in order to a) learn about potentially relevant resources that are available; b) design research that leverages those resources; and c) develop initial work plans. The VLC aims to support the "fuzzy front end" of innovation, where novel ideas emerge and there is the greatest potential for impact on research design. It is during the fuzzy front end that conceptual collisions across disciplines and exposure to diverse perspectives provide opportunity for creative thinking that can lead to inventive outcomes. The VLC integrates Semantic Web functionality for structuring distributed information, mash up functionality for retrieving and displaying information, and social media for discussing/rating information. We are working to provide three views of information that support researchers in different ways: 1. Innovation Marketplace: supports users as they try to understand what research is being conducted, who is conducting it, where they are located, and who they collaborate with; 2. Conceptual Mapper: supports users as they organize their

  1. Front-end ASICs for high-energy astrophysics in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Meuris, A.

    2016-07-01

    In most of embedded imaging systems for space applications, high granularity and increasing size of focal planes justify an almost systematic use of integrated circuits. . To fulfill challenging requirements for excellent spatial and energy resolution, integrated circuits must fit the sensors perfectly and interface the system such a way to optimize simultaneously noise, geometry and architecture. Moreover, very low power consumption and radiation tolerance are mandatory to envision a use onboard a payload in space. Consequently, being part of an optimized detection system for space, the integrated circuit is specifically designed for each application and becomes an Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC). The paper focuses on mixed analog and digital signal ASICs for spectro-imaging systems in the keVMeV energy band. The first part of the paper summarizes the main advantages conferred by the use of front-end ASICs for highenergy astrophysics instruments in space mission. Space qualification of ASICs requires the chip to be radiation hard. The paper will shortly describe some of the typical hardening techniques and give some guidelines that an ASIC designer should follow to choose the most efficient technology for his project. The first task of the front-end electronics is to convert the charge coming from the detector into a voltage. For most of the Silicon detectors (CCD, DEPFET, SDD) this is conversion happens in the detector itself. For other sensor materials, charge preamplifiers operate the conversion. The paper shortly describes the different key parameters of charge preamplifiers and the binding parameters for the design. Filtering is generally mandatory in order to increase the signal to noise ratio or to reduce the duration of the signal. After a brief review on the main noise sources, the paper reviews noise-filtering techniques that are commonly used in Integrated circuits designs. The way sensors and ASICs are interconnected together plays a

  2. The front-end electronics of the LSPE-SWIPE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanelli, F.; Biasotti, M.; Bevilacqua, A.; Siccardi, F.

    2016-07-01

    The SWIPE detector of the Ballon Borne Mission LSPE (see e.g. the contribution of P. de Bernardis et al. in this conference) intends to measure the primordial 'B-mode' polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). For this scope microwave telescopes need sensitive cryogenic bolometers with an overall equivalent noise temperature in the nK range. The detector is a spiderweb bolometer based on transition edge sensor and followed by a SQUID to perform the signal readout. This contribution will concentrate on the design, description and first tests on the front-end electronics which processes the squid output (and controls it). The squid output is first amplified by a very low noise preamplifier based on a discrete JFET input differential architecture followed by a low noise CMOS operational amplifier. Equivalent input noise density is 0.6 nV/Hz and bandwidth extends up to at least 2 MHz. Both devices (JFET and CMOS amplifier) have been tested at liquid nitrogen. The second part of the contribution will discuss design and results of the control electronics, both the flux locked loop for the squid and the slow control chain to monitor and set up the system will be reviewed.

  3. Monolithically Integrated SiGe/Si PIN-HBT Front-End Transimpedance Photoreceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieh, J.-S.; Qasaimeh, O.; Klotzkin, D.; Lu, L.-H.; Katehi, L. P. B.; Yang, K.; Bhattacharya, P.; Croke, E. T.

    1997-01-01

    The demand for monolithically integrated photoreceivers based on Si-based technology keeps increasing as low cost and high reliability products are required for the expanding commercial market. Higher speed and wider operating frequency range are expected when SiGe/Si heterojunction is introduced to the circuit design. In this paper, a monolithic SiGe/Si PIN-HBT front-end transimpedance photoreceiver is demonstrated for the first time. For this purpose, mesa-type SiGe/Si PIN-HBT technology was developed. Fabricated HBTs exhibit f(sub max) of 34 GHz with DC gain of 25. SiGe/Si PIN photodiodes, which share base and collector layers of HBTs, demonstrate responsivity of 0.3 A/W at lambda=850 nm and bandwidth of 450 MHz. Based on these devices, single- and dual-feedback transimpedance amplifiers were fabricated and they exhibited the bandwidth of 3.2 GHz and 3.3 GHz with the transimpedance gain of 45.2 dB(Omega) and 47.4 dB(Omega) respectively. Monolithically integrated single-feedback PIN-HBT photoreceivers were implemented and the bandwidth was measured to be approx. 0.5 GHz, which is limited by the bandwidth of PIN photodiodes.

  4. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system.

    PubMed

    Choong, W-S; Abu-Nimeh, F; Moses, W W; Peng, Q; Vu, C Q; Wu, J-Y

    2015-08-01

    We present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, which allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is "time stamped" by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA. This digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc.

  5. Digital pulse processing and optimization of the front-end electronics for nuclear instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Bobin, C; Bouchard, J; Thiam, C; Ménesguen, Y

    2014-05-01

    This article describes an algorithm developed for the digital processing of signals provided by a high-efficiency well-type NaI(Tl) detector used to apply the 4πγ technique. In order to achieve a low-energy threshold, a new front-end electronics has been specifically designed to optimize the coupling to an analog-to-digital converter (14 bit, 125 MHz) connected to a digital development kit produced by Altera(®). The digital pulse processing is based on an IIR (Infinite Impulse Response) approximation of the Gaussian filter (and its derivatives) that can be applied to the real-time processing of digitized signals. Based on measurements obtained with the photon emissions generated by an (241)Am source, the energy threshold is estimated to be equal to ~2 keV corresponding to the physical threshold of the NaI(Tl) detector. An algorithm developed for a Silicon Drift Detector used for low-energy x-ray spectrometry is also described. In that case, the digital pulse processing is specifically designed for signals provided by a reset-type preamplifier ((55)Fe source).

  6. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    DOE PAGES

    Choong, W. -S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W. W.; ...

    2015-08-12

    Here, we present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, whichmore » allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is "time stamped" by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA. In conclusion, this digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc.« less

  7. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, W. -S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C. Q.; Wu, J. -Y.

    2015-08-12

    Here, we present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, which allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is "time stamped" by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA. In conclusion, this digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc.

  8. Simulation of InP-based monolithically integrated PIN-HEMT front-end optical receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Sheng; Chen, Chao; Bian, Jian-Tao

    2005-01-01

    Model is developed for the dc I-V characteristics and microwave small-signal parameters of the InP-based In0.52Al0.28As/In0.65Ga0.35As HEMT"s based on physical principles, and the effect of the extrinsic source and drain resistances has also been included. Using the parameters obtained by this model and the small-signal model of PIN detector, we simulated the transimpedance configurations with an inverter and a cascode input circuit of monolithically integrated PIN-HEMT front-end optical receiver. The results indicate that the cascode input stage can realize a smaller input capacitance than the inverter-type, so it has a wider bandwidth. In order to operate in 2.5Gb/s transmission system, the cascode input stage is applied and the parameters are optimized. The simulations reveal that the transimpedance gain is larger than 63.2dBΩ and the sensitivity is 30dBm when the bit rate is 2.5Gb/s. The results obtained in this paper provide a guideline for the fabrication of PIN-HEMT optical receiver.

  9. Off-line front-end safety control system for the SPES project at the LNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, J.; Andrighetto, A.; Costa, L.; Bassato, G.; Giacchini, M.

    2012-02-01

    The off-line front-end apparatus of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project, developed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) in Italy, involves a number of subsystems and procedures that are potentially dangerous for both human operators and equipments. Among the most potentially dangerous systems are: the high voltage power supply, the ion source complex power supplies, the target chamber handling mechanisms and the laser source. In order to prevent possible injuries to the operators and damages to the equipments, a safety interlock system and logic monitoring have been developed, tested and are now in operation. The solution is based on Schneider Electrics Preventa family safety modules with capability to control the power supplied to critical subsystems in conjunction with safety detectors for critical variable monitoring. Moreover, a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC),model BMXP342020 from the Schneider Electrics Modicon M340 family, is used to monitor the status of the system as well as to control the sequence of preestablished operations. With the aim to have a user friendly system, a Human Machine Interface (HMI) have been developed using a touch screen model XBTGT5330 from the Schneider Electrics Magelis family, driven by the PLC.

  10. A new front-end ASIC for GEM detectors with time and charge measurement capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciciriello, F.; Corsi, F.; De Robertis, G.; Felici, G.; Loddo, F.; Marzocca, C.; Matarrese, G.; Ranieri, A.

    2016-07-01

    A 32 channel CMOS front-end ASIC has been designed to read out the GEM detectors intended to be used for beam monitoring in a new proton-therapy facility currently under construction. In order to improve the spatial resolution by exploiting charge centroid algorithms, the analog channels, based on the classic CSA+shaper architecture, are equipped with a peak detector (PD) which works as an analog memory during the read-out phase. The outputs of the PDs are multiplexed towards an integrated 8-bit subranging ADC. An accurate trigger signal marks the arrival of a valid event and is generated by fast-ORing the outputs of 32 voltage discriminators which compare the shaper outputs with a programmable threshold. The digital part of the ASIC manages the read-out of the channels, the A/D conversion and the configuration of the ASIC. A 100 Mbit/s LVDS serial link is used for data communication. The sensitivity of the analog channel is 15 mV/fC and the dynamic range is 80 fC. The simulated ENC is about 650 e- for a detector capacitance of 10 pF. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved

  11. A dual slope charge sampling analog front-end for a wireless neural recording system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Bae; Lee, Byunghun; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel dual slope charge sampling (DSCS) analog front-end (AFE) architecture, which amplifies neural signals by taking advantage of the charge sampling concept for analog signal conditioning, such as amplification and filtering. The presented DSCS-AFE achieves amplification, filtering, and sampling in a simultaneous fashion, while consuming very small amount of power. The output of the DSCS-AFE produces a pulse width modulated (PWM) signal that is proportional to the input voltage amplitude. A circular shift register (CSR) utilizes time division multiplexing (TDM) of the PWM pulses to create a pseudo-digital TDM-PWM signal that can feed a wireless transmitter. The 8-channel system-on-a-chip was fabricated in a 0.35-μm CMOS process, occupying 2.4 × 2.1 mm(2) and consuming 255 μW from a 1.8V supply. Measured input-referred noise for the entire system, including the FPGA in order to recover PWM signal is 6.50 μV(rms) in the 288 Hz~10 kHz range. For each channel, sampling rate is 31.25 kHz, and power consumption is 31.8 μW.

  12. FPGA-Based Front-End Electronics for Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Haselman, Michael; Dewitt, Don; McDougald, Wendy; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert; Hauck, Scott

    2009-02-22

    Modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are capable of performing complex discrete signal processing algorithms with clock rates above 100MHz. This combined with FPGA's low expense, ease of use, and selected dedicated hardware make them an ideal technology for a data acquisition system for positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Our laboratory is producing a high-resolution, small-animal PET scanner that utilizes FPGAs as the core of the front-end electronics. For this next generation scanner, functions that are typically performed in dedicated circuits, or offline, are being migrated to the FPGA. This will not only simplify the electronics, but the features of modern FPGAs can be utilizes to add significant signal processing power to produce higher resolution images. In this paper two such processes, sub-clock rate pulse timing and event localization, will be discussed in detail. We show that timing performed in the FPGA can achieve a resolution that is suitable for small-animal scanners, and will outperform the analog version given a low enough sampling period for the ADC. We will also show that the position of events in the scanner can be determined in real time using a statistical positioning based algorithm.

  13. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choong, W.-S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C. Q.; Wu, J.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    We present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, which allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is ``time stamped'' by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA . This digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc.

  14. Physiological motivated transmission-lines as front end for loudness models.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Iko; Mauermann, Manfred; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-05-01

    The perception of loudness is strongly influenced by peripheral auditory processing, which calls for a physiologically correct peripheral auditory processing stage when constructing advanced loudness models. Most loudness models, however, rather follow a functional approach: a parallel auditory filter bank combined with a compression stage, followed by spectral and temporal integration. Such classical loudness models do not allow to directly link physiological measurements like otoacoustic emissions to properties of their auditory filterbank. However, this can be achieved with physiologically motivated transmission-line models (TLMs) of the cochlea. Here two active and nonlinear TLMs were tested as the peripheral front end of a loudness model. The TLMs are followed by a simple generic back end which performs integration of basilar-membrane "excitation" across place and time to yield a loudness estimate. The proposed model approach reaches similar performance as other state-of-the-art loudness models regarding the prediction of loudness in sones, equal-loudness contours (including spectral fine structure), and loudness as a function of bandwidth. The suggested model provides a powerful tool to directly connect objective measures of basilar membrane compression, such as distortion product otoacoustic emissions, and loudness in future studies.

  15. A low power low noise analog front end for portable healthcare system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanchao, Wang; Keren, Ke; Wenhui, Qin; Yajie, Qin; Ting, Yi; Zhiliang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    The presented analog front end (AFE) used to process human bio-signals consists of chopping instrument amplifier (IA), chopping spikes filter and programmable gain and bandwidth amplifier. The capacitor-coupling input of AFE can reject the DC electrode offset. The power consumption of current-feedback based IA is reduced by adopting capacitor divider in the input and feedback network. Besides, IA's input thermal noise is decreased by utilizing complementary CMOS input pairs which can offer higher transconductance. Fabricated in Global Foundry 0.35 μm CMOS technology, the chip consumes 3.96 μA from 3.3 V supply. The measured input noise is 0.85 μVrms (0.5-100 Hz) and the achieved noise efficient factor is 6.48. Project supported by the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (No. 13511501100), the State Key Laboratory Project of China (No. 11MS002), and the State Key Laboratory of ASIC & System, Fudan University.

  16. Advances in Front-end Enabling Technologies for Thermal Infrared ` THz Torch' Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2016-09-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands (typically 20-40 and 60-100 THz) are best known for remote sensing applications that include temperature measurement (e.g. non-contacting thermometers and thermography), night vision and surveillance (e.g. ubiquitous motion sensing and target acquisition). This unregulated part of the electromagnetic spectrum also offers commercial opportunities for the development of short-range secure communications. The ` THz Torch' concept, which fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation by partitioning thermally generated spectral radiance into pre-defined frequency channels, was recently demonstrated by the authors. The thermal radiation within each channel can be independently pulse-modulated, transmitted and detected, to create a robust form of short-range secure communications within the thermal infrared. In this paper, recent progress in the front-end enabling technologies associated with the THz Torch concept is reported. Fundamental limitations of this technology are discussed; possible engineering solutions for further improving the performance of such thermal-based wireless links are proposed and verified either experimentally or through numerical simulations. By exploring a raft of enabling technologies, significant enhancements to both data rate and transmission range can be expected. With good engineering solutions, the THz Torch concept can exploit nineteenth century physics with twentieth century multiplexing schemes for low-cost twenty-first century ubiquitous applications in security and defence.

  17. The MYRRHA ADS Project in Belgium Enters the Front End Engineering Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bruyn, Didier; Abderrahim, Hamid Aït; Baeten, Peter; Leysen, Paul

    The MYRRHA project started in 1998 by SCK•CEN. MYRRHA is a MTR, based on the ADS concept, for material and fuel research, for studying the feasibility of transmutation of Minor Actinides and Long-Lived Fission Products arising from radioactive waste reprocessing and finally for demonstrating at a reasonable power scale the principle of the ADS. The MYRRHA design has progressed through various framework programmes of the European Commission in the context of Partitioning and Transmutation. The design has now entered into the Front End Engineering Phase (FEED) covering the period 2012-2015. The engineering company, which will handle this phase, has been selected and the works have begun in the late 2013. In the mean time we have made some refinements in both primary systems and plant layout, including reactor building design. In this paper, we present the most recent developments of the MYRRHA design in terms of reactor building and plant layout as existing today as well as a preliminary study concerning the spent fuel building of the facility. During the oral presentation we add some preliminary results of the interaction with the FEED contractor and the most recent version of the primary systems.

  18. BPM ANALOG FRONT-END ELECTRONICS BASED ON THE AD8307 LOG AMPLIFIER

    SciTech Connect

    R. SHURTER; ET AL

    2000-06-01

    Beam position monitor (BPM) signal-processing electronics utilizing the Analog Devices AD8307 logarithmic amplifier has been developed for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA), part of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Los Alamos. The low-pass filtered 350 MHz fundamental signal from each of the four microstrip electrodes in a BPM is ''detected'' by an AD8307 log amp, amplified and scaled to accommodate the 0 to +5V input of an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. The resultant four digitized signals represent a linear power relationship to the electrode signals, which are in turn related to beam current and position. As the AD8307 has a potential dynamic range of approximately 92 dB, much attention must be given to noise reduction, sources of which can be digital signals on the same board, power supplies, inter-channel coupling, stray RF and others. This paper will describe the operational experience of this particular analog front-end electronic circuit design.

  19. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. T.; de La Taille, C.; Suomijärvi, T.; Cao, Z.; Deligny, O.; Dulucq, F.; Ge, M. M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Nguyen Trung, T.; Wanlin, E.; Xiao, G.; Yin, L. Q.; Yun Ky, B.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, S. S.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a front-end electronics based on an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented for the future imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). To achieve this purpose, a 16-channel ASIC chip, PARISROC 2 (Photomultiplier ARray Integrated in SiGe ReadOut Chip) is used in the analog signal processing and digitization. The digitized results are sent to the server by a user-defined User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol (UDP/IP) hardcore engine through Ethernet that is managed by a FPGA. A prototype electronics fulfilling the requirements of the Wide Field of View Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA) of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project has been designed, fabricated and tested to prove the concept of the design. A detailed description of the development with the results of the test measurements are presented. By using a new input structure and a new configuration of the ASIC, the dynamic range of the circuit is extended. A highly precise-time calibrating algorithm is also proposed, verified and optimized for the mass production. The test results suggest that the proposed electronics design fulfills the general specification of the future IACTs.

  20. The Front-End Electronics for the HADES RPC Wall (ESTRELA-FEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belver, D.; Garzón, J. A.; Gil, A.; González-Díaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Lange, S.; Marín, J.; Montes, N.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.; Zapata, M.

    2006-08-01

    A new front-end electronics (FEE) system for RPC timing measurements has been developed for the ESTRELA project, which is part of the upgrade of the HADES experiment at GSI. The RPCs will cover an area of 8 m 2 with 2048 electronic channels. The chain consists on 2 boards: a 4-channel daughterboard (DB) and a 32-channel motherboard (MB). The DB uses a fast 2 GHz amplifier that feeds a discriminator with a constant threshold and an operational amplifier for a charge measurement by a Time-Over-Threshold (ToT) method for the integrated signal (for a slewing correction). The MB is connected to 8 DB, and provides voltage regulation, DACs for signal thresholds and a trigger logic. The MB delivers the differential output signals to an external HPTDC chip. Results are presented for (a) narrow electronic test pulses and for (b) RPC signals from gamma photons, showing a timing jitter around 15 ps/channel (for pulses above 100 fC) and 30-40 ps/channel, respectively. Tests with coincidently firing channels reveal levels of cross-talk below a 1% for a threshold of 25 fC, with a degradation of the time resolution of 10 ps at most.

  1. Front-End electronics development for the new Resistive Plate Chamber detector of HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Díaz, J.; Garzón, J. A.; González-Díaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Lange, J. S.; Marín, J.; Montes, N.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we present the new RPC wall, which is being installed in the HADES detector at Darmstadt GSI. It consists of time-of-flight (TOF) detectors used for both particle identification and triggering. Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors are becoming widely used because of their excellent TOF capabilities and reduced cost. The wall will contain 1024 RPC modules, covering an active area of around 7 m2, replacing the old TOFino detector at the low polar angle region. The excellent TOF and good charge resolutions of the new detector will improve the time resolution to values better than 100 ps. The Front-End electronics for the readout of the RPC signals is implemented with two types of boards to satisfy the space constraints: the Daughterboards are small boards that amplify the low level signals from the detector and provide fast discriminators for time of flight measurements, as well as an integrator for charge measurements. The Motherboard provides stable DC voltages and a stable ground, threshold DACs for the discriminators, multiplicity trigger and impedance matched paths for transfer of time window signals that contain information about time and charge. These signals are sent to a custom TDC board that label each event and send data through Ethernet to be conveniently stored.

  2. Wide Dynamic Range Front-end Electronics for Beam Current and Position Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rawnsley, W. R.; Potter, R. J.; Verzilov, V. A.; Root, L.

    2006-11-20

    An Analog Devices log detector, AD8306, and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), ADSP-21992, have been found useful for building wide dynamic range, accurate and inexpensive front-end electronics to measure and process the RF signals from TRIUMF's beam monitors. The high-precision log detector has a useful dynamic range of over 100 dB. The 160 MHz mixed-signal DSP is used to digitize the log detector output, linearize it via a lookup table, perform temperature compensation, and remove the variable duty cycle 1 kHz pulse structure of the beam. This approach has been applied to two types of devices in a 500 MeV proton beamline. The 0.1% DC to CW total current monitor is based on a capacitive pickup resonant at 46.11 MHz, the second harmonic of the bunch frequency. The DSP software provides low pass filtering, calculates the antilog of the data and passes the output to a CAMAC input register. The BPM electronics process data from inductive pickup loops. The DSP controls a GaAs switch which multiplexes signals from four adjacent pickups to a single log detector. The DSP performs difference-over-sum or log-ratio data analysis along with averaging over an arbitrary number of samples.

  3. CMS hadron calorimeter front-end upgrade for SLHC phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    We present an upgrade plan for the CMS HCAL detector. The HCAL upgrade is required for the increased luminosity (3 * 10E34) of SLHC Phase I which is targeted for 2014. A key aspect of the HCAL upgrade is to add longitudinal segmentation to improve background rejection, energy resolution, and electron isolation at the L1 trigger. The increased segmentation is achieved by replacing the hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) with silicon PMTs (SIPMs). We plan to instrument each fiber of the calorimeter with an SIPM (103,000 total). We will then electrically sum outputs from selected SIPMs to form the longitudinal readout segments. In addition to having more longitudinal information, the upgrade plans include a new custom ADC with matched sensitivity and timing information. The increased data volume requires higher speed transmitters and the additional power dissipation for the readout electronics requires better thermal design, since much of the on-detector infrastructure (front-end electronics crates, cooling pipes, optical fiber plant, etc.) will remain the same. We will report on the preliminary designs for these upgraded systems, along with performance requirements and initial design studies.

  4. Progress on the upgrade of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter Front-End electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jake; Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    We present a scheme to upgrade the CMS HCAL front-end electronics in the second long shutdown to upgrade the LHC (LS2), which is expected to occur around 2018. The HCAL electronics upgrade is required to handle the major instantaneous luminosity increase (up to 5 * 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and an expected integrated luminosity of {approx}3000 fb{sup -1}. A key aspect of the HCAL upgrade is to read out longitudinal segmentation information to improve background rejection, energy resolution, and electron isolation at the L1 trigger. This paper focuses on the requirements for the new electronics and on the proposed solutions. The requirements include increased channel count, additional timing capabilities, and additional redundancy. The electronics are required to operate in a harsh environment and are constrained by the existing infrastructure. The proposed solutions span from chip level to system level. They include the development of a new ASIC ADC, the design and testing of higher speed transmitters to handle the increased data volume, the evaluation and use of circuits from other developments, evaluation of commercial FPGAs, better thermal design, and improvements in the overall readout architecture. We will report on the progress of the designs for these upgraded systems, along with performance requirements and initial design studies.

  5. Charge-sensitive front-end electronics with operational amplifiers for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Födisch, P.; Berthel, M.; Lange, B.; Kirschke, T.; Enghardt, W.; Kaever, P.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe, CZT) radiation detectors are suitable for a variety of applications, due to their high spatial resolution and spectroscopic energy performance at room temperature. However, state-of-the-art detector systems require high-performance readout electronics. Though an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is an adequate solution for the readout, requirements of high dynamic range and high throughput are not available in any commercial circuit. Consequently, the present study develops the analog front-end electronics with operational amplifiers for an 8×8 pixelated CZT detector. For this purpose, we modeled an electrical equivalent circuit of the CZT detector with the associated charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA). Based on a detailed network analysis, the circuit design is completed by numerical values for various features such as ballistic deficit, charge-to-voltage gain, rise time, and noise level. A verification of the performance is carried out by synthetic detector signals and a pixel detector. The experimental results with the pixel detector assembly and a 22Na radioactive source emphasize the depth dependence of the measured energy. After pulse processing with depth correction based on the fit of the weighting potential, the energy resolution is 2.2% (FWHM) for the 511 keV photopeak.

  6. An analogue front-end ASIC prototype designed for PMT signal readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Lei; Yu, Li; Liang, Yu; Qin, Jia-Jun; Yang, Yun-Fan; Wu, Wei-Hao; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-06-01

    The Water Cherenkov Detector Array (WCDA) is one of the core detectors in the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), and it consists of 3600 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Both high resolution time and charge measurement are required over a large dynamic range from 1 photoelectron (P.E.) to 4000 P.E. The prototype of an analogue front-end Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) fabricated using Global Foundry 0.35 μm CMOS technology is designed to read out the PMT signal in the WCDA. This ASIC employs leading edge discrimination and an (RC)4 shaping structure. Combined with the following Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) and Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), both the arrival time and charge of the PMT signal can be measured. Initial test results indicate that time resolution is better than 350 ps and charge resolution is better than 10% at 1 P.E. and better than 1% with large input signals (300 P.E. to 4000 P.E.). Besides, this ASIC has a good channel-to-channel isolation of more than 84 dB and the temperature dependency of charge measurement is less than 5% in the range 0-50°C. Supported by Knowledge Innovation Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175174) and CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  7. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    PubMed Central

    Choong, W.-S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W.W.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C.Q.; Wu, J.-Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, which allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is “time stamped” by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA. This digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc. PMID:27134641

  8. The dielectric-filled parabola - A new millimeter/submillimeter wavelength receiver/transmitter front end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Dengler, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A design is presented for a semi-integrated millimeter/submillimeter wavelength receiver/transmitter front end incorporating a planar antenna and a solid-state device in an efficient feed structure which can be matched directly to high f-number optical systems. The feed system combines the simplicity and robustness of a dielectric substrate lens with the high gain of a parabolic reflector in a single structure that is termed a dielectric-filled parabola. The same fundamental unit can be configured as either a heterodyne or direct detection mode receiver, a power transmitter or a frequency multiplier by changing out the solid-state device and/or the integrated antenna. The structure can also be used with a small integrated antenna array in a multibeam or imaging arrangement. Design and fabrication details for the feed system are given. These are followed by beam pattern and impedance measurements taken on a microwave model when dipole, bow-tie, log-periodic, and log-spiral antennas are used as the integrated feed elements.

  9. Towards Optimal Filtering on ARM for ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Front-End Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Mitchell A.

    2015-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN generates enormous amounts of raw data which presents a serious computing challenge. After planned upgrades in 2022, the data output from the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter will increase by 200 times to over 40 Tb/s. Advanced and characteristically expensive Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are currently used to process this quantity of data. It is proposed that a cost- effective, high data throughput Processing Unit (PU) can be developed by using several ARM System on Chips in a cluster configuration to allow aggregated processing performance and data throughput while maintaining minimal software design difficulty for the end-user. ARM is a cost effective and energy efficient alternative CPU architecture to the long established x86 architecture. This PU could be used for a variety of high-level algorithms on the high data throughput raw data. An Optimal Filtering algorithm has been implemented in C++ and several ARM platforms have been tested. Optimal Filtering is currently used in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end for basic energy reconstruction and is currently implemented on DSPs.

  10. Front-end receiver electronics for a matrix transducer for 3-D transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zili; Blaak, Sandra; Chang, Zu-yao; Yao, Jiajian; Bosch, Johan G; Prins, Christian; Lancée, Charles T; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel A P; Meijer, Gerard C M

    2012-07-01

    There is a clear clinical need for creating 3-D images of the heart. One promising technique is the use of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). To enable 3-D TEE, we are developing a miniature ultrasound probe containing a matrix piezoelectric transducer with more than 2000 elements. Because a gastroscopic tube cannot accommodate the cables needed to connect all transducer elements directly to an imaging system, a major challenge is to locally reduce the number of channels, while maintaining a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. This can be achieved by using front-end receiver electronics bonded to the transducers to provide appropriate signal conditioning in the tip of the probe. This paper presents the design of such electronics, realizing time-gain compensation (TGC) and micro-beamforming using simple, low-power circuits. Prototypes of TGC amplifiers and micro-beamforming cells have been fabricated in 0.35-μm CMOS technology. These prototype chips have been combined on a printed circuit board (PCB) to form an ultrasound-receiver system capable of reading and combining the signals of three transducer elements. Experimental results show that this design is a suitable candidate for 3-D TEE.

  11. How Front-End Loading Contributes to Creating and Sustaining the Theory-Practice Gap in Higher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jeanne Maree

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I show how Mead's theory of emergence can prove explanatory in how the theory-practice gap is co-created and sustained in "front-end loading" university programs. Taking teacher education as an exemplar, I argue that trainee teachers encounter different and oft-times conflicting environmental, social and cultural conditions in the…

  12. Design of ultralow power receiver front-ends for 2.4 GHz wireless sensor network applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhang; Zhiqun, Li; Zengqi, Wang; Chenjian, Wu; Liang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an ultralow power receiver front-end designed for a wireless sensor network (WSN) in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The author designs two front-ends working in the saturation region and the subthreshold region respectively. The front-ends contain a two-stage cross-coupling cascaded common-gate (CG) LNA and a quadrature Gilbert IQ mixer. The measured conversion gain is variable with high gain at 24 dB and low gain at 7 dB for the saturation one, and high gain at 22 dB and low gain at 5 dB for the subthreshold one. The noise figure (NF) at high gain mode is 5.1 dB and 6.3 dB for each. The input 1 dB compression point (IP1dB) at low gain mode is about -6 dBm and -3 dBm for each. The front-ends consume about 2.1 mA current from 1.8 V power supply for the saturation one and 1.3 mA current for the subthreshold one. The measured results show that, comparing with the power consumption saving, it is worth making sacrifices on the performance for using the subthreshold technology.

  13. High-Frequency Wireless Communications System: 2.45-GHz Front-End Circuit and System Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, M.-H.; Huang, M.-C.; Ting, Y.-C.; Chen, H.-H.; Li, T.-L.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a course on high-frequency wireless communications systems is presented. With the 145-MHz baseband subsystem available from a prerequisite course, the present course emphasizes the design and implementation of the 2.45-GHz front-end subsystem as well as system integration issues. In this curriculum, the 2.45-GHz front-end…

  14. 75 FR 1179 - Passenger Equipment Safety Standards; Front End Strength of Cab Cars and Multiple-Unit Locomotives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ...This final rule is intended to further the safety of passenger train occupants by amending existing regulations to enhance requirements for the structural strength of the front end of cab cars and multiple-unit (MU) locomotives. These enhancements include the addition of requirements concerning structural deformation and energy absorption by collision posts and corner posts at the forward end......

  15. 40 CFR 63.488 - Methods and procedures for batch front-end process vent group determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Polymers and Resins § 63.488 Methods and procedures for batch front-end process vent group determination... be based on either organic HAP or TOC emissions. (1) The procedures specified in paragraphs (b... of product. (2) The annual uncontrolled organic HAP or TOC emissions and annual average batch...

  16. 40 CFR 63.490 - Batch front-end process vents-performance test methods and procedures to determine compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.490 Batch front-end process vents—performance test... may be based on either total organic HAP or TOC. For purposes of this paragraph (c), the term “batch... inlet sampling sites shall ensure the measurement of total organic HAP or TOC (minus methane and...

  17. An Inductively-Powered Wireless Neural Recording System with a Charge Sampling Analog Front-End

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Bae; Lee, Byunghun; Kiani, Mehdi; Mahmoudi, Babak; Gross, Robert; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    An inductively-powered wireless integrated neural recording system (WINeR-7) is presented for wireless and battery less neural recording from freely-behaving animal subjects inside a wirelessly-powered standard homecage. The WINeR-7 system employs a novel wide-swing dual slope charge sampling (DSCS) analog front-end (AFE) architecture, which performs amplification, filtering, sampling, and analog-to-time conversion (ATC) with minimal interference and small amount of power. The output of the DSCS-AFE produces a pseudo-digital pulse width modulated (PWM) signal. A circular shift register (CSR) time division multiplexes (TDM) the PWM pulses to create a TDM-PWM signal, which is fed into an on-chip 915 MHz transmitter (Tx). The AFE and Tx are supplied at 1.8 V and 4.2 V, respectively, by a power management block, which includes a high efficiency active rectifier and automatic resonance tuning (ART), operating at 13.56 MHz. The 8-ch system-on-a-chip (SoC) was fabricated in a 0.35-μm CMOS process, occupying 5.0 × 2.5 mm2 and consumed 51.4 mW. For each channel, the sampling rate is 21.48 kHz and the power consumption is 19.3 μW. In vivo experiments were conducted on freely behaving rats in an energized homecage by continuously delivering 51.4 mW to the WINeR-7 system in a closed-loop fashion and recording local field potentials (LFP). PMID:27069422

  18. A front-end wafer-level microsystem packaging technique with micro-cap array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yuh-Min

    2002-09-01

    The back-end packaging process is the remaining challenge for the micromachining industry to commercialize microsystem technology (MST) devices at low cost. This dissertation presents a novel wafer level protection technique as a final step of the front-end fabrication process for MSTs. It facilitates improved manufacturing throughput and automation in package assembly, wafer level testing of devices, and enhanced device performance. The method involves the use of a wafer-sized micro-cap array, which consists of an assortment of small caps micro-molded onto a material with adjustable shapes and sizes to serve as protective structures against the hostile environments during packaging. The micro-cap array is first constructed by a micromachining process with micro-molding technique, then sealed to the device wafer at wafer level. Epoxy-based wafer-level micro cap array has been successfully fabricated and showed good compatibility with conventional back-end packaging processes. An adhesive transfer technique was demonstrated to seal the micro cap array with a MEMS device wafer. No damage or gross leak was observed while wafer dicing or later during a gross leak test. Applications of the micro cap array are demonstrated on MEMS, microactuators fabricated using CRONOS MUMPS process. Depending on the application needs, the micro-molded cap can be designed and modified to facilitate additional component functions, such as optical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical functions, which are not easily achieved in the device by traditional means. Successful fabrication of a micro cap array comprised with microlenses can provide active functions as well as passive protection. An optical tweezer array could be one possibility for applications of a micro cap with microlenses. The micro cap itself could serve as micro well for DNA or bacteria amplification as well.

  19. Silicon Photomultipliers and front-end electronics performance for Cherenkov Telescope Array camera development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, G.; Bissaldi, E.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Ionica, M.; Paoletti, R.; Rando, R.; Simone, D.; Vagelli, V.

    2017-02-01

    In the last few years a number of efforts have been undertaken to develop new technology related to Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These photosensors consist of an array of identical Avalanche Photodiodes operating in Geiger mode and connected in parallel to a single output. The Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) is involved in the R&D program Progetto Premiale Telescopi CHErenkov made in Italy (TECHE.it) to develop photosensors for a SiPM based camera that will be part of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory. In this framework tests are ongoing on innovative devices suitable to detect Cherenkov light in the blue and near-UV wavelength region, the so-called Near Ultra-Violet Silicon Photomultipliers (NUV SiPMs). The tests on photosensors produced by Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) are revealing promising performance: low operating voltage, capability to detect very low intensity light down to a single photon and high Photo Detection Efficiency (PDE) in the range 390-410 nm. In particular the developed device is a High Density NUV-SiPM (NUV-HD SiPM) based on a micro-cell of 30 μm×30 μm and 6 mm×6 mm area. Tests on this detector in single-cell configuration and in a matrix arrangement have been done. At the same time front-end electronics based on the waveform sampling technique optimized for the new NUV-HD SIPMs is under study and development.

  20. Wideband Fully-Programmable Dual-Mode CMOS Analogue Front-End for Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Virgilio; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-channel dual-mode CMOS analogue front-end (AFE) for electrochemical and bioimpedance analysis. Current-mode and voltage-mode readouts, integrated on the same chip, can provide an adaptable platform to correlate single-cell biosensor studies with large-scale tissue or organ analysis for real-time cancer detection, imaging and characterization. The chip, implemented in a 180-nm CMOS technology, combines two current-readout (CR) channels and four voltage-readout (VR) channels suitable for both bipolar and tetrapolar electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. Each VR channel occupies an area of 0.48 mm2, is capable of an operational bandwidth of 8 MHz and a linear gain in the range between −6 dB and 42 dB. The gain of the CR channel can be set to 10 kΩ, 50 kΩ or 100 kΩ and is capable of 80-dB dynamic range, with a very linear response for input currents between 10 nA and 100 μA. Each CR channel occupies an area of 0.21 mm2. The chip consumes between 530 μA and 690 μA per channel and operates from a 1.8-V supply. The chip was used to measure the impedance of capacitive interdigitated electrodes in saline solution. Measurements show close matching with results obtained using a commercial impedance analyser. The chip will be part of a fully flexible and configurable fully-integrated dual-mode EIS system for impedance sensors and bioimpedance analysis. PMID:27463721

  1. A 14-bit 40-MHz analog front end for CCD application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingyu, Wang; Zhangming, Zhu; Shubin, Liu

    2016-06-01

    A 14-bit, 40-MHz analog front end (AFE) for CCD scanners is analyzed and designed. The proposed system incorporates a digitally controlled wideband variable gain amplifier (VGA) with nearly 42 dB gain range, a correlated double sampler (CDS) with programmable gain functionality, a 14-bit analog-to-digital converter and a programmable timing core. To achieve the maximum dynamic range, the VGA proposed here can linearly amplify the input signal in a gain range from -1.08 to 41.06 dB in 6.02 dB step with a constant bandwidth. A novel CDS takes image information out of noise, and further amplifies the signal accurately in a gain range from 0 to 18 dB in 0.035 dB step. A 14-bit ADC is adopted to quantify the analog signal with optimization in power and linearity. An internal timing core can provide flexible timing for CCD arrays, CDS and ADC. The proposed AFE was fabricated in SMIC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The whole circuit occupied an active area of 2.8 × 4.8 mm2 and consumed 360 mW. When the frequency of input signal is 6.069 MHz, and the sampling frequency is 40 MHz, the signal to noise and distortion (SNDR) is 70.3 dB, the effective number of bits is 11.39 bit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234002, 61322405, 61306044, 61376033), the National High-Tech Program of China (No. 2013AA014103), and the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory (No. ZHD201302).

  2. The front end electronics of the NA62 Gigatracker: challenges, design and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noy, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Ceccucci, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Fiorini, M.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Martoiu, S.; Morel, M.; Perktold, L.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2011-06-01

    The beam spectrometer of the NA62 experiment consists of 3 Gigatracker (GTK) stations. Each station comprises a pixel detector of 16 cm active area made of an assembly of 10 readout ASICs bump bonded to a 200 μm thick pixel silicon sensor, comprising 18000 pixels of 300 μm×300 μm. The main challenge of the NA62 pixel GTK station is the combination of an extremely high kaon/pion beam rate, where the intensity in the center of the beam reaches up to 1.5 Mhit s mm together with an extreme time resolution of 100 ps. To date, it is the first silicon tracking system with this time resolution. To face this challenge, the pixel analogue front end has been designed with a peaking time of 4 ns, with a planar silicon sensor operating up to 300 V over depletion. Moreover, the radiation level is severe, 2×10 1 MeV n cm per year of operation. Easy replacement of the GTK stations is foreseen as a design requirement. The amount of material of a single station should also be less than 0.5% X to minimize the background, which imposes strong constraints on the mechanics and the cooling system. We report upon the design and architecture of the 2 prototype demonstrator chips both designed in 130 nm CMOS technology, one with a constant fraction discriminator and the time stamp digitisation in each pixel (In-Pixel), and the other with a time-over-threshold discriminator and the processing of the time stamp located in the End of Column (EoC) region at the chip periphery. Some preliminary results are presented.

  3. An Inductively-Powered Wireless Neural Recording System with a Charge Sampling Analog Front-End.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Bae; Lee, Byunghun; Kiani, Mehdi; Mahmoudi, Babak; Gross, Robert; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2016-01-15

    An inductively-powered wireless integrated neural recording system (WINeR-7) is presented for wireless and battery less neural recording from freely-behaving animal subjects inside a wirelessly-powered standard homecage. The WINeR-7 system employs a novel wide-swing dual slope charge sampling (DSCS) analog front-end (AFE) architecture, which performs amplification, filtering, sampling, and analog-to-time conversion (ATC) with minimal interference and small amount of power. The output of the DSCS-AFE produces a pseudo-digital pulse width modulated (PWM) signal. A circular shift register (CSR) time division multiplexes (TDM) the PWM pulses to create a TDM-PWM signal, which is fed into an on-chip 915 MHz transmitter (Tx). The AFE and Tx are supplied at 1.8 V and 4.2 V, respectively, by a power management block, which includes a high efficiency active rectifier and automatic resonance tuning (ART), operating at 13.56 MHz. The 8-ch system-on-a-chip (SoC) was fabricated in a 0.35-μm CMOS process, occupying 5.0 × 2.5 mm(2) and consumed 51.4 mW. For each channel, the sampling rate is 21.48 kHz and the power consumption is 19.3 μW. In vivo experiments were conducted on freely behaving rats in an energized homecage by continuously delivering 51.4 mW to the WINeR-7 system in a closed-loop fashion and recording local field potentials (LFP).

  4. Custom single-photon avalanche diode with integrated front-end for parallel photon timing applications.

    PubMed

    Cammi, C; Panzeri, F; Gulinatti, A; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2012-03-01

    Emerged as a solid state alternative to photo multiplier tubes (PMTs), single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are nowadays widely used in the field of single-photon timing applications. Custom technology SPADs assure remarkable performance, in particular a 10 counts/s dark count rate (DCR) at low temperature, a high photon detection efficiency (PDE) with a 50% peak at 550 nm and a 30 ps (full width at half maximum, FWHM) temporal resolution, even with large area devices, have been obtained. Over the past few years, the birth of novel techniques of analysis has led to the parallelization of the measurement systems and to a consequent increasing demand for the development of monolithic arrays of detectors. Unfortunately, the implementation of a multidimensional system is a challenging task from the electrical point of view; in particular, the avalanche current pick-up circuit, used to obtain the previously reported performance, has to be modified in order to enable high parallel temporal resolution, while minimizing the electrical crosstalk probability between channels. In the past, the problem has been solved by integrating the front-end electronics next to the photodetector, in order to reduce the parasitic capacitances and consequently the filtering action on the current signal of the SPAD, leading to an improvement of the timing jitter at higher threshold. This solution has been implemented by using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies, which, however, do not allow a complete control on the SPAD structure; for this reason the intrinsic performance of CMOS SPADs, such as DCR, PDE, and afterpulsing probability, are worse than those attainable with custom detectors. In this paper, we propose a pixel architecture, which enables the development of custom SPAD arrays in which every channel maintains the performance of the best single photodetector. The system relies on the integration of the timing signal pick-up circuit next to the

  5. 49 CFR 393.114 - What are the requirements for front end structures used as part of a cargo securement system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... front end structure must be capable of withstanding the following horizontal forward static load: (1) For a front end structure less than 6 feet in height, a horizontal forward static load equal to one... higher, a horizontal forward static load equal to four-tenths (0.4) of the weight of the articles...

  6. 49 CFR 393.114 - What are the requirements for front end structures used as part of a cargo securement system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... front end structure must be capable of withstanding the following horizontal forward static load: (1) For a front end structure less than 6 feet in height, a horizontal forward static load equal to one... higher, a horizontal forward static load equal to four-tenths (0.4) of the weight of the articles...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives As specified in § 238.209(b), the forward end of a cab car or an MU locomotive may comply with the requirements of this appendix...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives As specified in § 238.209(b), the forward end of a cab car or an MU locomotive may comply with the requirements of this appendix...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives As specified in § 238.209(b), the forward end of a cab car or an MU locomotive may comply with the requirements of this appendix...

  10. Dynamic vacuum analysis for APS high heat flux beamline front ends using optical ray-tracing simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The high-power and high-flux x-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can cause significantly high gas desorption rates on beamline front-end components if beam missteering occurs. The effect of this gas desorption needs to be understood for dynamic vacuum analysis. To simulate beam missteering conditions, optical ray-tracing methods have been employed. The results of the ray-tracing analysis have been entered into a system-oriented vacuum program to provide dynamic vacuum calculations for determination of pumping requirements for the beamline front-ends. The APS will provide several types of synchrotron radiation sources, for example, undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets. For the purpose of this study, the wiggler source was chosen as a worst case'' scenario due to its high photon flux, high beam power, and relatively large beam cross section.

  11. Dynamic vacuum analysis for APS high heat flux beamline front ends using optical ray-tracing simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    The high-power and high-flux x-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can cause significantly high gas desorption rates on beamline front-end components if beam missteering occurs. The effect of this gas desorption needs to be understood for dynamic vacuum analysis. To simulate beam missteering conditions, optical ray-tracing methods have been employed. The results of the ray-tracing analysis have been entered into a system-oriented vacuum program to provide dynamic vacuum calculations for determination of pumping requirements for the beamline front-ends. The APS will provide several types of synchrotron radiation sources, for example, undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets. For the purpose of this study, the wiggler source was chosen as a ``worst case`` scenario due to its high photon flux, high beam power, and relatively large beam cross section.

  12. Front-end antenna system design for the ITER low-field-side reflectometer system using GENRAY ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Doyle, E. J.; Peebles, W. A.

    2016-11-01

    A monostatic antenna array arrangement has been designed for the microwave front-end of the ITER low-field-side reflectometer (LFSR) system. This paper presents details of the antenna coupling coefficient analyses performed using GENRAY, a 3-D ray tracing code, to evaluate the plasma height accommodation capability of such an antenna array design. Utilizing modeled data for the plasma equilibrium and profiles for the ITER baseline and half-field scenarios, a design study was performed for measurement locations varying from the plasma edge to inside the top of the pedestal. A front-end antenna configuration is recommended for the ITER LFSR system based on the results of this coupling analysis.

  13. Integrated front-end electronics in a detector compatible process: source-follower and charge-sensitive preamplifier configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, Lodovico; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Speziali, Valeria

    2001-12-01

    This study is concerned with the simulation and design of low-noise front-end electronics monolithically integrated on the same high-resistivity substrate as multielectrode silicon detectors, in a process made available by the Istituto per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica (ITC-IRST) of Trento, Italy. The integrated front-end solutions described in this paper use N-channel JFETs as basic elements. The first one is based upon an all-NJFET charge preamplifier designed to match detector capacitances of a few picofarads and available in both a resistive and a non resistive feedback configuration. In the second solution, a single NJFET in the source-follower configuration is connected to the detector, while its source is wired to an external readout channel through an integrated capacitor.

  14. An Integrated Front-End Readout And Feature Extraction System for the BaBar Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinlong; /Colorado U.

    2006-08-10

    The BABAR experiment has been operating at SLAC's PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory since 1999. The accelerator has achieved more than three times its original design luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with plans for an additional factor of three in the next two years. To meet the experiment's performance requirements in the face of significantly higher trigger and background rates, the drift chamber's front-end readout system has been redesigned around the Xilinx Spartan 3 FPGA. The new system implements analysis and feature-extraction of digitized waveforms in the front-end, reducing the data bandwidth required by a factor of four.

  15. Development of a data management front-end for use with a LANDSAT-based information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development and implementation of a data management front-end system for use with a LANDSAT based information system that facilitates the processsing of both LANDSAT and ancillary data was examined. The final tasks, reported on here, involved; (1) the implementation of the VICAR image processing software system at Penn State and the development of a user-friendly front-end for this system; (2) the implementation of JPL-developed software based on VICAR, for mosaicking LANDSAT scenes; (3) the creation and storage of a mosiac of 1981 summer LANDSAT data for the entire state of Pennsylvania; (4) demonstrations of the defoliation assessment procedure for Perry and Centre Counties, and presentation of the results at the 1982 National Gypsy Moth Review Meeting, and (5) the training of Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry personnel in the use of the defoliation analysis system.

  16. Toward Realization of 2.4 GHz Balunless Narrowband Receiver Front-End for Short Range Wireless Applications.

    PubMed

    El-Desouki, Munir M; Qasim, Syed Manzoor; BenSaleh, Mohammed S; Deen, M Jamal

    2015-05-07

    The demand for radio frequency (RF) transceivers operating at 2.4 GHz band has attracted considerable research interest due to the advancement in short range wireless technologies. The performance of RF transceivers depends heavily on the transmitter and receiver front-ends. The receiver front-end is comprised of a low-noise amplifier (LNA) and a downconversion mixer. There are very few designs that focus on connecting the single-ended output LNA to a double-balanced mixer without the use of on-chip transformer, also known as a balun. The objective of designing such a receiver front-end is to achieve high integration and low power consumption. To meet these requirements, we present the design of fully-integrated 2.4 GHz receiver front-end, consisting of a narrow-band LNA and a double balanced mixer without using a balun. Here, the single-ended RF output signal of the LNA is translated into differential signal using an NMOS-PMOS (n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor, p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor) transistor differential pair instead of the conventional NMOS-NMOS transistor configuration, for the RF amplification stage of the double-balanced mixer. The proposed receiver circuit fabricated using TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS technology operates at 2.4 GHz and produces an output signal at 300 MHz. The fabricated receiver achieves a gain of 16.3 dB and consumes only 6.74 mW operating at 1.5 V, while utilizing 2.08 mm2 of chip area. Measurement results demonstrate the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed receiver for short-range wireless applications, such as in wireless sensor network (WSN).

  17. A low power front-end architecture for SiPM readout with integrated ADC and multiplexed readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacco, I.; Fischer, P.; Ritzert, M.; Peric, I.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon Photo-Multiplier (SiPM) detectors are becoming widely used for optical photon and, in conjunction with suited scintillators, for gamma detection in both medical imaging and particle physics experiments. The spatial resolution can be improved by using smaller SiPMs with a corresponding increase in front-end channels density. The timing resolution of the whole system is a function of the detector parameters and of the characteristics of the front-end electronics. We present a low power front-end readout architecture which allows reading out several SiPMs though a single line in order to maximize the number of SiPMs. The design offers good timing performance and includes a simple charge digitizer in every channel. Four different single-ended channel designs have been designed, submitted for fabrication and characterized electronically and with SiPMs. The timing performance is obtained by using a low input impedance, precise threshold setting of a leading edge discriminator and a programmable input dc potential to set the SiPM HV bias on a channel per channel basis. Programmable low- and high-pass filters should allow reducing baseline fluctuations and noise. A simple ADC is implemented by first integrating the signal current and then discharging it at a constant rate until the baseline is reached again. The current consumption of the single channel is typically less than 10 mA. The time and energy information are sent out on a single wire. In order to keep as low as possible the output cabling the signals from different channels can be multiplexed on the same cable. The processing of these signals (extraction of time, ADC amplitude determination and channel number decoding) is performed by an external FPGA. The overall architecture, the front-end designs, and measurements with SiPMs are presented.

  18. Toward Realization of 2.4 GHz Balunless Narrowband Receiver Front-End for Short Range Wireless Applications

    PubMed Central

    El-Desouki, Munir M.; Qasim, Syed Manzoor; BenSaleh, Mohammed S.; Deen, M. Jamal

    2015-01-01

    The demand for radio frequency (RF) transceivers operating at 2.4 GHz band has attracted considerable research interest due to the advancement in short range wireless technologies. The performance of RF transceivers depends heavily on the transmitter and receiver front-ends. The receiver front-end is comprised of a low-noise amplifier (LNA) and a downconversion mixer. There are very few designs that focus on connecting the single-ended output LNA to a double-balanced mixer without the use of on-chip transformer, also known as a balun. The objective of designing such a receiver front-end is to achieve high integration and low power consumption. To meet these requirements, we present the design of fully-integrated 2.4 GHz receiver front-end, consisting of a narrow-band LNA and a double balanced mixer without using a balun. Here, the single-ended RF output signal of the LNA is translated into differential signal using an NMOS-PMOS (n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor, p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor) transistor differential pair instead of the conventional NMOS-NMOS transistor configuration, for the RF amplification stage of the double-balanced mixer. The proposed receiver circuit fabricated using TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS technology operates at 2.4 GHz and produces an output signal at 300 MHz. The fabricated receiver achieves a gain of 16.3 dB and consumes only 6.74 mW operating at 1.5 V, while utilizing 2.08 mm2 of chip area. Measurement results demonstrate the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed receiver for short-range wireless applications, such as in wireless sensor network (WSN). PMID:25961380

  19. Workshop on physics at the first muon collider and front-end of a muon collider: A brief summary

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.

    1998-02-01

    In November 1997 a workshop was held at Fermilab to explore the physics potential of the first muon collider, and the physics potential of the accelerator complex at the `front-end` of the collider. An extensive physics program emerged from the workshop. This paper attempts to summarize this physics program and to identify the main conclusions from the workshop. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. Neural recording front-end IC using action potential detection and analog buffer with digital delay for data compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Yao, Lei; Zou, Xiaodan; Goh, Wang Ling; Je, Minkyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a neural recording analog front-end IC intended for simultaneous neural recording with action potential (AP) detection for data compression in wireless multichannel neural implants. The proposed neural recording front-end IC detects the neural spikes and sends only the preserved AP information for wireless transmission in order to reduce the overall power consumption of the neural implant. The IC consists of a low-noise neural amplifier, an AP detection circuit and an analog buffer with digital delay. The neural amplifier makes use of a current-reuse technique to maximize the transconductance efficiency for attaining a good noise efficiency factor. The AP detection circuit uses an adaptive threshold voltage to generate an enable signal for the subsequent functional blocks. The analog buffer with digital delay is employed using a finite impulse response (FIR) filter which preserves the AP waveform before the enable signal as well as provides low-pass filtering. The neural recording front-end IC has been designed using standard CMOS 0.18-µm technology occupying a core area of 220 µm by 820 µm.

  1. Low Noise and Highly Linear Wideband CMOS RF Front-End for DVB-H Direct-Conversion Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ilku; Moon, Hyunwon; Woo, Doo Hyung

    In this paper, a wideband CMOS radio frequency (RF) front-end for digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H) receiver is proposed. The RF front-end circuit is composed of a single-ended resistive feedback low noise amplifier (LNA), a single-to-differential amplifier, an I/Q down-conversion mixer with linearized transconductors employing third order intermodulation distortion cancellation, and a divide-by-two circuit with LO buffers. By employing a third order intermodulation (IMD3) cancellation technique and vertical NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) switching pair for an I/Q down-conversion mixer, the proposed RF front-end circuit has high linearity and low low-frequency noise performance. It is fabricated in a 0.18µm deep n-well CMOS technology and draws 12mA from a 1.8V supply voltage. It shows a voltage gain of 31dB, a noise figure (NF) lower than 2.6dB, and an IIP3 of -8dBm from 470MHz to 862MHz.

  2. Development of a dedicated front-end electronics for straw tube trackers in the bar PANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyborowski, D.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, G.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Strzempek, P.; Swientek, K.; Terlecki, P.; Tokarz, J.

    2016-08-01

    The design and tests of front-end electronics for straw tube trackers in the bar PANDA experiment at FAIR are presented. The challenges for the front-end electronics, comprising operation at high counting rate up to 1 MHz per straw tube, are discussed and the proposed architecture comprising a switched gain charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP), a pole-zero cancellation circuit (PZC), a second order variable peaking time shaper, a trimming ion tail cancellation circuit, and a baseline holder (BLH), is described. The front-end provides an analogue output and a discriminator with LVDS differential driver for the Time-of-Arrival (ToA) and Time-over-Threshold (ToT) measurements. A prototype readout ASIC featuring four channels was fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS technology consuming 15.5 mW (analog part) and 12 mW (LVDS) per channel. The results of measurements of peaking time (25-67 ns), gain, noise (ENC 800-2500 el. for various gains), time walk and jitter are presented as well as the first results obtained with prototype straw tubes connected.

  3. Design of Microwave Front-End Narrowband Filter and Limiter Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Lee W.

    This dissertation proposes three novel bandpass filter structures to protect systems exposed to damaging levels of electromagnetic (EM) radiation from intentional and unintentional high-power microwave (HPM) sources. This is of interest because many commercial microwave communications and sensor systems are unprotected from high power levels. Novel technologies to harden front-end components must maintain existing system performance and cost. The proposed concepts all use low-cost printed circuit board (PCB) fabrication to create compact solutions that support high integration. The first proposed filter achieves size reduction of 46% using a technology that is suitable for low-loss, narrowband filters that can handle high power levels. This is accomplished by reducing a substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW) loaded evanescent-mode bandpass filter to a half-mode SIW (HMSIW) structure. Demonstrated third-order SIW and HMSIW filters have 1.7 GHz center frequency and 0.2 GHz bandwidth. Simulation and measurements of the filters utilizing combline resonators prove the underlying principles. The second proposed device combines a traditional microstrip bent hairpin filter with encapsulated gas plasma elements to create a filter-limiter: a novel narrowband filter with integral HPM limiter behavior. An equivalent circuit model is presented for the ac coupled plasma-shell components used in this dissertation, and parameter values were extracted from measured results and EM simulation. The theory of operation of the proposed filter-limiter was experimentally validated and key predictions were demonstrated including two modes of operation in the on state: a constant output power mode and constant attenuation mode at high power. A third-order filter-limiter with center frequency of 870 MHz was demonstrated. It operates passively from incident microwave energy, and can be primed with an external voltage source to reduce both limiter turn-on threshold power and output power

  4. A Novel Front-End ASIC With Post Digital Filtering and Calibration for CZT-Based PET Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Yin, J.; Li, C.; Zeng, H.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel front-end electronics based on a front-end ASIC with post digital filtering and calibration dedicated to CZT detectors for PET imaging. A cascade amplifier based on split-leg topology is selected to realize the charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA) for the sake of low noise performances and the simple scheme of the power supplies. The output of the CSA is connected to a variable-gain amplifier to generate the compatible signals for the A/D conversion. A multi-channel single-slope ADC is designed to sample multiple points for the digital filtering and shaping. The digital signal processing algorithms are implemented by a FPGA. To verify the proposed scheme, a front-end readout prototype ASIC is designed and implemented in 0.35 μm CMOS process. In a single readout channel, a CSA, a VGA, a 10-bit ADC and registers are integrated. Two dummy channels, bias circuits, and time controller are also integrated. The die size is 2.0 mm x 2.1 mm. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000 e{sup -} to 100000 e{sup -}, which is suitable for the detection of the X-and gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 550 keV. The linearity of the output voltage is less than 1 %. The gain of the readout channel is 40.2 V/pC. The static power dissipation is about 10 mW/channel. The above tested results show that the electrical performances of the ASIC can well satisfy PET imaging applications. (authors)

  5. Energy resolution and power consumption of Timepix detector for different detector settings and saturation of front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, M.; Hoang, S.; Stoffle, N.; Soukup, P.; Jakubek, J.; Pinsky, L. S.

    2014-05-01

    An ongoing research project in the area of radiation monitoring employing the Timepix technology from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration profits greatly from optimizing the precision of the position and energy information obtained for the detected quanta. Wider applications of the Timepix technology as a radiation monitor also puts new demands on the precision and speed of the energy calibration. We compare the analog signal in pixel front-end electronics for different sources used during detector evaluation and energy calibration. We use the direct measurement of the analog signal from the pixel preamplifier and comparator to characterize pulse shape differences for different sources, e.g. internal test pulses, external test pulses, ionizing radiation, etc. and study their interchangeability. Accurate per-pixel energy calibration of the Timepix detector enables the direct measurement of the energy deposited by different types of ionizing radiation. The energy calibration process requires the application of a known charge to front-end electronics of each pixel. The small pixel size limits use of the radioactive sources. The 59.54 keV line from 241Am is commonly used as the highest point in calibration curve. The heavy ion dosimetry as encountered in the space radiation environment requires a considerable extrapolation to the energies in the MeV range. We have observed that for energies around and beyond 1 MeV the response of the Timepix's front-end electronics no longer follows the extrapolated calibration function. We have investigated this non-linearity and identified its source. We also propose both hardware and software solutions to suppress this effect. In this paper we show the impact on pixel calibration and the subsequent energy resolution for different detector settings as well as the resulting power consumptions. We discuss the parameter optimization for several different real-world applications.

  6. System-level considerations for the front-end readout ASIC in the CBM experiment from the power supply perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinski, K.; Koczon, P.; Ayet, S.; Löchner, S.; Schmidt, C. J.

    2017-03-01

    New fixed target experiments using high intensity beams with energy up to 10 AGeV from the SIS100 synchrotron presently being constructed at FAIR/GSI are under preparation. Most of the readout electronics and power supplies are expected to be exposed to a very high flux of nuclear reaction products and have to be radiation tolerant up to 3 MRad (TID) and sustain up to 1014/cm2 of 1 MeV neutron equivalent in their life time. Moreover, the mostly minimum ionising particles under investigation leave very little signal in the sensors. Therefore very low noise level amplitude measurements are required by the front-end electronics for effective tracking. Sensor and interconnecting micro-cable capacitance and series resistance in conjunction with intrinsic noise of the charge sensitive amplifier are dominant noise sources in the system. However, the single-ended architecture of the amplifiers employed for the charge processing channels implies a potential problem with noise contributions from power supply sources. Strict system-level constraints leave very little freedom in selecting a power supply structure optimal with respect to: power efficiency, cooling capabilities and power density on modules, but also noise injection to the front-end via the power supply lines. Design of the power supply and distribution system of the Silicon Tracking System in the CBM experiment together with details on the front-end ASICs (STS -XYTER2) and measurement results of power supply and conditioning electronics (selected DC/DC converter and LDO regulators) are presented.

  7. Development and validation of a 64 channel front end ASIC for 3D directional detection for MIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, J. P.; Bourrion, O.; Bosson, G.; Guillaudin, O.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D.

    2011-11-01

    A front end ASIC has been designed to equip the \\textmu TPC prototype developed for the MIMAC project, which requires 3D reconstruction of low energy particle tracks in order to perform directional detection of galactic Dark Matter. Each ASIC is able to monitor 64 strips of pixels and provides the "Time Over Threshold" information for each of those. These 64 digital informations, sampled at a rate of 50 MHz, can be transferred at 400 MHz by eight LVDS serial links. Eight ASIC were validated on a 2 × 256 strips of pixels prototype.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COHERENT NOISE, ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE OF THE ATLAS EM CALORIMETER FRONT END BOARD

    SciTech Connect

    CHASE,B.CITTERIO,M.LANNI,F.MAKOWIECKI,D.RADEKA,S.RESCIA,S.TAKAI,H.ET AL.

    1999-09-20

    The ATLAS Electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter (EMCAL) Front End Board (FEB) will be located in custom-designed enclosures solidly connected to the feedtroughs. It is a complex mixed signal board which includes the preamplifier, shaper, switched capacitor array analog memory unit (SCA), analog to digital conversion, serialization of the data and related control logic. It will be described in detail elsewhere in these proceedings. The electromagnetic interference (either pick-up from the on board digital activity, from power supply ripple or from external sources) which affects coherently large groups of channels (coherent noise) is of particular concern in calorimetry and it has been studied in detail.

  9. Low noise 4-channel front end ASIC with on-chip DLL for the upgrade of the LHCb Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picatoste, E.; Bigbeder-Beau, C.; Duarte, O.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Grauges, E.; Lefrançois, J.; Machefert, F.; Mauricio, J.; Vilasis, X.

    2015-04-01

    An integrated circuit for the Upgrade of the LHCb Calorimeter front end electronics is presented. It includes four analog channels, a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) for signal phase synchronization for all channels and an SPI communication protocol based interface. The analog circuit is based on two fully differential interleaved channels with a switched integrator to avoid dead time and it incorporates dedicated solutions to achieve low noise, linearity and spill-over specifications. The included DLL is capable of shifting the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1 ns. The selected technology is AMS SiGe BiCMOS 0.35 um.

  10. Evaluation of the self-calibrating thermocouple as a front end to a smart temperature measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the novel self-calibrating thermocouple was performed to determine whether the sensor would be acceptable as a front end to a smart temperature measurement system. The evaluation consisted of a fast-ramp test, long-term drift tests, and physical examinations including X rays, microphotography, and energy-dispersive spectrometry. The results of the tests show that the sensor is a viable industrial-grade device worthy for use in this application. However, recommendations for improving fabrication of the assembly are made and caveats are given for conditions that may constrain the use of the sensor in certain situations. 4 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A front end ASIC for the readout of the PMT in the KM3NeT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajanana, D.; Gromov, V.; Timmer, P.; Heine, E.; Kluit, R.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we describe the front end ASIC to readout the Photo-Multiplier-Tube of the KM3NeT detector, in detail. Stringent power budgeting, area constraints and lowering cost motivate us to design a custom front-end ASIC for reading the PMT. The ASIC amplifies the PMT signal and discriminates it against a threshold level and delivers the information via low voltage differential signals (LVDS). These LVDS signals carry highly accurate timing information of the photons . The length of the LVDS signals or Time over Threshold (ToT) gives information on the number of detected photons. A one-time programmable read-only memory (PROM) block provides unique identification to the chip. The chip communicates with the data acquisition electronics via an I2C bus. The data is transmitted to shore via fiber optics, where processing is done. The ASIC was fabricated in 0.35u CMOS process from AustriaMicroSystems (AMS).

  12. Tunable compensation of GVD-induced FM-AM conversion in the front end of high-power lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rao; Fan, Wei; Jiang, Youen; Qiao, Zhi; Zhang, Peng; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-02-01

    Group velocity dispersion (GVD) is one of the main factors leading to frequency modulation (FM) to amplitude modulation (AM) conversion in the front end of high-power lasers. In order to compensate the FM-AM modulation, the influence of GVD, which is mainly induced by the phase filter effect, is theoretically investigated. Based on the theoretical analysis, a high-precision, high-stability, tunable GVD compensatory using gratings is designed and experimentally demonstrated. The results indicate that the compensator can be implemented in high-power laser facilities to compensate the GVD of fiber with a length between 200-500 m when the bandwidth of a phase-modulated laser is 0.34 nm or 0.58 nm and the central wavelength is in the range of 1052.3217-1053.6008 nm. Due to the linear relationship between the dispersion and the spacing distance of the gratings, the compensator can easily achieve closed-loop feedback controlling. The proposed GVD compensator promises significant applications in large laser facilities, especially in the future polarizing fiber front end of high-power lasers.

  13. An Ultra Low Power and Variation Tolerant GEN2 RFID Tag Front-End with Novel Clock-Free Decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Cho, Minchang; Cho, Seonghwan

    In this paper, an ultra low power analog front-end for EPCglobal Class 1 Generation 2 RFID tag is presented. The proposed RFID tag removes the need for high frequency clock and counters used in conventional tags, which are the most power hungry blocks. The proposed clock-free decoder employs an analog integrator with an adaptive current source that provides a uniform decoding margin regardless of the data rate and a link frequency extractor based on a relaxation oscillator that generates frequency used for backscattering. A dual supply voltage scheme is also employed to increase the power efficiency of the tag. In order to improve the tolerance of the proposed circuit to environmental variations, a self-calibration circuit is proposed. The proposed RFID analog front-end circuit is designed and simulated in 0.25µm CMOS, which shows that the power consumption is reduced by an order magnitude compared to the conventional RFID tags, without losing immunity to environmental variations.

  14. Petiroc and Citiroc: front-end ASICs for SiPM read-out and ToF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, J.; Callier, S.; de La Taille, C.; Seguin, N.; Thienpont, D.; Dulucq, F.; Ahmad, S.; Martin, G.

    2014-01-01

    Petiroc and Citiroc are the two latest ASIC from Weeroc dedicated to SiPM read-out. Petiroc is a 16-channel front-end ASIC designed to readout silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for particle time-of-flight measurement applications. It combines a very fast and low-jitter trigger with an accurate charge measurement. Citiroc is a 32-channel front-end ASIC designed to readout silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM). It allows triggering down to 1/3 pe and provides the charge measurement with a good noise rejection. Moreover, Citiroc outputs the 32-channel triggers with a high accuracy (100 ps). Each channel of both ASICs combines a trigger path with an accurate charge measurement path. An adjustment of the SiPM high voltage is possible using a channel-by-channel input DAC. That allows a fine SiPM gain and dark noise adjustment at the system level to correct for the non-uniformity of SiPMs. Timing measurement down to 16 ps RMS jitter for Petiroc and 100 ps RMS for Citiroc is possible along with 1% linearity energy measurement up to 2500 pe. The power consumption is around 3.5 mW/channel for Petiroc and 3 mW/channel for Citiroc, excluding ASICs outing buffer.

  15. A SAR-ADC using unit bridge capacitor and with calibration for the front-end electronics of PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wei, Tingcun; Li, Bo; Yang, Lifeng; Xue, Feifei; Hu, Yongcai

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a 12-bit 1 MS/s successive approximation register-analog to digital converter (SAR-ADC) for the 32-channel front-end electronics of CZT-based PET imaging system. To reduce the capacitance mismatch, instead of the fractional capacitor, the unit capacitor is used as the bridge capacitor in the split-capacitor digital to analog converter (DAC) circuit. In addition, in order to eliminate the periodical DNL errors of -1 LSB which often exists in the SAR-ADC using the charge-redistributed DAC, a calibration algorithm is proposed and verified by the experiments. The proposed 12-bit 1 MS/s SAR-ADC is designed and implemented using a 0.35 μm CMOS technology, it occupies only an active area of 986×956 μm2. The measurement results show that, at the power supply of 3.3/5.0 V and the sampling rate of 1 MS/s, the ADC with calibration has a signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SINAD) of 67.98 dB, the power dissipation of 5 mW, and a figure of merit (FOM) of 2.44 pJ/conv.-step. This ADC is with the features of high accuracy, low power and small layout area, it is especially suitable to the one-chip integration of the front-end readout electronics.

  16. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Gan, B.; Hu, Y.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e- to 180,000e-, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e- at zero farad plus 5.4 e- per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  17. Performance Trade-Off Analysis Comparing Different Front-End Configurations for a Digital X-ray Imager.

    PubMed

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-10-30

    Performance of indirect digital x-ray imagers is typically limited by the front-end components. Present x-ray-to-light converting phosphors significantly reduce detector resolution due to stochastic blurring and k-fluorescent x-ray reabsorption. Thinner phosphors improve resolution at the cost of lowering quantum detection efficiency (QDE) and increasing Swank noise. Magnifying fiber optic tapers (FOTs) are commonly used to increase the field-of-view of small sensor imagers, such as CMOS, CCD, or electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) based detectors, which results in a reduction in detector sensitivity and further reduces the MTF. We investigate performance trade-offs for different front-end configurations coupled to an EMCCD sensor with 8 μm pixels. Six different columnar structured CsI(Tl) scintillators with thicknesses of 100, 200, 350, 500, and 1000 μm type high-light (HL) and a 350 μm type high-resolution (HR) (Hamamatsu) and four different FOTs with magnification ratios (M) of 1, 2.5, 3.3, and 4 were studied using the RQA5 x-ray spectrum. The relative signal of the different scintillators largely followed the relative QDE, indicating their light output per absorbed x-ray was similar, with the type HR CsI emitting 57% of the type HL. The efficiency of the FOTs was inversely proportional to M(2) with the M = 1 FOT transmitting 87% of the incident light. At 5 (10) cycles/mm, the CsI MTF was 0.38 (0.22), 0.33 (0.17), 0.37 (0.19), 0.23 (0.09), 0.19 (0.08), and 0.09 (0.03) for the 100, 200, 350HR, 350, 500, and 1000 μm CsI, respectively and the FOT MTF was 0.89 (0.84), 0.80 (0.72), 0.70 (0.60), and 0.69 (0.37) for M = 1, 2.5, 3.3, and 4, respectively. The 1000, 500, and 350HR μm CsI had the highest DQE for low, medium, and high spatial frequency ranges of 0 to 1.6, 1.6 to 4.5, and 4.5 to 10 cycles/mm, respectively. Larger FOT M resulted in a reduction in DQE. Quantifying performance of different front-end configurations will enable optimal selection of components

  18. Pion Production from 5-15 GeV Beam for the Neutrino Factory Front-End Study

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, Gersende

    2010-03-30

    For the neutrino factory front-end study, the production of pions from a proton beam of 5-8 and 14 GeV kinetic energy on a Hg jet target has been simulated. The pion yields for two versions of the MARS15 code and two different field configurations have been compared. The particles have also been tracked from the target position down to the end of the cooling channel using the ICOOL code and the neutrino factory baseline lattice. The momentum-angle region of pions producing muons that survived until the end of the cooling channel has been compared with the region covered by HARP data and the number of pions/muons as a function of the incoming beam energy is also reported.

  19. The OPERA RPCs front end electronics; a novel application of LVDS line receiver as low cost discriminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, E.; Bergnoli, A.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carrara, E.; Ciesielski, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Kose, U.; Longhin, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Stanco, L.

    2012-11-01

    The OPERA spectrometer is built from two large dipoles instrumented with around 1000 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), covering a surface of about 3350 m2, and digitally read out by means of almost 27000 strips. The huge number of channels, the inaccessibility of many parts of the detector and the wide uncertainty about the signal amplitude pushed to study a low cost, high sensitivity discriminator, and a very carefully designed layout for the read out system. Here we will present a novel application of LVDS line receiver as discriminator, showing that it exceeds the requirements of a large RPC based detector and offers the intrinsic advantages of a mature technology in terms of costs, reliability and integration scale. We will also present the layout of the read out system showing as the sensitivity and the noise immunity were preserved in a system where the front end electronics is far away from the detector.

  20. Thermo-mechanical parametric studies of Fixed Mask 1 and Photon Shutter 2 for APS front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Kuzay, T.M.; Sheng, I.C.A.

    1992-09-03

    Fixed Mask 1 (FM1) and Photon Shutter 2 (PS2) are two of the critical elements on the front end of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). FMl and PS2 use an enhanced heat transfer tube developed at ANL. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on these components, inclined geometry is used in their design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. Complete closed form solutions for steady state conditions have been developed for the analyses of the thermal and thermo-mechanical behavior of FMl and PS2. A modified Manson-Coffin fatigue relation is proposed to predict the predict the thermal fatigue. The maximum temperatures and maximum effective stresses have been parametrically studied. Fatigue-failure life predictions are presented for the FM1 and PS2 designs.

  1. WNA's worldwide overview on front-end nuclear fuel cycle growth and health, safety and environmental issues.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pierre, Sylvain; Kidd, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the WNA's worldwide nuclear industry overview on the anticipated growth of the front-end nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to conversion and enrichment, and on the related key health, safety, and environmental (HSE) issues and challenges. It also puts an emphasis on uranium mining in new producing countries with insufficiently developed regulatory regimes that pose greater HSE concerns. It introduces the new WNA policy on uranium mining: Sustaining Global Best Practices in Uranium Mining and Processing-Principles for Managing Radiation, Health and Safety and the Environment, which is an outgrowth of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) cooperation project that closely involved industry and governmental experts in uranium mining from around the world.

  2. Ion-source and LEBT issues with the front-end systems for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Cheng, D.; DiGennaro, R.; Gough, R.A.; Greer, J.; Leung, K.N.; Ratti, A.; Reijonen, J.; Thomae, R.W.; Schenkel, T.; Staples, J.W.; Yourd, R.; Aleksandrov, A.; Stockli, M.P.; Welton, R.W.

    2001-09-01

    The Front-End Systems (FES) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project are being built by Berkeley Lab and will deliver a pulsed 40-mA H{sup -} ion beam at 2.5 MeV energy to the subsequent Drift-Tube Linac. The FES accelerator components comprise an rf driven, volume-production, cesium-enhanced, multi-cusp Ion Source; an electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) that includes provisions for transverse focusing, steering, and beam chopping; an RFQ accelerator; and a Medium-Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line. The challenges for Ion Source and LEBT design are the generation of a plasma suitable for creating the required high H{sup -} ion density, lifetime of the rf antenna at 6% duty factor, removal of the parasitic electron population from the extracted negative ions, and emittance conservation. The paper discusses these issues in detail and highlights key experimental results obtained so far.

  3. A low-power, low-latency, dual-channel serializer ASIC for detector front-end readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Gong, D.; Liu, T.; Chen, J.; Fan, Q.; Feng, Y.; Guo, D.; He, H.; Hou, S.; Huang, G.; Li, X.; Liu, C.; Sun, Q.; Sun, X.; Teng, P.-K.; Wang, J.; Xiang, A. C.; Yang, D.; Ye, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dual-channel serializer ASIC, LOCx2, and its pin-compatible backup, LOCx2-130, for detector front-end readout. LOCx2 is fabricated in a 0.25-μm Silicon-on-Sapphire CMOS process and each channel operates at 5.12 Gbps, while LOCx2-130 is fabricated in a 130-nm bulk CMOS process and each channel operates at 4.8 Gbps. The power consumption and the transmission latency are 900 mW and 27 ns for LOCx2 and the corresponding simulation result of LOCx2-130 are 386 mW and 38 ns, respectively.

  4. Exploiting jump-resonance hysteresis in silicon auditory front-ends for extracting speaker discriminative formant trajectories.

    PubMed

    Aono, Kenji; Shaga, Ravi K; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2013-08-01

    Jump-resonance is a phenomenon observed in non-linear circuits where the amplitude of the output signal exhibits an abrupt jump when the frequency of the input signal is varied. For [Formula: see text] filters used in the design of analog auditory front-ends (AFEs), jump-resonance is generally considered to be undesirable and several techniques have been proposed in literature to avoid or alleviate this artifact. In this paper we explore the use of jump-resonance based hysteresis in [Formula: see text] band-pass filters for encoding speech formant trajectories. Using prototypes of silicon AFEs fabricated in a 0.5 μm CMOS process, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach for extracting speaker discriminative features. These benefits are validated using speaker recognition experiments where consistent improvements in equal-error-rates (EERs) are achieved using the jump-resonance based features as compared to conventional features.

  5. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for a multi-wire 3D gas tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojek, K.; Rozpȩdzik, D.; Bodek, K.; Perkowski, M.; Severijns, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of the front-end electronics and the data acquisition (DAQ) system for readout of multi-wire drift chambers (MWDC). Apart of the conventional drift time measurement the system delivers the hit position along the wire utilizing the charge division technique. The system consists of preamplifiers, and analog and digital boards sending data to a back-end computer via an Ethernet interface. The data logging software formats the received data and enables an easy access to the data analysis software. The use of specially designed preamplifiers and peak detectors allows the charge-division readout of the low resistance signal wire. The implication of the charge-division circuitry onto the drift time measurement was studied and the overall performance of the electronic system was evaluated in dedicated off-line tests.

  6. A low noise front end electronics for micro-channel plate detector with wedge and strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, K.; Li, F.; Liang, F.; Chen, L.; Jin, G.

    2016-03-01

    A low noise Front End Electronics (FEE) for two-dimensional position sensitive Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector has been developed. The MCP detector is based on Wedge and Strip Anode (WSA) with induction readout mode. The WSA has three electrodes, the wedge electrode, the strip electrode, and the zigzag electrode. Then, three readout channels are designed in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB). The FEE is calibrated by a pulse generator from Agilent. We also give an analysis of the charge loss from the CSA. The noise levels of the three channels are less than 1 fC RMS at the shaping time of 200 ns. The experimental result shows that the position resolution of the MCP detector coupled with the designed PCB can reach up to 110 μm.

  7. Characteristics and Classification of Solid Radioactive Waste From the Front-End of the Uranium Fuel Cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Wei, Fangxin; Xu, Chunyan; Liao, Yunxuan; Jiang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The proper classification of radioactive waste is the basis upon which to define its disposal method. In view of differences between waste containing artificial radionuclides and waste with naturally occurring radionuclides, the scientific definition of the properties of waste arising from the front end of the uranium fuel cycle (UF Waste) is the key to dispose of such waste. This paper is intended to introduce briefly the policy and practice to dispose of such waste in China and some foreign countries, explore how to solve the dilemma facing such waste, analyze in detail the compositions and properties of such waste, and finally put forward a new concept of classifying such waste as waste with naturally occurring radionuclides.

  8. Design of a new front-end electronics test-bench for the upgraded ATLAS detector's Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kureba, C. O.; Govender, M.; Hofsajer, I.; Ruan, X.; Sandrock, C.; Spoor, M.

    2015-10-01

    The year 2022 has been scheduled to see an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in order to increase its instantaneous luminosity. The High Luminosity LHC, also referred to as the upgrade Phase-II, means an inevitable complete re-design of the read-out electronics in the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) detector. Here, the new read-out architecture is expected to have the front-end electronics transmit fully digitized information of the detector to the back-end electronics system. Fully digitized signals will allow more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms which will contribute to the required improved triggers at high pile-up. In Phase II, the current Mobile Drawer Integrity ChecKing (MobiDICK) test-bench will be replaced by the next generation test-bench for the TileCal superdrawers, the new Prometeo (A Portable ReadOut ModulE for Tilecal ElectrOnics). Prometeo is a portable, high-throughput electronic system for full certification of the front-end electronics of the ATLAS TileCal. It is designed to interface to the fast links and perform a series of tests on the data to assess the certification of the electronics. The Prometeo's prototype is being assembled by the University of the Witwatersrand and installed at CERN for further developing, tuning and tests. This article describes the overall design of the new Prometeo, and how it fits into the TileCal electronics upgrade.

  9. IMOTEPAD: A mixed-signal 64-channel front-end ASIC for small-animal PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaochao; Ollivier-Henry, Nicolas; Gao, Wu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Colledani, Claude; Humbert, Bernard; Brasse, David; Hu, Yann

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the design and characteristics of a mixed-signal 64-channel front-end readout ASIC called IMOTEPAD dedicated to multi-channel plate (MCP) photodetector coupled to LYSO scintillating crystals for small-animal PET imaging. In our configuration, the crystals are oriented in the axial direction readout on both sides by individual photodetector channels allowing the spatial resolution and the detection efficiency to be independent of each other. As a result, both energy signals and timing triggers from the photodetectors are required to be read out by the front-end ASIC. This dedicated ASIC IMOTEPAD comprises two parts: the analog part IMOTEPA and the digital part IMOTEPD. The IMOTEPA is dedicated to energy measurement. And the timing information is digitized by the IMOTEPD in which the key principal element is a time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) with 32 delay cells. The chip is designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. The measurements show that for the analog part IMOTEPA, the energy gain is 13.1 mV/pC while the peak time of a CR-RC pulse shaper is 280 ns. The SNR is 39 dB and the RMS noise is 300 μV. The nonlinearity is less than 3%. The crosstalk is less than 0.2%. For the IMOTEPD, the bin size of the TDC is 625 ps with a reference clock of 50 MHz. The RMS jitter of the DLL is less than 42 ps. The DNL of the TDC is equal to about 0.17 LSB and the INL is equal to 0.31 LSB. The power dissipation of each channel is less than 16.8 mW. The design of the ASIC, especially for TDC and the measurement results of the IMOTEPAD will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  10. Imaging X-ray detector front-end with high dynamic range: IDeF-X HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevin, O.; Lemaire, O.; Lugiez, F.; Michalowska, A.; Baron, P.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.

    2012-12-01

    Presented circuit, IDeF-X HD (Imaging Detector Front-end) is a member of the IDeF-X ASICs family for space applications. It has been optimized for a half millimeter pitch CdTe or CdZnTe pixelated detector arranged in 16×16 array. It is aimed to operate in the hard X-ray range from few keV up to 250 keV or more. The ASIC has been realized in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS process. The IDeF-X HD is a 32 channel analog front-end with self-triggering capability. The architecture of the analog channel includes a chain of charge sensitive amplifier with continuous reset system and non-stationary noise suppressor, adjustable gain stage, pole-zero cancellation stage, adjustable shaping time low pass filter, baseline holder and peak detector with discriminator. The power consumption of the IDeF-X HD is 800 μW per channel. With the in-channel variable gain stage the nominal 250 keV dynamic range of the ASIC can be extended up to 1 MeV anticipating future applications using thick sensors. Measuring the noise performance without a detector at the input with minimized leakage current (programmable) at the input, we achieved ENC of 33 electrons rms at 10.7 μs peak time. Measurements with CdTe detector show good energy resolution FWHM of 1.1 keV at 60 keV and 4.3 keV at 662 keV with detection threshold below 4 keV. In addition, an absolute temperature sensor has been integrated with resolution of 1.5 °C.

  11. Thermo-mechanical analysis of fixed mask 1 for the Advanced Photon Source insertion device front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The first fixed mask (FM1) is one of the critical elements on the insertion device front ends of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The heat flux from the APS undulators is enormous. For example, FM1 placed at a distance of 16 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 519 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 3.8 kW. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on this component, inclined geometry (1.5{degree}) is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. A box-cone-shape geometry was designed due to the limited space available in the front end. The box shape is a highly constrained geometry, which induces larger stress levels than would occur in a plate or a tube. In order to handle the expected higher stress and the stress concentration at the corners, a single Glidcop block (rather than copper) was used in the construction. The FM1 uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}C with single-phase water as the coolant. The authors simulated the location of the x-ray beam in several places to cover the worst possible case. The maximum temperature (about 180{degree}C) occurs when the beam hits the center of horizontal surface. The maximum effective stress (about 313 MPa) occurs when the x-ray beam hits about the corners.

  12. Front end for ELI-Beamlines' 100J cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG multi-slab amplifier with temporal pulse shaping capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jonathan T.; Naylon, Jack A.; Mazanec, Tomáś; Horáček, Martin; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2014-02-01

    We report on the progress of the front end development for a 100 J, 1030 nm amplifier at ELI-Beamlines and discuss requirements for and features of the front end. A particular emphasis is placed on the use of a fiber-based nanosecond pulse generator to produce arbitrarily shaped, stable pulses. Disadvantages of using such a fiber-based seed, such as a wandering baseline, are discussed and solutions are presented. A home-built RF harmonic synthesizer is shown to be capable of controlled sub-nanosecond shaping of optical pulses.

  13. The Giga Bit Transceiver based Expandable Front-End (GEFE)—a new radiation tolerant acquisition system for beam instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros Marin, M.; Boccardi, A.; Donat Godichal, C.; Gonzalez, J. L.; Lefevre, T.; Levens, T.; Szuk, B.

    2016-02-01

    The Giga Bit Transceiver based Expandable Front-End (GEFE) is a multi-purpose FPGA-based radiation tolerant card. It is foreseen to be the new standard FMC carrier for digital front-end applications in the CERN BE-BI group. Its intended use ranges from fast data acquisition systems to slow control installed close to the beamlines, in a radioactive environment exposed to total ionizing doses of up to 750 Gy. This paper introduces the architecture of the GEFE, its features as well as examples of its application in different setups.

  14. UNIX NSW Front End.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

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  15. A multifunctional switched-capacitor programmable gain amplifier for high-definition video analog front-ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zhang; Jie, Zhang; Mudan, Zhang; Xue, Li; Jun, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    A multifunctional programmable gain amplifier (PGA) that provides gain and offset adjusting abilities for high-definition video analog front-ends (AFE) is presented. With a switched-capacitor structure, the PGA also acts as a sample and holder of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in the AFE to reduce the power consumption and chip area of the whole AFE. Furthermore, the PGA converts the single-ended video signal into differential signal for the following ADC to reject common-mode noise and interferences. The 9-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) for gain and offset adjusting is embedded into the switched capacitor networks of the PGA. A video AFE integrated circuit based on the proposed PGA is fabricated in a 0.18-μm process. Simulation and measurement results show that the PGA achieves a gain control range of 0.90 to 2.34 and an offset control range of -220 to 220 mV while consuming 10.1 mA from a 1.8 V power supply. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61106027), and the Science and Technology Project of Shanxi Province (No. 2014K05-14).

  16. The front-end electronics for the 1.8-kchannel SiPM tracking plane in the NEW detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, J.; Toledo, J.; Esteve, R.; Lorca, D.; Monrabal, F.

    2015-01-01

    NEW is the first phase of NEXT-100 experiment, an experiment aimed at searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay. NEXT technology combines an excellent energy resolution with tracking capabilities thanks to a combination of optical sensors, PMTs for the energy measurement and SiPMs for topology reconstruction. Those two tools result in one of the highest background rejection potentials in the field. This work describes the tracking plane that will be constructed for the NEW detector which consists of close to 1800 sensors with a 1-cm pitch arranged in twenty-eight 64-SiPM boards. Then it focuses in the development of the electronics needed to read the 1800 channels with a front-end board that includes per-channel differential transimpedance input amplifier, gated integrator, automatic offset voltage compensation and 12-bit ADC. Finally, a description of how the FPGA buffers data, carries out zero suppression and sends data to the DAQ interface using CERN RD-51 SRS's DTCC link specification complements the description of the electronics of the NEW detector tracking plane.

  17. New x-ray pink-beam profile monitor system for the SPring-8 beamline front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Sunao; Kudo, Togo; Sano, Mutsumi; Watanabe, Atsuo; Tajiri, Hiroo

    2016-08-01

    A new beam profile monitoring system for the small X-ray beam exiting from the SPring-8 front-end was developed and tested at BL13XU. This system is intended as a screen monitor and also as a position monitor even at beam currents of 100 mA by using photoluminescence of a chemical vapor deposition-grown diamond film. To cope with the challenge that the spatial distribution of the photoluminescence in the vertical direction is too flat to detect the beam centroid within a limited narrow aperture, a filter was installed that absorbs the fundamental harmonic concentrated in the beam center, which resulted in "de-flattening" of the vertical distribution. For the measurement, the filter crossed the photon beam vertically at high speed to withstand the intense heat flux of the undulator pink-beam. A transient thermal analysis, which can simulate the movement of the irradiation position with time, was conducted to determine the appropriate configuration and the required moving speed of the filter to avoid accidental melting. In a demonstration experiment, the vertically separated beam profile could be successfully observed for a 0.8 × 0.8 mm2 beam shaped by an XY slit and with a fundamental energy of 18.48 keV. The vertical beam centroid could be detected with a resolution of less than 0.1 mm.

  18. A Simulation of the Front End Signal Digitization for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer thin RPC trigger upgrade project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangting; Chapman, John; Levin, Daniel; Dai, Tiesheng; Zhu, Junjie; Zhou, Bing; Um Atlas Group Team

    2016-03-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Phase-I (and Phase-II) upgrade includes the BIS78 muon trigger detector project: two sets of eight very thin Resistive Place Chambers (tRPCs) combined with small Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers in the pseudorapidity region 1<| η|<1.3. The tRPCs will be comprised of triplet readout layer in each of the eta and azimuthal phi coordinates, with about 400 readout strips per layer. The anticipated hit rate is 100-200 kHz per strip. Digitization of the strip signals will be done by 32-channel CERN HPTDC chips. The HPTDC is a highly configurable ASIC designed by the CERN Microelectronics group. It can work in both trigger and trigger-less modes, be readout in parallel or serially. For Phase-I operation, a stringent latency requirement of 43 bunch crossings (1075 ns) is imposed. The latency budget for the front end digitization must be kept to a minimal value, ideally less than 350 ns. We conducted detailed HPTDC latency simulations using the Behavioral Verilog code from the CERN group. We will report the results of these simulations run for the anticipated detector operating environment and for various HPTDC configurations.

  19. Analysis and design of a 1.8-2.7 GHz tunable 8-band TDD LTE receiver front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wang; Yuji, Wang; Weiwei, Wang; Xuegui, Chang; Na, Yan; Xi, Tan; Hao, Min

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes the analysis and design of a 0.13 μm CMOS tunable receiver front-end that supports 8 TDD LTE bands, covering the 1.8-2.7 GHz frequency band and supporting the 5/10/15/20 MHz bandwidth and QPSK/16QAM/64QAM modulation schemes. The novel zero-IF receiver core consists of a tunable narrowband variable gain low-noise amplifier (LNA), a current commutating passive down-conversion mixer with a 2nd order low pass trans-impedance amplifier, an LO divider, a rough gain step variable gain pre-amplifier, a tunable 4th order Chebyshev channel select active-RC low pass filter with cutoff frequency calibration circuit and a fine gain step variable gain amplifier. The LNA can be tuned by reconfiguring the output parallel LC tank to the responding frequency band, eliminating the fixed center frequency multiple LNA array for a multi-mode receiver. The large various gain range and bandwidth of the analog baseband can also be tuned by digital configuration to satisfy the specification requirement of various bandwidth and modulation schemes. The test chip is implemented in an SMIC 0.13 μm 1P8M CMOS process. The full receiver achieves 4.6 dB NF, -14.5 dBm out of band IIP3, 30-94 dB gain range and consumes 54 mA with a 1.2 V power supply.

  20. A High-Speed Adaptively-Biased Current-to-Current Front-End for SSPM Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bob; Walder, Jean-Pierre; Lippe, Henrik vonder; Moses, William; Janecek, Martin

    Solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays are an interesting technology for use in PET detector modules due to their low cost, high compactness, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and sub-nanosecond timing resolution. However, the large intrinsic capacitance of SSPM arrays results in RC time constants that can severely degrade the response time, which leads to a trade-off between array size and speed. Instead, we propose a front-end that utilizes an adaptively biased current-to-current converter that minimizes the resistance seen by the SSPM array, thus preserving the timing resolution for both large and small arrays. This enables the use of large SSPM arrays with resistive networks, which creates position information and minimizes the number of outputs for compatibility with general PET multiplexing schemes. By tuning the bias of the feedback amplifier, the chip allows for precise control of the close-loop gain, ensuring stability and fast operation from loads as small as 50pF to loads as large as 1nF. The chip has 16 input channels, and 4 outputs capable of driving 100 n loads. The power consumption is 12mW per channel and 360mW for the entire chip. The chip has been designed and fabricated in an AMS 0.35um high-voltage technology, and demonstrates a fast rise-time response and low noise performances.

  1. Latest Results from the Front End Test Stand High Performance H{sup -} Ion Source at RAL

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Whitehead, M.; Wood, T.; Perkins, M.

    2011-09-26

    The aim of the Front End Test Stand (FETS) project is to demonstrate that chopped low energy beams of high quality can be produced. FETS consists of a high power Penning Surface Plasma Ion Source, a 3 solenoid LEBT, a 3 MeV RFQ, a chopper and a comprehensive suite of diagnostics. This paper briefly outlines the status of the project, hardware installation and modifications. Results from experiments running the H{sup -} ion source at 2 ms pulse length are detailed: the discharge current is varied between 20 A and 50 A. The discharge repetition rate is varied between 12.5 and 50 Hz. Hydrogen and Caesium vapour flow rates are varied. The effect of electrode surface temperature and beam current droop are discussed. Peak beam currents of over 60 mA for 2 ms pulse length can be achieved. Normalised r.m.s emittances of 0.3 {pi}mm.mrads at the exit of the LEBT are presented for different source conditions.

  2. Performances of the Front-End Electronics for the HADES RPC TOF wall on a 12C beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Díaz, J.; Garzón, J. A.; Gil, A.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Traxler, M.; Zapata, M.

    2009-05-01

    A Front-End Electronics (FEE) chain for timing accurate measurements has been developed for the RPC wall upgrade of the High-Acceptance DiElectron Spectrometer (HADES). The wall will cover an area of around 8 m with 1122 RPC cells (2244 electronic channels). The FEE chain consists of two boards: a four-channel DaughterBOard (DBO) and a 32-channel MotherBOard (MBO). The DBO uses a fast 2 GHz amplifier feeding a discriminator. The time and the charge information are encoded in the leading and the trailing edge (by a charge to width method) of an LVDS signal. Each MBO houses up to eight DBOs providing them regulated voltage supply, threshold values via DACs, test signals and collection of their trigger outputs. The MBO delivers LVDS signals to a time-to-digital converter readout board (TRB) based on HPTDC for data acquisition. In this work, we present the performance of the FEE measured using: (a) narrow electronic test pulses and (b) real signals read out in a fully instrumented RPC sextant installed in its final position at the HADES. The detector was exposed to particles coming from reactions of a 12C beam on Be and Nb targets at 2 GeV/A kinetic energy. Results for the whole electronic chain (DBO+MBO+TRB) show a timing jitter of around 40 ps/channel for pulses above 100 fC and 80 ps/channel for beam data taken with the RPC.

  3. Explosion bonding of dissimilar materials for fabricating APS front end components: Analysis of metallurgical and mechanical properties and UHV applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuheng; Shu, Deming; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-06-15

    The front end beamline section contains photon shutters and fixed masks. These components are made of OFHC copper and GlidCOP AL-15. Stainless steels (304 or 316) are also used for connecting photon shutters and fixed masks to other components that operate in the ultrahigh vacuum system. All these dissimilar materials need to be joined together. However, bonding these dissimilar materials is very difficult because of their different mechanical and thermal properties and incompatible metallurgical properties. Explosion bonding is a bonding method in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallurgical bond between two or more similar or dissimilar materials. No intermediate filler metal, for example, a brazing compound or soldering alloy, is needed to promote bonding, and no external heat need be applied. A study of the metallurgical and mechanical properties and YGV applications of GlidCop AL-15, OFHC copper, and 304 stainless steel explosion-bonded joints has been done. This report contains five parts: an ultrasonic examination of explosion-bonded joints and a standard setup; mechanical-property and thermal-cycle tests of GlidCop AL-15/304 stainless steel explosion-bonded joints; leak tests of a GlidCop AL-15/304 stainless steel explosion-bonded interfaces for UHV application; metallurgical examination of explosion-bonded interfaces and failure analysis, and discussion and conclusion.

  4. Front-end electronics in a 65 nm CMOS process for high density readout of pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaioni, Luigi; Manghisoni, Massimo; Ratti, Lodovico; Re, Valerio; Traversi, Gianluca

    2011-09-01

    In future high energy physics experiments (HEP), readout integrated circuits for vertexing and tracking applications will be implemented by means of CMOS devices belonging to processes with minimum feature size in the 100 nm span. In these nanoscale technologies the impact of new dielectric materials and processing techniques on the analog behavior of MOSFETs has to be carefully evaluated. This paper is concerned with the study of the analog properties, in particular in terms of noise performance and radiation hardness, of MOSFET devices belonging to a 65 nm CMOS low power technology. The behavior of the 1/ f and white noise terms is studied as a function of the main device parameters before and after exposure to 10 keV X-rays and 60Co γ-rays. A prototype chip designed in a 65 nm CMOS process including deep n-well MAPS structures and a fast front-end conceived for the readout of high-resistivity pixel sensors will be introduced.

  5. Front-end chip for Silicon Photomultiplier detectors with pico-second Time-of-Flight resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankova, V.; Briggl, K.; Chen, H.; Gil, A.; Harion, T.; Munwes, Y.; Shen, W.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.

    2016-07-01

    A mixed-mode readout Application Specific Integrated Circuit (STIC3) has been developed for high precision timing measurements with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) for medical imaging and particle physics applications. The STiC3 is a 64-channel chip, with fully differential analog front-end for cross-talk and electronic noise immunity. The time and charge information from the SiPM signals are encrypted into two time stamps generated by integrated Time to Digital Converter (TDC) modules with 50 ps time binning. The TDC data is stored in an internal memory and transferred to a PC via a 160 MBit/s serial link using an 8/10 bit encoding. The chip provides an input bias tuning in a range of 0-900 mV to compensate the breakdown voltage variation of individual SiPMs. The TDC jitter together with the digital part is around 37 ps. A Coincidence Time Resolution (CTR) of 213.6 ps FWHM has been obtained with 3.1 × 3.1 × 15m2 LYSO:Ce scintillator crystals and Hamamatsu SiPM matrices (S12643-050CN(X)). Characterization measurements with the chip and its integration into the external plate of the EndoTOFPET-US prototype are presented.

  6. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT XIX, I--ENGINE TUNE-UP--CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINE, II--FRONT END SUSPENSION AND AXLES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF DIESEL ENGINE TUNE-UP PROCEDURES AND THE DESIGN OF FRONT END SUSPENSION AND AXLES USED ON DIESEL ENGINE EQUIPMENT. TOPICS ARE (1) PRE-TUNE-UP CHECKS, (2) TIMING THE ENGINE, (3) INJECTOR PLUNGER AND VALVE ADJUSTMENTS, (4) FUEL PUMP ADJUSTMENTS ON THE ENGINE (PTR AND PTG),…

  7. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 238, App. F Appendix F to Part 238—Alternative...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 238 - Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternative Dynamic Performance Requirements for Front End Structures of Cab Cars and MU Locomotives F Appendix F to Part 238 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 238, App. F Appendix F to Part 238—Alternative...

  9. Low-cost high-manufacturability and thermal stability optical front-end for 10-Gb ethernet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shin-Ge; Lee, Chun-Hsing; Liao, Li-Chun; Tsai, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Chih-Li; Huang, Min-Fa; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Cheng, Fu-Yi; Kao, Min-Sheng; Wang, Chiung-Hung

    2004-05-01

    With the drastic expansion of internet usage, the demand of 10Gb/s transmission optoelectronic devices for local-area-network (LAN) and storage-area-network (SAN) are increasing. The key issues of these applications are to improve cost, manufacturability and reliability of optoelectronic devices in high speed transmission. The authors have demonstrated extremely low cost, high manufacturability and thermal stability optical fron-end for 10Gb/s Ethernet applications in this paper. High performance and high sensitivity of 10Gb/s transmitter optical sub-assembly (TOSA) and receiver optical sub-assembly (ROSA) with TO-Can packages are discussed and demonstrated to overcome the critical points in high speed applications, respectively. Moreover, 10km interconnection of 10Gb/s optical front-end without isolated elements inside are also proved to be error free at 10.3125Gb/s. In order to improve the signal integrity and manufacturability of 10Gb/s OSA in small form factor transceiver modules assembly, the authors also integrate high speed flex board and OSA package to extend the signal path, and to minimize the effect of crosstalk in modules. Furthermore, the integration of flex board and OSA package more release the difficulties in conjuunction OSA and electrical sub-assembly (ESA) in module to fulfill the request of 10Gb/s transeivers' Multi-Source Agreement (MSA). The performance of temperature stabilized TOSA over wide case temperature range is also experimented. The optical eye diagram of 10Gb/s TOSA developed in this study showing excellent eye quality passing 10Gb/s Ethernet mask test between 0°C to 85°C.

  10. Stand-alone front-end system for high- frequency, high-frame-rate coded excitation ultrasonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-12-01

    A stand-alone front-end system for high-frequency coded excitation imaging was implemented to achieve a wider dynamic range. The system included an arbitrary waveform amplifier, an arbitrary waveform generator, an analog receiver, a motor position interpreter, a motor controller and power supplies. The digitized arbitrary waveforms at a sampling rate of 150 MHz could be programmed and converted to an analog signal. The pulse was subsequently amplified to excite an ultrasound transducer, and the maximum output voltage level achieved was 120 V(pp). The bandwidth of the arbitrary waveform amplifier was from 1 to 70 MHz. The noise figure of the preamplifier was less than 7.7 dB and the bandwidth was 95 MHz. Phantoms and biological tissues were imaged at a frame rate as high as 68 frames per second (fps) to evaluate the performance of the system. During the measurement, 40-MHz lithium niobate (LiNbO(3)) single-element lightweight (<;0.28 g) transducers were utilized. The wire target measure- ment showed that the -6-dB axial resolution of a chirp-coded excitation was 50 μm and lateral resolution was 120 μm. The echo signal-to-noise ratios were found to be 54 and 65 dB for the short burst and coded excitation, respectively. The contrast resolution in a sphere phantom study was estimated to be 24 dB for the chirp-coded excitation and 15 dB for the short burst modes. In an in vivo study, zebrafish and mouse hearts were imaged. Boundaries of the zebrafish heart in the image could be differentiated because of the low-noise operation of the implemented system. In mouse heart images, valves and chambers could be readily visualized with the coded excitation.

  11. Design of millimeter-wave MEMS-based reconfigurable front-end circuits using the standard CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Chan; Hsieh, Sheng-Chi; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Huang, Chin-Yen; Yao, Chun-Han; Lin, Chun-Chi

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the designs of three reconfigurable CMOS-MEMS front-end components for V-/W-band applications. The suspended MEMS structure is released through post-CMOS micromachining. To achieve circuit reconfigurability, dual-state and multi-state fishbone-beam-drive actuators are proposed herein. The reconfigurable bandstop is fabricated in a 0.35 µm CMOS process with the chip size of 0.765 × 0.98 mm2, showing that the stop-band frequency can be switched from 60 to 50 GHz with 40 V actuation voltage. The measured isolation is better than 38 dB at 60 GHz and 34 dB at 50 GHz, respectively. The bandpass filter-integrated single-pole single-throw switch, using the 0.18 µm CMOS process, demonstrates that insertion loss and return loss are better than 6.2 and 15 dB from 88 to 100 GHz in the on-state, and isolation is better than 21 dB in the off-state with an actuation voltage of 51 V. The chip size is 0.7 × 1.04 mm2. The third component is a reconfigurable slot antenna fabricated in a 0.18 µm CMOS process with the chip size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm2. By utilizing the multi-state actuators, the frequencies of this antenna can be switched to 43, 47, 50.5, 54, 57.5 GHz with return loss better than 20 dB. Those circuits demonstrate good RF performance and are relatively compact by employing several size miniaturizing techniques, thereby enabling a great potential for the future single-chip transceiver.

  12. Powerloads on the front end components and the duct of the heating and diagnostic neutral beam lines at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. J.; Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R. S.; Geli, F.; Graceffa, J.; Urbani, M.; Schunke, B.; Chareyre, J.; Dlougach, E.; Krylov, A.

    2015-04-08

    The heating and current drive beam lines (HNB) at ITER are expected to deliver ∼16.7 MW power per beam line for H beams at 870 keV and D beams at 1 MeV during the H-He and the DD/DT phases of ITER operation respectively. On the other hand the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) line shall deliver ∼2 MW power for H beams at 100 keV during both the phases. The path lengths over which the beams from the HNB and DNB beam lines need to be transported are 25.6 m and 20.7 m respectively. The transport of the beams over these path lengths results in beam losses, mainly by the direct interception of the beam with the beam line components and reionisation. The lost power is deposited on the surfaces of the various components of the beam line. In order to ensure the survival of these components over the operational life time of ITER, it is important to determine to the best possible extent the operational power loads and power densities on the various surfaces which are impacted by the beam in one way or the other during its transport. The main factors contributing to these are the divergence of the beamlets and the halo fraction in the beam, the beam aiming, the horizontal and vertical misalignment of the beam, and the gas profile along the beam path, which determines the re-ionisation loss, and the re-ionisation cross sections. The estimations have been made using a combination of the modified version of the Monte Carlo Gas Flow code (MCGF) and the BTR code. The MCGF is used to determine the gas profile in the beam line and takes into account the active gas feed into the ion source and neutraliser, the HNB-DNB cross over, the gas entering the beamline from the ITER machine, the additional gas atoms generated in the beam line due to impacting ions and the pumping speed of the cryopumps. The BTR code has been used to obtain the power loads and the power densities on the various surfaces of the front end components and the duct modules for different scenarios of ITER

  13. Band-1 receiver front-end cartridges for Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA): design and development toward production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Chiong, Chau-Ching; Huang, Yau-De; Huang, Chi-Den; Liu, Ching-Tang; Kuo, Yue-Fang; Weng, Shou-Hsien; Ho, Chin-Ting; Chiang, Po-Han; Wu, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Jian, Shou-Ting; Lee, Chien-Feng; Lee, Yi-Wei; Pospieszalski, Marian; Henke, Doug; Finger, Ricardo; Tapia, Valeria; Gonzalez, Alvaro

    2016-07-01

    The ALMA Band-1 receiver front-end prototype cold and warm cartridge assemblies, including the system and key components for ALMA Band-1 receivers have been developed and two sets of prototype cartridge were fully tested. The measured aperture efficiency for the cold receiver is above the 80% specification except for a few frequency points. Based on the cryogenically cooled broadband low-noise amplifiers provided by NRAO, the receiver noise temperature can be as low as 15 - 32K for pol-0 and 17 - 30K for pol-1. Other key testing items are also measured. The receiver beam pattern is measured, the results is well fit to the simulation and design. The pointing error extracted from the measured beam pattern indicates the error is 0.1 degree along azimuth and 0.15 degree along elevation, which is well fit to the specification (smaller than 0.4 degree). The equivalent hot load temperature for 5% gain compression is 492 - 4583K, which well fit to the specification of 5% with 373K input thermal load. The image band suppression is higher than 30 dB typically and the worst case is higher than 20 dB for 34GHz RF signal and 38GHz LO signal, which is all higher than 7 dB required specification. The cross talk between orthogonal polarization is smaller than -85 dB based on present prototype LO. The amplitude stability is below 2.0 x 10-7 , which is fit to the specification of 4.0 x 10-7 for timescales in the range of 0.05 s ≤ T ≤ 100 s. The signal path phase stability measured is smaller than 5 fs, which is smaller than 22 fs for Long term (delay drift) 20 s ≤ T < 300 sec. The IF output phase variation is smaller than 3.5° rms typically, and the specification is less than 4.5° rms. The measured IF output power level is -28 to -30.5 dBm with 300K input load. The measured IF output power flatness is less than 5.6 dB for 2GHz window, and 1.3dB for 31MHz window. The first batch of prototype cartridges will be installed on site for further commissioning on July of 2017.

  14. Characterization and performance of monolithic detector blocks with a dedicated ASIC front-end readout for PET imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rato Mendes, Pedro; Sarasola Martín, Icíar; Cañadas, Mario; de Acilu, Paz García; Cuypers, Robin; Manuel Pérez, José; Willmott, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    We are developing a human brain PET scanner prototype compatible with MRI based on monolithic scintillator crystals, APD matrices and a dedicated ASIC front-end readout. In this work we report on the performance of individual detector modules and on the operation of such modules in PET coincidence. Results will be presented on the individual characterization of detector blocks and its ASIC front-end readout, with measured energy resolutions of 13% full-width half-maximum (FWHM) at 511 keV and spatial resolutions of the order of 2 mm FWHM. First results on PET coincidence performance indicate spatial resolutions as good as 2.1 mm FWHM for SSRB/FBP reconstruction of tomographic data obtained using a simple PET demonstrator based on a pair of monolithic detector blocks with ASIC readout.

  15. FELIX: a PCIe based high-throughput approach for interfacing front-end and trigger electronics in the ATLAS Upgrade framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Bauer, K.; Borga, A.; Boterenbrood, H.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Drake, G.; Dönszelmann, M.; Francis, D.; Guest, D.; Gorini, B.; Joos, M.; Lanni, F.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Levinson, L.; Narevicius, J.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Roich, A.; Ryu, S.; Schreuder, F.; Schumacher, J.; Vandelli, W.; Vermeulen, J.; Whiteson, D.; Wu, W.; Zhang, J.

    2016-12-01

    The ATLAS Phase-I upgrade (2019) requires a Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system able to trigger and record data from up to three times the nominal LHC instantaneous luminosity. The Front-End LInk eXchange (FELIX) system provides an infrastructure to achieve this in a scalable, detector agnostic and easily upgradeable way. It is a PC-based gateway, interfacing custom radiation tolerant optical links from front-end electronics, via PCIe Gen3 cards, to a commodity switched Ethernet or InfiniBand network. FELIX enables reducing custom electronics in favour of software running on commercial servers. The FELIX system, the design of the PCIe prototype card and the integration test results are presented in this paper.

  16. Exploiting Electrocorticographic Spectral Characteristics for Optimized Signal Chain Design: A 1.08 Analog Front End With Reduced ADC Resolution Requirements.

    PubMed

    Smith, William A; Mogen, Brian J; Fetz, Eberhard E; Sathe, Visvesh S; Otis, Brian P

    2016-12-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG) is an important area of research for Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) development. ECoG, along with some other biopotentials, has spectral characteristics that can be exploited for more optimal front-end performance than is achievable with conventional techniques. This paper optimizes noise performance of such a system and discusses an equalization technique that reduces the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) dynamic range requirements and eliminates the need for a variable gain amplifier (VGA). We demonstrate a fabricated prototype in 1p9m 65 nm CMOS that takes advantage of the presented findings to achieve high-fidelity, full-spectrum ECoG recording. It requires 1.08 μW over a 150 Hz bandwidth for the entire analog front end and only 7 bits of ADC resolution.

  17. Measurement of the front-end dead-time of the LHCb muon detector and evaluation of its contribution to the muon detection inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Anelli, M.; Archilli, F.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bochin, B.; Bozzi, C.; Brundu, D.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Casu, L.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; De Simone, P.; Falabella, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, M.; Fontana, M.; Fresch, P.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Loi, A.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Martellotti, G.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Saitta, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Tellarini, G.; Vacca, C.; Vazquez-Gomez, R.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Vorobyev, A.

    2016-04-01

    A method is described which allows to deduce the dead-time of the front-end electronics of the LHCb muon detector from a series of measurements performed at different luminosities at a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz. The measured values of the dead-time range from ~ 70 ns to ~ 100 ns. These results allow to estimate the performance of the muon detector at the future bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz and at higher luminosity.

  18. A technical description of enhancements to the front-end user interface for the Worldwide Household Goods Information System for Transportation Modernization (WHIST-MOD)

    SciTech Connect

    Loftis, J.P.; Spears, P.M. ); James, T.L. )

    1990-08-01

    The Directorate of Personal Property of the Military Traffic Management Command (MTMC) asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design a decision support system, the Worldwide Household Goods Information System for Transportation Modernization. This decision support system will automate tasks and provide analysis tools for evaluating the Personal Property Program, predicting impacts to the program, and planning modifications to the program to meet the evolving needs of military service members and the transportation industry. The system designed by ORNL consists of three application modules: system dictionary applications, data acquisition and administration applications, and user applications. The user applications module is divided into two phases: the data selection front-end interface and the postprocessing back-end interface. This paper describes the prototyped front-end interface using ORACLE SQL*Forms, part of the ORACLE Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) toolset. The focus of this paper is a discussion of the need for enhancements to the initial design of the interface and the coding techniques used to prototype the enhancements. These enhancements make the front-end interface more flexible and easier to use by giving users options for identifying data to be used by the back-end interface. This report is based on in-depth interviews of MTMC staff, prototype meetings with the users, and the research and design work conducted at ORNL.

  19. THE PROJECT-X INJECTOR EXPERIMENT: A NOVEL HIGH PERFORMANCE FRONT-END FOR A FUTURE HIGH POWER PROTON FACILITY AT FERMILAB

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; et al,

    2013-09-25

    A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are carrying out a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of Project X. This program, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. PXIE is currently under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-17. PXIE will include an H* ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

  20. Practical Limits in the Sensitivity-Linearity Trade-off for Radio Telescope Front Ends in the HF and VHF-low Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, R. H.; Ellingson, S. W.; Brendler, J.

    2016-03-01

    Radio telescope front ends must have simultaneously low noise and sufficiently-high linearity to accommodate interfering signals. Typically these are opposing design goals. For modern radio telescopes operating in the HF (3-30MHz) and VHF-low (30-88MHz) bands, the problem is more nuanced in that front end noise temperature may be a relatively small component of the system temperature, and increased linearity may be required due to the particular interference problems associated with this spectrum. In this paper, we present an analysis of the sensitivity-linearity trade-off at these frequencies, applicable to existing commercially-available monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers in single-ended, differential, and parallelized configurations. This analysis and associated findings should be useful in the design and upgrade of front ends for low frequency radio telescopes. The analysis is demonstrated explicitly for one of the better-performing amplifiers encountered in this study, the Mini-Circuits PGA-103, and is confirmed by hardware measurements. We also present a design based on the Mini-Circuits HELA-10 amplifier, which is better-suited for applications where linearity is a primary concern.

  1. Development and evaluation of a comprehensive clinical decision support taxonomy: comparison of front-end tools in commercial and internally developed electronic health record systems

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Feblowitz, Joshua; Meltzer, Seth; McMullen, Carmit; Guappone, Ken; Carpenter, Jim; Richardson, Joshua; Simonaitis, Linas; Evans, R Scott; Nichol, W Paul; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support (CDS) is a valuable tool for improving healthcare quality and lowering costs. However, there is no comprehensive taxonomy of types of CDS and there has been limited research on the availability of various CDS tools across current electronic health record (EHR) systems. Objective To develop and validate a taxonomy of front-end CDS tools and to assess support for these tools in major commercial and internally developed EHRs. Study design and methods We used a modified Delphi approach with a panel of 11 decision support experts to develop a taxonomy of 53 front-end CDS tools. Based on this taxonomy, a survey on CDS tools was sent to a purposive sample of commercial EHR vendors (n=9) and leading healthcare institutions with internally developed state-of-the-art EHRs (n=4). Results Responses were received from all healthcare institutions and 7 of 9 EHR vendors (response rate: 85%). All 53 types of CDS tools identified in the taxonomy were found in at least one surveyed EHR system, but only 8 functions were present in all EHRs. Medication dosing support and order facilitators were the most commonly available classes of decision support, while expert systems (eg, diagnostic decision support, ventilator management suggestions) were the least common. Conclusion We developed and validated a comprehensive taxonomy of front-end CDS tools. A subsequent survey of commercial EHR vendors and leading healthcare institutions revealed a small core set of common CDS tools, but identified significant variability in the remainder of clinical decision support content. PMID:21415065

  2. Linearity enhancement design of a 16-channel low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huiming; Wei, Tingcun; Wang, Jia

    2017-03-01

    A 16-channel front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with linearity enhancement design for cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is presented in this paper. The resistors in the slow shaper are realized using a high-Z circuit to obtain constant resistance value instead of using only a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistor, thus the shaping time of the slow shaper can be kept constant for different amounts of input energies. As a result, the linearity of conversion gain is improved significantly. The ASIC was designed and fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a die size of 2.60 mm×3.53 mm. The tested results show that a typical channel provides an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 109.7e-+16.3e-/pF with a power consumption of 4 mW and achieves a conversion gain of 87 mV/fC with a nonlinearity of <0.4%. The linearity of conversion gain is improved by at least 86.6% as compared with the traditional approaches using the same front-end readout architecture and manufacture process. Moreover, the inconsistency among channels is <0.3%. An energy resolution of 2.975 keV (FWHM) for gamma rays of 59.5 keV was measured by connecting the ASIC to a 5 mm×5 mm ×2 mm CdZnTe detector at room temperature. The front-end readout ASIC presented in this paper achieves an outstanding linearity performance without compromising the noise, power consumption, and chip size performances.

  3. A synchronous analog very front-end in 65 nm CMOS with local fast ToT encoding for pixel detectors at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteil, E.; Pacher, L.; Paternò, A.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Rotondo, F.; Leng, C.; Chai, J.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes the design, in 65 nm CMOS, of a very compact, low power, low threshold synchronous analog front-end for pixel detectors at HL-LHC . Threshold trimming is avoided using offset compensation techniques. Fast ToT encoding is possible, as the comparator can be turned into a Local Oscillator up to several hundreds MHz. Two small prototypes have been submitted and tested; a X-ray irradiation up to 600 Mrad has been performed. Detailed results in terms of gain, noise, ToT and threshold dispersion are presented. This design will be part of the CHIPIX65 demonstrator and of the RD53A chip.

  4. A 55-dB SNDR, 2.2-mW double chopper-stabilized analog front-end for a thermopile sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengying, Chen; Xiaoyu, Hu; Jun, Fan; Yong, Hei

    2014-05-01

    A double chopper-stabilized analog front-end (DCS-AFE) circuit for a thermopile sensor is presented, which includes a closed-loop front-end amplifier and a 2nd-order 1 bit quantization sigma—delta modulator. The amplifier with a closed-loop structure ensures the gain stability against the temperature. Moreover, by adopting the chopper-stabilized technique both for the amplifier and 2nd-order 1-bit quantization sigma—delta modulator, the low-frequency 1/f noise and offset is reduced and high resolution is achieved. The AFE is implemented in the SMIC 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process. The measurement results show that in a 3.3 V power supply, 1 Hz input frequency and 3KHz clock frequency, the peak signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) is 55.4 dB, the effective number of bits (ENOB) is 8.92 bit, and in the range of -20 to 85 degrees, the detection resolution is 0.2 degree.

  5. A 16 GHz silicon-based monolithic balanced photodetector with on-chip capacitors for 25 Gbaud front-end receivers.

    PubMed

    Hai, Mohammed Shafiqul; Sakib, Meer Nazmus; Liboiron-Ladouceur, Odile

    2013-12-30

    In this paper, a Germanium-on-Silicon balanced photodetector (BPD) with integrated biasing capacitors is demonstrated for highly compact monolithic 100 Gb/s coherent receivers or 25 Gbaud front-end receivers for differential or quadrature phase shift keying. The balanced photodetector has a bandwidth of approximately 16.2 GHz at a reverse bias of -4.5 V. The balanced photodetector exhibits a common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 30 dB. For balanced detection of return-to-zero (RZ) differential phase shift keying (DPSK) signal, the photodetector has a sensitivity of -6.95 dBm at the BER of 10(-12). For non-return-to-zero (NRZ) on off keying (OOK) signal, the measured BER is 1.0 × 10(-12) for a received power of -1.65 dBm at 25 Gb/s and 9.9 × 10(-5) for -0.34 dBm at 30 Gb/s. The total footprint area of the monolithic front-end receiver is less than 1 mm(2). The BPD is packaged onto a ceramic substrate with two DC and one RF connectors exhibits a bandwidth of 15.9 GHz.

  6. Analog front-end design of the STS/MUCH-XYTER2—full size prototype ASIC for the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleczek, Rafal

    2017-01-01

    The design of the analog front-end of the STS/MUCH-XYTER2 ASIC, a full-size prototype chip for the Silicon Tracking System (STS, based on double-sided silicon strip sensors) and Muon Chamber (MUCH, based on gas sensors) detectors is presented. The ASIC contains 128 charge processing channels, each built of a charge sensitive amplifier, a polarity selection circuit and two pulse shaping amplifiers forming two parallel signal paths. The first path is used for timing measurement with a fast discriminator. The second path allows low-noise amplitude measurement with a 5-bit continuous-time flash ADC. Different operating conditions and constraints posed by two target detectors' applications require front-end electronics flexibility to meet extended system-wise requirements. The presented circuit implements switchable shaper peaking time, gain switching and trimming, input amplifier pulsed reset circuit, fail-safe measures. The power consumption is scalable (for the STS and the MUCH modes), but limited to 10 mW/channel.

  7. An analog front end with a 12-bit 3.2-MS/s SAR ADC for a power line communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huabin, Chen; Jixuan, Xiang; Xiangyan, Xue; Chixiao, Chen; Fan, Ye; Jun, Xu; Junyan, Ren

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents an analog front end for a power line communication system, including a 12-bit 3.2-MS/s energy-efficient successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter, a positive feedback programmable gain amplifier, a 9.8 ppm/°C bandgap reference and on-chip low-output voltage regulators. A two segment capacitive array structure (6 MSB 5 LSB) composed by split capacitors is designed for the SAR core to save area cost and release reference voltage accuracy requirements. Implemented in the GSMC 0.13 μm 1.5 V/12 V dual-gate 4P6M e-flash process, the analog front end occupies an area of 0.457 mm2 and consumes power of 18.8 mW, in which 1.1 mW cost by the SAR ADC. Measured at 500 kHz input, the spurious-free dynamic range and signal-to-noise plus distortion ratio of the ADC are 71.57 dB and 60.60 dB respectively, achieving a figure of merit of 350 fJ/conversion-step.

  8. The front-end electronics of the Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-Rays (STIX) on the ESA Solar Orbiter satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, O.; Bednarzik, M.; Commichau, V.; Graczyk, R.; Gröbelbauer, H. P.; Hurford, G.; Krucker, S.; Limousin, O.; Meuris, A.; Orleański, P.; Przepiórka, A.; Seweryn, K.; Skup, K.; Viertel, G.

    2012-12-01

    Solar Orbiter is an ESA mission to study the heliosphere in proximity to the Sun, scheduled for launch in January 2017. It carries a suite of ten instruments for comprehensive remote-sensing and in-situ measurements. The Spectrometer Telescope for Imaging X-Rays (STIX), one of the remote sensing instruments, images X-rays between 4 and 150keV using an Fourier technique. The angular resolution is 7 arcsec and the spectral resolution 1keV full-width-half-maximum at 6keV. X-ray detection uses pixelized Cadmium Telluride crystals provided by the Paul Scherrer Institute. The crystals are bonded to read-out hybrids developed by CEA Saclay, called Caliste-SO, incorporating a low-noise, low-power analog front-end ASIC IDeF-X HD. The crystals are cooled to -20°C to obtain very low leakage currents of less than 60pA per pixel, the prerequisite for obtaining the required spectral resolution. This article briefly describes the mission goals and then details the front-end electronics design and main challenges, resulting in part from the allocation limit in mass of 7kg and in power of 4W. Emphasis is placed on the design influence of the cooling requirement within the warm environment of a mission approaching the Sun to within the orbit of Mercury. The design for the long-term in-flight energy calibration is also explained.

  9. Design and Measurement of a Low-Noise 64-Channels Front-End Readout ASIC for CdZnTe Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Bo; Wei, Tingcun; Gao, Wu; Liu, Hui; Hu, Yann

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors, as one of the principal detectors for the next-generation X-ray and γ-ray imagers, have high energy resolution and supporting electrode patterning in the radiation environment at room-temperature. In the present, a number of internationally renowned research institutions and universities are actively using these detector systems to carry out researches of energy spectrum analysis, medical imaging, materials characterization, high-energy physics, nuclear plant monitoring, and astrophysics. As the most important part of the readout system for the CdZnTe detector, the front-end readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) would have an important impact on the performances of the whole detector system. In order to ensure the small signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sufficient range of the output signal, it is necessary to design a front-end readout ASIC with very low noise and very high dynamic range. In addition, radiation hardness should be considered when the detectors are utilized in the space applications and high energy physics experiments. In this paper, we present measurements and performances of a novel multi-channel radiation-hardness low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors. The readout circuits in each channel consist of charge sensitive amplifier, leakage current compensation circuit (LCC), CR-RC shaper, S-K filter, inverse proportional amplifier, peak detect and hold circuit (PDH), discriminator and trigger logic, time sequence control circuit and driving buffer. All of 64 readout channels' outputs enter corresponding inputs of a 64 channel multiplexer. The output of the mux goes directly out of the chip via the output buffer. The 64-channel readout ASIC is implemented using the TSMC 0.35 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology. The die size of the prototype chip is 2.7 mm x 8 mm. At room temperature, the equivalent noise level of a typical channel reaches 66 e{sup -} (rms) at zero farad for a power

  10. Front-end Evaluation as Part of a Comprehensive Approach to Inform the Development of a New Climate Exhibit at NCAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristvey, J. D., Jr.; Brinkworth, C.; Hatheway, B.; Williams, V.

    2015-12-01

    In an era of discord in public views of climate change, communicating atmospheric and related sciences to the public at a large research facility like the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) can be a daunting challenge yet one that is filled with many possibilities. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Center for Science Education (SciEd) is responsible for education and outreach activities at UCAR, including the exhibits program. Over 90,000 people visit the NCAR Mesa Lab each year to enjoy a number of exhibits that showcase our community's research. The current climate exhibit is twelve years old, and with advances in our understanding of climate science and exhibit design, SciEd staff are developing a new exhibit that is as cutting edge as the research conducted at NCAR. Based on listening sessions with NCAR scientists, the following big ideas for the exhibit emerged: How the climate system works The climate system is changing How scientists study our climate Regional impacts Solutions The goal of the new climate exhibit is to reach people using a variety of learning styles, including offerings for visitors who learn by doing, as well as providing informative text and images (Hatheway, 2014). Developers and evaluators are working together to conduct front-end, formative, and summative evaluations to understand of the needs of our visitors and collect ongoing data to inform development. The purpose of the front-end evaluation, conducted in the summer of 2014 was to develop informed data-driven strategies to move forward with exhibit design. The evaluation results to be shared in this session include: The demographics and behaviors of visitors Trends in visitors' experiences Visitor input on exhibit design (Williams and Tarsi, 2014). In this presentation, we will share the results, significance, and application of the front-end evaluation as part of a comprehensive approach to study both how we convey information about climate

  11. A Monolithically Integrated Receiver Front-End Comprising Ion-Implanted Lateral Interdigitated InGaAs Pin And Inp JFET Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. S.; Kitching, S. A.; Bland, S. W.

    1989-11-01

    An optical receiver front-end consisting of a lateral interdigitated InGaAs PIN photodetector integrated with an InP JFET amplifier has been fabricated by selective ion implantation. The lateral interdigitated InGaAs PlN is integrated here for the first time. The advantages of the lateral detector structure are its inherently low capacitance and the simplification of the InGaAs material growth requirement to a single layer. A quasi-planar integration approach has been developed in conjunction with a two-level metallisation interconnect scheme employing polyimide as the inter-level dielectric. An optical sensitivity of -29 dBm has been measured at 560 Mbit/s and 1.3 µm wavelength.

  12. Use of phase information with a stepper motor to control frequency for tuning system of the Front End Test Stand Radio Frequency Quadrupole at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsari, S.; Aslaninejad, M.; Pozimski, J.

    2015-03-01

    For the Front End Test Stand (FETS) linear accelerator project at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, a 4 m, 4 vanes Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a resonant frequency of 324 MHz has been designed. The RF power feeding the RFQ gives rise to the temperature increase in the RFQ, which in turn, results in shifting the resonant frequency of the RFQ. The frequency shift and the stability in the RFQ frequency can be maintained based on the reflected power or signal phase information. We have, however, investigated restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases driving a stepper motor. The concept and the system set-up and electronics are described in detail. Results of the measurements indicating the full restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases and stepper motor are presented. Moreover, measured sensitivity of tuner with respect to its position is given.

  13. Development of the front end test stand and vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses negative hydrogen ion sources at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Perkins, M.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Gabor, C.; Back, J.

    2014-02-15

    The ISIS pulsed spallation neutron and muon facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK uses a Penning surface plasma negative hydrogen ion source. Upgrade options for the ISIS accelerator system demand a higher current, lower emittance beam with longer pulse lengths from the injector. The Front End Test Stand is being constructed at RAL to meet the upgrade requirements using a modified ISIS ion source. A new 10% duty cycle 25 kV pulsed extraction power supply has been commissioned and the first meter of 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole has been delivered. Simultaneously, a Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analyses is under construction in a new laboratory at RAL. The detailed measurements of the plasma and extracted beam characteristics will allow a radical overhaul of the transport optics, potentially yielding a simpler source configuration with greater output and lifetime.

  14. The 3rd generation Front-End cards of the Pierre Auger surface detectors: Test results and performance in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.; Bäcker, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Buchholz, P.; Fleck, I.; Kampert, K.-H.; Rammes, M.; Rautenberg, J.; Taşcău, O.

    2009-07-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory comprises 1600 water Cherenkov detectors distributed over an area of 3000 km2. The Cherenkov light is detected by three 9-in. photo-multiplier tubes from which the signals of the anode and last dynode are digitized by 10 bit 40 MHz FADCs. An Altera Cyclone FPGA is employed to generate different local triggers and to handle the data transfer to a communication board. After briefly discussing the design of the cards we present an autonomous test-bench, which has been set up in order to test the large number of boards prior to installation in the field. The qualification procedure and the results obtained in the laboratory are presented. Up to three years of operation in the field demonstrate a very good performance and reliability of the Front-End cards.

  15. Size distribution of airborne particulate matter emitted by the front-end processing of municipal solid waste feed material for large-scale anaerobic digesters

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrish, H.P.; Narasimhan, R.; Daly, E.L. Jr.; Sengupta, S.; Nemerow, N.L.; Wong, K.V.

    1984-07-01

    A 100-ton/day proof-of-concept facility has been constructed in Pompano Beach, Florida, to examine the feasibility of producing methane-rich gas from the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste. One of the possible environmental impacts is from the particulate matter emitted into the atmosphere by the secondary shredding and conveying of light fraction feed material to the digesters. It has been found that the amount of particulate matter emitted into the atmosphere by the front-end processing is an order of magnitude higher when the plant is operating compared to when it is not operating. It has been found that the particle size distribution is bimodal both when the plant is operating as well as when it is not operating. Particle concentrations of episodic nature were found in July 1981 which were four times the concentration found during normal plant operation.

  16. Development of a data management front end for use with a LANDSAT based information system. [assessing gypsy moth defoliation damage in Pennsylvania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A user friendly front end was constructed to facilitate access to the LANDSAT mosaic data base supplied by JPL and to process both LANDSAT and ancillary data. Archieval and retrieval techniques were developed to efficiently handle this data base and make it compatible with requirements of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry. Procedures are ready for: (1) forming the forest/nonforest mask in ORSER compressed map format using GSFC-supplied classification procedures; (2) registering data from a new scene (defoliated) to the mask (which may involve mosaicking if the area encompasses two LANDSAT scenes; (3) producing a masked new data set using the MASK program; (4) analyzing this data set to produce a map showing degrees of defoliation, output on the Versatec plotter; and (5) producing color composite maps by a diazo-type process.

  17. Front-end technologies for robust ASR in reverberant environments—spectral enhancement-based dereverberation and auditory modulation filterbank features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Feifei; Meyer, Bernd T.; Moritz, Niko; Rehr, Robert; Anemüller, Jörn; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Goetze, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents extended techniques aiming at the improvement of automatic speech recognition (ASR) in single-channel scenarios in the context of the REVERB (REverberant Voice Enhancement and Recognition Benchmark) challenge. The focus is laid on the development and analysis of ASR front-end technologies covering speech enhancement and feature extraction. Speech enhancement is performed using a joint noise reduction and dereverberation system in the spectral domain based on estimates of the noise and late reverberation power spectral densities (PSDs). To obtain reliable estimates of the PSDs—even in acoustic conditions with positive direct-to-reverberation energy ratios (DRRs)—we adopt the statistical model of the room impulse response explicitly incorporating DRRs, as well in combination with a novel proposed joint estimator for the reverberation time T 60 and the DRR. The feature extraction approach is inspired by processing strategies of the auditory system, where an amplitude modulation filterbank is applied to extract the temporal modulation information. These techniques were shown to improve the REVERB baseline in our previous work. Here, we investigate if similar improvements are obtained when using a state-of-the-art ASR framework, and to what extent the results depend on the specific architecture of the back-end. Apart from conventional Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-hidden Markov model (HMM) back-ends, we consider subspace GMM (SGMM)-HMMs as well as deep neural networks in a hybrid system. The speech enhancement algorithm is found to be helpful in almost all conditions, with the exception of deep learning systems in matched training-test conditions. The auditory feature type improves the baseline for all system architectures. The relative word error rate reduction achieved by combining our front-end techniques with current back-ends is 52.7% on average with the REVERB evaluation test set compared to our original REVERB result.

  18. Design and Implementation of an Electronic Front-End Based on Square Wave Excitation for Ultrasonic Torsional Guided Wave Viscosity Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Rabani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The market for process instruments generally requires low cost devices that are robust, small in size, portable, and usable in-plant. Ultrasonic torsional guided wave sensors have received much attention by researchers for measurement of viscosity and/or density of fluids in recent years. The supporting electronic systems for these sensors providing many different settings of sine-wave signals are bulky and expensive. In contrast, a system based on bursts of square waves instead of sine waves would have a considerable advantage in that respect and could be built using simple integrated circuits at a cost that is orders of magnitude lower than for a windowed sine wave device. This paper explores the possibility of using square wave bursts as the driving signal source for the ultrasonic torsional guided wave viscosity sensor. A simple design of a compact and fully automatic analogue square wave front-end for the sensor is also proposed. The successful operation of the system is demonstrated by using the sensor for measuring the viscosity in a representative fluid. This work provides the basis for design and manufacture of low cost compact standalone ultrasonic guided wave sensors and enlightens the possibility of using coded excitation techniques utilising square wave sequences in such applications. PMID:27754324

  19. Developing the RAL front end test stand source to deliver a 60 mA, 50 Hz, 2 ms H- beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faircloth, Dan; Lawrie, Scott; Letchford, Alan; Gabor, Christoph; Perkins, Mike; Whitehead, Mark; Wood, Trevor; Tarvainen, Olli; Komppula, Jani; Kalvas, Taneli; Dudnikov, Vadim; Pereira, Hugo; Izaola, Zunbeltz; Simkin, John

    2013-02-01

    All the Front End Test Stand (FETS) beam requirements have been achieved, but not simultaneously [1]. At 50 Hz repetition rates beam current droop becomes unacceptable for pulse lengths longer than 1 ms. This is fundamental limitation of the present source design. Previous researchers [2] have demonstrated that using a physically larger Penning surface plasma source should overcome these limitations. The scaled source development strategy is outlined in this paper. A study of time-varying plasma behavior has been performed using a V-UV spectrometer. Initial experiments to test scaled plasma volumes are outlined. A dedicated plasma and extraction test stand (VESPA-Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analysis) is being developed to allow new source and extraction designs to be appraised. The experimental work is backed up by modeling and simulations. A detailed ANSYS thermal model has been developed. IBSimu is being used to design extraction and beam transport. A novel 3D plasma modeling code using beamlets is being developed by Cobham Vector Fields using SCALA OPERA, early source modeling results are very promising. Hardware on FETS is also being developed in preparation to run the scaled source. A new 2 ms, 50 Hz, 25 kV pulsed extraction voltage power supply has been constructed and a new discharge power supply is being designed. The design of the post acceleration electrode assembly has been improved.

  20. A time-based front-end ASIC for the silicon micro strip sensors of the bar PANDA Micro Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, V.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Riccardi, A.; Ritman, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Stockmanns, T.; Zambanini, A.

    2016-03-01

    The bar PANDA (Antiproton Annihilation at Darmstadt) experiment foresees many detectors for tracking, particle identification and calorimetry. Among them, the innermost is the MVD (Micro Vertex Detector) responsible for a precise tracking and the reconstruction of secondary vertices. This detector will be built from both hybrid pixel (two inner barrels and six forward disks) and double-sided micro strip (two outer barrels and outer rim of the last two disks) silicon sensors. A time-based approach has been chosen for the readout ASIC of the strip sensors. The PASTA (bar PANDA Strip ASIC) chip aims at high resolution time-stamping and charge information through the Time over Threshold (ToT) technique. It benefits from a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) allowing a time bin width down to 50 ps. The analog front-end was designed to serve both n-type and p-type strips and the performed simulations show remarkable performances in terms of linearity and electronic noise. The TDC consists of an analog interpolator, a digital local controller, and a digital global controller as the common back-end for all of the 64 channels.

  1. Design and evaluation of wide-range and low-power analog front-end enabling body-implanted devices to monitor charge injection properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Keita; Uno, Shoma; Goto, Tatsuya; Takezawa, Yoshiki; Harashima, Takuya; Morikawa, Takumi; Nishino, Satoru; Kino, Hisashi; Kiyoyama, Koji; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2017-04-01

    For safe electrical stimulation with body-implanted devices, the degradation of stimulus electrodes must be considered because it causes the unexpected electrolysis of water and the destruction of tissues. To monitor the charge injection property (CIP) of stimulus electrodes while these devices are implanted, we have proposed a charge injection monitoring system (CIMS). CIMS can safely read out voltages produced by a biphasic current pulse to a stimulus electrode and CIP is calculated from waveforms of the acquired voltages. In this paper, we describe a wide-range and low-power analog front-end (AFE) for CIMS that has variable gain-frequency characteristics and low-power analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion to adjust to the degradation of stimulus electrodes. The designed AFE was fabricated with 0.18 µm CMOS technology and achieved a valuable gain of 20–60 dB, an upper cutoff frequency of 0.2–10 kHz, and low-power interleaving A/D conversion. In addition, we successfully measured the CIP of stimulus electrodes for body-implanted devices using CIMS.

  2. A low-noise 64-channel front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors aimed to hard X-ray imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B.; Wei, T.; Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Hu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report on the recent development of a 64-channel low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors aimed to hard X-ray imaging systems. The readout channel is comprised of a charge sensitive amplifier, a leakage current compensation circuit, a CR-RC shaper, two S-K filters, an inverse proportional amplifier, a peak-detect-and-hold circuit, a discriminator and trigger logic, a time sequence control circuit and a driving buffer. The readout ASIC is implemented in TSMC 0.35 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology, the die size of the prototype chip is 2.7 mm×8.0 mm. The overall gain of the readout channel is 200 mV/fC, the power consumption is less than 8 mW/channel, the linearity error is less than 1%, the inconsistency among the channels is less than 2.86%, and the equivalent noise charge of a typical channel is 66 e- at zero farad plus 14 e- per picofarad. By connecting this readout ASIC to an 8×8 pixel CdZnTe detector, we obtained an energy spectrum, the energy resolution of which is 4.5% at the 59.5 keV line of 241Am source.

  3. Towards the development of a wearable Electrical Impedance Tomography system: A study about the suitability of a low power bioimpedance front-end.

    PubMed

    Menolotto, Matteo; Rossi, Stefano; Dario, Paolo; Della Torre, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Wearable systems for remote monitoring of physiological parameter are ready to evolve towards wearable imaging systems. The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) allows the non-invasive investigation of the internal body structure. The characteristics of this low-resolution and low-cost technique match perfectly with the concept of a wearable imaging device. On the other hand low power consumption, which is a mandatory requirement for wearable systems, is not usually discussed for standard EIT applications. In this work a previously developed low power architecture for a wearable bioimpedance sensor is applied to EIT acquisition and reconstruction, to evaluate the impact on the image of the limited signal to noise ratio (SNR), caused by low power design. Some anatomical models of the chest, with increasing geometric complexity, were developed, in order to evaluate and calibrate, through simulations, the parameters of the reconstruction algorithms provided by Electrical Impedance Diffuse Optical Reconstruction Software (EIDORS) project. The simulation results were compared with experimental measurements taken with our bioimpedance device on a phantom reproducing chest tissues properties. The comparison was both qualitative and quantitative through the application of suitable figures of merit; in this way the impact of the noise of the low power front-end on the image quality was assessed. The comparison between simulation and measurement results demonstrated that, despite the limited SNR, the device is accurate enough to be used for the development of an EIT based imaging wearable system.

  4. Design of a 12-bit 1 MS/s SAR-ADC for front-end readout of 32-channel CZT detector imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wei, Tingcun; Li, Bo; Guo, Panjie; Hu, Yongcai

    2015-06-01

    A 12-bit 1MS/s SAR-ADC for the front-end readout of a 32-channel CZT detector imaging system is presented. In order to improve the performances of the ADC, several techniques are proposed. First, a novel offset cancellation method for comparator is proposed, in which no any capacitor is introduced in the signal pathway, thus it has faster operation speed than traditional one. Second, the architecture of unit capacitor array is adopted in the charge-redistribution DAC to reduce the capacitor mismatch. Third, the radiation-hardened ability is enhanced through circuit and layout design. The prototype chip was fabricated using a TSMC 0.35 um 2P4M CMOS process. At a 3.3/5 V power supply, the proposed SAR-ADC achieves 67.64 dB SINAD at 1MS/s, consumes 10 mW power and occupies a core area of 1180×1080 um2.

  5. Development of a compact radiation-hardened low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CZT-based hard X-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Gan, B.; Li, X.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present the development and performances of a radiation-hardened front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) dedicated to CZT detectors for a hard X-ray imager in space applications. The readout channel consists of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA), a CR-RC shaper, a fast shaper, a discriminator and a driving buffer. With the additional digital filtering, the readout channel can achieve very low noise performances and low power dissipation. An eight-channel prototype ASIC is designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. The energy range of the detected X-rays is evaluated as 1.45 keV to 281 keV. The gain is larger than 100 mV/fC. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) of the ASIC is 53 e- at zero farad plus 10 e- per picofarad. The power dissipation is less than 4.4 mW/channel. Through the measurement with a CZT detector, the energy resolution is less than 3.45 keV (FWHM) under the irradiation of the radioactive source 241Am. The radiation effect experiments indicate that the proposed ASIC can resist the total ionization dose (TID) irradiation of higher than 200 krad (Si).

  6. The front-end electronics and slow control of large area SiPM for the SST-1M camera developed for the CTA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Bilnik, W.; Borkowski, J.; Cadoux, F.; Christov, A.; della Volpe, D.; Favre, Y.; Heller, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lyard, E.; Marszałek, A.; Moderski, R.; Montaruli, T.; Porcelli, A.; Prandini, E.; Rajda, P.; Rameez, M.; Schioppa, E.; Troyano Pujadas, I.; Ziȩtara, K.; Błocki, J.; Bogacz, L.; Bulik, T.; Curyło, M.; Dyrda, M.; Frankowski, A.; Grudniki, Ł.; Grudzińska, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Lalik, K.; Mach, E.; Mandat, D.; Michałowski, J.; Neronov, A.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśsko, P.; Pech, M.; Schovanek, P.; Seweryn, K.; Skowron, K.; Sliusar, V.; Sowiński, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Toscano, S.; Walter, R.; Wiȩcek, M.; Zagdański, A.; Żychowski, P.

    2016-09-01

    The single mirror Small Size Telescope (SST-1M) is one of the proposed designs for the smallest type of telescopes, SSTs that will compose the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The SST-1M camera will use Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM) which are nowadays commonly used in High Energy Physics experiments and many imaging applications. However the unique pixel shape and size have required a dedicated development by the University of Geneva and Hamamatsu. The resulting sensor has a surface of ∼94 mm2 and a total capacitance of ∼3.4 nF. These unique characteristics, combined with the stringent requirements of the CTA project on timing and charge resolution have led the University of Geneva to develop custom front-end electronics. The preamplifier stage has been tailored in order to optimize the signal shape using measurement campaigns and electronic simulation of the sensor. A dedicated trans-impedance pre-amplifier topology is used resulting in a power consumption of 400 mW per pixel and a pulse width < 30 ns. The measurements that have led to the choice of the different components and the resulting performance are detailed in this paper. The slow control electronics was designed to provide the bias voltage with 6.7 mV precision and to correct for temperature variation with a forward feedback compensation with 0.17 °C resolution. It is fully configurable and can be monitored using CANbus interface. The architecture and the characterization of the various elements are presented.

  7. Identification of amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of mammalian membrane-bound front-end fatty acid desaturases[S

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenshi; Ohno, Makoto; Taguchi, Masahiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Aki, Tsunehiro

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-bound desaturases are physiologically and industrially important enzymes that are involved in the production of diverse fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives. Here, we identified amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of rat Δ6 desaturase (D6d) acting on linoleoyl-CoA by comparing its amino acid sequence with that of Δ5 desaturase (D5d), which converts dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. The N-terminal cytochrome b5-like domain was excluded as a determinant by domain swapping analysis. Substitution of eight amino acid residues (Ser209, Asn211, Arg216, Ser235, Leu236, Trp244, Gln245, and Val344) of D6d with the corresponding residues of D5d by site-directed mutagenesis switched the substrate specificity from linoleoyl-CoA to dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. In addition, replacement of Leu323 of D6d with Phe323 on the basis of the amino acid sequence of zebra fish Δ5/6 bifunctional desaturase was found to render D6d bifunctional. Homology modeling of D6d using recent crystal structure data of human stearoyl-CoA (Δ9) desaturase revealed that Arg216, Trp244, Gln245, and Leu323 are located near the substrate-binding pocket. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the structural basis of the substrate specificity of a mammalian front-end fatty acid desaturase, which will aid in efficient production of value-added fatty acids. PMID:26590171

  8. Artificial Neural Network as the FPGA Trigger in the Cyclone V based Front-End for a Detection of Neutrino-Origin Showers

    SciTech Connect

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Glas, Dariusz; Pytel, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    Neutrinos play a fundamental role in the understanding of the origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. They interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere generating extensive air showers. However, their a very low rate of events potentially generated by neutrinos is a significant challenge for a detection technique and requires both sophisticated algorithms and high-resolution hardware. A trigger based on a artificial neural network was implemented into the Cyclone{sup R} V E FPGA 5CEFA9F31I7 - the heart of the prototype Front-End boards developed for tests of new algorithms in the Pierre Auger surface detectors. Showers for muon and tau neutrino initiating particles on various altitudes, angles and energies were simulated in CORSICA and Offline platforms giving pattern of ADC traces in Auger water Cherenkov detectors. The 3-layer 12-8-1 neural network was taught in MATLAB by simulated ADC traces according the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Results show that a probability of a ADC traces generation is very low due to a small neutrino cross-section. Nevertheless, ADC traces, if occur, for 1-10 EeV showers are relatively short and can be analyzed by 16-point input algorithm. We optimized the coefficients from MATLAB to get a maximal range of potentially registered events and for fixed-point FPGA processing to minimize calculation errors. New sophisticated triggers implemented in Cyclone{sup R} V E FPGAs with large amount of DSP blocks, embedded memory running with 120 - 160 MHz sampling may support a discovery of neutrino events in the Pierre Auger Observatory. (authors)

  9. On-line monitoring of in-vitro oral bioaccessibility tests as front-end to liquid chromatography for determination of chlorogenic acid isomers in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Kremr, Daniel; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Bajerová, Petra; Ventura, Karel; Miró, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    A novel fully automated in-vitro oral dissolution test assay as a front-end to liquid chromatography has been developed and validated for on-line chemical profiling and monitoring of temporal release profiles of three caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) isomers, namely, 3-CQA,4-CQA and 5-CQA, known as chlorogenic acids, in dietary supplements. Tangential-flow filtration is harnessed as a sample processing approach for on-line handling of CQA containing extracts of hard gelatin capsules and introduction of protein-free samples into the liquid chromatograph. Oral bioaccessibility/dissolution test assays were performed at 37.0±0.5°C as per US Pharmacopeia recommendations using pepsin with activity of ca. 749,000 USP units/L in 0.1mol/L HCl as the extraction medium and a paddle apparatus stirred at 50rpm. CQA release rates and steady-state dissolution conditions were determined accurately by fitting the chromatographic datasets, namely, the average cumulative concentrations of bioaccessible pools of every individual isomer monitored during 200min, with temporal resolutions of ≥10min, to a first-order dissolution kinetic model. Distinct solid-to-liquid phase ratios in the mimicry of physiological extraction conditions were assessed. Relative standard deviations for intra-day repeatability and inter-day intermediate precision of 5-CQA within the 5-40µg/mL concentration range were <3.4% and <5.5%, respectively. Trueness of the automatic flow method for determination of 5-CQA released from dietary supplements in gastric fluid surrogate was demonstrated by spike recoveries, spanning from 91.5-104.0%, upon completion of the dissolution process. The proposed hyphenated setup was resorted for evaluating potential differences in dissolution profiles and content of the three most abundant chlorogenic acid isomers in dietary supplements from varied manufacturers.

  10. Design of the front end electronics for the infrared camera of JEM-EUSO, and manufacturing and verification of the prototype model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroto, Oscar; Diez-Merino, Laura; Carbonell, Jordi; Tomàs, Albert; Reyes, Marcos; Joven-Alvarez, Enrique; Martín, Yolanda; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; del Peral, Luis; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.

    2014-07-01

    The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) will be launched and attached to the Japanese module of the International Space Station (ISS). Its aim is to observe UV photon tracks produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays developing in the atmosphere and producing extensive air showers. The key element of the instrument is a very wide-field, very fast, large-lense telescope that can detect extreme energy particles with energy above 1019 eV. The Atmospheric Monitoring System (AMS), comprising, among others, the Infrared Camera (IRCAM), which is the Spanish contribution, plays a fundamental role in the understanding of the atmospheric conditions in the Field of View (FoV) of the telescope. It is used to detect the temperature of clouds and to obtain the cloud coverage and cloud top altitude during the observation period of the JEM-EUSO main instrument. SENER is responsible for the preliminary design of the Front End Electronics (FEE) of the Infrared Camera, based on an uncooled microbolometer, and the manufacturing and verification of the prototype model. This paper describes the flight design drivers and key factors to achieve the target features, namely, detector biasing with electrical noise better than 100μV from 1Hz to 10MHz, temperature control of the microbolometer, from 10°C to 40°C with stability better than 10mK over 4.8hours, low noise high bandwidth amplifier adaptation of the microbolometer output to differential input before analog to digital conversion, housekeeping generation, microbolometer control, and image accumulation for noise reduction. It also shows the modifications implemented in the FEE prototype design to perform a trade-off of different technologies, such as the convenience of using linear or switched regulation for the temperature control, the possibility to check the camera performances when both microbolometer and analog electronics are moved further away from the power and digital electronics, and

  11. Treatment at the front end of the criminal justice continuum: the association between arrest and admission into specialty substance abuse treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Arfken, Cynthia L; Swartz, James A; Koch, Alison L

    2006-01-01

    Background To reduce criminal recidivism and drug use, it has been proposed that the substance abuse treatment delivery system cut across different components of the criminal justice continuum. Arrest, at the front end of this continuum, may represent a critical moment to motivate people with substance use disorders (SUD) to seek treatment but is often over looked as an intervention point. We used data from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) to compare treatment need and recent treatment admission for participants with no criminal justice (CJ) involvement in the past year, past-year arrest, and CJ supervision (i.e., probation or parole status). Results Of those arrested, 44.8% met criteria for an SUD. However, only 14% of those arrested with an SUD received treatment in the year of their arrest. In multivariate modelling, arrest was an independent predictor of treatment admission (odds ratio (OR) = 8.74) similar in magnitude to meeting criteria for an SUD (OR = 8.22). Those further along the continuum – under supervision – were most likely to receive treatment (OR = 22.62). Conclusion Arrest involves the largest number of individuals entering the criminal justice system. The NSDUH suggests that nearly 6 million individuals in the US experience an arrest annually and that nearly half meet criteria for an SUD. Although arrest involves the largest number of individuals entering the criminal justice system, it is also the most fleeting point as individuals can move in and out rather quickly. Minimally, arrest imposes contact between the individual and a law enforcement person and can be an opportunity for early intervention strategies such as pre-arraignment diversion into treatment or brief intervention strategies. Using brief intervention at this early point in the continuum may motivate a greater number of individuals to seek treatment or decrease drug and alcohol use. Training and procedural shifts at this point of contact could have

  12. SPIROC: design and performances of a dedicated very front-end electronics for an ILC Analog Hadronic CALorimeter (AHCAL) prototype with SiPM read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti Di Lorenzo, S.; Callier, S.; Fleury, J.; Dulucq, F.; De la Taille, C.; Chassard, G. Martin; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.

    2013-01-01

    For the future e+ e- International Linear Collider (ILC) the ASIC SPIROC (Silicon Photomultiplier Integrated Read-Out Chip) was designed to read out the Analog Hadronic Calorimeter (AHCAL) equipped with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM). It is an evolution of the FLC_SiPM chip designed by the OMEGA group in 2005. SPIROC2 [1] was realized in AMS SiGe 0.35 μm technology [2] and developed to match the requirements of large dynamic range, low noise, low consumption, high precision and large number of read-out channels. This ASIC is a very front-end read-out chip that integrates 36 self triggered channels with variable gain to achieve charge and time measurements. The charge measurement must be performed from 1 up to 2000 photo-electrons (p.e.) corresponding to 160 fC up to 320 pC for SiPM gain 106. The time measurement is performed with a coarse 12-bit counter related to the bunch crossing clock (up to 5 MHz) and a fine time ramp based on this clock (down to 200 ns) to achieve a resolution of 1 ns. An analog memory array with a depth of 16 for each channel is used to store the time information and the charge measurement. The analog memory content (time and charge) is digitized thanks to an internal 12-bit Wilkinson ADC. The data is then stored in a 4kbytes RAM. A complex digital part is necessary to manage all these features and to transfer the data to the DAQ. SPIROC2 is the second generation of the SPIROC ASIC family designed in 2008 by the OMEGA group. A very similar version (SPIROC2c) was submitted in February 2012 to improve the noise performance and also to integrate a new TDC (Time to Digital Converter) structure. This paper describes SPIROC2 and SPIROC2c ASICs and illustrates the main characteristics thank to a series of measurements.

  13. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras.

    PubMed

    Bolotnikov, A E; Ackley, K; Camarda, G S; Cherches, C; Cui, Y; De Geronimo, G; Fried, J; Hodges, D; Hossain, A; Lee, W; Mahler, G; Maritato, M; Petryk, M; Roy, U; Salwen, C; Vernon, E; Yang, G; James, R B

    2015-07-01

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm(3) detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays' performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  14. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E. Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.; Hodges, D.; Lee, W.; Petryk, M.

    2015-07-15

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm{sup 3} detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  15. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Petryk, M.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2015-07-28

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe (CZT) detectors coupled to a front-end readout ASIC for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6x6x15 mm3 detectors grouped into 3x3 sub-arrays of 2x2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are made possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  16. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    DOE PAGES

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; ...

    2015-07-28

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe (CZT) detectors coupled to a front-end readout ASIC for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6x6x15 mm3 detectors grouped into 3x3 sub-arrays of 2x2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics.more » The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are made possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.« less

  17. First results from the spectral DCT trigger implemented in the Cyclone V Front-End Board used for a detection of very inclined showers in the Pierre Auger surface detector Engineering Array

    SciTech Connect

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the first results from the trigger based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) operating in the new Front-End Boards with Cyclone V FPGA deployed in 8 test surface detectors in the Pierre Auger Engineering Array. The patterns of the ADC traces generated by very inclined showers were obtained from the Auger database and from the CORSIKA simulation package supported next by Offline reconstruction Auger platform which gives a predicted digitized signal profiles. Simulations for many variants of the initial angle of shower, initialization depth in the atmosphere, type of particle and its initial energy gave a boundary of the DCT coefficients used next for the on-line pattern recognition in the FPGA. Preliminary results have proven a right approach. We registered several showers triggered by the DCT for 120 MSps and 160 MSps. (authors)

  18. Extension of Alvis compiler front-end

    SciTech Connect

    Wypych, Michał; Szpyrka, Marcin; Matyasik, Piotr E-mail: mszpyrka@agh.edu.pl

    2015-12-31

    Alvis is a formal modelling language that enables possibility of verification of distributed concurrent systems. An Alvis model semantics finds expression in an LTS graph (labelled transition system). Execution of any language statement is expressed as a transition between formally defined states of such a model. An LTS graph is generated using a middle-stage Haskell representation of an Alvis model. Moreover, Haskell is used as a part of the Alvis language and is used to define parameters’ types and operations on them. Thanks to the compiler’s modular construction many aspects of compilation of an Alvis model may be modified. Providing new plugins for Alvis Compiler that support languages like Java or C makes possible using these languages as a part of Alvis instead of Haskell. The paper presents the compiler internal model and describes how the default specification language can be altered by new plugins.

  19. Monolithic Gallium Arsenide Superheterodyne Front End.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    subsystems. Therefore, microstrip circuitry was selected as the transmission medium over co - planar transmission lines, slot lines, and other space...power the chip. Figure 2.20 is a schematic of the two stage preamplifier and Fig. 2.21 is a photograph of the chip. The inherent non -linear nature of...Model Cgso , 0.5 pF gmo = 24 mS 7 1.63 44.4 3.08 -7.47 8 1.83 44.4 3.85 -8.18 9 2.01 44.4 4.65 -8.78 D: Noise Parameters for Fukui Model (Recessed Gate

  20. Interactive Textiles Front End Analysis. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    them with a thin film of piezoelectric materials, such as PZT (lead zirconate titanate), PVDF (polyvinyldiflouride) and zinc oxide. In the second...APPROACH: Pursue design, analysis, and testing of three sound reduction schemes: (1) tiles comprising a PVDF actuator, a distributed thin film PVDF ...Structural Composites: Piezoelectric Film Deposition on Intercalated Carbon Fibers Principle Investigator: R. Dillon; Nebraska Univ Engineering (Mech) Dept

  1. Extension of Alvis compiler front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wypych, Michał; Szpyrka, Marcin; Matyasik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Alvis is a formal modelling language that enables possibility of verification of distributed concurrent systems. An Alvis model semantics finds expression in an LTS graph (labelled transition system). Execution of any language statement is expressed as a transition between formally defined states of such a model. An LTS graph is generated using a middle-stage Haskell representation of an Alvis model. Moreover, Haskell is used as a part of the Alvis language and is used to define parameters' types and operations on them. Thanks to the compiler's modular construction many aspects of compilation of an Alvis model may be modified. Providing new plugins for Alvis Compiler that support languages like Java or C makes possible using these languages as a part of Alvis instead of Haskell. The paper presents the compiler internal model and describes how the default specification language can be altered by new plugins.

  2. A CMOS 0.18 μm 600 MHz clock multiplier PLL and a pseudo-LVDS driver for the high speed data transmission for the ALICE Inner Tracking System front-end chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuca, A.; Mazza, G.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Degerli, Y.; Dorokhov, A.; Flouzat, C.; Gajanana, D.; Gao, C.; Guilloux, F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hristozkov, S.; Junique, A.; Keil, M.; Kim, D.; Kofarago, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kwon, Y.; Mager, M.; Sielewicz, K. Marek; Marin Tobon, C. Augusto; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Pham, T. Hung; Puggioni, C.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Rousset, J.; Siddhanta, S.; Snoeys, W.; Song, M.; Usai, G.; Van Hoorne, J. Willem; Yang, P.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the 600 MHz clock multiplier PLL and the pseudo-LVDS driver which are two essential components of the Data Transmission Unit (DTU), a fast serial link for the 1.2 Gb/s data transmission of the ALICE inner detector front-end chip (ALPIDE). The PLL multiplies the 40 MHz input clock in order to obtain the 600 MHz and the 200 MHz clock for a fast serializer which works in Double Data Rate mode. The outputs of the serializer feed the pseudo-LVDS driver inputs which transmits the data from the pixel chip to the patch panel with a limited number of signal lines. The driver drives a 5.3 m-6.5 m long differential transmission line by steering a maximum of 5 mA of current at the target speed. To overcome bandwidth limitations coming from the long cables the pre-emphasis can be applied to the output. Currents for the main and pre-emphasis driver can individually be adjusted using on-chip digital-to-analog converters. The circuits will be integrated in the pixel chip and are designed in the same 0.18 μm CMOS technology and will operate from the same 1.8 V supply. Design and test results of both circuits are presented.

  3. Front-end and slow control electronics for large area SiPMs used for the single mirror Small Size Telescope (SST-1M) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Bilnik, W.; Borkowski, J.; Cadoux, F.; Christov, A.; della Volpe, D.; Favre, Y.; Heller, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lyard, E.; Marszalek, A.; Moderski, R.; Montaruli, T.; Porcelli, A.; Prandini, E.; Rajda, P.; Rameez, M.; Schioppa, E., Jr.; Troyano Pujadas, I.; Zietara, K.; Blocki, J.; Bogacz, L.; Bulik, T.; Curyło, M.; Dyrda, M.; Frankowski, A.; Grudniki, Ł.; Grudzinska, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Lalik, K.; Mach, E.; Mandat, D.; Michalowski, J.; Neronov, A.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśko, P.; Pech, M.; Schovanek, P.; Seweryn, K.; Skowron, K.; Sliusar, V.; Sowinski, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Toscano, S.; Walter, R.; Wiecek, M.; Zagdański, A.; Żychowski, P.

    2016-07-01

    The single mirror Small Size Telescope (SST-1M) project proposes a design among others for the smallest type of telescopes (SST), that will compose the south observatory of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The SST camera collecting the Cherenkov light resulting from very high energy gamma-ray interactions in the atmosphere proposes to use Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM). The SST-1M design has led to the use of unique pixel shape and size that required a dedicated development by the University of Geneva and Hamamatsu. An active surface of 94 mm2 and a resulting total capacitance of 3.4 nF combined with the stringent requirements of the CTA project on timing and charge resolution have led the University of Geneva to develop a custom preamplifier stage and slow-control system. The design and performance of the tailor made preamplifier stage and of the slow control electronics will be briefly described. The bias circuit of the sensor contains a resistor meant to prevent the sensor from drawing high current. However this resistor also introduces a voltage drop at the sensor input impacting the stability of its operation. A model has been developed in order to derive the parameters needed to account for it at the data analysis level. A solution based on the SST-1M front-end and digital readout is proposed to compensate for the voltage drop at the sensor cathode.

  4. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O'CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  5. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  6. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  7. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  8. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  9. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  10. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  11. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  12. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  13. Kayser-Fleischer Rings

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know about Wilson Disease Kayser-Fleischer Rings Definition Kayser-Fleischer Ring: Clinical sign. Brownish-yellow ring ... Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation For Patients & Families Resources Membership Events Centers ...

  14. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  15. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  16. Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Based on High-Efficiency Frisch-Ring Cdznte Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R; DeGeronimo, G; Fried, J; O'Connor, P; Kargar, A; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated both good energy resolution, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency in detecting gamma rays, highlighting the strong potential of CdZnTe materials for such applications. We are designing a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8 times 8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so greatly improving detection efficiency. By using the front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy-resolution. It includes a signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuits, a high-voltage module, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. In this paper, we detail the system's structure and report the results of our tests with it.

  17. Front End and HFOFO Snake for a Muon Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Alexahin, Y.

    2015-09-01

    A neutrino factory or muon collider requires the capture and cooling of a large number of muons. Scenarios for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of μ’s produced from a proton source target have been developed, for neutrino factory and muon collider scenarios. They require a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a $\\phi-\\delta E$ rotation section leading into the cooling channel. The currently preferred cooling channel design is an “HFOFO Snake” configuration that cools both $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ transversely and longitudinally. The status of the design is presented and variations are discussed.

  18. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  19. FFAGs: Front-end for neutrino factories and medical accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoshiharu

    The idea of Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator was originated by different people and groups in the early 1950s. It was independently introduced by Ohkawa [Ohkawa (1953)], Symon et al. [Symon et al. (1956)], and Kolomensky [Kolomensky and Lebedev (1966)] when the strong Alternate Gradient (AG) focusing and the phase stability schemes were applied to particle acceleration. The first FFAG electron model was developed in the MURA accelerator project led by Kerst and Cole in the late 1950s. Since then, they have fabricated several electron models in the early 1960s [Symon et al. (1956)]. However, the studies did not lead to a single practical FFAG accelerator for the following 50 years. Because of the difficulties of treating non-linear magnetic field and RF acceleration for non-relativistic particles, the proton FFAG, especially, was not accomplished until recently. In 2000, the FFAG concept was revived with the world's first proton FFAG (POP) which was developed at KEK [Aiba (2000); Mori (1999)]. Since then, in many places [Berg (2004); Johnstone et al. (2004); Mori (2011); Ruggiero (2004); Trbojevic (2004)], FFAGs have been developed and constructed...

  20. Intelligent Front-end Electronics for Silicon photodetectors (IFES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerzopf, Clemens; Gruber, Lukas; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2016-05-01

    While high channel density can be easily achieved for big experiments using custom made microchips, providing something similar for small and medium size experiments imposes a challenge. Within this work we describe a novel and cost effective solution to operate silicon photodetectors such as silicon photo multipliers (SiPM). The IFES modules provide the bias voltage for the detectors, a leading edge discriminator featuring time over threshold and a differential amplifier, all on one printed circuit board. We demonstrate under realistic conditions that the module is usable for high resolution timing measurements exploiting both charge and time information. Furthermore we show that the modules can be easily used in larger detector arrays. All in all this confirms that the IFES modules are a viable option for a broad range of experiments if cost-effectiveness and small form factor are required.

  1. CMOS front end electronics for the ATLAS muon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huth, J.; Oliver, J.; Hazen, E.; Shank, J.

    1997-12-31

    An all-CMOS design for an integrated ASD (Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator) chip for readout of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) is presented. Eight channels of charge-sensitive preamp, two-stage pole/zero shaper, Wilkinson ADC and discriminator with programmable hysteresis are integrated on a single IC. Key elements have been prototyped in 1.2 and 0.5 micron CMOS operating at 5V and 3.3V respectively.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CAPABILITY FRONT END ON NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, C; Heebner, J; Dawson, J; Fochs, S; Shverdin, M; Crane, J K; Kanz, V K; Halpin, J; Phan, H; Sigurdsson, R; Brewer, W; Britten, J; Brunton, G; Clark, W; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Nguyen, H; Shaw, B; Hackel, R; Hermann, M; Tietbohl, G; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-07-15

    We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

  3. Reconfigurable Front-end Antennas for Cognitive Radio Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    narrowband antenna is a microstrip patch printed on the reverse side of the substrate, connected to the wideband antenna via a shorting pin and designed to...operate from 5.15 to 5.35 GHz. A reconfigurable C-slot microstrip patch antenna is proposed in [20]. Reconfigurability is achieved by switching on and...off two patches using PIN diodes. The antenna can operate in dual- band or in a very wideband mode. In [21], a quad- antenna with a directional

  4. Enhancing the Front-End Phase of Design Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Erasto

    2006-01-01

    Design methodology (DM) is defined by the procedural path, expressed in design models, and techniques or methods used to untangle the various activities within a design model. Design education in universities is mainly based on descriptive design models. Much knowledge and organization have been built into DM to facilitate design teaching.…

  5. Front end nickel-zinc systems for noninterruptible power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M.; Leo, A.

    Scale-up considerations and performance characteristics of 2000 A-hr Ni-Zn cells are investigated to determine design features for the MX power system. Cell design and construction of the batteries, electrodes, and Co(OH)2, and graphite and Terlon positive plates are discussed. Two 2000 A-hr cells were tested over a thirty week period, charged at 85 A for 48 hr, and discharged at 65 A to 1.30 V. One cell demonstrated excellent capacity retention on float, although the other failed due to dendrite shorting caused by higher current densities obtained as a result of the drying out of the negative plates. Variations in initial performance between the two cells is attributed to variation in the extent of the dryout problem, and limiting factors in the float applications are attributed to separation degradation and electrolyte management.

  6. An Alternative Front End Analysis Strategy for Complex Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Instructional Design model (4C/ID) (see also van Merriënboer, Clark, & de Croock, 2002) couples complex problem solving with completing procedures...cue stimuli faster than novices, as well as underlying structures of problems or situations (Chi, Feltovich, & Glaser , 1981); • experts analyze...development. In R. Siegler (Ed.), Children’s thinking: What develops? (pp. 73–96). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Chi, M. T. H., Feltovich, P., & Glaser , R. (1981

  7. Front End Analysis of Soldier Individual Power Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    the system becomes more complex. The performanice of fuel cell systems is not limited by the Camot Cycle. Ele,-rical efficiencies in excess of 40...5.54 1852.41 EFFICIENCY The ideal thermodynamic efficiency of a Stirling engine is equal to the Camot efficiency for heat engines: effth = (Te-Tc) [re...2.829975 (cc) Bore = i.965779 (cm) Thermal efficiency ( Camot ): 66.97 percent Schmidt Analysis: Total swept volume (cc): 6.045856 Press ratio (pmax

  8. Transparent Information Systems through Gateways, Front Ends, Intermediaries, and Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Martha E.

    1986-01-01

    Provides overview of design requirements for transparent information retrieval (implies that user sees through complexity of retrieval activities sequence). Highlights include need for transparent systems; history of transparent retrieval research; information retrieval functions (automated converters, routers, selectors, evaluators/analyzers);…

  9. Design and implementation of the ATLAS TRT front end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, Mitch; Atlas TRT Collaboration

    2006-07-01

    The ATLAS TRT subsystem is comprised of 380,000 4 mm straw tube sensors ranging in length from 30 to 80 cm. Polypropelene plastic layers between straws and a xenon-based gas mixture in the straws allow the straws to be used for both tracking and transition radiation detection. Detector-mounted electronics with data sparsification was chosen to minimize the cable plant inside the super-conducting solenoid of the ATLAS inner tracker. The "on detector" environment required a small footprint, low noise, low power and radiation-tolerant readout capable of triggering at rates up to 20 MHz with an analog signal dynamic range of >300 times the discriminator setting. For tracking, a position resolution better than 150 μm requires leading edge trigger timing with ˜1 ns precision and for transition radiation detection, a charge collection time long enough to integrate the direct and reflected signal from the unterminated straw tube is needed for position-independent energy measurement. These goals have been achieved employing two custom Application-specific integrated circuits (ASICS) and board design techniques that successfully separate analog and digital functionality while providing an integral part of the straw tube shielding.

  10. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  11. Front-end ASIC for pixilated wide bandgap detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, Emerson; de Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Herman, Cedric; Zhang, Feng; He, Zhong

    2009-08-01

    A CMOS application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was developed for 3D Position Sensitive Detectors (PSD). The preamplifiers were optimized for pixellated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Mercuric-Iodide (HgI2) and Thallium Bromide (TlBr) sensors. The ASIC responds to an ionizing event in the sensor by measuring both amplitude and timing in the pertinent anode and cathode channels. Each channel is sensitive to events and transients of positive or negative polarity and performs low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping, peak and timing detection along with analog storage and multiplexing. Three methodologies are implemented to perform timing measurement in the cathode channel. Multiple sparse modes are available for the readout of channel data. The ASIC integrates 130 channels in an area of 12 x 9 mm2 and dissipates ~330 mW. With a CZT detector connected and biased, an electronic resolution of ~200 e- rms for charges up to 100 fC was measured. Spectral data from the University of Michigan revealed a cumulative single-pixel resolution of ~0.55 % FWHM at 662 KeV.

  12. FPAA suitability as analog front-end for biosignals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, D. P.; García, A.; Palma, A. J.; Meyer-Baese, U.

    2010-04-01

    The use of Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAAs) for analog conditioning of electric potentials on the surface of living tissue, such as Electrocardiography (ECG), is presented in this paper. The inherent reconfigurable capability of these devices provides versatility for circuitry dynamic tuning, i.e., changing amplification gains, filters corner frequencies, signal common levels, etc., without interrupting the signal acquisition path. A study of internal circuitry noise sources is presented and some configurations that attenuate noise effects are proposed.

  13. Intelligent front-end sample preparation tool using acoustic streaming.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Erika J.; McClain, Jaime L.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Branch, Darren W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Anderson, John Mueller; James, Conrad D.; Smith, Gennifer; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel

    2009-09-01

    We have successfully developed a nucleic acid extraction system based on a microacoustic lysis array coupled to an integrated nucleic acid extraction system all on a single cartridge. The microacoustic lysing array is based on 36{sup o} Y cut lithium niobate, which couples bulk acoustic waves (BAW) into the microchannels. The microchannels were fabricated using Mylar laminates and fused silica to form acoustic-fluidic interface cartridges. The transducer array consists of four active elements directed for cell lysis and one optional BAW element for mixing on the cartridge. The lysis system was modeled using one dimensional (1D) transmission line and two dimensional (2D) FEM models. For input powers required to lyse cells, the flow rate dictated the temperature change across the lysing region. From the computational models, a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min produced a temperature rise of 23.2 C and only 6.7 C when flowing at 60 {micro}L/min. The measured temperature changes were 5 C less than the model. The computational models also permitted optimization of the acoustic coupling to the microchannel region and revealed the potential impact of thermal effects if not controlled. Using E. coli, we achieved a lysing efficacy of 49.9 {+-} 29.92 % based on a cell viability assay with a 757.2 % increase in ATP release within 20 seconds of acoustic exposure. A bench-top lysing system required 15-20 minutes operating up to 58 Watts to achieve the same level of cell lysis. We demonstrate that active mixing on the cartridge was critical to maximize binding and release of nucleic acid to the magnetic beads. Using a sol-gel silica bead matrix filled microchannel the extraction efficacy was 40%. The cartridge based magnetic bead system had an extraction efficiency of 19.2%. For an electric field based method that used Nafion films, a nucleic acid extraction efficiency of 66.3 % was achieved at 6 volts DC. For the flow rates we tested (10-50 {micro}L/min), the nucleic acid extraction time was 5-10 minutes for a volume of 50 {micro}L. Moreover, a unique feature of this technology is the ability to replace the cartridges for subsequent nucleic acid extractions.

  14. The Front-End to Google for Teachers' Online Searching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyedarabi, Faezeh

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on an ongoing work in designing and developing a personalised search tool for teachers' online searching using Google search engine (repository) for the implementation and testing of the first research prototype.

  15. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  16. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  17. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  18. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  19. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  20. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  1. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  2. Fermilab Recycler Ring BPM Upgrade Based on Digital Receiver Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, R.; Crisp, J.; Prieto, P.; Voy, D.; Briegel, C.; McClure, C.; West, R.; Pordes, S.; Mengel, M.

    2004-11-01

    Electronics for the 237 BPMs in the Fermilab Recycler Ring have been upgraded from a log-amplifier based system to a commercially produced digitizer-digital down converter based system. The hardware consists of a pre-amplifier connected to a split-plate BPM, an analog differential receiver-filter module and an 8-channel 80-MHz digital down converter VME board. The system produces position and intensity with a dynamic range of 30 dB and a resolution of ±10 microns. The position measurements are made on 2.5-MHz bunched beam and barrier buckets of the un-bunched beam. The digital receiver system operates in one of six different signal processing modes that include 2.5-MHz average, 2.5-MHz bunch-by-bunch, 2.5-MHz narrow band, unbunched average, un-bunched head/tail and 89-kHz narrow band. Receiver data is acquired on any of up to sixteen clock events related to Recycler beam transfers and other machine activities. Data from the digital receiver board are transferred to the front-end CPU for position and intensity computation on an on-demand basis through the VME bus. Data buffers are maintained for each of the acquisition events and support flash, closed orbit and turn-by-turn measurements. A calibration system provides evaluation of the BPM signal path and application programs.

  3. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  4. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-07

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  5. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  6. On certain Hecke rings

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Sam; Bressler, Paul

    1987-01-01

    We examine rings that embed into the smash product of the group algebra of the Weyl group with the field of meromorphic functions on the Cartan subalgebra and are generated by elements that satisfy braid relations. We prove that every such ring is isomorphic to either the Hecke algebra, the nil Hecke ring, or the group algebra of the Weyl group. PMID:16593804

  7. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  8. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  9. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  10. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  11. On the solar dust ring(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.

    Based on a mechanism to form the solar dust ring, it is proved that the observed peak in infrared F-corona cannot be explained by silicate type grains alone. Preliminary analysis on the recent infrared data of the F-corona by Maihara et al. (1984) has suggested that the ring particles have different physical properties compared with the dust grains, which produce the background F-corona.

  12. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  13. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  14. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  15. Saturn's E ring revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Klinglesmith, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Images of the E ring of Saturn obtained by the image processing of photographs of the 1966 edge-on presentation of the planet's ring plane are presented. Two methods of image enhancement were used: scanning with an image quantizer operated in the derivative mode to enhance contrast and computerized subtraction of a circularly symmetric image of the overexposed Saturn disk. Further photographic and CCD observation confirming the existence of the ring extending to twice the diameter of the A ring, which was not detected by the Pioneer 11 imaging photopolarimeter, is indicated.

  16. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  17. Modified spiral wound retaining ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, A. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A spiral wound retaining ring with angled ends is described. The ring is crimped at the same angle as the ring ends to maintain a constant thickness dimension. The angling of the ends of the ring and crimp allow the ends to be positioned closer together while maintaining enough clearance to enable insertion and removal of the ring. By reducing the separation distance between the ends a stronger ring results since the double layer area of the ring is maximized.

  18. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  19. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  20. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina, where it slowly releases hormones — the chemicals the body makes to control organ function — through the vaginal wall into the ...

  1. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  2. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  3. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  4. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  5. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  6. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  7. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  8. Ring chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, A; Voyce, M A; Romain, D

    1977-01-01

    A mentally and physically retarded boy with a 46,XY,ring (4) (p16q35) chromosome complement is described. Chromosome banding showed that the amount of chromosome material deleted from the ring chromosome 4 was minimal, apparently no more than the telomeres. Chromosomal aberrations appear to be restricted to the production of double-sized dicentric rings, and aneuploidy. The mosiacism resulting from the behavioural peculiarities of ring chromosomes is described as dynamic mosaicism. It is suggested that the clinical features associated with this ring chromosome are more likely to be the result of the effects of a diploid/monosomy 4/polysomy 4 mosaicism than to the deficiency of the telomeric regions of the chromosome. Images PMID:881718

  9. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  10. 3-D ultrasound imaging using a forward-looking CMUT ring array for intravascular/intracardiac applications.

    PubMed

    Yeh, David T; Oralkan, Omer; Wygant, Ira O; O'Donnell, Matthew; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2006-06-01

    Forward-viewing ring arrays can enable new applications in intravascular and intracardiac ultrasound. This work presents compelling, full-synthetic, phased-array volumetric images from a forward-viewing capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) ring array wire bonded to a custom integrated circuit front end. The CMUT ring array has a diameter of 2 mm and 64 elements each 100 microm x 100 microm in size. In conventional mode, echo signals received from a plane reflector at 5 mm had 70% fractional bandwidth around a center frequency of 8.3 MHz. In collapse mode, 69% fractional bandwidth is measured around 19 MHz. Measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the echo averaged 16 times was 29 dB for conventional operation and 35 dB for collapse mode. B-scans were generated of a target consisting of steel wires 0.3 mm in diameter to determine resolution performance. The 6 dB axial and lateral resolutions for the B-scan of the wire target are 189 microm and 0.112 radians for 8 MHz, and 78 microm and 0.051 radians for 19 MHz. A reduced firing set suitable for real-time, intravascular applications was generated and shown to produce acceptable images. Rendered three-dimensional (3-D) images of a Palmaz-Schatz stent also are shown, demonstrating that the imaging quality is sufficient for practical applications.

  11. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  12. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  13. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  14. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  15. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  16. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  17. Supernumerary small ring chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Kaffe, S; Kim, H J; Hsu, L Y; Brill, C B; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    A supernumerary small ring chromosome was found in 30% of cultured peripheral leucocytes and 50% of skin fibroblasts in a 6-year-old boy with mild mental retardation and midline cleft palate. The extra chromosome appeared to carry a densely staining region on Giemsa banding. The banding patterns of the remaining 46 chromosomes were normal. C banding indicated that the ring chromosome contained mainly centromeric constitutive heterochromatin. Chromosome analysis of both parents showed normal karyotypes by both conventional and banding techniques; thus the origin of the ring chromosome could not be determined. Images PMID:604496

  18. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  19. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  1. Bending the Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Saturn's rings appear strangely warped in this view of the rings seen through the upper Saturn atmosphere.

    The atmosphere acts like a lens in refracting (bending) the light reflected from the rings. As the rings pass behind the overexposed limb (edge) of Saturn as seen from Cassini, the ring structure appears to curve downward due to the bending of the light as it passes through the upper atmosphere.

    This image was obtained using a near-infrared filter. The filter samples a wavelength where methane gas does not absorb light, thus making the far-off rings visible through the upper atmosphere.

    By comparing this image to similar ones taken using filters where methane gas does absorb, scientists can estimate the vertical profile of haze and the abundance of methane in Saturn's high atmosphere.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 14, 2005, through a filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 938 nanometers and at a distance of approximately 197,000 kilometers (123,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 820 meters (2,680 feet) per pixel.

  2. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  3. Ring correlations in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the correlations between rings in random network glasses in two dimensions as a function of their separation. Initially, we use the topological separation (measured by the number of intervening rings), but this leads to pseudo-long-range correlations due to a lack of topological charge neutrality in the shells surrounding a central ring. This effect is associated with the noncircular nature of the shells. It is, therefore, necessary to use the geometrical distance between ring centers. Hence we find a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law out to larger distances, with the correlations between rings decaying away when two rings are more than about three rings apart.

  4. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  5. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  6. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  7. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  8. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  9. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  10. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  11. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  12. Sensitivity to electronvolt-scale sterile neutrinos at a 3.8-GeV/c muon decay ring

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, Christopher D.

    2013-03-01

    The liquid-scintillator neutrino-detector (LSND) and mini booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) experiments claim to observe the oscillation $\\bar{v}$μ → $\\bar{v}$e, which can only be explained by additional neutrinos and is a claim that must be further tested. This thesis proposes a new accelerator and experiment called neutrinos from stored muons ( STORM) to refute or confirm the oscillation these claims by studying the CPT-equivalent channel ve → vμ . A 3.8-GeV/c muon decay ring is proposed with neutrino detectors placed 20 m and 2000 m from the decay ring. The detector technology would be a magnetized iron sampling calorimeter, where the magnetic field is induced by a superconducting transmission line. In a frequentist study, the sensitivity of this experiment after 5 years would be >10σ . The range of the thesis discussion starts with the proton front-end design and ends with neutrino parameter estimation. After describing the phenomenology of sterile neutrinos, the facility and detector performance work is presented. Finally, the systematics are explained before the sensitivity and parameter-estimation works are explained

  13. Ring laser gyroscope anode

    SciTech Connect

    Ljung, B.H.

    1981-03-17

    An anode for a ring laser gyroscope which provides improved current stability in the glow discharge path is disclosed. The anode of this invention permits operation at lower currents thereby allowing a reduction of heat dissipation in the ring laser gyroscope. The anode of one embodiment of this invention is characterized by a thumbtack appearance with a spherical end where the normal sharp end of the thumbtack would be located. The stem of the anode extends from the outside of the gyroscope structure to the interior of the structure such that the spherical end is substantially adjacent to the laser beam.

  14. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  15. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  16. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  17. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  18. Ring Flame Stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Ring Flame Stabilizer has been developed in conjunction with Lewis Research Center. This device can lower pollutant emissions (which contribute to smog and air pollution) from natural-gas appliances such as furnaces and water heaters by 90 percent while improving energy efficiency by 2 percent.

  19. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  20. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  1. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  2. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  3. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  4. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  5. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  6. Calculations of neutron and photon source terms and attenuation profiles for the generic design of the SPEAR3 storage ring shield.

    PubMed

    Rokni, S H; Khater, H; Liu, J C; Mao, S; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo particle generation and transport code was used to calculate shielding requirements for the 3 GeV, 500 mA SPEAR3 storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. The photon and neutron dose equivalent source term data were simulated for a 3 GeV electron beam interacting with two typical target/shielding geometries in the ring. The targets simulated are a rectangular block of 0.7 cm thick copper and a 5 cm thick iron block, both tilted at 1 degree relative to the beam direction. Attenuation profiles for neutrons and photons in concrete and lead as a function of angle at different shield thicknesses were calculated. The first, second and equilibrium attenuation lengths of photons and neutrons in the shield materials are derived from the attenuation profiles. The source term data and the attenuation lengths were then used to evaluate the shielding requirements for the ratchet walls of all front-ends of the SPEAR3 storage ring.

  7. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  8. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  9. Ring closure in actin polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  10. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  11. Uranus: the rings are black.

    PubMed

    Sinton, W M

    1977-11-04

    An upper limit of 0.05 is established for the geometric albedo of the newly discovered rings of Uranus. In view of this very low albedo, the particles of the rings cannot be ice-covered as are those of rings A and B of Saturn.

  12. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  13. Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Strained Ring Energetic Binders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-27

    polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ). PHBV was not found to have the mechanical instability problems of PBV, but was still thermally unstable (Tonset - 660C, Tmax - 1090C...DISCUSSION 4 Polybenzvalene (PBV) 4 Polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ) 6 Chain-Transfer Studies 11 CONCLUSIONS 15 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES 16 .F 4E 19 APPENDICES A...strained ring polymers similar to PBV are known. The investigation of one of these polymers, polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ), is also described in this report

  15. Which Ringed Planet...!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Don't worry - you are not the only one who thought this was a nice amateur photo of planet Saturn, Lord of the Rings in our Solar System! But then the relative brightness and positions of the moons may appear somewhat unfamiliar... and the ring system does look unusually bright when compared to the planetary disk...?? Well, it is not Saturn, but Uranus , the next giant planet further out, located at a distance of about 3,000 million km, or 20 times the distance between the Sun and the Earth. The photo shows Uranus surrounded by its rings and some of the moons, as they appear on a near-infrared image that was obtained in the K s -band (at wavelength 2.2 µm) with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile) . The exposure was made on November 19, 2002 (03:00 hrs UT) during a planetary research programme. The observing conditions were excellent (seeing 0.5 arcsec) and the exposure lasted 5 min. The angular diameter of Uranus is about 3.5 arcsec. The observers at ISAAC were Emmanuel Lellouch and Thérése Encrenaz of the Observatoire de Paris (France) and Jean-Gabriel Cuby and Andreas Jaunsen (both ESO-Chile). The rings The rings of Uranus were discovered in 1977, from observations during a stellar occultation event by astronomer teams at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Perth Observatory (Australia). Just before and after the planet moved in front of the (occulted) star, the surrounding rings caused the starlight to dim for short intervals of time. Photos obtained from the Voyager-2 spacecraft in 1986 showed a multitude of very tenuous rings. These rings are almost undetectable from the Earth in visible light. However, on the present VLT near-infrared picture, the contrast between the rings and the planet is strongly enhanced. At the particular wavelength at which this observation was made, the infalling sunlight is almost completely absorbed by gaseous methane present in the planetary atmosphere

  16. Precooler Ring Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Moenich, J.

    1980-10-02

    The precooler vacuum system, as proposed by FNAL, is based on a suitable modification of the existing Electron Cooling Ring System. Because of the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets, distributed ion pumping, as exists in the Electron Cooling Ring, is not applicable. Instead, the proposed pumping will be done with commercial appendage ion pumps mounted approximately every two meters around the circumference of the ring. The loss of effective pumping speed and non-uniformity of system pressure with appendage pumps may not be major considerations but the large number required does effect experimental and analytical equipment placement considerations. There is a distributed pumping technique available which: (1) is not affected by the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets; (2) will provide a minimum of four times the hydrogen pumping speed of the proposed appendage ion pumps; (3) will require no power during pumping after the strip is activated; (4) will provide the heat source for bakeout; (5) is easily replaceable; and (6) can be purchased, installed, and operated at a generous economic advantage over the presently proposed ion pumped system. The pumping technique referred to is non-evaporable gettering with ST101 Zr/Al pumping strip. A technical description of this pumping strip is given on Data Sheet 1 and 2 attached to this report.

  17. Saturn's ``Gossamer'' Ring: The F Ring's Inner Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    Recent Galileo and Earth-based images have revealed for the first time that Jupiter's ``gossamer'' ring is actually composed of two rings, one bounded at the outer edge by Amalthea and the other bounded by Thebe. Dynamical models suggest that these rings are composed of dust grains ejected off the surfaces of the two moons, which then evolve inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. A very faint sheet of material filling the region between Saturn's A and F Rings reported by Burns et al. (BAAS 15, 1013--1014, 1983) may be a dynamically analogous system, in which dust escapes from the F Ring and evolves inward to the A Ring. Unlike Jupiter's gossamer rings, however, the inner sheet of Saturn's F Ring has been well observed from a large range of phase angles and visual wavelengths by Voyager. Voyager images reveal that this faint ring shows a tenfold increase in brightness between phase angles of 125(deg) and 165(deg) , indicating that it is composed of fine dust microns in size. Preliminary estimates of the normal optical depth fall in the range 1--2*E(-4) , depending on the dust size distribution assumed. Initial spectrophotometry reveals that the ring is neutral in color. The ring is uniform in brightness over the entire region between the two rings, with no evidence for internal structure associated with Prometheus and Atlas, suggesting that neither of these embedded moons acts as either a source or a sink. We will refine the aforementioned measurements and develop photometric models to better constrain the properties of the dust in this ring. This will enable us to relate the dust population to that in the F Ring proper, and to better explore the dynamical processes at work.

  18. Helmet latching and attaching ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, E. W.; Viikinsalo, S. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A neck ring releasably secured to a pressurized garment carries an open-ended ring normally in the engagement position fitted into an annular groove and adapted to fit into a complementary annular groove formed in a helmet. Camming means formed on the inner surface at the end of the helmet engages the open-ended ring to retract the same and allow for one motion donning even when the garment is pressurized. A projection on the end of the split ring is engageable to physically retract the split ring.

  19. Mass of Saturn's A ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The mass of Saturn's A ring is reestimated using the behavior of spiral density waves embedded in the ring. The Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) observed the star delta-Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's rings during the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn in 1981 producing a radial profile of the rings. We examined forty spiral density waves in the Voyager PPS data of the A ring including 10 weaker waves that have not been previously analyzed by means of an autoregressive power spectral technique called Burg. The strengths of this new method for ring studies are that weaker, less extended waves are easily detected and characterized. This method is also the first one which does not require precise knowledge of the resonance location and phase of the wave in order to calculate the surface mass density. Uncertainties of up to 3 km are present in the currently available radial scales for Saturn's rings.

  20. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  1. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  2. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  3. Ring currents in azulene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, A. T.; Todorov, T. N.; Elena, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a self consistent polarisable ion tight binding theory for the study of push-pull processes in aromatic molecules. We find that the method quantitatively reproduces ab initio calculations of dipole moments and polarisability. We apply the scheme in a simulation which solves the time dependent Schrödinger equation to follow the relaxation of azulene from the second excited to the ground states. We observe rather spectacular oscillating ring currents which we explain in terms of interference between the HOMO and LUMO states.

  4. Wave structure in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Linda Joyce

    1992-01-01

    Planetary rings contain a wealth of wavelike structure that is driven by gravitational resonance interactions with nearby satellites. Wave behavior is a powerful tool for estimating physical ring parameters that are key to our understanding of ring origin and evolution. A new technique, utilizing the Burg autoregressive power spectral algorithm, was developed for probing the physical characteristics of rings and for detecting waves that are not otherwise visible. Data from the Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune and the Voyager radio science (RSS) occultation by Saturn's rings were used. Local surface mass density estimates are obtained from the dispersion of 40 spiral density waves in Saturn's A ring, including 10 weaker waves not previously analyzed. Surface mass densities vary from 20 to 60 gm sq cm. Increasing optical depth is not correlated with increasing surface mass density, especially after the Keeler gap, suggesting that ring particle size and composition are not uniform throughout the A ring. Saturn's A ring mass is reestimated using the surface mass densities and is 5.2 +/- 1.3 x 1021 gm. The wakes of Saturn's satellite Pan are not short timescale phenomena because the effects of Pan's gravitational perturbations persist for more than one Pan encounter. Four additional Pan wakes were discovered at longitudes greater than 360 deg. Collective effects such as collisions modify the wake dispersion more extensively at greater longitudes. Pan is the dominant mass in the Encke gap. A spiral density wave was detected inside the Uranian delta ring. Upper and lower bounds were estimated for the surface mass density of the delta ring 5 less than or equal to sigma less than or equal to 10 gm/sq cm, the viscosity 10 less than or equal to nu less than or equal to 40 sq cm/sec, and the local ring height 7 less than or equal to h less than or equal to 20 m. These values are comparable to the corresponding

  5. The Charging of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graps, Amara L.; Horanyi, M.; Havnes, O.; Gruen, E.

    2008-09-01

    Planetary rings have an undeniable aesthetic appeal, resulting in media icons of ringed planets as descriptive of the planetary sciences field as a whole. Such far-reaching symbolism might not be misplaced, however, because planetary rings represent a fundamental class of planetary structure that invites interdisciplinary investigations from specialists in dust, gravitational, plasma, collisional, and radiative transfer physics, due to: its sub-micron to meters-sized particles, its immersion in the planet's magnetic field, its embedded moonlets and its close proximity to the ringed planet's ionosphere and innermost moons. As such, planetary rings are a metaphoric bridge through a wide range of planetary physical processes. Processes to charge ring particles have different relative dynamical effects, dependent upon the rings' particle sizes, and the ring's plasma, magnetic and gravitational environments. This presentation will review what is known about the charging parameters and processes of planetary rings, in particular the sum of the individual currents from the time-varying charge dQ/dt, of the planetary ring particle. The individual currents depend on the environmental plasma conditions: number density, flow speed, temperature, and mass for the currents: electron and ion capture from the plasma, ion currents to a moving grain, photoelectron emission, secondary electron emission, thermionic effects, with stochastic charging influencing all of the above. Since rings are an ensemble of particles, ("cloud" Ring), we will define an ensemble, and consider the above currents, including those for the smallest ring particles, the dust particles, to arrive at a table giving charge potential and other relevant parameters.

  6. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  7. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  8. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  9. Ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  10. Reversible Rings with Involutions and Some Minimalities

    PubMed Central

    Fakieh, W. M.; Nauman, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    In continuation of the recent developments on extended reversibilities on rings, we initiate here a study on reversible rings with involutions, or, in short, ∗-reversible rings. These rings are symmetric, reversible, reflexive, and semicommutative. In this note we will study some properties and examples of ∗-reversible rings. It is proved here that the polynomial rings of ∗-reversible rings may not be ∗-reversible. A criterion for rings which cannot adhere to any involution is developed and it is observed that a minimal noninvolutary ring is of order 4 and that a minimal noncommutative ∗-reversible ring is of order 16. PMID:24489510

  11. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  12. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  13. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  14. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  15. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  16. Black ring deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon, Eric; Gimon, Eric G.; Levi, Thomas S.

    2007-06-22

    We present a sample microstate for a black ring in four and five dimensional language. The microstate consists of a black string microstate with an additional D6-brane. We show that with an appropriate choice of parameters the piece involving the black string microstate falls down a long AdS throat, whose M-theory lift is AdS_3 x S2. We wrap a spinning dipole M2-brane on the S2 in the probe approximation. In IIA, this corresponds to a dielectric D2-brane carrying only D0-charge. We conjecture this is the firstapproximation to a cloud of D0-branes blowing up due to their non-abelian degrees of freedom and the Myers effect.

  17. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  18. The Saturn Ring Observer: In situ studies of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Spilker, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey recently undertaken by the NRC's Space Studies Board for the National Academy of Sciences, studies were commissioned for a number of potential missions to outer planet targets. One of these studies examined the technological feasibility of a mission to carry out in situ studies of Saturn's rings, from a spacecraft placed in a circular orbit above the ring plane: the Saturn Ring Observer. The technical findings and background are discussed in a companion poster by T. R. Spilker et al. Here we outline the science goals of such a mission. Most of the fundamental interactions in planetary rings occur on spatial scales that are unresolved by flyby or orbiter spacecraft. Typical particle sizes in the rings of Saturn are in the 1 cm - 10 m range, and average interparticle spacings are a few meters. Indirect evidence indicates that the vertical thickness of the rings is as little as 5 - 10 m, which implies a velocity dispersion of only a few mm/sec. Theories of ring structure and evolution depend on the unknown characteristics of interparticle collisions and on the size distribution of the ring particles. The SRO could provide direct measurements of both the coefficient of restitution -- by monitoring individual collisions -- and the particles’ velocity dispersion. High-resolution observations of individual ring particles should also permit estimates of their spin states. Numerical simulations of Saturn’s rings incorporating both collisions and self-gravity predict that the ring particles are not uniformly distributed, but are instead clustered into elongated structures referred to as “self-gravity wakes”, which are continually created and destroyed on an orbital timescale. Theory indicates that the average separation between wakes in the A ring is of order 30-100 m. Direct imaging of self-gravity wakes, including their formation and subsequent dissolution, would provide critical validation of these models. Other

  19. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  20. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    PubMed

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.