Science.gov

Sample records for risk classification significantly

  1. Significance, definition, classification and risk factors of chronic kidney disease in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meyers, A M

    2015-03-01

    Renal dysfunction or chronic kidney disease (CKD) is found in 10% of the global population and is classified into five stages according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). No matter where a patient lives, estimation of the GFR is mandatory for decision-making and obtained by the simple measurement of a serum creatinine level. The objective of diagnosing CKD lies in its future prevention, early detection and proper treatment, which will prevent or delay functional deterioration. Primary hypertension (PH) occurs in 25% of South Africa (SA)s black population and is the putative cause of stage 5 CKD in 40 - 60% of these patients. Moreover, in this group, stage 5 CKD occurs at a relatively young age (35 - 45 years) compared with other population groups in whom stage 5 CKD resulting from PH usually occurs between 60 and 70 years of age. In the cohort study, PH has been found in 12 - 16% of black school learners (mean age 17 years) compared with 1.8 - 2% of other ethnic groups (mixed race, Asian, white). End-stage renal failure (ESRF) is the fifth most common cause of death in SA, excluding post-traumatic cases. In addition, undiagnosed or poorly controlled PH is a potent risk factor for other cardiovascular disease (CVD), e.g. congestive cardiac failure, myocardial infarction, stroke. Significant protein is also associated with CVD and protein >1 g/d is a significant risk factor for ESRF.

  2. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  3. Classification of BRCA1 missense variants of unknown clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, C; Dapic, V; Tice, B; Favis, R; Kwan, E; Barany, F; Manoukian, S; Radice, P; van der Luijt, R B; van Nesselrooij, B P M; Chenevix-Trench, G; kConFab; Caldes, T; de La Hoya, M; Lindquist, S; Tavtigian, S; Goldgar, D; Borg, A; Narod, S; Monteiro, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: BRCA1 is a tumour suppressor with pleiotropic actions. Germline mutations in BRCA1 are responsible for a large proportion of breast–ovarian cancer families. Several missense variants have been identified throughout the gene but because of lack of information about their impact on the function of BRCA1, predictive testing is not always informative. Classification of missense variants into deleterious/high risk or neutral/low clinical significance is essential to identify individuals at risk. Objective: To investigate a panel of missense variants. Methods and results: The panel was investigated in a comprehensive framework that included (1) a functional assay based on transcription activation; (2) segregation analysis and a method of using incomplete pedigree data to calculate the odds of causality; (3) a method based on interspecific sequence variation. It was shown that the transcriptional activation assay could be used as a test to characterise mutations in the carboxy-terminus region of BRCA1 encompassing residues 1396–1863. Thirteen missense variants (H1402Y, L1407P, H1421Y, S1512I, M1628T, M1628V, T1685I, G1706A, T1720A, A1752P, G1788V, V1809F, and W1837R) were specifically investigated. Conclusions: While individual classification schemes for BRCA1 alleles still present limitations, a combination of several methods provides a more powerful way of identifying variants that are causally linked to a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The framework presented here brings these variants nearer to clinical applicability. PMID:15689452

  4. A classification scheme for risk assessment methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Stamp, Jason Edwin; Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2004-08-01

    This report presents a classification scheme for risk assessment methods. This scheme, like all classification schemes, provides meaning by imposing a structure that identifies relationships. Our scheme is based on two orthogonal aspects--level of detail, and approach. The resulting structure is shown in Table 1 and is explained in the body of the report. Each cell in the Table represent a different arrangement of strengths and weaknesses. Those arrangements shift gradually as one moves through the table, each cell optimal for a particular situation. The intention of this report is to enable informed use of the methods so that a method chosen is optimal for a situation given. This report imposes structure on the set of risk assessment methods in order to reveal their relationships and thus optimize their usage.We present a two-dimensional structure in the form of a matrix, using three abstraction levels for the rows and three approaches for the columns. For each of the nine cells in the matrix we identify the method type by name and example. The matrix helps the user understand: (1) what to expect from a given method, (2) how it relates to other methods, and (3) how best to use it. Each cell in the matrix represent a different arrangement of strengths and weaknesses. Those arrangements shift gradually as one moves through the table, each cell optimal for a particular situation. The intention of this report is to enable informed use of the methods so that a method chosen is optimal for a situation given. The matrix, with type names in the cells, is introduced in Table 2 on page 13 below. Unless otherwise stated we use the word 'method' in this report to refer to a 'risk assessment method', though often times we use the full phrase. The use of the terms 'risk assessment' and 'risk management' are close enough that we do not attempt to distinguish them in this report. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. In Section 2 we provide context for this report

  5. Risk Classification and Risk-based Safety and Mission Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent activities to revamp and emphasize the need to streamline processes and activities for Class D missions across the agency have led to various interpretations of Class D, including the lumping of a variety of low-cost projects into Class D. Sometimes terms such as Class D minus are used. In this presentation, mission risk classifications will be traced to official requirements and definitions as a measure to ensure that projects and programs align with the guidance and requirements that are commensurate for their defined risk posture. As part of this, the full suite of risk classifications, formal and informal will be defined, followed by an introduction to the new GPR 8705.4 that is currently under review.GPR 8705.4 lays out guidance for the mission success activities performed at the Classes A-D for NPR 7120.5 projects as well as for projects not under NPR 7120.5. Furthermore, the trends in stepping from Class A into higher risk posture classifications will be discussed. The talk will conclude with a discussion about risk-based safety and mission assuranceat GSFC.

  6. Relevant and significant supervised gene clusters for microarray cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Maji, Pradipta; Das, Chandra

    2012-06-01

    An important application of microarray data in functional genomics is to classify samples according to their gene expression profiles such as to classify cancer versus normal samples or to classify different types or subtypes of cancer. One of the major tasks with gene expression data is to find co-regulated gene groups whose collective expression is strongly associated with sample categories. In this regard, a gene clustering algorithm is proposed to group genes from microarray data. It directly incorporates the information of sample categories in the grouping process for finding groups of co-regulated genes with strong association to the sample categories, yielding a supervised gene clustering algorithm. The average expression of the genes from each cluster acts as its representative. Some significant representatives are taken to form the reduced feature set to build the classifiers for cancer classification. The mutual information is used to compute both gene-gene redundancy and gene-class relevance. The performance of the proposed method, along with a comparison with existing methods, is studied on six cancer microarray data sets using the predictive accuracy of naive Bayes classifier, K-nearest neighbor rule, and support vector machine. An important finding is that the proposed algorithm is shown to be effective for identifying biologically significant gene clusters with excellent predictive capability. PMID:22552589

  7. Risk-informed radioactive waste classification and reclassification.

    PubMed

    Croff, Allen G

    2006-11-01

    Radioactive waste classification systems have been developed to allow wastes having similar hazards to be grouped for purposes of storage, treatment, packaging, transportation, and/or disposal. As recommended in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements' Report No. 139, Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes, a preferred classification system would be based primarily on the health risks to the public that arise from waste disposal and secondarily on other attributes such as the near-term practicalities of managing a waste, i.e., the waste classification system would be risk informed. The current U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed because key definitions--especially that of high-level waste--are based on the source of the waste instead of its inherent characteristics related to risk. A second important reason for concluding the existing U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed is there are no general principles or provisions for exempting materials from being classified as radioactive waste which would then allow management without regard to its radioactivity. This paper elaborates the current system for classifying and reclassifying radioactive wastes in the United States, analyzes the extent to which the system is risk informed and the ramifications of its not being so, and provides observations on potential future direction of efforts to address shortcomings in the U.S. radioactive waste classification system as of 2004.

  8. Risk-informed radioactive waste classification and reclassification.

    PubMed

    Croff, Allen G

    2006-11-01

    Radioactive waste classification systems have been developed to allow wastes having similar hazards to be grouped for purposes of storage, treatment, packaging, transportation, and/or disposal. As recommended in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements' Report No. 139, Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes, a preferred classification system would be based primarily on the health risks to the public that arise from waste disposal and secondarily on other attributes such as the near-term practicalities of managing a waste, i.e., the waste classification system would be risk informed. The current U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed because key definitions--especially that of high-level waste--are based on the source of the waste instead of its inherent characteristics related to risk. A second important reason for concluding the existing U.S. radioactive waste classification system is not risk informed is there are no general principles or provisions for exempting materials from being classified as radioactive waste which would then allow management without regard to its radioactivity. This paper elaborates the current system for classifying and reclassifying radioactive wastes in the United States, analyzes the extent to which the system is risk informed and the ramifications of its not being so, and provides observations on potential future direction of efforts to address shortcomings in the U.S. radioactive waste classification system as of 2004. PMID:17033455

  9. Molecular Pathology of Hepatic Neoplasms: Classification and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Zenta; Jain, Dhanpat

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled investigators to characterize the molecular genetics and genomics of hepatic neoplasia in remarkable detail. From these studies, an increasing number of molecular markers are being identified that correlate with clinically important tumor phenotypes. This paper discusses current knowledge relevant to the molecular classification of epithelial primary hepatic tumors that arise in adults, including focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CC), and combined HCC-CC. Genetic analysis has defined molecular subtypes of HCA that are clinicopathologically distinct and can be distinguished through immunohistochemistry. Gene expression studies have identified molecular signatures of progression from dysplastic nodules (DNs) to early HCC in cirrhosis. Analyses of the mutational spectra, chromosomal aberrations and instability, transcriptomics, and microRNA profiles of HCC have revealed the existence of biologically distinct subtypes of this common malignancy, with prognostic implications. Molecular characterization of biliary and hepatic progenitor cell phenotypes in liver cancer has shed new light on the histogenesis of these tumors and has focused attention on novel therapeutic targets. In coming years, the molecular classification of hepatic neoplasms will be increasingly valuable for guiding patient care, as targeted therapies for liver cancer are developed and brought into clinical practice. PMID:21559202

  10. Molecular pathology of hepatic neoplasms: classification and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Walther, Zenta; Jain, Dhanpat

    2011-04-07

    Recent technological advances have enabled investigators to characterize the molecular genetics and genomics of hepatic neoplasia in remarkable detail. From these studies, an increasing number of molecular markers are being identified that correlate with clinically important tumor phenotypes. This paper discusses current knowledge relevant to the molecular classification of epithelial primary hepatic tumors that arise in adults, including focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CC), and combined HCC-CC. Genetic analysis has defined molecular subtypes of HCA that are clinicopathologically distinct and can be distinguished through immunohistochemistry. Gene expression studies have identified molecular signatures of progression from dysplastic nodules (DNs) to early HCC in cirrhosis. Analyses of the mutational spectra, chromosomal aberrations and instability, transcriptomics, and microRNA profiles of HCC have revealed the existence of biologically distinct subtypes of this common malignancy, with prognostic implications. Molecular characterization of biliary and hepatic progenitor cell phenotypes in liver cancer has shed new light on the histogenesis of these tumors and has focused attention on novel therapeutic targets. In coming years, the molecular classification of hepatic neoplasms will be increasingly valuable for guiding patient care, as targeted therapies for liver cancer are developed and brought into clinical practice.

  11. Using QA classification to guide design and manage risk

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, J.; DeKlever, R.; Petrie, E.H.

    1993-01-28

    Raytheon Services Nevada has developed a classification process based on probabilistic risk assessment, using accident/impact scenarios for each system classified. Initial classification analyses were performed for the 20 systems of Package IA of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The analyses demonstrated a solid, defensible methodological basis for classification which minimizes the use of direct engineering judgment. They provide guidance for ESF design and risk management through the identification of: The critical characteristics of each system that need to be controlled; and the parts of the information base that most need to be further developed through performance assessment or other efforts.

  12. Adiposity significantly modifies genetic risk for dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher B; Nikpay, Majid; Lau, Paulina; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Davies, Robert W; Wells, George A; Dent, Robert; McPherson, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci robustly associated with plasma lipids, which also contribute to extreme lipid phenotypes. However, these common genetic variants explain <12% of variation in lipid traits. Adiposity is also an important determinant of plasma lipoproteins, particularly plasma TGs and HDL cholesterol (HDLc) concentrations. Thus, interactions between genes and clinical phenotypes may contribute to this unexplained heritability. We have applied a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) for both plasma TGs and HDLc in two large cohorts at the extremes of BMI. Both BMI and GRS were strongly associated with these lipid traits. A significant interaction between obese/lean status and GRS was noted for each of TG (P(Interaction) = 2.87 × 10(-4)) and HDLc (P(Interaction) = 1.05 × 10(-3)). These interactions were largely driven by SNPs tagging APOA5, glucokinase receptor (GCKR), and LPL for TG, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), GalNAc-transferase (GALNT2), endothelial lipase (LIPG), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) for HDLc. In contrast, the GRSLDL cholesterol × adiposity interaction was not significant. Sexual dimorphism was evident for the GRSHDL on HDLc in obese (P(Interaction) = 0.016) but not lean subjects. SNP by BMI interactions may provide biological insight into specific genetic associations and missing heritability. PMID:25225679

  13. Drug and Alcohol Use -- A Significant Risk Factor for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Drug and Alcohol Use - A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Email ... with HIV currently use drugs or binge on alcohol. Many people are unaware that the increased risk ...

  14. Inherited Cholesterol Disorder Significantly Boosts Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic disorder that causes high levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol have an increased risk for heart disease and ... in previous studies. Compared to people with average LDL cholesterol levels (less than 130 mg/dL), those with ...

  15. Classification of corrosion risk zones using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Nikolas; Anastasiou, Constantina; Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Danezis, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the major deterioration factor of the RC infrastructures. Several factors are contributing towards increasing the corrosion risk like the exposure and environmental conditions which are a function of the geographical location of the infrastructure. Information for these conditions and their affected areas can be proved valuable at design stage and/or during maintenance planning. This study aims to relate corrosion risk of RC infrastructures with their geographical location. The corrosion risk is quantified through data from NDT methods and subsequently correlated with its location. Therefore high risk areas with structures prone to corrosion deterioration are identified. The latter is implemented via GIS tools in order to create maps that describe how corrosion risk is related to the location of each structure. Two GIS methods are suggested, the grid system and the use of classified areas. Corrosion data has been collected from labs about various constructions in Cyprus and used in conjunction with GIS tools to provide useful information on corrosion identification. The outcome is a digitized map of the Limassol area which indicates the risks levels associated with corrosion of the steel reinforcement.

  16. A Retrospective Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Modified Braden Scale Score Risk Classifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Jing; Huai, Bao-Sha

    2015-09-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment in the world, but the currently used 5 risk classification groups do not accurately discriminate among their risk categories. To optimize risk classification based on Braden Scale scores, a retrospective analysis of all consecutively admitted patients in an acute care facility who were at risk for pressure ulcer development was performed between January 2013 and December 2013. Predicted pressure ulcer incidence first was calculated by logistic regression model based on original Braden score. Risk classification then was modified based on the predicted pressure ulcer incidence and compared between different risk categories in the modified (3-group) classification and the traditional (5-group) classification using chi-square test. Two thousand, six hundred, twenty-five (2,625) patients (mean age 59.8 ± 16.5, range 1 month to 98 years, 1,601 of whom were men) were included in the study; 81 patients (3.1%) developed a pressure ulcer. The predicted pressure ulcer incidence ranged from 0.1% to 49.7%. When the predicted pressure ulcer incidence was greater than 10.0% (high risk), the corresponding Braden scores were less than 11; when the predicted incidence ranged from 1.0% to 10.0% (moderate risk), the corresponding Braden scores ranged from 12 to 16; and when the predicted incidence was less than 1.0% (mild risk), the corresponding Braden scores were greater than 17. In the modified classification, observed pressure ulcer incidence was significantly different between each of the 3 risk categories (P less than 0.05). However, in the traditional classification, the observed incidence was not significantly different between the high-risk category and moderate-risk category (P less than 0.05) and between the mild-risk category and no-risk category (P less than 0.05). If future studies confirm the validity of these findings, pressure ulcer prevention protocols of care based on Braden Scale scores can

  17. Significance of clustering and classification applications in digital and physical libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Ioannis; Koulouris, Alexandros; Zervos, Spiros; Dendrinos, Markos; Giannakopoulos, Georgios

    2015-02-01

    Applications of clustering and classification techniques can be proved very significant in both digital and physical (paper-based) libraries. The most essential application, document classification and clustering, is crucial for the content that is produced and maintained in digital libraries, repositories, databases, social media, blogs etc., based on various tags and ontology elements, transcending the traditional library-oriented classification schemes. Other applications with very useful and beneficial role in the new digital library environment involve document routing, summarization and query expansion. Paper-based libraries can benefit as well since classification combined with advanced material characterization techniques such as FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) can be vital for the study and prevention of material deterioration. An improved two-level self-organizing clustering architecture is proposed in order to enhance the discrimination capacity of the learning space, prior to classification, yielding promising results when applied to the above mentioned library tasks.

  18. Risk-based Classification of Incidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwell, William S.; Knight, John C.; Strunk, Elisabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    As the penetration of software into safety-critical systems progresses, accidents and incidents involving software will inevitably become more frequent. Identifying lessons from these occurrences and applying them to existing and future systems is essential if recurrences are to be prevented. Unfortunately, investigative agencies do not have the resources to fully investigate every incident under their jurisdictions and domains of expertise and thus must prioritize certain occurrences when allocating investigative resources. In the aviation community, most investigative agencies prioritize occurrences based on the severity of their associated losses, allocating more resources to accidents resulting in injury to passengers or extensive aircraft damage. We argue that this scheme is inappropriate because it undervalues incidents whose recurrence could have a high potential for loss while overvaluing fairly straightforward accidents involving accepted risks. We then suggest a new strategy for prioritizing occurrences based on the risk arising from incident recurrence.

  19. Life insurance: genomic stratification and risk classification

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Yann; Burton, Hilary; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Feze, Ida Ngueng; Dent, Tom; Pashayan, Nora; Chowdhury, Susmita; Foulkes, William; Hall, Alison; Hamet, Pavel; Kirwan, Nick; Macdonald, Angus; Simard, Jacques; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2014-01-01

    With the development and increasing accessibility of new genomic tools such as next-generation sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genomic stratification models, the debate on genetic discrimination in the context of life insurance became even more complex, requiring a review of current practices and the exploration of new scenarios. In this perspective, a multidisciplinary group of international experts representing different interests revisited the genetics and life insurance debate during a 2-day symposium ‘Life insurance: breast cancer research and genetic risk prediction seminar' held in Quebec City, Canada on 24 and 25 September 2012. Having reviewed the current legal, social, and ethical issues on the use of genomic information in the context of life insurance, the Expert Group identified four main questions: (1) Have recent developments in genomics and related sciences changed the contours of the genetics and life insurance debate? (2) Are genomic results obtained in a research context relevant for life insurance underwriting? (3) Should predictive risk assessment and risk stratification models based on genomic data also be used for life insurance underwriting? (4) What positive actions could stakeholders in the debate take to alleviate concerns over the use of genomic information by life insurance underwriters? This paper presents a summary of the discussions and the specific action items recommended by the Expert Group. PMID:24129434

  20. Life insurance: genomic stratification and risk classification.

    PubMed

    Joly, Yann; Burton, Hilary; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Feze, Ida Ngueng; Dent, Tom; Pashayan, Nora; Chowdhury, Susmita; Foulkes, William; Hall, Alison; Hamet, Pavel; Kirwan, Nick; Macdonald, Angus; Simard, Jacques; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2014-05-01

    With the development and increasing accessibility of new genomic tools such as next-generation sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genomic stratification models, the debate on genetic discrimination in the context of life insurance became even more complex, requiring a review of current practices and the exploration of new scenarios. In this perspective, a multidisciplinary group of international experts representing different interests revisited the genetics and life insurance debate during a 2-day symposium 'Life insurance: breast cancer research and genetic risk prediction seminar' held in Quebec City, Canada on 24 and 25 September 2012. Having reviewed the current legal, social, and ethical issues on the use of genomic information in the context of life insurance, the Expert Group identified four main questions: (1) Have recent developments in genomics and related sciences changed the contours of the genetics and life insurance debate? (2) Are genomic results obtained in a research context relevant for life insurance underwriting? (3) Should predictive risk assessment and risk stratification models based on genomic data also be used for life insurance underwriting? (4) What positive actions could stakeholders in the debate take to alleviate concerns over the use of genomic information by life insurance underwriters? This paper presents a summary of the discussions and the specific action items recommended by the Expert Group.

  1. Advances in Risk Classification and Treatment Strategies for Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Navin R; Applebaum, Mark A; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Matthay, Katherine K; London, Wendy B; Ambros, Peter F; Nakagawara, Akira; Berthold, Frank; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Park, Julie R; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Pearson, Andrew D J; Cohn, Susan L

    2015-09-20

    Risk-based treatment approaches for neuroblastoma have been ongoing for decades. However, the criteria used to define risk in various institutional and cooperative groups were disparate, limiting the ability to compare clinical trial results. To mitigate this problem and enhance collaborative research, homogenous pretreatment patient cohorts have been defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group classification system. During the past 30 years, increasingly intensive, multimodality approaches have been developed to treat patients who are classified as high risk, whereas patients with low- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma have received reduced therapy. This treatment approach has resulted in improved outcome, although survival for high-risk patients remains poor, emphasizing the need for more effective treatments. Increased knowledge regarding the biology and genetic basis of neuroblastoma has led to the discovery of druggable targets and promising, new therapeutic approaches. Collaborative efforts of institutions and international cooperative groups have led to advances in our understanding of neuroblastoma biology, refinements in risk classification, and stratified treatment strategies, resulting in improved outcome. International collaboration will be even more critical when evaluating therapies designed to treat small cohorts of patients with rare actionable mutations. PMID:26304901

  2. Advances in Risk Classification and Treatment Strategies for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Navin R.; Applebaum, Mark A.; Volchenboum, Samuel L.; Matthay, Katherine K.; London, Wendy B.; Ambros, Peter F.; Nakagawara, Akira; Berthold, Frank; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Park, Julie R.; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Pearson, Andrew D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Risk-based treatment approaches for neuroblastoma have been ongoing for decades. However, the criteria used to define risk in various institutional and cooperative groups were disparate, limiting the ability to compare clinical trial results. To mitigate this problem and enhance collaborative research, homogenous pretreatment patient cohorts have been defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group classification system. During the past 30 years, increasingly intensive, multimodality approaches have been developed to treat patients who are classified as high risk, whereas patients with low- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma have received reduced therapy. This treatment approach has resulted in improved outcome, although survival for high-risk patients remains poor, emphasizing the need for more effective treatments. Increased knowledge regarding the biology and genetic basis of neuroblastoma has led to the discovery of druggable targets and promising, new therapeutic approaches. Collaborative efforts of institutions and international cooperative groups have led to advances in our understanding of neuroblastoma biology, refinements in risk classification, and stratified treatment strategies, resulting in improved outcome. International collaboration will be even more critical when evaluating therapies designed to treat small cohorts of patients with rare actionable mutations. PMID:26304901

  3. Advances in Risk Classification and Treatment Strategies for Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Navin R; Applebaum, Mark A; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Matthay, Katherine K; London, Wendy B; Ambros, Peter F; Nakagawara, Akira; Berthold, Frank; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Park, Julie R; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Pearson, Andrew D J; Cohn, Susan L

    2015-09-20

    Risk-based treatment approaches for neuroblastoma have been ongoing for decades. However, the criteria used to define risk in various institutional and cooperative groups were disparate, limiting the ability to compare clinical trial results. To mitigate this problem and enhance collaborative research, homogenous pretreatment patient cohorts have been defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group classification system. During the past 30 years, increasingly intensive, multimodality approaches have been developed to treat patients who are classified as high risk, whereas patients with low- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma have received reduced therapy. This treatment approach has resulted in improved outcome, although survival for high-risk patients remains poor, emphasizing the need for more effective treatments. Increased knowledge regarding the biology and genetic basis of neuroblastoma has led to the discovery of druggable targets and promising, new therapeutic approaches. Collaborative efforts of institutions and international cooperative groups have led to advances in our understanding of neuroblastoma biology, refinements in risk classification, and stratified treatment strategies, resulting in improved outcome. International collaboration will be even more critical when evaluating therapies designed to treat small cohorts of patients with rare actionable mutations.

  4. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations. 812.66... risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under § 812.2(b)(1)(ii), involves a significant risk device, it shall so notify the investigator and,...

  5. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES INVESTIGATIONAL DEVICE EXEMPTIONS IRB Review and Approval § 812.66 Significant risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations....

  6. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES INVESTIGATIONAL DEVICE EXEMPTIONS IRB Review and Approval § 812.66 Significant risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations....

  7. Identification and Classification of Common Risks in Space Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Hanna, Robert A.; Port, Daniel; Eggleston, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    Due to the highly constrained schedules and budgets that NASA missions must contend with, the identification and management of cost, schedule and risks in the earliest stages of the lifecycle is critical. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) it is the concurrent engineering teams that first address these items in a systematic manner. Foremost of these concurrent engineering teams is Team X. Started in 1995, Team X has carried out over 1000 studies, dramatically reducing the time and cost involved, and has been the model for other concurrent engineering teams both within NASA and throughout the larger aerospace community. The ability to do integrated risk identification and assessment was first introduced into Team X in 2001. Since that time the mission risks identified in each study have been kept in a database. In this paper we will describe how the Team X risk process is evolving highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches. The paper will especially focus on the identification and classification of common risks that have arisen during Team X studies of space based science missions.

  8. Predicting Disease Risk Using Bootstrap Ranking and Classification Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Ohad; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are widely used to search for genetic loci that underlie human disease. Another goal is to predict disease risk for different individuals given their genetic sequence. Such predictions could either be used as a “black box” in order to promote changes in life-style and screening for early diagnosis, or as a model that can be studied to better understand the mechanism of the disease. Current methods for risk prediction typically rank single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by the p-value of their association with the disease, and use the top-associated SNPs as input to a classification algorithm. However, the predictive power of such methods is relatively poor. To improve the predictive power, we devised BootRank, which uses bootstrapping in order to obtain a robust prioritization of SNPs for use in predictive models. We show that BootRank improves the ability to predict disease risk of unseen individuals in the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) data and results in a more robust set of SNPs and a larger number of enriched pathways being associated with the different diseases. Finally, we show that combining BootRank with seven different classification algorithms improves performance compared to previous studies that used the WTCCC data. Notably, diseases for which BootRank results in the largest improvements were recently shown to have more heritability than previously thought, likely due to contributions from variants with low minimum allele frequency (MAF), suggesting that BootRank can be beneficial in cases where SNPs affecting the disease are poorly tagged or have low MAF. Overall, our results show that improving disease risk prediction from genotypic information may be a tangible goal, with potential implications for personalized disease screening and treatment. PMID:23990773

  9. Narrow-band imaging observation of colorectal lesions using NICE classification to avoid discarding significant lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Santa; Iwatate, Mineo; Sano, Wataru; Hasuike, Noriaki; Kosaka, Hidekazu; Ikumoto, Taro; Kotaka, Masahito; Ichiyanagi, Akihiro; Ebisutani, Chikara; Hisano, Yasuko; Fujimori, Takahiro; Sano, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the risk of failing to detect diminutive and small colorectal cancers with the “resect and discard” policy. METHODS: Patients who received colonoscopy and polypectomy were recruited in the retrospective study. Probable histology of the polyps was predicted by six colonoscopists by the use of NICE classification. The incidence of diminutive and small colorectal cancers and their endoscopic features were assessed. RESULTS: In total, we found 681 cases of diminutive (1-5 mm) lesions in 402 patients and 197 cases of small (6-9 mm) lesions in 151 patients. Based on pathology of the diminutive and small polyps, 105 and 18 were non-neoplastic polyps, 557 and 154 were low-grade adenomas, 18 and 24 were high-grade adenomas or intramucosal/submucosal (SM) scanty invasive carcinomas, 1 and 1 were SM-d carcinoma, respectively. The endoscopic features of invasive cancer were classified as NICE type 3 endoscopically. CONCLUSION: The risk of failing to detect diminutive and small colorectal invasive cancer with the “resect and discard” strategy might be avoided through the use of narrow-band imaging observation with the NICE classification scheme and magnifying endoscopy. PMID:25512769

  10. New Classification Method Based on Support-Significant Association Rules Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoxin; Shi, Wen

    One of the most well-studied problems in data mining is mining for association rules. There was also research that introduced association rule mining methods to conduct classification tasks. These classification methods, based on association rule mining, could be applied for customer segmentation. Currently, most of the association rule mining methods are based on a support-confidence structure, where rules satisfied both minimum support and minimum confidence were returned as strong association rules back to the analyzer. But, this types of association rule mining methods lack of rigorous statistic guarantee, sometimes even caused misleading. A new classification model for customer segmentation, based on association rule mining algorithm, was proposed in this paper. This new model was based on the support-significant association rule mining method, where the measurement of confidence for association rule was substituted by the significant of association rule that was a better evaluation standard for association rules. Data experiment for customer segmentation from UCI indicated the effective of this new model.

  11. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltse, J.

    1990-12-31

    Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

  12. Revealing Significant Relations between Chemical/Biological Features and Activity: Associative Classification Mining for Drug Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Pulan

    2012-01-01

    Classification, clustering and association mining are major tasks of data mining and have been widely used for knowledge discovery. Associative classification mining, the combination of both association rule mining and classification, has emerged as an indispensable way to support decision making and scientific research. In particular, it offers a…

  13. Significant Association Between Adiponutrin and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Guang; Liu, Fang-Feng; Zhu, Hua-Qiang; Zhou, Xu; Lu, Jun; Chang, Hong; Hu, Jin-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract ADPN I148M polymorphism has been consistently reported to play a role in liver-associated diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease, chronic hepatitis C, and liver fat and fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. This significant association was also indicated in a series of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) studies, where the significance may be affected due to the small sample sizes. The aim of this study was to reexamine the ADPN-HCC association by use of meta-analysis. Biweekly computer-based literature searches plus manual screening were undertaken in an effort to identify all studies that met the predefined inclusion criteria. The Mantel–Haenszel method was selected to estimate risk effects (odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI]). To examine reliability of the pooled risk effects, we additionally performed sensitivity analysis and publication bias tests. Ten studies (1335 HCC patients and 2927 HCC-free controls) were identified for the meta-analysis. We found significantly increased risk of HCC attributable to presence of ADPN I148M polymorphism, with the highest risk associated with the M/M genotype under the recessive model of inheritance (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.87–2.67, between-study heterogeneity: P = 0.468). The significant increase persisted in Caucasian and African when data were stratified by ethnicity. Subgroup analysis according to source of controls revealed similar risk effects. Our meta-analysis indicates that I148M polymorphism in the ADPN gene may independently contribute to the progression of HCC irrespective of the etiologies. PMID:26632699

  14. Ecological Significance of a Geomorphic Stream Classification: Species and Functional Group Composition of Riparian Plant Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. R.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    We tested the ecological significance of a geomorphic classification of Sonoran Desert ephemeral stream channels based on channel plan-form, degree of lateral confinement, and boundary material composition. This typology has been shown to discriminate among channel geometry and hydraulic characteristics for bedrock, bedrock with alluvium, incised alluvium, braided, and piedmont headwater channels. We examined stream reach-scale relationships of geomorphic stream types to the relative cover and density of perennial plant species and functional groups, and identified the dominant fluvial drivers, within riparian communities at 101 ephemeral stream reaches on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground and Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range in southwestern Arizona, USA. Nonparametric multivariate analysis of variance showed that species and functional group composition differed significantly among geomorphic stream types, both in terms of relative cover and density. Partitioning of among-site multivariate dissimilarity revealed that species compositional differences between stream types were caused largely by variation in the cover and density of the most common members of the regional flora. Distinctive functional group composition among reach types resulted from differences in the cover and density of drought-deciduous shrubs and subshrubs, evergreen trees and shrubs, and photosynthetic-stemmed trees. Comparison of environmental and biotic dissimilarity matrices highlighted the role of channel gradient as the dominant abiotic driver of riparian plant community composition, with stream channel elevation and width:depth providing additional explanatory power. Distinctive riparian plant community composition among the geomorphic stream types demonstrates the ecological significance of this a priori channel classification, and indicates its potential utility in understanding spatial patterns of ecological dynamics, sample stratification for process-based studies, and reference

  15. Reappraisal of risk factors for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Boursi, Ben; Weiss, Brendan M; Haynes, Kevin; Mamtani, Ronac; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    A number of epidemiologic studies have demonstrated associations between obesity and diabetes and the risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, since MGUS is an asymptomatic condition we evaluated whether these are true associations or the result of detection-bias. We conducted a nested case-control study using a large primary-care database. Cases were defined as those with incident diagnosis of MGUS. For every case, four eligible controls matched on age, sex, practice site, and duration of follow-up were selected. Exposure variables included obesity and diabetes (including antidiabetic therapies) as well as other metabolic risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. The study included 2363 MGUS patients and 9193 matched controls. In the primary analysis, obesity and diabetes were associated with higher MGUS risk with an adjusted ORs of 1.15 (95% CI 1.02-1.29) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.13-1.50), respectively. However, after adjustment to the number of laboratory tests prior to the MGUS diagnosis, there was no association between obesity and diabetes and MGUS risk (ORs of 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22 and 1.08, 95% CI 0.93-1.25, respectively). In an additional analysis of antidiabetic therapies and MGUS risk, there was a nonsignificant decrease in MGUS risk among diabetes patients treated with metformin alone compared to subjects without diabetes (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.56-1.05). In summary, while previously described risk factors for MGUS might be the result of detection bias, metformin should be further evaluated as a possible chemoprevention modality. Am. J. Hematol. 91:581-584, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26953904

  16. [Obesity--significant risk factor for erectile dysfunction in men].

    PubMed

    Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł; Musialik, Katarzyna

    2014-02-01

    The obesity affects around 312 million people over the world. In The United States it causes more than 300 000 deaths per year. It leads to many complications, such as ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. It was proven recently that obesity is also an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction in men. 79% of men presenting erectile disorders have BMI of 25 kg/m2 or greater. BMI in the range 25-30 kg/m2 is associated with 1,5 times, and in the range of over 30 kg/m2 with 3 times greater risk of sexual dysfunction. The occurrence of erectile dysfunction in patients with obesity is caused by a number of complications which are characteristic for an excessive amount of fat tissue, in example: cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or dyslipidemia. In the United States diabetes and obesity are responsible for 8 million cases of erectile dysfunction. Scientific evidence indicates that excessive body weight should be considered as an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction. This risk increases with increasing BMI. Erectile disorders correlate with the occurrence of obesity at any time during the patient's life. Obesity leads to erectile dysfunction in a considerably greater extent than aging. Mechanisms responsible for the independent influence of obesity on the erectile dysfunction are: hormonal imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, psychological factors and physical inactivity. The basis for erectile dysfunction treatment in obesity is body weight loss. Erectile disorders in obese men are significantly more frequent than in general population. Obesity is beyond any doubts an independent risk factor of erectile dysfunction.

  17. Significance and limitation of the pathological classification of TDP-43 proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Tetsuaki

    2014-12-01

    Based on the cerebral tans-activation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43) immunohistochemistry, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology (FTLD-TDP) is classified into four subtypes: type A has numerous neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) and dystrophic neurites (DNs); type B has numerous NCIs with few DNs; type C is characterized by DNs which are often longer and thicker than DNs in type A, with few NCIs; and type D has numerous neuronal intranuclear inclusions and DNs with few NCIs. The relevance of this classification system is supported by clinical, biochemical and genetic correlations, although there is still significant heterogeneity, especially in cases with type A pathology. The subtypes of TDP-43 pathology should be determined in cases with other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, to evaluate the pathological significance of TDP-43 abnormality in them. The results of the biochemical analyses of the diseased brains and the cellular models suggest that different strains of TDP-43 with different conformations may determine the clinicopathological phenotypes of TDP-43 proteinopathy, like prion disease. Clarifying the mechanism of the conformational changes of TDP-43 leading to the formation of multiple abnormal strains may be important for differential diagnosis and developing disease-modifying therapy for TDP-43 proteinopathy.

  18. Significance and limitation of the pathological classification of TDP-43 proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Tetsuaki

    2014-12-01

    Based on the cerebral tans-activation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43) immunohistochemistry, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology (FTLD-TDP) is classified into four subtypes: type A has numerous neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) and dystrophic neurites (DNs); type B has numerous NCIs with few DNs; type C is characterized by DNs which are often longer and thicker than DNs in type A, with few NCIs; and type D has numerous neuronal intranuclear inclusions and DNs with few NCIs. The relevance of this classification system is supported by clinical, biochemical and genetic correlations, although there is still significant heterogeneity, especially in cases with type A pathology. The subtypes of TDP-43 pathology should be determined in cases with other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, to evaluate the pathological significance of TDP-43 abnormality in them. The results of the biochemical analyses of the diseased brains and the cellular models suggest that different strains of TDP-43 with different conformations may determine the clinicopathological phenotypes of TDP-43 proteinopathy, like prion disease. Clarifying the mechanism of the conformational changes of TDP-43 leading to the formation of multiple abnormal strains may be important for differential diagnosis and developing disease-modifying therapy for TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:25196969

  19. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Linda E; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; Lee, Janet M; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Spindler, Tassja J; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8)), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10(-12)) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10(-13)). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10(-4), false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  20. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  1. A novel integrated cytogenetic and genomic classification refines risk stratification in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V; Enshaei, Amir; Schwab, Claire; Wade, Rachel; Chilton, Lucy; Elliott, Alannah; Richardson, Stacey; Hancock, Jeremy; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Christopher D; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Harrison, Christine J

    2014-08-28

    Recent genomic studies have provided a refined genetic map of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increased the number of potential prognostic markers. Therefore, we integrated copy-number alteration data from the 8 most commonly deleted genes, subordinately, with established chromosomal abnormalities to derive a 2-tier genetic classification. The classification was developed using 809 ALL97/99 patients and validated using 742 United Kingdom (UK)ALL2003 patients. Good-risk (GR) genetic features included ETV6-RUNX1, high hyperdiploidy, normal copy-number status for all 8 genes, isolated deletions affecting ETV6/PAX5/BTG1, and ETV6 deletions with a single additional deletion of BTG1/PAX5/CDKN2A/B. All other genetic features were classified as poor risk (PR). Three-quarters of UKALL2003 patients had a GR genetic profile and a significantly improved event-free survival (EFS) (94%) compared with patients with a PR genetic profile (79%). This difference was driven by a lower relapse rate (4% vs 17%), was seen across all patient subgroups, and was independent of other risk factors. Even genetic GR patients with minimal residual disease (>0.01%) at day 29 had an EFS in excess of 90%. In conclusion, the integration of genomic and cytogenetic data defines 2 subgroups with distinct responses to treatment and identifies a large subset of children suitable for treatment deintensification.

  2. RPA classification has prognostic significance for surgically resected single brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Liu, Stephanie W.; Barnett, Gene H.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Toms, Steven A.; Jin Tao; Suh, John H.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate prognostic factors that correlate with overall survival among patients with a surgically resected single brain metastasis. Methods and Materials: An Institutional Review Board-approved database of Cleveland Clinic Brain Tumor Institute was queried for patients with a single brain metastasis treated by surgical resection between February 1984 and January 2004. The primary endpoint was overall survival from the date of surgery by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 271 patients were included. Statistically significant variables for improved survival on multivariate analysis included age <65 years, lack of extracranial metastases, control of primary tumor, histology (non-small-cell lung carcinoma), and use of stereotactic radiosurgery. The median survival for all patients was 10.2 months. Survival of patients in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 1 was better (21.4 months) than those in RPA class 2 (9.0 months, p < 0.001), RPA class 3 (8.9 months, p = 0.15), or the combined group of RPA classes 2 and 3 (9.0 months, p < 0.001). Patients had a median survival of 10.6 months after documented gross total resection and 8.7 months after subtotal resection, which approached statistical significance (p 0.07). Those who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery had a median survival of 17.1 months, which was greater than patients who were not treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (8.9 months, p = 0.006). Conclusions: This analysis supports the prognostic significance of the RPA classification in patients with a single brain metastasis who undergo surgical resection and adjuvant therapy. RPA class 1 patients have a very favorable prognosis with a median survival of 21.4 months.

  3. A hazard and risk classification system for catastrophic rock slope failures in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, R.; Oppikofer, T.; Anda, E.; Blikra, L. H.; Böhme, M.; Bunkholt, H.; Dahle, H.; Devoli, G.; Eikenæs, O.; Fischer, L.; Harbitz, C. B.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Loew, S.; Yugsi Molina, F. X.

    2012-04-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway carries out systematic geologic mapping of potentially unstable rock slopes in Norway that can cause a catastrophic failure. As catastrophic failure we describe failures that involve substantial fragmentation of the rock mass during run-out and that impact an area larger than that of a rock fall (shadow angle of ca. 28-32° for rock falls). This includes therefore rock slope failures that lead to secondary effects, such as a displacement wave when impacting a water body or damming of a narrow valley. Our systematic mapping revealed more than 280 rock slopes with significant postglacial deformation, which might represent localities of large future rock slope failures. This large number necessitates prioritization of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic monitoring and permanent monitoring and early-warning. In the past hazard and risk were assessed qualitatively for some sites, however, in order to compare sites so that political and financial decisions can be taken, it was necessary to develop a quantitative hazard and risk classification system. A preliminary classification system was presented and discussed with an expert group of Norwegian and international experts and afterwards adapted following their recommendations. This contribution presents the concept of this final hazard and risk classification that should be used in Norway in the upcoming years. Historical experience and possible future rockslide scenarios in Norway indicate that hazard assessment of large rock slope failures must be scenario-based, because intensity of deformation and present displacement rates, as well as the geological structures activated by the sliding rock mass can vary significantly on a given slope. In addition, for each scenario the run-out of the rock mass has to be evaluated. This includes the secondary effects such as generation of displacement waves or landslide damming of valleys with the potential of later

  4. Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Renee Clary and James Wandersee describe the beginnings of "Classification," which lies at the very heart of science and depends upon pattern recognition. Clary and Wandersee approach patterns by first telling the story of the "Linnaean classification system," introduced by Carl Linnacus (1707-1778), who is…

  5. [Yeasts of the genus Malassezia: taxonomic classification and significance in (veterinary and) clinical medicine].

    PubMed

    Weiss, R; Raabe, P; Mayser, P

    2000-01-01

    The historical development of the taxonomic classification of Malassezia yeasts until today yielded the description of seven different species based upon molecularbiological, morphological and biochemical parameters (M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, M. slooffiae). Tests like Cremophor EL assimilation, esculin degradation, catalase test, pigment production and determination of polidocanol sensitivity appear to be suitable procedures for routine identification of the different species. Their colonization of clinically healthy humans (in particular M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa) and animals (M. pachydermatis) skin renders interpretation difficulties, when isolating Malassezia spp. from clinical specimens. Out of the seven species, in man the clinical significance of M. furfur for pityriasis versicolor and systemic infections appears to be accepted largely. In dogs and cats M. pachydermatis has been regarded as cause of otitis externa and seborrhoeic dermatitis. But, due to geno- and phenotypic variabilities described for M. pachydermatis field isolates further investigations concerning the taxonomic uniformity of the species are necessary. PMID:11098629

  6. Deriving statistical significance maps for SVM based image classification and group comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Population based pattern analysis and classification for quantifying structural and functional differences between diverse groups has been shown to be a powerful tool for the study of a number of diseases, and is quite commonly used especially in neuroimaging. The alternative to these pattern analysis methods, namely mass univariate methods such as voxel based analysis and all related methods, cannot detect multivariate patterns associated with group differences, and are not particularly suitable for developing individual-based diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. A commonly used pattern analysis tool is the support vector machine (SVM). Unlike univariate statistical frameworks for morphometry, analytical tools for statistical inference are unavailable for the SVM. In this paper, we show that null distributions ordinarily obtained by permutation tests using SVMs can be analytically approximated from the data. The analytical computation takes a small fraction of the time it takes to do an actual permutation test, thereby rendering it possible to quickly create statistical significance maps derived from SVMs. Such maps are critical for understanding imaging patterns of group differences and interpreting which anatomical regions are important in determining the classifier's decision.

  7. Methodology of the biological risk classification of animal pathogens in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van Vaerenbergh, B; Koenen, F; Pauwels, K; Quanten, K; Boyen, F; Declercq, K; Desmecht, D; Thiry, J; Herman, P

    2010-12-01

    Since many micro-organisms are a biological hazard, they have been categorised into risk groups by many countries and organisations and classification lists have been developed. Current classification systems rely on criteria defined by the World Health Organization, which cover the severity of the disease the micro-organism might cause, its ability to spread and the availability of prophylaxis or efficient treatment. Animal pathogens are classified according to the definitions of the World Organisation for Animal Health, which also consider economic aspects of disease. In Europe, classification is often directly linked to containment measures. The Belgian classification system, however, only considers the inherent characteristics of the micro-organism, not its use, making the risk classification independent of containment measures. A common classification list for human and animal pathogens has been developed in Belgium using as comprehensive an approach as possible. The evolution of scientific knowledge will demand regular updating of classification lists. This paper describes the Belgian risk classification system and the methodology that was used for its peer-reviewed revision (with a focus on animal pathogens).

  8. How significant is perceived environmental risk to business location decisions?

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, T.; Calzonetti, F.

    1996-12-31

    It has been argued that adverse perceptions of risk associated with high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) facilities will have significant impacts on the attraction of new, and the maintenance of existing business activities in areas in which adverse perceptions develop. We examine this proposition by the considering the importance of environmental amenities and a range of other factors to business location decisions using evidence from surveys of more than 400 manufacturing and business service establishments in Colorado and Utah. We show that the importance of environmental amenities varies according to a number of factors, in particular the type of product (manufactured product or business service), type of establishment (single-establishment firm or establishment of a multilocational firm) and establishment employment size. Policies designed to offset the loss of business activity that might result from adverse risk perceptions associated with HLNW facilities must therefore take into account how sensitive various forms of business activity present or likely to locate in any particular area might be to environmental factors.

  9. Incorporating Classification Uncertainty in Competing- risks Nest- failure Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nesting birds risk nest failure due to many causes. Though partitioning risk of failure among causes has long been of interest to ornithologists, formal methods for estimating competing risk have been lacking.

  10. Effect of Wound Classification on Risk-Adjustment in American College of Surgeons NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Mila H.; Cohen, Mark E.; Bilimoria, Karl Y.; Latus, Melissa S.; Scholl, Lisa M.; Schwab, Bradley J.; Byrd, Claudia M.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Hall, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical wound classification has been used in risk-adjustment models. However, it can be subjective and potentially improperly bias hospital quality comparisons. The objective is to examine the effect of wound classification on hospital performance risk-adjustment models. Study Design Retrospective review of the 2011 ACS NSQIP database was conducted for wound classification categories: clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. To assess the influence of wound classification on risk-adjustment, two models were developed for each outcome: one including and one excluding wound classification. For each model, hospital postoperative complications were estimated using hierarchical multivariable regression methods. Absolute changes in hospital rank, correlations of odds-ratios, and outlier status agreement between models were examined. Results Of the 442,149 cases performed in 315 hospitals: 53.6% were classified as clean; 34.2% clean/contaminated; 6.7% contaminated; and 5.5% dirty/infected. The surgical site infection (SSI) rate was highest in dirty/infected (8.5%) and lowest in clean (1.8%) cases. For overall SSI, the absolute change in risk-adjusted hospital performance rank between models including vs. excluding wound classification was minimal (mean 4.5 out of 315 positions). The correlations between odds ratios of the two performance models were nearly perfect (R=0.9976, P<0.0001), and outlier status agreement was excellent (Kappa=0.9508, P<0.0001). Similar findings were observed in models of subgroups of SSI and other postoperative outcomes. Conclusions In circumstances where alternate information is available for risk-adjustment, there appear to be minimal differences in performance models that include vs. exclude wound classification. Therefore, ACS NSQIP is critically evaluating the continued use of wound classification in hospital performance risk-adjustment models. PMID:25053222

  11. A hazard and risk classification system for catastrophic rock slope failures in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, R.; Oppikofer, T.; Anda, E.; Blikra, L. H.; Böhme, M.; Bunkholt, H.; Dahle, H.; Devoli, G.; Eikenæs, O.; Fischer, L.; Harbitz, C. B.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Loew, S.; Yugsi Molina, F. X.

    2012-04-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway carries out systematic geologic mapping of potentially unstable rock slopes in Norway that can cause a catastrophic failure. As catastrophic failure we describe failures that involve substantial fragmentation of the rock mass during run-out and that impact an area larger than that of a rock fall (shadow angle of ca. 28-32° for rock falls). This includes therefore rock slope failures that lead to secondary effects, such as a displacement wave when impacting a water body or damming of a narrow valley. Our systematic mapping revealed more than 280 rock slopes with significant postglacial deformation, which might represent localities of large future rock slope failures. This large number necessitates prioritization of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic monitoring and permanent monitoring and early-warning. In the past hazard and risk were assessed qualitatively for some sites, however, in order to compare sites so that political and financial decisions can be taken, it was necessary to develop a quantitative hazard and risk classification system. A preliminary classification system was presented and discussed with an expert group of Norwegian and international experts and afterwards adapted following their recommendations. This contribution presents the concept of this final hazard and risk classification that should be used in Norway in the upcoming years. Historical experience and possible future rockslide scenarios in Norway indicate that hazard assessment of large rock slope failures must be scenario-based, because intensity of deformation and present displacement rates, as well as the geological structures activated by the sliding rock mass can vary significantly on a given slope. In addition, for each scenario the run-out of the rock mass has to be evaluated. This includes the secondary effects such as generation of displacement waves or landslide damming of valleys with the potential of later

  12. A comprehensive laboratory-based program for classification of variants of uncertain significance in hereditary cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Eggington, J M; Bowles, K R; Moyes, K; Manley, S; Esterling, L; Sizemore, S; Rosenthal, E; Theisen, A; Saam, J; Arnell, C; Pruss, D; Bennett, J; Burbidge, L A; Roa, B; Wenstrup, R J

    2014-09-01

    Genetic testing has the potential to guide the prevention and treatment of disease in a variety of settings, and recent technical advances have greatly increased our ability to acquire large amounts of genetic data. The interpretation of this data remains challenging, as the clinical significance of genetic variation detected in the laboratory is not always clear. Although regulatory agencies and professional societies provide some guidance regarding the classification, reporting, and long-term follow-up of variants, few protocols for the implementation of these guidelines have been described. Because the primary aim of clinical testing is to provide results to inform medical management, a variant classification program that offers timely, accurate, confident and cost-effective interpretation of variants should be an integral component of the laboratory process. Here we describe the components of our laboratory's current variant classification program (VCP), based on 20 years of experience and over one million samples tested, using the BRCA1/2 genes as a model. Our VCP has lowered the percentage of tests in which one or more BRCA1/2 variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) are detected to 2.1% in the absence of a pathogenic mutation, demonstrating how the coordinated application of resources toward classification and reclassification significantly impacts the clinical utility of testing.

  13. The false classification of extinction risk in noisy environments

    PubMed Central

    Connors, B. M.; Cooper, A. B.; Peterman, R. M.; Dulvy, N. K.

    2014-01-01

    Abundance trends are the basis for many classifications of threat and recovery status, but they can be a challenge to interpret because of observation error, stochastic variation in abundance (process noise) and temporal autocorrelation in that process noise. To measure the frequency of incorrectly detecting a decline (false-positive or false alarm) and failing to detect a true decline (false-negative), we simulated stable and declining abundance time series across several magnitudes of observation error and autocorrelated process noise. We then empirically estimated the magnitude of observation error and autocorrelated process noise across a broad range of taxa and mapped these estimates onto the simulated parameter space. Based on the taxa we examined, at low classification thresholds (30% decline in abundance) and short observation windows (10 years), false alarms would be expected to occur, on average, about 40% of the time assuming density-independent dynamics, whereas false-negatives would be expected to occur about 60% of the time. However, false alarms and failures to detect true declines were reduced at higher classification thresholds (50% or 80% declines), longer observation windows (20, 40, 60 years), and assuming density-dependent dynamics. The lowest false-positive and false-negative rates are likely to occur for large-bodied, long-lived animal species. PMID:24898368

  14. A new pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-long

    2015-02-01

    Lumbar disc protrusion is common. Its clinical manifestations and treatments are closely related to the pathological changes; however, the pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion is controversial. This article introduces a new pathological classification comprising four types of lumbar disc protrusion according to intraoperative findings. The damage-herniation type is probably caused by injury and is characterized by soft herniation, the capsule can easily be cut and the broken disc tissue blocks overflow or is easily removed. The broken disc substances should be completely removed; satisfactory results can be achieved by minimally invasive endoscopic surgery. The degeneration-protrusion type is characterized by hard and tough protrusions and the pathological process by degeneration and proliferative reaction. The nerve should be decompressed and relaxed with minimally invasive removal of the posterior wall; the bulged or protruded disc often need not be excised. The posterior vertebral osteochondrosis with disc protrusion type is characterized by deformity of the posterior vertebral body, osteochondral nodules and intervertebral disc protrusion. The herniated and fragmented disc tissue should be removed with partially protruding osteochondral nodules. Intervertebral disc cyst is of uncertain pathogenesis and is characterized by a cyst that communicates with the disc. Resection of the cyst under microscopic or endoscopic control can achieve good results; and whether the affected disc needs to be simultaneously resected is controversial. The new pathological classification proposed here is will aid better understanding of pathological changes and pathogenesis of lumbar disc protrusion and provides a reference for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25708029

  15. Radiation risk from mammography: is it clinically significant

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    The observation of excess breast cancers among women exposed to high doses of radiation has led to speculation that a similar risk of smaller magnitude could result from the low doses of x-rays used in mammography. However, such risk is extremely small and seems negligible when compared with the potential benefit for mammographic screening performed according to the American Cancer Society and American College of Radiology Guidelines.

  16. Radiation risk from mammography: is it clinically significant

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    The observation of excess breast cancers among women exposed to high doses of radiation has led to speculation that a similar risk of smaller magnitude could result from the low doses of x-rays used in mammography. However, such risk is extremely small and seems negligible when compared with the potential benefit for mammographic screening performed according to the American Cancer Society and American College of Radiology guidelines.

  17. [Significance of changes in habits followed by risk reduction].

    PubMed

    Völler, H

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk is substantially influenced by changes in habits. In this context the INTERHEART study showed that a healthy vitamin-packed nutrition and regular workout reduced the cardiovascular risk up to 79%. In this case people older than 50 years would benefit most from change. Patients suffering from obesity should combine a low-calory diet with physical training in order to reduce weight. Here optimal results can be achieved by considering intensity as well as quantity for each patient.

  18. Credit Risk Evaluation Using a C-Variable Least Squares Support Vector Classification Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lean; Wang, Shouyang; Lai, K. K.

    Credit risk evaluation is one of the most important issues in financial risk management. In this paper, a C-variable least squares support vector classification (C-VLSSVC) model is proposed for credit risk analysis. The main idea of this model is based on the prior knowledge that different classes may have different importance for modeling and more weights should be given to those classes with more importance. The C-VLSSVC model can be constructed by a simple modification of the regularization parameter in LSSVC, whereby more weights are given to the lease squares classification errors with important classes than the lease squares classification errors with unimportant classes while keeping the regularized terms in its original form. For illustration purpose, a real-world credit dataset is used to test the effectiveness of the C-VLSSVC model.

  19. Food Classification Systems Based on Food Processing: Significance and Implications for Policies and Actions: A Systematic Literature Review and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Moubarac, Jean-Claude; Parra, Diana C; Cannon, Geoffrey; Monteiro, Carlos A

    2014-06-01

    This paper is the first to make a systematic review and assessment of the literature that attempts methodically to incorporate food processing into classification of diets. The review identified 1276 papers, of which 110 were screened and 21 studied, derived from five classification systems. This paper analyses and assesses the five systems, one of which has been devised and developed by a research team that includes co-authors of this paper. The quality of the five systems is assessed and scored according to how specific, coherent, clear, comprehensive and workable they are. Their relevance to food, nutrition and health, and their use in various settings, is described. The paper shows that the significance of industrial food processing in shaping global food systems and supplies and thus dietary patterns worldwide, and its role in the pandemic of overweight and obesity, remains overlooked and underestimated. Once food processing is systematically incorporated into food classifications, they will be more useful in assessing and monitoring dietary patterns. Food classification systems that emphasize industrial food processing, and that define and distinguish relevant different types of processing, will improve understanding of how to prevent and control overweight, obesity and related chronic non-communicable diseases, and also malnutrition. They will also be a firmer basis for rational policies and effective actions designed to protect and improve public health at all levels from global to local.

  20. A TEST OF WATERSHED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS FOR ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To facilitate extrapolation among watersheds, ecological risk assessments should be based on a model of underlying factors influencing watershed response, particularly vulnerability. We propose a conceptual model of landscape vulnerability to serve as a basis for watershed classi...

  1. Educational level and osteoporosis risk in postmenopausal Moroccan women: a classification tree analysis.

    PubMed

    Allali, Fadoua; Rostom, Samira; Bennani, Loubna; Abouqal, Redouane; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) to evaluate whether the prevalence of osteoporosis and peripheral fractures might be influenced by the educational level and (2) to develop a simple algorithm using a tree-based approach with education level and other easily collected clinical data that allow clinicians to classify women into varying levels of osteoporosis risk. A total number of 356 women with a mean age of 58.9±7.7 years were included in this study. Patients were separated into four groups according to school educational level; group 1, no education (n=98 patients); group 2, elementary level (n=57 patients); group 3, secondary level (n=138 patients) and group 4, university level (n=66 patients). We observed dose-response linear relations between educational level and mean bone mineral density (BMD). The mean BMDs of education group 1 (10.39% (lumbar spine), 10.8% (trochanter), 16.8% (wrist), and 8.8% (femoral neck)) were lower compared with those of group IV (p<0.05). Twelve percent of patient had peripheral fractures. The prevalence of peripheral fractures increased with lowered educational levels. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant independent increase in the risk of peripheral fracture in patients with no formal education (odds ratio, 5.68; 95% , 1.16-27.64) after adjustment for age, BMI and spine BMD. Using the classification tree, four predictors were identified as the most important determinant for osteoporosis risk: the level of education, physical activity, age>62 years and BMI<30 kg/m2. This algorithm correctly classified 74% of the women with osteoporosis. Based on the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves, the accuracy of the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) model was 0.79. Our findings suggested that a lower level of education was associated with significantly lower BMDs at the lumbar spine and the hip sites, and with higher prevalence of osteoporosis at these sites in a dose-response manner, even after

  2. A review of a multifactorial probability based model for classification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants of uncertain significance (VUS)

    PubMed Central

    Lindor, Noralane M.; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Vallée, Maxime P.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Tavtigian, Sean; Goldgar, David E.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical mutation screening of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the presence of germline inactivating mutations is used to identify individuals at elevated risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Variants identified during screening are usually classified as pathogenic (increased risk of cancer) or not pathogenic (no increased risk of cancer). However, a significant proportion of genetic tests yield variants of uncertain significance (VUS) that have undefined risk of cancer. Individuals carrying these VUS cannot benefit from individualized cancer risk assessment. Recently a quantitative “posterior probability model” for assessing the clinical relevance of VUS in BRCA1 or BRCA2 that integrates multiple forms of genetic evidence has been developed. Here we provide a detailed review of this model. We describe the components of the model and explain how these can be combined to calculate a posterior probability of pathogenicity for each VUS. We explain how the model can be applied to public data and provide Tables that list the VUS that have been classified as not pathogenic or pathogenic using this method. While we use BRCA1 and BRCA2 VUS as examples, the method can be used as a framework for classification of the pathogenicity of VUS in other cancer genes. PMID:21990134

  3. The ecology of prominences. [classification, morphology and significance to solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the roles of prominences in the solar scheme. Attention is given to classifications and the ways in which prominences exist: hydrostatic support, ballistic support, and magnetic support. In the case of ballistic support, surges are differentiated from sprays which involve the ejection of material that is already above the solar surface. Discussion also covers filimets and fibrils and the conditions for their appearance. It is proposed that most flares originate in prominence instabilities. In addition supergranulation is covered, noting the network is not seen on the boundary of unipolar regions. It is concluded that prominences play a critical role in flares and field reconnection, and the evolution of solar magnetic fields.

  4. Risk Classification with an Adaptive Naive Bayes Kernel Machine Model

    PubMed Central

    Minnier, Jessica; Yuan, Ming; Liu, Jun S.; Cai, Tianxi

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies of complex traits have uncovered only a small number of risk markers explaining a small fraction of heritability and adding little improvement to disease risk prediction. Standard single marker methods may lack power in selecting informative markers or estimating effects. Most existing methods also typically do not account for non-linearity. Identifying markers with weak signals and estimating their joint effects among many non-informative markers remains challenging. One potential approach is to group markers based on biological knowledge such as gene structure. If markers in a group tend to have similar effects, proper usage of the group structure could improve power and efficiency in estimation. We propose a two-stage method relating markers to disease risk by taking advantage of known gene-set structures. Imposing a naive bayes kernel machine (KM) model, we estimate gene-set specific risk models that relate each gene-set to the outcome in stage I. The KM framework efficiently models potentially non-linear effects of predictors without requiring explicit specification of functional forms. In stage II, we aggregate information across gene-sets via a regularization procedure. Estimation and computational efficiency is further improved with kernel principle component analysis. Asymptotic results for model estimation and gene set selection are derived and numerical studies suggest that the proposed procedure could outperform existing procedures for constructing genetic risk models. PMID:26236061

  5. Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2011-01-01

    A supervised learning task involves constructing a mapping from input data (normally described by several features) to the appropriate outputs. Within supervised learning, one type of task is a classification learning task, in which each output is one or more classes to which the input belongs. In supervised learning, a set of training examples---examples with known output values---is used by a learning algorithm to generate a model. This model is intended to approximate the mapping between the inputs and outputs. This model can be used to generate predicted outputs for inputs that have not been seen before. For example, we may have data consisting of observations of sunspots. In a classification learning task, our goal may be to learn to classify sunspots into one of several types. Each example may correspond to one candidate sunspot with various measurements or just an image. A learning algorithm would use the supplied examples to generate a model that approximates the mapping between each supplied set of measurements and the type of sunspot. This model can then be used to classify previously unseen sunspots based on the candidate's measurements. This chapter discusses methods to perform machine learning, with examples involving astronomy.

  6. Coronary Risk Assessment by Point-Based vs. Equation-Based Framingham Models: Significant Implications for Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, William J.; Polansky, Jesse M.; John Boscardin, W.; Fung, Kathy Z.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND US cholesterol guidelines use original and simplified versions of the Framingham model to estimate future coronary risk and thereby classify patients into risk groups with different treatment strategies. We sought to compare risk estimates and risk group classification generated by the original, complex Framingham model and the simplified, point-based version. METHODS We assessed 2,543 subjects age 20–79 from the 2001–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) for whom Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) guidelines recommend formal risk stratification. For each subject, we calculated the 10-year risk of major coronary events using the original and point-based Framingham models, and then compared differences in these risk estimates and whether these differences would place subjects into different ATP-III risk groups (<10% risk, 10–20% risk, or >20% risk). Using standard procedures, all analyses were adjusted for survey weights, clustering, and stratification to make our results nationally representative. RESULTS Among 39 million eligible adults, the original Framingham model categorized 71% of subjects as having “moderate” risk (<10% risk of a major coronary event in the next 10 years), 22% as having “moderately high” (10–20%) risk, and 7% as having “high” (>20%) risk. Estimates of coronary risk by the original and point-based models often differed substantially. The point-based system classified 15% of adults (5.7 million) into different risk groups than the original model, with 10% (3.9 million) misclassified into higher risk groups and 5% (1.8 million) into lower risk groups, for a net impact of classifying 2.1 million adults into higher risk groups. These risk group misclassifications would impact guideline-recommended drug treatment strategies for 25–46% of affected subjects. Patterns of misclassifications varied significantly by gender, age, and underlying CHD risk. CONCLUSIONS Compared to the original

  7. Educational Environment Risks: Problems of Identification and Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayumova, Leysan R.; Zakirova, Venera G.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem is determined by the multidimensionality of educational environment, that is the system of business and interpersonal relationships of educational process subjects. The maintenance of these relations defines quality and nature of risks for teachers and their pupils. The article aims to identify and justify the…

  8. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  9. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  10. Classification of debtor credit status and determination amount of credit risk by using linier discriminant function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidi, Muhammad Nur; Sari, Resty Indah

    2012-05-01

    A decision of credit that given by bank or another creditur must have a risk and it called credit risk. Credit risk is an investor's risk of loss arising from a borrower who does not make payments as promised. The substantial of credit risk can lead to losses for the banks and the debtor. To minimize this problem need a further study to identify a potential new customer before the decision given. Identification of debtor can using various approaches analysis, one of them is by using discriminant analysis. Discriminant analysis in this study are used to classify whether belonging to the debtor's good credit or bad credit. The result of this study are two discriminant functions that can identify new debtor. Before step built the discriminant function, selection of explanatory variables should be done. Purpose of selection independent variable is to choose the variable that can discriminate the group maximally. Selection variables in this study using different test, for categoric variable selection of variable using proportion chi-square test, and stepwise discriminant for numeric variable. The result of this study are two discriminant functions that can identify new debtor. The selected variables that can discriminating two groups of debtor maximally are status of existing checking account, credit history, credit amount, installment rate in percentage of disposable income, sex, age in year, other installment plans, and number of people being liable to provide maintenance. This classification produce a classification accuracy rate is good enough, that is equal to 74,70%. Debtor classification using discriminant analysis has risk level that is small enough, and it ranged beetwen 14,992% and 17,608%. Based on that credit risk rate, using discriminant analysis on the classification of credit status can be used effectively.

  11. Nonparametric estimation and classification using radial basis function nets and empirical risk minimization.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, A; Linder, T; Lugosi, C

    1996-01-01

    Studies convergence properties of radial basis function (RBF) networks for a large class of basis functions, and reviews the methods and results related to this topic. The authors obtain the network parameters through empirical risk minimization. The authors show the optimal nets to be consistent in the problem of nonlinear function approximation and in nonparametric classification. For the classification problem the authors consider two approaches: the selection of the RBF classifier via nonlinear function estimation and the direct method of minimizing the empirical error probability. The tools used in the analysis include distribution-free nonasymptotic probability inequalities and covering numbers for classes of functions.

  12. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalchik, Kristin V.; Vallow, Laura A.; McDonough, Michelle; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Peterson, Jennifer L.; Adkisson, Cameron D.; Serago, Christopher; McLaughlin, Sarah A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  13. Pharmacology of Ultrasonic Vocalizations in adult Rats: Significance, Call Classification and Neural Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological studies of emotional arousal and initiation of emotional states in rats measured by their ultrasonic vocalizations are reviewed. It is postulated that emission of vocalizations is an inseparable feature of emotional states and it evolved from mother-infant interaction. Positive emotional states are associated with emission of 50 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by rewarding situations and dopaminergic activation of the nucleus accumbens and are mediated by D1, D2, and partially D3 dopamine receptors. Three biologically significant subtypes of 50 kHz vocalizations have been identified, all expressing positive emotional states: (1) flat calls without frequency modulation that serve as contact calls during social interactions; (2) frequencymodulated calls without trills that signal rewarding and significantly motivated situation; and (3) frequency-modulated calls with trills or trills themselves that are emitted in highly emotional situations associated with intensive affective state. Negative emotional states are associated with emission of 22 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by aversive situations, muscarinic cholinergic activation of limbic areas of medial diencephalon and forebrain, and are mediated by M2 muscarinic receptors. Two biologically significant subtypes of 22 kHz vocalizations have been identified, both expressing negative emotional sates: (1) long calls that serve as alarm calls and signal external danger; and (2) short calls that express a state of discomfort without external danger. The positive and negative states with emission of vocalizations are initiated by two ascending reticular activating subsystems: the mesolimbic dopaminergic subsystem as a specific positive arousal system, and the mesolimbic cholinergic subsystem as a specific negative arousal system. PMID:26411761

  14. Pharmacology of Ultrasonic Vocalizations in adult Rats: Significance, Call Classification and Neural Substrate.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological studies of emotional arousal and initiation of emotional states in rats measured by their ultrasonic vocalizations are reviewed. It is postulated that emission of vocalizations is an inseparable feature of emotional states and it evolved from mother-infant interaction. Positive emotional states are associated with emission of 50 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by rewarding situations and dopaminergic activation of the nucleus accumbens and are mediated by D1, D2, and partially D3 dopamine receptors. Three biologically significant subtypes of 50 kHz vocalizations have been identified, all expressing positive emotional states: (1) flat calls without frequency modulation that serve as contact calls during social interactions; (2) frequencymodulated calls without trills that signal rewarding and significantly motivated situation; and (3) frequency-modulated calls with trills or trills themselves that are emitted in highly emotional situations associated with intensive affective state. Negative emotional states are associated with emission of 22 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by aversive situations, muscarinic cholinergic activation of limbic areas of medial diencephalon and forebrain, and are mediated by M2 muscarinic receptors. Two biologically significant subtypes of 22 kHz vocalizations have been identified, both expressing negative emotional sates: (1) long calls that serve as alarm calls and signal external danger; and (2) short calls that express a state of discomfort without external danger. The positive and negative states with emission of vocalizations are initiated by two ascending reticular activating subsystems: the mesolimbic dopaminergic subsystem as a specific positive arousal system, and the mesolimbic cholinergic subsystem as a specific negative arousal system.

  15. Measurement of ECG abnormalities and cardiovascular risk classification: a cohort study of primary care patients in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Groot, Anne; Bots, Michiel L; Rutten, Frans H; den Ruijter, Hester M; Numans, Mattijs E; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2015-01-01

    Background GPs need accurate tools for cardiovascular (CV) risk assessment. Abnormalities in resting electrocardiograms (ECGs) relate to increased CV risk. Aim To determine whether measurement of ECG abnormalities on top of established risk estimation (SCORE) improves CV risk classification in a primary care population. Design and setting A cohort study of patients enlisted with academic general practices in the Netherlands (the Utrecht Health Project [UHP]). Method Incident CV events were extracted from the GP records. MEANS algorithm was used to assess ECG abnormalities. Cox proportional hazards modelling was applied to relate ECG abnormalities to CV events. For a prediction model only with SCORE variables, and a model with SCORE+ECG abnormalities, the discriminative value (area under the receiver operator curve [AUC]) and the net reclassification improvement (NRI) were estimated. Results A total of 2370 participants aged 38–74 years were included, all eligible for CV risk assessment. During a mean follow-up of 7.8 years, 172 CV events occurred. In 19% of the participants at least one ECG abnormality was found (Lausanne criteria). Presence of atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF) and myocardial infarction (MI) were significantly related to CV events. The AUC of the SCORE risk factors was 0.75 (95% CI = 0.71 to 0.79). Addition of MI or AF resulted in an AUC of 0.76 (95% CI = 0.72 to 0.79) and 0.75 (95% CI = 0.72 to 0.79), respectively. The NRI with the addition of ECG abnormalities was small (MI 1.0%; 95% CI = −3.2% to 6.9%; AF 0.5%; 95% CI = −3.5% to 3.3%). Conclusion Performing a resting ECG in a primary care population does not seem to improve risk classification when SCORE information — age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol/HDL ratio — is already available. PMID:25548311

  16. Chronic inflammation of the placenta: definition, classification, pathogenesis, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Kim, Jung-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory lesions of the placenta are characterized by the infiltration of the organ by lymphocytes, plasma cells, and/or macrophages and may result from infections (viral, bacterial, parasitic) or be of immune origin (maternal anti-fetal rejection). The 3 major lesions are villitis (when the inflammatory process affects the villous tree), chronic chorioamnionitis (which affects the chorioamniotic membranes), and chronic deciduitis (which involves the decidua basalis). Maternal cellular infiltration is a common feature of the lesions. Villitis of unknown etiology (VUE) is a destructive villous inflammatory lesion that is characterized by the infiltration of maternal T cells (CD8+ cytotoxic T cells) into chorionic villi. Migration of maternal T cells into the villi is driven by the production of T-cell chemokines in the affected villi. Activation of macrophages in the villi has been implicated in the destruction of the villous architecture. VUE has been reported in association with preterm and term fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia, fetal death, and preterm labor. Infants whose placentas have VUE are at risk for death and abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome at the age of 2 years. Chronic chorioamnionitis is the most common lesion in late spontaneous preterm birth and is characterized by the infiltration of maternal CD8+ T cells into the chorioamniotic membranes. These cytotoxic T cells can induce trophoblast apoptosis and damage the fetal membranes. The lesion frequently is accompanied by VUE. Chronic deciduitis consists of the presence of lymphocytes or plasma cells in the basal plate of the placenta. This lesion is more common in pregnancies that result from egg donation and has been reported in a subset of patients with premature labor. Chronic placental inflammatory lesions can be due to maternal anti-fetal rejection, a process associated with the development of a novel form of fetal systemic inflammatory response. The syndrome is characterized

  17. [Identification of the main risk factors for non infectious diseases: method of classification trees].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, E D; Varaksin, A N; Zhovner, I V

    2013-01-01

    There is presented ideology of the application of one of the methods for assessment of the influence of multi-factor influence of risk factors on population health--the method of classification trees. The method of classification trees is a hierarchical procedure for constructing a decision rule that allows to divide the population into groups with higher and lower morbidity "in the coordinates of" risk factors. The main advantage of the method--the possibility of finding the complex of risk factors having the greatest impact on the health of the population (in contrast to common methods, analyzing only the single-factor effects). In the paper there are presented two possible variants of application of classification trees: 1) the finding of the complex of environmental risk factors (RF), which provides the maximum impact on the prevalence of non infectious diseases in preschool children) in Yekaterinburg (environmental risk factors--the pollution of air drinking water, in the presence of a gas stove in the child's flat, etc.). It is shown that, together with socio-economic risk factors environmental risk factors increase the prevalence of respiratory diseases in preschool children in Ekaterinburg in 2.5-4 times (depending on the list and the number of environmental RF), 2) finding the complex of non-environmental factors that most effectively compensating the negative effect of environmental pollution on human health. This posing of the problem is associated with the fact that pollution environmental factors are (usually) unmodified, while family, behavioral or social factors can be partially or completely eliminated Implementation of the recommendations presented in the paper can reduce the incidence of circulatory diseases in preschool children in Yekaterinburg more than 2 times.

  18. Classification method for disease risk mapping based on discrete hidden Markov random fields.

    PubMed

    Charras-Garrido, Myriam; Abrial, David; Goër, Jocelyn De; Dachian, Sergueï; Peyrard, Nathalie

    2012-04-01

    Risk mapping in epidemiology enables areas with a low or high risk of disease contamination to be localized and provides a measure of risk differences between these regions. Risk mapping models for pooled data currently used by epidemiologists focus on the estimated risk for each geographical unit. They are based on a Poisson log-linear mixed model with a latent intrinsic continuous hidden Markov random field (HMRF) generally corresponding to a Gaussian autoregressive spatial smoothing. Risk classification, which is necessary to draw clearly delimited risk zones (in which protection measures may be applied), generally must be performed separately. We propose a method for direct classified risk mapping based on a Poisson log-linear mixed model with a latent discrete HMRF. The discrete hidden field (HF) corresponds to the assignment of each spatial unit to a risk class. The risk values attached to the classes are parameters and are estimated. When mapping risk using HMRFs, the conditional distribution of the observed field is modeled with a Poisson rather than a Gaussian distribution as in image segmentation. Moreover, abrupt changes in risk levels are rare in disease maps. The spatial hidden model should favor smoothed out risks, but conventional discrete Markov random fields (e.g. the Potts model) do not impose this. We therefore propose new potential functions for the HF that take into account class ordering. We use a Monte Carlo version of the expectation-maximization algorithm to estimate parameters and determine risk classes. We illustrate the method's behavior on simulated and real data sets. Our method appears particularly well adapted to localize high-risk regions and estimate the corresponding risk levels.

  19. Biological meaning, statistical significance, and classification of local spatial similarities in nonhomologous proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, N. N.; Go, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have completed an exhaustive search for the common spatial arrangements of backbone fragments (SARFs) in nonhomologous proteins. This type of local structural similarity, incorporating short fragments of backbone atoms, arranged not necessarily in the same order along the polypeptide chain, appears to be important for protein function and stability. To estimate the statistical significance of the similarities, we have introduced a similarity score. We present several locally similar structures, with a large similarity score, which have not yet been reported. On the basis of the results of pairwise comparison, we have performed hierarchical cluster analysis of protein structures. Our analysis is not limited by comparison of single chains but also includes complex molecules consisting of several subunits. The SARFs with backbone fragments from different polypeptide chains provide a stable interaction between subunits in protein molecules. In many cases the active site of enzyme is located at the same position relative to the common SARFs, implying a function of the certain SARFs as a universal interface of the protein-substrate interaction. PMID:8069217

  20. A risk classification for immunosuppressive treatment-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2015-12-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare, complex opportunistic infection of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus. This past decade, PML was increasingly recognized to be associated with the use of immunosuppressive and biologic agents. The risk for PML differs among these agents and remains difficult to quantify because of the complex pathogenesis of PML and the presence of confounding factors. This paper explores and updates the association of PML with different biologic and immunosuppressive agents and proposes an expanded classification system for the risk of PML. We identify three classes of drug that vary by PML risk, latency to infection, and underlying illness. We also review some of the most common agents with known associations to PML and explore risk mitigation strategies that aim to inform the decision-making process for clinicians and patients in the face of the changing incidence of PML and the growing landscape of immunologic agents.

  1. Dimension Reduction via Unsupervised Learning Yields Significant Computational Improvements for Support Vector Machine Based Protein Family Classification.

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2009-02-26

    Reducing the dimension of vectors used in training support vector machines (SVMs) results in a proportional speedup in training time. For large-scale problems this can make the difference between tractable and intractable training tasks. However, it is critical that classifiers trained on reduced datasets perform as reliably as their counterparts trained on high-dimensional data. We assessed principal component analysis (PCA) and sequential project pursuit (SPP) as dimension reduction strategies in the biology application of classifying proteins into well-defined functional ‘families’ (SVM-based protein family classification) by their impact on run-time, sensitivity and selectivity. Homology vectors of 4352 elements were reduced to approximately 2% of the original data size without significantly affecting accuracy using PCA and SPP, while leading to approximately a 28-fold speedup in run-time.

  2. Rock slope instabilities in Norway: First systematic hazard and risk classification of 22 unstable rock slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Martina; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Oppikofer, Thierry; Penna, Ivanna

    2016-04-01

    Unstable rock slopes that can cause large failures of the rock-avalanche type have been mapped in Norway for almost two decades. Four sites have earlier been characterized as high-risk objects based on expertise of few researchers. This resulted in installing continuous monitoring systems and set-up of an early-warning system for those four sites. Other unstable rock slopes have not been ranked related to their hazard or risk. There are ca. 300 other sites known of which 70 sites were installed for periodic deformation measurements using multiple techniques (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, extensometers, measurement bolts, and others). In 2012 a systematic hazard and risk classification system for unstable rock slopes was established in Norway and the mapping approach adapted to that in 2013. Now, the first 22 sites were classified for hazard, consequences and risk using this classification system. The selection of the first group of sites to be classified was based on an assumed high hazard or risk and importance given to the sites by Norwegian media and the public. Nine of the classified 22 unstable rock slopes are large sites that deform inhomogeneously or are strongly broken up in individual blocks. This suggests that different failure scenarios are possible that need to be analyzed individually. A total of 35 failure scenarios for those nine unstable rock slopes were considered. The hazard analyses were based on 9 geological parameters defined in the classification system. The classification system will be presented based on the Gamanjunni unstable rock slope. This slope has a well developed back scarp that exposes 150 m preceding displacement. The lateral limits of the unstable slope are clearly visible in the morphology and InSAR displacement data. There have been no single structures observed that allow sliding kinematically. The lower extend of the displacing rock mass is clearly defined in InSAR data and by a zone of higher rock fall activity. Yearly

  3. Adding carotid total plaque area to the Framingham risk score improves cardiovascular risk classification

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Hernan A.; Spence, John David; Armando, Luis J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular events (CE) due to atherosclerosis are preventable. Identification of high-risk patients helps to focus resources on those most likely to benefit from expensive therapy. Atherosclerosis is not considered for patient risk categorization, even though a fraction of CE are predicted by Framingham risk factors. Our objective was to assess the incremental value of combining total plaque area (TPA) with the Framingham risk score (FramSc) using post-test probability (Ptp) in order to categorize risk in patients without CE and identify those at high risk and requiring intensive treatment. Material and methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in the primary care setting in an Argentine population aged 22–90 years without CE. Both FramSc based on body mass index and Ptp-TPA were employed in 2035 patients for risk stratification and the resulting reclassification was compared. Total plaque area was measured with a high-resolution duplex ultrasound scanner. Results 57% male, 35% hypertensive, 27% hypercholesterolemia, 14% diabetes. 20.1% were low, 28.5% moderate, and 51.5% high risk. When patients were reclassified, 36% of them changed status; 24.1% migrated to a higher and 13.6% to a lower risk level (κ index = 0.360, SE κ = 0.16, p < 0.05, FramSc vs. Ptp-TPA). With this reclassification, 19.3% were low, 18.9% moderate and 61.8% high risk. Conclusions Quantification of Ptp-TPA leads to higher risk estimation than FramSc, suggesting that Ptp-TPA may be more sensitive than FramSc as a screening tool. If our observation is confirmed with a prospective study, this reclassification would improve the long-term benefits related to CE prevention. PMID:27279842

  4. Application of classification methods in assessment of NATO member countries' economic, security and political risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odehnal, Jakub

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to attempt possible quantification of determinants of military expenditure and their application to current NATO member countries. To analyse the economic, security and political risks of NATO member countries, author employ multivariate statistical techniques which take into consideration the multivariate properties of the data sets used as input variables. Classification of countries based on cluster analysis has made it possible to identify disparities between NATO member countries, and thus to describe diverse economic or security environment affecting the amount of military expenditure as a percentage of the respective countries' gross domestic product.

  5. Classification-based data mining for identification of risk patterns associated with hypertension in Middle Eastern population

    PubMed Central

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Kabir, Ali; Pournik, Omid; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a critical public health concern worldwide. Identification of risk factors using traditional multivariable models has been a field of active research. The present study was undertaken to identify risk patterns associated with hypertension incidence using data mining methods in a cohort of Iranian adult population. Data on 6205 participants (44% men) age > 20 years, free from hypertension at baseline with no history of cardiovascular disease, were used to develop a series of prediction models by 3 types of decision tree (DT) algorithms. The performances of all classifiers were evaluated on the testing data set. The Quick Unbiased Efficient Statistical Tree algorithm among men and women and Classification and Regression Tree among the total population had the best performance. The C-statistic and sensitivity for the prediction models were (0.70 and 71%) in men, (0.79 and 71%) in women, and (0.78 and 72%) in total population, respectively. In DT models, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, age, and waist circumference significantly contributed to the risk of incident hypertension in both genders and total population, wrist circumference and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose among women and fasting plasma glucose among men. In men, the highest hypertension risk was seen in those with SBP > 115 mm Hg and age > 30 years. In women those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 33 years had the highest risk for hypertension. For the total population, higher risk was observed in those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 38 years. Our study emphasizes the utility of DTs for prediction of hypertension and exploring interaction between predictors. DT models used the easily available variables to identify homogeneous subgroups with different risk pattern for the hypertension. PMID:27583845

  6. Transmission tower classification based on landslide risk map generated by Geographical Information System (GIS) at Cameron Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Hazwani N.; O, Rohayu C.; U, Fathoni; Baharuddin, Inz

    2013-06-01

    Transmission tower is usually locates at remote area which is covered by hilly topography. Landslide is mainly occurring at hilly area and causing failure to the tower structure. This phenomenon subsequently will affect the national electricity supply. A landslide risk hazard map is generated using Geographical Information System (GIS). Risk classification is introduced to initiate the monitoring process along Jor-Bintang transmission line, Cameron Highland, Pahang. The classification has been divided into three categories, which are low, medium and high. This method can be applied in slope monitoring activities since all towers have been classified based on their risk level. Therefore, maintenance schedule can be planned smoothly and efficiently.

  7. Transmission tower classification based on landslide risk Map generated by Geographical Information System (GIS) at Cameron Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Hazwani N.; O, Rohayu C.; U, Fathoni; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; A, Azwin Z.

    2013-06-01

    Transmission tower is usually locates at remote area which is covered by hilly topography. Landslide is mainly occurring at hilly area and causing failure to the tower structure. This phenomenon subsequently will affect the national electricity supply. A landslide risk hazard map is generated using Geographical Information System (GIS). Risk classification is introduced to initiate the monitoring process along Jor-Bintang transmission line, Cameron Highland, Pahang. The classification has been divided into three categories, which are low, medium and high. This method can be applied in slope monitoring activities since all towers have been classified based on their risk level. Therefore, maintenance schedule can be planned smoothly and efficiently.

  8. Classification of worldwide bovine tuberculosis risk factors in cattle: a stratified approach

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Marie-France; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Saegerman, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The worldwide status of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) as a zoonosis remains of great concern. This article reviews the main risk factors for bTB in cattle based on a three-level classification: animal, herd and region/country level. A distinction is also made, whenever possible, between situations in developed and developing countries as the difference of context might have consequences in terms of risk of bTB. Recommendations are suggested to animal health professionals and scientists directly involved in the control and prevention of bTB in cattle. The determination of Millenium Development Goals for bTB is proposed to improve the control/eradication of the disease worldwide. PMID:19497258

  9. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Matthew E.; Keisler, Jeffrey M.; Zussblatt, Niels P.; Plourde, Kenton J.; Wender, Ben A.; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis—methods commonly applied in financial and operations management—to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios—combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results.

  10. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Keisler, Jeffrey M; Zussblatt, Niels P; Plourde, Kenton J; Wender, Ben A; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis-methods commonly applied in financial and operations management-to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios-combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results.

  11. Proposal for a new risk stratification classification for meningioma based on patient age, WHO tumor grade, size, localization, and karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia Henriques; Sousa, Pablo; Otero, Álvaro; Gonçalves, Jesus Maria; Ruiz, Laura; de Oliveira, Catarina; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, Maria Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor recurrence remains the major clinical complication of meningiomas, the majority of recurrences occurring among WHO grade I/benign tumors. In the present study, we propose a new scoring system for the prognostic stratification of meningioma patients based on analysis of a large series of meningiomas followed for a median of >5 years. Methods Tumor cytogenetics were systematically investigated by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in 302 meningioma samples, and the proposed classification was further validated in an independent series of cases (n = 132) analyzed by high-density (500K) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Results Overall, we found an adverse impact on patient relapse-free survival (RFS) for males, presence of brain edema, younger patients (<55 years), tumor size >50 mm, tumor localization at intraventricular and anterior cranial base areas, WHO grade II/III meningiomas, and complex karyotypes; the latter 5 variables showed an independent predictive value in multivariate analysis. Based on these parameters, a prognostic score was established for each individual case, and patients were stratified into 4 risk categories with significantly different (P < .001) outcomes. These included a good prognosis group, consisting of approximately 20% of cases, that showed a RFS of 100% ± 0% at 10 years and a very poor-prognosis group with a RFS rate of 0% ± 0% at 10 years. The prognostic impact of the scoring system proposed here was also retained when WHO grade I cases were considered separately (P < .001). Conclusions Based on this risk-stratification classification, different strategies may be adopted for follow-up, and eventually also for treatment, of meningioma patients at different risks for relapse. PMID:24536048

  12. Precursor Analysis for Flight- and Ground-Based Anomaly Risk Significance Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the precursor analysis for flight and ground based anomaly risk significance. It includes information on accident precursor analysis, real models vs. models, and probabilistic analysis.

  13. Application of classification algorithms for analysis of road safety risk factor dependencies.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Hoon; Rhee, Wonjong; Yoon, Yoonjin

    2015-02-01

    Transportation continues to be an integral part of modern life, and the importance of road traffic safety cannot be overstated. Consequently, recent road traffic safety studies have focused on analysis of risk factors that impact fatality and injury level (severity) of traffic accidents. While some of the risk factors, such as drug use and drinking, are widely known to affect severity, an accurate modeling of their influences is still an open research topic. Furthermore, there are innumerable risk factors that are waiting to be discovered or analyzed. A promising approach is to investigate historical traffic accident data that have been collected in the past decades. This study inspects traffic accident reports that have been accumulated by the California Highway Patrol (CHP) since 1973 for which each accident report contains around 100 data fields. Among them, we investigate 25 fields between 2004 and 2010 that are most relevant to car accidents. Using two classification methods, the Naive Bayes classifier and the decision tree classifier, the relative importance of the data fields, i.e., risk factors, is revealed with respect to the resulting severity level. Performances of the classifiers are compared to each other and a binary logistic regression model is used as the basis for the comparisons. Some of the high-ranking risk factors are found to be strongly dependent on each other, and their incremental gains on estimating or modeling severity level are evaluated quantitatively. The analysis shows that only a handful of the risk factors in the data dominate the severity level and that dependency among the top risk factors is an imperative trait to consider for an accurate analysis.

  14. [Calcium pros and cons significance and risk of phosphorus supplementation. The risk of dietary phosphorus intake].

    PubMed

    Ohi, Akiko; Nomura, Kengo; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2011-12-01

    Dietary intake of phosphorus (Pi) is an important determinant of Pi balance in patients who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a reduced GFR. High dietary Pi burden may promote vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Recently, Ohnishi and Razzaque suggest that phosphate toxicity accelerates the mammalian aging process and that reducing the phosphate burden can delay the aging (FASEB J 24, 3562, 2010) . Dietary Pi is derived largely from foods with high protein content or food additives. Accurate information on the Pi content of foods is needed to achieve a low Pi intake and effectively manage CKD and the aging. In this review, we discuss the risk of dietary Pi intake in CKD and the aging.

  15. Classification of Kidney Transplant Recipients Using a Combination of Estimated GFR and Albuminuria Reflects Risk

    PubMed Central

    White, Christine A.; Akbari, Ayub; Talreja, Hari; Lalani, Neha; Knoll, Greg A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2012 Kidney Dialysis Initiative Global Outcomes chronic kidney disease (CKD) classification scheme subdivides stage 3 CKD and incorporates the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the novel scheme provides graded risk in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). Methods Prevalent KTRs with available laboratory data were included. The primary outcome was a composite of doubling of serum creatinine, graft failure, or death. Patients were stratified using the CKD-Epidemiolgic Collaboration equation, and ACR and the event rate per 1000 patient-years in each CKD category were calculated. Results There were 269 KTRs with a mean follow-up of 4.5 ± 2.0 years. There was a graded increase in outcomes with increasing ACR and decreasing estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). For the primary outcome, the event rate was 15.3 (95% confidence interval, 4.2-39.2) per 1000 patient-years for those with an eGFR greater than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and an ACR less than 30 mg/g, whereas it was 375 (95% confidence interval, 193.8-655.1) for those with an eGFR less than 30 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and an ACR greater than 300 mg/g. Conclusions The novel Kidney Dialysis Initiative Global Outcomes classification scheme provides graded risk for important clinical events in KTRs. This information can be used to identify high-risk patients and to tailor follow-up and management strategies aimed at improving outcomes.

  16. Risk-Aware Planetary Rover Operation: Autonomous Terrain Classification and Path Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Fuchs, Thoams J.; Steffy, Amanda; Maimone, Mark; Yen, Jeng

    2015-01-01

    Identifying and avoiding terrain hazards (e.g., soft soil and pointy embedded rocks) are crucial for the safety of planetary rovers. This paper presents a newly developed groundbased Mars rover operation tool that mitigates risks from terrain by automatically identifying hazards on the terrain, evaluating their risks, and suggesting operators safe paths options that avoids potential risks while achieving specified goals. The tool will bring benefits to rover operations by reducing operation cost, by reducing cognitive load of rover operators, by preventing human errors, and most importantly, by significantly reducing the risk of the loss of rovers.

  17. Carfilzomib significantly improves the progression-free survival of high-risk patients in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Rafael; Siegel, David; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Špička, Ivan; Masszi, Tamás; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Mihaylov, Georgi; Maisnar, Vladimír; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Wang, Michael; Niesvizky, Ruben; Oriol, Albert; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Minarik, Jiri; Palumbo, Antonio; Bensinger, William; Kukreti, Vishal; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stewart, A. Keith; Obreja, Mihaela; Moreau, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The presence of certain high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities, such as translocations (4;14) and (14;16) and deletion (17p), are known to have a negative impact on survival in multiple myeloma (MM). The phase 3 study ASPIRE (N = 792) demonstrated that progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly improved with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd), compared with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd) in relapsed MM. This preplanned subgroup analysis of ASPIRE was conducted to evaluate KRd vs Rd by baseline cytogenetics according to fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 417 patients with known cytogenetic risk status, 100 patients (24%) were categorized with high-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 48; Rd, n = 52) and 317 (76%) were categorized with standard-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 147; Rd, n = 170). For patients with high-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd resulted in a median PFS of 23.1 months, a 9-month improvement relative to treatment with Rd. For patients with standard-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd led to a 10-month improvement in median PFS vs Rd. The overall response rates for KRd vs Rd were 79.2% vs 59.6% (high-risk cytogenetics) and 91.2% vs 73.5% (standard-risk cytogenetics); approximately fivefold as many patients with high- or standard-risk cytogenetics achieved a complete response or better with KRd vs Rd (29.2% vs 5.8% and 38.1% vs 6.5%, respectively). KRd improved but did not abrogate the poor prognosis associated with high-risk cytogenetics. This regimen had a favorable benefit-risk profile in patients with relapsed MM, irrespective of cytogenetic risk status, and should be considered a standard of care in these patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01080391. PMID:27439911

  18. Carfilzomib significantly improves the progression-free survival of high-risk patients in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Fonseca, Rafael; Siegel, David; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Špička, Ivan; Masszi, Tamás; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Mihaylov, Georgi; Maisnar, Vladimír; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Wang, Michael; Niesvizky, Ruben; Oriol, Albert; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Minarik, Jiri; Palumbo, Antonio; Bensinger, William; Kukreti, Vishal; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stewart, A Keith; Obreja, Mihaela; Moreau, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The presence of certain high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities, such as translocations (4;14) and (14;16) and deletion (17p), are known to have a negative impact on survival in multiple myeloma (MM). The phase 3 study ASPIRE (N = 792) demonstrated that progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly improved with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd), compared with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd) in relapsed MM. This preplanned subgroup analysis of ASPIRE was conducted to evaluate KRd vs Rd by baseline cytogenetics according to fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 417 patients with known cytogenetic risk status, 100 patients (24%) were categorized with high-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 48; Rd, n = 52) and 317 (76%) were categorized with standard-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 147; Rd, n = 170). For patients with high-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd resulted in a median PFS of 23.1 months, a 9-month improvement relative to treatment with Rd. For patients with standard-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd led to a 10-month improvement in median PFS vs Rd. The overall response rates for KRd vs Rd were 79.2% vs 59.6% (high-risk cytogenetics) and 91.2% vs 73.5% (standard-risk cytogenetics); approximately fivefold as many patients with high- or standard-risk cytogenetics achieved a complete response or better with KRd vs Rd (29.2% vs 5.8% and 38.1% vs 6.5%, respectively). KRd improved but did not abrogate the poor prognosis associated with high-risk cytogenetics. This regimen had a favorable benefit-risk profile in patients with relapsed MM, irrespective of cytogenetic risk status, and should be considered a standard of care in these patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01080391. PMID:27439911

  19. Assessing the environmental risks associated with contaminated sites: Definition of an Ecotoxicological Classification index for landfill areas (ECRIS).

    PubMed

    Senese, V; Boriani, E; Baderna, D; Mariani, A; Lodi, M; Finizio, A; Testa, S; Benfenati, E

    2010-06-01

    Assessing ecological risk in quantitative terms is a site-specific complex procedure requiring evaluation of all possible pathways taken by the chemicals from the contamination source to the targets to be protected. Unfortunately, too many cases lack of physico-chemical and ecotoxicological data makes impossible to quantify the ecological risk. We present the Ecotoxicological Classification Risk Index for Soil (ECRIS), a new classification system specific for soil risk assessment, which gives a comparative indication of the risk linked to environmental contamination by any chemical. The tool we propose is based on the integration of a data set characterizing the ecotoxicological and exposure profile of chemicals. ECRIS is a simple approach specifically set up for the landfill scenario. This index draws on the huge amount of data from our many years of leachate analysis. ECRIS is useful for a first screening of probably contaminated soil. A case study based on some Italian landfills is proposed.

  20. Classification of electrical problems detected by infrared thermography using a risk assessment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Gregory B.; Huff, Roy

    2016-05-01

    For more than 40 years thermography has been used for electrical problem detection. In addition, since radiometric infrared cameras can establish apparent surface temperature of the problem, a classification system is often utilized based upon surface temperature, or temperature rise above normal operating temperature or ambient air temperature. This however can be an extremely unreliable classification method for a number of reasons including: emissivity and background energy; a lack of regard for failure modes and stressors; surface temperature variability with load and ambient conditions; temperature gradient from internal source to surface; and the presence of convection, just to name a few. Standards, such as NFPA 70B, try to address some of these issues by having very low threshold temperature limits, but this as well has issues including identifying an over-abundance of non-critical problems for immediate repair. This paper will present a risk assessment process and matrix which classifies electrical problems based upon a variety of factors affecting both probability and consequence of electrical component failure. Inherent in this process will be a discussion of understanding and analysing electrical connection failure modes and failure stressors, as well as consideration of both heat energy flow and stored energy rather than only considering surface temperature as a single point predictor of catastrophic failure.

  1. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. I: Conceptual development.

    PubMed

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    The predominant paradigm for the premarket assessment of genetically modified (GM) foods reflects heightened public concern by focusing on foods modified by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) techniques, while foods modified by other methods of genetic modification are generally not assessed for safety. To determine whether a GM product requires less or more regulatory oversight and testing, we developed and evaluated a risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) for crop-derived GM foods. The results of this research are presented in three papers. This paper describes the conceptual development of the proposed RBCS that focuses on two categories of adverse health effects: (1) toxic and antinutritional effects, and (2) allergenic effects. The factors that may affect the level of potential health risks of GM foods are identified. For each factor identified, criteria for differentiating health risk potential are developed. The extent to which a GM food satisfies applicable criteria for each factor is rated separately. A concern level for each category of health effects is then determined by aggregating the ratings for the factors using predetermined aggregation rules. An overview of the proposed scheme is presented, as well as the application of the scheme to a hypothetical GM food.

  2. Multicenter study on caries risk assessment in adults using survival Classification and Regression Trees.

    PubMed

    Arino, Masumi; Ito, Ataru; Fujiki, Shozo; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is an important public health problem worldwide. This study aims to prove how preventive therapies reduce the onset of caries in adult patients, and to identify patients with high or low risk of caries by using Classification and Regression Trees based survival analysis (survival CART). A clinical data set of 732 patients aged 20 to 64 years in nine Japanese general practices was analyzed with the following parameters: age, DMFT, number of mutans streptococci (SM) and Lactobacilli (LB), secretion rate and buffer capacity of saliva, and compliance with a preventive program. Results showed the incidence of primary carious lesion was affected by SM, LB and compliance with a preventive program; secondary carious lesion was affected by DMFT, SM and LB. Survival CART identified high-risk patients for primary carious lesion according to their poor compliance with a preventive program and SM (≥10(6) CFU/ml) with a hazard ratio of 3.66 (p = 0.0002). In the case of secondary caries, patients with LB (≥10(5) CFU/ml) and DMFT (>15) were identified as high risk with a hazard ratio of 3.50 (p < 0.0001). We conclude that preventive programs can be effective in limiting the incidence of primary carious lesion. PMID:27381750

  3. Multicenter study on caries risk assessment in adults using survival Classification and Regression Trees

    PubMed Central

    Arino, Masumi; Ito, Ataru; Fujiki, Shozo; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is an important public health problem worldwide. This study aims to prove how preventive therapies reduce the onset of caries in adult patients, and to identify patients with high or low risk of caries by using Classification and Regression Trees based survival analysis (survival CART). A clinical data set of 732 patients aged 20 to 64 years in nine Japanese general practices was analyzed with the following parameters: age, DMFT, number of mutans streptococci (SM) and Lactobacilli (LB), secretion rate and buffer capacity of saliva, and compliance with a preventive program. Results showed the incidence of primary carious lesion was affected by SM, LB and compliance with a preventive program; secondary carious lesion was affected by DMFT, SM and LB. Survival CART identified high-risk patients for primary carious lesion according to their poor compliance with a preventive program and SM (≥106 CFU/ml) with a hazard ratio of 3.66 (p = 0.0002). In the case of secondary caries, patients with LB (≥105 CFU/ml) and DMFT (>15) were identified as high risk with a hazard ratio of 3.50 (p < 0.0001). We conclude that preventive programs can be effective in limiting the incidence of primary carious lesion. PMID:27381750

  4. Assessment and risk classification protocol for patients in emergency units1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Michele de Freitas Neves; Oliveira, Gabriela Novelli; Pergola-Marconato, Aline Maino; Marconato, Rafael Silva; Bargas, Eliete Boaventura; Araujo, Izilda Esmenia Muglia

    2014-01-01

    Objective to develop, validate the contents and verify the reliability of a risk classification protocol for an Emergency Unit. Method the content validation was developed in a University Hospital in a country town located in the state of Sao Paulo and was carried out in two stages: the first with the individual assessment of specialists and the second with the meeting between the researchers and the specialists. The use of the protocol followed a specific guide. Concerning reliability, the concordance or equivalent method among observers was used. Results the protocol developed showed to have content validity and, after the suggested changes were made, there were excellent results concerning reliability. Conclusion the assistance flow chart was shown to be easy to use, and facilitate the search for the complaint in each assistance priority. PMID:26107828

  5. Exploring the color feature power for psoriasis risk stratification and classification: A data mining paradigm.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Vimal K; Londhe, Narendra D; Sonawane, Rajendra S; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-10-01

    A large percentage of dermatologist׳s decision in psoriasis disease assessment is based on color. The current computer-aided diagnosis systems for psoriasis risk stratification and classification lack the vigor of color paradigm. The paper presents an automated psoriasis computer-aided diagnosis (pCAD) system for classification of psoriasis skin images into psoriatic lesion and healthy skin, which solves the two major challenges: (i) fulfills the color feature requirements and (ii) selects the powerful dominant color features while retaining high classification accuracy. Fourteen color spaces are discovered for psoriasis disease analysis leading to 86 color features. The pCAD system is implemented in a support vector-based machine learning framework where the offline image data set is used for computing machine learning offline color machine learning parameters. These are then used for transformation of the online color features to predict the class labels for healthy vs. diseased cases. The above paradigm uses principal component analysis for color feature selection of dominant features, keeping the original color feature unaltered. Using the cross-validation protocol, the above machine learning protocol is compared against the standalone grayscale features with 60 features and against the combined grayscale and color feature set of 146. Using a fixed data size of 540 images with equal number of healthy and diseased, 10 fold cross-validation protocol, and SVM of polynomial kernel of type two, pCAD system shows an accuracy of 99.94% with sensitivity and specificity of 99.93% and 99.96%. Using a varying data size protocol, the mean classification accuracies for color, grayscale, and combined scenarios are: 92.85%, 93.83% and 93.99%, respectively. The reliability of the system in these three scenarios are: 94.42%, 97.39% and 96.00%, respectively. We conclude that pCAD system using color space alone is compatible to grayscale space or combined color and grayscale

  6. Exploring the color feature power for psoriasis risk stratification and classification: A data mining paradigm.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Vimal K; Londhe, Narendra D; Sonawane, Rajendra S; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-10-01

    A large percentage of dermatologist׳s decision in psoriasis disease assessment is based on color. The current computer-aided diagnosis systems for psoriasis risk stratification and classification lack the vigor of color paradigm. The paper presents an automated psoriasis computer-aided diagnosis (pCAD) system for classification of psoriasis skin images into psoriatic lesion and healthy skin, which solves the two major challenges: (i) fulfills the color feature requirements and (ii) selects the powerful dominant color features while retaining high classification accuracy. Fourteen color spaces are discovered for psoriasis disease analysis leading to 86 color features. The pCAD system is implemented in a support vector-based machine learning framework where the offline image data set is used for computing machine learning offline color machine learning parameters. These are then used for transformation of the online color features to predict the class labels for healthy vs. diseased cases. The above paradigm uses principal component analysis for color feature selection of dominant features, keeping the original color feature unaltered. Using the cross-validation protocol, the above machine learning protocol is compared against the standalone grayscale features with 60 features and against the combined grayscale and color feature set of 146. Using a fixed data size of 540 images with equal number of healthy and diseased, 10 fold cross-validation protocol, and SVM of polynomial kernel of type two, pCAD system shows an accuracy of 99.94% with sensitivity and specificity of 99.93% and 99.96%. Using a varying data size protocol, the mean classification accuracies for color, grayscale, and combined scenarios are: 92.85%, 93.83% and 93.99%, respectively. The reliability of the system in these three scenarios are: 94.42%, 97.39% and 96.00%, respectively. We conclude that pCAD system using color space alone is compatible to grayscale space or combined color and grayscale

  7. Relationship between coronary calcium score and high-risk plaque/significant stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between coronary calcium score (CCS) and vulnerable plaque/significant stenosis using coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). METHODS CCTA was performed in 651 patients and these patients were divided into the four groups (CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400). We studied the incidence of high-risk plaque, including positive remodeling, low attenuation plaque, spotty calcification, and napkin-ring sign, and significant stenosis in each group. RESULTS High-risk plaque was found in 1.3%, 10.1%, 13.3% and 13.4% of patients with CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400, respectively (P < 0.001). The difference was only significant for patients with zero CCS. The incidence of significant stenosis was 0.6%, 7.6%, 13.3% and 26.9% for each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), which represented a significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. The combined incidence of high-risk plaque and significant stenosis was 1.9%, 17.7%, 26.9% and 40.3% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), again representing a significant stepwise increase with CCS. The rate of major coronary event was 0%, 4.0%, 7.9% and 17.2% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), another significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. CONCLUSION Stepwise increased risk of coronary events associated with increasing CCS is caused by increasing incidence of significant stenosis, while that of high-risk plaque remains the same.

  8. Relationship between coronary calcium score and high-risk plaque/significant stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between coronary calcium score (CCS) and vulnerable plaque/significant stenosis using coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). METHODS CCTA was performed in 651 patients and these patients were divided into the four groups (CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400). We studied the incidence of high-risk plaque, including positive remodeling, low attenuation plaque, spotty calcification, and napkin-ring sign, and significant stenosis in each group. RESULTS High-risk plaque was found in 1.3%, 10.1%, 13.3% and 13.4% of patients with CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400, respectively (P < 0.001). The difference was only significant for patients with zero CCS. The incidence of significant stenosis was 0.6%, 7.6%, 13.3% and 26.9% for each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), which represented a significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. The combined incidence of high-risk plaque and significant stenosis was 1.9%, 17.7%, 26.9% and 40.3% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), again representing a significant stepwise increase with CCS. The rate of major coronary event was 0%, 4.0%, 7.9% and 17.2% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), another significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. CONCLUSION Stepwise increased risk of coronary events associated with increasing CCS is caused by increasing incidence of significant stenosis, while that of high-risk plaque remains the same. PMID:27621776

  9. Geotechnical Risk Classification for Underground Mines / Klasyfikacja Poziomu Zagrożenia Geotechnicznego W Kopalniach Podziemnych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ritesh Kumar; Rinne, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Underground mining activities are prone to major hazards largely owing to geotechnical reasons. Mining combined with the confined working space and uncertain geotechnical data leads to hazards having the potential of catastrophic consequences. These incidents have the potential of causing multiple fatalities and large financial damages. Use of formal risk assessment in the past has demonstrated an important role in the prediction and prevention of accidents in risk prone industries such as petroleum, nuclear and aviation. This paper proposes a classification system for underground mining operations based on their geotechnical risk levels. The classification is done based on the type of mining method employed and the rock mass in which it is carried out. Mining methods have been classified in groups which offer similar geotechnical risk. The rock mass classification has been proposed based on bulk rock mass properties which are collected as part of the routine mine planning. This classification has been subdivided for various stages of mine planning to suit the extent of available data. Alpha-numeric coding has been proposed to identify a mining operation based on the competency of rock and risk of geotechnical failures. This alpha numeric coding has been further extended to identify mining activity under `Geotechnical Hazard Potential (GHP)'. GHP has been proposed to be used as a preliminary tool of risk assessment and risk ranking for a mining activity. The aim of such classification is to be used as a guideline for the justification of a formal geotechnical risk assessment. Górnictwo podziemne pociąga za sobą różnorakie zagrożenia spowodowane przez uwarunkowania geotechniczne. Urabianie złoża w połączeniu z pracą w zamkniętej przestrzeni oraz z niepewnymi danymi geotechnicznymi powodować może zagrożenia, które w konsekwencji prowadzić mogą do wypadków, a te potencjalnie powodować mogą skutki śmiertelne dla osób oraz

  10. Determination of the health of Lunyangwa wetland using Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanda, Elijah M. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Msilimba, Golden

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands are major sources of various ecological goods and services including storage and distribution of water in space and time which help in ensuring the availability of surface and groundwater throughout the year. However, there still remains a poor understanding of the range of values of water quality parameters that occur in wetlands either in its impacted state or under natural conditions. It was thus imperative to determine the health of Lunyangwa wetland in Mzuzu City in Malawi in order to classify and determine its state. This study used the Escom's Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index Field Guide to determine the overall characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland and to calculate its combined Wetland Index Score. Data on site information, field measurements (i.e. EC, pH, temperature and DO) and physical characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland were collected from March, 2013 to February, 2014. Results indicate that Lunyangwa wetland is a largely open water zone which is dominated by free-floating plants on the water surface, beneath surface and emergent in substrate. Furthermore, the wetland can be classified as of a C ecological category (score = 60-80%), which has been moderately modified with moderate risks of the losses and changes occurring in the natural habitat and biota in the wetland. It was observed that the moderate modification and risk were largely because of industrial, agricultural, urban/social catchment stressors on the wetland. This study recommends an integrated and sustainable management approach coupled with continuous monitoring and evaluation of the health of the wetland for all stakeholders in Mzuzu City. This would help to maintain the health of Lunyangwa wetland which is currently at risk of being further modified due to the identified catchment stressors.

  11. Chronic Disease Disparities by County Economic Status and Metropolitan Classification, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Kristina A.; Self-Brown, Shannon; Roblin, Douglas W.; Barker, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Racial/ethnic disparities have been studied extensively. However, the combined influence of geographic location and economic status on specific health outcomes is less well studied. This study’s objective was to examine 1) the disparity in chronic disease prevalence in the United States by county economic status and metropolitan classification and 2) the social gradient by economic status. The association of hypertension, arthritis, and poor health with county economic status was also explored. Methods We used 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. County economic status was categorized by using data on unemployment, poverty, and per capita market income. While controlling for sociodemographics and other covariates, we used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the relationship between economic status and hypertension, arthritis, and self-rated health. Results Prevalence of hypertension, arthritis, and poor health in the poorest counties was 9%, 13%, and 15% higher, respectively, than in the most affluent counties. After we controlled for covariates, poor counties still had a higher prevalence of the studied conditions. Conclusion We found that residents of poor counties had a higher prevalence of poor health outcomes than affluent counties, even after we controlled for known risk factors. Further, the prevalence of poor health outcomes decreased as county economics improved. Findings suggest that poor counties would benefit from targeted public health interventions, better access to health care services, and improved food and built environments. PMID:27584875

  12. An Ecological-Transactional Model of Significant Risk Factors for Child Psychopathology in Outer Mongolia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Kohrt, Brandon A.; Waldman, Irwin; Saltzman, Kasey; Carrion, Victor G.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined significant risk factors, including child maltreatment, for child psychopathology in a cross-cultural setting. Ninety-nine Mongolian boys, ages 3-10 years, were assessed. Primary caregivers (PCG) completed structured interviews including the Emory Combined Rating Scale (ECRS) and the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire…

  13. Risk Factors for Clinically Significant Intimate Partner Violence among Active-Duty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesized risk factors for men's and women's clinically significant intimate partner violence (CS-IPV) from four ecological levels (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were tested in a representative sample of active-duty U.S. Air Force members (N = 42,744). When considered together, we expected only individual and family factors to…

  14. A novel subtype classification and risk of breast cancer by histone modification profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Hu, Hanyang; He, Lin; Yu, Xueyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Zhong, Rong; Shu, Maoguo

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has been classified into several intrinsic molecular subtypes on the basis of genetic and epigenetic factors. However, knowledge about histone modifications that contribute to the classification and development of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes remains limited. Here we compared the genome-wide binding patterns of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 between human mammary epithelial cells and three breast cancer cell lines representing the luminal, HER2, and basal subtypes. We characterized thousands of unique binding events as well as bivalent chromatin signatures unique to each cancer subtype, which were involved in different epigenetic regulation programs and signaling pathways in breast cancer progression. Genes linked to the unique histone mark features exhibited subtype-specific expression patterns, both in cancer cell lines and primary tumors, some of which were confirmed by qPCR in our primary cancer samples. Finally, histone mark-based gene classifiers were significantly correlated with relapse-free survival outcomes in patients. In summary, we have provided a valuable resource for the identification of novel biomarkers of subtype classification and clinical prognosis evaluation in breast cancers. PMID:27178334

  15. Is chrysotile asbestos exposure a significant health risk to the general population?

    PubMed

    Valić, F; Beritic-Stahuljak, D

    1993-06-01

    The main unresolved issues concerning environmental exposure to chrysotile asbestos of the general population are discussed. A review of the results of the measurement of airborne chrysotile fibres in buildings is presented showing that the results have been consistently low with the exception of buildings with damaged friable asbestos-containing material. Quantitative risk assessments are presented indicating that the lifetime risk is small compared to many other environmental risks. Possible adverse health effects of paraoccupational exposures in the case of high domestic airborne asbestos levels cannot be excluded. Both on the basis of electron microscopy analyses of asbestos exposures at locations with heavy traffic, and the very shallow slopes in the exposure-response relationships for increased lung cancer risk, the conclusion is drawn that exposure to airborne asbestos-containing friction materials has not been proven to pose a significant health risk to the general population. Reviewing animal ingestion studies published and all the available epidemiological studies related to asbestos in drinking water, the conclusion is drawn that the carcinogenic risk in the general population is low even in the case of drinking water containing elevated concentrations of chrysotile asbestos.

  16. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Chung, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Tseng, Hung-Pin; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  17. A genome-wide association study demonstrates significant genetic variation for fracture risk in Thoroughbred racehorses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thoroughbred racehorses are subject to non-traumatic distal limb bone fractures that occur during racing and exercise. Susceptibility to fracture may be due to underlying disturbances in bone metabolism which have a genetic cause. Fracture risk has been shown to be heritable in several species but this study is the first genetic analysis of fracture risk in the horse. Results Fracture cases (n = 269) were horses that sustained catastrophic distal limb fractures while racing on UK racecourses, necessitating euthanasia. Control horses (n = 253) were over 4 years of age, were racing during the same time period as the cases, and had no history of fracture at the time the study was carried out. The horses sampled were bred for both flat and National Hunt (NH) jump racing. 43,417 SNPs were employed to perform a genome-wide association analysis and to estimate the proportion of genetic variance attributable to the SNPs on each chromosome using restricted maximum likelihood (REML). Significant genetic variation associated with fracture risk was found on chromosomes 9, 18, 22 and 31. Three SNPs on chromosome 18 (62.05 Mb – 62.15 Mb) and one SNP on chromosome 1 (14.17 Mb) reached genome-wide significance (p < 0.05) in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Two of the SNPs on ECA 18 were located in a haplotype block containing the gene zinc finger protein 804A (ZNF804A). One haplotype within this block has a protective effect (controls at 1.95 times less risk of fracture than cases, p = 1 × 10-4), while a second haplotype increases fracture risk (cases at 3.39 times higher risk of fracture than controls, p = 0.042). Conclusions Fracture risk in the Thoroughbred horse is a complex condition with an underlying genetic basis. Multiple genomic regions contribute to susceptibility to fracture risk. This suggests there is the potential to develop SNP-based estimators for genetic risk of fracture in the Thoroughbred racehorse, using methods

  18. Hazard interaction analysis for multi-hazard risk assessment: a systematic classification based on hazard-forming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Siu, Y. L.; Mitchell, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops a systematic hazard interaction classification based on the geophysical environment that natural hazards arise from - the hazard-forming environment. According to their contribution to natural hazards, geophysical environmental factors in the hazard-forming environment were categorized into two types. The first are relatively stable factors which construct the precondition for the occurrence of natural hazards, whilst the second are trigger factors, which determine the frequency and magnitude of hazards. Different combinations of geophysical environmental factors induce different hazards. Based on these geophysical environmental factors for some major hazards, the stable factors are used to identify which kinds of natural hazards influence a given area, and trigger factors are used to classify the relationships between these hazards into four types: independent, mutex, parallel and series relationships. This classification helps to ensure all possible hazard interactions among different hazards are considered in multi-hazard risk assessment. This can effectively fill the gap in current multi-hazard risk assessment methods which to date only consider domino effects. In addition, based on this classification, the probability and magnitude of multiple interacting natural hazards occurring together can be calculated. Hence, the developed hazard interaction classification provides a useful tool to facilitate improved multi-hazard risk assessment.

  19. Hazard interaction analysis for multi-hazard risk assessment: a systematic classification based on hazard-forming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baoyin; Siu, Yim Ling; Mitchell, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    This paper develops a systematic hazard interaction classification based on the geophysical environment that natural hazards arise from - the hazard-forming environment. According to their contribution to natural hazards, geophysical environmental factors in the hazard-forming environment were categorized into two types. The first are relatively stable factors which construct the precondition for the occurrence of natural hazards, whilst the second are trigger factors, which determine the frequency and magnitude of hazards. Different combinations of geophysical environmental factors induce different hazards. Based on these geophysical environmental factors for some major hazards, the stable factors are used to identify which kinds of natural hazards influence a given area, and trigger factors are used to classify the relationships between these hazards into four types: independent, mutex, parallel and series relationships. This classification helps to ensure all possible hazard interactions among different hazards are considered in multi-hazard risk assessment. This can effectively fill the gap in current multi-hazard risk assessment methods which to date only consider domino effects. In addition, based on this classification, the probability and magnitude of multiple interacting natural hazards occurring together can be calculated. Hence, the developed hazard interaction classification provides a useful tool to facilitate improved multi-hazard risk assessment.

  20. Familial monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma: epidemiology, risk factors, and biological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Alexandra J.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a precursor to multiple myeloma (MM), is one of the most common premalignant conditions in the general population. The cause of MGUS is largely unknown. Recent studies show that there is an increased prevalence of MGUS in blood relatives of persons with lymphoproliferative and plasma cell proliferative disorders, suggesting presence of shared underlying genetic influences. In the past few years, additional studies have examined risk factors and biologic characteristics that may contribute to the increased prevalence of MGUS among relatives of probands with MGUS, MM, and other blood malignancies. This article reviews the known epidemiology and risk factors for familial MGUS and myeloma, the risk of lymphoproliferative disorders and other malignancies among blood-relatives of patients with MGUS and MM, and discusses future directions for research. PMID:22354002

  1. Bioinformatics analyses of significant prognostic risk markers for thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Min, Xiao-Shan; Huang, Peng; Liu, Xu; Dong, Chao; Jiang, Xiao-Lin; Yuan, Zheng-Tai; Mao, Lin-Feng; Chang, Shi

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to identify the prognostic risk markers for thyroid papillary carcinoma (TPC) by bioinformatics. The clinical data of TPC and their microRNAs (miRNAs) and genes expression profile data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Elastic net-Cox's proportional regression hazards model (EN-COX) was used to identify the prognostic associated factors. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Kaplan-Meier (KM) curve were used to screen the significant prognostic risk miRNA and genes. Then, the target genes of the obtained miRNAs were predicted followed by function prediction. Finally, the significant risk genes were performed literature mining and function analysis. Total 1046 miRNAs and 20531 genes in 484 cases samples were identified after data preprocessing. From the EN-COX model, 30 prognostic risk factors were obtained. Based on the 30 risk factors, 3 miRNAs and 11 genes were identified from the ROC and KM curves. The target genes of miRNA-342 such as B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) were mainly enriched in the biological process related to cellular metabolic process and Disease Ontology terms of lymphoma. The target genes of miRNA-93 were mainly enriched in the pathway of G1 phase. Among the 11 prognostic risk genes, v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homologue F (MAFF), SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 4 (SOX4), and retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARA) encoded transcription factors. Besides, RARA was enriched in four pathways. These prognostic markers such as miRNA-93, miRNA-342, RARA, MAFF, SOX4, and BCL2 may be used as targets for TPC chemoprevention.

  2. Interpretation of risk significance of passive component aging using probabilistic structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.H. ); Atwood, C.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) being developed at most nuclear power plants to calculate the risk of core damage generally focus on the possible failure of active components. Except as initiating events, the possible failure of passive components is given little consideration. The NRC is sponsoring a project at INEL to investigate the risk significance of passive components as they age. For this project, we developed a technique to calculate the failure probability of passive components over time, and demonstrated the technique by applying it to a weld in the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system. A decreasing yearly rupture rate for this weld was calculated instead of the increasing rupture rate trend one might expect. We attribute this result to infant mortality; that is, most of those initial flaws that will eventually lead to rupture will do so early in life. This means that although each weld in a population may be wearing out, the population as a whole can exhibit a decreasing rupture rate. This observation has implications for passive components in commercial nuclear plants and other facilities where aging is a concern. For the population of passive components that exhibit a decreasing failure rate, risk increase is not a concern. The next step of the work is to identify the attributes that contribute to this decreasing rate, and to determine any attributes that would contribute to an increasing failure rate and thus to an increased risk.

  3. Interpretation of risk significance of passive component aging using probabilistic structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.H.; Atwood, C.L.

    1993-05-01

    The probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) being developed at most nuclear power plants to calculate the risk of core damage generally focus on the possible failure of active components. Except as initiating events, the possible failure of passive components is given little consideration. The NRC is sponsoring a project at INEL to investigate the risk significance of passive components as they age. For this project, we developed a technique to calculate the failure probability of passive components over time, and demonstrated the technique by applying it to a weld in the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system. A decreasing yearly rupture rate for this weld was calculated instead of the increasing rupture rate trend one might expect. We attribute this result to infant mortality; that is, most of those initial flaws that will eventually lead to rupture will do so early in life. This means that although each weld in a population may be wearing out, the population as a whole can exhibit a decreasing rupture rate. This observation has implications for passive components in commercial nuclear plants and other facilities where aging is a concern. For the population of passive components that exhibit a decreasing failure rate, risk increase is not a concern. The next step of the work is to identify the attributes that contribute to this decreasing rate, and to determine any attributes that would contribute to an increasing failure rate and thus to an increased risk.

  4. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. II: Graded testing.

    PubMed

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a graded approach to the testing of crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods based on concern levels in a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) and currently available testing methods. A graded approach offers the potential for more efficient use of testing resources by focusing less on lower concern GM foods, and more on higher concern foods. In this proposed approach to graded testing, products that are classified as Level I would have met baseline testing requirements that are comparable to what is widely applied to premarket assessment of GM foods at present. In most cases, Level I products would require no further testing, or very limited confirmatory analyses. For products classified as Level II or higher, additional testing would be required, depending on the type of the substance, prior dietary history, estimated exposure level, prior knowledge of toxicity of the substance, and the nature of the concern related to unintended changes in the modified food. Level III testing applies only to the assessment of toxic and antinutritional effects from intended changes and is tailored to the nature of the substance in question. Since appropriate test methods are not currently available for all effects of concern, future research to strengthen the testing of GM foods is discussed.

  5. Performance analysis of wavelet transforms and morphological operator-based classification of epilepsy risk levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikumar, Rajaguru; Vijayakumar, Thangavel

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the performance of singular value decomposition (SVD), expectation maximization (EM), and modified expectation maximization (MEM) as the postclassifiers for classifications of the epilepsy risk levels obtained from extracted features through wavelet transforms and morphological filters from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. The code converter acts as a level one classifier. The seven features such as energy, variance, positive and negative peaks, spike and sharp waves, events, average duration, and covariance are extracted from EEG signals. Out of which four parameters like positive and negative peaksand spike and sharp waves, events and average duration are extracted using Haar, dB2, dB4, and Sym 8 wavelet transforms with hard and soft thresholding methods. The above said four features are also extracted through morphological filters. Then, the performance of the code converter and classifiers are compared based on the parameters such as performance index (PI) and quality value (QV).The performance index and quality value of code converters are at low value of 33.26% and 12.74, respectively. The highest PI of 98.03% and QV of 23.82 are attained at dB2 wavelet with hard thresholding method for SVD classifier. All the postclassifiers are settled at PI value of more than 90% at QV of 20.

  6. Interpretation of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, risk assessment and testing of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dang, ZhiChao

    2016-01-01

    Chemical induced changes in fish biomarkers vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics (SSC), and sex ratio indicate modes/mechanisms of action (MOAs) of EAS (estrogen, androgen and steroidogenesis) pathways. These biomarkers could be used for defining MOAs and the causal link between MOAs and adverse effects in fish for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This paper compiled data sets of 150 chemicals for VTG, 57 chemicals for SSC and 38 chemicals for sex ratio in fathead minnow, medaka and zebrafish. It showed 1) changes in fish biomarkers can indicate the MOAs as anticipated; 2) in addition to EAS pathways, chemicals with non-EAS pathways induced changes in fish biomarkers; 3) responses of fish biomarkers did not always follow the anticipated patterns of EAS pathways. These responses may result from the interaction of chemical-induced multiple MOAs and confounding factors like fish diet, infection, culture conditions, general toxicity and stress response. The complex response of fish biomarkers to a chemical of interest requires EDC testing at multiple biological levels. Interpretation of fish biomarker data should be combined with relevant information at different biological levels, which is critical for defining chemical specific MOAs. The utility of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, PBT assessment, risk assessment, and testing of EDCs in the regulatory context was discussed. This paper emphasizes the importance of fish biomarker data in the regulatory context, a weight of evidence approach for the interpretation of fish biomarker data and the need for defining levels of evidence for the identification of EDCs.

  7. [Classification of enterprises according to degree of accident and occupational disease risk].

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, M M; Petrosiants, E V

    2001-01-01

    The authors suggested approach to classification of enterprises and economy branches according to occupational conditions. Suggestion is to classify by means of quantitative methods based on claster analysis.

  8. Diagnosis, risk stratification and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, N W C J; Mutis, T; Poddighe, P J; Lokhorst, H M; Zweegman, S

    2016-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is one of the most common premalignant disorders. IgG and IgA MGUS are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma (MM), whereas light-chain MGUS is a precursor condition of light-chain MM. Smoldering MM (SMM) is a precursor condition with higher tumor burden and higher risk of progression to symptomatic MM compared to MGUS. Assessment of the risk of progression of patients with asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies is based on various factors including clonal burden, as well as biological characteristics, such as cytogenetic abnormalities and light-chain production. Several models have been constructed that are useful in daily practice for predicting risk of progression of MGUS or SMM. Importantly, the plasma cell clone may occasionally be responsible for severe organ damage through the production of a M-protein which deposits in tissues or has autoantibody activity. These disorders are rare and often require therapy directed at eradication of the underlying clone. Importantly, recent studies have shown that asymptomatic patients with a bone marrow plasma cell percentage ≥60%, free light-chain ratio ≥100, or >1 focal lesion on MRI (myeloma-defining events) have a 80% risk of developing symptomatic MM within 2 years. These patients are now considered to have MM requiring therapy, similar to patients with symptomatic disease. In this review, we provide an overview of the new diagnostic criteria of the monoclonal gammopathies and discuss risk of progression to active MM. We also provide recommendations for the management of patients with MGUS and SMM including risk-adapted follow-up. PMID:27161311

  9. Diagnosis, risk stratification and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, N W C J; Mutis, T; Poddighe, P J; Lokhorst, H M; Zweegman, S

    2016-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is one of the most common premalignant disorders. IgG and IgA MGUS are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma (MM), whereas light-chain MGUS is a precursor condition of light-chain MM. Smoldering MM (SMM) is a precursor condition with higher tumor burden and higher risk of progression to symptomatic MM compared to MGUS. Assessment of the risk of progression of patients with asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies is based on various factors including clonal burden, as well as biological characteristics, such as cytogenetic abnormalities and light-chain production. Several models have been constructed that are useful in daily practice for predicting risk of progression of MGUS or SMM. Importantly, the plasma cell clone may occasionally be responsible for severe organ damage through the production of a M-protein which deposits in tissues or has autoantibody activity. These disorders are rare and often require therapy directed at eradication of the underlying clone. Importantly, recent studies have shown that asymptomatic patients with a bone marrow plasma cell percentage ≥60%, free light-chain ratio ≥100, or >1 focal lesion on MRI (myeloma-defining events) have a 80% risk of developing symptomatic MM within 2 years. These patients are now considered to have MM requiring therapy, similar to patients with symptomatic disease. In this review, we provide an overview of the new diagnostic criteria of the monoclonal gammopathies and discuss risk of progression to active MM. We also provide recommendations for the management of patients with MGUS and SMM including risk-adapted follow-up.

  10. An Improved Patient-Specific Mortality Risk Prediction in ICU in a Random Forest Classification Framework.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Soumya; Mitra, Jhimli; Khanna, Sankalp; Dowling, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic and automatic patient specific prediction of the risk associated with ICU mortality may facilitate timely and appropriate intervention of health professionals in hospitals. In this work, patient information and time series measurements of vital signs and laboratory results from the first 48 hours of ICU stays of 4000 adult patients from a publicly available dataset are used to design and validate a mortality prediction system. An ensemble of decision trees are used to simultaneously predict and associate a risk score against each patient in a k-fold validation framework. Risk assessment prediction accuracy of 87% is achieved with our model and the results show significant improvement over a baseline algorithm of SAPS-I that is commonly used for mortality prediction in ICU. The performance of our model is further compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms evaluated on the same dataset. PMID:26210418

  11. Risk of abnormal triple screen for Down syndrome is significantly higher in patients with female fetuses.

    PubMed

    Spong, C Y; Ghidini, A; Stanley-Christian, H; Meck, J M; Seydel, F D; Pezzullo, J C

    1999-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that mid-trimester maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels are significantly higher and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels significantly lower in women with male compared with female fetuses. We have evaluated whether triple-screen criteria are more likely to identify women with female fetuses as at risk for Down syndrome. From the Georgetown University genetics database we obtained the absolute values and corresponding multiples of the median (MoM) for AFP, hCG and unconjugated oestriol (uE3) in singleton gestations for the period database November 1992 July 1996. A Down syndrome risk of 1/270 or greater at mid-trimester was considered as high risk. A total of 977 patients with triple screen and outcome information were identified, including 502 female and 475 male fetuses. Patients with female fetuses were significantly more likely to have lower serum AFP (p=0.003) and a positive triple screen for Down syndrome (72 (14 per cent) versus 45 (9 per cent), p<0.02) than those with male fetuses. The gestational age at triple screen, maternal serum hCG and uE3, race and diabetes were not significantly different between the two groups. Since Down syndrome is less common in female than male fetuses, and the rates of female and male Down syndrome fetuses detected by triple screen and subsequent amniocentesis are not significantly different, the excess of positive mid-trimester maternal serum triple screen in women with female fetuses is likely due to false-positive results. PMID:10327139

  12. Ecological status classification of the Taizi River Basin, China: a comparison of integrated risk assessment approaches.

    PubMed

    Fan, Juntao; Semenzin, Elena; Meng, Wei; Giubilato, Elisa; Zhang, Yuan; Critto, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Zhou, Yun; Ding, Sen; Wan, Jun; He, Mengchang; Lin, Chunye

    2015-10-01

    Integrated risk assessment approaches allow to achieve a sound evaluation of ecological status of river basins and to gain knowledge about the likely causes of impairment, useful for informing and supporting the decision-making process. In this paper, the integrated risk assessment (IRA) methodology developed in the EU MODELKEY project (and implemented in the MODELKEY Decision Support System) is applied to the Taizi River (China), in order to assess its Ecological and Chemical Status according to EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) requirements. The available dataset is derived by an extensive survey carried out in 2009 and 2010 across the Taizi River catchment, including the monitoring of physico-chemical (i.e. DO, EC, NH3-_N, chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand in 5 days (BOD5) and TP), chemical (i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals), biological (i.e. macroinvertebrates, fish, and algae), and hydromorphological parameters (i.e. water quantity, channel change and morphology diversity). The results show a negative trend in the ecological status from the highland to the lowland of the Taizi River Basin. Organic pollution from agriculture and domestic sources (i.e. COD and BOD5), unstable hydrological regime (i.e. water quantity shortage) and chemical pollutants from industry (i.e. PAHs and metals) are found to be the main stressors impacting the ecological status of the Taizi River Basin. The comparison between the results of the IRA methodology and those of a previous study (Leigh et al. 2012) indicates that the selection of indicators and integrating methodologies can have a relevant impact on the classification of the ecological status. The IRA methodology, which integrates information from five lines of evidence (i.e., biology, physico-chemistry, chemistry, ecotoxicology and hydromorphology) required by WFD, allows to better identify the biological communities that are potentially at risk and the stressors that are most

  13. PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS SIGNIFICANTLY ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS IN RURAL THAI CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Kavinum, Suporn; Papwijitsil, Ratchadaporn; Tontiwattanasap, Worawit; Khunyotying, Wanlee; Umpan, Jiraporn; BoonthuM, Ratchaneekorn; Kaewnate, Yingyot; Boonmee, Sasis; Thongchub, Winai; Rodsung, Thassanee

    2014-11-01

    A community-based study was conducted to determine personal risk factors and environmental sources of lead exposure for elevated blood lead levels (≥ 10 µg/dl, EBLLs) among rural children living at the Thailand-Myanmar border in Tak Province, northwestern Thailand. Six hundred ninety-five children aged 1-14 years old were screened for BLLs. Environmental specimens for lead measurements included samples of water from the streams, taps, and household containers, house floor dust, and foods. Possible lead release from the cooking ware was determined using the leaching method with acetic acid. The overall prevalence of EBLLs was 47.1% and the geometric mean level of blood lead was 9.16 µg/dl. Personal risk factors significantly associated with EBLLs included being male, younger age, anemia, and low weight-for-age. Significant environmental risk factors were exposure to a lead-acid battery of solar energy system and use of a non-certified metal cooking pot. Some families whose children had high BLLs reported production of lead bullets from the used batteries at home. About one-third of the house dust samples taken near batteries contained lead content above the recommended value, compared with none of those taken from other areas and from the houses with no batteries. The metal pots were safe for cooking rice but might be unsafe for acidic food preparation. Both nutritional intervention and lead exposure prevention programs are essential to reduce EBLLs in this population. PMID:26466436

  14. PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS SIGNIFICANTLY ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS IN RURAL THAI CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Kavinum, Suporn; Papwijitsil, Ratchadaporn; Tontiwattanasap, Worawit; Khunyotying, Wanlee; Umpan, Jiraporn; BoonthuM, Ratchaneekorn; Kaewnate, Yingyot; Boonmee, Sasis; Thongchub, Winai; Rodsung, Thassanee

    2014-11-01

    A community-based study was conducted to determine personal risk factors and environmental sources of lead exposure for elevated blood lead levels (≥ 10 µg/dl, EBLLs) among rural children living at the Thailand-Myanmar border in Tak Province, northwestern Thailand. Six hundred ninety-five children aged 1-14 years old were screened for BLLs. Environmental specimens for lead measurements included samples of water from the streams, taps, and household containers, house floor dust, and foods. Possible lead release from the cooking ware was determined using the leaching method with acetic acid. The overall prevalence of EBLLs was 47.1% and the geometric mean level of blood lead was 9.16 µg/dl. Personal risk factors significantly associated with EBLLs included being male, younger age, anemia, and low weight-for-age. Significant environmental risk factors were exposure to a lead-acid battery of solar energy system and use of a non-certified metal cooking pot. Some families whose children had high BLLs reported production of lead bullets from the used batteries at home. About one-third of the house dust samples taken near batteries contained lead content above the recommended value, compared with none of those taken from other areas and from the houses with no batteries. The metal pots were safe for cooking rice but might be unsafe for acidic food preparation. Both nutritional intervention and lead exposure prevention programs are essential to reduce EBLLs in this population.

  15. Prognostic significance of neurological signs in high-risk infants - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Elisa G; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature on the significance of specific neurological signs in infancy, in particular in infants at risk for developmental problems such as cerebral palsy (CP). A literature search was performed using the databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and AMED. Papers on infantile reactions ('primitive reflexes') and postural reactions were included if data were available allowing for calculation of sensitivity, specificity, or positive and negative predictive value for CP or atypical developmental outcome. Our search identified 23 articles on 20 different neurological signs. Properties of six neurological signs were reported in at least three different papers. The data indicated that, in early infancy, an absent Moro or plantar grasp response may be predictive for adverse developmental outcome. After early infancy, persistence of the Moro response and asymmetric tonic neck reflex was clinically significant. Prediction of a delayed emergence of the parachute reaction increases with age. Abnormal performances on the pull-to-sit manoeuvre and vertical suspension test have predictive significance throughout infancy. The neurological signs reviewed have some predictive value in infants at risk. For most of the signs, criteria for abnormality and significance are age-dependent. PMID:27027608

  16. [Significance of vascular calcification in diabetic patients with increased risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke].

    PubMed

    Shioi, Atsushi

    2003-09-01

    Patients with diabetes have greatly elevated risks of atherosclerotic diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. Vascular calcification in advanced atherosclerosis is a common feature in diabetic patients. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that apoptosis and chondro/osteogenic differentiation of vascular wall cells such as smooth muscle cells may play important roles in the progression of vascular calcification. Diabetes may promote vascular calcification through the action of various factors including hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and advanced glycation end products. Detection of coronary calcium by electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) revealed clinical significance of vascular calcification and this technique may be a useful method to identify diabetic patients with increased risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke. PMID:15775191

  17. [Naming and classification of steroids and human stress ulcers. Articles of historic significance published by Hans Selye 70 years ago].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Sándor; Gyires, Klára

    2015-08-30

    The name of Hans Selye is mostly known worldwide as the discoverer of stress reaction. Yet, he made numerous other seminal and clinically relevant discoveries. Namely, since he had a focused research on steroid hormones originating from the adrenal cortex that play a crucial role in stress response, he was the first who introduced about 70 years ago the first classification of steroids that is still valid nowadays. This is based on three objective facts: (a) the names of steroid groups are identical with their organ of origin (e.g., corticoids from the adrenal cortex, testoids/androgens from the testis); (b) chemical structures of the steroids are identical within a group (e.g., all corticoids have pregnane nucleus with 21 carbon atoms); and (c) the biological effects are homogenous within a group (e.g., all glucocorticoids exert catabolic effect, while androgens are anabolic). It should be emphasized that Selye also discovered in animal models the pro-inflammmatory effect of mineralocorticoids and the anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids, about 8-10 years before Nobel Prize was awarded to a physician for the first clinical use of adrenocorticotrop hormone and cortisone. Last, but not least, Selye was the first who recognized about 70 years ago the occurence of stress ulcers in humans, based on clinical reports on the huge increase in the number of perforated gastric anti-duodenal ulcers during bombings of London in World War II. The subsequent ulcer research by Selye`s former students and their contemporaries resulted in the recognition of anti-duodenal ulcer effect of dopamine, and the central gastroprotective actions of thyreotrop releasing hormone and endogenous opioids. Thus, Hans Selye made much more contributions to medical science and clinical practice than 'just' the discoverer of biologic stress response.

  18. [Naming and classification of steroids and human stress ulcers. Articles of historic significance published by Hans Selye 70 years ago].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Sándor; Gyires, Klára

    2015-08-30

    The name of Hans Selye is mostly known worldwide as the discoverer of stress reaction. Yet, he made numerous other seminal and clinically relevant discoveries. Namely, since he had a focused research on steroid hormones originating from the adrenal cortex that play a crucial role in stress response, he was the first who introduced about 70 years ago the first classification of steroids that is still valid nowadays. This is based on three objective facts: (a) the names of steroid groups are identical with their organ of origin (e.g., corticoids from the adrenal cortex, testoids/androgens from the testis); (b) chemical structures of the steroids are identical within a group (e.g., all corticoids have pregnane nucleus with 21 carbon atoms); and (c) the biological effects are homogenous within a group (e.g., all glucocorticoids exert catabolic effect, while androgens are anabolic). It should be emphasized that Selye also discovered in animal models the pro-inflammmatory effect of mineralocorticoids and the anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids, about 8-10 years before Nobel Prize was awarded to a physician for the first clinical use of adrenocorticotrop hormone and cortisone. Last, but not least, Selye was the first who recognized about 70 years ago the occurence of stress ulcers in humans, based on clinical reports on the huge increase in the number of perforated gastric anti-duodenal ulcers during bombings of London in World War II. The subsequent ulcer research by Selye`s former students and their contemporaries resulted in the recognition of anti-duodenal ulcer effect of dopamine, and the central gastroprotective actions of thyreotrop releasing hormone and endogenous opioids. Thus, Hans Selye made much more contributions to medical science and clinical practice than 'just' the discoverer of biologic stress response. PMID:26299832

  19. Weighing risk factors associated with bee colony collapse disorder by classification and regression tree analysis.

    PubMed

    VanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Speybroeck, Niko; Evans, Jay D; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Mullin, Chris; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Tarpy, David R; Haubruge, Eric; Pettis, Jeffrey S; Saegerman, Claude

    2010-10-01

    Colony collapse disorder (CCD), a syndrome whose defining trait is the rapid loss of adult worker honey bees, Apis mellifera L., is thought to be responsible for a minority of the large overwintering losses experienced by U.S. beekeepers since the winter 2006-2007. Using the same data set developed to perform a monofactorial analysis (PloS ONE 4: e6481, 2009), we conducted a classification and regression tree (CART) analysis in an attempt to better understand the relative importance and interrelations among different risk variables in explaining CCD. Fifty-five exploratory variables were used to construct two CART models: one model with and one model without a cost of misclassifying a CCD-diagnosed colony as a non-CCD colony. The resulting model tree that permitted for misclassification had a sensitivity and specificity of 85 and 74%, respectively. Although factors measuring colony stress (e.g., adult bee physiological measures, such as fluctuating asymmetry or mass of head) were important discriminating values, six of the 19 variables having the greatest discriminatory value were pesticide levels in different hive matrices. Notably, coumaphos levels in brood (a miticide commonly used by beekeepers) had the highest discriminatory value and were highest in control (healthy) colonies. Our CART analysis provides evidence that CCD is probably the result of several factors acting in concert, making afflicted colonies more susceptible to disease. This analysis highlights several areas that warrant further attention, including the effect of sublethal pesticide exposure on pathogen prevalence and the role of variability in bee tolerance to pesticides on colony survivorship.

  20. Interpretation of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, risk assessment and testing of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dang, ZhiChao

    2016-01-01

    Chemical induced changes in fish biomarkers vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics (SSC), and sex ratio indicate modes/mechanisms of action (MOAs) of EAS (estrogen, androgen and steroidogenesis) pathways. These biomarkers could be used for defining MOAs and the causal link between MOAs and adverse effects in fish for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This paper compiled data sets of 150 chemicals for VTG, 57 chemicals for SSC and 38 chemicals for sex ratio in fathead minnow, medaka and zebrafish. It showed 1) changes in fish biomarkers can indicate the MOAs as anticipated; 2) in addition to EAS pathways, chemicals with non-EAS pathways induced changes in fish biomarkers; 3) responses of fish biomarkers did not always follow the anticipated patterns of EAS pathways. These responses may result from the interaction of chemical-induced multiple MOAs and confounding factors like fish diet, infection, culture conditions, general toxicity and stress response. The complex response of fish biomarkers to a chemical of interest requires EDC testing at multiple biological levels. Interpretation of fish biomarker data should be combined with relevant information at different biological levels, which is critical for defining chemical specific MOAs. The utility of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, PBT assessment, risk assessment, and testing of EDCs in the regulatory context was discussed. This paper emphasizes the importance of fish biomarker data in the regulatory context, a weight of evidence approach for the interpretation of fish biomarker data and the need for defining levels of evidence for the identification of EDCs. PMID:27155823

  1. [Assessment of the significance of climatogeographic conditions as health risk factors].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanov, R S; Gadzhiibragimov, D A; Medzhikova, M A; Kudriavtseva, O A

    2010-01-01

    Under the conditions of hot and mountain-continental climate, the morbidity rates in the inhabitants were estimated to be significantly lower than those in young men who had not been acclimatized or adapted to living conditions and in non-acclimatized men. A role of individual physical environmental factors (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, average and maximum air speed) and integral exposure by the wind chill index (a combined impact of an air speed and ambient temperature) as risk factors to human health was defined, The mountain-continental climate showed a relationship of the influence of these factors to habitation at different altitudes above sea level. PMID:20491267

  2. [Assessment of the significance of climatogeographic conditions as health risk factors].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanov, R S; Gadzhiibragimov, D A; Medzhikova, M A; Kudriavtseva, O A

    2010-01-01

    Under the conditions of hot and mountain-continental climate, the morbidity rates in the inhabitants were estimated to be significantly lower than those in young men who had not been acclimatized or adapted to living conditions and in non-acclimatized men. A role of individual physical environmental factors (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, average and maximum air speed) and integral exposure by the wind chill index (a combined impact of an air speed and ambient temperature) as risk factors to human health was defined, The mountain-continental climate showed a relationship of the influence of these factors to habitation at different altitudes above sea level.

  3. Predicting economic and medical outcomes based on risk adjustment for congenital heart surgery classification of pediatric cardiovascular surgical admissions.

    PubMed

    Raucci, Frank J; Hoke, Tracey R; Gutgesell, Howard P

    2014-12-01

    The Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) classification is an established method for predicting mortality for congenital heart disease surgery. It is unknown if this extends to the cost of hospitalization or if differences in economic and medical outcomes exist in certain subpopulations. Using data obtained from the University HealthSystem Consortium, we examined inpatient resource use by patients with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, procedure codes representative of RACHS-1 classifications 1 through 5 and 6 from 2006 to 2012. A total of 15,453 pediatric congenital heart disease surgical admissions were analyzed, with overall mortality of 4.5% (n = 689). As RACHS-1 classification increased, the total cost of hospitalization, hospital charges, total length of stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and mortality increased. Even when controlled for RACHS-1 classification, black patients (n = 2034) had higher total costs ($96,884 ± $3,392, p = 0.003), higher charges ($318,313 ± $12,018, p <0.001), and longer length of stay (20.4 ± 0.7 days, p <0.001) compared with white patients ($85,396 ± $1,382, $285,622 ± $5,090, and 18.0 ± 0.3 days, respectively). Hispanic patients had similarly disparate outcomes ($104,292 ± $2,759, $351,371 ± $10,627, and 23.0 ± 0.6 days, respectively) and also spent longer in the intensive care unit (14.9 ± 0.5 days, p <0.001). In conclusion, medical and economic measures increased predictably with increased procedure risk, and admissions for black and Hispanic patients were longer and more expensive than those of their white counterparts but without increased mortality.

  4. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  5. The APC I1307K allele conveys a significant increased risk for cancer.

    PubMed

    Leshno, Ari; Shapira, Shiran; Liberman, Eliezer; Kraus, Sarah; Sror, Miri; Harlap-Gat, Amira; Avivi, Doran; Galazan, Lior; David, Maayan; Maharshak, Nitsan; Moanis, Serhan; Arber, Nadir; Moshkowitz, Menachem

    2016-03-15

    This study is the first attempt to evaluate the association between the APC I1307K variant and overall cancer risk. It is unique in both its large sample size and in the reliability of data in the control group. The findings described in this article have major implications in terms of identifying asymptomatic individuals who are at increased risk to harbor cancer and therefore targeted to be enrolled in specific early detection and prevention programs. The prevalence of the APC I1307K missense mutation among Ashkenazi Jews is ∼ 6%. Carriers are at an increased risk for colorectal neoplasia. In this study, we examined the association of this variant with non-colorectal cancers. Consecutive 13,013 healthy subjects who underwent screening at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center between 2006 and 2014 were enrolled. This population was supplemented with 1,611 cancer patients from the same institution. Demographics, medical history, and pathological data were recorded. Mortality data were obtained from the Ministry of Health's registry. The prevalence of APC I1307K in cancer patients and healthy subjects was compared. The APC I1307K variant was detected in 189 (11.8%) cancer patients compared to 614 (4.7%) healthy subjects, reflecting an adjusted age and sex odds ratio (OR) of 2.53 (p < 0.0001). History of two or more cancer types was associated with a positive carrier prevalence (OR = 4.38 p < 0.0001). Males had significantly increased carrier prevalence in lung, urologic, pancreatic, and skin cancers. The carrier prevalence among females was significantly higher only in breast and skin cancers. Female carriers developed cancer at a significantly older age compared to non-carriers (average 62.7 years vs. 57.8, respectively, p = 0.027), had better survival rates (HR = 0.58, p = 0.022) and overall increased longevity (average age of death 78.8 vs. 70.4 years, respectively, p = 0.003). In conclusion, the APC I1307K variant is a reliable marker for overall cancer risk

  6. Is risk associated with drinking water in Australia of significant concern to justify mandatory regulation?

    PubMed

    McKay, J; Moeller, A

    2001-10-01

    Presently in Australia there are no mandatory drinking water standards. Here we argue that the risk associated with drinking water in Australia is of a dimension discernible to warrant mandatory regulations. The catchments that supply the major metropolitan areas of Sydney and Adelaide, and the groundwater for the city of Perth have been seriously compromised by the encroachment of development and activities. Melbourne in the past has generally relied on a closed catchment reservoir system; however, population growth in the near future will sequester the full online operation of additional reservoirs, which have multiple land use catchments. In addition to the current landscape circumstances, the management of a water system in itself proposes significant issues of risk. Two critical assumptions that are unique to a mass medium substance like water and dramatically alter the appraisal of risk are: (1) very large numbers of people are potentially exposed, and (2) small changes in contaminant levels may have adverse population outcomes. It is also known that water reticulation systems frequently suffer from contamination problems caused solely by the distribution system, and optimal management of these facilities would best be served by statutory protected transparency and dedicated water quality programs. In 1979, an Australian parliamentary committee stated that an "uncontaminated water supply is" a "basic requirement for the obtainment of good health"; however, recent surveys of Australian water systems show many are not meeting basic water quality criteria, and many communities are not receiving regular monitoring or testing as required by government authorized Australian drinking water guidelines. Exacerbating this situation is the lack of reporting and statutory endorsed standardized procedures to ensure information is properly and promptly recorded and that data are centralized for maximum benefit. The evaluation of risk associated with drinking water in

  7. Submicroscopic and Asymptomatic Plasmodium Parasitaemia Associated with Significant Risk of Anaemia in Papua, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Handayuni, Irene; Trianty, Leily; Utami, Retno A. S.; Tirta, Yusrifar Kharisma; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel; Kusuma, Andreas; Wirjanata, Grennady; Kho, Steven; Simpson, Julie A.; Auburn, Sarah; Douglas, Nicholas M.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R.; Marfurt, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Submicroscopic Plasmodium infections are an important parasite reservoir, but their clinical relevance is poorly defined. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in southern Papua, Indonesia, using cluster random sampling. Data were recorded using a standardized questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for haemoglobin measurement. Plasmodium parasitaemia was determined by blood film microscopy and PCR. Between April and July 2013, 800 households and 2,830 individuals were surveyed. Peripheral parasitaemia was detected in 37.7% (968/2,567) of individuals, 36.8% (357) of whom were identified by blood film examination. Overall the prevalence of P. falciparum parasitaemia was 15.4% (396/2567) and that of P. vivax 18.3% (471/2567). In parasitaemic individuals, submicroscopic infection was significantly more likely in adults (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.82 [95%CI: 2.49–5.86], p<0.001) compared to children, females (AOR = 1.41 [1.07–1.86], p = 0.013), individuals not sleeping under a bednet (AOR = 1.4 [1.0–1.8], p = 0.035), and being afebrile (AOR = 3.2 [1.49–6.93], p = 0.003). The risk of anaemia (according to WHO guidelines) was 32.8% and significantly increased in those with asymptomatic parasitaemia (AOR 2.9 [95% 2.1–4.0], p = 0.007), and submicroscopic P. falciparum infections (AOR 2.5 [95% 1.7–3.6], p = 0.002). Asymptomatic and submicroscopic infections in this area co-endemic for P. falciparum and P. vivax constitute two thirds of detectable parasitaemia and are associated with a high risk of anaemia. Novel public health strategies are needed to detect and eliminate these parasite reservoirs, for the benefit both of the patient and the community. PMID:27788243

  8. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  9. Reassessing the cultural and psychopharmacological significance of Banisteriopsis caapi: preparation, classification and use among the Piaroa of Southern Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Robin

    2008-09-01

    Recent attention to the monoamine oxidase inhibiting properties of Banisteriopsis caapi's harmala alkaloids has precluded a balanced assessment of B. caapi's overall significance to indigenous South American societies. Relatively little attention has been paid to the cultural contexts, local meanings and patterns of use of B. caapi among snuff-using societies, such as the Piaroa, who do not prepare decoctions containing N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) admixtures. This article reviews the psychopharmacological literature on B. caapi in light of recent ethnographic work conducted among the Piaroa of southern Venezuela. Piaroa shamans use only B. caapi's cambium, identify at least five distinct varieties of B. caapi, and emphasise the plant's importance for heightening empathy. Some Piaroa people also attribute a range of extra-shamanic uses to B. caapi, including as a stimulant and hunting aid. In light of the psychopharmacological complexity of harmala alkaloids, and ethnographic evidence for a wide range of B. caapi uses,future research should reconsider B. caapi's cultural heritage and psychopharmacological potential as a stimulant and antidepressant-like substance.

  10. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu; Tian, Suyan

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  11. Microbial risk classifications for recreational waters and applications to the Swan and Canning Rivers in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Lugg, R; Devine, B; Cook, A; Weinstein, P

    2011-03-01

    Protecting recreational water quality where 'whole-of-body contact' activities occur is important from a public health and economic perspective. Numerous studies have demonstrated that infectious illnesses occur when swimming in faecally polluted waters. With the release of the 2008 Australian recreational water guidelines, the Western Australian (WA) Department of Health conducted a formal evaluation to highlight the advantages of applying the microbial risk management framework to 27 swimming beaches in the Swan and Canning Rivers in Perth, WA. This involved a two-phase approach: (i) calculation of 95th percentiles using historical enterococci data; and (ii) undertaking sanitary inspections. The outcomes were combined to assign provisional risk classifications for each site. The classifications are used to promote informed choices as a risk management strategy. The study indicates that the majority of swimming beaches in the Swan-Canning Rivers are classified as 'very good' to 'good' and are considered safe for swimming. The remaining sites were classified as 'poor', which is likely to be attributed to environmental influences. Information from the study was communicated to the public via a series of press releases and the Healthy Swimming website. The guidelines provide a sound approach to managing recreational water quality issues, but some limitations were identified.

  12. [Living in areas of risk: tensions between management of environmental disasters and the significance of risk in everyday life].

    PubMed

    Spink, Mary Jane Paris

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses risks management of environmental disasters from the standpoint of people in vulnerable situations. It is based on the initial phase of research on Life in risk areas conducted with financial support from CNPq. Data was gathered from multiple sources: activities of a local organization (Sociedade Santos Mártires); informal conversations with community residents and leaders in the region; legislative history of Brazilian civil defense; newspaper articles on disasters in the region and extensive bibliographic research. Based on social of critical analysis of risk theories, the objective was to understand the processes of how people deal with risk. Three themes are addressed: description of the territory focusing on the concept of social and environmental vulnerability; the complex network of actors that constitute risk in this territory; local risk management with a focus on everyday life in the community. The preliminary results suggest that in order to understand risk management in situations of vulnerability it is necessary to take into account the heterogeneous network of actors that constitute risk in the territory as well as the multiple dimensions of risk hierarchies as perceived by local inhabitants.

  13. A significant risk factor for poststroke depression: the depression-related subnetwork

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Songran; Hua, Ping; Shang, Xinyuan; Cui, Zaixu; Zhong, Suyu; Gong, Gaolang; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite being one of the direct causes of depression, whether stroke-induced neuroanatomical deterioration actually plays an important role in the onset of poststroke depression (PSD) is controversial. We assessed the structural basis of PSD, particularly with regard to white matter connectivity. Methods We evaluated lesion index, fractional anisotropy (FA) reduction and brain structural networks and then analyzed whole brain voxel-based lesions and FA maps. To understand brain damage in the context of brain connectivity, we used a graph theoretical approach. We selected nodes whose degree correlated with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score (p < 0.05, false discovery rate–corrected), after controlling for age, sex, years of education, lesion size, Mini Mental State Examination score and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. We used Poisson regression with robust standard errors to assess the contribution of the identified network toward poststroke major depression. Results We included 116 stroke patients in the study. Fourteen patients (12.1%) had diagnoses of major depression and 26 (22.4%) had mild depression. We found that lesions in the right insular cortex, left putamen and right superior longitudinal fasciculus as well as FA reductions in broader areas were all associated with major depression. Seventeen nodes were selected to build the depression-related subnetwork. Decreased local efficiency of the subnetwork was a significant risk factor for poststroke major depression (relative risk 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.72–0.98, p = 0.027). Limitations The inability of DTI tractography to process fibre crossings may have resulted in inaccurate construction of white matter networks and affected statistical findings. Conclusion The present study provides, to our knowledge, the first graph theoretical analysis of white matter networks linked to poststroke major depression. These findings provide new insights into the

  14. USING STREAM MORPHOLOGY CLASSIFICATION TO MANAGE ECOLOGICAL RISKS FROM LAND USE CHANGES IN THE LMR WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the amount and types of land use in a watershed can destabilize stream channel structure, increase sediment loading and degrade in-stream habitat. Stream classification systems (e.g. Rosgen) may be useful for determining the susceptibility of stream channel segments t...

  15. USUING STREAM MORPHOLOGY CLASSIFICATION TO MANAGE ECOLOGICAL RISKS FROM LAND USE CHANGES IN THE LMR WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the amount and types of land use in a watershed can destabilize stream channel structure, increase sediment loading and degrade in-stream habitat. Stream classification systems (e.g. Rosgen) may be useful for determining the susceptibility of stream channel segments t...

  16. Effect of Adding McKenzie Syndrome, Centralization, Directional Preference, and Psychosocial Classification Variables to a Risk-Adjusted Model Predicting Functional Status Outcomes for Patients With Lumbar Impairments.

    PubMed

    Werneke, Mark W; Edmond, Susan; Deutscher, Daniel; Ward, Jason; Grigsby, David; Young, Michelle; McGill, Troy; McClenahan, Brian; Weinberg, Jon; Davidow, Amy L

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Background Patient-classification subgroupings may be important prognostic factors explaining outcomes. Objectives To determine effects of adding classification variables (McKenzie syndrome and pain patterns, including centralization and directional preference; Symptom Checklist Back Pain Prediction Model [SCL BPPM]; and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire subscales of work and physical activity) to a baseline risk-adjusted model predicting functional status (FS) outcomes. Methods Consecutive patients completed a battery of questionnaires that gathered information on 11 risk-adjustment variables. Physical therapists trained in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy methods classified each patient by McKenzie syndromes and pain pattern. Functional status was assessed at discharge by patient-reported outcomes. Only patients with complete data were included. Risk of selection bias was assessed. Prediction of discharge FS was assessed using linear stepwise regression models, allowing 13 variables to enter the model. Significant variables were retained in subsequent models. Model power (R(2)) and beta coefficients for model variables were estimated. Results Two thousand sixty-six patients with lumbar impairments were evaluated. Of those, 994 (48%), 10 (<1%), and 601 (29%) were excluded due to incomplete psychosocial data, McKenzie classification data, and missing FS at discharge, respectively. The final sample for analyses was 723 (35%). Overall R(2) for the baseline prediction FS model was 0.40. Adding classification variables to the baseline model did not result in significant increases in R(2). McKenzie syndrome or pain pattern explained 2.8% and 3.0% of the variance, respectively. When pain pattern and SCL BPPM were added simultaneously, overall model R(2) increased to 0.44. Although none of these increases in R(2) were significant, some classification variables were stronger predictors compared with some other variables included in

  17. Effect of Adding McKenzie Syndrome, Centralization, Directional Preference, and Psychosocial Classification Variables to a Risk-Adjusted Model Predicting Functional Status Outcomes for Patients With Lumbar Impairments.

    PubMed

    Werneke, Mark W; Edmond, Susan; Deutscher, Daniel; Ward, Jason; Grigsby, David; Young, Michelle; McGill, Troy; McClenahan, Brian; Weinberg, Jon; Davidow, Amy L

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Background Patient-classification subgroupings may be important prognostic factors explaining outcomes. Objectives To determine effects of adding classification variables (McKenzie syndrome and pain patterns, including centralization and directional preference; Symptom Checklist Back Pain Prediction Model [SCL BPPM]; and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire subscales of work and physical activity) to a baseline risk-adjusted model predicting functional status (FS) outcomes. Methods Consecutive patients completed a battery of questionnaires that gathered information on 11 risk-adjustment variables. Physical therapists trained in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy methods classified each patient by McKenzie syndromes and pain pattern. Functional status was assessed at discharge by patient-reported outcomes. Only patients with complete data were included. Risk of selection bias was assessed. Prediction of discharge FS was assessed using linear stepwise regression models, allowing 13 variables to enter the model. Significant variables were retained in subsequent models. Model power (R(2)) and beta coefficients for model variables were estimated. Results Two thousand sixty-six patients with lumbar impairments were evaluated. Of those, 994 (48%), 10 (<1%), and 601 (29%) were excluded due to incomplete psychosocial data, McKenzie classification data, and missing FS at discharge, respectively. The final sample for analyses was 723 (35%). Overall R(2) for the baseline prediction FS model was 0.40. Adding classification variables to the baseline model did not result in significant increases in R(2). McKenzie syndrome or pain pattern explained 2.8% and 3.0% of the variance, respectively. When pain pattern and SCL BPPM were added simultaneously, overall model R(2) increased to 0.44. Although none of these increases in R(2) were significant, some classification variables were stronger predictors compared with some other variables included in

  18. Agreement between the SCORE and D’Agostino Scales for the Classification of High Cardiovascular Risk in Sedentary Spanish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Grandes, Gonzalo; Iglesias-Valiente, José A.; Sánchez, Alvaro; Montoya, Imanol; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Background: To evaluate agreement between cardiovascular risk in sedentary patients as estimated by the new Framingham-D’Agostino scale and by the SCORE chart, and to describe the patient characteristics associated with the observed disagreement between the scales. Design: A cross-sectional study was undertaken involving a systematic sample of 2,295 sedentary individuals between 40–65 years of age seen for any reason in 56 primary care offices. An estimation was made of the Pearson correlation coefficient and kappa statistic for the classification of high risk subjects (≥20% according to the Framingham-D’Agostino scale, and ≥5% according to SCORE). Polytomous logistic regression models were fitted to identify the variables associated with the discordance between the two scales. Results: The mean risk in males (35%) was 19.5% ± 13% with D’Agostino scale, and 3.2% ± 3.3% with SCORE. Among females, they were 8.1% ± 6.8% and 1.2% ± 2.2%, respectively. The correlation between the two scales was 0.874 in males (95% CI: 0.857–0.889) and 0.818 in females (95% CI: 0.800–0.834), while the kappa index was 0.50 in males (95% CI: 0.44%–0.56%) and 0.61 in females (95% CI: 0.52%–0.71%). The most frequent disagreement, characterized by high risk according to D’Agostino scale but not according to SCORE, was much more prevalent among males and proved more probable with increasing age and increased LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and systolic blood pressure values, as well as among those who used antihypertensive drugs and smokers. Conclusions: The quantitative correlation between the two scales is very high. Patient categorization as corresponding to high risk generates disagreements, mainly among males, where agreement between the two classifications is only moderate. PMID:20049225

  19. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a Framework for Providing Patient- and Family-Centered Audiological Care for Older Adults and Their Significant Others.

    PubMed

    Grenness, Caitlin; Meyer, Carly; Scarinci, Nerina; Ekberg, Katie; Hickson, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Hearing impairment is highly prevalent in the older population, and it impacts communication and quality of life for both the people with the hearing difficulties and their significant others. In this article, typical audiological assessment and management of an older adult is contrasted with a best practice approach wherein the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework is applied. The aim of the comparison is to demonstrate how the ICF expands our focus: rather than merely focusing on impairment, we also consider the activities, participation, and contextual factors for both the person with the hearing impairment and his or her family. A case example of an older patient and her spouse is provided, and their shared experience of the patient's hearing impairment is mapped onto the ICF framework. Family-centered hearing care is recommended for individualizing care and improving outcomes for older patients and their families. PMID:27489398

  20. Classification-based data mining for identification of risk patterns associated with hypertension in Middle Eastern population: A 12-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Kabir, Ali; Pournik, Omid; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a critical public health concern worldwide. Identification of risk factors using traditional multivariable models has been a field of active research. The present study was undertaken to identify risk patterns associated with hypertension incidence using data mining methods in a cohort of Iranian adult population.Data on 6205 participants (44% men) age > 20 years, free from hypertension at baseline with no history of cardiovascular disease, were used to develop a series of prediction models by 3 types of decision tree (DT) algorithms. The performances of all classifiers were evaluated on the testing data set.The Quick Unbiased Efficient Statistical Tree algorithm among men and women and Classification and Regression Tree among the total population had the best performance. The C-statistic and sensitivity for the prediction models were (0.70 and 71%) in men, (0.79 and 71%) in women, and (0.78 and 72%) in total population, respectively. In DT models, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, age, and waist circumference significantly contributed to the risk of incident hypertension in both genders and total population, wrist circumference and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose among women and fasting plasma glucose among men. In men, the highest hypertension risk was seen in those with SBP > 115 mm Hg and age > 30 years. In women those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 33 years had the highest risk for hypertension. For the total population, higher risk was observed in those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 38 years.Our study emphasizes the utility of DTs for prediction of hypertension and exploring interaction between predictors. DT models used the easily available variables to identify homogeneous subgroups with different risk pattern for the hypertension. PMID:27583845

  1. Classification-based data mining for identification of risk patterns associated with hypertension in Middle Eastern population: A 12-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Kabir, Ali; Pournik, Omid; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a critical public health concern worldwide. Identification of risk factors using traditional multivariable models has been a field of active research. The present study was undertaken to identify risk patterns associated with hypertension incidence using data mining methods in a cohort of Iranian adult population.Data on 6205 participants (44% men) age > 20 years, free from hypertension at baseline with no history of cardiovascular disease, were used to develop a series of prediction models by 3 types of decision tree (DT) algorithms. The performances of all classifiers were evaluated on the testing data set.The Quick Unbiased Efficient Statistical Tree algorithm among men and women and Classification and Regression Tree among the total population had the best performance. The C-statistic and sensitivity for the prediction models were (0.70 and 71%) in men, (0.79 and 71%) in women, and (0.78 and 72%) in total population, respectively. In DT models, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, age, and waist circumference significantly contributed to the risk of incident hypertension in both genders and total population, wrist circumference and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose among women and fasting plasma glucose among men. In men, the highest hypertension risk was seen in those with SBP > 115 mm Hg and age > 30 years. In women those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 33 years had the highest risk for hypertension. For the total population, higher risk was observed in those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 38 years.Our study emphasizes the utility of DTs for prediction of hypertension and exploring interaction between predictors. DT models used the easily available variables to identify homogeneous subgroups with different risk pattern for the hypertension.

  2. Duplications of the Neuropeptide Receptor VIPR2 Confer Significant Risk for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Vacic, Vladimir; McCarthy, Shane; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Murray, Fiona; Chou, Hsun-Hua; Peoples, Aine; Makarov, Vladimir; Yoon, Seungtai; Bhandari, Abhishek; Corominas, Roser; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Krastoshevsky, Olga; Krause, Verena; Larach-Walters, Verónica; Welsh, David K.; Craig, David; Kelsoe, John R.; Gershon, Elliot S.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Aquila, Marie Dell; Morris, Derek W.; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Insel, Paul A.; McClellan, Jon; King, Mary-Claire; Karayiorgou, Maria; Levy, Deborah L.; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Sebat, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Rare copy number variants (CNVs) play a prominent role in the etiology of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders1. Substantial risk for schizophrenia is conferred by large (>500 kb) CNVs at several loci, including microdeletions at 1q21.1 2, 3q29 3, 15q13.3 2 and 22q11.2 4 and microduplication at 16p11.2 5. However, these CNVs collectively account for a small fraction (2-4%) of cases, and the relevant genes and neurobiological mechanisms are not well understood. Here we performed a large two-stage genome-wide scan of rare CNVs and report the significant association of copy number gains at chromosome 7q36.3 with schizophrenia (P= 4.0×10-5, OR = 16.14 [3.06, ∞]). Microduplications with variable breakpoints occurred within a 362 kb region and were detected in 29 of 8,290 (0.35%) patients versus two of 7,431 (0.03%) controls in the combined sample (p-value= 5.7×10-7, odds ratio (OR) = 14.1 [3.5, 123.9]). All duplications overlapped or were located within 89 kb upstream of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor VIPR2. VIPR2 transcription and cyclic-AMP signaling were significantly increased in cultured lymphocytes from patients with microduplications of 7q36.3. These findings implicate altered VIP signaling in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and suggest VIPR2 as a potential target for the development of novel antipsychotic drugs. PMID:21346763

  3. Automatic Classification of Structured Product Labels for Pregnancy Risk Drug Categories, a Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Laritza M.; Fushman, Dina Demner

    2015-01-01

    With regular expressions and manual review, 18,342 FDA-approved drug product labels were processed to determine if the five standard pregnancy drug risk categories were mentioned in the label. After excluding 81 drugs with multiple-risk categories, 83% of the labels had a risk category within the text and 17% labels did not. We trained a Sequential Minimal Optimization algorithm on the labels containing pregnancy risk information segmented into standard document sections. For the evaluation of the classifier on the testing set, we used the Micromedex drug risk categories. The precautions section had the best performance for assigning drug risk categories, achieving Accuracy 0.79, Precision 0.66, Recall 0.64 and F1 measure 0.65. Missing pregnancy risk categories could be suggested using machine learning algorithms trained on the existing publicly available pregnancy risk information. PMID:26958248

  4. Factors associated with an increased risk of vertebral fracture in monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance

    PubMed Central

    Piot, J M; Royer, M; Schmidt-Tanguy, A; Hoppé, E; Gardembas, M; Bourrée, T; Hunault, M; François, S; Boyer, F; Ifrah, N; Renier, G; Chevailler, A; Audran, M; Chappard, D; Libouban, H; Mabilleau, G; Legrand, E; Bouvard, B

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of fractures. This study describes prospectively the bone status of MGUS patients and determines the factors associated with vertebral fracture. We included prospectively 201 patients with MGUS, incidentally discovered, and with no known history of osteoporosis: mean age 66.6±12.5 years, 48.3% women, 51.7% immunoglobulin G (IgG), 33.3% IgM and 10.4% IgA. Light chain was kappa in 64.2% patients. All patients had spinal radiographs and bone mineral density measurement in addition to gammopathy assessment. At least one prevalent non-traumatic vertebral fracture was discovered in 18.4% patients and equally distributed between men and women. Fractured patients were older, had a lower bone density and had also more frequently a lambda light chain isotype. Compared with patients with κ light chain, the odds ratio of being fractured for patients with λ light chain was 4.32 (95% confidence interval 1.80–11.16; P=0.002). These results suggest a high prevalence of non-traumatic vertebral fractures in MGUS associated with lambda light chain isotype and not only explained by low bone density. PMID:26314987

  5. Anabolic steroids detected in bodybuilding dietary supplements - a significant risk to public health.

    PubMed

    Abbate, V; Kicman, A T; Evans-Brown, M; McVeigh, J; Cowan, D A; Wilson, C; Coles, S J; Walker, C J

    2015-07-01

    Twenty-four products suspected of containing anabolic steroids and sold in fitness equipment shops in the United Kingdom (UK) were analyzed for their qualitative and semi-quantitative content using full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), accurate mass liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), high pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), UV-Vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, X-ray crystallography enabled the identification of one of the compounds, where reference standard was not available. Of the 24 products tested, 23 contained steroids including known anabolic agents; 16 of these contained steroids that were different to those indicated on the packaging and one product contained no steroid at all. Overall, 13 different steroids were identified; 12 of these are controlled in the UK under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. Several of the products contained steroids that may be considered to have considerable pharmacological activity, based on their chemical structures and the amounts present. This could unwittingly expose users to a significant risk to their health, which is of particular concern for naïve users.

  6. Derivation of a No-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to diethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Kirman, C R; Hughes, B; Becker, R A; Hays, S M

    2016-04-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) has been found to produce liver and kidney tumors in mice following lifetime dermal exposures. Data regarding the mode of action by which DEA produces these tumors were used to support a dose-response assessment that resulted in a no-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to DEA. DEA and its metabolites are structural analogs to endogenous agents important to choline homeostasis. Sufficient information is available to support an epigenetic MOA involving the perturbation of choline homeostasis and hepatic methylation reactions in the formation of mouse liver tumors. This MOA may also apply to mouse kidney tumors, but direct measurements for key events in kidney are lacking. For both tumor types, dose-response data were pooled across four cancer bioassays conducted for DEA and DEA-containing condensates in order to provide a more robust characterization of the dose-response relationships. Doses were expressed in terms of dermally absorbed dose so that the dose-dependency and species differences in the dermal absorption of DEA were addressed. The resulting NSRL value of 3400 ug/day for dermal exposures to DEA is considered to be protective of human health for both tumor endpoints.

  7. Derivation of a No-Significant-Risk-Level (NSRL) for diethanolamine (DEA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingxuan; Amacher, David E; Whittaker, Margaret H

    2014-02-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) has been listed on the State of California's Proposition 65 List. This listing is based in part on tumors reported in a National Toxicology Program (NTP) 2-year dermal carcinogenicity study in mice which found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in B6C3F₁ mice based on increased incidences of liver neoplasms in both sexes, and increased incidences of renal tubule neoplasms in males. Although considerable controversy exists on the relevance of the NTP study to humans, industries are obligated to comply with the Proposition 65 labeling requirement and drinking water discharge prohibition, unless they are able to demonstrate that DEA levels in their products are below a specific No Significant Risk Level (NSRL). The State of California has not published an NSRL for DEA. In this article, a NSRL of 5.6 μg/day and a life-stage-adjusted NSRL(adj) of 1.4 μg/day are derived from the NTP carcinogenicity study using a benchmark dose modeling method based on the incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in female mice, in accordance with the guidelines of California EPA.

  8. Classification of wounds at risk and their antimicrobial treatment with polihexanide: a practice-oriented expert recommendation.

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Assadian, O; Gerber, V; Kingsley, A; Kramer, A; Leaper, D J; Mosti, G; Piatkowski de Grzymala, A; Riepe, G; Risse, A; Romanelli, M; Strohal, R; Traber, J; Vasel-Biergans, A; Wild, T; Eberlein, T

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are no generally accepted definitions for wounds at risk of infection. In clinical practice, too many chronic wounds are regarded as being at risk of infection, and therefore many topical antimicrobials - in terms of frequency and duration of use - are applied to wounds. Based on expert discussion and current knowledge, a clinical assessment score was developed. The objective of this wounds at risk (W.A.R.) score is to allow decision-making on the indication for the use of antiseptics on the basis of polihexanide. The proposed clinical classification of W.A.R. shall facilitate the decision for wound antisepsis and allow an appropriate general treatment regimen with the focus on the prevention of wound infection. The W.A.R. score is based on a clinically oriented risk assessment using concrete patient circumstances. The indication for the use of antiseptics results from the addition of differently weighted risk causes, for which points are assigned. Antimicrobial treatment is justified in the case of 3 or more points.

  9. Potential Increased Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality With Significant Dose Fractionation in the Canadian Fluoroscopy Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zablotska, Lydia B.; Little, Mark P.; Cornett, R. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Risks of noncancer causes of death, particularly cardiovascular disease, associated with exposures to high-dose ionizing radiation, are well known. Recent studies have reported excess risk in workers who are occupationally exposed to low doses at a low dose rate, but the risks of moderately fractionated exposures, such as occur during diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. The Canadian Fluoroscopy Cohort Study includes 63,707 tuberculosis patients exposed to multiple fluoroscopic procedures in 1930–1952 and followed-up for death from noncancer causes in 1950–1987. We used a Poisson regression to estimate excess relative risk (ERR) per Gy of cumulative radiation dose to the lung (mean dose = 0.79 Gy; range, 0–11.60). The risk of death from noncancer causes was significantly lower in these subjects compared with the Canadian general population (P < 0.001). We estimated small, nonsignificant increases in the risk of death from noncancer causes with dose. We estimated an ERR/Gy of 0.176 (95% confidence interval: 0.011, 0.393) (n = 5,818 deaths) for ischemic heart disease (IHD) after adjustment for dose fractionation. A significant (P = 0.022) inverse dose fractionation effect in dose trends of IHD was observed, with the highest estimate of ERR/Gy for those with the fewest fluoroscopic procedures per year. Radiation-related risks of IHD decreased significantly with increasing time since first exposure and age at first exposure (both P < 0.05). This is the largest study of patients exposed to moderately fractionated low-to-moderate doses of radiation, and it provides additional evidence of increased radiation-associated risks of death from IHD, in particular, significantly increased radiation risks from doses similar to those from diagnostic radiation procedures. The novel finding of a significant inverse dose-fractionation association in IHD mortality requires further investigation. PMID:24145888

  10. Brief Report: Classification of Adolescent Suicide and Risk-Taking Deaths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankey, Melissa; Lawrence, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the suicide and risk-taking deaths of adolescents aged 12-17 years between January 1996 and December 2000. The methodology consisted of a case file review of government records. One hundred and eighty-seven adolescents (133 males, 54 females) died by suicide and risk-taking and could be classified into three distinct groups:…

  11. Classification of Risk Status in ADHD Screening: A Comparison of Symptom Item Formats on Behavior Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John D.; Ashley, Donna M.; Bramlett, Ronald K.; Murphy, John J.

    This report presents a study that examined the effects of symptom item formats on estimates of risk status across alternative attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) behavior checklists for 38 referred children. The mean age of the children was 7 years 9 months. The study focused on ADHD risk as measured by two behavior checklists which…

  12. No Significant Effects of Smoking or Alcohol Consumption on Risk of Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jennifer R.; Richardson, Peter A.; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoking, but not higher alcohol consumption, is associated with increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to EAC. However, it is still unclear whether smoking or alcohol is implicated in the development of BE. Aim To evaluate the associations between smoking, alcohol and the risk of BE. Methods The study included eligible patients scheduled for elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and a sample of patients eligible for screening colonoscopy recruited from primary care clinics. We compared 258 patients with definitive BE with two separate control groups: 453 patients from the primary care group (“colonoscopy controls”) and 1,145 patients from the elective EGD group (“endoscopy controls”) with no endoscopic or histopathologic BE. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) using multivariable logistic regression models. Results Seventy-seven percent of BE cases, 75 % of colonoscopy controls and 72 % of endoscopy controls were ever smokers. Of these, approximately 45 % were current smokers. Overall, 91 % of study participants were ex or current alcohol drinkers, with the majority drinking beer. We found no association between various measure of smoking exposure (status, intensity, age at initiation, duration, pack-years and cessation) and risk of BE. Alcohol consumption was not associated with increased risk of BE. Conversely, moderate intake was associated with lower risk (14 to<28 drinks/week, OR 0.39, 95 % CI 0.15–1.00). Conclusion Smoking and alcohol were not strong or consistent risk factors for BE. The likely role of smoking in increasing risk of EAC is through promoting progression from BE to cancer. PMID:24114046

  13. Assessment on the classification of landslide risk level using Genetic Algorithm of Operation Tree in central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chiang; Yeh, Hui-Chung; Chen, Yen-Chang

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the classification of landslide areas by Genetic Algorithm of Operation Tree (GAOT) of Chen-Yu-Lan River upstream watershed of National Taiwan University Experimental Forest (NTUEF) after the Typhoon Morakot in 2009 using remotely and geological data. Landslides of 624.5 ha which accounting for 1.9% of total area were delineated with the threshold of slope (22°) and area size (1 hectare), 48 landslide sites were located in the upstream Chen-Yu-Lan watershed using FORMOSAT-II satellite imagery, the aerial photo and GIS related coverage. The five risk levels of these landslide areas was classified by the area, elevation, slope order, aspect, erosion order and geological factor order using the Simplicity Method suggested in the Technical Regulations for Soil and Water Conservation of Taiwan. If all the landslide sites were considered, the accuracy of classification using GAOT is 97.9%, superior than the K-means, Ward method, Shared Nearest Neighbor method, Maximum Likelihood Classifier and Bayesian Classifier; if 36 sites were used as training samples and the rest 12 sites were tested, the accuracy still can reach 81.3%. More geological data, anthropogenic influence and hydrological factors may be necessary for clarifying the landside area and the results benefit the assessment for future correction and management of the authorities.

  14. Radioactive and mixed waste - risk as a basis for waste classification. Symposium proceedings No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-21

    The management of risks from radioactive and chemical materials has been a major environmental concern in the United states for the past two or three decades. Risk management of these materials encompasses the remediation of past disposal practices as well as development of appropriate strategies and controls for current and future operations. This symposium is concerned primarily with low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes. Individual reports were processed separately for the Department of Energy databases.

  15. [The significance of high sensitive C reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Meguro, Shu; Ishibashi, Midori; Takei, Izumi

    2012-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Several prospective studies have indicated that an elevated high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level is a risk factor for CVD. These results were also confirmed by prospective studies in Japan both for primary and secondary prevention. A randomized control study using statins also revealed that lower levels of both LDL cholesterol and hs-CRP were independently related to the incidence of CVD. Recent meta-analysis revealed that hs-CRP was a risk factor not only for CVD but for other diseases including cancers. It revealed that the absolute value of hs-CRP varied among the study populations. The mechanism of how hs-CRP is associated with the pathogenesis of CVD is not fully understood. Generally, inflammation in the vascular wall and the release of inflammatory cytokines from macrophages was considered to the main mechanism, but infection with such as chlamydia or Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal disease have been postulated as the causes of systemic inflammation. Recently, visceral fat accumulation and its cross-interaction with inflammatory cells have been proposed as the cause of systemic inflammation as "innate inflammation". Our original cross sectional studies also showed the correlations of hs-CRP with BMI and triglyceride. Although there is no specific therapy for the reduction of hs-CRP, we have to consider hs-CRP as a risk factor for CVD which complements other classical risk factors. PMID:22686046

  16. Constructing a holistic approach to disaster risk reduction: the significance of focusing on vulnerability reduction.

    PubMed

    Palliyaguru, Roshani; Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Baldry, David

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the increase in natural disaster losses, policy-makers, practitioners, and members of the research community around the world are seeking effective and efficient means of overcoming or minimising them. Although various theoretical constructs are beneficial to understanding the disaster phenomenon and the means of minimising losses, the disaster risk management process becomes less effective if theory and practice are set apart from one another. Consequently, this paper seeks to establish a relationship between two theoretical constructs, 'disaster risk reduction (DRR)' and 'vulnerability reduction', and to develop a holistic approach to DRR with particular reference to improving its applicability in practical settings. It is based on a literature review and on an overall understanding gained through two case studies of post-disaster infrastructure reconstruction projects in Sri Lanka and three expert interviews in Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom.

  17. [Early risk factors of eating disorders--do events of prenatal and perinatal periods bear significance?].

    PubMed

    Raevuori, Anu; Niemelä, Solja; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Sourander, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Evidence of the relation of complications occurring in the pregnancy, delivery and neonatal periods to the risk of contracting a subsequent eating disorder has been obtained during recent years. Factors associated with parturition and neonatal period seem to predict both anorexia and bulimia, whereas disorders during pregnancy are more clearly associated with the descendant's anorexia. This difference may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disorders.

  18. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, D.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, F.W.

    1997-11-01

    'This report summarizes the first year''s progress of research funded under the Department of Energy''s Environmental Management Science Program. The research was initiated to better determine ecological risks from toxic and radioactive contaminants. More precisely, the research is designed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and to identify characteristics of non-human populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, as is typically found on many DOE sites. The authors propose to establish a protocol to assess risks to non-human species at higher levels of biological organization by relating molecular damage to more relevant responses that reflect population health. They think that they can achieve this by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables, and by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization.'

  19. [Dosage values for characterization of patient exposure in computerized tomography and their significance for risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Hidajat, N; Schröder, R J; Wolf, M; Vogl, T; Felix, R

    1997-06-01

    In order to evaluate patients' exposure to radiation in computed tomography, dose quantities such as the computed tomography dose index (CTDI), multiple scan average dose (MSAD) and dose free in air on the axis of rotation are used. The CTDI and the MSAD, derivable from the CTDI, are a good measure for the absorbed doses in the examined volume, but they do not take the biological sensitivity of the organs into account and do not describe the radiogenic risk that is actually relevant for patients and doctors. The dose on the axis of rotation is not an accurate measure of the effective dose and the radiogenic risk. The declaration of a limit for the dose on the axis of rotation should take the different regions into account, in order to guarantee acceptable image quality on one hand and to avoid an unnecessarily high risk on the other side. As physical dose quantities, the CTDI, MSAD and dose on the axis of rotation are useful to characterize and differentiate between programs and systems concerning radiation exposure.

  20. Risk-based prioritization methodology for the classification of groundwater pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Lisa; Zabeo, Alex; Critto, Andrea; Giubilato, Elisa; Marcomini, Antonio

    2015-02-15

    Water management is one of the EU environmental priorities and it is one of the most serious challenges that today's major cities are facing. The main European regulation for the protection of water resources is represented by the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the Groundwater Directive (2006/118/EC) which require the identification, risk-based ranking and management of sources of pollution and the identification of those contamination sources that threaten the achievement of groundwater's good quality status. The aim of this paper is to present a new risk-based prioritization methodology to support the determination of a management strategy for the achievement of the good quality status of groundwater. The proposed methodology encompasses the following steps: 1) hazard analysis, 2) pathway analysis, 3) receptor vulnerability analysis and 4) relative risk estimation. Moreover, by integrating GIS functionalities and Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) techniques, it allows to: i) deal with several sources and multiple impacted receptors within the area of concern; ii) identify different receptors' vulnerability levels according to specific groundwater uses; iii) assess the risks posed by all contamination sources in the area; and iv) provide a risk-based ranking of the contamination sources that can threaten the achievement of the groundwater good quality status. The application of the proposed framework to a well-known industrialized area located in the surroundings of Milan (Italy) is illustrated in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework in supporting the identification of intervention priorities. Among the 32 sources analyzed in the case study, three sources received the highest relevance score, due to the medium-high relative risks estimated for Chromium (VI) and Perchloroethylene. The case study application showed that the developed methodology is flexible and easy to adapt to different contexts, thanks to the possibility to

  1. Identifying unique and shared risk factors for physical intimate partner violence and clinically-significant physical intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Slep, Amy M Smith; Foran, Heather M; Heyman, Richard E; Snarr, Jeffery D; Usaf Family Advocacy Research Program

    2014-12-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health concern. To date, risk factor research has not differentiated physical violence that leads to injury and/or fear (i.e., clinically significant IPV; CS-IPV) from general physical IPV. Isolating risk relations is necessary to best inform prevention and treatment efforts. The current study used an ecological framework and evaluated relations of likely risk factors within individual, family, workplace, and community levels with both CS-IPV and general IPV to determine whether they were related to one type of IPV, both, or neither for both men and women. Probable risk and promotive factors from multiple ecological levels of influence were selected from the literature and assessed, along with CS-IPV and general IPV, via an anonymous, web-based survey. The sample comprised US Air Force (AF) active duty members and civilian spouses (total N = 36,861 men; 24,331 women) from 82 sites worldwide. Relationship satisfaction, age, and alcohol problems were identified as unique risk factors (in the context of the 23 other risk factors examined) across IPV and CS-IPV for men and women. Other unique risk factors were identified that differed in prediction of IPV and CS-IPV. The results suggest a variety of both established and novel potential foci for indirectly targeting partner aggression and clinically-significant IPV by improving people's risk profiles at the individual, family, workplace, and community levels. Aggr. Behav. 9999:XX-XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25474230

  2. Identifying unique and shared risk factors for physical intimate partner violence and clinically-significant physical intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Slep, Amy M Smith; Foran, Heather M; Heyman, Richard E; Snarr, Jeffery D; Usaf Family Advocacy Research Program

    2015-05-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health concern. To date, risk factor research has not differentiated physical violence that leads to injury and/or fear (i.e., clinically significant IPV; CS-IPV) from general physical IPV. Isolating risk relations is necessary to best inform prevention and treatment efforts. The current study used an ecological framework and evaluated relations of likely risk factors within individual, family, workplace, and community levels with both CS-IPV and general IPV to determine whether they were related to one type of IPV, both, or neither for both men and women. Probable risk and promotive factors from multiple ecological levels of influence were selected from the literature and assessed, along with CS-IPV and general IPV, via an anonymous, web-based survey. The sample comprised US Air Force (AF) active duty members and civilian spouses (total N = 36,861 men; 24,331 women) from 82 sites worldwide. Relationship satisfaction, age, and alcohol problems were identified as unique risk factors (in the context of the 23 other risk factors examined) across IPV and CS-IPV for men and women. Other unique risk factors were identified that differed in prediction of IPV and CS-IPV. The results suggest a variety of both established and novel potential foci for indirectly targeting partner aggression and clinically-significant IPV by improving people's risk profiles at the individual, family, workplace, and community levels. Aggr. Behav. 41:227-241, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27541201

  3. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Scott, D.; Rowe, C.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, W.

    1998-06-01

    'The goal of this report is to establish a protocol for assessing risks to non-human populations exposed to environmental stresses typically found on many DOE sites. The authors think that they can achieve this by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments, and by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables (such as age-specific survivorship, reproductive output, age at maturity and longevity). This research is needed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, and radiation with concomitant exposure to chemicals. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization. The experimental facility will allow them to develop a credible assessment tool for appraising ecological risks, and to evaluate the effects of radionuclide/chemical synergisms on non-human species. This report summarizes work completed midway of a 3-year project that began in November 1996. Emphasis to date has centered on three areas: (1) developing a molecular probe to measure stable chromosomal aberrations known as reciprocal translocations, (2) constructing an irradiation facility where the statistical power inherent in replicated mesocosms can be used to address the response of non-human organisms to exposures from low levels of radiation and metal contaminants, and (3) quantifying responses of organisms living in contaminated mesocosms and field sites.'

  4. Brief Communication: Newly developing rift in Larsen C Ice Shelf presents significant risk to stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, D.; Luckman, A. J.; Cook, A.; Bevan, S.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, B.; Holland, P. R.

    2015-06-01

    An established rift in the Larsen C Ice Shelf, formerly constrained by a suture zone containing marine ice, grew rapidly during 2014 and is likely in the near future to generate the largest calving event since the 1980s and result in a new minimum area for the ice shelf. Here we investigate the recent development of the rift, quantify the projected calving event and, using a numerical model, assess its likely impact on ice shelf stability. We find that the ice front is at risk of becoming unstable when the anticipated calving event occurs.

  5. Combining the ASA Physical Classification System and Continuous Intraoperative Surgical Apgar Score Measurement in Predicting Postoperative Risk.

    PubMed

    Jering, Monika Zdenka; Marolen, Khensani N; Shotwell, Matthew S; Denton, Jason N; Sandberg, Warren S; Ehrenfeld, Jesse Menachem

    2015-11-01

    The surgical Apgar score predicts major 30-day postoperative complications using data assessed at the end of surgery. We hypothesized that evaluating the surgical Apgar score continuously during surgery may identify patients at high risk for postoperative complications. We retrospectively identified general, vascular, and general oncology patients at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Logistic regression methods were used to construct a series of predictive models in order to continuously estimate the risk of major postoperative complications, and to alert care providers during surgery should the risk exceed a given threshold. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was used to evaluate the discriminative ability of a model utilizing a continuously measured surgical Apgar score relative to models that use only preoperative clinical factors or continuously monitored individual constituents of the surgical Apgar score (i.e. heart rate, blood pressure, and blood loss). AUROC estimates were validated internally using a bootstrap method. 4,728 patients were included. Combining the ASA PS classification with continuously measured surgical Apgar score demonstrated improved discriminative ability (AUROC 0.80) in the pooled cohort compared to ASA (0.73) and the surgical Apgar score alone (0.74). To optimize the tradeoff between inadequate and excessive alerting with future real-time notifications, we recommend a threshold probability of 0.24. Continuous assessment of the surgical Apgar score is predictive for major postoperative complications. In the future, real-time notifications might allow for detection and mitigation of changes in a patient's accumulating risk of complications during a surgical procedure.

  6. Classification and assessment of water bodies as adaptive structural measures for flood risk management planning.

    PubMed

    McMinn, William R; Yang, Qinli; Scholz, Miklas

    2010-09-01

    Severe rainfall events have become increasingly common in Europe. Flood defence engineering works are highly capital intensive and can be limited by land availability, leaving land and communities exposed to repeated flooding. Any adaptive drainage structure must have engineered inlets and outlets that control the water level and the rate of release. In Scotland, there are a relatively high number of drinking water reservoirs (operated by Scottish Water), which fall within this defined category and could contribute to flood management control. Reducing the rate of runoff from the upper reaches of a catchment will reduce the volume and peak flows of flood events downstream, thus allowing flood defences to be reduced in size, decreasing the corresponding capital costs. A database of retention basins with flood control potential has been developed for Scotland. The research shows that the majority of small and former drinking water reservoirs are kept full and their spillways are continuously in operation. Utilising some of the available capacity to contribute to flood control could reduce the costs of complying with the EU Flood Directive. Furthermore, the application of a previously developed classification model for Baden in Germany for the Scottish data set showed a lower diversity for basins in Scotland due to less developed infrastructure. The principle value of this approach is a clear and unambiguous categorisation, based on standard variables, which can help to promote communication and understanding between stakeholders.

  7. Significant factors of aviation insurance and risk management strategy: an empirical study of Taiwanese airline carriers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi Hsin; Chang, Yu Hern

    2008-04-01

    Aviation insurance premiums have become a heavy burden for the airline industry since September 11, 2001. Although the industry must constantly balance its operations between profitability and safety, the reality is that airlines are in the business of making money. Therefore, their ability to reduce cost and manage risk is a key factor for success. Unlike past research, which used subjective judgment methods, this study applied quantitative historical data (1999-2000) and gray relation analysis to identify the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance premiums. An empirical study of six airlines in Taiwan was conducted to determine these factors and to analyze the management strategies used to deal with them. Results showed that the loss experience and performance of individual airlines were the key elements associated with aviation insurance premiums paid by each airline. By identifying and understanding the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance, airlines will better understand their relative operational strengths and weaknesses, and further help top management identify areas for further improvement. Knowledge of these factors combined with effective risk management strategies, may result in lower premiums and operating costs for airline companies. PMID:18419661

  8. Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, R J; Eakins, J S; Jansen, J T M; Harrison, J D

    2012-08-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) on human health has been the subject of much conjecture. Both the chemical and radiological aspects of its behaviour in the human body have previously been investigated in detail, with the radiological impact being assumed to be linked to the alpha decay of uranium. More recently, it has been proposed that the accumulation in tissue of high-Z materials, such as DU, may give rise to enhanced local energy deposition in the presence of natural background photon radiation due to the high photoelectric interaction cross sections of high-Z atoms. It is speculated that, in addition to producing short-range photoelectrons, these events will be followed by intense Auger and Coster-Kronig electron emission, thereby causing levels of cell damage that are unaccounted for in conventional models of radiological risk. In this study, the physical and biological bases of these claims are investigated. The potential magnitudes of any effect are evaluated and discussed, and compared with the risks from other radiological or chemical hazards. Monte Carlo calculations are performed to estimate likely energy depositions due to the presence of uranium in human tissues in photon fields: whole body doses, organ doses in anthropomorphic phantoms and nano-/micro-dosimetric scenarios are each considered. The proposal is shown generally to be based on sound physics, but overall the impact on human health is expected to be negligible.

  9. Significant factors of aviation insurance and risk management strategy: an empirical study of Taiwanese airline carriers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi Hsin; Chang, Yu Hern

    2008-04-01

    Aviation insurance premiums have become a heavy burden for the airline industry since September 11, 2001. Although the industry must constantly balance its operations between profitability and safety, the reality is that airlines are in the business of making money. Therefore, their ability to reduce cost and manage risk is a key factor for success. Unlike past research, which used subjective judgment methods, this study applied quantitative historical data (1999-2000) and gray relation analysis to identify the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance premiums. An empirical study of six airlines in Taiwan was conducted to determine these factors and to analyze the management strategies used to deal with them. Results showed that the loss experience and performance of individual airlines were the key elements associated with aviation insurance premiums paid by each airline. By identifying and understanding the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance, airlines will better understand their relative operational strengths and weaknesses, and further help top management identify areas for further improvement. Knowledge of these factors combined with effective risk management strategies, may result in lower premiums and operating costs for airline companies.

  10. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods. III: Evaluation using a panel of reference foods.

    PubMed

    Chao, Eunice; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents an exploratory evaluation of four functional components of a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) for crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods in a concordance study. Two independent raters assigned concern levels to 20 reference GM foods using a rating form based on the proposed RBCS. The four components of evaluation were: (1) degree of concordance, (2) distribution across concern levels, (3) discriminating ability of the scheme, and (4) ease of use. At least one of the 20 reference foods was assigned to each of the possible concern levels, demonstrating the ability of the scheme to identify GM foods of different concern with respect to potential health risk. There was reasonably good concordance between the two raters for the three separate parts of the RBCS. The raters agreed that the criteria in the scheme were sufficiently clear in discriminating reference foods into different concern levels, and that with some experience, the scheme was reasonably easy to use. Specific issues and suggestions for improvements identified in the concordance study are discussed.

  11. Risk Factors for the Failure of Spinal Burst Fractures Treated Conservatively According to the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS): A Retrospective Cohort Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jieliang; Xu, Linfei; Zhang, Baolong; Hu, Zhenming

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of thoracolumbar (TL) burst fractures is still controversial. The thoracolumbar injury classification and severity score (TLICS) algorithm is now widely used to guide clinical decision making, however, in clinical practice, we come to realize that TLICS also has its limitations for treating patients with total scores less than 4, for which conservative treatment may not be optimal in all cases. Purpose The aim of this study is to identify several risk factors for the failure of conservative treatment of TL burst fractures according to TLICS algorithm. Methods From June 2008 to December 2013, a cohort of 129 patients with T10-l2 TL burst fractures with a TLISC score ≤3 treated non-operatively were identified and included into this retrospective study. Age, sex, pain intensity, interpedicular distance (IPD), canal compromise, loss of vertebral body height and kyphotic angle (KA) were selected as potential risk factors and compared between the non-operative success group and the non-operative failure group. Results One hundred and four patients successfully completed non-operative treatment, the other 25 patients were converted to surgical treatment because of persistent local back pain or progressive neurological deficits during follow-up. Our results showed that age, visual analogue scale (VAS) score and IPD, KA were significantly different between the two groups. Furthermore, regression analysis indicated that VAS score and IPD could be considered as significant predictors for the failure of conservative treatment. Conclusion The recommendation of non-operative treatment for TLICS score ≤3 has limitations in some patients, and VAS score and IPD could be considered as risk factors for the failure of conservative treatment. Thus, conservative treatment should be decided with caution in patients with greater VAS scores or IPD. If non-operative management is decided, a close follow-up is necessary. PMID:26284373

  12. Limitations and implications of stream classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, K.E.; Fitzpatrick, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stream classifications that are based on channel form, such as the Rosgen Level II classification, are useful tools for the physical description and grouping of streams and for providing a means of communication for stream studies involving scientists and (or) managers with different backgrounds. The Level II classification also is used as a tool to assess stream stability, infer geomorphic processes, predict future geomorphic response, and guide stream restoration or rehabilitation activities. The use of the Level II classification for these additional purposes is evaluated in this paper. Several examples are described to illustrate the limitations and management implications of the Level II classification. Limitations include: (1) time dependence, (2) uncertain applicability across physical environments, (3) difficulty in identification of a true equilibrium condition, (4) potential for incorrect determination of bankfull elevation, and (5) uncertain process significance of classification criteria. Implications of using stream classifications based on channel form, such as Rosgen's, include: (1) acceptance of the limitations, (2) acceptance of the risk of classifying streams incorrectly, and (3) classification results may be used inappropriately. It is concluded that use of the Level II classification for purposes beyond description and communication is not appropriate. Research needs are identified that, if addressed, may help improve the usefulness of the Level II classification.

  13. Prognostic factors and risk classifications for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Abe, Takashige

    2015-10-01

    The introduction of molecular-targeted therapy has made dramatical changes to treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Currently, there are four vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors and two mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in Japan. For the appropriate clinical use of these molecular-targeted drugs, the identification of prognostic and/or predictive factors in patients who received these drugs is required. Although molecular biological and genetic factors that determine the prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been reported, most of these factors are problematic in that the number of patients analyzed was small. In contrast, clinicopathological prognostic factors, including the practice of cytoreductive nephrectomy, pathological findings, metastatic sites and metastasectomy, and abnormal inflammatory response, have been identified by analyzing a relatively large number of patients. Several prognostic classification models that were developed by combining these clinicopathological factors are widely used in not only clinical trials, but also routine clinical practice. However, the quality of these prognostic models is considered to be insufficient regarding prognostic prediction of metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients and, thus, requires further improvements. Recently, basic and clinical studies have been extensively carried out for the identification of promising informative markers and for understanding molecular mechanisms of resistance to molecular-targeted drugs in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients. The present review considers ongoing translational research efforts on clinicopathological, molecular biological, and genetic prognostic and/or predictive factors for metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients in the era of molecular-targeted therapy, and discusses the clinical implications of these findings.

  14. Relative significance of heat transfer processes to quantify tradeoffs between complexity and accuracy of energy simulations with a building energy use patterns classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarinejad, Mohammad

    This dissertation develops rapid and accurate building energy simulations based on a building classification that identifies and focuses modeling efforts on most significant heat transfer processes. The building classification identifies energy use patterns and their contributing parameters for a portfolio of buildings. The dissertation hypothesis is "Building classification can provide minimal required inputs for rapid and accurate energy simulations for a large number of buildings". The critical literature review indicated there is lack of studies to (1) Consider synoptic point of view rather than the case study approach, (2) Analyze influence of different granularities of energy use, (3) Identify key variables based on the heat transfer processes, and (4) Automate the procedure to quantify model complexity with accuracy. Therefore, three dissertation objectives are designed to test out the dissertation hypothesis: (1) Develop different classes of buildings based on their energy use patterns, (2) Develop different building energy simulation approaches for the identified classes of buildings to quantify tradeoffs between model accuracy and complexity, (3) Demonstrate building simulation approaches for case studies. Penn State's and Harvard's campus buildings as well as high performance LEED NC office buildings are test beds for this study to develop different classes of buildings. The campus buildings include detailed chilled water, electricity, and steam data, enabling to classify buildings into externally-load, internally-load, or mixed-load dominated. The energy use of the internally-load buildings is primarily a function of the internal loads and their schedules. Externally-load dominated buildings tend to have an energy use pattern that is a function of building construction materials and outdoor weather conditions. However, most of the commercial medium-sized office buildings have a mixed-load pattern, meaning the HVAC system and operation schedule dictate

  15. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Prevention Bundle Significantly Reduces the Risk of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Critically Ill Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Sen, Soman; Johnston, Charles; Greenhalgh, David; Palmieri, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality for critically ill burn patients. Prevention of VAP through bundled preventative measures may reduce the risk and incidence of VAP in burn patients. A retrospective chart review was performed of all mechanically ventilated adult (age ≥ 18 years) burn patients before and after VAP prevention bundle implementation. Data collected included age, TBSA, gender, diagnosis of inhalation injury, mechanism of injury, comorbid illnesses, length of mechanical ventilation, length of hospital stay, development of VAP, discharge disposition, and mortality. Burn patients with VAP had larger burn injuries (47.6 ± 22.2 vs 23.9 ± 23.01), more inhalation injuries (44.6% vs 27%), prolonged mechanical ventilation, and longer intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stays. Mortality was also higher in burn patients who developed VAP (34% vs 19%). On multivariate regression analysis, TBSA and ventilator days were independent risk factors for VAP. In 2010, a VAP prevention bundle was implemented in the burn ICU and overseen by a nurse champion. Compliance with bundle implementation was more than 95%. By 2012, independent of age, TBSA, inhalation injury, ventilator days, ICU and hospital length of stay, VAP prevention bundles resulted in a significantly reduced risk of developing VAP (odds ratio of 0.15). Burn patients with an inhalation injury and a large burn injury are at increased risk of developing VAP. The incidence and risk of VAP can be significantly reduced in burn patients with VAP prevention bundles.

  16. Significance of model credibility in estimating climate projection distributions for regional hydroclimatological risk assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brekke, L.D.; Dettinger, M.D.; Maurer, E.P.; Anderson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Ensembles of historical climate simulations and climate projections from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multi-model dataset were investigated to determine how model credibility affects apparent relative scenario likelihoods in regional risk assessments. Methods were developed and applied in a Northern California case study. An ensemble of 59 twentieth century climate simulations from 17 WCRP CMIP3 models was analyzed to evaluate relative model credibility associated with a 75-member projection ensemble from the same 17 models. Credibility was assessed based on how models realistically reproduced selected statistics of historical climate relevant to California climatology. Metrics of this credibility were used to derive relative model weights leading to weight-threshold culling of models contributing to the projection ensemble. Density functions were then estimated for two projected quantities (temperature and precipitation), with and without considering credibility-based ensemble reductions. An analysis for Northern California showed that, while some models seem more capable at recreating limited aspects twentieth century climate, the overall tendency is for comparable model performance when several credibility measures are combined. Use of these metrics to decide which models to include in density function development led to local adjustments to function shapes, but led to limited affect on breadth and central tendency, which were found to be more influenced by 'completeness' of the original ensemble in terms of models and emissions pathways. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  17. Redefining ALL classification: toward detecting high-risk ALL and implementing precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hunger, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the commonest childhood tumor and remains a leading cause of cancer death in the young. In the last decade, microarray and sequencing analysis of large ALL cohorts has revolutionized our understanding of the genetic basis of this disease. These studies have identified new ALL subtypes, each characterized by constellations of structural and sequence alterations that perturb key cellular pathways, including lymphoid development, cell-cycle regulation, and tumor suppression; cytokine receptor, kinase, and Ras signaling; and chromatin modifications. Several of these pathways, particularly kinase-activating lesions and epigenetic alterations, are logical targets for new precision medicine therapies. Genomic profiling has also identified important interactions between inherited genetic variants that influence the risk of leukemia development and the somatic genetic alterations that are required to establish the leukemic clone. Moreover, sequential sequencing studies at diagnosis, remission, and relapse have provided important insights into the relationship among genetic variants, clonal heterogeneity, and the risk of relapse. Ongoing studies are extending our understanding of coding and noncoding genetic alterations in B-progenitor and T-lineage ALL and using these insights to inform the development of faithful experimental models to test the efficacy of new treatment approaches. PMID:25999453

  18. Heat wave hazard classification and risk assessment using artificial intelligence fuzzy logic.

    PubMed

    Keramitsoglou, Iphigenia; Kiranoudis, Chris T; Maiheu, Bino; De Ridder, Koen; Daglis, Ioannis A; Manunta, Paolo; Paganini, Marc

    2013-10-01

    The average summer temperatures as well as the frequency and intensity of hot days and heat waves are expected to increase due to climate change. Motivated by this consequence, we propose a methodology to evaluate the monthly heat wave hazard and risk and its spatial distribution within large cities. A simple urban climate model with assimilated satellite-derived land surface temperature images was used to generate a historic database of urban air temperature fields. Heat wave hazard was then estimated from the analysis of these hourly air temperatures distributed at a 1-km grid over Athens, Greece, by identifying the areas that are more likely to suffer higher temperatures in the case of a heat wave event. Innovation lies in the artificial intelligence fuzzy logic model that was used to classify the heat waves from mild to extreme by taking into consideration their duration, intensity and time of occurrence. The monthly hazard was subsequently estimated as the cumulative effect from the individual heat waves that occurred at each grid cell during a month. Finally, monthly heat wave risk maps were produced integrating geospatial information on the population vulnerability to heat waves calculated from socio-economic variables.

  19. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population. PMID:24126108

  20. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population.

  1. Fragile X Premutation Is a Significant Risk Factor for Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Allingham-Hawkins, Diane J.; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Chitayat, David; Holden, Jeanette J.A.; Yang, Kathy T.; Lee, C.; Hudson, R.; Gorwill, H.; Nolin, Sarah L.; Glicksman, Anne; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Brown, W. Ted; Howard-Peebles, Patricia N.; Becchi, Cindy; Cummings, Emilie; Fallon, Lee; Seitz, Suzanne; Black, Susan H.; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Costa, Silvia S.; Otto, Paulo A.; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C.; Murray, Anna; Webb, J.; MacSwinney, F.; Dennis, N.; Jacobs, Patricia A.; Syrrou, Maria; Georgiou, Ioannis; Patsalis, Phillipos C.; Uzielli, Maria L. Giovannucci; Guarducci, S.; Lapi, E.; Cecconi, A.; Ricci, U.; Ricotti, G.; Biondi, C.; Scarselli, B.; Vieri, F.

    2013-01-01

    The preliminary results of an international collaborative study examining premature menopause in fragile X carriers are presented. A total of 760 women from fragile X families was surveyed about their fragile X carrier status and their menstrual and reproductive histories. Among the subjects, 395 carried a premutation, 128 carried a full mutation, and 237 were noncarriers. Sixty-three (16%) of the premutation carriers had experienced menopause prior to the age of 40 compared with none of the full mutation carriers and one (0.4%) of the controls. Based on these preliminary data, there is a significant association between fragile X premutation carrier status and premature menopause. PMID:10208170

  2. A significant association between BDNF promoter methylation and the risk of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuting; Ji, Huihui; Liu, Guili; Wang, Qinwen; Liu, Huifen; Shen, Wenwen; Li, Longhui; Xie, Xiaohu; Zhou, Wenhua; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-06-10

    As a member of the neurotrophic factor family, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the survival and differentiation of neurons. The aim of our work was to evaluate the role of BDNF promoter methylation in drug addiction. A total of 60 drug abusers (30 heroin and 30 methylamphetamine addicts) and 52 healthy age- and gender-matched controls were recruited for the current case control study. Bisulfite pyrosequencing technology was used to determine the methylation levels of five CpGs (CpG1-5) on the BDNF promoter. Among the five CpGs, CpG5 methylation was significantly lower in drug abusers than controls. Moreover, significant associations were found between CpG5 methylation and addictive phenotypes including tension-anxiety, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, and depression-dejection. In addition, luciferase assay showed that the DNA fragment of BDNF promoter played a key role in the regulation of gene expression. Our results suggest that BDNF promoter methylation is associated with drug addiction, although further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms by which BDNF promoter methylation contributes to the pathophysiology of drug addiction. PMID:26976342

  3. A Prolonged Time Interval Between Trauma and Prophylactic Radiation Therapy Significantly Increases the Risk of Heterotopic Ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Waleed F.; Packianathan, Satyaseelan; Shourbaji, Rania A.; Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew; Khan, Majid A.; Baird, Michael C.; Russell, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain whether the time from injury to prophylactic radiation therapy (RT) influences the rate of heterotopic ossification (HO) after operative treatment of displaced acetabular fractures. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution, retrospective analysis of patients referred for RT for the prevention of HO. Between January 2000 and January 2009, 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures were treated surgically followed by RT for HO prevention. We analyzed the effect of time from injury on prevention of HO by RT. In all patients, 700 cGy was prescribed in a single fraction and delivered within 72 hours postsurgery. The patients were stratified into five groups according to time interval (in days) from the date of their accident to the date of RT: Groups A {<=}3, B {<=}7, C {<=}14, D {<=}21, and E >21days. Results: Of the 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures treated with RT, (18%) 106 patients developed HO within the irradiated field. The risk of HO after RT increased from 10% for RT delivered {<=}3 days to 92% for treatment delivered >21 days after the initial injury. Wilcoxon test showed a significant correlation between the risk of HO and the length of time from injury to RT (p < 0.0001). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between all other factors and the risk of HO (race, gender, cause and type of fracture, surgical approach, or the use of indomethacin). Conclusions: Our data suggest that there is higher incidence and risk of HO if prophylactic RT is significantly delayed after a displaced acetabular fracture. Thus, RT should be administered as early as clinically possible after the trauma. Patients undergoing RT >3 weeks from their displaced acetabular fracture should be informed of the higher risk (>90%) of developing HO despite prophylaxis.

  4. Incremental value of diagonal earlobe crease to the Diamond-Forrester classification in estimating the probability of significant coronary artery disease determined by computed tomographic angiography.

    PubMed

    Shmilovich, Haim; Cheng, Victor Y; Nakazato, Ryo; Smith, Thomas W; Otaki, Yuka; Nakanishi, Rine; Paz, William; Pimentel, Raymond T; Berman, Daniel S; Rajani, Ronak

    2014-12-01

    The Diamond-Forrester (DF) algorithm overestimates the likelihood of significant coronary artery disease (≥50% stenosis, CAD50). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the addition of a diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) enhances the predictive ability of DF to detect CAD50 by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA). We evaluated 430 patients referred for CTA for symptoms, cardiovascular risk factors, and CAD50 likelihood using DF. Observers blinded to CTA findings evaluated the presence of DELC. The diagnostic accuracy and relation of DF, DELC, and DF + DELC for predicting CAD50 in patients with chest pain were evaluated using receiver operating characteristics curve (area under curve) analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses. In 199 patients with chest pain, the sensitivity and specificity for CAD50 were 96% and 20% for DF (AUC 0.59, p = 0.59), 91% and 32% for DELC (AUC 0.62, p = 0.03), and 91% and 41% for DF + DELC (AUC 0.66, p = 0.004). On multivariate analyses DELC was the only independent predictor of CAD50 (odds ratio 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1 to 12.9, p = 0.048). DF + DELC increased the predictive ability to detect CAD50 above cardiovascular risk factors (odds ratio 5.6, 95% confidence interval 1.6 to 19.8, p = 0.007). In patients with chest pain, the presence of DELC is related to CAD50 beyond DF. A combined variable of DF + DELC provides superior discriminatory ability for detecting CAD50 than either method alone.

  5. Analysis of bioclimatic time series and their neural network-based classification to characterise drought risk patterns in South Italy.

    PubMed

    Incerti, G; Feoli, E; Salvati, L; Brunetti, A; Giovacchini, A

    2007-03-01

    A new approach to characterise geographical areas with a drought risk index (DRI) is suggested, by applying an artificial neural network (ANN) classifier to bioclimatic time series for which operational temporal units (OtUs) are defined. A climatic database, corresponding to a grid of 8 km x 8 km cells covering the Italian peninsula, was considered. Each cell is described by the time series of seven variables recorded from 1989 to 2000. Sixteen cells were selected according to land cover homogeneity and completeness of the time series data. The periodic components of the time series were calculated by means of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method. Temporal units corresponding to the period of the sinusoidal functions most related to the data were used as OtUs. The ANN for each OtU calculates a DRI value ranging between -1 and 1. The value is interpretable as the proximity of the OtUs to one of two situations corresponding to minimum and maximum drought risk, respectively. The former set (DRI = -1) is represented by an ideal OtU with minimum values of temperatures and evapo-transpiration, and maximum values of rainfall, normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) and soil water content. The second set (DRI = 1) is represented by the reciprocal OtU to the former one. The classification of the cells based on DRI time profiles showed that, at the scale used in this work, DRI has no dependence on land cover class, but is related to the location of the cells. The methodology was integrated with GIS (geographic information system) software, and used to show the geographic pattern of DRI in a given area at different periods.

  6. Favorable vs Unfavorable Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Review of the New Classification System and Its Impact on Treatment Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Nicholas A; Anscher, Mitchell S

    2016-03-01

    The population of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer are a large and heterogeneous group with highly variable prognoses, which present a challenge to efforts to develop standardized treatment recommendations. New classification systems have been proposed that modify the existing National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines and that subdivide men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer into favorable and unfavorable subgroups. This review will examine the changing landscape of intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the effects on treatment decisions that may result from this new classification. The literature provides evidence that men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer have prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality rates similar to the rates in patients with low-risk prostate cancer and thus may be candidates for active surveillance, dose-escalated radiation therapy without short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), or, interestingly, standard-dose radiation therapy plus short-term ADT. Conversely, patients with unfavorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer have prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality rates similar to the rates in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. These patients would not be candidates for active surveillance and may in fact require long-term ADT in addition to standard-dose or dose-escalated radiation therapy instead of 4 to 6 months of ADT.

  7. Radial Artery Coursing Behind the Biceps Brachii Tendon: Significance for the Transradial Catheterization and a Clinically Oriented Classification of the Radial Artery Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jelev, L. Surchev, L.

    2008-09-15

    In routine clinical practice the variations of the radial artery are the main reason for technical failure during transradial catheterization. If these variations are well documented, however, they do not represent a problem in the transradial approach. Therefore, we report here a rare case of the radial artery which is very strange but potentially valuable for the clinical practice: it arises at a right angle from the brachial artery and passes behind the biceps brachii tendon. Based on our findings and on an extensive literature review, we propose for the first time a clinically oriented classification of the variations of the radial artery. This classification is related to the catheterization success at the usual access site of the radial artery at the wrist.

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene haplotypes and circulating nitric oxide levels significantly associate with risk of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nejatizadeh, Azim; Kumar, Rahul; Stobdan, Tsering; Goyal, A K; Sikdar, Sunandan; Gupta, Mohit; Javed, Saleem; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a potent vasodilator, plays a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation. Endothelial NO synthase gene (NOS3) polymorphisms influence NO levels. Here, we investigated the role of the -922A/G, -786T/C, 4b/4a, and 894G/T polymorphisms of the NOS3 and NO(x) levels in 800 consecutive unrelated subjects comprising 455 patients of essential hypertension and 345 controls. The polymorphisms were investigated independently and as haplotypes. Plasma NO(x) levels (nitrate and nitrite) were estimated by the Griess method. Genotype frequencies for the -786T/C, 4b/4a, and 894G/T polymorphisms differed significantly (P<0.001) between patients and controls and were associated with an increased risk of hypertension (OR=2.0, OR=3.8, OR=1.6, respectively). The 4-locus haplotypes ATaG (H1), ATaT (H2), and GCaG (H3) were significantly associated with essential hypertension and served as susceptible haplotypes (Psignificantly lower in patients than controls (P<0.0001). The individual polymorphisms showed marginal association with NO(x) level; however, the susceptible haplotype H2 associated significantly with lower NO(x) levels in patients (P<0.001) and conversely the haplotype H4 with higher NO(x) levels in controls (P<0.001). In conclusion, the 4b/4a and likely -786T/C polymorphisms were identified as the determinants modifying the risk of hypertension. This study identifies the NOS3 variants and haplotypes as genetic risk factors and as useful markers of increased susceptibility to the risk of essential hypertension. PMID:18325347

  9. Can I be sued for that? Liability risk and the disclosure of clinically significant genetic research findings

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Amy L.; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Zawati, Ma’n H.; Clayton, Ellen Wright

    2014-01-01

    Genomic researchers increasingly are faced with difficult decisions about whether, under what circumstances, and how to return research results and significant incidental findings to study participants. Many have argued that there is an ethical—maybe even a legal—obligation to disclose significant findings under some circumstances. At the international level, over the last decade there has begun to emerge a clear legal obligation to return significant findings discovered during the course of research. However, there is no explicit legal duty to disclose in the United States. This creates legal uncertainty that may lead to unmanaged variation in practice and poor quality care. This article discusses liability risks associated with the disclosure of significant research findings for investigators in the United States. PMID:24676095

  10. MRSA in a large German University Hospital: Male gender is a significant risk factor for MRSA acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, Markus; Jatzwauk, Lutz; Monecke, Stephan; Möbius, Jana; Weusten, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Background: The continually rising number of hospital acquired infections and particularly MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) colonization poses a major challenge from both clinical and epidemiological perspectives. The assessment of risk factors is vital in determining the best prevention, diagnosis and treatment strategies. Materials and methods: We analyzed 798 cases of MRSA in a large German University Hospital over a 7-year period. Data was collected retro- and prospectively including patient age, sex, type of ward and duration of inpatient stay. In addition we analyzed all cases on ICU with regards to cross infection and MRSA genotyping via DNA MicroArray Technology. The years 2004 to 2007 were analyzed with a specific focus on gender. Results: Male gender is significantly correlated with increased risk of MRSA acquisition (p<0.001), the predominant setting for MRSA is on ICU. 75% of the MRSA positive patients are over 50 years of age (average age 59.8 years). The inpatient time was 4.15 times higher in MRSA carriers compared with non-MRSA cases, however this was not significant. MRSA genotyping on ICU showed mainly the subtypes ST 5, ST 22, ST 228, however cross contamination with identical genotypes was only detected in a minority of cases (5 out of 22). Conclusion: Unlike previous studies which show no or inconclusive evidence of gender as a risk factor, our data confirm that male gender is a significant risk factor for MRSA carrier status. Further research will be required to investigate the aetiology of these findings. PMID:20941335

  11. Incidence of and significant risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in patients dosed by using individualized pharmacokinetic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bertino, J S; Booker, L A; Franck, P A; Jenkins, P L; Franck, K R; Nafziger, A N

    1993-01-01

    Incidence of and risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity (AAN) were evaluated in 1489 patients prospectively monitored with individualized pharmacokinetic monitoring (IPM). Incidence of AAN was 7.9% with individual (univariate) risk factors including advanced age, decreased albumin, poor nutritional status, pneumonia, concurrent furosemide, amphotericin B, vancomycin, cephalosporin, or piperacillin, intensive care unit treatment, leukemia, rapidly fatal illness, liver or renal disease, reduced aminoglycoside clearance, elevated initial steady-state trough concentration (Cminss), volume of distribution or half-life, duration of therapy, total dose, fever, male gender, shock, pleural effusion, and ascites. Multiple logistic regression revealed that Cminss, concurrent clindamycin, vancomycin, piperacillin, or cephalosporin, ascites, advanced age, male gender, decreased albumin, duration of therapy, and leukemia were significant independent risk factors for AAN. Positive predictive value of the model was 30.8%; negative predictive value was 91.7%. No identifiable risk factor alone or in combination was of sufficient sensitivity to reliably predict AAN, but use of IPM may lower the incidence of AAN. PMID:8418164

  12. Persistent depression is a significant risk factor for the development of arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroki; Fujii, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Depression often coexists with hypertension and various cardiovascular diseases. However, the relationship between depression and the development of arteriosclerosis has not been fully established. We assessed depression and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in 828 middle-aged Japanese male subjects at baseline and during 3 years of follow-up. Depression was assessed using Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression questionnaires, and the study subjects were divided into the following three groups: persistent depression, transient depression and no depression. The number (%) of subjects with persistent, transient and no depression were 104 (12.6), 76 (9.2) and 648 (78.2), respectively. Blood pressure and baPWV did not differ among the three groups at baseline. The changes in the baPWV values (⊿baPWV) correlated significantly and positively with age, body mass index, baseline systolic blood pressure and persistent depression (r = 0.32, P < 0.01). After 3 years of follow-up, the ⊿baPWV was significantly greater in subjects with persistent depression compared with those with no depression (36 ± 28 vs. 18 ± 10 cm s(-1), P = 0.02). After adjustment for conventional risk factors, persistent depression was significantly associated with ⊿baPWV by multiple regression analysis (β = 0.261, P < 0.01). To sum up, persistent depression was a significant risk factor for the development of arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

  13. The Risk Factors for Failure of an Upper Extremity Replantation: Is the Use of Cigarettes/Tobacco a Significant Factor?

    PubMed Central

    He, Ji-Yin; Chen, Shih-Heng; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the potential risk factors associated with the failure of an upper extremity replantation with a focus on cigarette or tobacco use. Patients and Methods A cohort of 102 patients with 149 replants (6 extremities, 143 digits) and a mean age of 41 years (range 5 to 72 years) was enrolled in this study. The data collected included age, gender, tobacco/cigarettes use, trauma mechanism, underlying disease (e.g., hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), etc.), and vein graft use. An analysis with a multivariable regression was conducted to identify the risk factors of replant failure and their respective odds ratios (ORs). Results Multilevel generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) with a binomial distribution and logit link showed that smoking did not increase the risk of replant failure (p = 0.234). In addition, the survival of replants was not affected by DM or HTN (p = 0.285 and 0.938, respectively). However, the replantation results were significantly affected by the age of the patients and the mechanism of injury. Patients older than 50 years and those with avulsion or crush injuries tended to have a higher risk of replant failure (OR = 2.29, 6.45, and 5.42, respectively; p = 0.047, 0.028, and 0.032, respectively). Conclusions This study showed that the use of cigarettes/tobacco did not affect the replantation outcome. The main risks for replant failure included being older than 50 years and the trauma mechanism (avulsion or crush injuries). PMID:26513147

  14. Tapeworm infection is a significant risk factor for spasmodic colic and ileal impaction colic in the horse.

    PubMed

    Proudman, C J; French, N P; Trees, A J

    1998-05-01

    The association between the equine intestinal tapeworm Anoplocephala perfoliata and specific types of intestinal disease was investigated by matched case-control study using coprological and serological diagnosis. We have previously shown that the host IgG(T) response to 12/13 kDa antigens of A. perfoliata correlates well with infection intensity, therefore this antibody response was used to investigate the risk of colic at different levels of parasite infection intensity. One hundred and three spasmodic colic cases with an equal number of controls matched for age, breed and gender, and 20 ileal impaction cases each with 2 similarly matched controls were obtained. Cases of spasmodic colic were much more likely (odds ratio = 8.0) to be associated with A. perfoliata infection detected coprologically than controls. Serological diagnosis revealed an increasing risk of spasmodic colic with increasing infection intensity. Calculation of an aetiological fraction suggests that 22% of spasmodic colic cases in this study were tapeworm associated. No significant association was found between colic and strongyle egg count. Conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the relationship between colic and A. perfoliata infection intensity was not confounded by strongyle egg count and there was a linear relationship between infection intensity and the log-odds of spasmodic colic. For cases of ileal impaction, a strong association was found between colic and A. perfoliata as diagnosed by coprological means (odds ratio of 34.0). Serological diagnosis also revealed a strong association that increased with higher levels of infection intensity (odds ratio = 26.0). The aetiological fraction for the ileal impaction data suggests that 81% of the ileal impaction cases in this study were tapeworm associated. This study concludes that A. perfoliata is a significant risk factor for spasmodic colic and ileal impaction colic in the horse; and that the risk of spasmodic colic

  15. Significant associations between hemostatic/fibrinolytic systems and accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese elementary schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lisheng; Horigome, Hitoshi; Kato, Yoshiaki; Kikuchi, Toshihiro; Nakahara, Satoko; Sumazaki, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the reference values of hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers and investigate their relationship with physical constitution and cardiovascular risk factors in a normal schoolchildren population. This study comprised 148 healthy Japanese children aged 9-10 years (males 73; females 75). We performed laboratory tests including blood levels of leptin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), hemostatic and fibrinolytic markers [plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), coagulation factor VII (FVII), coagulation factor X (FX), fibrinogen (Fbg), protein C, protein S], as well as common biochemical markers in the morning after an overnight fast. We investigated the mean, 10th, 50th and 90th percentile values of these markers. All parameters were compared between two groups, that is those with body mass index (BMI) 90th percentile or higher and BMI less than 90th percentile, and between subgroups based on the number of cardiovascular risk factors. Multiple-linear regression was used to assess associations between these hematological parameters and the components related to metabolic syndrome (MetS). Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), uric acid, leptin, hs-CRP, and all hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers (PAI-1, FVII, FX, Fbg, protein C, protein S) tested were significantly higher in the group with BMI 90th percentile or higher, and increased with accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors. Multiple-linear regression analysis showed that these values were associated with one or more components related to MetS. Reference values of hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers in Japanese schoolchildren were obtained. Many hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers showed significant association with BMI and accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors in normal Japanese schoolchildren. PMID:25185676

  16. [Endarterectomy more favourable than stenting in symptomatic significant carotid stenosis: higher risk of ischaemic stroke or death following stenting].

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Beuk, Roland J; Huisman, Ad B; Manschot, Sanne M; Zeebregts, Clark J; Geelkerken, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has proven its value in the treatment of patients with recent significant carotid artery stenosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with carotid artery stenting ('stenting' in short) is an alternative to CEA. The results of stenting and CEA in patients with symptomatic significant carotid artery stenosis were evaluated in 9 prospective randomized controlled trials and 11 meta-analyses. Almost all of these trials failed to show superiority of stenting to CEA. According to the 4 largest and most recent studies in this field the risk of a stroke or death within 30 days after the intervention is considerably higher following stenting than following CEA. In the long run the results of stenting and CEA seem to be comparable. CEA remains the gold standard in treatment of significant carotid artery stenosis, in particular in patients older than 70. PMID:21329537

  17. [Endarterectomy more favourable than stenting in symptomatic significant carotid stenosis: higher risk of ischaemic stroke or death following stenting].

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Beuk, Roland J; Huisman, Ad B; Manschot, Sanne M; Zeebregts, Clark J; Geelkerken, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has proven its value in the treatment of patients with recent significant carotid artery stenosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with carotid artery stenting ('stenting' in short) is an alternative to CEA. The results of stenting and CEA in patients with symptomatic significant carotid artery stenosis were evaluated in 9 prospective randomized controlled trials and 11 meta-analyses. Almost all of these trials failed to show superiority of stenting to CEA. According to the 4 largest and most recent studies in this field the risk of a stroke or death within 30 days after the intervention is considerably higher following stenting than following CEA. In the long run the results of stenting and CEA seem to be comparable. CEA remains the gold standard in treatment of significant carotid artery stenosis, in particular in patients older than 70.

  18. Security classification of information

    SciTech Connect

    Quist, A.S.

    1993-04-01

    This document is the second of a planned four-volume work that comprehensively discusses the security classification of information. The main focus of Volume 2 is on the principles for classification of information. Included herein are descriptions of the two major types of information that governments classify for national security reasons (subjective and objective information), guidance to use when determining whether information under consideration for classification is controlled by the government (a necessary requirement for classification to be effective), information disclosure risks and benefits (the benefits and costs of classification), standards to use when balancing information disclosure risks and benefits, guidance for assigning classification levels (Top Secret, Secret, or Confidential) to classified information, guidance for determining how long information should be classified (classification duration), classification of associations of information, classification of compilations of information, and principles for declassifying and downgrading information. Rules or principles of certain areas of our legal system (e.g., trade secret law) are sometimes mentioned to .provide added support to some of those classification principles.

  19. Genomics-based Approach and Prognostic Stratification Significance of Gene Mutations in Intermediate-risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bian-Hong; Li, Yong-Hui; Yu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (IR-AML), which accounts for a substantial number of AML cases, is highly heterogeneous. We systematically summarize the latest research progress on the significance of gene mutations for prognostic stratification of IR-AML. Data Sources: We conducted a systemic search from the PubMed database up to October, 2014 using various search terms and their combinations including IR-AML, gene mutations, mutational analysis, prognosis, risk stratification, next generation sequencing (NGS). Study Selection: Clinical or basic research articles on NGS and the prognosis of gene mutations in IR-AML were included. Results: The advent of the era of whole-genome sequencing has led to the discovery of an increasing number of molecular genetics aberrations that involved in leukemogenesis, and some of them have been used for prognostic risk stratification. Several studies have consistently identified that some gene mutations have prognostic relevance, however, there are still many controversies for some genes because of lacking sufficient evidence. In addition, tumor cells harbor hundreds of mutated genes and multiple mutations often coexist, therefore, single mutational analysis is not sufficient to make accurate prognostic predictions. The comprehensive analysis of multiple mutations based on sophisticated genomic technologies has raised increasing interest in recent years. Conclusions: NGS represents a pioneering and helpful approach to prognostic risk stratification of IR-AML patients. Further large-scale studies for comprehensive molecular analysis are needed to provide guidance and a theoretical basis for IR-AML prognostic stratification and clinical management. PMID:26315090

  20. Presence of anomalous coronary seen on angiogram is not associated with increased risk of significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Suryanarayana, Prakash; Kollampare, Shubha; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Lee, Justin; Husnain, Muhammad; Luni, Faraz Khan; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is unclear if anomalous coronary arteries are at higher risk for atherosclerosis. The link between anomalous coronary artery and early coronary artery disease has been suggested. The aim of this study is to determine whether the coronary artery anomaly predisposes to development of significant coronary disease. Using retrospective chart review, patients with documented anomalous coronary arteries recognized during coronary angiography between years 2000 to 2007 were analyzed. Prevalence of significant atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (defined as more than 50% luminal narrowing) was compared between normal and anomalous coronaries. A total of 147 patients with anomalous coronary arteries were found. Right coronary artery was the most common anomalous artery 128 of 148 (86.5%) in our dataset. There was no difference in the occurrence of atherosclerosis between anomalous and nonanomalous coronaries. Significant atherosclerosis was present in 59 of the 148 anomalous coronary arteries (37.8%), and 112 of the 293 nonanomalous coronary arteries (38.2%, p = 0.9). On the basis of our study, there is no evidence that anomalous coronary arteries predispose to significant coronary artery disease in comparison to normal coronary arteries.

  1. RBP4 variants are significantly associated with plasma RBP4 levels and hypertriglyceridemia risk in Chinese Hanss⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Li, Huaixing; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Qi, Qibin; Hu, Frank B.; Liu, Yong; Lin, Xu

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that plasma RBP4 levels were strongly associated with metabolic syndrome components. This study aimed to determine whether RBP4 variants are associated with the metabolic syndrome components and plasma RBP4 levels, and to investigate whether the associations between plasma RBP4 and the metabolic syndrome components are causal. Five tagSNPs were tested for their associations with plasma RBP4 levels and metabolic syndrome components in a population-based sample of 3,210 Chinese Hans. A possible causal relationship between plasma RBP4 levels and hypertriglyceridemia was explored by Mendelian randomization. Plasma RBP4 levels were significantly associated with rs10882273 (βz −0.10SD[−0.17, −0.03], P = 0.0050), rs3758538 (βz −0.13SD[−0.24, −0.02], P = 0.0249) in all participants, and with rs17108993 in Shanghai participants (βz −0.19SD[−0.32, −0.05], P = 0.0061). The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3758538 was significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia (OR 0.62[0.45–0.85], P = 0.0026) and triglycerides (βz −0.19SD[−0.30, −0.07], P = 0.001) in all participants. In Mendelian randomization analysis, the observed effect size of association between rs3758538 and hypertriglyceridemia was different from the expected effect size (P = 0.0213). This is the first study to show that the RBP4 variants are significantly associated with plasma RBP4 levels and hypertriglyceridemia risk in Chinese Hans. However, results of Mendelian randomization do not support the hypothesis that RBP4 levels are causally related to hypertriglyceridemia risk. PMID:19287041

  2. Significance of exposure assessment to analysis of cancer risk from inorganic arsenic in drinking water in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Brown, K G; Chen, C J

    1995-08-01

    The primary source of evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased mortality from cancer at internal sites (bladder, liver, lung, and other organs) is a large ecologic study conducted in regions of Southwest Taiwan endemic to Blackfoot disease. The dose-response patterns for lung, liver, and bladder cancers display a nonlinear dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure. The data do not appear suitable, however, for the more refined task of dose-response assessment, particularly for inference of risk at the low arsenic concentrations found in some U.S. water supplies. The problem lies in variable arsenic concentrations between the wells within a village, largely due to a mix of shallow wells and deep artesian wells, and in having only one well test for 24 (40%) of the 60 villages. The current analysis identifies 14 villages where the exposure appears most questionable, based on criteria described in the text. The exposure values were then changed for seven of the villages, from the median well test being used as a default to some other point in the village's range of well tests that would contribute to smoothing the appearance of a dose-response curve. The remaining seven villages, six of which had only one well test, were deleted as outliers. The resultant dose-response patterns showed no evidence of excess risk below arsenic concentrations of 0.1 mg/l. Of course, that outcome is dependent on manipulation of the data, as described. Inclusion of the seven deleted villages would make estimates of risk much higher at low doses. In those seven villages, the cancer mortality rates are significantly high for their exposure levels, suggesting that their exposure values may be too low or that other etiological factors need to be taken into account.

  3. Significance of exposure assessment to analysis of cancer risk from inorganic arsenic in drinking water in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Chen, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    The primary source of evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased mortality from cancer at internal sites (bladder, liver, lung, and other organs) is a large ecologic study conducted in regions of Southwest Taiwan endemic to Blackfoot disease. The dose-response patterns for lung, liver, and bladder cancers display a nonlinear dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure. The data do not appear suitable, however, for the more refined task of dose-response assessment, particularly for inference of risk at the low arsenic concentrations found in some U.S. water supplies. The problem lies in variable arsenic concentrations between the wells within a village, largely due to a mix of shallow wells and deep artesian wells, and in having only one well test for 24 (40%) of the 60 villages. The current analysis identifies 14 villages where the exposure appears most questionable, based on criteria described in the test. The exposure values were then changed for seven of the villages, from the median well test being used as a default to some other point in the village`s range of well tests that would contribute to smoothing the appearance of a dose-response curve. The remaining seven villages, six of which had only one well test, were deleted as outliers. The resultant dose-response patterns showed no evidence of excess risk below arsenic concentrations of 0.1 mg/l. Of course, that outcome is dependent on manipulation of the data, as described. Inclusion of the seven deleted villages would make estimates of risk much higher at low doses. In those seven villages the cancer mortality rates are significantly high for their exposure levels, suggesting that their exposure values may be too low or that other etiological factors need to be taken into account. 10 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Significant positive correlation between sunshine and lactase nonpersistence in Europe may implicate both in similarly altering risks for some diseases.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Leighton, Henry; Burstein, Barry; Shrier, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing latitude and increasing frequency of population lactase nonpersistence have been reported to diminish risks for several diseases, but the reason for overlap has not been explained. We evaluate, relationships between calculated national annual ultraviolet light B (UVB) exposure, latitude, and national lactose digestion frequencies. Annual UVB exposure and latitude were based on weighted averages from several cities in different countries. Lactase distribution status was based on published data that have been used previously to derive relations with diseases. We compare univariate regression analyses (r(2)(adj), slope) of percentage of lactase nonpersistence with UVB or latitude. We determine, differences between European and non-European sources by multiregression analysis of independent variables. Correlation between UVB and latitude is high (r(2) = 0.89), and between percentage of lactase nonpersistence and either latitude or UVB the correlation is moderately strong with r(2) = 0.51 and 0.46, respectively, with P ≤ 0.01 for both. A more detailed analysis shows that correlations between percentage of lactase nonpersistence and UVB are only significant in Europe, r(2) = 0.59, P < 0.001, whereas outside Europe: r(2) = 0.06, P = 0.16. These relationships raise hypothetical explanations to account for the observed overlap in similar risk modification by the 2 variables.

  5. Predicting the Risk for Central Pain Using the Sensory Components of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Yuval; Zeilig, Gabi; Bondi, Moshe; Ringler, Erez; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-11-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CP) after spinal cord injury (SCI) is excruciating and difficult to manage. Pre-emptive treatment could be initiated in patients at risk for CP providing that it can be predicted. A combination of psychophysical tests could predict CP, but the process necessitates sophisticated equipment and constant monitoring. A simple predictive tool for CP is required. The aim of this study was to test the predictability for CP of the sensory component of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (SC-ISNCSCI), routinely performed on all SCI patients. In an historical-prospective study, the SC-ISNCSCI and background variables were extracted from medical records of 115 SCI patients. In a prospective study, 20 SCI patients underwent the SC-ISNCSCI at admission and were followed-up for 12 months. In both studies, pinprick (PP) and light touch (LT) scores from the SC-ISNCSCI and the difference between them (LT-PP) were compared between those who eventually developed CP and those who did not. Heat-pain and touch thresholds were measured and correlated with the SC-ISNCSCI to test its validity. In both studies, patients who developed CP had, prior to CP, lower PP than LT scores, and lower PP scores than those who did not develop CP. At-level delta LT-PP score>1 best predicted CP; the odds of developing CP with LT-PP>1 was 24.4 times that of the reverse category (LT-PP<1). Heat-pain and touch thresholds significantly correlated with PP and LT. We conclude that the SC-ISNCSCI can be used as a clinical biomarker of CP with high probability. PMID:26244708

  6. Clinical Application of Revised Laboratory Classification Criteria for Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: Is the Follow-Up Interval of 12 Weeks Instead of 6 Weeks Significantly Useful?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background. According to revised classification criteria of true antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, at least one of three antiphospholipid antibodies should be present on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. However, it can be inconvenient to perform follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. We investigated clinical application of follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. Method. Totals of 67, 199, and 332 patients tested positive initially for the lupus anticoagulants confirm, the anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibody, and the anti-cardiolipin antibody test, respectively, from Jan 2007 to Jul 2009. We investigated clinical symptoms of patients, follow-up interval, and results of each test. Results. Among patients with initial test positive, 1.5%–8.5% were subjected to follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks. Among 25 patients with negative conversion in tests, patients with interval of more than 12 weeks showed clinical symptom positivity of 33.3%, which was higher than that of 12.5% with 6–12 weeks. Among 34 patients with persistent test positive, clinical symptoms positivity trended to be more evident in patients at interval of 6–12 weeks (47.4% versus 26.7%, P = 0.191) than more than 12 weeks. Conclusion. Less than 10% of patients with initial test positive had follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks and the patients with persistent test positive at interval of more than 12 weeks showed trends toward having lower clinical symptoms than 6–12 weeks. More research is needed focused on the evidence that follow-up test at interval of more than 12 weeks should be performed instead of 6 weeks. PMID:27610369

  7. Clinical Application of Revised Laboratory Classification Criteria for Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: Is the Follow-Up Interval of 12 Weeks Instead of 6 Weeks Significantly Useful?

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background. According to revised classification criteria of true antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, at least one of three antiphospholipid antibodies should be present on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. However, it can be inconvenient to perform follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. We investigated clinical application of follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. Method. Totals of 67, 199, and 332 patients tested positive initially for the lupus anticoagulants confirm, the anti-β 2 glycoprotein-I antibody, and the anti-cardiolipin antibody test, respectively, from Jan 2007 to Jul 2009. We investigated clinical symptoms of patients, follow-up interval, and results of each test. Results. Among patients with initial test positive, 1.5%-8.5% were subjected to follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks. Among 25 patients with negative conversion in tests, patients with interval of more than 12 weeks showed clinical symptom positivity of 33.3%, which was higher than that of 12.5% with 6-12 weeks. Among 34 patients with persistent test positive, clinical symptoms positivity trended to be more evident in patients at interval of 6-12 weeks (47.4% versus 26.7%, P = 0.191) than more than 12 weeks. Conclusion. Less than 10% of patients with initial test positive had follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks and the patients with persistent test positive at interval of more than 12 weeks showed trends toward having lower clinical symptoms than 6-12 weeks. More research is needed focused on the evidence that follow-up test at interval of more than 12 weeks should be performed instead of 6 weeks. PMID:27610369

  8. No significant independent relationships with cardiometabolic biomarkers were detected in the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study population.

    PubMed

    Alkerwi, Ala'a; Shivappa, Nitin; Crichton, Georgina; Hébert, James R

    2014-12-01

    Recently, there has been an influx of research interest regarding the anti-inflammatory role that diet has in chronic and metabolic diseases. A literature-based dietary inflammatory index (DII) that can be used to characterize the inflammation-modulating capacity of individuals' diets has even been developed and validated in an American population. We hypothesized that the DII could predict levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important inflammatory marker, as well as metabolic measures that include the metabolic syndrome and its components in European adults. This hypothesis was tested according to data from 1352 participants from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study, a nationwide, cross-sectional survey based in Luxembourg. Statistical methods consisted of descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The DII ranged from a minimum of -4.02 (most anti-inflammatory) to a maximum of 4.00 points, with a mean value of -0.41. Participants with higher DII score were significantly younger and had lower body mass index, waist circumferences, and systolic blood pressure levels. Other cardiovascular biomarkers including diastolic blood pressure, CRP, lipids, and glycemic biomarkers did not vary significantly across DII tertiles. Participants with proinflammatory (>1) DII scores had increased adjusted odds (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.13) of having a low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with those with anti-inflammatory scores (DII ≤1). There were no significant relationships between high-sensitivity CRP and the DII. This study, which tested the inflammatory capacity of the DII outside the United States, did not detect a significant independent relationship with cardiometabolic biomarkers, by using Food Frequency Questionnaire-collected data. These results are informative and representative of a relevant step in directing future research for nutrition and diet

  9. No significant independent relationships with cardiometabolic biomarkers were detected in the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study population☆

    PubMed Central

    Alkerwi, Ala'a; Shivappa, Nitin; Crichton, Georgina; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been an influx of research interest regarding the anti-inflammatory role that diet has in chronic and metabolic diseases. A literature-based dietary inflammatory index (DII) that can be used to characterize the inflammation-modulating capacity of individuals’ diets has even been developed and validated in an American population. We hypothesized that the DII could predict levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important inflammatory marker, as well as metabolic measures that include the metabolic syndrome and its components in European adults. This hypothesis was tested according to data from 1352 participants from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study, a nationwide, cross-sectional survey based in Luxembourg. Statistical methods consisted of descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The DII ranged from a minimum of −4.02 (most anti-inflammatory) to a maximum of 4.00 points, with a mean value of −0.41. Participants with higher DII score were significantly younger and had lower body mass index, waist circumferences, and systolic blood pressure levels. Other cardiovascular biomarkers including diastolic blood pressure, CRP, lipids, and glycemic biomarkers did not vary significantly across DII tertiles. Participants with proinflammatory (>1) DII scores had increased adjusted odds (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.13) of having a low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with those with anti-inflammatory scores (DII ≤1). There were no significant relationships between high-sensitivity CRP and the DII. This study, which tested the inflammatory capacity of the DII outside the United States, did not detect a significant independent relationship with cardiometabolic biomarkers, by using Food Frequency Questionnaire–collected data. These results are informative and representative of a relevant step in directing future research for nutrition and

  10. Safety classification systems used in dermatological medication risk counseling of pregnant and lactating patients: a case for an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian Wong; Heller, Misha M; Murase, Jenny E

    2013-01-01

    Many women of childbearing age use prescription and non-prescription medications. Therefore, patients need to be counseled regarding the potential teratogenicity of medications if they are, or could become, pregnant. In this editorial, the present authors will explain the three advantages of the evidence-based medicine system when compared with the US Food and Drug Administration system for medication risk classification in pregnancy. The present authors will also comment on medication use during lactation and provide resources on medication use during pregnancy and lactation for clinicians and their patients.

  11. Application of linear graph embedding as a dimensionality reduction technique and sparse representation classifier as a post classifier for the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sunil Kumar; Rajaguru, Harikumar

    2015-12-01

    The most common and frequently occurring neurological disorder is epilepsy and the main method useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy is electroencephalogram (EEG) signal analysis. Due to the length of EEG recordings, EEG signal analysis method is quite time-consuming when it is processed manually by an expert. This paper proposes the application of Linear Graph Embedding (LGE) concept as a dimensionality reduction technique for processing the epileptic encephalographic signals and then it is classified using Sparse Representation Classifiers (SRC). SRC is used to analyze the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals and the parameters such as Sensitivity, Specificity, Time Delay, Quality Value, Performance Index and Accuracy are analyzed.

  12. Urine phyto-oestrogen metabolites are not significantly associated with risk of type 2 diabetes: the Singapore Chinese health study.

    PubMed

    Talaei, Mohammad; Lee, Bee L; Ong, Choon N; van Dam, Rob M; Yuan, Jian M; Koh, Woon P; Pan, An

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the relationship between urine concentrations of phyto-oestrogens (isoflavones and lignans) and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and elderly Chinese residing in Singapore. Urine metabolites of isoflavones and lignans were assayed by HPLC among 564 diabetes cases and 564 matched controls in a case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort. Participants were free of diagnosed diabetes, CVD and cancer at morning urine collections during 1999-2004. Cases were participants who reported to have physician-diagnosed diabetes at follow-up visits during 2006-2010, whereas controls were randomly selected among those who remained free of diabetes and were matched to the index cases by age, sex, dialect group and date of urine collection. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate OR and 95 % CI with adjustment for potential confounders. The mean age of the participants at the time of urine collection was 59·8 years, and the average interval between urine collection and diabetes diagnosis was 4·0 years. The multivariate-adjusted OR for diabetes were 1·00 (reference), 0·76 (95 % CI 0·52, 1·11), 0·78 (95 % CI 0·53, 1·14) and 0·79 (95 % CI 0·54, 1·15) across quartiles of urine isoflavones (P for trend=0·54), and were 1·00 (reference), 0·87 (95 % CI 0·60, 1·27), 1·10 (95 % CI 0·77, 1·56) and 0·93 (95 % CI 0·63, 1·37) for lignans (P for trend=0·93). The results were similar in men and women, as well as for individual metabolites of isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, glycitin and equol) or lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone). The present study did not find a significant association between urine phyto-oestrogen metabolites and risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese adults.

  13. Orthostatic Hypotension in the ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) Blood Pressure Trial: Prevalence, Incidence, and Prognostic Significance.

    PubMed

    Fleg, Jerome L; Evans, Gregory W; Margolis, Karen L; Barzilay, Joshua; Basile, Jan N; Bigger, J Thomas; Cutler, Jeffrey A; Grimm, Richard; Pedley, Carolyn; Peterson, Kevin; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn; Cushman, William C

    2016-10-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. However, in populations with both hypertension and diabetes mellitus, its prevalence, the effect of intensive versus standard systolic blood pressure (BP) targets on incident OH, and its prognostic significance are unclear. In 4266 participants in the ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) BP trial, seated BP was measured 3×, followed by readings every minute for 3 minutes after standing. Orthostatic BP change, calculated as the minimum standing minus the mean seated systolic BP and diastolic BP, was assessed at baseline, 12 months, and 48 months. The relationship between OH and clinical outcomes (total and cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, heart failure hospitalization or death and the primary composite outcome of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and cardiovascular death) was assessed using proportional hazards analysis. Consensus OH, defined by orthostatic decline in systolic BP ≥20 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥10 mm Hg, occurred at ≥1 time point in 20% of participants. Neither age nor systolic BP treatment target (intensive, <120 mm Hg versus standard, <140 mm Hg) was related to OH incidence. Over a median follow-up of 46.9 months, OH was associated with increased risk of total death (hazard ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-2.36) and heart failure death/hospitalization (hazard ratio, 1.85, 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.93), but not with the primary outcome or other prespecified outcomes. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, OH was common, not associated with intensive versus standard BP treatment goals, and predicted increased mortality and heart failure events.

  14. Identification of Sexually Abused Female Adolescents at Risk for Suicidal Ideations: A Classification and Regression Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brabant, Marie-Eve; Hebert, Martine; Chagnon, Francois

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the clinical profiles of 77 female teenager survivors of sexual abuse and examined the association of abuse-related and personal variables with suicidal ideations. Analyses revealed that 64% of participants experienced suicidal ideations. Findings from classification and regression tree analysis indicated that depression,…

  15. Incremental impact of breast cancer SNP panel on risk classification in a screening population of white and African American women

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Anne Marie; Armstrong, Katrina; Handorf, Elizabeth; Jones, Marisa; Chen, Jinbo; Demeter, Mirar Bristol; McGuire, Erin; Conant, Emily F; Domchek, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer risk prediction remains imperfect, particularly among non-white populations. This study examines the impact of including single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles in risk prediction for white and African American women undergoing screening mammogram. Using a prospective cohort study, standard risk information and buccal swabs were collected at the time of screening mammography. A 12 SNP panel was performed by deCODE Genetics. Five-year and lifetime risks incorporating SNPs were calculated by multiplying estimated Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) risk by the total genetic risk ratio. Concordance between the BCRAT and the Combined Model (BCRAT + SNPs) in identifying high-risk women was measured using the kappa statistic. SNP data were available for 813 women (39% African American, 55% white). The mean BCRAT 5-year risk was 1.70% for whites and 1.19% for African Americans. Mean genetic risk ratios were 1.10 in whites and 1.29 in African Americans. Among whites, three SNPs had higher frequencies, and among African Americans, seven SNPs had higher and four had lower high-risk allele frequencies than previously reported. Agreement between the BCRAT and the Combined Model was relatively low for identifying high-risk women (5-year κ=0.53, lifetime κ=0.37). Addition of SNPs had the greatest effect among African Americans, with 13% identified as having high 5-year risk by BCRAT, but 33% by the Combined Model. A greater proportion of African Americans were reclassified as having high 5-year risk than whites using the Combined Model (21% vs. 10%). The addition of SNPs to the BCRAT reclassifies the high-risk status of some women undergoing screening mammography, particularly African Americans. Further research is needed to determine the clinical validity and utility of the SNP panel for use in breast cancer risk prediction, particularly among African Americans for whom these risk alleles have generally not been validated. PMID:23474973

  16. Prognostic significance of early ischemia after acute myocardial infarction in low-risk patients. IRES (Ischemia Residua) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Galli, M; Campolo, L

    1993-05-15

    Early postinfarction angina is generally believed to imply an unfavorable prognosis. However, most of the published information devices from data collected in the prethrombolytic era, with widely differing populations and definitions of early angina, and very little data pertinent to low-risk patients are available. This collaborative study prospectively assessed the incidence of early recurrent ischemia after thrombolysis, as well as its prognostic significance, in 453 consecutive patients aged < or = 70 years with an uncomplicated course in the first 24 hours of a first myocardial infarction participating in the second Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto Miocardico (GISSI-2) trial. Early recurrent ischemia (spontaneous, transient ST depression or elevation of > 1 mm and/or T-wave inversion), assessed in the coronary care unit with continuous clinical and electrocardiographic monitoring, was documented in 35 of 453 patients (8%) and was unrelated to sex, age, electrocardiographic location, Q-wave or non-Q-wave infarction, thrombolytic agent and time to its administration. In-hospital cardiac events (7 deaths, 19 nonfatal reinfarctions and 8 urgent revascularizations) occurred in 15 of 35 patients (43%) with versus 19 of 418 without (4.5%) recurrent ischemia (p < 0.001). At the 6-month follow-up of 352 medically treated patients who did not have in-hospital events, the incidence of death, reinfarction and recurrent angina was comparable between patients with (2 of 18, 11%) and without (62 of 334, 19%) early ischemia (p = NS). With use of stepwise multivariate analysis, early ischemia was the only significant predictor of in-hospital cardiac events (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Immune Defects in the Risk of Infection and Response to Vaccination in Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tete, Sarah M.; Bijl, Marc; Sahota, Surinder S.; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma cell proliferative disorders monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and malignant multiple myeloma (MM) are characterized by an accumulation of transformed clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow and production of monoclonal immunoglobulin. They typically affect an older population, with median age of diagnosis of approximately 70 years. In both disorders, there is an increased risk of infection due to the immunosuppressive effects of disease and conjointly of therapy in MM, and response to vaccination to counter infection is compromised. The underlying factors in a weakened immune response in MGUS and MM are as yet not fully understood. A confounding factor is the onset of normal aging, which quantitatively and qualitatively hampers humoral immunity to affect response to infection and vaccination. In this review, we examine the status of immune alterations in MGUS and MM and set these against normal aging immune responses. We focus primarily on quantitative and functional aspects of B-cell immunity. Furthermore, we review the current knowledge relating to susceptibility to infectious disease in MGUS and MM, and how efficacy of conventional vaccination is affected by proliferative disease-related and therapy-related factors. PMID:24917865

  18. Lack of Significant Effects of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection on Cervical Adenocarcinoma Risk: Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Gheit, Tarik; Sundström, Karin; Ploner, Alexander; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Eklund, Carina; Tommasino, Massimo; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Background A role of Chlamydia trachomatis in HPV-induced cervical carcinogenesis has been reported for cervical cancer but studies on cervical adenocarcinoma are limited. Methods A total of 1,553 cervical smears taken up to 26 years before diagnosis in a large population-based nested case-control study of cervical adenocarcinoma (AC, 132 cases with matched controls), and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, 159 cases with matched controls) were tested for C. trachomatis and HPV DNA by a type-specific PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping (TS-MPG) assay. Results Only 1.7% of samples were positive for C. trachomatis, with no significant differences between AC/AIS cases and controls. HPV-positivity was detected in 49.3% of C. trachomatis-negative and 65.4% C. trachomatis-positive samples, respectively. Conclusions A large prospective study did not find any risk for cervical adenocarcinoma and/or AIS conferred by C. trachomatis infection. Impact C. trachomatis appears not to be involved in cervical adenocarcinomas. PMID:27227411

  19. Evaluation of diet quality and weight status of children from a low socioeconomic urban environment supports "at risk" classification.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Denise D; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia; McKay, M Geraldine; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; Touger-Decker, Riva; Smith, Jeffrey K; Perlman, Adam

    2007-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated diet quality and weight status in 248 randomly selected low-income urban children, aged 7 to 13 years, who were participating in a larger study on the effectiveness of multivitamin supplementation on school performance. Food frequency questionnaires were used to determine intake of total calories and food groups, selected micronutrients, and amount and percent of calories from sweets. Results were compared to age-appropriate recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid and to the Dietary Reference Intakes. Height, weight, and ages obtained from current-year student health records were used to calculate body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) percentile for age. Of 193 participants with usable food frequencies and available weight, height, sex, and age, 22% (n=43) were at risk for overweight and 36% (n=69) were overweight. More than 75% of participants failed to meet recommended servings for grains, vegetables, dairy, and fruit groups, and mean intake of each of these food groups was significantly less than recommendations (P<0.001). Twenty-five percent or more of subjects did not meet Recommended Dietary Allowances for iron and folate. Mean intake of calcium was below the Adequate Intake for calcium and 76% of children 8 years old and younger and 93% of children 9 years old and older did not meet the Adequate Intake for calcium. Mean calorie intake was 1,723 kcal (standard deviation+/-924) and mean percent of calories from carbohydrate, protein, and fat was 57%, 13%, and 32%, respectively. No correlation was found between total calories, total dietary sugar, or percent of calories from sweets and body mass index. Results of this study suggest that these urban children may be "at risk," based on the high percentage who are overweight and have insufficient food group consumption and micronutrient intake. PMID:17964318

  20. Evaluation of diet quality and weight status of children from a low socioeconomic urban environment supports "at risk" classification.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Denise D; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia; McKay, M Geraldine; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; Touger-Decker, Riva; Smith, Jeffrey K; Perlman, Adam

    2007-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated diet quality and weight status in 248 randomly selected low-income urban children, aged 7 to 13 years, who were participating in a larger study on the effectiveness of multivitamin supplementation on school performance. Food frequency questionnaires were used to determine intake of total calories and food groups, selected micronutrients, and amount and percent of calories from sweets. Results were compared to age-appropriate recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid and to the Dietary Reference Intakes. Height, weight, and ages obtained from current-year student health records were used to calculate body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) percentile for age. Of 193 participants with usable food frequencies and available weight, height, sex, and age, 22% (n=43) were at risk for overweight and 36% (n=69) were overweight. More than 75% of participants failed to meet recommended servings for grains, vegetables, dairy, and fruit groups, and mean intake of each of these food groups was significantly less than recommendations (P<0.001). Twenty-five percent or more of subjects did not meet Recommended Dietary Allowances for iron and folate. Mean intake of calcium was below the Adequate Intake for calcium and 76% of children 8 years old and younger and 93% of children 9 years old and older did not meet the Adequate Intake for calcium. Mean calorie intake was 1,723 kcal (standard deviation+/-924) and mean percent of calories from carbohydrate, protein, and fat was 57%, 13%, and 32%, respectively. No correlation was found between total calories, total dietary sugar, or percent of calories from sweets and body mass index. Results of this study suggest that these urban children may be "at risk," based on the high percentage who are overweight and have insufficient food group consumption and micronutrient intake.

  1. An integrated framework for safety, quality and risk management: an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification

    PubMed Central

    Runciman, W B; Williamson, J A H; Deakin, A; Benveniste, K A; Bannon, K; Hibbert, P D

    2006-01-01

    More needs to be done to improve safety and quality and to manage risks in health care. Existing processes are fragmented and there is no single comprehensive source of information about what goes wrong. An integrated framework for the management of safety, quality and risk is needed, with an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification. The World Alliance for Patient Safety provides a platform for the development of a coherent approach; 43 desirable attributes for such an approach are discussed. An example of an incident management and information system serving a patient safety classification is presented, with a brief account of how and where it is currently used. Any such system is valueless unless it improves safety and quality. Quadruple‐loop learning (personal, local, national and international) is proposed with examples of how an exemplar system has been successfully used at the various levels. There is currently an opportunity to “get it right” by international cooperation via the World Health Organization to develop an integrated framework incorporating systems that can accommodate information from all sources, manage and monitor things that go wrong, and allow the worldwide sharing of information and the dissemination of tools for the implementation of strategies which have been shown to work. PMID:17142615

  2. Integrating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Assay With Clinical Parameters Improves Risk Classification for Relapse and Survival in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine H.; Hammond, Elizabeth M.; Trotti, Andy M.; Wang Huijun; Spencer, Sharon; Zhang Huazhong; Cooper, Jay; Jordan, Richard; Rotman, Marvin H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been consistently found to be an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR) after radiotherapy. We assessed the extent by which it can refine risk classification for overall survival (OS) and LRR in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: EGFR expression in locally advanced HNSCC was measured by immunohistochemistry in a series of patients randomized to receive accelerated or conventional radiation regimens in a Phase III trial. Subsequently, data of the two series were pooled (N = 533) for conducting a recursive partitioning analysis that incorporated clinical parameters (e.g., performance status, primary site, T and N categories) and four molecular markers (EGFR, p53, Ki-67, and microvessel density). Results: This study confirmed that patients with higher than median levels of tumor EGFR expression had a lower OS (relative risk [RR]: 1.90, p = 0.0010) and a higher LRR (RR: 1.91, p = 0.0163). Of the four markers analyzed, only EGFR was found to contribute to refining classification of patients into three risk classes with distinct OS and LRR outcomes. The addition of EGFR to three clinical parameters could identify patients having up to a fivefold difference in the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Adding pretreatment EGFR expression data to known robust clinical prognostic variables improved the estimation of the probability for OS and LRR after radiotherapy. Its use for stratifying or selecting patients with defined tumor feature and pattern of relapse for enrollment into clinical trials testing specific therapeutic strategy warrants further investigation.

  3. Security classification of information

    SciTech Connect

    Quist, A.S.

    1989-09-01

    Certain governmental information must be classified for national security reasons. However, the national security benefits from classifying information are usually accompanied by significant costs -- those due to a citizenry not fully informed on governmental activities, the extra costs of operating classified programs and procuring classified materials (e.g., weapons), the losses to our nation when advances made in classified programs cannot be utilized in unclassified programs. The goal of a classification system should be to clearly identify that information which must be protected for national security reasons and to ensure that information not needing such protection is not classified. This document was prepared to help attain that goal. This document is the first of a planned four-volume work that comprehensively discusses the security classification of information. Volume 1 broadly describes the need for classification, the basis for classification, and the history of classification in the United States from colonial times until World War 2. Classification of information since World War 2, under Executive Orders and the Atomic Energy Acts of 1946 and 1954, is discussed in more detail, with particular emphasis on the classification of atomic energy information. Adverse impacts of classification are also described. Subsequent volumes will discuss classification principles, classification management, and the control of certain unclassified scientific and technical information. 340 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Classification Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Children, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The interview presents opinions of Nicholas Hobbs on the classification of exceptional children, including topics such as ecologically oriented classification systems, the role of parents, and need for revision of teacher preparation programs. (IM)

  5. Risk adjustment models for interhospital comparison of CS rates using Robson’s ten group classification system and other socio-demographic and clinical variables

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Caesarean section (CS) rate is a quality of health care indicator frequently used at national and international level. The aim of this study was to assess whether adjustment for Robson’s Ten Group Classification System (TGCS), and clinical and socio-demographic variables of the mother and the fetus is necessary for inter-hospital comparisons of CS rates. Methods The study population includes 64,423 deliveries in Emilia-Romagna between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2004, classified according to theTGCS. Poisson regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted hospital relative risks of CS compared to a reference category. Analyses were carried out in the overall population and separately according to the Robson groups (groups I, II, III, IV and V–X combined). Adjusted relative risks (RR) of CS were estimated using two risk-adjustment models; the first (M1) including the TGCS group as the only adjustment factor; the second (M2) including in addition demographic and clinical confounders identified using a stepwise selection procedure. Percentage variations between crude and adjusted RRs by hospital were calculated to evaluate the confounding effect of covariates. Results The percentage variations from crude to adjusted RR proved to be similar in M1 and M2 model. However, stratified analyses by Robson’s classification groups showed that residual confounding for clinical and demographic variables was present in groups I (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and III (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and to a minor extent in groups II (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour). Conclusions The TGCS classification is useful for

  6. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and risk of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies: 728 cases followed up to 30 years in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchik, Stephanie A.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Drayson, Mark T.; Landgren, Ola

    2014-01-01

    In 728 Swedish cases of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), followed up to 30 years (median, 10 years), we estimated the cumulative risk of hematologic disorders originating from lymphoid and myeloid lineages. Using Cox regression models, we examined associations of demographic and laboratory factors with progression and determined the discriminatory power of 3 prediction models for progression. Eighty-four MGUS cases developed a lymphoid disorder, representing a cumulative risk of 15.4%. Multiple myeloma (MM) occurred in 53 patients, and the 30-year cumulative risk was 10.6%; an ∼0.5% annual risk. Three factors were significantly associated with progression: abnormal free light-chain (FLC) ratio (<0.26 or >1.65), M-protein concentration (≥1.5 g/dL), and reduction of 1 or 2 noninvolved immunoglobulin isotype levels (immunoparesis). A prediction model with separate effects for these 3 factors and the M-protein isotype had higher discriminatory power than other models, although the differences were not statistically significant. The 30-year cumulative risk for myeloid malignancies was <2%. Our study confirms that abnormal FLC ratio and M-protein concentration >1.5 g/dL, factors previously considered by Mayo Clinic researchers, are predictors for MM progression and suggests that separate consideration of immunoparesis and the Mayo Clinic risk factors could improve identification of MGUS patients at high risk for progression. PMID:24222331

  7. Independent contractors or employees? Reducing reclassification risks.

    PubMed

    Moore, W B; Groth, C D

    1993-05-01

    With the aggressive stance taken by the IRS regarding worker classification, many organizations may be risking significant retroactive assessments with respect to the use of independent contractors. Employers should be aware of the 20 primary factors considered by the IRS when examining independent contractor relationships and prepare in advance for IRS classification review or audit.

  8. Does the use of salmon frames as bait for lobster/crab creel fishing significantly increase the risk of disease in farmed salmon in Scotland?

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander G

    2015-07-01

    Salmon farming is an important economic activity, and employer, particularly for remoter areas of Scotland; crustacean fisheries are also significant small businesses in these areas. Salmon frames (the head and spine that remain after evisceration and filleting) are sometimes used to bait the creel pots used to catch lobsters and crabs. These frames may contain pathogens that could potentially be spread to salmon farms in the vicinity of creel fisheries. Therefore, an analysis has been carried out for key pathogens of farmed salmon to assess the risks associated with this process. Infection of farms via creel bait requires that: (1) pathogens are present in salmon at harvest; (2) they are not removed from the salmon that used for bait during processing; (3) they transmit from creel pot baits to salmon farms. This last step is critical and leads to most of the uncertainty in results. Risk were assessed for 7 viruses, 3 bacteria, and 3 eukaryotic parasites of importance to salmon farming. A potentially significant risk was identified in association with disease control programmes if fish were filleted at a secondary processor; such a situation should arise only rarely. A very low risk, per event, was identified from imports, however, because of large numbers of Norwegian imports processed in the UK this risk is always present. Risks were at worst of low (disease control) or very low (imports) probability and are significant only because of the magnitude of consequences. PMID:25980750

  9. Does the use of salmon frames as bait for lobster/crab creel fishing significantly increase the risk of disease in farmed salmon in Scotland?

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander G

    2015-07-01

    Salmon farming is an important economic activity, and employer, particularly for remoter areas of Scotland; crustacean fisheries are also significant small businesses in these areas. Salmon frames (the head and spine that remain after evisceration and filleting) are sometimes used to bait the creel pots used to catch lobsters and crabs. These frames may contain pathogens that could potentially be spread to salmon farms in the vicinity of creel fisheries. Therefore, an analysis has been carried out for key pathogens of farmed salmon to assess the risks associated with this process. Infection of farms via creel bait requires that: (1) pathogens are present in salmon at harvest; (2) they are not removed from the salmon that used for bait during processing; (3) they transmit from creel pot baits to salmon farms. This last step is critical and leads to most of the uncertainty in results. Risk were assessed for 7 viruses, 3 bacteria, and 3 eukaryotic parasites of importance to salmon farming. A potentially significant risk was identified in association with disease control programmes if fish were filleted at a secondary processor; such a situation should arise only rarely. A very low risk, per event, was identified from imports, however, because of large numbers of Norwegian imports processed in the UK this risk is always present. Risks were at worst of low (disease control) or very low (imports) probability and are significant only because of the magnitude of consequences.

  10. Which Measures of Health Status Assessment are the Most Significant in Organized Cohorts with Low Current Cardiovascular Risk? The Screening Study of Penitentiary Staff in Saratov Region, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Kiselev, Anton R.; Balashov, Sergey V.; Posnenkova, Olga M.; Prokhorov, Mikhail D.; Gridnev, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare different methods of health status assessment in organized cohort of penitentiary employees in Saratov Region, Russian Federation. Materials and Methods: 1,014 penitentiary employees (81.8% male) aged 33.4±6.8 years were included in the cohort study. All participants underwent an annual preventive health examination in the Center of Medical and Social Rehabilitation of Russian Federal Penitentiary Service in Saratov Region. The prevalence of common cardiovascular risk factors was assessed. Risk Score and the number of fulfilled health metrics proposed by American Heart Association (AHA) were calculated for each participant. Results: It is shown that penitentiary staff in Saratov Region is characterized by low current risk score (1.2±0.8%), but high prevalence of such risk factors as increased body weight and obesity (51%), tobacco use or passive smoking (81%), and unhealthy diet (55%). 98.4% of participants had the Score level of ≤5%, but only 4.5% of penitentiary staff met the ideal cardiovascular health (they met all seven AHA health metrics). One fifth of the participants met three or less AHA health metrics. A statistically significant correlation between the risk Score and the number of fulfilled AHA health metrics is revealed (Chi-square = 5.1, p=0.024). The probability of fulfilment of less than 5 AHA health metrics in subjects with medium risk score is shown to be almost twofold greater than in subjects with low risk Score. However, there are a lot of differences in the assessment of cardiovascular health by risk Score and AHA health metrics. Conclusion: AHA health metrics are more preferable than the risk Score or assessment of separate cardiovascular risk factors for preventive management in organized cohorts with low current cardiovascular risk such as penitentiary staff in Saratov Region. PMID:27026764

  11. Classification accuracy improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements made in processing system designed for MIDAS (prototype multivariate interactive digital analysis system) effects higher accuracy in classification of pixels, resulting in significantly-reduced processing time. Improved system realizes cost reduction factor of 20 or more.

  12. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Enhancing the Classification Skill in Second-Graders at Risk for Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Adel Abdulla; Kanpolat, Yavuz Erhan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Computers and other technological instruments in general have become a more common practice in our schools nowadays, and Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) has been recently provided in various formats from kindergartens on. It can help children at-risk for learning disabilities. Method: This study investigated the effectiveness of…

  13. A significantly joint effect between arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-H.; Yeh, S.-D.; Shen, K.-H.; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Juang, G.-D.; Hsu, L.-I; Chiou, H.-Y.; Chen, C.-J.

    2009-11-15

    Cigarette smoking, arsenic and occupational exposures are well-known risk factors for the development of urothelial carcinoma (UC). Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures on risk of UC could be modified by genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 2E1 and glutathione S-transferase omega. A hospital-based case-control study consisted of 520 histologically confirmed UC cases, and 520 age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls were carried out from September 1998 to December 2007. Genotyping of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Subjects with both of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have a significantly increased UC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9-4.4). Significantly increased UC risks of 1.5 and 1.9 were found for study subjects with high arsenic exposure and those who have been exposed to two or more occupational exposures, respectively. A significantly increased UC risk of 3.9 was observed in study subjects with H2-H2 diplotype of GSTO1 and GSTO2. The significantly highest UC risk of 9.0 was found for those with all environmental risk factors of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and two or more risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2. Our findings suggest that a significantly joint effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of UC was found.

  14. TET2 Mutations Improve the New European LeukemiaNet Risk Classification of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Metzeler, Klaus H.; Maharry, Kati; Radmacher, Michael D.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Margeson, Dean; Becker, Heiko; Curfman, John; Holland, Kelsi B.; Schwind, Sebastian; Whitman, Susan P.; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Blum, William; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Wetzler, Meir; Moore, Joseph O.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Baer, Maria R.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Larson, Richard A.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency of TET2 mutations, their associations with clinical and molecular characteristics and outcome, and the associated gene- and microRNA-expression signatures in patients with primary cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods Four-hundred twenty-seven patients with CN-AML were analyzed for TET2 mutations by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing and for established prognostic gene mutations. Gene- and microRNA-expression profiles were derived using microarrays. Results TET2 mutations, found in 23% of patients, were associated with older age (P < .001) and higher pretreatment WBC (P = .04) compared with wild-type TET2 (TET2-wt). In the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) favorable-risk group (patients with CN-AML who have mutated CEBPA and/or mutated NPM1 without FLT3 internal tandem duplication [FLT3-ITD]), TET2-mutated patients had shorter event-free survival (EFS; P < .001) because of a lower complete remission (CR) rate (P = .007), and shorter disease-free survival (DFS; P = .003), and also had shorter overall survival (P = .001) compared with TET2-wt patients. TET2 mutations were not associated with outcomes in the ELN intermediate-I–risk group (CN-AML with wild-type CEBPA and wild-type NPM1 and/or FLT3-ITD). In multivariable models, TET2 mutations were associated with shorter EFS (P = .004), lower CR rate (P = .03), and shorter DFS (P = .05) only among favorable-risk CN-AML patients. We identified a TET2 mutation-associated gene-expression signature in favorable-risk but not in intermediate-I–risk patients and found distinct mutation-associated microRNA signatures in both ELN groups. Conclusion TET2 mutations improve the ELN molecular-risk classification in primary CN-AML because of their adverse prognostic impact in an otherwise favorable-risk patient subset. Our data suggest that these patients may be candidates for alternative therapies. PMID:21343549

  15. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk intensive care unit patients receiving antacid prophylaxis: frequency and significance.

    PubMed

    Derrida, S; Nury, B; Slama, R; Marois, F; Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Sicot, C

    1989-02-01

    Gastroccult reagent was used every 4 h to detect blood in gastric juice in 41 ICU patients at risk of GI bleeding (GB) and receiving antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5). Of the present patients, 27% (11/41) had at least one episode of occult GB (three consecutive positive determinations; a total of 14 episodes). Endoscopy identified acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions (stress ulcers) as the most frequent lesion in this group (eight patients). Sepsis was the most frequent underlying condition associated with occult GB due to stress ulcer. Hematemesis occurred in 36% (4/11) of patients with occult GB and was due to stress ulcer in three patients and to benign gastric tumor in one. No overt GB occurred in the absence of previous occult GB. We conclude that: a) risk of GB persists in critically ill ICU patients in spite of antacid prophylaxis (gastric pH greater than 3.5); b) high-risk patients can be identified through periodic testing for the presence of blood in gastric juice using the reagent; c) when occult GB occurs, treatment should be based on the endoscopy results. In the absence of acute gastroduodenal mucosal lesions, antacid prophylaxis should not be modified, and specific treatment of the identified lesion(s) should be initiated. In the presence of stress lesions, antacid prophylaxis should be reinforced if the pH of the gastric content is less than 3.5 and a septic complication should be actively sought if the pH is greater than 3.5. PMID:2783669

  16. High Dose Atorvastatin Associated with Increased Risk of Significant Hepatotoxicity in Comparison to Simvastatin in UK GPRD Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alan T.; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Hall, Gillian C.; Ford, Ian; Mills, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Occasional risk of serious liver dysfunction and autoimmune hepatitis during atorvastatin therapy has been reported. We compared the risk of hepatotoxicity in atorvastatin relative to simvastatin treatment. Methods The UK GPRD identified patients with a first prescription for simvastatin [164,407] or atorvastatin [76,411] between 1997 and 2006, but with no prior record of liver disease, alcohol-related diagnosis, or liver dysfunction. Incident liver dysfunction in the following six months was identified by biochemical value and compared between statin groups by Cox regression model adjusting for age, sex, year treatment started, dose, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index and comorbid conditions. Results Moderate to severe hepatotoxicity [bilirubin >60μmol/L, AST or ALT >200U/L or alkaline phosphatase >1200U/L] developed in 71 patients on atorvastatin versus 101 on simvastatin. Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for all atorvastatin relative to simvastatin was 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.4–2.6]. High dose was classified as 40–80mg daily and low dose 10–20mg daily. Hepatotoxicity occurred in 0.44% of 4075 patients on high dose atorvastatin [HDA], 0.07% of 72,336 on low dose atorvastatin [LDA], 0.09% of 44,675 on high dose simvastatin [HDS] and 0.05% of 119,732 on low dose simvastatin [LDS]. AHRs compared to LDS were 7.3 [4.2–12.7] for HDA, 1.4 [0.9–2.0] for LDA and 1.5 [1.0–2.2] for HDS. Conclusions The risk of hepatotoxicity was increased in the first six months of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin treatment, with the greatest difference between high dose atorvastatin and low dose simvastatin. The numbers of events in the analyses were small. PMID:26983033

  17. Increased Risk of Clinically Significant Gallstones following an Appendectomy: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chen, Chao-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Although the vermiform appendix is commonly considered a vestigial organ, adverse health consequences after an appendectomy have garnered increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the risks of gallstone occurrence during a 5-year follow-up period after an appendectomy, using a population-based dataset. We used data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. The exposed cohort included 4916 patients who underwent an appendectomy. The unexposed cohort was retrieved by randomly selecting 4916 patients matched with the exposed cohort in terms of sex, age, and year. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who received a diagnosis of gallstones during the follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed for the analysis. During the 5-year follow-up period, the incidence rate per 1000 person-years was 4.71 for patients who had undergone an appendectomy, compared to a rate of 2.59 for patients in the unexposed cohort (p<0.001). Patients who had undergone an appendectomy were independently associated with a 1.79 (95% CI = 1.29~2.48)-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with gallstones during the 5-year follow-up period. We found that among female patients, the adjusted hazard ratio of gallstones was 2.25 (95% CI = 1.41~3.59) for patients who underwent an appendectomy compared to unexposed patients. However, for male patients, we failed to observe an increased hazard for gallstones among patients who underwent an appendectomy compared to unexposed patients. We found an increased risk of a subsequent gallstone diagnosis within 5 years after an appendectomy. PMID:27788255

  18. A significant correlation between the plasma levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin B-6 and a reduced risk of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Yen, Chi-Hua; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Lin, Jui-Yuan; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between plasma levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin B-6 and the risk of CAD. Patients with at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery identified by cardiac catheterization were assigned to the case group (n = 45). The control group (n = 89) comprised healthy individuals with normal blood biochemistry. The plasma concentrations of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin B-6 (pyridoxal 5'-phosphate) and the lipid profiles of the participants were measured. Subjects with CAD had significantly lower plasma levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin B-6 compared to the control group. The plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration (β = 1.06, P = .02) and the ratio of coenzyme Q10 to total cholesterol (β = .28, P = .01) were positively correlated with vitamin B-6 status. Subjects with higher coenzyme Q10 concentration (≥516.0 nmol/L) had a significantly lower risk of CAD, even after adjusting for the risk factors for CAD. Subjects with higher pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentration (≥59.7 nmol/L) also had a significantly lower risk of CAD, but the relationship lost its statistical significance after adjusting for the risk factors of CAD. There was a significant correlation between the plasma levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin B-6 and a reduced risk of CAD. Further study is needed to examine the benefits of administering coenzyme Q10 in combination with vitamin B-6 to CAD patients, especially those with low coenzyme Q10 level.

  19. Remote sensing (normalized difference vegetation index) classification of risk versus minimal risk habitats for human exposure to Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) nymphs in Mendocino County, California.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Lane, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    In California, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls nymphs have been implicated as the primary bridging vectors to humans of the spirochetal bacterium causing Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi). Because the nymphs typically do not ascend emergent vegetation, risk of human exposure is minimal in grasslands, chaparral, and woodland-grass. Instead, woodlands with a ground cover dominated by leaf litter (hereinafter referred to as woodland-leaf) have emerged as a primary risk habitat for exposure to B. burgdorferi-infected nymphs. As a means of differentiating woodland-leaf habitats from others with minimal risk (e.g., chaparral, grassland, and woodland-grass), we constructed a maximum likelihood model of these habitat types within a 7,711-ha area in southeastern Mendocino County based on the normalized difference vegetation index derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper imagery (based on a 30 by 30-m pixel size) over four seasons. The overall accuracy of the model to discriminate woodland-leaf, woodland-grass, open grassland, and chaparral was 83.85% (Kappa coefficient of 0.78). Validation of the accuracy of the model to classify woodland-leaf yielded high values both for producer accuracy (93.33% of validated woodland-leaf pixels correctly classified by the model) and user accuracy (96.55% of model-classified validation pixels correctly categorized as woodland-leaf). Woodland-leaf habitats were found to be highly aggregated within the examined area. In conclusion, our model successfully used remotely sensed data as a predictor of habitats where humans are at risk for Lyme disease in the far-western United States. PMID:15691012

  20. Remote sensing (normalized difference vegetation index) classification of risk versus minimal risk habitats for human exposure to Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) nymphs in Mendocino County, California.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Lane, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    In California, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls nymphs have been implicated as the primary bridging vectors to humans of the spirochetal bacterium causing Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi). Because the nymphs typically do not ascend emergent vegetation, risk of human exposure is minimal in grasslands, chaparral, and woodland-grass. Instead, woodlands with a ground cover dominated by leaf litter (hereinafter referred to as woodland-leaf) have emerged as a primary risk habitat for exposure to B. burgdorferi-infected nymphs. As a means of differentiating woodland-leaf habitats from others with minimal risk (e.g., chaparral, grassland, and woodland-grass), we constructed a maximum likelihood model of these habitat types within a 7,711-ha area in southeastern Mendocino County based on the normalized difference vegetation index derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper imagery (based on a 30 by 30-m pixel size) over four seasons. The overall accuracy of the model to discriminate woodland-leaf, woodland-grass, open grassland, and chaparral was 83.85% (Kappa coefficient of 0.78). Validation of the accuracy of the model to classify woodland-leaf yielded high values both for producer accuracy (93.33% of validated woodland-leaf pixels correctly classified by the model) and user accuracy (96.55% of model-classified validation pixels correctly categorized as woodland-leaf). Woodland-leaf habitats were found to be highly aggregated within the examined area. In conclusion, our model successfully used remotely sensed data as a predictor of habitats where humans are at risk for Lyme disease in the far-western United States.

  1. Hubble Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A classification scheme for galaxies, devised in its original form in 1925 by Edwin P Hubble (1889-1953), and still widely used today. The Hubble classification recognizes four principal types of galaxy—elliptical, spiral, barred spiral and irregular—and arranges these in a sequence that is called the tuning-fork diagram....

  2. Clinical significance of CD81 expression by clonal plasma cells in high-risk smoldering and symptomatic multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Gutiérrez, N-C; Chen, X; Vídriales, M-B; Montalbán, M-Á; Rosiñol, L; Oriol, A; Martínez-López, J; Mateos, M-V; López-Corral, L; Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Pérez, J-J; Fernández-Redondo, E; de Arriba, F; Palomera, L; Bengoechea, E; Terol, M-J; de Paz, R; Martin, A; Hernández, J; Orfao, A; Lahuerta, J-J; Bladé, J; Pandiella, A; Miguel, J-F San

    2012-08-01

    The presence of CD19 in myelomatous plasma cells (MM-PCs) correlates with adverse prognosis in multiple myeloma (MM). Although CD19 expression is upregulated by CD81, this marker has been poorly investigated and its prognostic value in MM remains unknown. We have analyzed CD81 expression by multiparameter flow cytometry in MM-PCs from 230 MM patients at diagnosis included in the Grupo Español de Mieloma (GEM)05>65 years trial as well as 56 high-risk smoldering MM (SMM). CD81 expression was detected in 45% (103/230) MM patients, and the detection of CD81(+) MM-PC was an independent prognostic factor for progression-free (hazard ratio=1.9; P=0.003) and overall survival (hazard ratio=2.0; P=0.02); this adverse impact was validated in an additional series of 325 transplant-candidate MM patients included in the GEM05 <65 years trial. Moreover, CD81(+) SMM (n=34/56, 57%) patients had a shorter time to progression to MM (P=0.02). Overall, our results show that CD81 may have a relevant role in MM pathogenesis and represent a novel adverse prognostic marker in myeloma. PMID:22333880

  3. Microbiological sampling plan based on risk classification to verify supplier selection and production of served meals in food service operation.

    PubMed

    Lahou, Evy; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Van Landeghem, Filip; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-08-01

    Food service operations are confronted with a diverse range of raw materials and served meals. The implementation of a microbial sampling plan in the framework of verification of suppliers and their own production process (functionality of their prerequisite and HACCP program), demands selection of food products and sampling frequencies. However, these are often selected without a well described scientifically underpinned sampling plan. Therefore, an approach on how to set-up a focused sampling plan, enabled by a microbial risk categorization of food products, for both incoming raw materials and meals served to the consumers is presented. The sampling plan was implemented as a case study during a one-year period in an institutional food service operation to test the feasibility of the chosen approach. This resulted in 123 samples of raw materials and 87 samples of meal servings (focused on high risk categorized food products) which were analyzed for spoilage bacteria, hygiene indicators and food borne pathogens. Although sampling plans are intrinsically limited in assessing the quality and safety of sampled foods, it was shown to be useful to reveal major non-compliances and opportunities to improve the food safety management system in place. Points of attention deduced in the case study were control of Listeria monocytogenes in raw meat spread and raw fish as well as overall microbial quality of served sandwiches and salads.

  4. The polymorphism interleukin-8 -251A/T is associated with a significantly increased risk of cancers from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziliang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lina; Yin, Sheng; Zang, Rongyu; Yang, Gong

    2014-07-01

    Emerging evidences show that interleukin-8 (IL-8) has important regulatory functions in tumorigenesis. IL-8 -251A/T is a single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the IL-8 gene and affects IL-8 production. Analysis of previous studies on the association of -251A/T polymorphism with different cancer types remained to be illustrated. To further assess the effect of -251A/T polymorphism on cancer risks, we performed this meta-analysis, up to November 2013, of 12,917 cases with different cancer types and 17,689 controls from 47 published case-control designed studies. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA 11.0 software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of associations. ORs with 95 % CIs for IL-8 -251A/T polymorphism and cancer were estimated using fixed- and random-effects models when appropriate. Significantly increased risks were found in overall under the models of A allele vs. T allele, AA vs. TT, and AA vs. AT/TT. Significantly elevated risks were observed in breast cancer under the models of A allele vs. T allele, AT vs. TT, AA/AT vs. TT, and AA vs. AT/TT, and in nasopharyngeal carcinoma under the models of AT vs. TT, AA/AT vs. TT, and AA vs. AT/TT. We found that significantly elevated risks were observed in the Asian population and hospital-based studies in all comparison models. Thus, this meta-analysis indicates that IL-8 -251A/T polymorphism is associated with a significantly increased risk of cancers and may provide evidence-based medical certificate to study the cancer susceptibility.

  5. [Classification of Histopathological Findings in the Liver Cited in the Pesticides Risk Assessment Reports Published by the Food Safety Commission of Japan and Thesaurus Construction Based on the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic (INHAND) Criteria].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Umemura, Takashi; Yoshida, Midori

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological findings are important to the understanding of toxicity profiles of pesticides. The liver is often a target organ of chemicals. In the present study, histopathological findings in the liver cited in the pesticides risk assessment reports published by the Food Safety Commission of Japan were classified. The histopathological findings were obtained in repeated-dose 90-day oral toxicity studies of mice, rats and dogs and carcinogenicity studies of rodents. After the classification, a thesaurus was constructed based on the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic (INHAND) Criteria. We recommend the use of INHAND criteria in risk assessment reports to improve mutual understanding between applicants and risk assessors.

  6. Atrial fibrillation burden and atrial fibrillation type: Clinical significance and impact on the risk of stroke and decision making for long-term anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Pettorelli, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia increasing the risk of morbidity and adverse outcomes (stroke, heart failure, death). AF is found in 1-2% of the general population, with increasing prevalence with aging. Its exact epidemiological profile is incomplete and underestimated, because 10-40% of AF patients (particularly the elderly) can be asymptomatic ("clinically silent or subclinical AF"), with occasional electrocardiographic diagnosis. The research interest on silent AF has increased by the evidence that its outcome is no less severe, in terms of risks of stroke and death, than that for symptomatic patients. Data collected from more than 18,000 patients indicate that cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs) are validated tools for detecting silent AF and measuring the time spent in AF, defined as "AF burden." A maximum daily AF burden of ≥5-6min, but particularly ≥1h, is associated with a significant increase in the risk of stroke, and may be clinically relevant to improve current risk stratification based on risk scores and for "personalizing" prescription of oral anticoagulants. An in-depth study of the temporal relationship between AF and ischemic stroke showed that data from CIEDs reveal a complex scenario, by which AF is certainly a risk factor for cardioembolic stroke, with a cause-effect relationship related to atrial thrombi, but can also be a simple "marker of risk," with a noncausal association with stroke. In such cases, stroke is possibly related to atheroemboli from the aorta, the carotid arteries, or other sources. PMID:27196706

  7. New criteria to identify risk of progression in monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and smoldering multiple myeloma based on multiparameter flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Persona, Ernesto; Vidriales, María-Belén; Mateo, Gema; García-Sanz, Ramón; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; de Coca, Alfonso García; Galende, Josefina; Martín-Nuñez, Guillermo; Alonso, José M; de Las Heras, Natalia; Hernández, José M; Martín, Alejandro; López-Berges, Consuelo; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2007-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) are plasma cell disorders with a risk of progression of approximately 1% and 10% per year, respectively. We have previously shown that the proportion of bone marrow (BM) aberrant plasma cells (aPCs) within the BMPC compartment (aPC/BMPC) as assessed by flow cytometry (FC) contributes to differential diagnosis between MGUS and multiple myloma (MM). The goal of the present study was to investigate this parameter as a marker for risk of progression in MGUS (n = 407) and SMM (n = 93). Patients with a marked predominance of aPCs/BMPC (> or = 95%) at diagnosis displayed a significantly higher risk of progression both in MGUS and SMM (P< .001). Multivariate analysis for progression-free survival (PFS) selected the percentage aPC/BMPC (> or = 95%) as the most important independent variable, together with DNA aneuploidy and immunoparesis, for MGUS and SMM, respectively. Using these independent variables, we have identified 3 risk categories in MGUS (PFS at 5 years of 2%, 10%, and 46%, respectively; P< .001) and SMM patients (PFS at 5 years of 4%, 46%, and 72%, respectively; P < .001). Our results show that multiparameter FC evaluation of BMPC at diagnosis is a valuable tool that could help to individualize the follow-up strategy for MGUS and SMM patients. PMID:17576818

  8. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparity is a significant independent risk factor for mortality after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crocchiolo, Roberto; Zino, Elisabetta; Vago, Luca; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Barbara; Pollichieni, Simona; Sacchi, Nicoletta; Sormani, Maria Pia; Marcon, Jessica; Lamparelli, Teresa; Fanin, Renato; Garbarino, Lucia; Miotti, Valeria; Bandini, Giuseppe; Bosi, Alberto; Ciceri, Fabio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Fleischhauer, Katharina

    2009-08-13

    The importance of donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DPB1 matching for the clinical outcome of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is controversial. We have previously described an algorithm for nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparities involving HLA-DPB1*0901,*1001,*1701,*0301,*1401,*4501, based on T-cell alloreactivity patterns. By revisiting the immunogenicity of HLA-DPB1*02, a modified algorithm was developed and retrospectively tested in 621 unrelated HSCTs facilitated through the Italian Registry for oncohematologic adult patients. The modified algorithm proved to be markedly more predictive of outcome than the original one, with significantly higher Kaplan-Meier probabilities of 2-year survival in permissive compared with nonpermissive transplantations (55% vs 39%, P = .005). This was the result of increased adjusted hazards of nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.74; confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.53; P = .004) but not of relapse (HR = 1.02; CI, 0.73-1.42; P = .92). The increase in the hazards of overall mortality by nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparity was similar in 10 of 10 (HR = 2.12; CI, 1.23-3.64; P = .006) and 9 of 10 allele-matched transplantations (HR = 2.21; CI, 1.28-3.80; P = .004), both in early-stage and in advanced-stage disease. These data call for revisiting current HLA matching strategies for unrelated HSCT, suggesting that searches should be directed up-front toward identification of HLA-DPB1 permissive, 10 of 10 or 9 of 10 matched donors. PMID:19515726

  9. Risk Factors at Time of Primary ACL Reconstruction that Contribute to Significant Chondral Surface Change at Time of Revision ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Christopher C.; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Articular cartilage health is an important issue following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). It is not clear what risk factors at the time of primary reconstruction affect future articular cartilage health. The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors affecting chondral surface change in a cohort from the time of primary ACLR to revision ACLR. Methods: Subjects who had both primary and revision data contained in the MOON and MARS registries were included. Data included chondral surface status (grade and size) at time of primary and revision, meniscal status (no treatment/repair, ≤33% excision, >33% excision) at time of primary, time from primary to revision ACLR, and age, sex, BMI, Marx, KOOS, and IKDC at time of revision. Significant chondral surface change was defined as >25% deterioration between time of primary and revision in the femoral condyle, tibial plateau, patella, or trochlea. Logistic regression was used to test each variable’s contribution to significant chondral surface change in the medial compartment, lateral compartment, and patellofemoral compartment. Results: 134 subjects met our inclusion criteria. 34/134 (25.4%) had significant lateral compartment chondral surface change, 32/134 (23.9%) had significant medial compartment chondral surface change, and 31/134 (23.1%) had significant patellofemoral chondral surface change. Median age at time of revision was 19.5 years [IQ range 17-25] and median time from primary to revision was 462.5 days [IQ range 292-1049]. KOOS and IKDC at revision were not associated with significant chondral surface change in any compartment. Patients with >33% of their lateral meniscus excised had 13.5 times the odds of having significant lateral compartment surface change compared to subjects who either did not have lateral meniscal damage, had it repaired, or had an excision of ≤33% controlling for age (p<0.001). Patients with ≤33% excision of their medial meniscus had

  10. Editorial Commentary: Big Data Suggest That Because of a Significant Increased Risk of Postoperative Infection, Steroid Injection Is Not Recommended After Ankle Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-02-01

    A recent study addressing infection rate after intra-articular steroid injection during ankle arthroscopy gives pause to this practice, with an odds ratio of 2.2 in the entire population that was injected with a steroid simultaneously with ankle arthroscopy compared with patients who did not receive an ankle injection. Big data, used in the study upon which the Editor comments here, suggest that because of a significant increased risk of postoperative infection, steroid injection is not recommended after ankle arthroscopy.

  11. Prognostic significance of L1CAM expression and its association with mutant p53 expression in high-risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Inge C; Stelloo, Ellen; Nout, Remi A; Nijman, Hans W; Edmondson, Richard J; Church, David N; MacKay, Helen J; Leary, Alexandra; Powell, Melanie E; Mileshkin, Linda; Creutzberg, Carien L; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Bosse, Tjalling

    2016-02-01

    Studies in early-stage, predominantly low- and intermediate-risk endometrial cancer have demonstrated that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) overexpression identifies patients at increased risk of recurrence, yet its prognostic significance in high-risk endometrial cancer is unclear. To evaluate this, its frequency, and the relationship of L1CAM with the established endometrial cancer biomarker p53, we analyzed the expression of both markers by immunohistochemistry in a pilot series of 116 endometrial cancers (86 endometrioid, 30 non-endometrioid subtype) with high-risk features (such as high tumor grade and deep myometrial invasion) and correlated results with clinical outcome. We used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) endometrial cancer series to validate our findings. Using the previously reported cutoff of 10% positive staining, 51/116 (44%) tumors were classified as L1CAM-positive, with no significant association between L1CAM positivity and the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.195). However, increasing the threshold for L1CAM positivity to 50% resulted in a reduction of the frequency of L1CAM-positive tumors to 24% (28/116), and a significant association with the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.018). L1CAM expression was strongly associated with mutant p53 in the high-risk and TCGA series (P<0.001), although a substantial fraction (36% of endometrioid, 10% of non-endometrioid morphology) of p53-mutant endometrial cancers displayed <10% L1CAM positivity. Moreover, 30% of p53-wild-type non-endometrioid endometrial cancers demonstrated diffuse L1CAM staining, suggesting p53-independent mechanisms of L1CAM overexpression. In conclusion, the previously proposed threshold for L1CAM positivity of >10% does not predict prognosis in high-risk endometrial cancer, whereas an alternative threshold (>50%) does. L1CAM expression is strongly, but not universally, associated with mutant p53, and may be strong enough for clinical implementation as prognostic marker in combination

  12. Towards an International Classification for Patient Safety: the conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Heather; Castro, Gerard; Fletcher, Martin; Hatlie, Martin; Hibbert, Peter; Jakob, Robert; Koss, Richard; Lewalle, Pierre; Loeb, Jerod; Perneger, Thomas; Runciman, William; Thomson, Richard; Van Der Schaaf, Tjerk; Virtanen, Martti

    2009-02-01

    Global advances in patient safety have been hampered by the lack of a uniform classification of patient safety concepts. This is a significant barrier to developing strategies to reduce risk, performing evidence-based research and evaluating existing healthcare policies relevant to patient safety. Since 2005, the World Health Organization's World Alliance for Patient Safety has undertaken the Project to Develop an International Classification for Patient Safety (ICPS) to devise a classification which transforms patient safety information collected from disparate systems into a common format to facilitate aggregation, analysis and learning across disciplines, borders and time. A drafting group, comprised of experts from the fields of patient safety, classification theory, health informatics, consumer/patient advocacy, law and medicine, identified and defined key patient safety concepts and developed an internationally agreed conceptual framework for the ICPS based upon existing patient safety classifications. The conceptual framework was iteratively improved through technical expert meetings and a two-stage web-based modified Delphi survey of over 250 international experts. This work culminated in a conceptual framework consisting of ten high level classes: incident type, patient outcomes, patient characteristics, incident characteristics, contributing factors/hazards, organizational outcomes, detection, mitigating factors, ameliorating actions and actions taken to reduce risk. While the framework for the ICPS is in place, several challenges remain. Concepts need to be defined, guidance for using the classification needs to be provided, and further real-world testing needs to occur to progressively refine the ICPS to ensure it is fit for purpose. PMID:19147595

  13. SERIAL NECK ULTRASOUND IS MORE LIKELY TO IDENTIFY FALSE-POSITIVE ABNORMALITIES THAN CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT DISEASE IN LOW-RISK PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samantha Peiling; Bach, Ariadne M.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Fish, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective American Thyroid Association (ATA) low-risk papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients without structural evidence of disease on initial posttreatment evaluation have a low risk of recurrence. Despite this, most patients undergo frequent surveillance neck ultrasound (US). The objective of the study was to evaluate the clinical utility of routine neck US in ATA low-risk PTC patients with no structural evidence of disease after their initial thyroid surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 171 ATA low-risk PTC patients after total thyroidectomy, with or without radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation, who had a neck US without suspicious findings after therapy. The main outcome measure was a comparison of the frequency of finding false-positive US abnormalities and the frequency of identifying structural disease recurrence. Results Over a median follow-up of 8 years, 171 patients underwent a median of 5 neck US (range 2–17). Structural recurrence with low-volume disease (≤1 cm) was identified in 1.2% (2/171) of patients at a median of 2.8 years (range 1.6–4.1 years) after their initial diagnosis. Recurrence was associated with rising serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level in 1 of the 2 patients and was detected without signs of biochemical recurrence in the other patient. Conversely, false-positive US abnormalities were identified in 67% (114/171) of patients after therapy, leading to additional testing without identifying clinically significant disease. Conclusion In ATA low-risk patients without structural evidence of disease on initial surveillance evaluation, routine screening US is substantially more likely to identify false-positive results than clinically significant structural disease recurrence. PMID:26372300

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma: IMWG consensus perspectives risk factors for progression and guidelines for monitoring and management.

    PubMed

    Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M; Rajkumar, S V; Landgren, O; Blade, J; Merlini, G; Kröger, N; Einsele, H; Vesole, D H; Dimopoulos, M; San Miguel, J; Avet-Loiseau, H; Hajek, R; Chen, W M; Anderson, K C; Ludwig, H; Sonneveld, P; Pavlovsky, S; Palumbo, A; Richardson, P G; Barlogie, B; Greipp, P; Vescio, R; Turesson, I; Westin, J; Boccadoro, M

    2010-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was identified in 3.2% of 21 463 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, 50 years of age or older. The risk of progression to multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, AL amyloidosis or a lymphoproliferative disorder is approximately 1% per year. Low-risk MGUS is characterized by having an M protein <15 g/l, IgG type and a normal free light chain (FLC) ratio. Patients should be followed with serum protein electrophoresis at six months and, if stable, can be followed every 2-3 years or when symptoms suggestive of a plasma cell malignancy arise. Patients with intermediate and high-risk MGUS should be followed in 6 months and then annually for life. The risk of smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma (SMM) progressing to multiple myeloma or a related disorder is 10% per year for the first 5 years, 3% per year for the next 5 years and 1-2% per year for the next 10 years. Testing should be done 2-3 months after the initial recognition of SMM. If the results are stable, the patient should be followed every 4-6 months for 1 year and, if stable, every 6-12 months. PMID:20410922

  15. JAK2 p.V617F allele burden in myeloproliferative neoplasms one month after allogeneic stem cell transplantation significantly predicts outcome and risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Thoralf; Edelmann, Anja; Siebolts, Udo; Krahl, Rainer; Nehring, Claudia; Jäkel, Nadja; Cross, Michael; Maier, Jacqueline; Niederwieser, Dietger; Wickenhauser, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The risk profile and prognosis of patients with myelofibrosis is well described by the Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System risk categorization. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is considered for intermediate-2/high risk disease. However, indicators of prognosis after transplantation are still lacking. Seventy simultaneously collected pairs of trephine and blood samples were quantified for JAK2 p.V617F allele burden to compare test sensitivity. The course of 30 patients with JAK2 p.V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasia was correlated with allele burden after transplantation. Monitoring can be performed on full blood samples as well as trephine biopsies, provided that techniques with ample sensitivity (0.01% to 0.001%) are available. Measurement of allele burden on day 28 after transplantation discriminates two prognostic groups: patients with a JAK2 p.V617F allele burden >1% have a significantly higher risk of relapse of JAK2 p.V617F positive neoplasia (P=0.04) and a poorer overall survival (P<0.01). In conclusion, measurement of JAK2 p.V617F allele burden early after transplantation is an important predictive parameter in monitoring patients following this treatment. As this might provide an important tool in early management of imminent early relapse it will be important to define consensus guidelines for optimal monitoring. PMID:23300178

  16. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography angiography for clinical imaging of stable coronary artery disease. Diagnostic classification and risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Giusca, Sorin; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Erbel, Christian; Katus, Hugo A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the pharmacologic and interventional treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death in Western societies. X-ray coronary angiography has been the modality of choice for diagnosing the presence and extent of CAD. However, this technique is invasive and provides limited information on the composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) have emerged as promising non-invasive techniques for the clinical imaging of CAD. Hereby, CCTA allows for visualization of coronary calcification, lumen narrowing and atherosclerotic plaque composition. In this regard, data from the CONFIRM Registry recently demonstrated that both atherosclerotic plaque burden and lumen narrowing exhibit incremental value for the prediction of future cardiac events. However, due to technical limitations with CCTA, resulting in false positive or negative results in the presence of severe calcification or motion artifacts, this technique cannot entirely replace invasive angiography at the present time. CMR on the other hand, provides accurate assessment of the myocardial function due to its high spatial and temporal resolution and intrinsic blood-to-tissue contrast. Hereby, regional wall motion and perfusion abnormalities, during dobutamine or vasodilator stress, precede the development of ST-segment depression and anginal symptoms enabling the detection of functionally significant CAD. While CT generally offers better spatial resolution, the versatility of CMR can provide information on myocardial function, perfusion, and viability, all without ionizing radiation for the patients. Technical developments with these 2 non-invasive imaging tools and their current implementation in the clinical imaging of CAD will be presented and discussed herein. PMID:25147526

  17. Automatic Classification of Marine Mammals with Speaker Classification Methods.

    PubMed

    Kreimeyer, Roman; Ludwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals based on human speaker classification methods as an element of a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool. This work is part of the Protection of Marine Mammals (PoMM) project under the framework of the European Defense Agency (EDA) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and Kiel University. The automatic classification should support sonar operators in the risk mitigation process before and during sonar exercises with a reliable automatic classification result. PMID:26611006

  18. Automatic Classification of Marine Mammals with Speaker Classification Methods.

    PubMed

    Kreimeyer, Roman; Ludwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals based on human speaker classification methods as an element of a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool. This work is part of the Protection of Marine Mammals (PoMM) project under the framework of the European Defense Agency (EDA) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and Kiel University. The automatic classification should support sonar operators in the risk mitigation process before and during sonar exercises with a reliable automatic classification result.

  19. Environmental risk assessment of airborne trichloroacetic acid--a contribution to the discussion on the significance of anthropogenic and natural sources.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Jan; Regelmann, Jürgen; Riedhammer, Caroline

    2003-07-01

    In environmental risk assessments the question has to be answered, whether risk reduction measures are necessary in order to protect the environment. If the combination of natural and anthropogenic sources of a chemical substance leads to an unacceptable risk, the man-made emissions have to be reduced. In this case the proportions of the anthropogenic and natural emissions have to be quantified. Difficulties and possible solutions are discussed in the scope of the OECD- and EU-risk assessments of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and tetrachloroethylene. In the atmosphere, TCA is formed by photo-oxidative degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PER) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. The available data on atmospheric chemistry indicate that tetrachloroethylene is the more important pre-cursor. With its high water solubility and low volatility, TCA is adsorbed onto aerosol particles and precipitated during rainfalls. Extended monitoring in rainwater confirmed the global distribution of airborne TCA. TCA reaches soils by dry and wet deposition. In addition formation of TCA from tetrachloroethylene in plants was observed. Consequently, high concentrations were detected in needles, leaves and in forest soil especially in mountain regions. The effect assessment revealed that plants exposed via soil are the most sensitive species compared to other terrestrial organisms. A PNECsoil of 2.4 microg/kg dw was derived from a long-term study with pine and spruce seedlings. When this PNEC is compared with the measured concentrations of TCA in soil, in certain regions a PEC/PNEC ratio >1 is obtained. This clearly indicates a risk to the terrestrial ecosystem, with the consequence that risk reduction measures are deemed necessary. To quantify the causes of the high levels of TCA in certain soils, and to investigate the geographical extent of the problem, intensive and widespread monitoring of soil, air and rainwater for TCA and tetrachloroethylene would be necessary to be able to perform a full mass

  20. Development of linear and threshold no significant risk levels for inhalation exposure to titanium dioxide using systematic review and mode of action considerations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Suh, Mina; Mittal, Liz; Wikoff, Daniele S; Welsh, Brian; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been characterized as a poorly soluble particulate (PSP) with low toxicity. It is well accepted that low toxicity PSPs such as TiO2 induce lung tumors in rats when deposition overwhelms particle clearance mechanisms. Despite the sensitivity of rats to PSPs and questionable relevance of PSP-induced tumors to humans, TiO2 is listed as a possible human carcinogen by some agencies and regulators. Thus, environmental toxicity criteria for TiO2 are needed for stakeholders to evaluate potential risks from environmental exposure and regulatory compliance. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to characterize the available data and identify candidate datasets upon which toxicity values could be derived. Key to this assessment, a survey of mechanistic data relevant for lung cancer was used to support quantitative inhalation risk assessment approaches. A total of 473 human studies were identified, 7 of which were epidemiological studies that met inclusion criteria to quantitatively characterize carcinogenic endpoints in humans. None of these studies supported derivation of toxicity criteria; therefore, animal data were used to derived safety values for TiO2 using different dose-metrics (regional deposited dose ratios, TiO2 particle surface area lung burden, and volumetric overload of alveolar macrophages), benchmark dose modeling, and different low-dose extrapolation approaches. Based on empirical evidence and mechanistic support for nonlinear mode of action involving particle overload, chronic inflammation and cell proliferation, a no significant risk level (NSRL) of 300 μg/day was derived. By comparison, low-dose linear extrapolation from tumor incidence in the rat lung resulted in an NSRL value of 44 μg/day. These toxicity values should be useful for stakeholders interested in assessing risks from environmental exposure to respirable TiO2.

  1. Prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in deep venous thrombosis patients and its clinical significance as a thrombophilic risk factor: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Sharma, Amit; Sazawal, Sudha; Ahuja, Ankur; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism is known to be a complex interaction of genetic and acquired factors leading to thrombosis. JAK2V617F mutation is believed to contribute to a thrombophilic phenotype, possibly through enhanced leukocyte-platelet interactions in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Several studies have focused on the importance of screening for JAK2V617F mutation in patients with splanchnic venous thrombosis (VT) for the detection of nonovert MPNs. The role of JAK2V617F mutation in VT outside the splanchnic region is still widely unsettled. The primary aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), its clinical significance as a prothrombotic risk factor, and its possible interactions with other genetic thrombophilic risk factors. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic, symptomatic DVT were evaluated. Median age of presentation was 32 years (range 15-71 years) with a sex ratio of 1.3:1. Overall, the most common genetic prothrombotic factor was factor V Leiden mutation, found in 10.8% (16 of 148) of patients who also showed strong association with increased risk of thrombosis (odds ratio 5.94, confidence interval 1.33-26.4, P = .019). Deficiencies in protein C, protein S, and antithrombin were seen in 8 (5.4%), 10 (6.7%), and 8 (5.4%) patients, respectively. It was observed that the frequency of JAK2V617F mutation was lower in Indian patients, and it also showed weaker association with risk of thrombosis, at least in cases of venous thrombosis outside the splanchnic region.

  2. Areca Nut Chewing and an Impaired Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate as Significant Risk Factors for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Xu, Ran; Zhao, Xiaokun; Zhong, Zhaohui; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Xuan; Wu, Shuiqing; Ai, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the predictive value of preoperative clinicopathological variables, with a special focus on areca nut chewing, on disease recurrence and progression in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Data from 242 patients diagnosed with NMIBC between 2008 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Fifteen clinicopathological variables were analyzed to evaluate their prognostic value. During a mean observation period of 21 months, disease recurrence occurred in 140 patients (57.9%). On multivariate analysis, heavy-areca nut chewing (HR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.37–3.47), current smoking (HR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.99–4.80), moderately impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (HR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.09–2.83), severely impaired eGFR (HR = 3.32, 95% CI: 1.70–6.48) and tumor grade (HR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.36–2.77) were independent factors for recurrence, based on which a risk factor model was developed to stratify patients into high, medium and low risk groups. In conclusion, our study suggests that in addition to quitting smoking, quitting areca nut chewing may also reduce the risk of first recurrence in NMBIC patients, monitoring and preserving their renal function may be beneficial as well. Further prospective studies are needed to verify the prognostic significance of these factors and the risk stratification model in this population. PMID:27385379

  3. Landscape Risk Factors for Lyme Disease in the Eastern Broadleaf Forest Province of the Hudson River Valley and the Effect of Explanatory Data Classification Resolution

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed how landcover classification affects associations between landscape characteristics and Lyme disease rate. Landscape variables were derived from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), including native classes (e.g., deciduous forest, developed low intensity)...

  4. Subject Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gayle; And Others

    Three newspaper librarians described how they manage the files of newspaper clippings which are a necessary part of their collections. The development of a new subject classification system for the clippings files was outlined. The new subject headings were based on standard subject heading lists and on local need. It was decided to use a computer…

  5. Classifying Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novakowski, Janice

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the experience of a group of first-grade teachers as they tackled the science process of classification, a targeted learning objective for the first grade. While the two-year process was not easy and required teachers to teach in a new, more investigation-oriented way, the benefits were great. The project helped teachers and…

  6. Development of a New Classification Method for Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma Based on Lymph Node Density and Standard Pathological Risk Factors: The ND Staging System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zai-Shang; Yao, Kai; Chen, Peng; Wang, Bin; Mi, Qi-Wu; Chen, Jie-Ping; Li, Yong-Hong; Deng, Chuang-Zhong; Liu, Zhuo-Wei; Qin, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Han, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Object: In this study, we evaluated the role of lymph node density (LND) and validated whether LND increases the accuracy of survival prediction when combined with the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) pathological node (N) staging system for penile cancer (7th edition). Methods: A total of 270 Chinese penile cancer patients treated between March 1999 and October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LND was analyzed as a trichotomous variable for the prediction of DSS in this cohort. We developed a new prediction model, which we refer to as the ND staging system, that is based on LND and pathological N staging. The predictive accuracy of this model was further assessed using the concordance index. Results: LND was correlated with the laterality of lymph node metastasis, extranodal extension, pelvic lymph node metastases, and pathologic tumor (T) and N stages (P<0.05). In separate multivariate Cox regression models, the LND (hazard ratio [HR], 1.966, 95% confidence interval [CI], (1.112-3.473, P=0.020) yielded independent effects on the outcome. According to the LND classification, the 3-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates for patients with LNDs <7.0%, 7.0 to 16.9%, and ≥17.0% were 90.9%, 66.5%, and 22.2%, respectively (P<7.0%; 7.0%-16.9%=0.006; P7.0-16.9%; ≥17.0%=0.001). The corresponding rates were 95.7%, 76.7%, and 28.1% for the ND1, ND2, and ND3 patients, respectively (PND1-ND2=0.047; PND2-ND3<0.001). The indexes indicated that the accuracy of the pathological ND category that incorporated LND was significantly increased. Conclusion: LND was associated with some prognosticators and is thus a prognostic factor. The ND staging system that incorporates the LND better reflects the prognoses of penile cancer patients. PMID:26918038

  7. Lack of significant effects of Chlamydia trachomatis infection on cervical cancer risk in a nested case-control study in North-East Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tungsrithong, Naowarat; Kasinpila, Chananya; Maneenin, Chanwit; Namujju, Proscovia B; Lehtinen, Matti; Anttila, Ahti; Promthet, Supannee

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be an important public health problem in Thailand. While the high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types have been established as the principle causative agent of both malignancies and the precursor lesions, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), other factors may also be involved like other sexually transmitted diseases, as well as smoking. Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium which has a tendency to cause chronic infection featuring inflammation and therefore might be expected to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In the present nested case-control study, 61 cases of cervical cancer and 288 matched controls with original serum samples were identified from the Khon Kaen Cohort, established in the North-East of Thailand, by linkage to the Khon Kaen population based cancer registry. C. trachomatis specific IgG antibodies at recruitment were measured by microimmunofluorescence and assessed for association with cervical cancer using STATA release10. No significant link was noted either with all cancers or after removal of adenocarcinomas. The results suggest no association between Chlamydia infection and cervical cancer development in North-East Thailand, but possible influencing factors must be considered in any future research on this topic.

  8. Homozygosis for (12) CA repeats in the first intron of the human IFN-gamma gene is significantly associated with the risk of aplastic anaemia in Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Carlo; Capasso, Mario; Svahn, Johanna; Marrone, Agnese; Haupt, Riccardo; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Giordani, Lucia; Longoni, Daniela; Pillon, Marta; Pistorio, Angela; Di Michele, Paola; Iori, Anna Paola; Pongiglione, Carola; Lanciotti, Marina; Iolascon, Achille

    2004-09-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mediates the final damage of the stem cell compartment in Aplastic Anaemia (AA). Normal subjects homozygous for 12 (CA) repeats of polymorphism variable number of dinucleotide (CA) repeat (VNDR) in position 1349 of the IFN-gamma gene (IFNG) were shown to overproduce IFN-gammain vitro. We studied the distribution of polymorphism VNDR 1349 of IFNG in 67 Caucasian AA patients and in normal controls. Genotype (CA)12-12, (homozygosis for allele 2) and the single allele 12 were significantly more frequent (P = 0.005 and 0.004 respectively) in patients versus controls. The polymorphism was equally distributed in AA patients regardless of their response to immunosuppression. Homozygosity for 12 (CA) repeats of polymorphism VNDR 1349 of IFNG is strongly associated with the risk of AA in Caucasian subjects.

  9. 12 CFR 1777.20 - Capital classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... notice of proposed capital classification, holds core capital equaling or exceeding the minimum capital... classification, holds core capital equaling or exceeding the minimum capital level. (3) Significantly... the date specified in the notice of proposed capital classification, holds core capital less than...

  10. Stomatin-like protein 2 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma is significantly associated with high-risk clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Bartolome, Aleksandar; Boskovic, Srdjan; Paunovic, Ivan; Bozic, Vesna; Cvejic, Dubravka

    2016-04-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2), a member of the stomatin protein family, has emerged as a potential molecular hallmark of tumor progression in several human malignancies. The aim of this study was to analyze SLP-2 expression pattern in benign and malignant thyroid tumors (n = 210) and to examine its relationship with clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation in thyroid cancer. SLP-2 immunohistochemical expression was not detected in benign adenomas and was absent/weak in follicular and anaplastic carcinomas. High expression levels of SLP-2, found only in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), particularly in the classical variant, were significantly associated with adverse clinicopathological parameters: lymph node metastasis (p = 0.002), extrathyroid invasion (p < 0.001), pT status (p < 0.001), and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.001). Additional genotyping of PTC cases for the BRAFV600E mutation revealed for the first time a close relation between SLP-2 overexpression and the presence of BRAF mutation (p = 0.02) with high positive rates of lymph node metastasis (70%) and extrathyroid invasion (80%) in these cases. The significant association of SLP-2 overexpression with unfavorable clinicopathological characteristics and BRAFV600E mutation indicates that SLP-2 may have a role in aggressiveness of BRAF-mutated PTC and that SLP-2 evaluation could be clinically useful in identification of high-risk PTC patients.

  11. KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae enteric colonization acquired during intensive care unit stay: the significance of risk factors for its development and its impact on mortality.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Marangos, Markos; Fligou, Fotini; Christofidou, Myrto; Sklavou, Christina; Vamvakopoulou, Sophia; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Filos, Kriton S

    2013-10-01

    A prospective observational study of 226 intensive care unit (ICU) patients was conducted during a 25-month period. Rectal samples were taken at day 1, 4, and 7 and, afterwards, once weekly. Klebsiella pneumoniae was identified using standard techniques, whereas the presence of bla(KPC) gene was confirmed by PCR. During ICU stay, 72.6% of the patients were colonized with Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp). Male gender, prior bed occupants, and patients in nearby beds colonized with KPC-Kp, tracheotomy, number of invasive catheters inserted, and number of antibiotics administered were the major risk factors for KPC-Kp colonization. ICU mortality (35.4%) was significantly related to Simplified Acute Physiology II score and respiratory insufficiency upon admission, cortisone administration, aminoglycoside administration, confirmed KPC-Kp infection, and severe sepsis or septic shock. The high prevalence of KPC-Kp enteric carriage in ICU patients and the significant mortality associated with KPC-Kp infection dictate the importance of early identification and isolation of such carriers.

  12. Stomatin-like protein 2 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma is significantly associated with high-risk clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Bartolome, Aleksandar; Boskovic, Srdjan; Paunovic, Ivan; Bozic, Vesna; Cvejic, Dubravka

    2016-04-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2), a member of the stomatin protein family, has emerged as a potential molecular hallmark of tumor progression in several human malignancies. The aim of this study was to analyze SLP-2 expression pattern in benign and malignant thyroid tumors (n = 210) and to examine its relationship with clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation in thyroid cancer. SLP-2 immunohistochemical expression was not detected in benign adenomas and was absent/weak in follicular and anaplastic carcinomas. High expression levels of SLP-2, found only in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), particularly in the classical variant, were significantly associated with adverse clinicopathological parameters: lymph node metastasis (p = 0.002), extrathyroid invasion (p < 0.001), pT status (p < 0.001), and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.001). Additional genotyping of PTC cases for the BRAFV600E mutation revealed for the first time a close relation between SLP-2 overexpression and the presence of BRAF mutation (p = 0.02) with high positive rates of lymph node metastasis (70%) and extrathyroid invasion (80%) in these cases. The significant association of SLP-2 overexpression with unfavorable clinicopathological characteristics and BRAFV600E mutation indicates that SLP-2 may have a role in aggressiveness of BRAF-mutated PTC and that SLP-2 evaluation could be clinically useful in identification of high-risk PTC patients. PMID:26750533

  13. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma: a review of the current understanding of epidemiology, biology, risk stratification, and management of myeloma precursor disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2013-03-01

    The term monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was coined in 1978. The recent advances in our knowledge about MGUS and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) have helped us better understand the pathogenesis of myeloma. It seems that myeloma evolves from a precursor state in almost all cases. We do not completely understand the multistep process from the precursor state to myeloma, but studies like whole genome sequencing continue to improve our understanding of this process. The process of transformation may not be linear acquisition of changes, but rather a branched heterogeneous process. Clinical features that are prognostic of rapid transformation have been identified, but no specific molecular markers have been identified. Even with recent advances, multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease in the vast majority, and intervening at the precursor state provides a unique opportunity to alter the natural history of the disease. A limitation is that a vast majority of patients with precursor disease, especially low-risk MGUS, will never progress to myeloma in their lifetime, and treating these patients is not only unnecessary but may be potentially harmful. The challenge is to identify a subset of patients with the precursor state that would definitely progress to myeloma and in whom interventions will have a meaningful impact. As our understanding of the molecular and genetic processes improves, these studies will guide the selection of high-risk patients more appropriately and ultimately direct a tailored management strategy to either delay progression to symptomatic myeloma or even "cure" a person at this premalignant stage. PMID:23224402

  14. Inherited genetic markers discovered to date are able to identify a significant number of men at considerably elevated risk for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jielin; Kader, A. Karim; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Kim, Seong-Tae; Zhu, Yi; Turner, Aubrey R.; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Zheng; Adolfsson, Jan; Wiklund, Fredrik; Zheng, S. Lilly; Isaacs, William B.; Grönberg, Henrik; Xu, Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer (PCa) risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are continuously being discovered. Their ability to identify men at high risk and the impact of increasing numbers of SNPs on predictive performance are not well understood. METHODS Absolute risk for PCa was estimated in a population-based case-control study in Sweden (2,899 cases and 1,722 controls) using family history and three sets of sequentially discovered PCa risk-associated SNPs. Their performance in predicting PCa was assessed by positive predictive values (PPV) and sensitivity. RESULTS SNPs and family history were able to differentiate individual risk for PCa and identify men at higher risk; ~18% and ~8% of men in the study had 20-year (55–74 years) absolute risks that were two-fold (0.24) or three-fold (0.36) greater than the population median risk (0.12), respectively. When predictive performances were compared at absolute risk cutoffs of 0.12, 0.24 or 0.36, PPV increased considerably (~20%, ~30% and ~37%, respectively) while sensitivity decreased considerably (~55%, ~20% and ~10%, respectively). In contrast, when increasing numbers of SNPs (5, 11 and 28 SNPs) were used in risk prediction, PPV approached a constant value while sensitivity increased steadily. CONCLUSIONS SNPs discovered to date are suitable for risk prediction while additional SNPs discovered in the future may identify more subjects at higher risk. Men identified as high-risk by SNP-based testing may be targeted for PCa screening or chemoprevention. The clinical impact on improving the effectiveness of these interventions can be and should be assessed. PMID:20878950

  15. Risk.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephen R; Hudgens, Michael G; Brookhart, M Alan; Westreich, Daniel

    2015-02-15

    The epidemiologist primarily studies transitions between states of health and disease. The purpose of the present article is to define a foundational parameter for such studies, namely risk. We begin simply and build to the setting in which there is more than 1 event type (i.e., competing risks or competing events), as well as more than 1 treatment or exposure level of interest. In the presence of competing events, the risks are a set of counterfactual cumulative incidence functions for each treatment. These risks can be depicted visually and summarized numerically. We use an example from the study of human immunodeficiency virus to illustrate concepts. PMID:25660080

  16. Significance of level v lymph node dissection in clinically node positive oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and evaluation of potential risk factors for level v lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Devendra G; Chheda, Yogen P; Shah, Shakuntala V; Patel, Ashok M; Sharma, Mohit R

    2013-09-01

    Level V lymph node (LN) dissection has been significantly associated with postoperative shoulder dysfunction as a sequel of spinal accessory nerve (SAN) dysfunction. The aim of study was to determine the role of level V LN dissection in clinically node positive (cN+) oral cavity cancer. We have prospectively evaluated 210 patients of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). During neck dissection, the contents of the level V LN were dissected, labelled, and processed separately from the neck dissection specimen. We studied the prevalence of histopathologic metastasis to level V nodes in clinically node negative (cN0), cN1 and cN2 groups. Potential risk factors for the involvement of level V LN were also analysed. Of 210 cases, 48 were cN0. Out of them 77 % were pN0 and none of cNo (48) patients had level V metastases. Out of 162 cN+ cases, 112 were cN1 and 49 cN2. Amongst cN1 (112) cases, cN1 with palpable level lb LN (99), 60 % had pN0 and none of them had level V LN involvement but cN1 with palpable ll/lll LN (13), 85 % had pN+ and 1 patient had level V LN involvement (8 %). 8 patients from cN2 (49) group had level V LN involvement (16 %). Over all level V LN involvement was 4.3 %. Tongue was the most common site to give rise to level V LN metastases and extra capsular spread (ECS) was present in 100 % patient with level V LN metastases. Thus, we concluded that, apart from cN0, patients with cN1 oral cavity cancer with level lb as only site, carefully selected cases could safely undergo SND. Potential risk factors for level V LN metastases are clinically evident ECS, multiple LN involvement and cN1 with deep jugular chain of LN involvement. PMID:24426737

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and β-blocker transformation products may not pose a significant risk of toxicity to aquatic organisms in wastewater effluent-dominated receiving waters.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair K; Challis, Jonathan K; Wong, Charles S; Hanson, Mark L

    2015-10-01

    A probabilistic ecological risk assessment was conducted for the transformation products (TPs) of 3 β-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, and propranolol) and 5 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) to assess potential threats to aquatic organisms in effluent-dominated surface waters. To this end, the pharmacokinetic literature, the University of Minnesota's Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database Pathway Prediction System aerobic microbial degradation software, and photolysis literature pertaining to β-blockers and SSRIs were used to determine their most likely TPs formed via human metabolism, aerobic biodegradation, and photolysis, respectively. Monitoring data from North American and European surface waters receiving human wastewater inputs were the basis of the exposure characterizations of the parent compounds and the TPs, where available. In most cases, where monitoring data for TPs did not exist, we assumed a conservative 1:1 parent-to-TP production ratio (i.e., 100% of parent converted). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s EPISuite and ECOSAR v1.11 software were used to estimate acute and chronic toxicities to aquatic organisms. Hazard quotients, which were calculated using the 95(th) percentile of the exposure distributions, ranged from 10(-11) to 10(-3) (i.e., all significantly less than 1). Based on these results, the TPs of interest would be expected to pose little to no environmental risk in surface waters receiving wastewater inputs. Overall, we recommend developing analytical methods that can isolate and quantify human metabolites and TPs at environmentally relevant concentrations to confirm these predictions. Further, we recommend identifying the major species of TPs from classes of pharmaceuticals that could elicit toxic effects via specific modes of action (e.g., norfluoxetine via the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]1A receptors) and conducting aquatic toxicity

  18. Remote Sensing Information Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the classification of Remote Sensing data in relation to epidemiology. Classification is a way to reduce the dimensionality and precision to something a human can understand. Classification changes SCALAR data into NOMINAL data.

  19. Classification and knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Automated procedures to classify objects are discussed. The classification problem is reviewed, and the relation of epistemology and classification is considered. The classification of stellar spectra and of resolved images of galaxies is addressed.

  20. Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel

    2016-01-01

    Speaking up, i.e. expressing ones concerns, is a critical piece of effective communication. Yet, we see many situations in which crew members have concerns and still remain silent. Why would that be the case? And how can we assess the risks of speaking up vs. the risks of keeping silent? And once we do make up our minds to speak up, how should we go about it? Our workshop aims to answer these questions, and to provide us all with practical tools for effective risk assessment and effective speaking-up strategies..

  1. Classification schemes for arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jason M; Kim, Helen; Young, William L; Lawton, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    The wide variety of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) anatomy, size, location, and clinical presentation makes patient selection for surgery a difficult process. Neurosurgeons have identified key factors that determine the risks of surgery and then devised classification schemes that integrate these factors, predict surgical results, and help select patients for surgery. These classification schemes have value because they transform complex decisions into simpler algorithms. In this review, the important grading schemes that have contributed to management of patients with brain AVMs are described, and our current approach to patient selection is outlined.

  2. Landscape risk factors for Lyme disease in the eastern broadleaf forest province of the Hudson River valley and the effect of explanatory data classification resolution.

    PubMed

    Messier, Kyle P; Jackson, Laura E; White, Jennifer L; Hilborn, Elizabeth D

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed how landcover classification affects associations between landscape characteristics and Lyme disease rate. Landscape variables were derived from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), including native classes (e.g., deciduous forest, developed low intensity) and aggregate classes (e.g., forest, developed). Percent of each landcover type, median income, and centroid coordinates were calculated by census tract. Regression results from individual and aggregate variable models were compared with the dispersion parameter-based R(2) (Rα(2)) and AIC. The maximum Rα(2) was 0.82 and 0.83 for the best aggregate and individual model, respectively. The AICs for the best models differed by less than 0.5%. The aggregate model variables included forest, developed, agriculture, agriculture-squared, y-coordinate, y-coordinate-squared, income and income-squared. The individual model variables included deciduous forest, deciduous forest-squared, developed low intensity, pasture, y-coordinate, y-coordinate-squared, income, and income-squared. Results indicate that regional landscape models for Lyme disease rate are robust to NLCD landcover classification resolution.

  3. A multichannel Markov random field framework for tumor segmentation with an application to classification of gene expression-based breast cancer recurrence risk.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ahmed B; Gavenonis, Sara C; Daye, Dania; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A; Kontos, Despina

    2013-04-01

    We present a methodological framework for multichannel Markov random fields (MRFs). We show that conditional independence allows loopy belief propagation to solve a multichannel MRF as a single channel MRF. We use conditional mutual information to search for features that satisfy conditional independence assumptions. Using this framework we incorporate kinetic feature maps derived from breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as observation channels in MRF for tumor segmentation. Our algorithm based on multichannel MRF achieves an receiver operating characteristic area under curve (AUC) of 0.97 for tumor segmentation when using a radiologist's manual delineation as ground truth. Single channel MRF based on the best feature chosen from the same pool of features as used by the multichannel MRF achieved a lower AUC of 0.89. We also present a comparison against the well established normalized cuts segmentation algorithm along with commonly used approaches for breast tumor segmentation including fuzzy C-means (FCM) and the more recent method of running FCM on enhancement variance features (FCM-VES). These previous methods give a lower AUC of 0.92, 0.88, and 0.60, respectively. Finally, we also investigate the role of superior segmentation in feature extraction and tumor characterization. Specifically, we examine the effect of improved segmentation on predicting the probability of breast cancer recurrence as determined by a validated tumor gene expression assay. We demonstrate that an support vector machine classifier trained on kinetic statistics extracted from tumors as segmented by our algorithm gives a significant improvement in distinguishing between women with high and low recurrence risk, giving an AUC of 0.88 as compared to 0.79, 0.76, 0.75, and 0.66 when using normalized cuts, single channel MRF, FCM, and FCM-VES, respectively, for segmentation.

  4. [New WHO classification of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Helpap, B

    2002-01-01

    The WHO classification of urothelial carcinomas of the urinary bladder (1999) presents the papillary urothelial neoplasia of low malignant potential (PUNLMP) as a new entity in between the papillomas and the papillary urothelial carcinomas. This neoplasia shows a typical basal palisading, a low mitotic rate, and a low MIB-1-proliferation index. The PUNLMP is said to have an increased risk of development of recurrent papillary lesions with the possibility of malignant transformation. At present, there is an intensive discussion on this new entity. The participants of a meeting on the consensus classification on urothelial tumors held in Ancona in 2000 have meanwhile split in two discussion groups. One favors the new WHO classification with the papillary urothelial carcinomas G I, G II, and G III, but without PUNLMP, whereas the other group favors the consensus classification of 1998 with papillomas, papillary urothelial neoplasia of low malignant potential, and non invasive as well as invasive low-grade and high grade papillary urothelial carcinomas. Future long term prospective studies will show the significance of PUNLMP compared to well differentiated non invasive papillary urothelial urinary bladder carcinoma G I (G Ia). Otherwise, there is no significant difference in the classification of carcinomas and non epithelial lesions compared with the previous classification of 1973. The new WHO does however discriminate the minimally invasive papillary urothelial carcinomas in those with infiltration of the lamina propria above the muscularis mucosae (pT1a), the infiltration of the lamina muscularis mucosae (pT1b), and the extension beyond the muscularis mucosae (pT1c). The recurrence rate increases from stage pT1b. This substaging may be of therapeutical relevance.

  5. Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in high risk B-ALL: a report from Children’s Oncology Group study AALL0232

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brent L.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Salzer, Wanda L.; Nachman, James B.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Dai, Yunfeng; Winick, Naomi J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Carroll, William L.; Larsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) is highly prognostic in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). In Children’s Oncology Group high-risk B-ALL study AALL0232, we investigated MRD in subjects randomized in a 2 × 2 factorial design to receive either high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) or Capizzi methotrexate (C-MTX) during interim maintenance (IM) or prednisone or dexamethasone during induction. Subjects with end-induction MRD ≥0.1% or those with morphologic slow early response were nonrandomly assigned to receive a second IM and delayed intensification phase. MRD was measured by 6-color flow cytometry in 1 of 2 reference labs, with excellent agreement between the two. Subjects with end-induction MRD <0.01% had a 5-year event-free survival (EFS) of 87% ± 1% vs 74% ± 4% for those with MRD 0.01% to 0.1%; increasing MRD amounts was associated with progressively worse outcome. Subjects converting from MRD positive to negative by end consolidation had a relatively favorable 79% ± 5% 5-year disease-free survival vs 39% ± 7% for those with MRD ≥0.01%. Although HD-MTX was superior to C-MTX, MRD retained prognostic significance in both groups (86% ± 2% vs 58% ± 4% for MRD-negative vs positive C-MTX subjects; 88% ± 2% vs 68% ± 4% for HD-MTX subjects). Intensified therapy given to subjects with MRD >0.1% did not improve either 5-year EFS or overall survival (OS). However, these subjects showed an early relapse rate similar to that seen in MRD-negative ones, with EFS/OS curves for patients with 0.1% to 1% MRD crossing those with 0.01% to 0.1% MRD at 3 and 4 years, thus suggesting that the intensified therapy altered the disease course of MRD-positive subjects. Additional interventions targeted at the MRD-positive group may further improve outcome. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00075725. PMID:26124497

  6. STI/HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Prevalent STI Among Incarcerated African American Men in Committed Partnerships: The Significance of Poverty, Mood Disorders, and Substance Use.

    PubMed

    Khan, M R; Golin, C E; Friedman, S R; Scheidell, J D; Adimora, A A; Judon-Monk, S; Hobbs, M M; Dockery, G; Griffin, S; Oza, K K; Myers, D; Hu, H; Medina, K P; Wohl, D A

    2015-08-01

    African Americans face disproportionate sexually transmitted infection including HIV (STI/HIV), with those passing through a correctional facility at heightened risk. There is a need to identify modifiable STI/HIV risk factors among incarcerated African Americans. Project DISRUPT is a cohort study of incarcerated African American men recruited from September 2011 through January 2014 from prisons in North Carolina who were in committed partnerships with women at prison entry (N = 207). During the baseline (in-prison) study visit, participants responded to a risk behavior survey and provided a urine specimen, which was tested for STIs. Substantial proportions reported multiple partnerships (42 %), concurrent partnerships (33 %), and buying sex (11 %) in the 6 months before incarceration, and 9 % tested positive for an STI at baseline (chlamydia: 5.3 %, gonorrhea: 0.5 %, trichomoniasis: 4.9 %). Poverty and depression appeared to be strongly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Substance use was linked to prevalent STI, with binge drinking the strongest independent risk factor (adjusted odds ratio: 3.79, 95 % CI 1.19-12.04). There is a continued need for improved prison-based STI testing, treatment, and prevention education as well as mental health and substance use diagnosis.

  7. STI/HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Prevalent STI among Incarcerated African American Men in Committed Intimate Partnerships: The Significance of Poverty, Mood Disorders, and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Khan, MR; Golin, CE; Friedman, SR; Scheidell, JD; Adimora, AA; Judon-Monk, S; Hobbs, MM; Dockery, G; Griffin, S; Oza, KK; Myers, D; Hu, H; Medina, KP; Wohl, DA

    2015-01-01

    African Americans face disproportionate sexually transmitted infection including HIV (STI/HIV), with those passing through a correctional facility at heightened risk. There is a need to identify modifiable STI/HIV risk factors among incarcerated African Americans. Project DISRUPT is a cohort study of incarcerated African American men recruited from September 2011 through January 2014 from prisons in North Carolina who were in committed partnerships with women at prison entry (N=207). During the baseline (in-prison) study visit, participants responded to a risk behavior survey and provided a urine specimen, which was tested for STIs. Substantial proportions reported multiple partnerships (42%), concurrent partnerships (33%), and buying sex (11%) in the six months before incarceration, and 9% tested positive for an STI at baseline (chlamydia: 5.3%, gonorrhea: 0.5%, trichomoniasis: 4.9%). Poverty and depression appeared to be strongly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Substance use was linked to prevalent STI, with binge drinking the strongest independent risk factor (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.79, 95% CI: 1.19–12.04). There is a continued need for improved prison-based STI testing, treatment, and prevention education as well as mental health and substance use diagnosis. PMID:25863467

  8. Three 15-min bouts of moderate postmeal walking significantly improves 24-h glycemic control in older people at risk for impaired glucose tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three 15-min bouts of postmeal walking with 45 min of sustained walking on 24-h glycemic control in older persons at risk for glucose intolerance. Inactive older (=60 years of age) participants (N = 10) were recruited from the community a...

  9. Could the significantly increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis reported in Italian male steel workers be explained by occupational exposure to cadmium?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Daniel; James, Benjamin; Hutchinson, David

    2016-01-01

    Multiple chronic disease risks have been identified in Italian furnace workers. A range of potential toxins have been identified in foundry dust. We suggest that the heavy metal cadmium (Cd) plays an important role in the development of chronic diseases, notably rheumatoid arthrits, and propose that research into the mechanism of action be undertaken to discover the aetiology of this link. PMID:27152117

  10. Sources of variation in hydrological classifications: Time scale, flow series origin and classification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñas, Francisco J.; Barquín, José; Álvarez, César

    2016-07-01

    Classification of flow regimes in water management and hydroecological research has grown significantly in recent years. However, depending on available data and the procedures applied, there may be several credible classifications for a specific catchment. In this study, three inductive classifications derived from different initial flow data and one expert-driven classification were defined. The hydrological interpretation, statistical performance and spatial correspondence of these classifications were compared. Daily Gauged Classification (DC) was derived from daily flow data while Monthly Gauged Classification (MC) and Monthly Modeled Classification (MMC) were derived from monthly flow series, using gauged and modeled flow data, respectively. Expert-Driven Classification (EDC) was based on a Spanish nationwide hydrological classification, which is being used in the current River Basin Management Plans. The results showed that MC accounted for much of the critical hydrological information variability comprised within the DC. However, it also presented limitations regarding the inability to represent important hydroecological attributes, especially those related to droughts and high flow events. In addition, DC and MC presented an equivalent performance more than 60% of the time and obtained a mean ARI value of 0.4, indicating a similar classification structure. DC and MC outperformed MMC 100% and more than 50% of the times when they were compared by means of the classification strength and ANOVA, respectively. MMC also showed low correspondence with these classifications (ARI = 0.20). Thus, the use of modeled flow series should be limited to poorly gauged areas. Finally, the significantly reduced performance and the uneven distribution of classes found in EDC questions its application for different management objectives. This study shows that the selection of the most suitable approach according to the available data has significant implications for the

  11. Variations in Prevalent Cardiovascular Disease and Future Risk by Metabolic Syndrome Classification in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Todd M.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Bittner, Vera; Safford, Monika M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III define metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) differently, with unclear implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods We examined 22,719 participants in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. We classified participants as: no MetSyn, MetSyn by ATP-III and IDF criteria, MetSyn by ATP-only, or MetSyn by IDF-only. To assess current CVD, we determined the odds of self-reported CVD by MetSyn category using multivariable logistic regression, controlling for socio-demographic and behavioral factors. To estimate future coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, we calculated Framingham risk scores (FRS). Results Overall, 10,785 individuals (47%) had MetSyn. Of these, 79% had MetSyn by both definitions, 6% by ATP-only, and 14% by IDF-only. Compared to those without MetSyn, ATP-only individuals had the highest odds of current CVD and of having a FRS >20%. Also compared to those without MetSyn, IDF-only individuals had 43% higher odds of current CVD and two-fold increased odds of having a FRS >20%. Conclusions Consistent with previous reports, ATP-III MetSyn criteria identified individuals with increased odds of CVD and elevated future CHD risk. However, the IDF definition identified a clinically important number of additional individuals at excess CVD risk. PMID:20211299

  12. Prognostic significance of the 2004 WHO/ISUP classification for prediction of recurrence, progression, and cancer-specific mortality of non-muscle-invasive urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic study of 1,515 cases.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chin-Chen; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Chen, Kuang-Kuo; Yu, Hui-Jung; Sun, Chih-Hao; Ho, Donald M T

    2010-05-01

    To verify prognostic significance of the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO)/International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading systems, we retrospectively studied the tumors of 1,515 patients who underwent transurethral resection of primary non-muscle-invasive urothelial tumors (pTa, 1,006 patients; pT1, 509 patients) confined to the bladder. Cases were classified according to the 2004 WHO/ISUP systems as 212 cases of papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP), 706 low-grade papillary urothelial carcinomas (LPUCs), and 597 high-grade papillary urothelial carcinomas (HPUCs). PUNLMP showed the statistically significantly lowest recurrence cumulative incidence compared with the other tumor types. There were significant differences and trends for higher progression and cancer-specific mortality cumulative incidence in the following order: PUNLMP, LPUC, pTa HPUC, and pT1 HPUC. No differences of progression and cancer-specific mortality cumulative incidence were found between pTa and pT1 LPUC. Our study validates the usefulness of the 2004 WHO/ISUP system to classify urothelial tumors into prognostically distinct categories that would contribute to the design of therapeutic and monitoring strategies for patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder urothelial tumors.

  13. New classification of landslide-inducing anthropogenic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, C.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Derron, M.-H.; Nadim, F.; Leroi, E.

    2012-04-01

    Although landslides are usually considered typical examples of natural hazards, they can be influenced by human activities. Many examples can be found in the literature about slope instabilities induced by anthropogenic activities, ranging from small superficial landslides to rock avalanches. Research on this topic is of primary importance for understanding and mitigation of landslide risk. Indeed, slope stabilities influenced by human actions contribute significantly to the risk level because, by definition, they are located where elements at risk and people are present. Within the framework of the European project SafeLand "Living with Landslide Risk in Europe", the authors analyzed the landslides induced by anthropogenic factors in Europe and elsewhere (SafeLand deliverable D1.6). During the bibliographical research, it appeared that a complete and illustrated classification on human activities influencing slope stabilities does not yet exist. Therefore, a new classification was introduced by Michoud et al. (2011) about anthropogenic activities affecting slope stability conditions. This classification takes into account conceptual processes leading to landslides (Terzaghi, 1950; Jaboyedoff and Derron, 2005) and the distinction between destabilization factors and triggering factors (Vaunat et al., 1994; Leroueil et al., 1996). The classification was tested and improved through fifty-eight well-documented case studies, even lots of large landslides, such as Elm, Aberfan, Namsos and Rissa landslides, etc. Furthermore, the boundary between natural and "anthropogenic" landslide triggers (e.g. water run-off modified by new land-uses, creating landslides some km farther), and the time during which changes and reactions are to be considered as direct consequences of human activities were highlighted. Finally, anthropogenic influences can also be positive and examples of (non-voluntary) positive human impacts on slope stability are presented. Jaboyedoff, M. and Derron, M

  14. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  15. From landscape to domain: Soils role in landscape classifications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil landscape classifications are designed to divide landscapes into units with significance for the provisioning and regulating of ecosystem services and the development of conservation plans for natural resources. More specifically, such classifications serve as the basis for stratifying manageme...

  16. Identification and classification of high risk groups for Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis using an artificial neural network based on occupational histories: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbo; Tang, Zhifeng; Yang, Yongli; Weng, Dong; Sun, Gao; Duan, Zhiwen; Chen, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Background Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a preventable, but not fully curable occupational lung disease. More and more coal miners are likely to be at risk of developing CWP owing to an increase in coal production and utilization, especially in developing countries. Coal miners with different occupational categories and durations of dust exposure may be at different levels of risk for CWP. It is necessary to identify and classify different levels of risk for CWP in coal miners with different work histories. In this way, we can recommend different intervals for medical examinations according to different levels of risk for CWP. Our findings may provide a basis for further emending the measures of CWP prevention and control. Methods The study was performed using longitudinal retrospective data in the Tiefa Colliery in China. A three-layer artificial neural network with 6 input variables, 15 neurons in the hidden layer, and 1 output neuron was developed in conjunction with coal miners' occupational exposure data. Sensitivity and ROC analyses were adapted to explain the importance of input variables and the performance of the neural network. The occupational characteristics and the probability values predicted were used to categorize coal miners for their levels of risk for CWP. Results The sensitivity analysis showed that influence of the duration of dust exposure and occupational category on CWP was 65% and 67%, respectively. The area under the ROC in 3 sets was 0.981, 0.969, and 0.992. There were 7959 coal miners with a probability value < 0.001. The average duration of dust exposure was 15.35 years. The average duration of ex-dust exposure was 0.69 years. Of the coal miners, 79.27% worked in helping and mining. Most of the coal miners were born after 1950 and were first exposed to dust after 1970. One hundred forty-four coal miners had a probability value ≥0.1. The average durations of dust exposure and ex-dust exposure were 25.70 and 16.30 years

  17. ABO blood group but not haemostasis genetic polymorphisms significantly influence thrombotic risk: a study of 180 homozygotes for the Factor V Leiden mutation.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Limited data exist on the impact of additional genetic risk factors on the clinical manifestations of factor (F) V Leiden homozygotes. A retrospective multi-centre cohort study was performed to assess the role of the FII G20210A gene mutation, the protein C (PC) promoter CG haplotype, the combination of two PC polymorphisms (A-1641G, C-1654T), the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism, two thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor polymorphisms (Thr325Ile, Ala147Thr), two plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 polymorphisms (-675 4G/5G, A-844G), the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism and the ABO blood group on the thrombotic phenotype in FV Leiden homozygotes. 127 subjects with venous thrombosis and 53 asymptomatic subjects were analysed. The T allele of MTHFR C677T was more frequent in symptomatic subjects than in asymptomatic ones (68% vs. 45%, P = 0.02; odds ratio (OR) 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-5.8, after adjustment for potential confounders). For the other polymorphisms, no difference was observed between symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. The non-O blood group was more frequent among symptomatic carriers (84% vs. 57%, P = 0.0002; OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7-9.7). In conclusion, except for the ABO blood group, none of the polymorphisms studied contribute strongly to the thrombotic risk in FV Leiden homozygotes.

  18. Significant reduction of the risk of venous thromboembolism in all long-term immobile patients a few months after the onset of immobility.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Tarek A-Z K

    2005-01-01

    Prophylactic anticoagulation is a standard practice in patients with sudden lower limbs paralysis. Thromboprophylaxis is usually continued until the patient regains independent mobility. The duration of anticoagulation in long-term immobile patients is unknown. Spinal cord injury patients are the only population that was comprehensively studied and prophylactic anticoagulation is discontinued after 4 months as the risk of venous thromboembolism drops dramatically after 3-4 months. Development of muscle spasticity has been traditionally considered to be the reason for this low risk as lower limbs spasticity/spasms might be able to improve the calf muscle pump action. We are presenting the evidence from physiological studies of the lower limbs vascular system that cast doubt over this explanation and present an alternative hypothesis backed by several clinical circumstantial evidence suggesting that the vascular changes following long term lower limbs inactivity which are universal to all immobile patients is probably the main protecting factor. We suggest that prophylactic anticoagulation is necessary only on the first 4 months following the acute onset of immobility in all neurologically impaired immobile patients regardless of their muscle tone state.

  19. Classification Shell Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etzold, Carol

    1983-01-01

    Discusses shell classification exercises. Through keying students advanced from the "I know what a shell looks like" stage to become involved in the classification process: observing, labeling, making decisions about categories, and identifying marine animals. (Author/JN)

  20. Classification of hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brown, M A; de Swiet, M

    1999-03-01

    In many ways there should be no need to classify hypertensive disorders in clinical practice. The very presence of rising blood pressure should alert the clinician to seek evidence for the development of pre-eclampsia and whether there are any emerging abnormalities of fetal growth and/or maternal renal, cerebral, hepatic or coagulation functions which may necessitate specific treatment, including delivery. While such a view may be appropriate for experienced clinicians with an understanding of the pathophysiology of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, it is of little help to junior or less experienced medical staff. Moreover, without an agreed international classification system it is impossible to compare truly clinical outcome, intervention or basic research studies from different units as entry criteria to these studies may differ considerably across individual units and certainly across countries. In this chapter we highlight the limitations of the existing classification systems and propose a system that is based on our present understanding of the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. The proposed system is not a radical departure from previous classifications, with grouping of hypertensive subjects into gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and chronic (usually essential) hypertension. Proteinuria, while remaining a hallmark of pre-eclampsia, is no longer considered a 'sine qua non' for this disorder to be diagnosed, reflecting our greater understanding of the maternal and fetal abnormalities in pre-eclampsia since previous classification systems were developed. This classification system has been compared with the traditional system of diagnosing proteinuric pre-eclampsia in a study of 1183 women with hypertension in pregnancy: diagnosing pre-eclampsia in this new manner still stratifies a high-risk group of pregnant women and the proposed diagnosis of gestational hypertension in this system stratifies a group of women at low maternal and fetal risk

  1. ADP computer security classification program

    SciTech Connect

    Augustson, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    CG-ADP-1, the Automatic Data Processing Security Classification Guide, provides for classification guidance (for security information) concerning the protection of Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor Automatic Data Processing (ADP) systems which handle classified information. Within the DOE, ADP facilities that process classified information provide potentially lucrative targets for compromise. In conjunction with the security measures required by DOE regulations, necessary precautions must be taken to protect details of those ADP security measures which could aid in their own subversion. Accordingly, the basic principle underlying ADP security classification policy is to protect information which could be of significant assistance in gaining unauthorized access to classified information being processed at an ADP facility. Given this policy, classification topics and guidelines are approved for implementation. The basic program guide, CG-ADP-1 is broad in scope and based upon it, more detailed local guides are sometimes developed and approved for specific sites. Classification topics are provided for system features, system and security management, and passwords. Site-specific topics can be addressed in local guides if needed.

  2. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A Polymorphisms Are Significantly Associated with Higher Cancer Risk: An Updated Meta-Analysis from 34 Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Qin, Qin; Liu, Jia; Xu, Li-Ping; Zhao, Lian-Jun; Zhang, Qu; Cai, Jing; Ma, Jian-Xin; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Sun, Xin-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background HIF-1 activates various genes in cancer progression and metastasis. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are reportedly associated with cancer risk; however, the results are inconclusive. Methodology/Principal Findings A meta-analysis of 34 studies that involved 7522 cases and 9847 controls for 1772 C/T and 24 studies that involved 4884 cases and 8154 controls for 1790 G/A was conducted to identify the association of C/T and G/A polymorphisms with cancer risk. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to assess the strength of association. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms were associated with higher cancer risk in homozygote comparison (1772C/T: TT vs. CC: OR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.52, 3.96; Pheterogeneity = 0.028; 1790G/A: AA vs. GG: OR=4.74, 95% CI: 1.78, 12.6; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), dominant model (1772C/T: TT/CT vs. CC: OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.55; Pheterogeneity < 0.01, 1790G/A: AA/GA vs. GG: OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.60; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), T allele versus C allele (T vs. C: OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.70; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), and A allele versus G allele (A vs. G: OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.96; Pheterogeneity < 0.01). On a subgroup analysis, the 1772 C/T polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer, whereas the 1790 G/A polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for lung cancer and prostate cancer. A significantly increased cancer risk was found in both Asians and Caucasians for 1772C/T polymorphism, whereas a significantly increased cancer risk was found in Caucasians in the heterozygote comparison and recessive model for 1790G/A polymorphism. Conclusions HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are significantly associated with higher cancer risk. PMID:24260383

  3. Prognostic significance of pattern and burden of metastatic disease in patients with stage 4 neuroblastoma: A study from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Daniel A; London, Wendy B; Stephens, Derek; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Simon, Thorsten; Nakagawara, Akira; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Matthay, Katherine K; Cohn, Susan L; Pearson, Andrew D J; Irwin, Meredith S

    2016-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer with remarkably divergent tumour behaviour and the presence of metastatic disease is a powerful predictor of adverse outcome. However, the importance of the involvement of specific metastatic sites or overall metastatic burden in determining outcome has not been fully explored. We analysed data from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database for 2250 patients with stage 4 disease treated from 1990 to 2002. Metastatic burden was assessed using a 'metastatic site index' (MSI), a score based on the number of metastatic systems involved. Overall, involvement of bone marrow, bone, lung, central nervous system, or other sites was associated with worse outcome. For patients aged ≥18 months, involvement of liver had the greatest impact on outcome and was associated with tumour MYCN amplification and adrenal primary and lung metastases. Increased MSI was associated with worse outcome and higher baseline ferritin/lactate dehydrogenase. We explored the impact of initial treatment approach on these associations. Limiting the analysis to patients allocated to protocols including stem cell transplant (SCT), there was no longer an association of outcome with metastatic involvement of any individual system or increasing MSI. Thus, treatment escalation with SCT (and the addition of differentiating agents to maintenance therapy) appears to have provided maximal benefit to patients with greatest metastatic disease burden. These findings underscore the importance of examining prognostic factors in the context of specific treatments since the addition of new therapies may change or even negate the predictive impact of a particular variable. PMID:27434878

  4. Prognostic significance of pattern and burden of metastatic disease in patients with stage 4 neuroblastoma: A study from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Daniel A; London, Wendy B; Stephens, Derek; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Simon, Thorsten; Nakagawara, Akira; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Matthay, Katherine K; Cohn, Susan L; Pearson, Andrew D J; Irwin, Meredith S

    2016-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer with remarkably divergent tumour behaviour and the presence of metastatic disease is a powerful predictor of adverse outcome. However, the importance of the involvement of specific metastatic sites or overall metastatic burden in determining outcome has not been fully explored. We analysed data from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database for 2250 patients with stage 4 disease treated from 1990 to 2002. Metastatic burden was assessed using a 'metastatic site index' (MSI), a score based on the number of metastatic systems involved. Overall, involvement of bone marrow, bone, lung, central nervous system, or other sites was associated with worse outcome. For patients aged ≥18 months, involvement of liver had the greatest impact on outcome and was associated with tumour MYCN amplification and adrenal primary and lung metastases. Increased MSI was associated with worse outcome and higher baseline ferritin/lactate dehydrogenase. We explored the impact of initial treatment approach on these associations. Limiting the analysis to patients allocated to protocols including stem cell transplant (SCT), there was no longer an association of outcome with metastatic involvement of any individual system or increasing MSI. Thus, treatment escalation with SCT (and the addition of differentiating agents to maintenance therapy) appears to have provided maximal benefit to patients with greatest metastatic disease burden. These findings underscore the importance of examining prognostic factors in the context of specific treatments since the addition of new therapies may change or even negate the predictive impact of a particular variable.

  5. Holistic facial expression classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, John; McDonald, J.

    2005-06-01

    This paper details a procedure for classifying facial expressions. This is a growing and relatively new type of problem within computer vision. One of the fundamental problems when classifying facial expressions in previous approaches is the lack of a consistent method of measuring expression. This paper solves this problem by the computation of the Facial Expression Shape Model (FESM). This statistical model of facial expression is based on an anatomical analysis of facial expression called the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We use the term Action Unit (AU) to describe a movement of one or more muscles of the face and all expressions can be described using the AU's described by FACS. The shape model is calculated by marking the face with 122 landmark points. We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to analyse how the landmark points move with respect to each other and to lower the dimensionality of the problem. Using the FESM in conjunction with Support Vector Machines (SVM) we classify facial expressions. SVMs are a powerful machine learning technique based on optimisation theory. This project is largely concerned with statistical models, machine learning techniques and psychological tools used in the classification of facial expression. This holistic approach to expression classification provides a means for a level of interaction with a computer that is a significant step forward in human-computer interaction.

  6. A genome-wide association study of posttraumatic stress disorder identifies the retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) gene as a significant risk locus

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Mark W.; Baldwin, Clinton; Guffanti, Guia; Melista, Efi; Wolf, Erika J.; Reardon, Annemarie F.; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.; Miller, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the results of the first genome-wide association study of PTSD performed using trauma-exposed white non-Hispanic participants from a cohort of veterans and their intimate partners (295 cases and 196 controls). Several SNPs yielded evidence of association. One SNP (rs8042149), located in the retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORA), reached genome-wide significance. Nominally significant associations were observed for other RORA SNPs in two African American replication samples—one from the veteran cohort (43 cases and 41 controls) and another independent cohort (100 cases and 421 controls). However, only the associated SNP from the veteran African American replication sample survived gene-level multiple testing correction. RORA has been implicated in prior GWAS studies of psychiatric disorders and is known to play an important role in neuroprotection and other behaviorally-relevant processes. This study represents an important step towards identifying the genetic underpinnings of PTSD. PMID:22869035

  7. [Recent psychiatric classification systems and their significance for forensic psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Hoff, P

    1992-05-01

    The influence of operationalized diagnostic systems is growing steadily in general and forensic psychiatry. This article discusses the historical context and the advantages and problems that may occur in the application of the new diagnostic systems. It is of special importance that the improvement of communication and reliability within psychiatry does not lead to an uncritical or even dogmatical understanding of the new diagnostic categories.

  8. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Caroline Mohr; Brenner, Frances W.; Miller, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    This review presents the current taxonomy of the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella, along with the current methods for the identification of each species within the three genera, incorporating both conventional biochemical and commercial methods. While all of these organisms are ubiquitous in the environment, individual case reports and nosocomial outbreak reports that demonstrate their ability to cause major infectious disease problems are presented. Lastly, anticipated antimicrobial susceptibility patterns are reviewed. Many of these organisms are easily controlled, but the advent of newer and more powerful antimicrobial agents has led to some problems of which laboratorians need to be aware. PMID:11023955

  9. Classification, disease, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Classification shapes medicine and guides its practice. Understanding classification must be part of the quest to better understand the social context and implications of diagnosis. Classifications are part of the human work that provides a foundation for the recognition and study of illness: deciding how the vast expanse of nature can be partitioned into meaningful chunks, stabilizing and structuring what is otherwise disordered. This article explores the aims of classification, their embodiment in medical diagnosis, and the historical traditions of medical classification. It provides a brief overview of the aims and principles of classification and their relevance to contemporary medicine. It also demonstrates how classifications operate as social framing devices that enable and disable communication, assert and refute authority, and are important items for sociological study. PMID:21532133

  10. Classification, disease, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Classification shapes medicine and guides its practice. Understanding classification must be part of the quest to better understand the social context and implications of diagnosis. Classifications are part of the human work that provides a foundation for the recognition and study of illness: deciding how the vast expanse of nature can be partitioned into meaningful chunks, stabilizing and structuring what is otherwise disordered. This article explores the aims of classification, their embodiment in medical diagnosis, and the historical traditions of medical classification. It provides a brief overview of the aims and principles of classification and their relevance to contemporary medicine. It also demonstrates how classifications operate as social framing devices that enable and disable communication, assert and refute authority, and are important items for sociological study.

  11. Fragile X premutation is a significant risk factor for premature ovarian failure: the International Collaborative POF in Fragile X study--preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Allingham-Hawkins, D J; Babul-Hirji, R; Chitayat, D; Holden, J J; Yang, K T; Lee, C; Hudson, R; Gorwill, H; Nolin, S L; Glicksman, A; Jenkins, E C; Brown, W T; Howard-Peebles, P N; Becchi, C; Cummings, E; Fallon, L; Seitz, S; Black, S H; Vianna-Morgante, A M; Costa, S S; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C; Murray, A; Webb, J; Vieri, F

    1999-04-01

    The preliminary results of an international collaborative study examining premature menopause in fragile X carriers are presented. A total of 760 women from fragile X families was surveyed about their fragile X carrier status and their menstrual and reproductive histories. Among the subjects, 395 carried a premutation, 128 carried a full mutation, and 237 were noncarriers. Sixty-three (16%) of the premutation carriers had experienced menopause prior to the age of 40 compared with none of the full mutation carriers and one (0.4%) of the controls. Based on these preliminary data, there is a significant association between fragile X premutation carrier status and premature menopause.

  12. Preventing risk for significant behavior problems through a cognitive-behavioral intervention: effects of the tools for getting along curriculum at one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen W; Daunic, Ann P; Barber, Brian R; Aydin, Burak; Van Loan, Christopher L; Taylor, Gregory G

    2014-10-01

    Efficient and effective social-emotional learning programs increase the likelihood of success in school for all students, and particularly for those who may develop emotional or behavior problems. In this study, we followed a sub-sample of students 1 year after their participation in a randomized controlled trial of the effects of the Tools for Getting Along (TFGA) curriculum. TFGA is a universally delivered, preventive cognitive-behavioral curricular intervention designed to improve upper elementary school students' emotional and behavioral self-regulation. To determine effects at 1-year follow-up, we assessed 720 out of the 1,296 original students across TFGA and control conditions on measures of curricular knowledge, teacher-rated executive function and behavior, and student-reported anger and social problem solving. Findings indicated a continued positive effect on curricular knowledge for students taught TFGA relative to controls. We also found significant pretest by condition interaction effects on teacher reports of skills associated with executive function, including inhibitory control and shift (cognitive flexibility), and on teacher reported internalizing and externalizing behavior. Specifically, students with poorer scores on these measures at pretest benefited from TFGA at follow-up relative to comparable students in the control condition. Finally, we found marginally significant pretest by condition interaction effects on proactive aggression, outward expressions of anger, and the executive function related skills of initiating activities and using working memory. Counter to expectations, we found negative TFGA effects on student-reported trait anger and anger control. PMID:25062801

  13. Preventing risk for significant behavior problems through a cognitive-behavioral intervention: effects of the tools for getting along curriculum at one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen W; Daunic, Ann P; Barber, Brian R; Aydin, Burak; Van Loan, Christopher L; Taylor, Gregory G

    2014-10-01

    Efficient and effective social-emotional learning programs increase the likelihood of success in school for all students, and particularly for those who may develop emotional or behavior problems. In this study, we followed a sub-sample of students 1 year after their participation in a randomized controlled trial of the effects of the Tools for Getting Along (TFGA) curriculum. TFGA is a universally delivered, preventive cognitive-behavioral curricular intervention designed to improve upper elementary school students' emotional and behavioral self-regulation. To determine effects at 1-year follow-up, we assessed 720 out of the 1,296 original students across TFGA and control conditions on measures of curricular knowledge, teacher-rated executive function and behavior, and student-reported anger and social problem solving. Findings indicated a continued positive effect on curricular knowledge for students taught TFGA relative to controls. We also found significant pretest by condition interaction effects on teacher reports of skills associated with executive function, including inhibitory control and shift (cognitive flexibility), and on teacher reported internalizing and externalizing behavior. Specifically, students with poorer scores on these measures at pretest benefited from TFGA at follow-up relative to comparable students in the control condition. Finally, we found marginally significant pretest by condition interaction effects on proactive aggression, outward expressions of anger, and the executive function related skills of initiating activities and using working memory. Counter to expectations, we found negative TFGA effects on student-reported trait anger and anger control.

  14. Will weight loss cause significant dosimetric changes of target volumes and organs at risk in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanben; Fei, Zhaodong; Chen, Lisha; Bai, Penggang; Lin, Xiang; Pan, Jianji

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to quantify dosimetric effects of weight loss for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Overall, 25 patients with NPC treated with IMRT were enrolled. We simulated weight loss during IMRT on the computer. Weight loss model was based on the planning computed tomography (CT) images. The original external contour of head and neck was labeled plan 0, and its volume was regarded as pretreatment normal weight. We shrank the external contour with different margins (2, 3, and 5 mm) and generated new external contours of head and neck. The volumes of reconstructed external contours were regarded as weight during radiotherapy. After recontouring outlines, the initial treatment plan was mapped to the redefined CT scans with the same beam configurations, yielding new plans. The computer model represented a theoretical proportional weight loss of 3.4% to 13.7% during the course of IMRT. The dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) of primary gross tumor volume and clinical target volume significantly increased by 1.9% to 2.9% and 1.8% to 2.9% because of weight loss, respectively. The dose to the PTV of gross tumor volume of lymph nodes fluctuated from −2.0% to 1.0%. The dose to the brain stem and the spinal cord was increased (p < 0.001), whereas the dose to the parotid gland was decreased (p < 0.001). Weight loss may lead to significant dosimetric change during IMRT. Repeated scanning and replanning for patients with NPC with an obvious weight loss may be necessary.

  15. Alpha2C-adrenoceptor Del322-325 polymorphism and risk of psychiatric disorders: significant association with opiate abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Guadalupe; Martín-Guerrero, Idoia; de Prado, Elena; Gabilondo, Ane M; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A; García-Orad, África; Meana, J Javier

    2016-06-01

    Objectives α2C-adrenoceptors (α2C-AR) are involved in behavioural responses relevant to psychiatric disorders and suicide completion. The genetic polymorphism α2CDel322-325-AR confers a loss-of-function phenotype. Functional human studies have associated α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with major depression pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to analyse, for the first time, the association of α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with suicide completion and with related psychiatric disorders: major depression, schizophrenia, opiate and alcohol abuse and dependence. Methods Post-mortem brain DNA was extracted (n = 516) and genotyping performed by HaeIII restriction endonuclease digestion of PCR products and DNA fragment analysis on capillary sequencer. Amplified products were sequenced to confirm the presence of the polymorphism. Results The frequency of α2CDel322-325-AR in suicide (9%, n = 236) and non-suicide victims (11%, n = 280) was similar. Genotype frequencies for the α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism in depressed (15%, n = 39) and schizophrenic subjects (18%, n = 39) were higher than in controls (7%, n = 187), but these differences did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.125 and P = 0.063, respectively). A selective and significant association of α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with opiate abuse and dependence was found (23%, n = 35, P = 0.011). Conclusions Our results indicate that α2CDel322-325-AR may play a role in the pathophysiology of opiate abuse and dependence and raise the interest for larger genetic associative studies. PMID:27007576

  16. Alpha2C-adrenoceptor Del322-325 polymorphism and risk of psychiatric disorders: significant association with opiate abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Guadalupe; Martín-Guerrero, Idoia; de Prado, Elena; Gabilondo, Ane M; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A; García-Orad, África; Meana, J Javier

    2016-06-01

    Objectives α2C-adrenoceptors (α2C-AR) are involved in behavioural responses relevant to psychiatric disorders and suicide completion. The genetic polymorphism α2CDel322-325-AR confers a loss-of-function phenotype. Functional human studies have associated α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with major depression pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to analyse, for the first time, the association of α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with suicide completion and with related psychiatric disorders: major depression, schizophrenia, opiate and alcohol abuse and dependence. Methods Post-mortem brain DNA was extracted (n = 516) and genotyping performed by HaeIII restriction endonuclease digestion of PCR products and DNA fragment analysis on capillary sequencer. Amplified products were sequenced to confirm the presence of the polymorphism. Results The frequency of α2CDel322-325-AR in suicide (9%, n = 236) and non-suicide victims (11%, n = 280) was similar. Genotype frequencies for the α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism in depressed (15%, n = 39) and schizophrenic subjects (18%, n = 39) were higher than in controls (7%, n = 187), but these differences did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.125 and P = 0.063, respectively). A selective and significant association of α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with opiate abuse and dependence was found (23%, n = 35, P = 0.011). Conclusions Our results indicate that α2CDel322-325-AR may play a role in the pathophysiology of opiate abuse and dependence and raise the interest for larger genetic associative studies.

  17. Periodic health examination, 1993 update: 3. Periodontal diseases: classification, diagnosis, risk factors and prevention. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, A I; Lewis, D W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the 1979 Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination recommendations on the diagnosis and prevention of periodontal disease. OPTIONS: Self-care at home, professional care, treatment with antimicrobial agents and management of patients at high risk. OUTCOMES: Maintaining the gingiva, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament in a healthy state (absence of gingival bleeding and no loss of epithelial attachment). EVIDENCE: A literature search for articles published from 1980 to 1993 was conducted. Selected studies published before 1980 were also reviewed if there were no recent updates. Evidence was evaluated and classified as good, fair or poor according to the criteria of the task force. VALUES: The task force's evidence-based rules for recommendations were used. In addition, whenever feasible, and on the basis of advice from the reviewers and experts, recommendations were modified in the interest of maintaining oral health (e.g., dental flossing in children). BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The recommendations are not expected to increase the costs of preventing periodontal diseases for the general population. They could benefit dental patients and reduce costs because they are based on the periodontal needs of patients rather than on the current universal application approach. PMID:8221425

  18. Prognostic Role of the Endoscopic Classification "DICA".

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Elisei, Walter; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular inflammation and complication assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Its predictive value in those patients was recently retrospectively assessed. For each patient, the following parameters were recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis, months of follow-up, therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any), occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis, and need of surgery. A total of 1651 patients (793 male, 858 female, mean age 66.6±11.1 y) were enrolled: 939 (56.9%) classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) as DICA 2, and 211 (12.8%) as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9 to 138) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients, and surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated with the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ=405.029; P<0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=4.319; 95% CI, 3.639-5.126; P<0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients scheduled therapy was effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391-0.914) (P=0.006, log-rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and need of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122-0.364) and 0.459 (0.258-0.818), respectively. DICA classification seems to be a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27622352

  19. Support Vector Machine Implementations for Classification & Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Yelundur, Anil; McChesney, Charlie; Landry, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Background We describe Support Vector Machine (SVM) applications to classification and clustering of channel current data. SVMs are variational-calculus based methods that are constrained to have structural risk minimization (SRM), i.e., they provide noise tolerant solutions for pattern recognition. The SVM approach encapsulates a significant amount of model-fitting information in the choice of its kernel. In work thus far, novel, information-theoretic, kernels have been successfully employed for notably better performance over standard kernels. Currently there are two approaches for implementing multiclass SVMs. One is called external multi-class that arranges several binary classifiers as a decision tree such that they perform a single-class decision making function, with each leaf corresponding to a unique class. The second approach, namely internal-multiclass, involves solving a single optimization problem corresponding to the entire data set (with multiple hyperplanes). Results Each SVM approach encapsulates a significant amount of model-fitting information in its choice of kernel. In work thus far, novel, information-theoretic, kernels were successfully employed for notably better performance over standard kernels. Two SVM approaches to multiclass discrimination are described: (1) internal multiclass (with a single optimization), and (2) external multiclass (using an optimized decision tree). We describe benefits of the internal-SVM approach, along with further refinements to the internal-multiclass SVM algorithms that offer significant improvement in training time without sacrificing accuracy. In situations where the data isn't clearly separable, making for poor discrimination, signal clustering is used to provide robust and useful information – to this end, novel, SVM-based clustering methods are also described. As with the classification, there are Internal and External SVM Clustering algorithms, both of which are briefly described. PMID:17118147

  20. mp-MRI Prostate Characterised PIRADS 3 Lesions are Associated with a Low Risk of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer - A Retrospective Review of 92 Biopsied PIRADS 3 Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, Heath; Jyoti, Rajeev; Haxhimolla, Hodo Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether prostate image reporting and data system (PIRADS) 3 lesions as assessed by a 3T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent clinically significant prostate cancer. Method A retrospective review was performed on a series of consecutive patients who underwent MRI guided biopsy of the prostate for clinical suspicion of prostate cancer between January 2013 and March 2014. Demographic, clinical, MRI and biopsy data were reviewed and compared. The same 3T MRI without the use of an endo-rectal coil was employed to assess each patient, obtaining high resolution T2 weighted images, diffusion weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhancement. The MRI data was sent to Dynacad software for analysis. A single experienced radiologist reported all the studies from this series using a modified PIRADS scoring system. Subsequently, all the lesions marked PIRADS 3 or above were targeted with 18G core biopsy using DynaTrim in-gantry MRI guidance system. Needle position targeting the lesion was recorded prior to each biopsy. All core biopsy samples were sent to one of two pathology laboratories where they were processed and reported as per the International Society of Urological Pathology protocols. Results One hundred and eighteen patients comprising a total of 215 lesions were reviewed. Amongst this cohort, 92 PIRADS 3 lesions were identified and biopsied. The mean age of patients in this cohort was 62.6 years. Median prostate specific antigen (PSA) was 6.5 ng/ml and median prostate size was 78.4 ml. Eightysix (93.5%) of biopsied PIRADS 3 lesions were benign and 6 (6.5%) lesions were found to be malignant. Of these 6 malignant lesions, 4 (66%) were Gleason score 6 (3 + 3) and 2 (33%) were Gleason score 7 (3 + 4). Of the 86 non-malignant lesions, 1 (1.2%) represented high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and 2 (2.4%) represented atypical small acinar proliferation. PIRADS 3 lesions within the peripheral zone were more likely to be

  1. Recursive heuristic classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, David C.

    1994-01-01

    The author will describe a new problem-solving approach called recursive heuristic classification, whereby a subproblem of heuristic classification is itself formulated and solved by heuristic classification. This allows the construction of more knowledge-intensive classification programs in a way that yields a clean organization. Further, standard knowledge acquisition and learning techniques for heuristic classification can be used to create, refine, and maintain the knowledge base associated with the recursively called classification expert system. The method of recursive heuristic classification was used in the Minerva blackboard shell for heuristic classification. Minerva recursively calls itself every problem-solving cycle to solve the important blackboard scheduler task, which involves assigning a desirability rating to alternative problem-solving actions. Knowing these ratings is critical to the use of an expert system as a component of a critiquing or apprenticeship tutoring system. One innovation of this research is a method called dynamic heuristic classification, which allows selection among dynamically generated classification categories instead of requiring them to be prenumerated.

  2. On the nature of global classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheelis, M. L.; Kandler, O.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular sequencing technology has brought biology into the era of global (universal) classification. Methodologically and philosophically, global classification differs significantly from traditional, local classification. The need for uniformity requires that higher level taxa be defined on the molecular level in terms of universally homologous functions. A global classification should reflect both principal dimensions of the evolutionary process: genealogical relationship and quality and extent of divergence within a group. The ultimate purpose of a global classification is not simply information storage and retrieval; such a system should also function as an heuristic representation of the evolutionary paradigm that exerts a directing influence on the course of biology. The global system envisioned allows paraphyletic taxa. To retain maximal phylogenetic information in these cases, minor notational amendments in existing taxonomic conventions should be adopted.

  3. Urban land cover classification using hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, G.; Ahamed, J. Mohammed; Hebbar, R.; Raj, U.

    2014-11-01

    Urban land cover classification using remote sensing data is quite challenging due to spectrally and spatially complex urban features. The present study describes the potential use of hyperspectral data for urban land cover classification and its comparison with multispectral data. EO-1 Hyperion data of October 05, 2012 covering parts of Bengaluru city was analyzed for land cover classification. The hyperspectral data was initially corrected for atmospheric effects using MODTRAN based FLAASH module and Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) transformation was applied to reduce data dimensionality. The threshold Eigen value of 1.76 in VNIR region and 1.68 in the SWIR region was used for selection of 145 stable bands. Advanced per pixel classifiers viz., Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) were used for general urban land cover classification. Accuracy assessment of the classified data revealed that SVM was quite superior (82.4 per cent) for urban land cover classification as compared to SAM (67.1 per cent). Selecting training samples using end members significantly improved the classification accuracy by 20.1 per cent in SVM. The land cover classification using multispectral LISS-III data using SVM showed lower accuracy mainly due to limitation of spectral resolution. The study indicated the requirement of additional narrow bands for achieving reasonable classification accuracy of urban land cover. Future research is focused on generating hyperspectral library for different urban features.

  4. WHO-EORTC classification for cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Willemze, Rein; Jaffe, Elaine S; Burg, Günter; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Berti, Emilio; Swerdlow, Steven H; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Chimenti, Sergio; Diaz-Perez, José L; Duncan, Lyn M; Grange, Florent; Harris, Nancy Lee; Kempf, Werner; Kerl, Helmut; Kurrer, Michael; Knobler, Robert; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Sander, Christian; Santucci, Marco; Sterry, Wolfram; Vermeer, Maarten H; Wechsler, Janine; Whittaker, Sean; Meijer, Chris J L M

    2005-05-15

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are currently classified by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification or the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, but both systems have shortcomings. In particular, differences in the classification of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides, Sezary syndrome, and the group of primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders and the classification and terminology of different types of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas have resulted in considerable debate and confusion. During recent consensus meetings representatives of both systems reached agreement on a new classification, which is now called the WHO-EORTC classification. In this paper we describe the characteristic features of the different primary cutaneous lymphomas and other hematologic neoplasms frequently presenting in the skin, and discuss differences with the previous classification schemes. In addition, the relative frequency and survival data of 1905 patients with primary cutaneous lymphomas derived from Dutch and Austrian registries for primary cutaneous lymphomas are presented to illustrate the clinical significance of this new classification.

  5. 1p/19q-driven prognostic molecular classification for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Xiaohui; Zeng, Wei; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2014-12-01

    The subjectivity in pathological diagnosis of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) and uncertainty in designation of glioblastoma with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) were two major dilemmas which puzzled neuro-pathologists and neurosurgeons. The present study was designed to project a molecular classification scheme based on the status of chromosome 1p and 19q. Patients (n = 117) with histological diagnosis of primary high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HGOs) enrolled in the study. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes 1p and 19q was performed. Univariate analysis showed that higher tumor grade, 1p/19q maintenance and 1q/19p co polysomy were confirmed as risk factors in HGOs (P < 0.01). Accordingly, patients with HGOs were divided into four subtypes which conferred remarkably distinct prognosis based on the number of risk factors (0 risk factor: HGOs-1, 1 risk factor: HGOs-2, 2 risk factors: HGOs-3, 3 risk factors: HGOs-4). Cox regression model revealed that the tumor grade was no longer independently associated with survival, while the molecular classification scheme showed a marked prognostic significance (HR = 0.359, 95 % CI 0.261-0.494, P < 0.001 for progression-free survival (PFS); HR = 0.393, 95 % CI 0.283-0.546, P < 0.001 for overall survival (OS)). The classification scheme incorporating traditional pathology with molecular information can be served as a supplement of the current WHO classification system and contribute to the personalized treatment decision-making. PMID:25151507

  6. Classification of Itch.

    PubMed

    Ständer, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pruritus has diverse forms of presentation and can appear not only on normal skin [International Forum for the Study of Itch (IFSI) classification group II], but also in the company of dermatoses (IFSI classification group I). Scratching, a natural reflex, begins in response to itch. Enough damage can be done to the skin by scratching to cause changes in the primary clinical picture, often leading to a clinical picture predominated by the development of chronic scratch lesions (IFSI classification group III). An internationally recognized, standardized classification system was created by the IFSI to not only aid in clarifying terms and definitions, but also to harmonize the global nomenclature for itch. PMID:27578063

  7. Introduction to Kernel Methods: Classification of Multivariate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauvel, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this chapter, kernel methods are presented for the classification of multivariate data. An introduction example is given to enlighten the main idea of kernel methods. Then emphasis is done on the Support Vector Machine. Structural risk minimization is presented, and linear and non-linear SVM are described. Finally, a full example of SVM classification is given on simulated hyperspectral data.

  8. Urogenital tuberculosis: definition and classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve the approach to the diagnosis and management of urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB), we need clear and unique classification. UGTB remains an important problem, especially in developing countries, but it is often an overlooked disease. As with any other infection, UGTB should be cured by antibacterial therapy, but because of late diagnosis it may often require surgery. Methods Scientific literature dedicated to this problem was critically analyzed and juxtaposed with the author’s own more than 30 years’ experience in tuberculosis urology. Results The conception, terms and definition were consolidated into one system; classification stage by stage as well as complications are presented. Classification of any disease includes dispersion on forms and stages and exact definitions for each stage. Clinical features and symptoms significantly vary between different forms and stages of UGTB. A simple diagnostic algorithm was constructed. Conclusions UGTB is multivariant disease and a standard unified approach to it is impossible. Clear definition as well as unique classification are necessary for real estimation of epidemiology and the optimization of therapy. The term ‘UGTB’ has insufficient information in order to estimate therapy, surgery and prognosis, or to evaluate the epidemiology. PMID:25745561

  9. North American Magazine Coverage of Skin Cancer and Recreational Tanning Before and After the WHO/IARC 2009 Classification of Indoor Tanning Devices as Carcinogenic.

    PubMed

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-09-01

    The mass media is an influential source of skin cancer information for the public. In 2009, the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer classified UV radiation from tanning devices as carcinogenic. Our objective was to determine if media coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning increased in volume or changed in nature after this classification. We conducted a directed content analysis on 29 North American popular magazines (2007-2012) to investigate the overall volume of articles on skin cancer and recreational tanning and, more specifically, the presence of skin cancer risk factors, UV behaviors, and early detection information in article text (n = 410) and images (n = 714). The volume of coverage on skin cancer and recreational tanning did not increase significantly after the 2009 classification of tanning beds as carcinogenic. Key-related messages, including that UV exposure is a risk factor for skin cancer and that indoor tanning should be avoided, were not reported more frequently after the classification, but the promotion of the tanned look as attractive was conveyed more often in images afterwards (p < .01). Content promoting high-SPF sunscreen use increased after the classification (p < .01), but there were no significant positive changes in the frequency of coverage of skin cancer risk factors, other UV behaviors, or early detection information over time. The classification of indoor tanning beds as carcinogenic had no significant impact on the volume or nature of skin cancer and recreational tanning coverage in magazines.

  10. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  11. 41 CFR 105-62.101 - Security classification categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vitally affecting the national security, intelligence sources and methods, and the compromise of vital... revelation of significant military plans or intelligence operations. This classification shall be...

  12. 41 CFR 105-62.101 - Security classification categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vitally affecting the national security, intelligence sources and methods, and the compromise of vital... revelation of significant military plans or intelligence operations. This classification shall be...

  13. Interventions delivered in clinical settings are effective in reducing risk of HIV transmission among people living with HIV: results from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)'s Special Projects of National Significance initiative.

    PubMed

    Myers, Janet J; Shade, Starley B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Koester, Kimberly; Maiorana, Andre; Malitz, Faye E; Bie, Jennifer; Kang-Dufour, Mi-Suk; Morin, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    To support expanded prevention services for people living with HIV, the US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) sponsored a 5-year initiative to test whether interventions delivered in clinical settings were effective in reducing HIV transmission risk among HIV-infected patients. Across 13 demonstration sites, patients were randomized to one of four conditions. All interventions were associated with reduced unprotected vaginal and/or anal intercourse with persons of HIV-uninfected or unknown status among the 3,556 participating patients. Compared to the standard of care, patients assigned to receive interventions from medical care providers reported a significant decrease in risk after 12 months of participation. Patients receiving prevention services from health educators, social workers or paraprofessional HIV-infected peers reported significant reduction in risk at 6 months, but not at 12 months. While clinics have a choice of effective models for implementing prevention programs for their HIV-infected patients, medical provider-delivered methods are comparatively robust.

  14. Risk of progression in smouldering myeloma and monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance: comparative analysis of the evolution of monoclonal component and multiparameter flow cytometry of bone marrow plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Persona, Ernesto; Mateo, Gema; García-Sanz, Ramón; Mateos, María-Victoria; de Las Heras, Natalia; de Coca, Alfonso García; Hernández, José M; Galende, Josefina; Martín-Nuñez, Guillermo; Bárez, Abelardo; Alonso, José M; Martín, Alejandro; López-Berges, Consuelo; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F; Vidriales, María-Belén

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the impact of two novel criteria; having >95% abnormal plasma cells by flow cytometry at diagnosis and the evolving subtype of the disease, as predictors of progression in 61 smouldering multiple myeloma (SMM) and 311 monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) patients. Although both criteria were of prognostic value, the risk of progression was better identified by immunophenotyping [Hazard Ratio (HR) 6.2 and 17.2 for SMM and MGUS, respectively] than evolving subtype, which had independent prognostic value only in MGUS (HR 3.6). Immunophenotyping discriminated the different risk of progression within the evolving and non-evolving subgroups of SMM (P = 0.01) and MGUS (P < 0.001). PMID:19821821

  15. 22 CFR 9.6 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR 2001.22. (c) Department of State Classification Guide. The Department of State Classification... classification. (a) Definition. Derivative classification is the incorporating, paraphrasing, restating...

  16. Library Classification 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In this article the author explores how a new library classification system might be designed using some aspects of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) and ideas from other systems to create something that works for school libraries in the year 2020. By examining what works well with the Dewey Decimal System, what features should be carried…

  17. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O.; Vogel, Timothy M.; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Correctly identifying nearest “neighbors” of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned

  18. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O; Vogel, Timothy M; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-08-01

    Correctly identifying nearest "neighbors" of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned with

  19. Improving classification of psychoses.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Stephen M; O'Donovan, Michael C; Saks, Elyn; Burns, Tom; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Psychosis has been recognised as an abnormal state in need of care throughout history and by diverse cultures. Present classifications of psychotic disorder remain based on the presence of specific psychotic symptoms, relative to affective and other symptoms, and their sequence and duration. Although extant diagnostic classifications have restricted validity, they have proven reliability and most clinicians and some patients find them useful. Moreover, these classifications have yet to be replaced by anything better. We propose that an expansion of the subgrouping approach inherent to classification will provide incremental improvement to present diagnostic constructs-as has worked in the rest of medicine. We also propose that subgroups could be created both within and across present diagnostic classifications, taking into consideration the potential value of continuous measures (eg, duration of psychotic symptoms and intelligence quotient). Health-care workers also need to work with service users and carers to develop and adapt approaches to diagnosis that are seen as helpful.

  20. Improving classification of psychoses.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Stephen M; O'Donovan, Michael C; Saks, Elyn; Burns, Tom; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Psychosis has been recognised as an abnormal state in need of care throughout history and by diverse cultures. Present classifications of psychotic disorder remain based on the presence of specific psychotic symptoms, relative to affective and other symptoms, and their sequence and duration. Although extant diagnostic classifications have restricted validity, they have proven reliability and most clinicians and some patients find them useful. Moreover, these classifications have yet to be replaced by anything better. We propose that an expansion of the subgrouping approach inherent to classification will provide incremental improvement to present diagnostic constructs-as has worked in the rest of medicine. We also propose that subgroups could be created both within and across present diagnostic classifications, taking into consideration the potential value of continuous measures (eg, duration of psychotic symptoms and intelligence quotient). Health-care workers also need to work with service users and carers to develop and adapt approaches to diagnosis that are seen as helpful. PMID:27063387

  1. 2-Stage Classification Modeling

    1994-11-01

    CIRCUIT2.4 is used to design optimum two-stage classification configurations and operating conditions for energy conservation. It permits simulation of five basic grinding-classification circuits, including one single-stage and four two-stage classification arrangements. Hydrocyclones, spiral classifiers, and sieve band screens can be simulated, and the user may choose the combination of devices for the flowsheet simulation. In addition, the user may select from four classification modeling methods to achieve the goals of a simulation project using themore » most familiar concepts. Circuit performance is modeled based on classification parameters or equipment operating conditions. A modular approach was taken in designing the program, which allows future addition of other models with relatively minor changes.« less

  2. 2-Stage Classification Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Baltich, L. K.

    1994-11-01

    CIRCUIT2.4 is used to design optimum two-stage classification configurations and operating conditions for energy conservation. It permits simulation of five basic grinding-classification circuits, including one single-stage and four two-stage classification arrangements. Hydrocyclones, spiral classifiers, and sieve band screens can be simulated, and the user may choose the combination of devices for the flowsheet simulation. In addition, the user may select from four classification modeling methods to achieve the goals of a simulation project using the most familiar concepts. Circuit performance is modeled based on classification parameters or equipment operating conditions. A modular approach was taken in designing the program, which allows future addition of other models with relatively minor changes.

  3. The 1973 WHO Classification Is More Suitable than the 2004 WHO Classification for Predicting Prognosis in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Tan, Jun; Sun, Chuanyu; Gou, Yuancheng; Tong, Shijun; Xia, Guowei; Fang, Zujun; Ding, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Predicting the recurrence and progression of Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer(NMIBC) is critical for urologist. Histological grade provides significant prognostic information, especially for prediction of progression. Currently, the 1973 and the 2004 WHO classification co-exist. Which system is better for predicting rumor recurrence and progression still a matter for debate. Methodology/Principal Findings 348 patients diagnosed with Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer were enrolled in our retrospective study. Paraffin sections were assessed by an experienced urological pathologist according to both the 1973 and 2004 WHO classifications. Tumor recurrence and progression was followed-up in all patients. During follow-up, corresponding 5-year recurrence-free survival rates of G1, G2 and G3 were 82.1%, 55.9%, 32.1% and the 5-year progression-free survival rates were 95.9%, 84.4% and 43.3%, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rates of papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP), low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma(LGPUC) and high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma (HGPUC) were 69.8%, 67.1% and 42.0% respectively and the 5-year progression-free survival rates were 100%, 90.9% and 54.8% respectively. In multivariate analysis, the 1973 WHO classification significantly associated with both tumor recurrence and progression(p = 0.010 and p = 0.022, respectively); the 2004 WHO classification correlated with tumor progression(p = 0.019), while was not proved to be a variable that can predict the risk of recurrence(p = 0.547). Kaplan-Meier plots showed that both the 1973 WHO and the 2004 WHO classifications were significantly associated with progression-free survival (p<0.0001, log-rank test). For prediction of recurrence, significant differences were observed between the tumor grades classified using the 1973 WHO grading system (p<0.0001, log-rank test), while a significant overlap was observed between

  4. Acne image analysis: lesion localization and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Fazly Salleh; Kaffenberger, Benjamin; Bikowski, Joseph; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    Acne is a common skin condition present predominantly in the adolescent population, but may continue into adulthood. Scarring occurs commonly as a sequel to severe inflammatory acne. The presence of acne and resultant scars are more than cosmetic, with a significant potential to alter quality of life and even job prospects. The psychosocial effects of acne and scars can be disturbing and may be a risk factor for serious psychological concerns. Treatment efficacy is generally determined based on an invalidated gestalt by the physician and patient. However, the validated assessment of acne can be challenging and time consuming. Acne can be classified into several morphologies including closed comedones (whiteheads), open comedones (blackheads), papules, pustules, cysts (nodules) and scars. For a validated assessment, the different morphologies need to be counted independently, a method that is far too time consuming considering the limited time available for a consultation. However, it is practical to record and analyze images since dermatologists can validate the severity of acne within seconds after uploading an image. This paper covers the processes of region-ofinterest determination using entropy-based filtering and thresholding as well acne lesion feature extraction. Feature extraction methods using discrete wavelet frames and gray-level co-occurence matrix were presented and their effectiveness in separating the six major acne lesion classes were discussed. Several classifiers were used to test the extracted features. Correct classification accuracy as high as 85.5% was achieved using the binary classification tree with fourteen principle components used as descriptors. Further studies are underway to further improve the algorithm performance and validate it on a larger database.

  5. Classification, epidemiology, and genetics of orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Stephanie E; Meyer, Robert E; Strauss, Ronald P; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2014-04-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs) include a broad range of facial conditions that differ in cause and disease burden. In the published literature, there is substantial ambiguity in both terminology and classification of OFCs. This article discusses the terminology and classification of OFCs and the epidemiology of OFCs. Demographic, environmental, and genetic risk factors for OFCs are described, including suggestions for family counseling. This article enables clinicians to counsel families regarding the occurrence and recurrence of OFCs. Although much of the information is detailed, it is intended to be accessible to all health professionals for use in their clinical practices.

  6. Changing blood donor screening criteria from permanent deferral for men who have sex with men to individual sexual risk assessment: no evidence of a significant impact on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Suligoi, Barbara; Pupella, Simonetta; Regine, Vincenza; Raimondo, Mariangela; Velati, Claudio; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2001, the criteria for blood donor eligibility in Italy were modified by a ministerial decree from a permanent deferral for "men who have sex with men" to an individual risk assessment of sexual behaviours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of this change in donor screening criteria on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic among blood donors in Italy. Materials and methods We used the data obtained from the Italian blood donor epidemiological surveillance system. We compared data collected in 2009 and 2010, when the individual risk assessment policy was applied, with data collected in 1999 when permanent deferral was applied for men who have sex with men based on a declaration of sexual orientation. We evaluated the change over time in the relative proportion of HIV antibody-positive donors who likely acquired the infection from men who have sex with men vs heterosexual sexual exposure; the relative risk was calculated using 1999 as the reference year. Results In all 3 years, the majority of HIV antibody-positive donors reported sexual exposure as a risk factor for HIV infection; this proportion increased over time, although not statistically significantly. Heterosexuals always accounted for at least 40% of all HIV antibody-positive cases. The rate of HIV antibody-positive donors increased similarly in men who have sex with men and heterosexuals; specifically, the rate of HIV antibody-positive cases per 100,000 donors was more than 2-fold higher among men who have sex with men in 2009–2010 than in 1999 (2009–2010 vs 1999, RR =2.8; P =0.06), and that among heterosexuals was 1.5 fold higher (P =0.18). Discussion When comparing the period before (1999) and after (2009–2010), the implementation of the individual risk assesment policy in 2001, no significant increase in the proportion of men who have sex with men compared to heterosexuals was observed among HIV antibody-positive blood donors, suggesting that the change in donor

  7. Influence of anthropogenic activities on PAHs in sediments in a significant gulf of low-latitude developing regions, the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea: distribution, sources, inventory and probability risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingyang; Xue, Rui; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhang, Gan

    2015-01-15

    Fifteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 41 surface sediment samples and a sediment core (50 cm) from the Beibu Gulf, a significant low-latitude developing gulf, were analyzed. PAHs concentrations were 3.01-388 ng g(-)(1) (mean 95.5 ng g(-)(1)) in the surface sediments and 10.5-87.1 ng g(-)(1) (average 41.1 ng g(-)(1)) in the sediment core. Source apportionment indicated that PAHs were generated from coke production and vehicular emissions (39.4%), coal and biomass combustion (35.8%), and petrogenic sources (24.8%). PAHs were mainly concentrated in the industrialized and urbanized regions and the harbor, and were transported by atmospheric deposition to the marine matrix. The mass inventory (1.57-2.62t) and probability risk showed sediments here served as an important reservoir but low PAH risk. Different from oil and natural gas in developed regions, coal combustion has always been a significant energy consumption pattern in this developing region for the past 30 years (56 ± 5%).

  8. Multiple Spectral-Spatial Classification Approach for Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Tilton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    A .new multiple classifier approach for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Several classifiers are used independently to classify an image. For every pixel, if all the classifiers have assigned this pixel to the same class, the pixel is kept as a marker, i.e., a seed of the spatial region, with the corresponding class label. We propose to use spectral-spatial classifiers at the preliminary step of the marker selection procedure, each of them combining the results of a pixel-wise classification and a segmentation map. Different segmentation methods based on dissimilar principles lead to different classification results. Furthermore, a minimum spanning forest is built, where each tree is rooted on a classification -driven marker and forms a region in the spectral -spatial classification: map. Experimental results are presented for two hyperspectral airborne images. The proposed method significantly improves classification accuracies, when compared to previously proposed classification techniques.

  9. Sentiment classification technology based on Markov logic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hui; Li, Zhigang; Yao, Chongchong; Zhang, Weizhe

    2016-07-01

    With diverse online media emerging, there is a growing concern of sentiment classification problem. At present, text sentiment classification mainly utilizes supervised machine learning methods, which feature certain domain dependency. On the basis of Markov logic networks (MLNs), this study proposed a cross-domain multi-task text sentiment classification method rooted in transfer learning. Through many-to-one knowledge transfer, labeled text sentiment classification, knowledge was successfully transferred into other domains, and the precision of the sentiment classification analysis in the text tendency domain was improved. The experimental results revealed the following: (1) the model based on a MLN demonstrated higher precision than the single individual learning plan model. (2) Multi-task transfer learning based on Markov logical networks could acquire more knowledge than self-domain learning. The cross-domain text sentiment classification model could significantly improve the precision and efficiency of text sentiment classification.

  10. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  11. On the nature of global classification

    PubMed Central

    Wheelis, Mark L.; Kandler, Otto; Woese, Carl R.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular sequencing technology has brought biology into the era of global (universal) classification. Methodologically and philosophically, global classification differs significantly from traditional, local classificagtion. The need for uniformity requires that higher level taxa be defined on the molecular level in terms of universally homologous functions. A global classification should reflect both principal dimentions of the evolutionary process: genealogical relationship and quality and extent of divergence within a group. The ultimate purpose of a global classification is not simply information storage and retrieval; such a system should also as an heuristic representation of the evolutionary paradigm that exerts a directing influence on the course of biology. The global system envisioned allows paraphyletic taxa. To retain maximal phylogenetic information in these cases, minor notational amendments in existing taxonomic conventions should be adopted. PMID:11537862

  12. The Relationship between Preoperative Wound Classification and Postoperative Infection: A Multi-Institutional Analysis of 15,289 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mioton, Lauren M; Jordan, Sumanas W; Hanwright, Philip J; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in surgical techniques, sterile protocols, and perioperative antibiotic regimens, surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a significant problem. We investigated the relationship between wound classification (i.e., clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, dirty) and SSI rates in plastic surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a multi-institutional, surgical outcomes database for all patients undergoing plastic surgery procedures from 2006-2010. Patient demographics, wound classification, and 30-day outcomes were recorded and analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results A total of 15,289 plastic surgery cases were analyzed. The overall SSI rate was 3.00%, with superficial SSIs occurring at comparable rates across wound classes. There were similar rates of deep SSIs in the clean and clean/contaminated groups (0.64%), while rates reached over 2% in contaminated and dirty cases. Organ/space SSIs occurred in less than 1% of each wound classification. Contaminated and dirty cases were at an increased risk for deep SSIs (odds ratios, 2.81 and 2.74, respectively); however, wound classification did not appear to be a significant predictor of superficial or organ/space SSIs. Clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty cases were at increased risk for a postoperative complication, and contaminated and dirty cases also had higher odds of reoperation and 30-day mortality. Conclusions Analyzing a multi-center database, we found that wound classification was a significant predictor of overall complications, reoperation, and mortality, but not an adequate predictor of surgical site infections. When comparing infections for a given wound classification, plastic surgery had lower overall rates than the surgical population at large. PMID:24086804

  13. Update on diabetes classification.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celeste C; Philipson, Louis H

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the difficulties in creating a definitive classification of diabetes mellitus in the absence of a complete understanding of the pathogenesis of the major forms. This brief review shows the evolving nature of the classification of diabetes mellitus. No classification scheme is ideal, and all have some overlap and inconsistencies. The only diabetes in which it is possible to accurately diagnose by DNA sequencing, monogenic diabetes, remains undiagnosed in more than 90% of the individuals who have diabetes caused by one of the known gene mutations. The point of classification, or taxonomy, of disease, should be to give insight into both pathogenesis and treatment. It remains a source of frustration that all schemes of diabetes mellitus continue to fall short of this goal.

  14. An Easy Classification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    File folders can be used effectively to develop and retrieve information about animal classification systems. Animal characters are drawn separately on the front side of a file cover and holes are punched next to each character. (PS)

  15. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  16. Cardiovascular, diabetes, and cancer strips: evidences, mechanisms, and classifications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing-Hua; Hu, Da-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To report and name firstly that there are cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancers (CDC) strips; and disclose their mechanisms, classifications, and clinical significances. Study design Narrative and systematic review study and interpretive analysis. Methods Data sources and study selection: to collect and present related evidences on CDC strips from evidence-based, open-access, both Chinese- and English-language literatures in recent 10 years on clinical trials from PubMed according to keywords “CVD, DM and cancers” as well as authors’ extensive clinical experience with the treatment of more than fifty thousands of patients with CVD, diabetes and cancers over the past decades, and analyze their related mechanisms and categories which based on authors’ previous works. Data extraction: data were mainly extracted from 48 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed data were included, narratively and systematically reviewed. Results With several conceptual and technical breakthrough, authors present related evidences on CDC strips, these are, CVD and DM, DM and cancers, cancers and CVD linked, respectively; And “Bad SEED” +/– “bad soil” theory or doctrine may explain this phenomenon due to “internal environmental injure, abnormal or unbalance” in human body resulting from the role of risk factors (RFs) related multi-pathways and multi-targets, which including organ & tissue (e.g., vascular-specific), cell and gene-based mechanisms. Their classifications include main strips/type B, and Branches/type A as showed by tables and figures in this article. Conclusions There are CDC strips and related mechanisms and classifications. CDC strips may help us to understand, prevent, and control related common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as well as these high risk strips. PMID:25276377

  17. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  18. Classification of older adults with/without a fall history using machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Lin Zhang; Ou Ma; Fabre, Jennifer M; Wood, Robert H; Garcia, Stephanie U; Ivey, Kayla M; McCann, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    Falling is a serious problem in an aged society such that assessment of the risk of falls for individuals is imperative for the research and practice of falls prevention. This paper introduces an application of several machine learning methods for training a classifier which is capable of classifying individual older adults into a high risk group and a low risk group (distinguished by whether or not the members of the group have a recent history of falls). Using a 3D motion capture system, significant gait features related to falls risk are extracted. By training these features, classification hypotheses are obtained based on machine learning techniques (K Nearest-neighbour, Naive Bayes, Logistic Regression, Neural Network, and Support Vector Machine). Training and test accuracies with sensitivity and specificity of each of these techniques are assessed. The feature adjustment and tuning of the machine learning algorithms are discussed. The outcome of the study will benefit the prediction and prevention of falls.

  19. Classification of older adults with/without a fall history using machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Lin Zhang; Ou Ma; Fabre, Jennifer M; Wood, Robert H; Garcia, Stephanie U; Ivey, Kayla M; McCann, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    Falling is a serious problem in an aged society such that assessment of the risk of falls for individuals is imperative for the research and practice of falls prevention. This paper introduces an application of several machine learning methods for training a classifier which is capable of classifying individual older adults into a high risk group and a low risk group (distinguished by whether or not the members of the group have a recent history of falls). Using a 3D motion capture system, significant gait features related to falls risk are extracted. By training these features, classification hypotheses are obtained based on machine learning techniques (K Nearest-neighbour, Naive Bayes, Logistic Regression, Neural Network, and Support Vector Machine). Training and test accuracies with sensitivity and specificity of each of these techniques are assessed. The feature adjustment and tuning of the machine learning algorithms are discussed. The outcome of the study will benefit the prediction and prevention of falls. PMID:26737845

  20. Concepts of Classification and Taxonomy Phylogenetic Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, D.

    2016-05-01

    Phylogenetic approaches to classification have been heavily developed in biology by bioinformaticians. But these techniques have applications in other fields, in particular in linguistics. Their main characteristics is to search for relationships between the objects or species in study, instead of grouping them by similarity. They are thus rather well suited for any kind of evolutionary objects. For nearly fifteen years, astrocladistics has explored the use of Maximum Parsimony (or cladistics) for astronomical objects like galaxies or globular clusters. In this lesson we will learn how it works.

  1. Repeat Cardiovascular Risk Assessment after Four Years: Is There Improvement in Risk Prediction?

    PubMed Central

    Chamnan, Parinya; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Griffin, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Framingham risk equations are widely used to predict cardiovascular disease based on health information from a single time point. Little is known regarding use of information from repeat risk assessments and temporal change in estimated cardiovascular risk for prediction of future cardiovascular events. This study was aimed to compare the discrimination and risk reclassification of approaches using estimated cardiovascular risk at single and repeat risk assessments Methods Using data on 12,197 individuals enrolled in EPIC-Norfolk cohort, with 12 years of follow-up, we examined rates of cardiovascular events by levels of estimated absolute risk (Framingham risk score) at the first and second health examination four years later. We calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (aROC) and risk reclassification, comparing approaches using information from single and repeat risk assessments (i.e., estimated risk at different time points). Results The mean Framingham risk score increased from 15.5% to 17.5% over a mean of 3.7 years from the first to second health examination. Individuals with high estimated risk (≥20%) at both health examinations had considerably higher rates of cardiovascular events than those who remained in the lowest risk category (<10%) in both health examinations (34.0 [95%CI 31.7–36.6] and 2.7 [2.2–3.3] per 1,000 person-years respectively). Using information from the most up-to-date risk assessment resulted in a small non-significant change in risk classification over the previous risk assessment (net reclassification improvement of -4.8%, p>0.05). Using information from both risk assessments slightly improved discrimination compared to information from a single risk assessment (aROC 0.76 and 0.75 respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Using information from repeat risk assessments over a period of four years modestly improved prediction, compared to using data from a single risk assessment. However, this

  2. Developmental dyslexia: predicting individual risk

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul A; Hulme, Charles; Nash, Hannah M; Gooch, Debbie; Hayiou-Thomas, Emma; Snowling, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Background Causal theories of dyslexia suggest that it is a heritable disorder, which is the outcome of multiple risk factors. However, whether early screening for dyslexia is viable is not yet known. Methods The study followed children at high risk of dyslexia from preschool through the early primary years assessing them from age 3 years and 6 months (T1) at approximately annual intervals on tasks tapping cognitive, language, and executive-motor skills. The children were recruited to three groups: children at family risk of dyslexia, children with concerns regarding speech, and language development at 3;06 years and controls considered to be typically developing. At 8 years, children were classified as ‘dyslexic’ or not. Logistic regression models were used to predict the individual risk of dyslexia and to investigate how risk factors accumulate to predict poor literacy outcomes. Results Family-risk status was a stronger predictor of dyslexia at 8 years than low language in preschool. Additional predictors in the preschool years include letter knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, and executive skills. At the time of school entry, language skills become significant predictors, and motor skills add a small but significant increase to the prediction probability. We present classification accuracy using different probability cutoffs for logistic regression models and ROC curves to highlight the accumulation of risk factors at the individual level. Conclusions Dyslexia is the outcome of multiple risk factors and children with language difficulties at school entry are at high risk. Family history of dyslexia is a predictor of literacy outcome from the preschool years. However, screening does not reach an acceptable clinical level until close to school entry when letter knowledge, phonological awareness, and RAN, rather than family risk, together provide good sensitivity and specificity as a screening battery. PMID:25832320

  3. Comparison of serum creatinine, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin for acute kidney injury occurrence according to risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage criteria classification system in early after living kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Reza; Mohebi, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the kidney function after living kidney donation, we measured serum creatinine (SCr), cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) of 42 living donors before uninephrectomy and in three immediate days after it. We also evaluated the prevalence of the occurrence of the different stages of acute kidney injury (AKI) classified according to risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage (RIFLE) criteria, and accuracy of each of these three biomarkers for predicting them were evaluated. Significant serum NGAL (s-NGAL) changes were limited to the 1 st day after donation, whereas SCr and cystatin C changes continued to the third day after donation. s-NGAL level in the 1 st day and serum cystatin C in the 3 rd day after donation, respectively, had the largest area under curve and best sensitivity and specificity for Stage 1 (risk) AKI prediction. During the immediate three days after donation, about half of patients suffered from AKI; mostly Stage 1 (injury). The sequence of the emergence of s-NGAL and s-cystatin C in the 1 st and 3 rd days as biomarkers with highest accuracy and power for RIFLE criteria defined AKI stage discrimination in our study was comparable to previous studies. We conclude that our study suggests that AKI was best detected in the 1 st day after uninephrectomy by the s-NGAL levels, whereas cystatin C was the best in the 3 rd day after donation for detection of AKI. PMID:27424680

  4. [Definition, etiology, classification and presentation forms].

    PubMed

    Mas Garriga, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is defined as a degenerative process affecting the joints as a result of mechanical and biological disorders that destabilize the balance between the synthesis and degradation of joint cartilage, stimulating the growth of subchondral bone; chronic synovitis is also present. Currently, the joint is considered as a functional unit that includes distinct tissues, mainly cartilage, the synovial membrane, and subchondral bone, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Distinct risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis have been described: general, unmodifiable risk factors (age, sex, and genetic makeup), general, modifiable risk factors (obesity and hormonal factors) and local risk factors (prior joint anomalies and joint overload). Notable among the main factors related to disease progression are joint alignment defects and generalized osteoarthritis. Several classifications of osteoarthritis have been proposed but none is particularly important for the primary care management of the disease. These classifications include etiological (primary or idiopathic forms and secondary forms) and topographical (typical and atypical localizations) classifications, the Kellgren and Lawrence classification (radiological repercussions) and that of the American College of Rheumatology for osteoarthritis of the hand, hip and knee. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis is 10.2% in Spain and shows a marked discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings. Hand osteoarthritis, with a prevalence of symptomatic involvement of around 6.2%, has several forms of presentation (nodal osteoarthritis, generalized osteoarthritis, rhizarthrosis, and erosive osteoarthritis). Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip affects between 3.5% and 5.6% of persons older than 50 years and has different radiological patterns depending on femoral head migration.

  5. Vertebral fracture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, Paola C.; Tankó, László B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    A novel method for classification and quantification of vertebral fractures from X-ray images is presented. Using pairwise conditional shape models trained on a set of healthy spines, the most likely unfractured shape is estimated for each of the vertebrae in the image. The difference between the true shape and the reconstructed normal shape is an indicator for the shape abnormality. A statistical classification scheme with the two shapes as features is applied to detect, classify, and grade various types of deformities. In contrast with the current (semi-)quantitative grading strategies this method takes the full shape into account, it uses a patient-specific reference by combining population-based information on biological variation in vertebra shape and vertebra interrelations, and it provides a continuous measure of deformity. Good agreement with manual classification and grading is demonstrated on 204 lateral spine radiographs with in total 89 fractures.

  6. Classification images with uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Tjan, Bosco S.; Nandy, Anirvan S.

    2009-01-01

    Classification image and other similar noise-driven linear methods have found increasingly wider applications in revealing psychophysical receptive field structures or perceptual templates. These techniques are relatively easy to deploy, and the results are simple to interpret. However, being a linear technique, the utility of the classification-image method is believed to be limited. Uncertainty about the target stimuli on the part of an observer will result in a classification image that is the superposition of all possible templates for all the possible signals. In the context of a well-established uncertainty model, which pools the outputs of a large set of linear frontends with a max operator, we show analytically, in simulations, and with human experiments that the effect of intrinsic uncertainty can be limited or even eliminated by presenting a signal at a relatively high contrast in a classification-image experiment. We further argue that the subimages from different stimulus-response categories should not be combined, as is conventionally done. We show that when the signal contrast is high, the subimages from the error trials contain a clear high-contrast image that is negatively correlated with the perceptual template associated with the presented signal, relatively unaffected by uncertainty. The subimages also contain a “haze” that is of a much lower contrast and is positively correlated with the superposition of all the templates associated with the erroneous response. In the case of spatial uncertainty, we show that the spatial extent of the uncertainty can be estimated from the classification subimages. We link intrinsic uncertainty to invariance and suggest that this signal-clamped classification-image method will find general applications in uncovering the underlying representations of high-level neural and psychophysical mechanisms. PMID:16889477

  7. Classification images with uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Tjan, Bosco S; Nandy, Anirvan S

    2006-04-04

    Classification image and other similar noise-driven linear methods have found increasingly wider applications in revealing psychophysical receptive field structures or perceptual templates. These techniques are relatively easy to deploy, and the results are simple to interpret. However, being a linear technique, the utility of the classification-image method is believed to be limited. Uncertainty about the target stimuli on the part of an observer will result in a classification image that is the superposition of all possible templates for all the possible signals. In the context of a well-established uncertainty model, which pools the outputs of a large set of linear frontends with a max operator, we show analytically, in simulations, and with human experiments that the effect of intrinsic uncertainty can be limited or even eliminated by presenting a signal at a relatively high contrast in a classification-image experiment. We further argue that the subimages from different stimulus-response categories should not be combined, as is conventionally done. We show that when the signal contrast is high, the subimages from the error trials contain a clear high-contrast image that is negatively correlated with the perceptual template associated with the presented signal, relatively unaffected by uncertainty. The subimages also contain a "haze" that is of a much lower contrast and is positively correlated with the superposition of all the templates associated with the erroneous response. In the case of spatial uncertainty, we show that the spatial extent of the uncertainty can be estimated from the classification subimages. We link intrinsic uncertainty to invariance and suggest that this signal-clamped classification-image method will find general applications in uncovering the underlying representations of high-level neural and psychophysical mechanisms.

  8. Impact of structure space continuity on protein fold classification

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinrui; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure classification hierarchically clusters domain structures based on structure and/or sequence similarities and plays important roles in the study of protein structure-function relationship and protein evolution. Among many classifications, SCOP and CATH are widely viewed as the gold standards. Fold classification is of special interest because this is the lowest level of classification that does not depend on protein sequence similarity. The current fold classifications such as those in SCOP and CATH are controversial because they implicitly assume that folds are discrete islands in the structure space, whereas increasing evidence suggests significant similarities among folds and supports a continuous fold space. Although this problem is widely recognized, its impact on fold classification has not been quantitatively evaluated. Here we develop a likelihood method to classify a domain into the existing folds of CATH or SCOP using both query-fold structure similarities and within-fold structure heterogeneities. The new classification differs from the original classification for 3.4–12% of domains, depending on factors such as the structure similarity score and original classification scheme used. Because these factors differ for different biological purposes, our results indicate that the importance of considering structure space continuity in fold classification depends on the specific question asked. PMID:27006112

  9. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  10. [Malignant lymphoma: REAL classification to new WHO classification].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, M

    2000-03-01

    The Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms(REAL) proposed in 1994 represented a new paradigm for the classification of lymphomas. This classification emphasized that each disease was a distinct entity, defined by a constellation of clinical and laboratory features, i.e., morphology and genetic features, immunophenotype, clinical presentation, and course. And it also noted that the site(s) of presentation were a signpost for important underlying biologic distinctions. A new WHO classification is planed to be proposed, re-categorizing entities of the REAL classification. Now, WHO members planed to publish the new classification as the bluebook of WHO at first in 1998 and now in 2000. This paper reports mainly different points in the new WHO classification of malignant lymphoma from the REAL classification.

  11. 41 CFR 105-62.101 - Security classification categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... classification categories. As set forth in Executive Order 12065, official information or material which requires... vitally affecting the national security, intelligence sources and methods, and the compromise of vital... revelation of significant military plans or intelligence operations. This classification shall be...

  12. Cognitive Gains from Extended Play at Classification and Seriation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Kimberly N.; Busby, Rosetta F.; Pasnak, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Used classification and seriation games over 4 months to teach the oddity principle and insertion into a series to Head Start 4-year-olds during free play. A comparison group participated in free play without the teacher-directed classification and seriation games. At the conclusion, intervention students were significantly better than comparison…

  13. 41 CFR 105-62.101 - Security classification categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... classification categories. As set forth in Executive Order 12065, official information or material which requires... three categories: Namely, Top Secret, Secret, or Confidential, depending on its degree of significance... provided by statute. The three classification categories are defined as follows: (a) Top Secret. Top...

  14. Classification, clinical features, and genetics of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) constitute a major health burden (0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide), and remain a preventable cause of still birth, neonatal, and infant death, or significant lifelong handicaps. The malformations result from failure of the neural folds to fuse in the midline, and form the neural tube between the third and the fourth week of embryonic development. This review article discusses their classification, clinical features, and genetics. Most NTDs are sporadic and both genetic, and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in its etiology. Consanguinity was suggested to contribute to the high incidence of NTDs in several countries, including Saudi Arabia. Syndromes, often associated with chromosomal anomalies, account for <10% of all NTDs; but a higher proportion (20%) has been documented in Saudi Arabia. Genetic predisposition constitutes the major underlying risk factor, with a strong implication of genes that regulate folate one-carbon metabolism and planar cell polarity. PMID:25551113

  15. Improving Student Question Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

  16. Homographs: Classification and Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacak, M.; Henisz, Bozena

    1968-01-01

    Homographs are defined in this study as sets of word forms which are spelled alike but which have entirely or partially different meanings and which may have different syntactic functions (that is, they belong to more than one form class or to more than one subclass of a form class). This report deals with the classification and identification of…

  17. Shark Teeth Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Creel, Sally; Lee, Velda

    2009-01-01

    On a recent autumn afternoon at Harmony Leland Elementary in Mableton, Georgia, students in a fifth-grade science class investigated the essential process of classification--the act of putting things into groups according to some common characteristics or attributes. While they may have honed these skills earlier in the week by grouping their own…

  18. Soil Classification and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This instructional unit was designed to enable students, primarily at the secondary level, to (1) classify soils according to current capability classifications of the Soil Conservation Service, (2) select treatments needed for a given soil class according to current recommendations provided by the Soil Conservation Service, and (3) interpret a…

  19. Equivalent Diagnostic Classification Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; Bechger, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Rupp and Templin (2008) do a good job at describing the ever expanding landscape of Diagnostic Classification Models (DCM). In many ways, their review article clearly points to some of the questions that need to be answered before DCMs can become part of the psychometric practitioners toolkit. Apart from the issues mentioned in this article that…

  20. Teach Classification with Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Deborah

    1980-01-01

    Described is a creative approach to the use of contact slides as a means of student participation in a learning unit on animal classification. The finished product is a slide presentation in which students themselves have made the slides and taped the narration. (CS)

  1. Efficient Fingercode Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-Wei; Law, Kwok-Yan; Gollmann, Dieter; Chung, Siu-Leung; Li, Jian-Bin; Sun, Jia-Guang

    In this paper, we present an efficient fingerprint classification algorithm which is an essential component in many critical security application systems e. g. systems in the e-government and e-finance domains. Fingerprint identification is one of the most important security requirements in homeland security systems such as personnel screening and anti-money laundering. The problem of fingerprint identification involves searching (matching) the fingerprint of a person against each of the fingerprints of all registered persons. To enhance performance and reliability, a common approach is to reduce the search space by firstly classifying the fingerprints and then performing the search in the respective class. Jain et al. proposed a fingerprint classification algorithm based on a two-stage classifier, which uses a K-nearest neighbor classifier in its first stage. The fingerprint classification algorithm is based on the fingercode representation which is an encoding of fingerprints that has been demonstrated to be an effective fingerprint biometric scheme because of its ability to capture both local and global details in a fingerprint image. We enhance this approach by improving the efficiency of the K-nearest neighbor classifier for fingercode-based fingerprint classification. Our research firstly investigates the various fast search algorithms in vector quantization (VQ) and the potential application in fingerprint classification, and then proposes two efficient algorithms based on the pyramid-based search algorithms in VQ. Experimental results on DB1 of FVC 2004 demonstrate that our algorithms can outperform the full search algorithm and the original pyramid-based search algorithms in terms of computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy.

  2. Eating Disorder Diagnoses: Empirical Approaches to Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Keel, Pamela K.; Williamson, Donald A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2007-01-01

    Decisions about the classification of eating disorders have significant scientific and clinical implications. The eating disorder diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) reflect the collective wisdom of experts in the field but are frequently not supported in…

  3. An Integrative Dimensional Classification of Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widiger, Thomas A.; Livesley, W. John; Clark, Lee Anna

    2009-01-01

    Psychological assessment research concerns how to describe psychological dysfunction in ways that are both valid and useful. Recent advances in assessment research hold the promise of facilitating significant improvements in description and diagnosis. One such contribution is in the classification of personality disorder symptomatology. The…

  4. Temporal context in floristic classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. W.; Lees, B. G.

    1996-11-01

    Multi-temporal remote sensing data present a number of significant problems for the statistical and spatial competence of a classifier. Ideally, a classifier of multi-temporal data should be temporally invariant. It must have the capacity to account for the variations in season, growth cycle, radiometric, and atmospheric conditions at any point in time when classifying the land cover. This paper tests two methods of creating a temporally invariant classifier based on the pattern recognition capabilities of a neural network. A suite of twelve multi-temporal datasets spread over 5 yr along with a comprehensive mix of environmental variables are fused into floristic classification images by the neural network. Uncertainties in the classifications are addressed explicitly with a confidence mask generated from the fuzzy membership value's output by the neural network. These confidence masks are used to produce constrained classification images. The overall accuracy percentage achieved from a study site containing highly disturbed undulating terrain averages 60%. The first method of training, sequential learning of temporal context, is tested by an examination of the step-by-step evolution of the sequential training process. This reveals that the sequential classifier may not have learned about time, because time was constant during each network training session. It also suggests that there are optimal times during the annual cycle to train the classifier for particular floristic classes. The second method of training the classifier is randomised exposure to the entire temporal training suite. Time was now a fluctuating input variable during the network training process. This method produced the best spatially accurate results. The performance of this classifier as a temporally invariant classifier is tested amongst four multi-temporal datasets with encouraging results. The classifier consistently achieved an overall accuracy percentage of 60%. The pairwise predicted

  5. Classification and Pathology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min

    2016-07-01

    Advancement in the understanding of lung tumor biology enables continued refinement of lung cancer classification, reflected in the recently introduced 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer. In small biopsy or cytology specimens, special emphasis is placed on separating adenocarcinomas from the other lung cancers to effectively select tumors for targeted molecular testing. In resection specimens, adenocarcinomas are further classified based on architectural pattern to delineate tissue types of prognostic significance. Neuroendocrine tumors are divided into typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma based on a combination of features, especially tumor cell proliferation rate. PMID:27261908

  6. Classification of electrocaloric cooling device types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, P.; Raatz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The research on the electrocaloric effect (ECE), the materials and their application has significantly increased in the last years, which resulted in several different concepts and demonstrators of electrocaloric (EC) cooling devices. The aim of this paper is to give a systematic overview of possible design concepts of EC cooling devices and to provide a method for their classification. Nine different device types could be distinguished. Each device type is being specified according to function principle, characteristic properties, technical challenges and technical readiness level. This classification and state of the art reveal areas requiring deeper research and can help researchers and engineers to select appropriate concepts for further investigation, improvement and application.

  7. Automated classification of colon polyps in endoscopic image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sebastian; Palm, Stephan; Tischendorf, Jens J. W.; Behrens, Alexander; Trautwein, Christian; Aach, Til

    2012-03-01

    Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in the US. In recent years, however, early diagnosis and treatment have caused a significant rise in the five year survival rate. Preventive screening is often performed by colonoscopy (endoscopic inspection of the colon mucosa). Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is a novel diagnostic approach highlighting blood vessel structures on polyps which are an indicator for future cancer risk. In this paper, we review our automated inter- and intra-observer independent system for the automated classification of polyps into hyperplasias and adenomas based on vessel structures to further improve the classification performance. To surpass the performance limitations we derive a novel vessel segmentation approach, extract 22 features to describe complex vessel topologies, and apply three feature selection strategies. Tests are conducted on 286 NBI images with diagnostically important and challenging polyps (10mm or smaller) taken from our representative polyp database. Evaluations are based on ground truth data determined by histopathological analysis. Feature selection by Simulated Annealing yields the best result with a prediction accuracy of 96.2% (sensitivity: 97.6%, specificity: 94.2%) using eight features. Future development aims at implementing a demonstrator platform to begin clinical trials at University Hospital Aachen.

  8. Significance of Urinary Full-Length Megalin in Patients with IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Rin; Nonaka, Kanae; Sasaki, Yu; Trejo, Juan Alejandro Oliva; Kurosawa, Hiroyuki; Hirayama, Yoshiaki; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Saito, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Megalin is highly expressed at the apical membranes of proximal tubular epithelial cells. A urinary full-length megalin (C-megalin) assay is linked to the severity of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes. This study examined the relationship between levels of urinary C-megalin and histological findings in adult patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements Urine samples voided in the morning on the day of renal biopsy were obtained from 73 patients with IgAN (29 men and 44 women; mean age, 33 years) and 5 patients with membranous nephropathy (MN). Renal pathologic variables were analyzed using the Oxford classification of IgAN, the Shigematsu classification and the Clinical Guidelines of IgAN in Japan. The levels of urinary C-megalin were measured by sandwich ELISA. Results Histological analysis based on the Oxford classification revealed that the levels of urinary C-megalin were correlated with mesangial hypercellularity in IgAN patients (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.04–3.27, P<0.05). There was a significant correlation between the levels of urinary C-megalin and the severity of chronic extracapillary abnormalities according to the Shigematsu classification in IgAN patients (β = 0.33, P = 0.008). The levels of urinary C-megalin were significantly higher in all risk levels of IgAN patients requiring dialysis using the Clinical Guidelines of IgAN in Japan than in the control group. The levels of urinary C-megalin were significantly higher in the high risk and very high risk grades than in the low risk grade (P<0.05). The levels of urinary C-megalin were significantly higher in MN patients compared to the control group. Conclusions The levels of urinary C-megalin are associated with histological abnormalities in adult IgAN patients. There is a possibility that urinary C-megalin is an independent predictor of disease progression of IgAN. In addition, our results suggest that urinary C-megalin is

  9. Validation of the Killip-Kimball Classification and Late Mortality after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Bruno Henrique Gallindo; Oliveira, Gustavo Bernardes F.; Ramos, Rui Fernando; Lopes, Bernardo Baptista C.; Barros, Cecília Bitarães S.; Carvalho, Erick de Oliveira; Teixeira, Fabio Bellini P.; Arruda, Guilherme D'Andréa S.; Revelo, Maria Sol Calero; Piegas, Leopoldo Soares

    2014-01-01

    Background The classification or index of heart failure severity in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was proposed by Killip and Kimball aiming at assessing the risk of in-hospital death and the potential benefit of specific management of care provided in Coronary Care Units (CCU) during the decade of 60. Objective To validate the risk stratification of Killip classification in the long-term mortality and compare the prognostic value in patients with non-ST-segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) relative to patients with ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI), in the era of reperfusion and modern antithrombotic therapies. Methods We evaluated 1906 patients with documented AMI and admitted to the CCU, from 1995 to 2011, with a mean follow-up of 05 years to assess total mortality. Kaplan-Meier (KM) curves were developed for comparison between survival distributions according to Killip class and NSTEMI versus STEMI. Cox proportional regression models were developed to determine the independent association between Killip class and mortality, with sensitivity analyses based on type of AMI. Results: The proportions of deaths and the KM survival distributions were significantly different across Killip class >1 (p <0.001) and with a similar pattern between patients with NSTEMI and STEMI. Cox models identified the Killip classification as a significant, sustained, consistent predictor and independent of relevant covariables (Wald χ2 16.5 [p = 0.001], NSTEMI) and (Wald χ2 11.9 [p = 0.008], STEMI). Conclusion The Killip and Kimball classification performs relevant prognostic role in mortality at mean follow-up of 05 years post-AMI, with a similar pattern between NSTEMI and STEMI patients. PMID:25014060

  10. Falls classification using tri-axial accelerometers during the five-times-sit-to-stand test.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; Walsh, Cathal; Foran, Timothy; Greene, Barry R; Fan, Chie Wei; Cunningham, Clodagh; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-09-01

    The five-times-sit-to-stand test (FTSS) is an established assessment of lower limb strength, balance dysfunction and falls risk. Clinically, the time taken to complete the task is recorded with longer times indicating increased falls risk. Quantifying the movement using tri-axial accelerometers may provide a more objective and potentially more accurate falls risk estimate. 39 older adults, 19 with a history of falls, performed four repetitions of the FTSS in their homes. A tri-axial accelerometer was attached to the lateral thigh and used to identify each sit-stand-sit phase and sit-stand and stand-sit transitions. A second tri-axial accelerometer, attached to the sternum, captured torso acceleration. The mean and variation of the root-mean-squared amplitude, jerk and spectral edge frequency of the acceleration during each section of the assessment were examined. The test-retest reliability of each feature was examined using intra-class correlation analysis, ICC(2,k). A model was developed to classify participants according to falls status. Only features with ICC>0.7 were considered during feature selection. Sequential forward feature selection within leave-one-out cross-validation resulted in a model including four reliable accelerometer-derived features, providing 74.4% classification accuracy, 80.0% specificity and 68.7% sensitivity. An alternative model using FTSS time alone resulted in significantly reduced classification performance. Results suggest that the described methodology could provide a robust and accurate falls risk assessment.

  11. Land Cover Classification in a Complex Urban-Rural Landscape with Quickbird Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Emilio Federico.

    2010-01-01

    High spatial resolution images have been increasingly used for urban land use/cover classification, but the high spectral variation within the same land cover, the spectral confusion among different land covers, and the shadow problem often lead to poor classification performance based on the traditional per-pixel spectral-based classification methods. This paper explores approaches to improve urban land cover classification with Quickbird imagery. Traditional per-pixel spectral-based supervised classification, incorporation of textural images and multispectral images, spectral-spatial classifier, and segmentation-based classification are examined in a relatively new developing urban landscape, Lucas do Rio Verde in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. This research shows that use of spatial information during the image classification procedure, either through the integrated use of textural and spectral images or through the use of segmentation-based classification method, can significantly improve land cover classification performance. PMID:21643433

  12. Effects of two classification strategies on a Benthic Community Index for streams in the Northern Lakes and Forests Ecoregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butcher, Jason T.; Stewart, Paul M.; Simon, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    Ninety-four sites were used to analyze the effects of two different classification strategies on the Benthic Community Index (BCI). The first, a priori classification, reflected the wetland status of the streams; the second, a posteriori classification, used a bio-environmental analysis to select classification variables. Both classifications were examined by measuring classification strength and testing differences in metric values with respect to group membership. The a priori (wetland) classification strength (83.3%) was greater than the a posteriori (bio-environmental) classification strength (76.8%). Both classifications found one metric that had significant differences between groups. The original index was modified to reflect the wetland classification by re-calibrating the scoring criteria for percent Crustacea and Mollusca. A proposed refinement to the original Benthic Community Index is suggested. This study shows the importance of using hypothesis-driven classifications, as well as exploratory statistical analysis, to evaluate alternative ways to reveal environmental variability in biological assessment tools.

  13. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Prosthesis Design Classification System.

    PubMed

    Routman, Howard D; Flurin, Pierre-Henri; Wright, Thomas W; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Hamilton, Matthew A; Roche, Christopher P

    2015-12-01

    Multiple different reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) prosthesis designs are available in the global marketplace for surgeons to perform this growing procedure. Subtle differences in rTSA prosthesis design parameters have been shown to have significant biomechanical impact and clinical consequences. We propose an rTSA prosthesis design classification system to objectively identify and categorize different designs based upon their specific glenoid and humeral prosthetic characteristics for the purpose of standardizing nomenclature that will help the orthopaedic surgeon determine which combination of design configurations best suit a given clinical scenario. The impact of each prosthesis classification type on shoulder muscle length and deltoid wrapping are also described to illustrate how each prosthesis classification type impacts these biomechanical parameters. PMID:26631189

  14. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    SciTech Connect

    Mahn, J.A.; Hannaman, G.W.; Kryska, P.

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  15. Definition and classification of negative outcomes in solid organ transplantation. Application in liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Clavien, P A; Camargo, C A; Croxford, R; Langer, B; Levy, G A; Greig, P D

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study defined negative outcomes of solid organ transplantation, proposed a new classification of complications by severity, and applied the classification to evaluate the results of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). SUMMARY AND BACKGROUND DATA: The lack of uniform reporting of negative outcomes has made reports of transplantation procedures difficult to interpret and compare. In fact, only mortality is well reported; morbidity rates and severity of complications have been poorly described. METHODS: Based on previous definition and classification of complications for general surgery, a new classification for transplantation in four grades is proposed. Results including risk factors of the first 215 OLTs performed at the University of Toronto have been evaluated using the classification. RESULTS: All but two patients (99%) had at least one complication of any kind, 92% of patients surviving more than 3 months had grade 1 (minor) complications, 74% had grade 2 (life-threatening) complications, and 30% had grade 3 (residual disability or cancer) complications. Twenty-nine per cent of patients had grade 4 complications (retransplantation or death). The most common grade 1 complications were steroid responsive rejection (69% of patients) and infection that did not require antibiotics or invasive procedures (23%). Grade 2 complications primarily were infection requiring antibiotics or invasive procedures (64%), postoperative bleeding requiring > 3 units of packed red cells (35%), primary dysfunction (26%), and biliary disease treated with antibiotics or requiring invasive procedures (18%). The most frequent grade 3 complication was renal failure, which is defined as a permanent rise in serum creatinine levels > or = twice the pretransplantation values (11%). Grade 4 complications (retransplantation or death) mainly were infection (14%) and primary dysfunction (11%). Comparison between the first and last 50 OLTs of the series indicates a significant

  16. Two-gene signature improves the discriminatory power of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification to predict the survival of patients with early-stage lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yifeng; Hou, Likun; Yang, Yu; Xie, Huikang; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhigang; Zhao, Heng; Gao, Wen; Su, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the contribution of a gene expression–based signature (composed of BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, SH3BGR) to survival prediction for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma categorized by the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/the European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. We also aimed to verify whether gene signature improves the risk discrimination of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods Total RNA was extracted from 93 patients with pathologically confirmed TNM stage Ia and Ib lung adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression levels of ten genes in the signature (BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, and SH3BGR) were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Each patient was categorized according to the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification by accessing hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides. The corresponding Kaplan–Meier survival analysis by the log-rank statistic, multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, and c-index calculation were conducted using the programming language R (Version 2.15.1) with the “risksetROC” package. Results The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the risk factor of the ten-gene expression signature can significantly improve the discriminatory value of TNM staging in survival prediction, but not the value of the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. Further analysis suggested that only BRCA1 and ERBB3 in the signature were independent risk factors after adjusting for the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification by Cox regression. A new algorithm of the two-gene expression signature containing BRCA1 and ERBB3 was generated. Adding the two-gene signature into the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification model further improved the discriminatory c-statistic from 0.728 to 0.756. Conclusion The two-gene signature composed of BRCA1 and ERBB3 was an independent

  17. A Molecular Predictor Reassesses Classification of Human Grade II/III Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Rème, Thierry; Bièche, Ivan; Rigau, Valérie; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Prévot, Vincent; Baroncini, Marc; Fontaine, Denys; Chevassus, Hugues; Vacher, Sophie; Lidereau, Rosette; Duffau, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse gliomas are incurable brain tumors divided in 3 WHO grades (II; III; IV) based on histological criteria. Grade II/III gliomas are clinically very heterogeneous and their prognosis somewhat unpredictable, preventing definition of appropriate treatment. On a cohort of 65 grade II/III glioma patients, a QPCR-based approach allowed selection of a biologically relevant gene list from which a gene signature significantly correlated to overall survival was extracted. This signature clustered the training cohort into two classes of low and high risk of progression and death, and similarly clustered two external independent test cohorts of 104 and 73 grade II/III patients. A 22-gene class predictor of the training clusters optimally distinguished poor from good prognosis patients (median survival of 13–20 months versus over 6 years) in the validation cohorts. This classification was stronger at predicting outcome than the WHO grade II/III classification (P≤2.8E-10 versus 0.018). When compared to other prognosis factors (histological subtype and genetic abnormalities) in a multivariate analysis, the 22-gene predictor remained significantly associated with overall survival. Early prediction of high risk patients (3% of WHO grade II), and low risk patients (29% of WHO grade III) in clinical routine will allow the development of more appropriate follow-up and treatments. PMID:23805239

  18. Classification SAR targets with support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lanying

    2007-02-01

    With the development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, automatic target recognition (ATR) is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we proposed a 3-class target classification system in SAR images. The system is based on invariant wavelet moments and support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. It is a two-stage approach. The first stage is to extract and select a small set of wavelet invariant moment features to indicate target images. The wavelet invariant moments take both advantages of the wavelet inherent property of multi-resolution analysis and moment invariants quality of invariant to translation, scaling changes and rotation. The second stage is classification of targets with SVM algorithm. SVM is based on the principle of structural risk minimization (SRM), which has been shown better than the principle of empirical risk minimization (ERM) which is used by many conventional networks. To test the performance and efficiency of the proposed method, we performed experiments on invariant wavelet moments, different kernel functions, 2-class identification, and 3-class identification. Test results show that wavelet invariant moments indicate the target effectively; linear kernel function achieves better results than other kernel functions, and SVM classification approach performs better than conventional nearest distance approach.

  19. Year 2000 Computing Crisis: Significant Risks Remain to Department of Education's Student Financial Aid Systems. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willemssen, Joel C.

    This testimony discusses the risks faced by the U.S. Department of Education due to the year 2000 (Y2K) computing crisis, focusing on student financial aid systems, the actions the Department has taken in recent months to address these risks, and the key issues the Department must deal with if its computer systems are to be ready for the century…

  20. Automated Defect Classification (ADC)

    1998-01-01

    The ADC Software System is designed to provide semiconductor defect feature analysis and defect classification capabilities. Defect classification is an important software method used by semiconductor wafer manufacturers to automate the analysis of defect data collected by a wide range of microscopy techniques in semiconductor wafer manufacturing today. These microscopies (e.g., optical bright and dark field, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.) generate images of anomalies that are induced or otherwise appear on wafermore » surfaces as a result of errant manufacturing processes or simple atmospheric contamination (e.g., airborne particles). This software provides methods for analyzing these images, extracting statistical features from the anomalous regions, and applying supervised classifiers to label the anomalies into user-defined categories.« less

  1. The classification of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. K.; Eaton, N.; Green, S. F.; McCheyne, R. S.; Meadows, A. J.

    A numerical taxonomy of asteroids is proposed and illustrated for a sample of 82 well-characterized asteroids in the TRIAD file described by Zellner (1979). The growth of different classification schemes, reflecting the rapid increase in knowledge of the physical and orbital properties of asteroids, is traced since about 1970. The proposed system is adapted from a microbiological taxonomy program and uses only physical parameters: albedo, red/blue ratio, visible-spectrum curvature, Fe(2+) absorption near 0.9 microns, U-B, and B-V. A dendrogram is presented and interpreted, and the scheme is found to agree reasonably well with conventional classifications, to allow the incorporation of new kinds of data, and to facilitate the identification of objects with particular charcteristics to plan future observations.

  2. Tree Classification Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the IND Tree Package to prospective users. IND does supervised learning using classification trees. This learning task is a basic tool used in the development of diagnosis, monitoring and expert systems. The IND Tree Package was developed as part of a NASA project to semi-automate the development of data analysis and modelling algorithms using artificial intelligence techniques. The IND Tree Package integrates features from CART and C4 with newer Bayesian and minimum encoding methods for growing classification trees and graphs. The IND Tree Package also provides an experimental control suite on top. The newer features give improved probability estimates often required in diagnostic and screening tasks. The package comes with a manual, Unix 'man' entries, and a guide to tree methods and research. The IND Tree Package is implemented in C under Unix and was beta-tested at university and commercial research laboratories in the United States.

  3. Automated Defect Classification (ADC)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The ADC Software System is designed to provide semiconductor defect feature analysis and defect classification capabilities. Defect classification is an important software method used by semiconductor wafer manufacturers to automate the analysis of defect data collected by a wide range of microscopy techniques in semiconductor wafer manufacturing today. These microscopies (e.g., optical bright and dark field, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.) generate images of anomalies that are induced or otherwise appear on wafer surfaces as a result of errant manufacturing processes or simple atmospheric contamination (e.g., airborne particles). This software provides methods for analyzing these images, extracting statistical features from the anomalous regions, and applying supervised classifiers to label the anomalies into user-defined categories.

  4. SLC classification: an update.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, A; Yee, S W; Sali, A; Giacomini, K M

    2013-07-01

    The 386 human SLC superfamily members are diverse in sequence, structure, and function. Using sequence similarity, we previously classified the SLC superfamily members and identified relationships among families. With the recent determination of new SLC structures and identification of previously unknown human SLC families, an update of our previous classification is timely. Here, we comprehensively compare the SLC sequences and structures and discuss the applicability of structure-based ligand discovery to key SLC members.

  5. Granular loess classification based

    SciTech Connect

    Browzin, B.S.

    1985-05-01

    This paper discusses how loess might be identified by two index properties: the granulometric composition and the dry unit weight. These two indices are necessary but not always sufficient for identification of loess. On the basis of analyses of samples from three continents, it was concluded that the 0.01-0.5-mm fraction deserves the name loessial fraction. Based on the loessial fraction concept, a granulometric classification of loess is proposed. A triangular chart is used to classify loess.

  6. Evaluation of gene expression classification studies: factors associated with classification performance.

    PubMed

    Novianti, Putri W; Roes, Kit C B; Eijkemans, Marinus J C

    2014-01-01

    Classification methods used in microarray studies for gene expression are diverse in the way they deal with the underlying complexity of the data, as well as in the technique used to build the classification model. The MAQC II study on cancer classification problems has found that performance was affected by factors such as the classification algorithm, cross validation method, number of genes, and gene selection method. In this paper, we study the hypothesis that the disease under study significantly determines which method is optimal, and that additionally sample size, class imbalance, type of medical question (diagnostic, prognostic or treatment response), and microarray platform are potentially influential. A systematic literature review was used to extract the information from 48 published articles on non-cancer microarray classification studies. The impact of the various factors on the reported classification accuracy was analyzed through random-intercept logistic regression. The type of medical question and method of cross validation dominated the explained variation in accuracy among studies, followed by disease category and microarray platform. In total, 42% of the between study variation was explained by all the study specific and problem specific factors that we studied together.

  7. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  8. Classification of mental disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, E.

    1959-01-01

    One of the fundamental difficulties in devising a classification of mental disorders is the lack of agreement among psychiatrists regarding the concepts upon which it should be based: diagnoses can rarely be verified objectively and the same or similar conditions are described under a confusing variety of names. This situation militates against the ready exchange of ideas and experiences and hampers progress. As a first step towards remedying this state of affairs, the author of the article below has undertaken a critical survey of existing classifications. He shows how some of the difficulties created by lack of knowledge regarding pathology and etiology may be overcome by the use of “operational definitions” and outlines the basic principles on which he believes a generally acceptable international classification might be constructed. If this can be done it should lead to a greater measure of agreement regarding the value of specific treatments for mental disorders and greatly facilitate a broad epidemiological approach to psychiatric research. PMID:13834299

  9. Neuromuscular disease classification system.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns. PMID:23804164

  10. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid U.; Jarpe, Stephen P.; Maurer, William

    1994-01-01

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  11. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  12. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  13. Classification images predict absolute efficiency.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard F; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2005-02-24

    How well do classification images characterize human observers' strategies in perceptual tasks? We show mathematically that from the classification image of a noisy linear observer, it is possible to recover the observer's absolute efficiency. If we could similarly predict human observers' performance from their classification images, this would suggest that the linear model that underlies use of the classification image method is adequate over the small range of stimuli typically encountered in a classification image experiment, and that a classification image captures most important aspects of human observers' performance over this range. In a contrast discrimination task and in a shape discrimination task, we found that observers' absolute efficiencies were generally well predicted by their classification images, although consistently slightly (approximately 13%) higher than predicted. We consider whether a number of plausible nonlinearities can account for the slight under prediction, and of these we find that only a form of phase uncertainty can account for the discrepancy.

  14. p63 expression confers significantly better survival outcomes in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates p53-like and p53-independent tumor suppressor function

    PubMed Central

    Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Wang, Xiao-xiao; Xia, Yi; Visco, Carlo; Tzankov, Alexandar; Zhang, Li; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Dybkaer, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L.; Hsi, Eric D.; Choi, William W.L.; van Krieken, J. Han; Huh, Jooryung; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J.M.; Zhao, Xiaoying; Møller, Michael B.; Parsons, Ben M.; Winter, Jane N.; Piris, Miguel A.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Young, Ken H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of p53 family member, p63 in oncogenesis is the subject of controversy. Limited research has been done on the clinical implications of p63 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In this study, we assessed p63 expression in de novo DLBCL samples (n=795) by immunohistochemistry with a pan-p63-monoclonal antibody and correlated it with other clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. p63 expression was observed in 42.5% of DLBCL, did not correlate with p53 levels, but correlated with p21, MDM2, p16INK4A, Ki-67, Bcl-6, IRF4/MUM-1 and CD30 expression, REL gains, and BCL6 translocation. p63 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in DLBCL, which was most significant in patients with International Prognostic Index (IPI) >2, and in activated-B-cell–like DLBCL patients with wide-type TP53. The prognostic impact in germinal-center-B-cell–like DLBCL was not apparent, which was likely due to the association of p63 expression with high-risk IPI, and potential presence of ∆Np63 isoform in TP63 rearranged patients (a mere speculation). Gene expression profiling suggested that p63 has both overlapping and distinct functions compared with p53, and that p63 and mutated p53 antagonize each other. In summary, p63 has p53-like and p53-independent functions and favorable prognostic impact, however this protective effect can be abolished by TP53 mutations. PMID:26878872

  15. p63 expression confers significantly better survival outcomes in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates p53-like and p53-independent tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Zhang, Shanxiang; Li, Xin; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Xia, Yi; Visco, Carlo; Tzankov, Alexandar; Zhang, Li; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Dybkaer, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L; Hsi, Eric D; Choi, William W L; van Krieken, J Han; Huh, Jooryung; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Zhao, Xiaoying; Møller, Michael B; Parsons, Ben M; Winter, Jane N; Piris, Miguel A; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Young, Ken H

    2016-02-01

    The role of p53 family member p63 in oncogenesis is the subject of controversy. Limited research has been done on the clinical implications of p63 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In this study, we assessed p63 expression in de novo DLBCL samples (n=795) by immunohistochemistry with a pan-p63-monoclonal antibody and correlated it with other clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. p63 expression was observed in 42.5% of DLBCL, did not correlate with p53 levels, but correlated with p21, MDM2, p16INK4A, Ki-67, Bcl-6, IRF4/MUM-1 and CD30 expression, REL gains, and BCL6 translocation. p63 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in DLBCL, which was most significant in patients with International Prognostic Index (IPI) >2, and in activated-B-cell-like DLBCL patients with wide- type TP53. The prognostic impact in germinal-center-B-cell-like DLBCL was not apparent, which was likely due to the association of p63 expression with high-risk IPI, and potential presence of ∆Np63 isoform in TP63 rearranged patients (a mere speculation). Gene expression profiling suggested that p63 has both overlapping and distinct functions compared with p53, and that p63 and mutated p53 antagonize each other. In summary, p63 has p53-like and p53-independent functions and favorable prognostic impact, however this protective effect can be abolished by TP53 mutations. PMID:26878872

  16. [Risk Assessment and Risk Management of Chemicals in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tie-yu; Zhou, Yun-qiao; Li, Qi-feng; Lü, Yong-long

    2016-02-15

    Risk assessment and risk management have been increasingly approved as an effective approach for appropriate disposal and scientific management of chemicals. This study systematically analyzed the risk assessment methods of chemicals from three aspects including health risk, ecological risk and regional risk. Based on the current situation of classification and management towards chemicals in China, a specific framework of risk management on chemicals was proposed by selecting target chemicals, predominant industries and related stakeholders as the objects. The results of the present study will provide scientific support for improving risk assessment and reasonable management of chemicals in China. PMID:27363124

  17. Webcam classification using simple features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramoun, Thitiporn; Choe, Jeehyun; Li, He; Chen, Qingshuang; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat; Lu, Yung-Hsiang; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Thousands of sensors are connected to the Internet and many of these sensors are cameras. The "Internet of Things" will contain many "things" that are image sensors. This vast network of distributed cameras (i.e. web cams) will continue to exponentially grow. In this paper we examine simple methods to classify an image from a web cam as "indoor/outdoor" and having "people/no people" based on simple features. We use four types of image features to classify an image as indoor/outdoor: color, edge, line, and text. To classify an image as having people/no people we use HOG and texture features. The features are weighted based on their significance and combined. A support vector machine is used for classification. Our system with feature weighting and feature combination yields 95.5% accuracy.

  18. AVHRR channel selection for land cover classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, S.K.; Hoffer, R.M.; Chapman, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Mapping land cover of large regions often requires processing of satellite images collected from several time periods at many spectral wavelength channels. However, manipulating and processing large amounts of image data increases the complexity and time, and hence the cost, that it takes to produce a land cover map. Very few studies have evaluated the importance of individual Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels for discriminating cover types, especially the thermal channels (channels 3, 4 and 5). Studies rarely perform a multi-year analysis to determine the impact of inter-annual variability on the classification results. We evaluated 5 years of AVHRR data using combinations of the original AVHRR spectral channels (1-5) to determine which channels are most important for cover type discrimination, yet stabilize inter-annual variability. Particular attention was placed on the channels in the thermal portion of the spectrum. Fourteen cover types over the entire state of Colorado were evaluated using a supervised classification approach on all two-, three-, four- and five-channel combinations for seven AVHRR biweekly composite datasets covering the entire growing season for each of 5 years. Results show that all three of the major portions of the electromagnetic spectrum represented by the AVHRR sensor are required to discriminate cover types effectively and stabilize inter-annual variability. Of the two-channel combinations, channels 1 (red visible) and 2 (near-infrared) had, by far, the highest average overall accuracy (72.2%), yet the inter-annual classification accuracies were highly variable. Including a thermal channel (channel 4) significantly increased the average overall classification accuracy by 5.5% and stabilized inter-annual variability. Each of the thermal channels gave similar classification accuracies; however, because of the problems in consistently interpreting channel 3 data, either channel 4 or 5 was found to be a more

  19. Remote Sensing Classification Uncertainty: Validating Probabilistic Pixel Level Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, Michail; Cornford, Dan; Bastin, Lucy; Pons, Xavier; Sevillano, Eva; Moré, Gerard; Serra, Pere; Ninyerola, Miquel

    2013-04-01

    There already exists an extensive literature on classification of remotely sensed imagery, and indeed classification more widely, that considers a wide range of probabilistic and non-probabilistic classification methodologies. Although for many probabilistic classification methodologies posterior class probabilities are produced per pixel (observation) these are often not communicated at the pixel level, and typically not validated at the pixel level. Most often the probabilistic classification in converted into a hard classification (of the most probable class) and the accuracy of the resulting classification is reported in terms of a global confusion matrix, or some score derived from this. For applications where classification accuracy is spatially variable and where pixel level estimates of uncertainty can be meaningfully exploited in workflows that propagate uncertainty validating and communicating the pixel level uncertainty opens opportunities for more refined and accountable modelling. In this work we describe our recent work applying and validation of a range of probabilistic classifiers. Using a multi-temporal Landsat data set of the Ebro Delta in Catalonia, which has been carefully radiometrically and geometrically corrected, we present a range of Bayesian classifiers from simple Bayesian linear discriminant analysis to a complex variational Gaussian process based classifier. Field study derived labelled data, classified into 8 classes, which primarily consider land use and the degree of flooding in what is a rice growing region, are used to train the pixel level classifiers. Our focus is not so much on the classification accuracy, but rather the validation of the probabilistic classification made by all methods. We present a range of validation plots and scores, many of which are used for probabilistic weather forecast verification, but are new to remote sensing classification including of course the standard measures of misclassification, but also

  20. Learning classification trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray

    1991-01-01

    Algorithms for learning classification trees have had successes in artificial intelligence and statistics over many years. How a tree learning algorithm can be derived from Bayesian decision theory is outlined. This introduces Bayesian techniques for splitting, smoothing, and tree averaging. The splitting rule turns out to be similar to Quinlan's information gain splitting rule, while smoothing and averaging replace pruning. Comparative experiments with reimplementations of a minimum encoding approach, Quinlan's C4 and Breiman et al. Cart show the full Bayesian algorithm is consistently as good, or more accurate than these other approaches though at a computational price.

  1. Interactive Classification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBessonet, Cary

    2000-01-01

    The investigators upgraded a knowledge representation language called SL (Symbolic Language) and an automated reasoning system called SMS (Symbolic Manipulation System) to enable the more effective use of the technologies in automated reasoning and interactive classification systems. The overall goals of the project were: 1) the enhancement of the representation language SL to accommodate a wider range of meaning; 2) the development of a default inference scheme to operate over SL notation as it is encoded; and 3) the development of an interpreter for SL that would handle representations of some basic cognitive acts and perspectives.

  2. Classification of airborne laser scanning data using JointBoost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Huang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Fan; Sohn, Gunho

    2015-02-01

    The demands for automatic point cloud classification have dramatically increased with the wide-spread use of airborne LiDAR. Existing research has mainly concentrated on a few dominant objects such as terrain, buildings and vegetation. In addition to those key objects, this paper proposes a supervised classification method to identify other types of objects including power-lines and pylons from point clouds using a JointBoost classifier. The parameters for the learning model are estimated with various features computed based on the geometry and echo information of a LiDAR point cloud. In order to overcome the shortcomings stemming from the inclusion of bare ground data before classification, the proposed classifier directly distinguishes terrain using a feature step-off count. Feature selection is conducted using JointBoost to evaluate feature correlations thus improving both classification accuracy and operational efficiency. In this paper, the contextual constraints for objects extracted by graph-cut segmentation are used to optimize the initial classification results obtained by the JointBoost classifier. Our experimental results show that the step-off count significantly contributes to classification. Seventeen effective features are selected for the initial classification results using the JointBoost classifier. Our experiments indicate that the proposed features and method are effective for classification of airborne LiDAR data from complex scenarios.

  3. Geographical classifications to guide rural health policy in Australia.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Matthew R; Humphreys, John S

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government's recent decision to replace the Rural Remote and Metropolitan Area (RRMA) classification with the Australian Standard Geographical Classification - Remoteness Areas (ASGC-RA) system highlights the ongoing significance of geographical classifications for rural health policy, particularly in relation to improving the rural health workforce supply. None of the existing classifications, including the government's preferred choice, were designed specifically to guide health resource allocation, and all exhibit strong weaknesses when applied as such. Continuing reliance on these classifications as policy tools will continue to result in inappropriate health program resource distribution. Purely 'geographical' classifications alone cannot capture all relevant aspects of rural health service provision within a single measure. Moreover, because many subjective decisions (such as the choice of algorithm and breakdown of groupings) influence a classification's impact and acceptance from its users, policy-makers need to specify explicitly the purpose and role of their different programs as the basis for developing and implementing appropriate decision tools such as 'rural-urban' classifications. Failure to do so will continue to limit the effectiveness that current rural health support and incentive programs can have in achieving their objective of improving the provision of health care services to rural populations though affirmative action programs. PMID:19995449

  4. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  5. Mimicking human texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rikxoort, Eva M.; van den Broek, Egon L.; Schouten, Theo E.

    2005-03-01

    In an attempt to mimic human (colorful) texture classification by a clustering algorithm three lines of research have been encountered, in which as test set 180 texture images (both their color and gray-scale equivalent) were drawn from the OuTex and VisTex databases. First, a k-means algorithm was applied with three feature vectors, based on color/gray values, four texture features, and their combination. Second, 18 participants clustered the images using a newly developed card sorting program. The mutual agreement between the participants was 57% and 56% and between the algorithm and the participants it was 47% and 45%, for respectively color and gray-scale texture images. Third, in a benchmark, 30 participants judged the algorithms' clusters with gray-scale textures as more homogeneous then those with colored textures. However, a high interpersonal variability was present for both the color and the gray-scale clusters. So, despite the promising results, it is questionable whether average human texture classification can be mimicked (if it exists at all).

  6. Classification of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Paulino, Thiago Marques Luz; Zaharieva, Dessi P.; Yavelberg, Loren; Jamnik, Veronica; Riddell, Michael C.; Cinar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has a wide range of effects on glucose concentrations in type 1 diabetes (T1D) depending on the type (ie, aerobic, anaerobic, mixed) and duration of activity performed. This variability in glucose responses to physical activity makes the development of artificial pancreas (AP) systems challenging. Automatic detection of exercise type and intensity, and its classification as aerobic or anaerobic would provide valuable information to AP control algorithms. This can be achieved by using a multivariable AP approach where biometric variables are measured and reported to the AP at high frequency. We developed a classification system that identifies, in real time, the exercise intensity and its reliance on aerobic or anaerobic metabolism and tested this approach using clinical data collected from 5 persons with T1D and 3 individuals without T1D in a controlled laboratory setting using a variety of common types of physical activity. The classifier had an average sensitivity of 98.7% for physiological data collected over a range of exercise modalities and intensities in these subjects. The classifier will be added as a new module to the integrated multivariable adaptive AP system to enable the detection of aerobic and anaerobic exercise for enhancing the accuracy of insulin infusion strategies during and after exercise. PMID:26443291

  7. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients. PMID:26948350

  8. A Stellar Classification Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattner, S. M.; Glaspey, J.

    2005-12-01

    With the multitude of stellar objects in the sky, we have investigated development of an automated spectral classification system within IRAF to assist in the analysis of small to moderate sized spectroscopic datasets. Using data mining, we extracted 108 standard, sharp-lined B, A, and F stars from the NOAO Digital Library, and measured equivalent widths for 65 prominent lines in the 3000-7000 Angstrom range. Spectral type versus equivalent width intensity was plotted in order to retrieve the lines that demonstrated a clear relationship. For each of the 29 spectral features exhibiting a good correlation between spectral type and line strength, we could fit the data with a polynomial of order three to five. These polynomial fits were then used to predict the spectral types for a separate sample of objects from the NOAO Digital Library. From the comparison of the second data set with the first, we found that several lines could be used for an automated classification system, allowing us good reason to believe that such a system can eventually be established. Kattner's research was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation through Scientific Program Order No. 3 (AST-0243875) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

  9. PSC: protein surface classification.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-07-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25,857 functional surfaces identified from 24,170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided.

  10. Medulloblastoma: molecular pathways and histopathological classification

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death among pediatric patients, and medulloblastoma constitutes 20% of them. Currently, the treatment is risk-adapted. Maximum surgical resection is recommended, always followed by chemotherapy and neuroaxis radiotherapy. In spite of the improving survival rate, survivors succumb to treatment-induced side effects. To reduce toxic effects, molecular-targeted treatment is proposed. Medulloblastoma research is very robust, and new articles on the subject are published daily. In the current review we have tried to bring together molecular pathophysiology of the neoplasm and current pathological classification, thus making an effort to relate tumor biology and the histological picture. PMID:27279861

  11. Insomnia: I. Classification, assessment and pharmaceutical treatment.

    PubMed

    Cleghorn, J M; Kaplan, R D; Bellissimo, A; Szatmari, P

    1983-08-01

    Insomnia is a public health problem because of its high prevalence, the risk of hypnotic drug abuse, and self medication combined with alcohol and other nonprescription chemicals. Clinical experience has given rise to a descriptive classification of the insomnias many of which are secondary to medical disease. The information now available allows us to suggest a systematic approach to the assessment of insomnia emphasizing its history, events associated with sleep onset, observable behaviour and experience associated with interruptions in sleep. This paper attempts to organize the present state of knowledge in a format that can be taught to general physicians who deal with the most insomnia patients. PMID:6627189

  12. Medulloblastoma: molecular pathways and histopathological classification.

    PubMed

    Borowska, Anna; Jóźwiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death among pediatric patients, and medulloblastoma constitutes 20% of them. Currently, the treatment is risk-adapted. Maximum surgical resection is recommended, always followed by chemotherapy and neuroaxis radiotherapy. In spite of the improving survival rate, survivors succumb to treatment-induced side effects. To reduce toxic effects, molecular-targeted treatment is proposed. Medulloblastoma research is very robust, and new articles on the subject are published daily. In the current review we have tried to bring together molecular pathophysiology of the neoplasm and current pathological classification, thus making an effort to relate tumor biology and the histological picture. PMID:27279861

  13. Deep Reconstruction Models for Image Set Classification.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Munawar; Bennamoun, Mohammed; An, Senjian

    2015-04-01

    Image set classification finds its applications in a number of real-life scenarios such as classification from surveillance videos, multi-view camera networks and personal albums. Compared with single image based classification, it offers more promises and has therefore attracted significant research attention in recent years. Unlike many existing methods which assume images of a set to lie on a certain geometric surface, this paper introduces a deep learning framework which makes no such prior assumptions and can automatically discover the underlying geometric structure. Specifically, a Template Deep Reconstruction Model (TDRM) is defined whose parameters are initialized by performing unsupervised pre-training in a layer-wise fashion using Gaussian Restricted Boltzmann Machines (GRBMs). The initialized TDRM is then separately trained for images of each class and class-specific DRMs are learnt. Based on the minimum reconstruction errors from the learnt class-specific models, three different voting strategies are devised for classification. Extensive experiments are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed framework for the tasks of face and object recognition from image sets. Experimental results show that the proposed method consistently outperforms the existing state of the art methods. PMID:26353289

  14. Lightcurve Based Classification Of Transients Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donalek, Ciro; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Moghaddam, B.; Turmon, M.; Chen, Y.; Sharma, N.

    2012-01-01

    In many scientific fields, a new generation of instruments is generating exponentially growing data streams, that may enable significant new discoveries. The requirement to perform the analysis rapidly and objectively, coupled with the huge amount of data available, implies a need for an automated event detection, classification, and decision making. In astronomy, this is the case with the new generation of synoptic sky surveys, that discover an ever increasing number of transient events. However, not all of them are equally interesting and worthy of a follow-up with limited resources. This presents some unusual classification challenges: the data are sparse, heterogeneous and incomplete; evolving in time; and most of the relevant information comes from a variety of archival data and contextual information. We are exploring a variety of machine learning techniques, using the ongoing CRTS sky survey as a testbed: Bayesian Network, [dm,dt] histograms, Decision Trees, Neural Networks, Symbolic Regression. In this work we focus on the lightcurve based classification using an hierarchical approach where some astrophysically motivated major features are used to separate different groups of classes. Proceeding down the classification hierarchy every node uses those classifiers that are demonstrated to work best for that particular task.

  15. 78 FR 54970 - Cotton Futures Classification: Optional Classification Procedure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... process in March 2012 (77 FR 5379). When verified by a futures classification, Smith-Doxey data serves as...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 27 RIN 0581-AD33 Cotton Futures... for the addition of an optional cotton futures classification procedure--identified and known...

  16. 78 FR 68983 - Cotton Futures Classification: Optional Classification Procedure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ...-Doxey data into the cotton futures classification process in March 2012 (77 FR 5379). When verified by a... October 9, 2013 (78 FR 54970). AMS received two comments: one from a national trade organization... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 27 RIN 0581-AD33 Cotton Futures Classification:...

  17. Expanding the definition and classification of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Giles, Thomas D; Berk, Bradford C; Black, Henry R; Cohn, Jay N; Kostis, John B; Izzo, Joseph L; Weber, Michael A

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities are frequently the cause, as well as the effect, of elevated blood pressure. As such, early cardiovascular disease (CVD) may be established before identifiable blood pressure thresholds are crossed. To identify individuals at risk for CVD at an earlier point in the disease process, as well as to avoid labeling persons as hypertensive who are at low risk for CVD, the Hypertension Writing Group proposes incorporating the presence or absence of cardiovascular risk factors, early disease markers, and target organ damage into the definition and classification scheme of hypertension. To describe both the complexity and progressive nature of hypertension, the following definition is proposed: "Hypertension is a progressive cardiovascular syndrome arising from complex and interrelated etiologies. Early markers of the syndrome are often present before blood pressure elevation is observed; therefore, hypertension cannot be classified solely by discrete blood pressure thresholds. Progression is strongly associated with functional and structural cardiac and vascular abnormalities that damage the heart, kidneys, brain, vasculature, and other organs and lead to premature morbidity and death." Classification of hypertension must involve assessing global cardiovascular risk to situate an individual's risk for CVD and events along a continuum. As knowledge of early CVD continues to evolve, the approach to classifying individuals along that continuum can be expected to evolve accordingly. The four categories currently used to classify hypertension are normal, prehypertension, and stages 1 and 2 hypertension. The population identified with prehypertension includes a subgroup with early CVD. We believe it would be preferable to classify all individuals as either normal or hypertensive, based on their cardiovascular evaluation, using the four categories of normal and stages 1, 2, and 3 hypertension.

  18. [Nosological classification and assessment of muscle dysmorphia].

    PubMed

    Babusa, Bernadett; Túry, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    Muscle dysmorphia is a recently described psychiatric disorder, characterized by a pathological preoccupation with muscle size. In spite of their huge muscles, muscle dysmorphia sufferers believe that they are insufficiently large and muscular therefore would like to be bigger and more muscular. Male bodybuilders are at high-risk for the disorder. The nosological classification of muscle dysmorphia has been changed over the years. However, consensus has not emerged so far. Most of the ongoing debate has conceptualized muscle dysmorphia as an eating disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and body dysmorphic disorder. There are a number of arguments for and againts. In the present study the authors do not take a position on the diagnostic classification of muscle dysmorphia. The purpose of the study is to review the present approaches relating to the diagnostic classification of muscle dysmporphia. Many different questionnaires were developed for the assessment of muscle dysmorphia. Currently, there is a lack of assessment methods measuring muscle dysmorphia symptoms in Hungary. As a secondary purpose the study also presents the Hungarian version of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (Mayville et al., 2002). PMID:21799218

  19. Considerations of Unmanned Aircraft Classification for Civil Airworthiness Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Morris, A. Terry; Verstynen, Harry A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft in the National Airspace System (NAS) has been characterized as the next great step forward in the evolution of civil aviation. Although use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in military and public service operations is proliferating, civil use of UAS remains limited in the United States today. This report focuses on one particular regulatory challenge: classifying UAS to assign airworthiness standards. Classification is useful for ensuring that meaningful differences in design are accommodated by certification to different standards, and that aircraft with similar risk profiles are held to similar standards. This paper provides observations related to how the current regulations for classifying manned aircraft, based on dimensions of aircraft class and operational aircraft categories, could apply to UAS. This report finds that existing aircraft classes are well aligned with the types of UAS that currently exist; however, the operational categories are more difficult to align to proposed UAS use in the NAS. Specifically, the factors used to group manned aircraft into similar risk profiles do not necessarily capture all relevant UAS risks. UAS classification is investigated through gathering approaches to classification from a broad spectrum of organizations, and then identifying and evaluating the classification factors from these approaches. This initial investigation concludes that factors in addition to those currently used today to group manned aircraft for the purpose of assigning airworthiness standards will be needed to adequately capture risks associated with UAS and their operations.

  20. [The trocar hernia after laparoscopic operative interventions. classification, treatment, prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Nychytaĭlo, M Iu; Bulyk, I I; Zahriĭchuk, M S; Korytko, I P; Homan, A V

    2014-11-01

    Own experience of treatment of patients, suffering trocar hernias, occurred after laparoscopic operative interventions, was analyzed. Classification of trocar hernias was proposed, the main factors of risk and prognostic criteria of a trocar hernias formation were analyzed. The main methods of the trocar hernias correction are adduced.

  1. Classification in Astronomy: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Astronomers have always classified celestial objects. The ancient Greeks distinguished between asteros, the fixed stars, and planetos, the roving stars. The latter were associated with the Gods and, starting with Plato in his dialog Timaeus, provided the first mathematical models of celestial phenomena. Giovanni Hodierna classified nebulous objects, seen with a Galilean refractor telescope in the mid-seventeenth century into three classes: "Luminosae," "Nebulosae," and "Occultae." A century later, Charles Messier compiled a larger list of nebulae, star clusters and galaxies, but did not attempt a classification. Classification of comets was a significant enterprise in the 19th century: Alexander (1850) considered two groups based on orbit sizes, Lardner (1853) proposed three groups of orbits, and Barnard (1891) divided them into two classes based on morphology. Aside from the segmentation of the bright stars into constellations, most stellar classifications were based on colors and spectral properties. During the 1860s, the pioneering spectroscopist Angelo Secchi classified stars into five classes: white, yellow, orange, carbon stars, and emission line stars. After many debates, the stellar spectral sequence was refined by the group at Harvard into the familiar OBAFGKM spectral types, later found to be a sequence on surface temperature (Cannon 1926). The spectral classification is still being extended with recent additions of O2 hot stars (Walborn et al. 2002) and L and T brown dwarfs (Kirkpatrick 2005). Townley (1913) reviews 30 years of variable star classification, emerging with six classes with five subclasses. The modern classification of variable stars has about 80 (sub)classes, and is still under debate (Samus 2009). Shortly after his confirmation that some nebulae are external galaxies, Edwin Hubble (1926) proposed his famous bifurcated classification of galaxy morphologies with three classes: ellipticals, spirals, and irregulars. These classes are still

  2. ANALYSIS OF A CLASSIFICATION ERROR MATRIX USING CATEGORICAL DATA TECHNIQUES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, George H.; Fitzpatrick-Lins, Katherine

    1984-01-01

    Summary form only given. A classification error matrix typically contains tabulation results of an accuracy evaluation of a thematic classification, such as that of a land use and land cover map. The diagonal elements of the matrix represent the counts corrected, and the usual designation of classification accuracy has been the total percent correct. The nondiagonal elements of the matrix have usually been neglected. The classification error matrix is known in statistical terms as a contingency table of categorical data. As an example, an application of these methodologies to a problem of remotely sensed data concerning two photointerpreters and four categories of classification indicated that there is no significant difference in the interpretation between the two photointerpreters, and that there are significant differences among the interpreted category classifications. However, two categories, oak and cottonwood, are not separable in classification in this experiment at the 0. 51 percent probability. A coefficient of agreement is determined for the interpreted map as a whole, and individually for each of the interpreted categories. A conditional coefficient of agreement for the individual categories is compared to other methods for expressing category accuracy which have already been presented in the remote sensing literature.

  3. Genome-wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis-regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rodrigo R R; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P; Murray, Robin M; Bray, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32-q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele-specific expression to assess cis-regulatory effects associated with the two best-supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis-effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genome‐wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis‐regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Rodrigo R. R.; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P.; Murray, Robin M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32‐q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele‐specific expression to assess cis‐regulatory effects associated with the two best‐supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis‐effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  5. 32 CFR 2001.14 - Classification challenges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classification challenges. 2001.14 Section 2001... Classification § 2001.14 Classification challenges. (a) Challenging classification. Authorized holders, including authorized holders outside the classifying agency, who want to challenge the classification status...

  6. 43 CFR 2461.1 - Proposed classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Proposed classifications. 2461.1 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) BUREAU INITIATED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Multiple-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.1 Proposed classifications. (a) Proposed classifications...

  7. 22 CFR 9.4 - Original classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Original classification. 9.4 Section 9.4... classification. (a) Definition. Original classification is the initial determination that certain information... classification. (b) Classification levels. (1) Top Secret shall be applied to information the...

  8. 43 CFR 2461.4 - Changing classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Changing classifications. 2461.4 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) BUREAU INITIATED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Multiple-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.4 Changing classifications. Classifications may be...

  9. 7 CFR 27.34 - Classification procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Classification procedure. 27.34 Section 27.34... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Classification and Micronaire Determinations § 27.34 Classification procedure. Classification shall proceed as rapidly as possible, but...

  10. 43 CFR 2461.1 - Proposed classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Proposed classifications. 2461.1 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) BUREAU INITIATED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Multiple-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.1 Proposed classifications. (a) Proposed classifications...

  11. 43 CFR 2461.4 - Changing classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Changing classifications. 2461.4 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) BUREAU INITIATED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Multiple-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.4 Changing classifications. Classifications may be...

  12. 7 CFR 27.34 - Classification procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classification procedure. 27.34 Section 27.34... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Classification and Micronaire Determinations § 27.34 Classification procedure. Classification shall proceed as rapidly as possible, but...

  13. 43 CFR 2461.1 - Proposed classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Proposed classifications. 2461.1 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) BUREAU INITIATED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Multiple-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.1 Proposed classifications. (a) Proposed classifications...

  14. 22 CFR 9.6 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CFR 2001.22. (c) Department of State Classification Guide. The Department of State Classification... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Derivative classification. 9.6 Section 9.6... classification. (a) Definition. Derivative classification is the incorporating, paraphrasing, restating...

  15. 22 CFR 9.4 - Original classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Original classification. 9.4 Section 9.4... classification. (a) Definition. Original classification is the initial determination that certain information... classification. (b) Classification levels. (1) Top Secret shall be applied to information the...

  16. 22 CFR 9.6 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CFR 2001.22. (c) Department of State Classification Guide. The Department of State Classification... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Derivative classification. 9.6 Section 9.6... classification. (a) Definition. Derivative classification is the incorporating, paraphrasing, restating...

  17. 32 CFR 2001.14 - Classification challenges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classification challenges. 2001.14 Section 2001... Classification § 2001.14 Classification challenges. (a) Challenging classification. Authorized holders, including authorized holders outside the classifying agency, who want to challenge the classification status...

  18. 22 CFR 9.6 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CFR 2001.22. (c) Department of State Classification Guide. The Department of State Classification... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Derivative classification. 9.6 Section 9.6... classification. (a) Definition. Derivative classification is the incorporating, paraphrasing, restating...

  19. 22 CFR 9.4 - Original classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Original classification. 9.4 Section 9.4... classification. (a) Definition. Original classification is the initial determination that certain information... classification. (b) Classification levels. (1) Top Secret shall be applied to information the...

  20. 7 CFR 27.34 - Classification procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classification procedure. 27.34 Section 27.34... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Classification and Micronaire Determinations § 27.34 Classification procedure. Classification shall proceed as rapidly as possible, but...

  1. 5 CFR 9701.221 - Classification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Classification requirements. 9701.221... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Process § 9701.221 Classification.... (d) Classification decisions become effective on the date designated by the authorized...

  2. 43 CFR 2461.4 - Changing classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Changing classifications. 2461.4 Section... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) BUREAU INITIATED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Multiple-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.4 Changing classifications. Classifications may be...

  3. 7 CFR 27.34 - Classification procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Classification procedure. 27.34 Section 27.34... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Classification and Micronaire Determinations § 27.34 Classification procedure. Classification shall proceed as rapidly as possible, but...

  4. 32 CFR 2001.14 - Classification challenges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classification challenges. 2001.14 Section 2001... Classification § 2001.14 Classification challenges. (a) Challenging classification. Authorized holders, including authorized holders outside the classifying agency, who want to challenge the classification status...

  5. 5 CFR 9901.221 - Classification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classification requirements. 9901.221... SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Classification Classification Process § 9901.221 Classification... jobs as he or she considers necessary for the purpose of this section. (d) A classification action...

  6. 32 CFR 2400.15 - Classification guides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classification guides. 2400.15 Section 2400.15... Derivative Classification § 2400.15 Classification guides. (a) OSTP shall issue and maintain classification guides to facilitate the proper and uniform derivative classification of information. These guides...

  7. 32 CFR 2400.15 - Classification guides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classification guides. 2400.15 Section 2400.15... Derivative Classification § 2400.15 Classification guides. (a) OSTP shall issue and maintain classification guides to facilitate the proper and uniform derivative classification of information. These guides...

  8. 5 CFR 9701.221 - Classification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Classification requirements. 9701.221... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Classification Process § 9701.221 Classification.... (d) Classification decisions become effective on the date designated by the authorized...

  9. 32 CFR 2001.14 - Classification challenges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classification challenges. 2001.14 Section 2001... Classification § 2001.14 Classification challenges. (a) Challenging classification. Authorized holders, including authorized holders outside the classifying agency, who want to challenge the classification status...

  10. 22 CFR 9.6 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 2001.22. (c) Department of State Classification Guide. The Department of State Classification... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Derivative classification. 9.6 Section 9.6... classification. (a) Definition. Derivative classification is the incorporating, paraphrasing, restating...

  11. 32 CFR 2001.14 - Classification challenges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification challenges. 2001.14 Section 2001... Classification § 2001.14 Classification challenges. (a) Challenging classification. Authorized holders, including authorized holders outside the classifying agency, who want to challenge the classification status...

  12. 14 CFR 1203.412 - Classification guides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification guides. 1203.412 Section... PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.412 Classification guides. (a) General. A classification guide, based upon classification determinations made by appropriate program and...

  13. 32 CFR 2400.15 - Classification guides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification guides. 2400.15 Section 2400.15...