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  1. Mid-Adulthood Risk Factor Profiles for CKD

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Gearoid M.; Preis, Sarah R.; Hwang, Shih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Early identification of CKD risk factors may allow risk factor modification and prevention of CKD progression. We investigated the hypothesis that risk factors are present ≥30 years before the diagnosis of CKD in a case-control study using data from the Framingham Offspring Study. Patients with incident CKD (eGFR≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) at examination cycles 6, 7, and 8 were age- and sex-matched 1:2 to patients without CKD at baseline (examination 5). CKD risk factors were measured at each examination cycle. Logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, and time period, were constructed to compare risk factor profiles at each time point between cases and controls. During follow-up, 441 new cases of CKD were identified and matched to 882 controls (mean age 69.2 years, 52.4% women). Those who ultimately developed CKD were more likely to have hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.51), obesity (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.59), and higher triglyceride levels (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.83) 30 years before CKD diagnosis, and were more likely to have hypertension (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.79), higher triglyceride levels (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.64), lower HDLc (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.97), and diabetes (OR, 2.90; 95% CI, 1.59 to 5.29) 20 years before CKD diagnosis. These findings demonstrate that risk factors for CKD are identifiable ≥30 years before diagnosis and suggest the importance of early risk factor identification in patients at risk for CKD. PMID:24970884

  2. Mid-adulthood risk factor profiles for CKD.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Gearoid M; Preis, Sarah R; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Fox, Caroline S

    2014-11-01

    Early identification of CKD risk factors may allow risk factor modification and prevention of CKD progression. We investigated the hypothesis that risk factors are present ≥30 years before the diagnosis of CKD in a case-control study using data from the Framingham Offspring Study. Patients with incident CKD (eGFR≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) at examination cycles 6, 7, and 8 were age- and sex-matched 1:2 to patients without CKD at baseline (examination 5). CKD risk factors were measured at each examination cycle. Logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, and time period, were constructed to compare risk factor profiles at each time point between cases and controls. During follow-up, 441 new cases of CKD were identified and matched to 882 controls (mean age 69.2 years, 52.4% women). Those who ultimately developed CKD were more likely to have hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.51), obesity (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.59), and higher triglyceride levels (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.83) 30 years before CKD diagnosis, and were more likely to have hypertension (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.79), higher triglyceride levels (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.64), lower HDLc (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.97), and diabetes (OR, 2.90; 95% CI, 1.59 to 5.29) 20 years before CKD diagnosis. These findings demonstrate that risk factors for CKD are identifiable ≥30 years before diagnosis and suggest the importance of early risk factor identification in patients at risk for CKD.

  3. Stroke Risk Factor Profiles in African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Bradford B.; Johnston, Karen C.; Kongable, Gail; Hung, Elena; Richardson, DeJuran; Gorelick, Philip B.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose If sex differences in stroke risk factor profiles exist among African Americans in the United States, prevention strategies will need to reflect those differences. African Americans and women have been underrepresented in stroke prevention studies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether medical and lifestyle factors differ among women and men who have enrolled in the African-American Antiplatelet Stroke Prevention Study (AAASPS). Methods We performed a planned exploratory analysis of differences in baseline characteristics and risk factors between women and men enrolled in AAASPS, a double-blind, randomized, multicenter, controlled trial. Frequencies of vascular risk factors and related conditions, medical therapies, stroke subtypes, and vascular territories were compared between women and men by 1-way ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test where appropriate. Results A total of 1087 African American patients (574 women, 513 men) enrolled between December 1995 and June 1999. Women had higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, family history of stroke, and no reported leisure exercise. Men had higher rates of smoking and heavy alcohol use. Few differences were noted in proportions of stroke subtype or proportions receiving preventive therapy. Conclusions AAASPS represents the largest enrollment of African American women in a recurrent stroke prevention study. Our data suggest that African American women in a clinical trial differ from men in the frequency of key vascular risk factors. Although limited, these data provide an important first characterization of sex differences in African Americans with stroke. PMID:11935036

  4. Risk factor profile for sudden cardiac death during mountain hiking.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, M; Pachinger, O; Schocke, M F H; Ulmer, H

    2007-07-01

    Mountain hiking is associated with a death rate of about 4 deaths per 100,000 hikers annually. About 50 % of all fatalities during mountain hiking are sudden cardiac deaths (SCDs). But there are only few data available regarding risk factors and triggers associated with SCD during mountain hiking. Thus, a case-control analysis between persons who died suddenly during mountain hiking and randomly selected controls was carried out. Risk factor profiles of 179 males over the age of 34 who suffered SCD during mountain hiking were compared to those of 537 matched controls. Hikers who died suddenly during mountain hiking were much more likely to have had a prior MI (17% vs. 0.9%; p < 0.001), known coronary artery disease (CAD) without prior MI (17 % vs. 4%; p < 0.001), diabetes (6% vs. 1 %; p < 0.001), hypercholesterolemia (54 % vs. 20%; p < 0.001), and were less engaged in regular mountain sports activities (31% vs. 58%; p < 0.001) compared to hikers from the control group. Based on the reported relationship between traditional risk factors and coronary plaque morphology, acute plaque rupture with thrombus formation and subsequent lethal arrhythmias may be assumed to be a dominant mechanism precipitating SCD during hiking. In contrast, in skiers especially non-occlusive plaques may precipitate ischemia leading to an imbalance between oxygen demand and supply and subsequent lethal arrhythmias. As preventive measures recommended to hikers at risk, adaptation to regular mountain sports activities by an adequate training program and pharmacological interventions, e.g. lipid lowering drugs, aspirin, and beta-blockers, should be considered.

  5. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  6. Sudden infant death syndrome: risk factor profiles for distinct subgroups.

    PubMed

    Kohlendorfer, U; Kiechl, S; Sperl, W

    1998-05-15

    The authors investigated risk profiles of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) as a function of age at death. A case-control study carried out in the Tyrol region of Austria enrolled 99 infants who died of SIDS between 1984 and 1994 and 136 randomly selected controls. Early and late SIDS (< 120 days of age vs. > or = 120 days) were defined according to the clear-cut bimodal age-at-death distribution. Inadequate antenatal care, low parental social and educational level, and the prone sleeping position were risk conditions that applied to both early and late SIDS. A marked seasonal variation (winter preponderance) was the most outstanding feature of late SIDS. A gestational age of < 37 weeks (odds ratio (OR) = 8.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.6-26.0), repeated episodes of apnea (OR = 5.7, 95% CI 1.2-27.0), low birth weight (< 2,500 g) (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.1-11.0), a family history of sudden infant death (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.1-7.5), and maternal smoking during pregnancy (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.0-4.5) were associated with early SIDS. This study identified two distinct subgroups of SIDS infants characterized by different risk conditions and ages at death. These results underline a multiple-cause hypothesis for SIDS etiology which involves a genetic predisposition, immaturity in the first months of life, and environmental factors acting at various ages.

  7. Profiling immunologic risk for acute rejection in liver transplantation: Recipient age is an important risk factor.

    PubMed

    Kueht, Michael L; Cotton, Ronald T; Galvan, N Thao N; O'Mahony, Christine A; Goss, John A; Rana, Abbas

    2016-09-01

    Careful management of induction and maintenance of immunosuppression is paramount to prevent acute rejection in liver transplantation. A methodical analysis of risk factors for acute cellular rejection may provide a more comprehensive method to profile the immunologic risk of candidates. Using registry data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), we identified 42,508 adult recipients who underwent orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) between 2002 and 2013. We excluded recipients with a blank entry for treated rejection. We analyzed this all inclusive cohort in addition to a subset of 27,493 patients with just tacrolimus immunosuppression. Multivariate logistic regression was used on both cohorts and identified independent risk factors for treated acute rejection at one year. Recipient age (reference group was 40 to 60years) was a dominant risk factor for rejection in both cohorts and had a dose response relationship. The strongest risk factors in the inclusive cohort were: age 18-25 (OR 2.20), age 26-29 (OR 2.03), and primary biliary cholangitis (OR 1.55). The most protective factors were age 70 and older (OR 0.68), and age 65-69 (OR 0.70). The rates of rejection had a similar pattern. Although prior studies have suggested age as a risk factor for rejection in liver transplantation, this is the first study of national-level data to demonstrate a robust dose dependent relationship between age and risk for rejection at one year. Clinicians should place significant weight on recipient age when they assess their recipients for the immunologic risk of rejection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk factor profile for chronic kidney disease is similar to risk factor profile for small artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Stephen T.; Rule, Andrew D.; Schwartz, Gary L.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Jack, Clifford R.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bailey, Kent R.

    2013-01-01

    Background and method We investigated whether chronic kidney disease detected by increased serum creatinine (SCr) or urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) may reflect arteriosclerosis involving the kidneys. The sample consisted of 1585 members of sibships (804 non-Hispanic whites and 781 non-Hispanic blacks) in which at least two siblings had primary hypertension. We first evaluated the correlations of increased SCr and UACR with the presence of cerebral small vessel arteriosclerosis, which was determined by increased subcortical white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume on brain magnetic resonance imaging; and with peripheral large vessel arteriosclerosis, which was determined by decreased ankle-brachial index (ABI). After age adjustment, increased SCr and UACR correlated with increased WMH volume (0.54 and 0.52, respectively) and with decreased ABI (0.50 and 0.54, respectively; all P < 0.001). We then used logistic regression to evaluate the dependency of each measure of disease on conventional risk factors for arteriosclerosis to assess whether the risk factors’ effects were proportional across different measures of disease. Results Age, race, sex, hypertension, diabetes, total cholesterol, and smoking made similar overall contributions to the prediction of each measure of disease, as judged by the model C-statistics, which varied in a narrow range from 0.84 to 0.85 (all P < 0.001). However, the relative contributions that the modifiable risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, total cholesterol, and smoking made to prediction of increased SCr and UACR were disproportionate to their relative contributions to prediction of decreased ABI (P < 0.0001). Conclusion The findings support the view that chronic kidney disease detected by increased SCr or UACR primarily reflects small vessel arteriosclerosis involving the kidneys. PMID:21720267

  9. Risk factor profiles among intravenous drug using young adults: a latent class analysis (LCA) approach.

    PubMed

    James, Sigrid; McField, Edward S; Montgomery, Susanne B

    2013-03-01

    Using data from a cross-sectional study that examined health risk behaviors among urban intravenous drug-using (IDU) adolescents and young adults, this study investigated risk profiles among a high-risk sample (n=274). Risk profiles were empirically derived through latent class analysis based on indicators of engagement in health-risking behaviors, experience of abuse and violence as well as individual and family risk factors. The best fitting model was a 3-class model. Class 1 (n=95) captured participants with the lowest risk across all indicators. Compared to Class 1, Class 2 (n=128) and Class 3 (n=51) had elevated rates of engagement in health-risking behaviors as well as individual and family risk factors; however, Class 3 had the highest rate of engagement in sexual risk behavior, and backgrounds of substantial abuse and violence as well as familial psychopathology. Class 2 was the group most socioeconomically disadvantaged, with the highest percentage of participants coming from poor backgrounds, spending the longest time homeless and working the fewest months. Identifying subgroups of IDU has the potential to guide the development of more targeted and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this high-risk population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient Profiles in Dutch Forensic Psychiatry Based on Risk Factors, Pathology, and Offense.

    PubMed

    van der Veeken, Frida C A; Bogaerts, Stefan; Lucieer, Jacques

    2017-09-01

    Forensic psychiatry embodies a highly heterogeneous population differing widely in terms of diagnoses, crimes committed, and risk factors. All of these are vitally important for treatment indications and should be accounted for in research. However, there is limited empirical knowledge of patient profiles. This study constructed patient profiles on the basis of the three domains mentioned above. Participants were found guilty of having committed crimes due to psychiatric disorders and were admitted to Forensic Psychiatric Center (FPC) 2landen or FPC De Kijvelanden in the Netherlands. Retrospective data were retrieved from patient files. Diagnoses were assessed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) criteria and risk factors according to the Historical Clinical Future-30 (HKT-30) instrument. Latent class analysis was conducted to define typologies; external variables were included for validation. Four different classes or "patient risk profiles," with varying psychopathologies, risk factors, and crimes, were identified. Results were consistent with previous studies, and external validation with the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) two-factor model and the four facets of the PCL-R agreed with results found. Results display specific risk factors for specific psychopathology/offense combinations.

  11. Investigation of Profiles of Risk Factors for Adolescent Psychopathology: A Person-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra, Gilbert R.; DuBois, David L.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Latent variable mixture modeling was used to identify subgroups of adolescents with distinct profiles of risk factors from individual, family, peer, and broader contextual domains. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Four-class models provided the most theoretically meaningful solutions for both 7th (n = 907;…

  12. Appreciating Complexity in Adolescent Self-Harm Risk Factors: Psychological Profiling in a Longitudinal Community Sample.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Sarah; Jones, Michael P; Hudson, Jennifer L

    2017-07-28

    Past research identifies a number of risk factors for adolescent self-harm, but often fails to account for overlap between these factors. This study investigated the underlying, broader concepts by identifying different psychological profiles among adolescents. We then compared new self-harm rates over a six-month period across different psychological profiles. Australian high school students (n = 326, 68.1% female) completed a questionnaire including a broad range of psychological and socioenvironmental risk and protective factors. Non-hierarchical cluster analysis produced six groups with different psychological profiles at baseline and rate of new self-harm at follow-up. The lowest rate was 1.4% in a group that appeared psychologically healthy; the highest rate was 37.5% in a group that displayed numerous psychological difficulties. Four groups with average self-harm had varied psychological profiles including low impulsivity, anxiety, impulsivity, and poor use of positive coping strategies. Identifying multiple profiles with distinct psychological characteristics can improve detection, guide prevention, and tailor treatment.

  13. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Profiling of Group C Employees in JIPMER, Puducherry.

    PubMed

    Aswin, K; Ghorpade, Arun G; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Kumar, Ganesh

    2014-07-01

    Settings-based approach for health promotion includes conducting risk factor surveillance as one of its component. It was aimed to estimate the prevalence of CVD risk factors among group C employees of tertiary care hospital in south India. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 400 group C employees aged ≥20 years using the WHO "STEPwise approach to surveillance of non-communicable diseases" (STEPS) methodology. Standardized international protocols were used to measure behavioral risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity) and physical characteristics (weight, waist and hip circumferences, height, and blood pressure). Multivariate analysis was done to predict the factors, which carry independent risk of hypertension. Risk factor profiling of the staff was done using WHO/ISH risk prediction chart to calculate the 10-year risk of a fatal or non-fatal major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke), according to age, gender, blood pressure, smoking status, and presence or absence of diabetes mellitus. Mean age in years was 40.9 (±10.4), and men constituted 81.3% of study population. Prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors was as follows: Current smokers 12.3% men, regular alcohol intake 33.2% among men, overweight (≥23 kg/m(2)) 74.5%, central obesity 78.7%, hypertension 38.8%, and history of diabetes mellitus 13.2%. Age, gender, physical inactivity, obesity, and family history of hypertension were found to be independently associated with hypertension. Four percent participants had a >10% risk of developing CVD in next 10 years. The prevalence of CVD risk factors is high in the sample population. Employee wellness program should be started in the institute to combat the burden of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Profiling risk for acute rejection in kidney transplantation: recipient age is a robust risk factor.

    PubMed

    Rana, Abbas; Murthy, Bhamidipati; Pallister, Zachery; Kueht, Michael; Cotton, Ronald; Galvan, N Thao N; Etheridge, Whiston; Liu, Hau; Goss, John; O'Mahony, Christine

    2016-09-29

    Careful management of immunosuppression is paramount to prevent acute rejection in kidney transplantation. We studied a cohort of 139,875 kidney transplant recipients from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) database between 2002 and 2013. We confirmed the analysis with a cohort of 35,277 who received thymoglobulin induction with tacrolimus maintenance, and a third cohort of 12,161 recipients who received basiliximab induction with tacrolimus maintenance. We performed multivariate logistic regression analyses on data from all three cohorts and identified independent risk factors for treated acute rejection at 1 year. Recipient age was a robust risk factor for rejection in all three cohorts in a dose response pattern. Young age (18-25 years) was among the strongest risk factors for rejection in all three cohorts; thymoglobulin cohort: OR 1.87 (1.59-2.19); basiliximab cohort: OR 2.41 (1.89-3.05); and inclusive cohort: OR 1.97 (1.83-2.12). The opposite was true for old age (65-69 years); thymoglobulin cohort: OR 0.69 (0.59-0.81); basiliximab cohort: OR 0.77 (0.62-0.96); and inclusive cohort: OR 0.75 (0.70-0.80). This study is unique because it is the largest and most comprehensive multivariate analysis that demonstrates recipient age is a robust risk factor for acute rejection in an inverse dose response pattern.

  15. Comparison of risk factor profiles in incidental Lewy body disease and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Roberta; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Klos, Kevin J; DelleDonne, Anthony; Heckman, Michael G; Crook, Julia E; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Boeve, Bradley F; Dickson, Dennis W; Ahlskog, J Eric

    2009-09-01

    To explore whether associations of potential risk factors for incidental Lewy body disease (iLBD) are similar to those for Parkinson disease (PD). Brain autopsy study (1988-2004) of subjects without evidence of neurodegenerative disease or tremor who were evaluated by at least 1 physician within 1 year of death. Researchers analyzed incidental Lewy pathology blinded to clinical abstraction. Olmsted County, Minnesota. Subjects Residents of Olmsted County and the immediate vicinity aged older than 60 years. Whether risk factors previously associated with PD in Olmsted County are also associated with iLBD. Of 235 subjects, 34 had iLBD (14.5%). The overall risk factor profiles for iLBD and PD were fairly similar between the 2 sets of odds ratio (OR) estimates, with 11 of 16 ORs in the same direction. Prior Olmsted County studies documented 7 risk factors with statistically significant associations with PD; for physician occupation and caffeine intake, the ORs for iLBD were in the same direction and statistically significant, whereas for education, head injury, and number of children, they were in the same direction but not significant; they were in the opposite direction but not statistically significant for depression and anxiety. Incidental Lewy body disease was not associated with various end-of-life conditions or causes of death, though these patients were slightly older and more likely cachectic. Based on this exploratory study, iLBD and PD appear to have similar risk factor profiles. Thus, at least some cases of iLBD could represent preclinical PD, arrested PD, or a partial syndrome due to a lesser burden of causative factors. Incidental Lewy body disease is not explained by nonspecific end-of-life brain insults.

  16. Effect of clinical and social risk factors on hospital profiling for stroke readmission: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Keyhani, Salomeh; Myers, Laura J; Cheng, Eric; Hebert, Paul; Williams, Linda S; Bravata, Dawn M

    2014-12-02

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and Veterans Health Administration (VA) will report 30-day stroke readmission rates as a measure of hospital quality. A national debate on whether social risk factors should be included in models developed for hospital profiling is ongoing. To compare a CMS-based model of 30-day readmission with a more comprehensive model that includes measures of social risk (such as homelessness) or clinical factors (such as stroke severity and functional status). Data from a retrospective cohort study were used to develop a CMS-based 30-day readmission model that included age and comorbid conditions based on codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (model 1). This model was then compared with one that included administrative social risk factors (model 2). Finally, the CMS model (model 1) was compared with a model that included social risk and clinical factors from chart review (model 3). These 3 models were used to rank hospitals by 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates and examine facility rankings among the models. Hospitals in the VA. Patients hospitalized with stroke in 2007. 30-day readmission rates. The 30-day readmission rate was 12.8%. The c-statistics for the 3 models were 0.636, 0.646, and 0.661, respectively. All hospitals were classified as performing "as expected" using all 3 models (that is, performance did not differ from the VA national average); therefore, the addition of detailed clinical information or social risk factors did not alter assessment of facility performance. A predominantly male veteran cohort limits the generalizability of these findings. In the VA, more comprehensive models that included social risk and clinical factors did not affect hospital comparisons based on 30-day readmission rates. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  17. Risk factors and clinical profiles in Turkish children with cerebral palsy: analysis of 625 cases.

    PubMed

    Erkin, Gulten; Delialioglu, Sibel Unsal; Ozel, Sumru; Culha, Canan; Sirzai, Hulya

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate risk factors, clinical profiles and gross motor function levels of Turkish children with cerebral palsy (CP). A total of 625 consecutive children with CP, who were rehabilitated in the pediatrics rehabilitation clinic between 2000 and 2004 years, were included. Factors causing CP were investigated by interviewing the families and by scanning medical files. Risk factors were recorded as consanguineous marriage, maternal disorder, preterm birth, birth asphyxia, low birth weight, multiple pregnancy, neonatal convulsion, kernicterus, postnatal central nervous system infection and brain injury. Swedish classification was followed in CP typing. Of 625 children with CP, 370 (59.2%) were males and 255 (40.8%) were females, with ages ranging between 2 and 13 years (the mean age was 5.11+/-2.19 years). It was determined that 47.8% of the cases were spastic diplegic CP, 27.7% were spastic tetraplegic CP, 12.8% spastic hemiplegic CP and 11.7% were other types (ataxic, dyskinetic and mixed CP types). The most frequently encountered risk factors were low birth weight (45.1%), preterm birth (40.5%), birth asphyxia (34.6%) and consanguineous marriage (23.8%). Low birth weight, preterm birth, birth asphyxia and consanguineous marriage were top-ranked risk factors that were determined in Turkish children with CP. Compared with other countries, consanguineous marriage is still an important problem in Turkey.

  18. Genomic and Metabolomic Profile Associated to Clustering of Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Marrachelli, Vannina G.; Rentero, Pilar; Mansego, María L.; Morales, Jose Manuel; Galan, Inma; Pardo-Tendero, Mercedes; Martinez, Fernando; Martin-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Briongos, Laisa; Chaves, Felipe Javier; Redon, Josep; Monleon, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background To identify metabolomic and genomic markers associated with the presence of clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs) from a general population. Methods and Findings One thousand five hundred and two subjects, Caucasian, > 18 years, representative of the general population, were included. Blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters and metabolic markers were measured. Subjects were grouped according the number of CMRFs (Group 1: <2; Group 2: 2; Group 3: 3 or more CMRFs). Using SNPlex, 1251 SNPs potentially associated to clustering of three or more CMRFs were analyzed. Serum metabolomic profile was assessed by 1H NMR spectra using a Brucker Advance DRX 600 spectrometer. From the total population, 1217 (mean age 54±19, 50.6% men) with high genotyping call rate were analysed. A differential metabolomic profile, which included products from mitochondrial metabolism, extra mitochondrial metabolism, branched amino acids and fatty acid signals were observed among the three groups. The comparison of metabolomic patterns between subjects of Groups 1 to 3 for each of the genotypes associated to those subjects with three or more CMRFs revealed two SNPs, the rs174577_AA of FADS2 gene and the rs3803_TT of GATA2 transcription factor gene, with minimal or no statistically significant differences. Subjects with and without three or more CMRFs who shared the same genotype and metabolomic profile differed in the pattern of CMRFS cluster. Subjects of Group 3 and the AA genotype of the rs174577 had a lower prevalence of hypertension compared to the CC and CT genotype. In contrast, subjects of Group 3 and the TT genotype of the rs3803 polymorphism had a lower prevalence of T2DM, although they were predominantly males and had higher values of plasma creatinine. Conclusions The results of the present study add information to the metabolomics profile and to the potential impact of genetic factors on the variants of clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors

  19. Novel atherosclerotic risk factors and angiographic profile of young Gujarati patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Jayesh; Jain, Sharad; Virpariya, Kapil; Rawal, Jayesh; Joshi, Hasit; Sharma, Kamal; Roy, Bhavesh; Thakkar, Ashok

    2014-07-01

    In this study we aimed to analyse the frequency of atherosclerotic risk factors with focus to novel risk factors for coronary artery disease and angiographic profile in young (≤ 40 years) acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patient with healthy controls in Gujarat, India. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 109 consecutive young patients aged ≤ 40 years old, diagnosed to have ACS were included in the study. All ACS patients underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. An equivalent age and sex matched population without coronary disease with similar risk factors without tobacco considered a control group. All angiographic patients were evaluated for conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, obesity as well as novel atherogenic risk factors like high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), Lipoprotein(a) [LP(a)], homocysteine, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and B (ApoB). In a study group, out of 109 young patients, 90 (82.6%) patients were presented to our hospital as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 10 (9.2%) presented as known non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and 9 (8.3%) presented as unstable angina (UA). Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, LP(a) and lipid tetrad index were significantly higher in the study group whereas the HDL levels significantly lower as compared to the control group. A quite common risk factors of premature CAD are smoking, high Hs-CRP, high LP(a), hyperhomocysteinaemia and positive family history in the young ACS. Most common presentation of ACS in young was STEMI. On angiography, single vessel involvement was the most common finding.

  20. Bicycling to school improves the cardiometabolic risk factor profile: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Lars; Børrestad, Line A B; Tarp, Jakob; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether bicycling to school improves cardiometabolic risk factor profile and cardiorespiratory fitness among children. Design Prospective, blinded, randomised controlled trial. Setting Single centre study in Odense, Denmark Participants 43 children previously not bicycling to school were randomly allocated to control group (n=20) (ie, no change in lifestyle) or intervention group (ie, bicycling to school) (n=23). Primary and secondary outcome measures Change in cardiometabolic risk factor score and change in cardiorespiratory fitness. Results All participants measured at baseline returned at follow-up. Based upon intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses, clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors was lowered by 0.58 SD (95% CI −1.03 to −0.14, p=0.012) in the bicycling group compared to the control group. Cardiorespiratory fitness (l O2/min) per se did not increase significantly more in the intervention than in the control group (β=0.0337, 95% CI −0.06 to 0.12, p=0.458). Conclusions Bicycling to school counteracted a clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors and should thus be recognised as potential prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The intervention did, however, not elicit a larger increase in cardiorespiratory fitness in the intervention group as compared with the control group. Trial registration Registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01236222). PMID:23117560

  1. Genetic and environmental factors in associations between infant growth and adult cardiometabolic risk profile in twins.

    PubMed

    Touwslager, Robbert N H; Gielen, Marij; Mulder, Antonius L M; Gerver, Willem J M; Zimmermann, Luc J; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Houben, Alfons J H M; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Derom, Catherine; Vlietinck, Robert; Loos, Ruth J F; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2013-10-01

    Accelerated infant growth is associated with an altered, mostly adverse adult cardiometabolic risk profile. The importance of genetic and environmental factors to these associations is unclear. The objective was to examine the importance of genetic and environmental factors in the associations between infant growth and adult cardiometabolic risk factors (anthropometric characteristics, lipids, insulin sensitivity, leptin, blood pressure, and fibrinogen) in twins. Cardiometabolic risk factors were assessed in 240 twin pairs (aged 18-34 y) from the East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey. Infant growth was defined as change in weight z score. We regressed intrapair differences in growth during 4 growth windows (0-1, 1-6, 6-12, and 12-24 mo) against intrapair differences in the risk factors in monozygotic and dizygotic twins separately. Within monozygotic twin pairs only, associations between infant growth and most adult lipids, glucose, leptin, and blood pressure (eg, systolic blood pressure: b = 5.95 mm Hg per change in z score, P = 0.01 in monozygotic twins; b = -1.64, P = 0.82 in dizygotic twins from 12 to 24 mo) were found. Within dizygotic twin pairs only, associations between growth and triglycerides and fibrinogen (eg, fibrinogen: b = 0.07 ln mg/dL per change in z score, P = 0.31 in monozygotic twins; b = 0.79, P = 0.01 in dizygotic twins from 0 to 1 mo) were identified. Most associations showed a detrimental effect of accelerated growth, but beneficial associations were also identified (eg, total-to-high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol ratio: b = -0.22 per change in z score from 1 to 6 mo, P = 0.008 in monozygotic twins). Our data showed that environmental factors play a role in the associations between infant growth and most adult lipids, glucose, leptin, and blood pressure, whereas genetic factors are involved regarding triglycerides and fibrinogen.

  2. Risk factor profiles of stroke, myocardial infarction, and atrial fibrillation: a Japanese Multicenter Cooperative Registry.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Shibata, Yoshisato; Hirabayashi, Takayuki; Mihara, Ban; Hamashige, Naohisa; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Goto, Shinya; Origasa, Hideki; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Isozaki, Mitsuhiro; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2010-05-01

    We sought to clarify risk factor profiles and current treatment of Japanese patients with stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) using the database of the Japan Thrombosis Registry for Atrial Fibrillation, Coronary, or Cerebrovascular Events (J-TRACE). J-TRACE is a nationwide multicenter cooperative cohort of Japanese patients with MI, stroke, and NVAF. Baseline characteristics of 8087 Japanese patients (5804 male, average age 68.7 years) with history of stroke (n=3554), MI (n=2291), or NVAF (n=2242) were analyzed. History of stroke (14.7%) was more frequent than history of MI (2.6%) in patients with stroke, whereas history of stroke (6.6%) was less frequent than history of MI (7.6%) in patients with MI. In patients with NVAF, history of stroke (14.3%) was far more frequent than history of MI (3.4%). Hypertension was more frequent in stroke (74.4%) than MI (62.0%) or NVAF (57.7%), whereas hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, and cigarette smoking were more prevalent in patients with MI (56.1%, 35.1%, and 33.3%, respectively) than in those with stroke (35.7%, 22.4%, and 19.7%, respectively) or NVAF (26.9%, 17.2%, and 16.1%, respectively). Alcohol consumption (34.9%) and obesity (body mass index>25) (32.8%) were most common in patients with NVAF. In all patients, nonmedication rates were higher in patients with hypercholesterolemia (29.8%) or diabetes (36.9%) than in those with hypertension (9.5%). Warfarin was used in 58.9% of patients with low-risk and 75.4% with high-risk NVAF. Risk factor profiles and their modification were not similar among patients in Japan with MI, stroke, and NVAF, although they share a high risk of thrombotic events. Copyright (c) 2010 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk Factors Profile of Shoulder Dystocia in Oman: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khaduri, Maha M.; Abudraz, Rania Mohammed; Al-Farsi, Yahya M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the risk factor profile of shoulder dystocia and associated neonatal complications in Oman, a developing Arab country. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted among 111 cases with dystocia and 111 controls, identified during 1994-2006 period in a tertiary care hospital in Oman. Controls were randomly selected among women who did not have dystocia, and were matched to cases on the day of delivery. Data related to potential risk factors, delivery, and obstetric complications were collected. Results Dystocia was significantly associated with older maternal age, higher parity, larger BMI, diabetes, and previous record of dystocia. In addition, dystocia was associated more with vacuum and forceps deliveries. Routine traction (51%) was the most used manoeuvre. Among dystocia cases, 13% were associated with fetal complications of which Erb’s Palsy was the most prevalent (79%). Conclusion Our finding of significant associations with risk factors lays out the ground to develop a predictability index for shoulder dystocia, which would help in making it preventable. Further p rospective studies are required to confirm the obtained results. PMID:25337307

  4. Risk factors profile of shoulder dystocia in oman: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaduri, Maha M; Abudraz, Rania Mohammed; Rizvi, Sayed G; Al-Farsi, Yahya M

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the risk factor profile of shoulder dystocia and associated neonatal complications in Oman, a developing Arab country. A retrospective case-control study was conducted among 111 cases with dystocia and 111 controls, identified during 1994-2006 period in a tertiary care hospital in Oman. Controls were randomly selected among women who did not have dystocia, and were matched to cases on the day of delivery. Data related to potential risk factors, delivery, and obstetric complications were collected. Dystocia was significantly associated with older maternal age, higher parity, larger BMI, diabetes, and previous record of dystocia. In addition, dystocia was associated more with vacuum and forceps deliveries. Routine traction (51%) was the most used manoeuvre. Among dystocia cases, 13% were associated with fetal complications of which Erb's Palsy was the most prevalent (79%). Our finding of significant associations with risk factors lays out the ground to develop a predictability index for shoulder dystocia, which would help in making it preventable. Further p rospective studies are required to confirm the obtained results.

  5. Profile of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Mortality in Patients with Symptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanati, Silméia Garcia; Mouraria, Guilherme Grisi; Matsubara, Luiz Shigero; Giannini, Mariângela; Matsubara, Beatriz B

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The present study examines cardiovascular risk factor profiles and 24-month mortality in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. DESIGN STUDY: Prospective observational study including 75 consecutive patients with PAD (67 ± 9.7 years of age; 52 men and 23 women) hospitalized for planned peripheral vascular reconstruction. Doppler echocardiograms were performed before surgery in 54 cases. Univariate analyses were performed using Student’s t-test or Fisher’s exact test. Survival analysis at 24-month follow-up was performed using the Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier method including age and chronic use of aspirin as covariates. Survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. RESULTS: Hypertension and smoking were the most frequent risk factors (52 cases and 51 cases, respectively), followed by diabetes (32 cases). Undertreated dyslipidemia was found in 26 cases. Fasting glycine levels (131 ± 69.1 mg/dl) were elevated in 29 cases. Myocardial hypertrophy was found in 18 out of 54 patients. Thirty-four patients had been treated with aspirin. Overall mortality over 24 months was 24% and was associated with age (HR: 0.064; CI95: 0.014–0.115; p=0.013) and lack of use of aspirin, as no deaths occurred among those using this drug (p<0.001). No association was found between cardiovascular death (11 cases) and the other risk factors. CONCLUSION: There is a high prevalence of uncontrolled (treated or untreated) cardiovascular risk factors in patients undergoing planned peripheral vascular reconstruction, and chronic use of aspirin is associated with reduced all-cause mortality in these patients. PMID:19488590

  6. Resistance profiles and risk factors of resistant microorganisms in bacteraemia of abdominal origin.

    PubMed

    Martín Jaramago, J; Armero Ibáñez, R; Camarena Miñana, J J; Morales Suárez-Varela, M

    2017-04-20

    The presence of resistant microorganisms is a major cause of failure in initial empirical antimicrobial therapy. The objectives of this study are to determine the resistance profile of microorganisms that cause bacteraemia of abdominal origin and to identify whether the previous use of antibiotics and the place of acquisition of bacteraemia are risk factors associated with the presence of resistant organisms. A clinical, observational, epidemiological, retrospective cohort study was conducted with all the adult patients admitted to a university hospital from 2011-2013. Antimicrobial resistance profiles were described and a 95% confidence interval chi-square test was used to determine whether the variables studied were risk factors in the isolation of resistant microorganisms. Of the 1245 patients with bacteraemia, 212 (17%) presented bacteraemia of abdominal origin. The resistance profile highlights the incidence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (50%), coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to linezolid (20.58%), enterococci resistant to vancomycin (3.12%), Escherichia coli resistant to third-generation cephalosporins (9.9%) and fluoroquinolones (35.64%), Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins (8.33%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to fluoroquinolones and carbapenem (25% and 25% respectively) and Acinetobacter baumanii resistant to fluoroquinolones and carbapenem (100% and 100% respectively), Candida albicans resistant to fluconazole (11.11%), single Candida krusei isolate resistant to fluconazole and Candida parapsilosis resistant to echinocandins (12.5%). In our study, previous use of antibiotics had a statistically significant association with the isolation of resistant microorganisms (P=.013) but not the place of acquisition of bacteraemia (P=.239). Establishing the incidence of resistant organisms can improve empirical antimicrobial therapy in patients with bacteraemia of abdominal origin. Previous use of

  7. Groundwater source contamination mechanisms: physicochemical profile clustering, risk factor analysis and multivariate modelling.

    PubMed

    Hynds, Paul; Misstear, Bruce D; Gill, Laurence W; Murphy, Heather M

    2014-04-01

    An integrated domestic well sampling and "susceptibility assessment" programme was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland from April 2008 to November 2010. Overall, 211 domestic wells were sampled, assessed and collated with local climate data. Based upon groundwater physicochemical profile, three clusters have been identified and characterised by source type (borehole or hand-dug well) and local geological setting. Statistical analysis indicates that cluster membership is significantly associated with the prevalence of bacteria (p=0.001), with mean Escherichia coli presence within clusters ranging from 15.4% (Cluster-1) to 47.6% (Cluster-3). Bivariate risk factor analysis shows that on-site septic tank presence was the only risk factor significantly associated (p<0.05) with bacterial presence within all clusters. Point agriculture adjacency was significantly associated with both borehole-related clusters. Well design criteria were associated with hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas characterised by high permeability subsoils, while local geological setting was significant for hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas dominated by low/moderate permeability subsoils. Multivariate susceptibility models were developed for all clusters, with predictive accuracies of 84% (Cluster-1) to 91% (Cluster-2) achieved. Septic tank setback was a common variable within all multivariate models, while agricultural sources were also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Furthermore, well liner clearance was a significant factor in all models, indicating that direct surface ingress is a significant well contamination mechanism. Identification and elucidation of cluster-specific contamination mechanisms may be used to develop improved overall risk management and wellhead protection strategies, while also informing future remediation and maintenance efforts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Groundwater source contamination mechanisms: Physicochemical profile clustering, risk factor analysis and multivariate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynds, Paul; Misstear, Bruce D.; Gill, Laurence W.; Murphy, Heather M.

    2014-04-01

    An integrated domestic well sampling and "susceptibility assessment" programme was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland from April 2008 to November 2010. Overall, 211 domestic wells were sampled, assessed and collated with local climate data. Based upon groundwater physicochemical profile, three clusters have been identified and characterised by source type (borehole or hand-dug well) and local geological setting. Statistical analysis indicates that cluster membership is significantly associated with the prevalence of bacteria (p = 0.001), with mean Escherichia coli presence within clusters ranging from 15.4% (Cluster-1) to 47.6% (Cluster-3). Bivariate risk factor analysis shows that on-site septic tank presence was the only risk factor significantly associated (p < 0.05) with bacterial presence within all clusters. Point agriculture adjacency was significantly associated with both borehole-related clusters. Well design criteria were associated with hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas characterised by high permeability subsoils, while local geological setting was significant for hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas dominated by low/moderate permeability subsoils. Multivariate susceptibility models were developed for all clusters, with predictive accuracies of 84% (Cluster-1) to 91% (Cluster-2) achieved. Septic tank setback was a common variable within all multivariate models, while agricultural sources were also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Furthermore, well liner clearance was a significant factor in all models, indicating that direct surface ingress is a significant well contamination mechanism. Identification and elucidation of cluster-specific contamination mechanisms may be used to develop improved overall risk management and wellhead protection strategies, while also informing future remediation and maintenance efforts.

  9. Profile and risk factors for congenital heart defects: A study in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Abqari, Shaad; Gupta, Akash; Shahab, Tabassum; Rabbani, MU; Ali, S Manazir; Firdaus, Uzma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in children representing a major global health burden. It is thus important to determine their prevalence and spectrum and identify risk factors associated with the development of heart defects. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was carried out in the Department of Pediatrics and Center of Cardiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India, from February 2014 to August 2015. All patients referred with complaints or clinical examination suggestive of CHDs were further evaluated with echocardiography. On Echocardiography, patients having CHDs were included as cases and those having a normal echocardiographic study were included as controls. Healthy controls were also included. 400 cases and 400 controls were thus identified; preterms having patent ductus arteriosus and patent foramen ovale and those with acquired heart defects were excluded. Risk factors among cases and controls were further studied. Results: Acyanotic heart defects were 290 (72.50%) of the total heart defects, whereas the contribution of cyanotic heart defects was 110 (27.50%). Out of all CHDs, ventricular septal defect was the most common lesion with contribution of 152 (38%) cases, whereas among the cyanotic heart defects, Tetralogy of Fallot was the most common lesion (18% of total cases). Out of the total 400 cases, 261 were males (65.25%). On univariate analysis, paternal age (odds ratio, OR, 2.01), bad obstetric history (OR, 2.65), antenatal febrile illness (OR, 4.12), and advanced maternal age (OR, 3.28) were found to increase the risk of CHD whereas intake of multivitamin (OR, 3.02) was found to be protective. The risk factors were further analyzed with multivariate logistic regression analysis and all the above factors were found to be significantly associated. Conclusion: We noted that the profile of CHD in our population was similar

  10. AGE-Related Differences of Novel Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Angiographic Profile Among Gujarati Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Jayesh; Joshi, Hasit; Sahoo, Sibasis; Virpariya, Kapil; Parmar, Meena; Shah, Komal

    2015-06-01

    Although numerous risk factors have been established to predict the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the risk factor profile may be different between the younger and older individuals. To analyse the frequency and pattern of atherogenic risk factors and angiographic profiles in age-stratified Gujarati patients with ACS. ACS patients undergoing coronary angiography at U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research, Gujarat, India between January 2008 and December 2012 were classified in to two age groups with 40y as cut-off. Patients were assessed for conventional risk factors (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity), novel risk factors (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein (a), homocysteine), and angiographic profiles.The statistical difference between two age groups was determined by Student's t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. A total of 200 patients, 100 patients ≤40 y of age and 100 patients >40 y of age, were evaluated. Older patients had higher frequency of hypertension (32 vs. 16%, p=0.008), while family history of coronary artery disease was more common among younger patients (19 vs. 9%, p=0.041). The incidence of diabetes, dyslipidaemia, smoking and tobacco chewing did not vary significantly between the two groups. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the younger group (p<0.05). Lipoprotein (a), homocysteine and high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels were comparable between two age groups. Multi-vessel coronary artery disease was more common among older group. The most commonly affected coronary artery was the left anterior descending artery among younger patients (44%) and the left circumflex artery among older patients (38.1%). Young patients with ACS had different atherosclerotic risk profile and less extensive coronary artery disease as compared to older counterparts. Emphasis

  11. Expanding the epidemiologic profile: risk factors for active tuberculosis in people immigrating to Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Wobeser, Wendy L.; Yuan, Lilian; Naus, Monika; Corey, Paul; Edelson, Jeff; Heywood, Neil; Holness, D. Linn

    2000-01-01

    Background Many people immigrating to Canada come from countries with a high burden of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to develop a detailed epidemiologic profile of foreign-born people with tuberculosis living in Ontario. Methods In this population-based case-control study, cases of tuberculosis diagnosed in 1994-1995 were identified from the database of the Ontario Reportable Disease Information Service and were considered eligible for analysis if a record of landing (receipt of permission to establish residence in Canada) from the period 1986-1995 was found in the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) database, if the person was at least 11 years of age at the time their visa was issued, and if the person had not been diagnosed with tuberculosis before becoming legally landed in Canada. Control subjects, who met the same criteria as the case subjects but who did not have tuberculosis in 1994-1995, were identified from a CIC database for landed immigrants. Results A total of 1341 cases of tuberculosis in foreign-born people were reported in Ontario in 1994-1995. A record of landing was found in CIC databases for 1099 of these people, 224 of whom were not legally landed at the time of diagnosis. In total, 602 cases met the inclusion criteria. The 2 strongest determinants of risk among those who had become landed within the preceding 10 years were referral for medical surveillance by immigration officials (odds ratio [OR] 3.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6-6.0) and world region of origin (Somalia [OR 67.7, 95% CI 31.3-154.9], Vietnam [OR 25.0, 95% CI 12.5-50.0], the Philippines [OR 11.9, 95% CI 6.0-23.3], other sub-Saharan African countries [OR 11.6, 95% CI 5.7-23.2], India [OR 9.7, 95% CI 4.9-18.9], China [OR 6.1, 95% CI 3.1-12.1], other Asian countries [OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.4-9.1], the Middle East [OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.0-8.3], Latin America [OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-3.8), and the former socialist countries of Europe [OR 1.8, 95% CI 0.8-3.8]; the reference

  12. Serum Lipid Profile, Prevalence of Dyslipidaemia, and Associated Risk Factors Among Northern Mexican Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bibiloni, Maria del Mar; Salas, Rogelio; De la Garza, Yolanda E.; Villarreal, Jesus Z.; Sureda, Antoni; Tur, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The increase in overweight and obese children and adolescents may be linked to increased rates of dyslipidaemia. The aim was to assess the serum lipid profile, the prevalence of dyslipidaemia, and associated risk factors among the North Mexican adolescent population. Methods: Two hundred and ninety-three subjects (47.8% girls) ages 11 to 16 years took part in the Nuevo León State Survey of Nutrition and Health 2011–2012. According to the 2011 Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents, dyslipidaemia was defined as a presence of ≥1 of the following levels (mg/dL): Total cholesterol ≥200, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥130, non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <40, and triglyceride ≥130. Results: The overall frequency of dyslipidaemia was 48.8% with no differences between sexes. Adolescents with high body mass index were more likely to have at least 1 abnormal lipid level (overweight: odds ratio [OR]: 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14–3.77, P < 0.05; obesity: OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.11–4.41, P < 0.05) than those with normal weight. Abdominally subjects with obesity were also more likely to have at least 1 abnormal lipid level (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.35–3.91, P < 0.01) than their leaner counterparts. Conclusions: Half of Mexican adolescents living in the State of Nuevo León have at least 1 abnormal lipid concentration. Low HDL-chol level was the most common dyslipidaemia. Body mass index and abdominal obesity were associated with the prevalence of at least 1 abnormal lipid level. PMID:27379432

  13. Risk Factors and Health Profiles of Recent Migrant Women Who Experienced Violence Associated with Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Anita J.; Merry, Lisa A.; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Violence associated with pregnancy is a major public health concern, but little is known about it in recent migrant women. This study looked at (1) risk factors for violence associated with pregnancy among newly arrived migrant women in Canada and (2) if those who experienced violence associated with pregnancy had a different health profile or use of healthcare services for themselves or their infants during pregnancy and up to 4 months postpartum compared to other childbearing migrant women. Methods Pregnant migrant women in Canada <5 years were recruited in 12 hospitals in 3 large cities between 2006 and 2009 and followed to 4 months postpartum. Data were collected on maternal background, migration history, violence associated with pregnancy, maternal and infant physical and mental health, and services used. Results Of a total of 774 pregnant migrant women, 59 (7.6%) women reported violence associated with pregnancy. Migrant women who experienced violence, compared to those who did not, were at increased risk of violence if they lived without a partner, were asylum seekers, migrated <2 years ago, or had less than high school education. Women who reported violence were less likely to have up-to-date vaccinations, take folic acid before pregnancy, more likely to commence prenatal care after 3 months gestation and to not use contraceptives after birth. They were also more likely to have a history of miscarriage and report more postpartum pain and increased bleeding. They were also more likely to have inadequate social support and report more depression, anxiety, somatization, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on standardized tests. No differences were found in the health status of the infants of women who experienced violence compared to those who did not. Conclusions Clinicians should sensitively ask recent migrant women (asylum seekers, refugees, and nonrefugee immigrants) about violence associated with pregnancy and appropriately assess

  14. Factors to consider in developing individual pharmaceutical product quality risk profiles useful to government procurement agencies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Boehm, Garth; Zheng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Governments that procure pharmaceutical products from an Essential Medicine List (EML) bear special responsibility for the quality of these products. In this article we examine the possibility of developing a pharmaceutical product quality risk assessment scheme for use by government procurement officials. We use the Chinese EML as a basis, and US recall data is examined as it is publically available.This is justified as the article is only concerned with inherent product quality risks. After establishing a link between Chinese essential medicines and those available in the US, we examine US recall data to separate product specific recalls. We conclude that, in addition to existing manufacturing based risks, there are two other product specific risks that stand out from all others, degradation and dissolution failure. Methodology for relative product risk for degradation is needed to be developed and further work is required to better understand dissolution failures which largely occur with modified-release solid oral products. We conclude that a product specific quality risk profile would be enhanced by including a risk assessment for degradation for all products, and in the case of solid oral products, dissolution. PMID:26904402

  15. Factors to consider in developing individual pharmaceutical product quality risk profiles useful to government procurement agencies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Boehm, Garth; Zheng, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Governments that procure pharmaceutical products from an Essential Medicine List (EML) bear special responsibility for the quality of these products. In this article we examine the possibility of developing a pharmaceutical product quality risk assessment scheme for use by government procurement officials. We use the Chinese EML as a basis, and US recall data is examined as it is publically available.This is justified as the article is only concerned with inherent product quality risks. After establishing a link between Chinese essential medicines and those available in the US, we examine US recall data to separate product specific recalls. We conclude that, in addition to existing manufacturing based risks, there are two other product specific risks that stand out from all others, degradation and dissolution failure. Methodology for relative product risk for degradation is needed to be developed and further work is required to better understand dissolution failures which largely occur with modified-release solid oral products. We conclude that a product specific quality risk profile would be enhanced by including a risk assessment for degradation for all products, and in the case of solid oral products, dissolution.

  16. Vascular Risk Factor Profiles Differ Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Defined Subtypes of Younger-Onset Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Hugh S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Differing associations of vascular risk factors with lacunar infarct have been reported, which is likely because of diagnostic differences and possible heterogeneity in the pathogenesis underlying lacunar infarction. In a large magnetic resonance imaging–verified cohort of lacunar infarct patients, we investigated the risk factor profile of lacunar infarction and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics. Methods— One thousand twenty-three patients with lacunar infarction (mean age, 56.7; SD, 8.5) were recruited from 72 stroke centers throughout the United Kingdom as part of the UK Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Study. Risk factor profiles were compared with 1961 stroke-free population controls with similar age. Furthermore, we tested risk factor profiles of lacunar stroke patients for association with the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and location of the acute lacunar infarct. Results— Hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.85–2.64), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.61–2.73), hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.46–2.07), and smoking (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.39–1.96) were independently associated in lacunar infarct patients compared with healthy controls. Patients with multiple lacunar infarcts were more likely to be men (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.81–3.53) and have hypertension (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12–2.04) compared with patients with a single lacunar infarct, independent of other vascular risk factors. The presence of moderate-to-severe WMH versus no or mild WMH was independently associated with increased age (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12–2.04), hypertension (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.44–2.95), and impaired renal function (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82–0.98). Conclusions— In this magnetic resonance imaging–verified lacunar stroke population, we identified a distinct risk factor profile in the group as a whole. However, there were differing risk factor profiles

  17. Vascular Risk Factor Profiles Differ Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Defined Subtypes of Younger-Onset Lacunar Stroke.

    PubMed

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Markus, Hugh S

    2017-09-01

    Differing associations of vascular risk factors with lacunar infarct have been reported, which is likely because of diagnostic differences and possible heterogeneity in the pathogenesis underlying lacunar infarction. In a large magnetic resonance imaging-verified cohort of lacunar infarct patients, we investigated the risk factor profile of lacunar infarction and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics. One thousand twenty-three patients with lacunar infarction (mean age, 56.7; SD, 8.5) were recruited from 72 stroke centers throughout the United Kingdom as part of the UK Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Study. Risk factor profiles were compared with 1961 stroke-free population controls with similar age. Furthermore, we tested risk factor profiles of lacunar stroke patients for association with the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities (WMH), and location of the acute lacunar infarct. Hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.85-2.64), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.61-2.73), hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.46-2.07), and smoking (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.39-1.96) were independently associated in lacunar infarct patients compared with healthy controls. Patients with multiple lacunar infarcts were more likely to be men (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.81-3.53) and have hypertension (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12-2.04) compared with patients with a single lacunar infarct, independent of other vascular risk factors. The presence of moderate-to-severe WMH versus no or mild WMH was independently associated with increased age (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12-2.04), hypertension (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.44-2.95), and impaired renal function (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98). In this magnetic resonance imaging-verified lacunar stroke population, we identified a distinct risk factor profile in the group as a whole. However, there were differing risk factor profiles according to the presence of multiple lacunar infarcts and confluent WMH. The

  18. Effects of regular exercise on cardiovascular risk factors profile and oxidative stress in obese type 2 diabetic patients in regard to SCORE risk.

    PubMed

    Lazarevic, Gordana; Antic, Slobodan; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Djordjevic, Vidosava; Vlahovic, Predag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate not only the effects of aerobic exercise on overall cardiovascular risk factors profile and oxidative stress in obese, type 2 diabetic patients, but to elucidate if those effects depended on the previously estimated Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) risk. Changes in several well-established cardiovascular risk factors and oxidative stress-defense parameters were measured in a total of 30 previously sedentary, obese type 2 diabetic patients, including 16 low-risk (SCORE < 5%, aged 48.8 +/- 6.0 years, with a mean BMI of 33.28 +/- 2.94 kg/m2) and 14 high-risk (SCORE > or = 5%, aged 56.3 +/- 6.9 years, with a mean BMI of 31.40 +/- 1.13 kg/m2) patients, in regard to the SCORE model, during six months of regular aerobic exercise, performed under supervision. Significant improvement was observed in the majority of cardiovascular risk factors, including body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, glycaemia, glycated haemoglobin, median blood glucose and lipid profile parameters in both diabetic subgroups during the exercise programme. However, the benefits of exercise on the majority of examined parameters became more evident in the low-risk subgroup, compared to the high-risk subgroup from baseline to 3 months. Regular exercise markedly reduced oxidative stress in both subgroups as well, as demonstrated for glutathione, plasma malondialdehyde, sulphydryl groups and catalase. Regular aerobic exercise, performed under supervision, has many beneficial effects in improving overall cardiovascular risk factors profile and reducing oxidative stress in both low-risk and high-risk (according to SCORE model), previously sedentary and obese type 2 diabetic patients.

  19. Profile of non-communicable disease risk factors among employees at a Saudi university.

    PubMed

    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Al Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Mostafa, Ola Abdelmoniem; Darwish, Amr Ahmed; Al-Naboli, Mohamed Rashad

    2014-01-01

    There is paucity of studies defining the prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) risk factors in Saudi Arabia despite the surging epidemic of obesity, change in dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the prevalence of NCDs risk factors among employees at King Faisal University in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia and to determine the possible correlates for clustering of NCDs risk factors among them. All employees were invited to participate; the World Health Organization STEPwise approach was used for data collection which consisted of a personal interview to collect socio-demographic characteristics, NCD history, tobacco use, vegetables and fruit consumption, and physical activity (PA), followed by anthropometric measurements namely weight, height and waist circumference and blood pressure measurements, subjects were finally subjected to biochemical tests with determination of fasting plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, cholesterol and high density lipoproteins. Of the surveyed employees (n=691), daily current smokers accounted for 22.7%. 94.9%, 95.1% and 86% consumed < 5 servings per day of vegetables, fruits and both fruits and vegetables respectively, 73% were physically inactive, 64% were overweight or obese, 22.1% had hypertension, and 21.5% were diabetics. Elevated cholesterol levels were found in 36.6%, low high density lipoproteins in 36.8%, and elevated triglycerides in 36.1%. Only 3% had no NCD risk factors, and 57.6% had ≥3 factors. Multivariate logistic regression showed that gender (being male, adjusted odds ratio 'aOR'=1.51), aged ≥ 50 years (aOR=3.06), < college education (aOR=1.75), current smokers (aOR=2.37), being obese (aOR=6.96) and having a low PA level (aOR=4.59) were the significant positive predictors for clustering of NCD risk factors. Over fifty percent of the studied university's employees had multiple (≥3) NCD risk factors. Screening and health promotion initiatives should be launched at

  20. AGE-Related Differences of Novel Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Angiographic Profile Among Gujarati Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Hasit; Sahoo, Sibasis; Virpariya, Kapil; Parmar, Meena; Shah, Komal

    2015-01-01

    Context Although numerous risk factors have been established to predict the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the risk factor profile may be different between the younger and older individuals. Aim To analyse the frequency and pattern of atherogenic risk factors and angiographic profiles in age-stratified Gujarati patients with ACS. Materials and Methods ACS patients undergoing coronary angiography at U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research, Gujarat, India between January 2008 and December 2012 were classified in to two age groups with 40y as cut-off. Patients were assessed for conventional risk factors (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity), novel risk factors (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein (a), homocysteine), and angiographic profiles.The statistical difference between two age groups was determined by Student’s t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables. Results A total of 200 patients, 100 patients ≤40 y of age and 100 patients >40 y of age, were evaluated. Older patients had higher frequency of hypertension (32 vs. 16%, p=0.008), while family history of coronary artery disease was more common among younger patients (19 vs. 9%, p=0.041). The incidence of diabetes, dyslipidaemia, smoking and tobacco chewing did not vary significantly between the two groups. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the younger group (p<0.05). Lipoprotein (a), homocysteine and high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels were comparable between two age groups. Multi-vessel coronary artery disease was more common among older group. The most commonly affected coronary artery was the left anterior descending artery among younger patients (44%) and the left circumflex artery among older patients (38.1%). Conclusion Young patients with ACS had different atherosclerotic risk profile and less extensive coronary

  1. Clinical profile and risk factors for keratoplasty and development of hydrops in north Indian patients with keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Titiyal, Jeewan S; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Namrata; Tandon, Radhika; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2009-05-01

    To review the profile of Indian patients with keratoconus and evaluate risk factors for keratoplasty and development of hydrops. In this prospective observational study, 120 consecutive patients with bilateral or unilateral keratoconus presenting to the cornea services of a large, tertiary care ophthalmic center were evaluated. A detailed history including information about the age at onset of symptoms, nature of ocular complaints, and so on was taken. Investigations included visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, keratometry, pachymetry, and videokeratography. There were 76 males and 44 females (mean age at presentation was 20.07 +/- 6.4 years). Five percent families revealed a positive family history. Earlier age at onset (P = 0.002) and eye rubbing (P = 0.02) were found significantly associated with increased risk for surgery. Eyes undergoing surgery had steeper corneas, lower best-corrected visual acuity, corneal scarring, and vernal keratoconjunctivitis were significant risk factors (P values: 0.001, 0.0001, and 0.04, respectively). Hydrops represents a significant independent risk factor for surgery (P = 0.0001). Patients with younger age at onset (P value 0.01), history of eye rubbing (P value 0.02), and atopy (P value 0.01) had higher risk for developing corneal hydrops. This knowledge of risk factors should enable clinicians and patients to make more informed decisions regarding the management of keratoconus.

  2. Profile of Non-communicable Disease Risk Factors Among Young People in Palau

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chifa; Singeo, Singeru Travis; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Honjo, Kaori; Mita, Takashi; Ikerdeu, Edolem; Cui, Renzhe; Li, Yuanying; Watson, Berry Moon; Ngirmang, Gregorio; Iso, Hiroyasu; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    Background Although non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become the predominant health problems of Palauan society, there have been no comprehensive data on NCD risk factors available to develop effective control strategies. Therefore, the first Palauan national STEPwise approach to risk factor Surveillance (STEPS) was completed in mid-2013 to provide information on its adult population aged 25 to 64 years. This study aims to obtain corresponding data from the younger adults aged 18 to 24 years, who remained to be surveyed. Methods We conducted an epidemiological study, targeting the 18- to 24-year-old age group. A survey station and a mobile team were established to recruit voluntary participants dwelling in Koror. A slightly modified WHO STEPS instrument was used, including a structured questionnaire for behavioral risk factors, physical measurements, and blood tests. Results A total of 356 young people were recruited during the survey. In both sexes, nearly half of the participants were overweight/obese. The prevalence of hypertension was higher in men than in women (17.6% vs 1.7%). Raised blood glucose and impaired fasting glucose were observed in 3.5% and 5.2% of the total participants, respectively. About 36% of the subjects were observed to have raised levels of total cholesterol. More than 70% of the young people were current tobacco users, in terms of all kinds of tobacco products. Conclusions The current survey, for the first time, revealed a high prevalence of NCD risk factors, especially overweight/obesity and tobacco use, among young people in Palau. This indicates that swift measures against NCDs are required even in this young age group. PMID:25787240

  3. Profile of Non-communicable Disease Risk Factors Among Young People in Palau.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chifa; Singeo, Singeru Travis; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Honjo, Kaori; Mita, Takashi; Ikerdeu, Edolem; Cui, Renzhe; Li, Yuanying; Watson, Berry Moon; Ngirmang, Gregorio; Iso, Hiroyasu; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    Although non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become the predominant health problems of Palauan society, there have been no comprehensive data on NCD risk factors available to develop effective control strategies. Therefore, the first Palauan national STEPwise approach to risk factor Surveillance (STEPS) was completed in mid-2013 to provide information on its adult population aged 25 to 64 years. This study aims to obtain corresponding data from the younger adults aged 18 to 24 years, who remained to be surveyed. We conducted an epidemiological study, targeting the 18- to 24-year-old age group. A survey station and a mobile team were established to recruit voluntary participants dwelling in Koror. A slightly modified WHO STEPS instrument was used, including a structured questionnaire for behavioral risk factors, physical measurements, and blood tests. A total of 356 young people were recruited during the survey. In both sexes, nearly half of the participants were overweight/obese. The prevalence of hypertension was higher in men than in women (17.6% vs 1.7%). Raised blood glucose and impaired fasting glucose were observed in 3.5% and 5.2% of the total participants, respectively. About 36% of the subjects were observed to have raised levels of total cholesterol. More than 70% of the young people were current tobacco users, in terms of all kinds of tobacco products. The current survey, for the first time, revealed a high prevalence of NCD risk factors, especially overweight/obesity and tobacco use, among young people in Palau. This indicates that swift measures against NCDs are required even in this young age group.

  4. Acute Kidney Injury in Mechanically Ventilated Patients: The Risk Factor Profile Depends on the Timing of Aki Onset.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Raúl; Nin, Nicolás; Peñuelas, Oscar; Ferreiro, Alejandro; Rios, Fernando; Marin, Maria Carmen; Raymondos, Konstantinos; Lorente, Jose A; Koh, Younsuck; Hurtado, Javier; Gonzalez, Marco; Abroug, Fekri; Jibaja, Manuel; Arabi, Yaseen; Moreno, Rui; Matamis, Dimitros; Anzueto, Antonio; Esteban, Andres

    2017-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication in patients under mechanical ventilation (MV). We aimed to assess the risk factors for AKI with particular emphasis on those potentially preventable. Retrospective analysis of a large, multinational database of MV patients with >24 h of MV and normal renal function at admission. AKI was defined according to creatinine-based KDIGO criteria. Risk factors were analyzed according to the time point at which AKI occurred: early (≤48 h after ICU admission, AKIE) and late (day 3 to day 7 of ICU stay, AKIL). A conditional logistic regression model was used to identify variables independently associated with AKI. Three thousand two hundred six patients were included. Seven hundred patients had AKI (22%), the majority of them AKIE (547/704). The risk factor profile was highly dependent upon the timing of AKI onset. In AKIE risk factors were older age; SAPS II score; postoperative and cardiac arrest as the reasons for MV; worse cardiovascular SOFA, pH, serum creatinine, and platelet count; higher level of peak pressure and Vt/kg; and fluid overload at admission. In contrast, AKIL was linked mostly to events that occurred after admission (lower platelet count and pH; ICU-acquired sepsis; and fluid overload). None ventilation-associated parameters were identify as risk factors for AKIL. In the first 48 h, risk factors are associated with the primary disease and the patient's condition at admission. Subsequently, emergent events like sepsis and organ dysfunction appear to be predictive factors making prevention a challenge.

  5. Betaine supplementation improves the atherogenic risk factor profile in a transgenic mouse model of hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Schwahn, B C; Wang, X-L; Mikael, L G; Wu, Q; Cohn, J; Jiang, H; Maclean, K N; Rozen, R

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the lipotropic action of betaine on plasma lipoproteins and tissue lipids. Adult mice, wild type (+/+) or heterozygous (+/-) for a disruption of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) gene, were supplemented with betaine for 1 year and compared with mice on control diets. Outcome measures were plasma homocysteine and lipoprotein levels, aortic and liver morphology, and liver staining for 3-nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress marker) and Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I). We also investigated short-term effects of supplemental betaine on plasma lipoproteins in Mthfr +/+ and +/- mice. Both genotypes showed significantly lower plasma homocysteine after long-term betaine supplementation, and lower plasma triglycerides and higher HDL-cholesterol after both short- and long-term betaine. Lipid accumulation in liver and aortic wall tended to be lower in Mthfr+/+ compared to Mthfr+/- mice and in betaine-supplemented compared to unsupplemented mice. Nitrotyrosine staining was higher and ApoA-I staining was lower in livers of Mthfr+/- compared to Mthfr+/+ mice. Betaine did not affect staining of nitrotyrosine but increased ApoA-I staining. A significant negative correlation was observed between plasma homocysteine and liver ApoA-I. Mild MTHFR deficiency in mice is associated with increased risk for atherosclerotic disease. Betaine has a lipotropic effect, which is associated with a reduction in homocysteine, an increase in ApoA-I and an amelioration of the atherogenic risk profile.

  6. Hematological profile and risk factors associated with pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Quetta, Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Shafee, Muhammad; Abbas, Ferhat; Ashraf, Muhammad; Alam Mengal, Mohammad; Kakar, Niamatullah; Ahmad, Zafar; Ali, Fawad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic debilitating infectious disease affecting more than one third of the global population. This study was designed to investigate different peripheral blood parameters and risk factors in TB patients. Methods: A total of 600 (Male, 238 and Female, 362) aging 20-80 Years patients with clinical signs of prolonged cough, chest pain and fever, were evaluated for peripheral blood parameters using hematology analyzer. All the informations related to the disease were collected from the patients and recorded using predesigned questionnaire. Results: Erythrocytic Sedimentation Rate (ESR), Hemoglobin (Hb) and lymphocytes were markedly changed in both sexes. Hemoglobin was recorded lower than normal value in 55% and 53% of male and female population respectively. Total leukocyte count was also lower than normal values in 8% and 6% of male and female respectively. Similarly neutropenia was observed in 5% and 8% cases, while neutrophilia was recorded as 60% and 64% in male and female patients respectively. Lymphocytopenia was also observed in 59% and 43% patients in male and female respectively. Illiteracy, smoking habits, overcrowding and living in shared houses were the main associated risk factors contributing in the enhancement of the disease. Conclusion: The disease was present significantly more in females and was relatively higher in older patients. Different hematological parameters like Erythrocytic sedimentation Rate (ESR), platelets and leukocytes work as hallmark and help the clinicians in early diagnosis of the disease. Malnutrition, smoking tobacco, living in shared houses, illiteracy and poverty were the common risk factors contributing to the dissemination of the tuberculosis in the target area population. PMID:24639827

  7. Different risk factor profiles distinguish early-onset from late-onset BKV-replication.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, Thomas; Babel, Nina; Reinke, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Two of three reactivations of latent BKV-infection occur within the first 6 months after renal transplantation. However, a clear differentiation between early-onset and late-onset BKV-replication is lacking. Here, we studied all kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) at our single transplant center between 2004 and 2012. A total of 103 of 862 KTRs were diagnosed with BK viremia (11.9%), among which 24 KTRs (2.8%) showed progression to BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVN). Sixty-seven KTRs with early-onset BKV-replication (65%) and 36 KTRs with late-onset BKV-replication (35%) were identified. A control group of 598 KTRs without BKV-replication was used for comparison. Lymphocyte-depleting induction, CMV-reactivation, and acute rejection increased the risk of early-onset BKV-replication (P < 0.05). Presensitized KTRs undergoing renal retransplantation were those at increased risk of late-onset BKV-replication (P < 0.05). Among KTRs with BK viremia, higher doses of mycophenolate increased the risk of progression to BKVN (P = 0.004). KTRs with progression to BKVN showed inferior allograft function (P < 0.05). KTRs with late-onset BK viremia were more likely not to recover to baseline creatinine after BKV-replication (P = 0.018). Our data suggest different risk factors in the pathogenesis of early-onset and late-onset BKV-reactivation. While a more intensified immunosuppression is associated with early-onset BKV-replication, a chronic inflammatory state in presensitized KTRs may contribute to late-onset BKV-replication.

  8. [Clinical and demographic profile and risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Carlos; Pacheco, Carlos; Jaimes, Fabián

    2017-01-24

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea. The increasing incidence added to a lower rate of response to the initial treatment and higher rates of relapse has generated a higher burden of the disease. To determine the clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients with C. difficile infection. We made a nested case-cohort study. We reviewed medical records of the patients with nosocomial diarrhea for whom an assay for toxin A-B of C. difficile had been requested from February, 2010, to February, 2012. We defined case as a patient with diarrhea and a positive assay for the toxin, and control as those patients with a negative assay for the toxin. We collected data on demographic and clinical characteristics, risk factors, hospital length of stay, treatment, and complications. We collected data from 123 patients during the follow-up period, 30 of whom were positive for the toxin. Mean age in the study population was 49 years and 60% were men. The main symptoms were abdominal pain (35%) and fever (34%). The principal complications were electrolytic alteration and severe sepsis with secondary acute kidney injury. Mortality was 13% and independent factors associated to the appearance of the infection were the use of proton pump inhibitors and previous gastrointestinal tract surgery. The use of proton pump inhibitors and previous gastrointestinal tract surgery were factors associated to C. difficile infection.

  9. Lipid profile and cardiovascular risk factors among first-year Brazilian university students in São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Costa Silva Zemdegs, J; Barreto Corsi, L; De Castro Coelho, L; Duarte Pimentel, G; Toyomi Hirai, A; Sachs, A

    2011-01-01

    The surveillance of cardiovascular risk factors has been recommended worldwide. The current study is aimed to estimate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among first-year students from a public university in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. A cross-sectional study of 56 first-year students, of both genders, was performed. Information about demographic characteristics, family history of chronic diseases, smoking, and physical activity was obtained by means of a standardised questionnaire. Anthropometrical parameters (BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage), metabolic parameters (glycaemia, serum lipid profile), and dietary data (total energy intake, percentage of total energy from macronutrients, cholesterol and dietary fiber) were assessed. The risk of cardiovascular diseases was characterised by family history of cardiovascular diseases (44.6%), smoking (10.7%), physical inactivity (35.7%), borderline high total cholesterol and LDL-c levels (16.1% and 5.4, respectively), decreased HDL-c levels (8.9%), increased triglyceride levels (8.9%), and overweight and obesity (17.8% and 7.1%, respectively). The diet of the students was inadequate: it was high in fat and protein, and low in carbohydrate and dietary fibre. The prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in young adults draws attention to the need to adopt preventive plans in the university setting.

  10. Risk factors, lipid profile, and histopathological study of oral cancers in Kolar district: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Amith; Shashidhar, Kurpad Nagaraj; Anantharamaiah, Hemalatha; Rangareddy, Harish; Sathyanarayana, Vinaya Babu

    2014-01-01

    To estimate serum lipid profile in oral squamous cell carcinoma and correlate the risk factors and lipid profile with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Lipid profile was done in agriculturists/laborers in the age group of 30-70 years; 56 subjects (cases = 28, control = 28) were included. Study was carried out for a duration of four months; statistical analyses applied were mean, standard deviation, and independent 't' test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Eleven cases had buccal mucosa cancer, nine had tongue carcinoma, and eight had gingivobuccal sulcus carcinoma. Lipid profile such as total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol, and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) were marginally and slightly elevated in cases compared to controls. HDL was grossly decreased in cases compared to controls. There was a significant association between HDL and squamous cell carcinoma; maximum number of SCC had a history of smoking in the range of 10-19 years, irrespective of other lipid parameters, constrained to the fact that lipids are genetically determined, have geographical variation, and are highly skewed.

  11. Risk factor profile for non-communicable diseases among Mishing tribes in Assam, India: results from a WHO STEPs survey.

    PubMed

    Misra, Palash Jyoti; Mini, G K; Thankappan, K R

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive risk factor profile of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) has not been reported from tribal population in India. This survey was carried out to assess the prevalence of NCD risk factors among Mishing tribes in Assam using the WHO STEPs approach. A total of 332 individuals of the Mishing tribe (men 54%) aged 25-64 yr were selected from Tinsukia district by multistage cluster sampling. Using the WHO STEPs approach information was collected on demographics, STEP 1 variables (tobacco, alcohol, physical activity, diet) and measured STEP 2 variables (weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure). Multivariate analysis was used to find the relation between STEP 1 and STEP 2 variables. Overall, tobacco use was 84 per cent (men 94%; women 73%, p0 <0.001) and alcohol use was 67 per cent (men 82%; women 50%, p0 <0.05); 86 per cent reported vigorous physical activity, (men 91%, women 82%; p0 < 0.05). Sixty eight per cent reported to consume unhealthy diet (less than five servings of fruits and vegetables/day), 11 per cent had abdominal obesity, 16 per cent were overweight and 26 per cent had hypertension. Non users of tobacco and those who consumed more fruits and vegetables had higher prevalence of overweight ( p0 <0.05). Among the hypertensives, 24 per cent were aware, 17 per cent treated and 2.4 per cent controlled their hypertension. Older individuals had higher hypertension prevalence ( p0 <0.05) compared to younger individuals. Tobacco use, alcohol use and unhealthy diet habits were high among men and women in this population and were major NCD risk factors. An integrated approach of culturally appropriate population level and high risk strategies are warranted to reduce these risk factors and to enhance adequate control of hypertension.

  12. Risk factor profile for non-communicable diseases among Mishing tribes in Assam, India: Results from a WHO STEPs survey

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Palash Jyoti; Mini, G.K.; Thankappan, K.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: A comprehensive risk factor profile of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) has not been reported from tribal population in India. This survey was carried out to assess the prevalence of NCD risk factors among Mishing tribes in Assam using the WHO STEPs approach. Methods: A total of 332 individuals of the Mishing tribe (men 54%) aged 25-64 yr were selected from Tinsukia district by multistage cluster sampling. Using the WHO STEPs approach information was collected on demographics, STEP 1 variables (tobacco, alcohol, physical activity, diet) and measured STEP 2 variables (weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure). Multivariate analysis was used to find the relation between STEP 1 and STEP 2 variables. Results: Overall, tobacco use was 84 per cent (men 94%; women 73%, P<0.001) and alcohol use was 67 per cent (men 82%; women 50%, P<0.05); 86 per cent reported vigorous physical activity, (men 91%, women 82%; P < 0.05). Sixty eight per cent reported to consume unhealthy diet (less than five servings of fruits and vegetables/day), 11 per cent had abdominal obesity, 16 per cent were overweight and 26 per cent had hypertension. Non users of tobacco and those who consumed more fruits and vegetables had higher prevalence of overweight (P<0.05). Among the hypertensives, 24 per cent were aware, 17 per cent treated and 2.4 per cent controlled their hypertension. Older individuals had higher hypertension prevalence (P<0.05) compared to younger individuals. Interpretation & conclusions: Tobacco use, alcohol use and unhealthy diet habits were high among men and women in this population and were major NCD risk factors. An integrated approach of culturally appropriate population level and high risk strategies are warranted to reduce these risk factors and to enhance adequate control of hypertension. PMID:25366204

  13. Cardiovascular risk-factor profiles of normal and overweight children and adolescents: insights from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    PubMed

    Maximova, Katerina; Kuhle, Stefan; Davidson, Zachary; Fung, Christina; Veugelers, Paul J

    2013-08-01

    There is no cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile in a representative sample of Canadian children and adolescents according to weight status. The 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey, launched by Statistics Canada in partnership with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, provides an opportunity to address this gap. The Canadian Health Measures Survey collected information at 15 sites across Canada from March 2007 to March 2009 from Canadians aged 6 to 79 years living in private households. The survey consisted of a household interview and a visit to a mobile examination centre to perform physical measurements, including anthropometry, blood pressure, and biospecimen collection. The present analysis is based on data from 2087 children and adolescents aged 6 to 19 years. Children and adolescents who were overweight or obese had on average higher mean concentrations and higher prevalence of adverse levels of CVD risk factors (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and insulin levels) than did normal-weight children and adolescents. Adjustment for covariates (gender, age, household education, household income adequacy, and province of residence) and compliance with recommendations for daily steps, soft-drink intake, and sleep duration did not alter the differences in CVD risk factors between normal weight and overweight or obese children and adolescents. Results of this study underscore the importance of excess weight as an independent risk factor for CVD health in early life and call for primary prevention of overweight and obesity in childhood to reduce CVD risk. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spanish version of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale: factor structure, reliability, and validity in Mexican adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robles-García, Rebeca; Fresán, Ana; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Conrod, Patricia; Gómez, Diego; de Quevedo Y Domínguez, María Emilia G; Rafful, Claudia; Real, Tania; Vásquez, Lucía; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2014-12-30

    To validate the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) in a sample of Mexican adolescents, this brief 23-item self-report questionnaire has been developed to screen four high-risk personality traits for substance misuse, to guide targeted approaches to prevention of addictions in adolescents. The scale has been previously validated in United Kingdom, Canada, Sri Lanka and China. A sample of 671 adolescents aged 11-17 completed a Spanish translation of the SURPS as well as other measures of personality and substance use. The Spanish translation of the SURPS has moderate internal consistency, and demonstrated a four-factor structure very similar to the original scale. The four subscales show good concurrent validity and three of the subscales were found to correlate with measures of substance use. The Spanish translation of the SURPS seems to be a valid and sensitive scale that can be used in a Mexican adolescent population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that affects ... these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer . Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking ...

  16. Lipid Profile and Its Association with Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in the Highlanders of Lhasa, Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Deji; Stigum, Hein; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Luobu, Ouzhu; Thelle, Dag S.; Nafstad, Per; Bjertness, Espen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Sherpa, Lhamo Y., Deji, Hein Stigum, Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong, Ouzhu Luobu, Dag S. Thelle, Per Nafstad, and Espen Bjertness. Lipid profile and its association with risk factors for coronary heart disease in highlanders of Lhasa, Tibet. High Alt. Med. Biol. 12:57–63, 2011.—The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of abnormal lipid levels and its association with selected coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in the Tibetan population living at 3660 meters above sea level in Lhasa, Tibet. Three hundred seventy one randomly selected male and female, aged 30 to 70 yr took part in the study. Based on the National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCED) adult treatment panel ATP-III 2004 criteria, the age-adjusted prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was 12.0%; high triglycerides (TG), 33.4%; high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), 4.8%; and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C); 24.3%. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, diet, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), an increase in waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) by 0.1 unit was associated with a statistically significant increase in TG, total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C by 0.25 mmol/L, 0.24 mmol/L, and 0.18 mmol/L, respectively. Female gender increased HDL-C by 0.18 mmol/L when compared with males. Age-adjusted prevalences of Framingham CHD risk score for males and females were 16.3% and 0.6%, respectively. This study demonstrated a high prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in males, a higher prevalence of low HDL-C in females, and a high hypercholesterolemia prevalence in both genders. However, further longitudinal studies assessing CHD risk factors in high altitude natives are required. PMID:21452966

  17. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  18. Construct Validity of the Infant Motor Profile: Relation with Prenatal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Fidler, Vaclav; Middelburg, Karin J.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The Infant Motor Profile (IMP) is a qualitative assessment of motor behaviour of infants aged 3 to 18 months. The aim of this study was to investigate construct validity of the IMP through the relation of IMP scores with prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal variables, including the presence of brain pathology indicated by neonatal ultrasound…

  19. Construct Validity of the Infant Motor Profile: Relation with Prenatal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; La Bastide-Van Gemert, Sacha; Fidler, Vaclav; Middelburg, Karin J.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The Infant Motor Profile (IMP) is a qualitative assessment of motor behaviour of infants aged 3 to 18 months. The aim of this study was to investigate construct validity of the IMP through the relation of IMP scores with prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal variables, including the presence of brain pathology indicated by neonatal ultrasound…

  20. Urinary tract infection during pregnancy, angiogenic factor profiles, and risk of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Easter, Sarah Rae; Cantonwine, David E; Zera, Chloe A; Lim, Kee-Hak; Parry, Samuel I; McElrath, Thomas F

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of research, and much progress in discernment of biomarkers in the maternal circulation, the pathogenesis of preeclampsia (PE) remains elusive. The pathophysiology of PE is believed to involve aberrant placentation and an associated increase in systemic inflammation. In this conceptualization, PE becomes more likely when the level of systemic inflammatory burden inherent in pregnancy itself exceeds the maternal capacity to compensate for this additional stress. If this is the case, then it is possible to hypothesize that conditions, such as infectious disease, that increase systemic inflammatory burden should also increase the risk of PE. As urinary tract infection (UTI) represents a common source of inflammation during pregnancy, we tested whether presence of UTI during pregnancy increased the odds of developing PE. Prior work has documented this association. However many of these studies were limited by small cohort sizes and insufficient control for covariates. The present study is a secondary analysis of a robust contemporary obstetrical cohort recruited to examine the ability of longitudinally sampled maternal angiogenic concentrations to predict PE. We hypothesize that the occurrence of UTI during a pregnancy is associated with the later occurrence of PE in that pregnancy. As PE is believed to be associated with aberrations in systemic angiogenic levels (placental growth factor and soluble isoform of VEGF receptor), we further hypothesize that there will be significant interactions between maternal angiogenic protein levels and the occurrence of UTI. Women aged ≥18 years (n = 2607) were recruited and followed up prospectively from the initiation of prenatal care through delivery at 3 regional academic centers. PE was defined by American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists criteria and was independently validated by a panel of physicians. UTI was defined by the presence of clinical symptoms necessitating treatment in addition to

  1. Cumulative Socioeconomic Status Risk, Allostatic Load, and Adjustment: A Prospective Latent Profile Analysis With Contextual and Genetic Protective Factors

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; Chen, Yi-fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Evans, Gary W.; Beach, Steven R. H.; Windle, Michael; Simons, Ronald L.; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Philibert, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The health disparities literature identified a common pattern among middle-aged African Americans that includes high rates of chronic disease along with low rates of psychiatric disorders despite exposure to high levels of cumulative SES risk. The current study was designed to test hypotheses about the developmental precursors to this pattern. Hypotheses were tested with a representative sample of 443 African American youths living in the rural South. Cumulative SES risk and protective processes were assessed at 11-13 years; psychological adjustment was assessed at ages 14-18 years; genotyping at the 5-HTTLPR was conducted at age 16 years; and allostatic load (AL) was assessed at age 19 years. A Latent Profile Analysis identified 5 profiles that evinced distinct patterns of SES risk, AL, and psychological adjustment, with 2 relatively large profiles designated as focal profiles: a physical health vulnerability profile characterized by high SES risk/high AL/low adjustment problems, and a resilient profile characterized by high SES risk/low AL/low adjustment problems. The physical health vulnerability profile mirrored the pattern found in the adult health disparities literature. Multinomial logistic regression analyses indicated that carrying an s allele at the 5-HTTLPR and receiving less peer support distinguished the physical health vulnerability profile from the resilient profile. Protective parenting and planful self-regulation distinguished both focal profiles from the other 3 profiles. The results suggest the public health importance of preventive interventions that enhance coping and reduce the effects of stress across childhood and adolescence. PMID:22709130

  2. Bacteriological profile and associated risk factors of neonatal sepsis in Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital Thapathali, Kathmandu.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, N; Shah, P K; Acharya, G; Vaidya, K M

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal Sepsis is one of the most common reasons for admission to neonatal units in developing countries. It is also a major cause of mortality in both developed and developing countries. Identification of the common bacteria and risk factors causing such infections and their susceptibility patterns will provide necessary information for timely intervention. This study was carried out to determine the bacteriological profile and associated risk factors of neonatal sepsis in Paropakar Maternity and Women's hospital. A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted among neonates suspected of neonatal sepsis. Blood culture was performed and organisms were identified and antibiotic susceptibility was carried out with standard microbiological methods. Data were analysed by using SPSS. Ver. 16 software. The positive yield of blood culture was 21%. The most common isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas spp. In Antibiotic susceptibility pattern Gentamycin showed the highest sensitivity to all types of isolated organisms. Vancomycin sensitivity was highest for Gram positive organism and Ciprofloxacin was most effective for Gram negative organisms isolated. Ampicillin and Amoxycillin were the least effective drug. Multiple drug resistance was observed in 77.15% of isolates. Prematurity, low birth weight and maternal pyrexia before delivery were found to be strongly associated with neonatal sepsis. Gram positive organisms were more prevalent than gram negative organisms.

  3. Sedentary lifestyle and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors, insulin resistance and inflammatory profile.

    PubMed

    León-Latre, Montserrat; Moreno-Franco, Belén; Andrés-Esteban, Eva M; Ledesma, Marta; Laclaustra, Martín; Alcalde, Víctor; Peñalvo, José L; Ordovás, José M; Casasnovas, José A

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the association between sitting time and biomarkers of insulin resistance and inflammation in a sample of healthy male workers. Cross-sectional study carried out in a sample of 929 volunteers belonging to the Aragon Workers' Health Study cohort. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, pharmacological and laboratory data were collected: lipids-total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoproteins A-1 and B-100, lipoprotein (a)-, insulin resistance-glucose, glycated hemoglobin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, insulin, and triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio-, and inflammatory profile-C-reactive protein and leukocytes. Information on sitting time and physical activity was assessed using a questionnaire. Sedentary behavior was analyzed in terms of prevalences and medians, according to tertiles, using a multivariate model (crude and adjusted linear regression) with biomarkers of inflammation and insulin resistance. The most sedentary individuals had higher body mass index, greater waist circumference, and higher systolic blood pressure, with a significant upward trend in each tertile. Likewise, they had a worse lipid profile with a higher C-reactive protein level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and insulin concentration. In the multivariate analysis, we observed a significant association between the latter parameters and sitting time in hours (log C-reactive protein [β = 0.07], log homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index [β = 0.05], triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio [β = 0.23], and insulin [β = 0.44]), which remained after adjustment for metabolic equivalents-h/week. Workers who spend more time sitting show a worse inflammatory and insulin resistance profile independently of the physical activity performed. Copyright © 2013

  4. The Study of Lipid Profile, Diet and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children Born to Parents Having Premature Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, MR; Sandeep, B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidemia is a marker for ischemic heart disease (IHD), which can be detected in early childhood and tracks to adulthood. Dyslipidemia, along with factors like diet, obesity and sedentary activity, increases the risk of a child developing IHD in adulthood. Early detection and modification of these risk factors can prevent IHD. Objectives: To study the lipid profile in children born to parents with history of premature IHD and also to study the effect of diet, lifestyle factors, and obesity in the study group. Materials and Methods: Fifty children of parents with premature IHD and 50 control children without any family history of IHD were analyzed for cardiovascular risk factors such as lipid profile, body mass index (BMI) and hypertension. The effects of modifiable risk factors like diet and physical activity on lipid profile were analyzed. The correlation between parent and child lipid profile was studied. Results: Mean total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly higher (P<0.05) in children with family history of IHD as compared to children without family history. There was a positive correlation between lipid levels of parents and their children. Children with elevated BMI, a sedentary lifestyle, and excess oily/junk diet intake showed increased incidence of dyslipidemia (P<0.05). Conclusions: Children of IHD patients have significant incidence of dyslipidemia. The risk factors like BMI, diet and physical activity increase the incidence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, all children of premature IHD patients should be screened for dyslipidemia. PMID:22279260

  5. Association of lipid profile and waist circumference as cardiovascular risk factors for overweight and obesity among school children in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Nasser M; Yousef, Mervat

    2012-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a national as well as worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of overweight and obesity among Qatari children with lipid profile and waist circumference as adverse cardiovascular risk factors in children aged 6–11 years. International Obesity Task Force reference values were used to screen for overweight and obesity. Methods A cross-sectional study in a randomly selected sample was conducted in 315 Qatari primary school students aged 6–11 years. Anthropometric measurements, including body weight, height, waist circumference, and body mass index were calculated for 151 girls and 164 boys. Weight categories were based on International Obesity Task Force reference values. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides were measured, and atherogenic index was calculated. Results In total, 31.71% of boys and 32.78% of girls were overweight or obese. Overweight and obese children screened against International Obesity Task Force reference values had a significantly increased risk of high waist circumference (P < 0.0001), hypertriglyceridemia (P = 0.002), low HDL-C (P = 0.017), and atherogenic index (P = 0.021) compared with children who were not overweight or obese. The partial correlation coefficient for the cardiovascular risk marker of waist circumference indicated a positive significant association with total cholesterol (r = 0.465, P = 0.003), triglycerides (r = 0.563, P < 0.001), and LDL-C (r = 0.267, P = 0.003), and a significant negative association with HDL-C (r = −0.361, P = 0.004). Overweight and obesity significantly increase the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs) of cardiovascular risk factors as follows: hypertriglyceridemia (OR 6.34, CI 2.49–13.44, P < 0.0001); LDL-C (OR 3.18, CI 1.04–9.75, P = 0.043); hypercholesterolemia (OR 1.88, CI 1.10–3.19, P = 0.020); and

  6. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  7. Risk factors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Connors, K C; Sheehan, Timothy J; Vaughan, James S

    2005-06-01

    Minimize surprises on your financial statement by adopting a model for integrated risk management that: Examines interrelationships among operations, investments, and financing. Incorporates concepts of the capital asset pricing model to manage unexpected volatility

  8. [Cardiovascular risk factors in women].

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye

    2010-03-01

    It is estimated that at least 80% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) have conventional risk factors and optimization of these risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality due to this disease considerably. Contemporary women have increased burden of some of these risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and smoking. Turkish women have a worse CV risk profile than Turkish men in some aspects. Risk stratification systems such as Framingham have a tendency of underestimating the risk in women. Coronary artery disease remains in vessel wall for a longer period of time in women; therefore obstructive disease appear later in their lifespan necessitating risk stratification systems for estimating their lifetime risk.

  9. Sugar-sweetened and diet beverage consumption is associated with cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bortsov, Andrey V; Liese, Angela D; Bell, Ronny A; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Hamman, Richard F; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J; Lawrence, Jean M; Maahs, David M; McKeown, Robert; Marcovina, Santica M; Thomas, Joan; Williams, Desmond E; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes is high and associated with age, gender, and race/ethnicity. It has also been shown that youth with type 1 diabetes often do not follow dietary recommendations. The objective of this cross-sectional observational study was to explore the association of sugar-sweetened and diet beverage intake with A1c, plasma lipids, adiponectin, leptin, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure in youth with type 1 diabetes. We examined data from 1,806 youth age 10-22 years with type 1 diabetes, of which 22% were minority (10% Hispanic, 8% African Americans, 4% other races) and 48% were female. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet beverage, and mineral water intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical covariates, physical activity and total energy intake, high sugar-sweetened beverage intake (at least one serving per day vs. none), was associated with higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and plasma triglycerides, but not with A1c. High diet beverage intake was associated with higher A1c, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. These associations were partially confounded by body mass index, saturated fat and total fiber intake. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake may have an adverse effect on CVD risk in youth with type 1 diabetes. Diet beverage intake may be a marker of unhealthy lifestyle which, in turn, is associated with worse metabolic control and CVD risk profile in these youth. Youth with diabetes should be encouraged to minimize sugar-sweetened beverage intake.

  10. Sugar-sweetened and diet beverage consumption is associated with cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bortsov, Andrey V.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamman, Richard F.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Maahs, David M.; McKeown, Robert; Marcovina, Santica M.; Thomas, Joan; Williams, Desmond E.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes is high and associated with age, gender, and race/ethnicity. It has also been shown that youth with type 1 diabetes often do not follow dietary recommendations. The objective of this cross-sectional observational study was to explore the association of sugar-sweetened and diet beverage intake with A1c, plasma lipids, adiponectin, leptin, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure in youth with type 1 diabetes. We examined data from 1,806 youth age 10–22 years with type 1 diabetes, of which 22% were minority (10% Hispanic, 8% African Americans, 4% other races) and 48% were female. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet beverage, and mineral water intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical covariates, physical activity and total energy intake, high sugar-sweetened beverage intake (at least one serving per day vs. none), was associated with higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and plasma triglycerides, but not with A1c. High diet beverage intake was associated with higher A1c, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. These associations were partially confounded by body mass index, saturated fat and total fiber intake. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake may have an adverse effect on CVD risk in youth with type 1 diabetes. Diet beverage intake may be a marker of unhealthy lifestyle which, in turn, is associated with worse metabolic control and CVD risk profile in these youth. Youth with diabetes should be encouraged to minimize sugar-sweetened beverage intake. PMID:21249401

  11. Musculoskeletal complaints in cardiac rehabilitation: Prevalence and impact on cardiovascular risk factor profile and functional and psychosocial status.

    PubMed

    Rocha, José Afonso; Allison, Thomas G; Santoalha, José Miguel; Araújo, Vítor; Pereira, Fernando Parada; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2015-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and their association with risk factor profile and functional and psychosocial status in patients on a cardiac rehabilitation program. In this cross-sectional study of 449 patients admitted within three months of an acute coronary syndrome, patients were divided into those with (MSC+) and those without (MSC-) musculoskeletal complaints. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Short Form 36 Health Survey were used to assess psychosocial status and quality of life, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire for physical activity. Functional capacity was estimated from exercise testing. Musculoskeletal pain was present in 119 patients (27%), mainly in the lower limbs (56%). MSC+ were older (mean 56.5±9.9 vs. 53.2±9.5 years; p<0.001) and more frequently women (20.2% vs. 9.1%; p<0.001). MSC+ had a higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (68.6% vs. 51.2%; p<0.001), hypertension (51.7% vs. 35.5%; p<0.001), obesity (29.4% vs. 17.9%; p<0.001) and metabolic syndrome (44.5% vs. 31.5%; p<0.001). MSC+ showed higher body mass index and waist circumference, and lower physical activity levels (p<0.05), as well as lower functional capacity (8.6±2.2 vs. 9.6±2.1 MET; p<0.05), higher scores for depression (6 [3-9] vs. 3 [1-7]; p<0.05) and anxiety (7 [3-10] vs. 5 [2-8]; p<0.05), and lower scores for physical (44.1±8.7 vs. 47.6±7.6; p<0.05) and mental (39.2±13.0 vs. 44.0±13.0; p<0.05) quality of life. Musculoskeletal complaints are common in cardiac rehabilitation and predict lower levels of physical activity, worse cardiovascular risk factor profile, and poorer functional capacity and psychosocial status, irrespective of age and gender. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Lipid profile changes during the first year after kidney transplantation: risk factors and influence of the immunosuppressive drug regimen.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, G A; Felipe, C R; Park, S I; Mandia-Sampaio, E L; Tedesco-Silva, H; Medina-Pestana, J O

    2011-12-01

    This study analyzed the incidence, time course, and risk factors associated with dyslipidemia during the first year after kidney transplantation among patients receiving various immunosuppressive regimens. The analysis included 474 kidney transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine (CSA) combined with sirolimus (SRL; n=137) or mycophenolate (MMF, n=58) or everolimus (EVR, n=47); or SRL combined with MMF (n=32); or tacrolimus (TAC) combined with SRL (n=86) or MMF (n=114). All patients received prednisone. We evaluated the influence of demographic features, clinical outcomes, and statin use on lipid profiles during the first year after transplantation. total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (hdl-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (ldl-C), non-HDL-C, TC:HDL-C, LDL-C:HDL-C, TG:HDL-C. Lipid profiles were within the recommended ranges in 28% of patients pretransplantation and in 10% at 1 year; 27% of them received statins. At 1 year, LDL-C<100 mg/dL was observed in 31.8% of patients but more than 35% of these patients still showed other lipid fractions or ratios outside recommended target concentrations. Among all patients with LDL-C>100 mg/dL, almost 70% to 80% had other lipid fractions or ratios within target ranges. A logistic regression analysis showed age, gender, time on dialysis, diabetes, type of calcineurin inhibitor (CSA vs TAC), adjunctive therapy (SRL/EVR vs MMF) and prednisone dose to be associated with dyslipidemia. Dyslipidemia is frequent at 1 year after transplantation. The lack of agreement among changes observed in lipid fractions and ratios suggests that more studies are necessary to guide therapy besides targeting LDL-C concentrations as recommended by current guidelines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inflammation-modulating cytokine profile and lipid interaction in HIV-related risk factors for cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Elizabeth; Mduluza, Takafira; Nyagura, Mudavanhu; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Gomo, Zvenyika Alfred

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are associated with changes in plasma levels of lipoproteins, thus posing the risk of cardiovascular complications in infected individuals. The alteration in plasma lipoprotein levels results from dysregulation of inflammation-modulating cytokines that control lipid metabolism. Little is understood regarding the relationship between the cytokines and serum lipid levels, which have been reported to be altered in adults receiving ART. The objective of this study was to describe the profiles of inflammation-modulating cytokines and their relationship to lipids as cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in HIV infection. This observational cross-sectional study measured plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α, IL-4, total cholesterol (TC), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in HIV-infected and uninfected adults. A total of 219 HIV-infected participants were enrolled from an HIV treatment center; of them, 187 were receiving ART and 32 were ART naïve, while 65 were HIV-uninfected blood donors. HIV-infected individuals had higher levels of IL-10 (HIV-infected ART-naïve [P=0.0024] and ART-receiving [P=0.033]) than their uninfected counterparts. ART-naïve subjects had significantly higher plasma levels of IL-10 than ART-receiving subjects (P=0.0014). No significant difference was observed in plasma levels of IL-4 and TNF-α across the three groups. Regarding plasma lipoproteins, HDL-c levels were reduced in HIV ART-naïve (P=0.002) and ART-receiving (P=0.015) subjects compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Similarly, TC levels were lower in the HIV-infected than in the HIV-uninfected group regardless of whether the patients were undergoing ART or not (P<0.001). IL-10 levels correlated with TC levels in the HIV-uninfected group but not in the HIV-infected groups. Levels of HDL-c were reduced, while IL-10 plasma concentrations were elevated in HIV-infected individuals. A

  14. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  15. The distinctive profile of risk factors of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in comparison with other head and neck cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Abdulamir, AS; Hafidh, RR; Abdulmuhaimen, N; Abubakar, F; Abbas, KA

    2008-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and other head and neck cancer (HNCA) types show a great epidemiological variation in different regions of the world. NPC has multifactorial etiology and many interacting risk factors are involved in NPC development mainly Epstein Barr virus (EBV). There is a need to scrutinize the complicated network of risk factors affecting NPC and how far they are different from that of other HNCA types. Methods 122 HNCA patients and 100 control subjects were studied in the region of the Middle East. Three types of HNCA were involved in our study, NPC, carcinoma of larynx (CL), and hypopharyngeal carcinoma (HPC). The risk factors studied were the level of EBV serum IgG and IgA antibodies measured by ELISA, age, sex, smoking, alcohol intake, histology, and family history of the disease. Results EBV serum level of IgG and IgA antibodies was higher in NPC than CL, HPC, and control groups (p < 0.01). NPC was associated with lymphoepithelioma (LE) tumors, males, regular alcohol intake, and regular smoking while CL and HPC were not (p < 0.05). CL and HPC were associated with SCC tumors (p < 0.05). Furthermore, NPC, unlike CL and HPC groups, was not affected by the positive family history of HNCA (p > 0.05). The serum levels of EBV IgG and IgA antibodies were higher in LE tumors, regular smokers, younger patients, and negative family history groups of NPC patients than SCC tumors, non-regular smokers, older patients and positive family history groups respectively (p < 0.05) while this was not found in the regular alcoholics (p > 0.05). Conclusion It was concluded that risk factors of NPC deviate much from that of other HNCA. EBV, smoking, alcohol intake, LE tumors, male patient, and age > 54 years were hot risk factors of NPC while SCC and positive family history of the disease were not. Earlier incidence, smoking, LE tumors, and negative family history of the disease in NPC patients were associated much clearly with EBV. It is proposed that

  16. Distribution of osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based cohort: associations to risk factor profiles and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lombnæs, Guro Økelsrud; Magnusson, Karin; Østerås, Nina; Nordsletten, Lars; Risberg, May Arna; Hagen, Kåre Birger

    2017-04-27

    The objective of the study was to examine the hand-, knee- and hip osteoarthritis (OA) distribution, risk factor profiles and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a population-based OA cohort. Persons with self-reported OA responded to questionnaires and attended a clinical examination (N = 606). We analyzed cross-sectional associations to risk factor profiles and HRQoL dimensions (Short Form 36) in four mutually exclusive groups based on fulfillment of The American College of Rheumatology criteria: no OA (NOA), monoarticular upper extremity (hand) OA (MOAupper-ex.), monoarticular lower extremity (hip or knee) OA (MOAlower-ex.) and polyarticular OA (POA). Multivariate regression analyses and correspondence analysis were performed. The distribution of NOA, MOAupper-ex. MOAlower-ex. and POA was 21.1, 25.4, 22.4 and 31.0%, respectively. Compared to NOA, minor differences were found in risk factor profile in MOAupper-ex., whereas POA was significantly associated with sociodemographic, metabolic and mechanical features. The correspondence analysis identified different risk factor profiles between the four OA phenotypes, but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.13). Regarding HRQoL, neither OA groups were associated with poorer mental functioning. MOAlower-ex. and POA were associated with, among other things, poorer physical functioning (β = -6.2, 95% CI -11.2 to -1.2 and β = -12.5, 95% CI -17.4 to -7.9, respectively) and more pain (β = -5.4, 95% CI -10.4 to -0.3 and β = -10.5, 95% CI -15.3 to -5.8, respectively). In this cohort of persons with self-reported OA, POA was the most prevalent phenotype and was associated with an unfortunate risk factor profile and several diminished HRQoL dimensions. POA needs further attention in research and clinical care.

  17. Epidemiological profiles of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections in Malian women: Risk factors and relevance of disparities

    PubMed Central

    Bouare, Nouhoum; Gothot, Andre; Delwaide, Jean; Bontems, Sebastien; Vaira, Dolores; Seidel, Laurence; Gerard, Paul; Gerard, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To document the epidemiologic patterns and risk factors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in Mali in order to develop prevention means for both diseases. METHODS: Two prospective studies were conducted in Bamako in 2009 among 1000 pregnant women (i.e., young women) who consulted six reference health centers, and in 2010, among 231 older women who attended general practice in two hospitals. Antibody tests and molecular analysis (performed only for HCV) were used to quantify the frequencies of both infections. The data were collected from patients recruited through a questionnaire. Transmission risk factors of both diseases were identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: HCV seroprevalence was 0.2% for young and 6.5% for older women. HIV prevalence was similar in both populations (4.1% vs 6.1%). In older women, the analysis of risk factors highlighted an association between HCV infection and episodes of hospitalization (P < 0.01). The study did not show an association between HIV infection and the variables such as hospitalization, transfusion, tattoo, dental care, and endoscopy. A significant decrease of HIV seroprevalence was detected in young women who used condoms for contraception more than for other purposes (P < 0.01). By contrast, HIV seroprevalence was significantly increased in young women using condoms mainly to prevent sexual infections rather than for contraception (P < 0.01). No HCV/HIV coinfection was detected in our study. CONCLUSION: Risk factors and epidemiologic data of HIV and HCV as well as the absence of co-infection strongly suggest epidemiological disparities between these diseases. PMID:23671724

  18. Evaluation of Serum Magnesium, Lipid Profile and Various Biochemical Parameters as Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramavataram, DVSS; Patel, Payal A.; Rupani, Mihir P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic inflammatory disease, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than the general population. Chronic inflammatory conditions are likely to alter magnesium level and various biochemical parameters. Objectives To study the probable changes in serum magnesium, lipid profile and various biochemical parameters and to assess risk factors of CVD in newly diagnosed RA patients compared to controls. Materials and Methods We studied 50 newly diagnosed RA adult patients and 50 healthy individuals as controls. Serum magnesium, calcium, lipid profile, uric acid and other biochemical parameters were measured in study subjects. Results were expressed as Mean ± SD and compared between RA subjects and controls by Independent sample t-test and Pearson correlation. Results We found decreased serum magnesium and calcium in RA subjects compared to the controls (p < 0.001). RA subjects had atherogenic lipid profile characterized by elevated total cholesterol (p = 0.054), LDL cholesterol (p = 0.008) and decreased HDL cholesterol (p <0.001). Serum uric acid was higher in RA cases compared to controls (p = 0.025). Serum magnesium was negatively correlated with total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol in RA cases. Conclusion Decreased magnesium level, dyslipidemia and increased uric acid observed in our study together may be more potent risk factors for CVD in newly diagnosed RA subjects. We recommend that serum magnesium should be investigated as a part of cardiovascular risk management in RA. We suggest that decreased serum magnesium and increased serum uric acid may be considered as nontraditional risk factors of CVD in RA. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the impact of inflammation on various biochemical parameters and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with RA. PMID:26023546

  19. Transcriptional profiling revealed the anti-proliferative effect of MFN2 deficiency and identified risk factors in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yuqing; Zhang, Yanwei; Li, Rong; Gu, Ping; Xiong, Liwen; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Wei; Han, Baohui

    2016-07-01

    Mitofusin-2 (MFN2) was initially identified as a hyperplasia suppressor in hyper-proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of hypertensive rat arteries, which has also been implicated in various cancers. There exists a controversy in whether it is an oncogene or exerting anti-proliferative effect on tumor cells. Our previous cell cycle analysis and MTT assay showed that cell proliferation was inhibited in MFN2 deficient A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, without investigating the changes in regulatory network or addressing the underlying mechanisms. Here, we performed expression profiling in MFN2 knockdown A549 cells and found that cancer-related pathways were among the most susceptible pathways to MFN2 deficiency. Through comparison with expression profiling of a cohort consisting of 61 pairs of tumor-normal matched samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we teased out the specific pathways to address the impact that MFN2 ablation had on A549 cells, as well as identified a few genes whose expression level associated with clinicopathologic parameters. In addition, transcriptional factor target enrichment analysis identified E2F as a potential transcription factor that was deregulated in response to MFN2 deficiency. Although bioinformatics analysis usually entail further verification, our study provided considerable information for future scientific inquiries in related areas as well as a paradigm for characterizing perturbation in regulatory network.

  20. Effect of an individualised physical exercise program on lipid profile in sedentary patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rubio Pérez, Francisco Javier; Franco Bonafonte, Luis; Ibarretxe Guerediaga, Daiana; Oyon Belaza, Maria Pilar; Ugarte Peyron, Paola

    Physical exercise has become in an important tool in the reduction of cardiovascular risk. To evaluate the effectiveness of an unsupervised physical exercise program that on the physical condition and the lipid profile. The final sample included 49 sedentary men and women, who were non-smokers, with dyslipidaemia, overweight, and type1 obesity. The 4-month program included walking for 30-60minutes every day, and for three days a week, 30minutes of cycling at an intensity of 40-60% of maximum functional capacity, as well as isometric abdominals and static stretching. Anthropometrics, physical condition (6minute test), and the lipid profile were evaluated before and after the physical exercise program. The objective was to achieve a caloric expenditure between 1200-2000kcal/week. At the end of the program it was observed, in both sexes, that there was a decrease in total cholesterol (P<0.02), LDL cholesterol (P<0.01), VLDL cholesterol (P<0.01), and triglycerides (P<0.05), and an increase HDL cholesterol (P<0.05). There was also an increase in the distance travelled in the 6minute test of 52m in men and 39.5m in women (P<0.002), plus a decrease in the perception of fatigue on the Borg scale of 1.19 in men, and 0.96 in women (P<0.01). There were no anthropometric changes. The physical exercise improved physical condition and the lipid profile in the sample that has been studied, with 64% of participants continuing to do it. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is still unknown. Scientists ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  2. Newborn APOE genotype influences maternal lipid profile and the severity of high-risk pregnancy - preeclampsia: Interaction with maternal genotypes as a modulating risk factor in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Procopciuc, Lucia Maria; Caracostea, Gabriela; Zaharie, Gabriela; Stamatian, Florin

    2015-01-01

    To establish the role of the interaction between maternal and newborn apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes on the risk, lipid profile and prognosis of preeclampsia (PE). Forty-seven preeclamptic women and 94 normotensive pregnant women and their newborns were genotyped for APOE using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Maternal APOE-ε4 allele was associated with an about eight times higher risk of PE (adjusted OR = 8.4, 95% CI: 2.51-28.17, p = 0.001). The multivariate logistic regression model showed that the newborn APOE-ε4 allele was associated with an about six times higher risk of PE (adjusted OR = 5.6, 95% CI: 2.09-15.21, p = 0.001) for the given gestational age levels. Pregnant women with severe PE whose newborns carried the APOE-ε4 allele delivered at earlier gestational ages neonates with a lower birth weight compared to pregnant women with newborns negative for this allele. Higher TG and LDL-C levels and lower HDL-C levels were found in pregnant women with severe PE whose newborns were carriers of the APOE-ε4 allele compared to preeclamptic women whose newborns were carriers of the ε3/ε3 genotype. If we checked the combined effect of the mother/newborn genotypes on the risk of PE, we found that the risk to develop PE was 15.4-fold (p < 0.001) increased if mothers or newborns were carriers of the APOE-ε4 allele. The risk increased to 20.02 (p < 0.001) if both the mother and newborn were carriers of the APOE-ε4 allele. Our study confirms the maternal/newborn APOE genotype interaction influences the risk for PE, as well as prognosis and lipid profile.

  3. Identifying risk profiles for childhood obesity using recursive partitioning based on individual, familial, and neighborhood environment factors.

    PubMed

    Van Hulst, Andraea; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène; Gauvin, Lise; Kestens, Yan; Henderson, Mélanie; Barnett, Tracie A

    2015-02-15

    Few studies consider how risk factors within multiple levels of influence operate synergistically to determine childhood obesity. We used recursive partitioning analysis to identify unique combinations of individual, familial, and neighborhood factors that best predict obesity in children, and tested whether these predict 2-year changes in body mass index (BMI). Data were collected in 2005-2008 and in 2008-2011 for 512 Quebec youth (8-10 years at baseline) with a history of parental obesity (QUALITY study). CDC age- and sex-specific BMI percentiles were computed and children were considered obese if their BMI was ≥95th percentile. Individual (physical activity and sugar-sweetened beverage intake), familial (household socioeconomic status and measures of parental obesity including both BMI and waist circumference), and neighborhood (disadvantage, prestige, and presence of parks, convenience stores, and fast food restaurants) factors were examined. Recursive partitioning, a method that generates a classification tree predicting obesity based on combined exposure to a series of variables, was used. Associations between resulting varying risk group membership and BMI percentile at baseline and 2-year follow up were examined using linear regression. Recursive partitioning yielded 7 subgroups with a prevalence of obesity equal to 8%, 11%, 26%, 28%, 41%, 60%, and 63%, respectively. The 2 highest risk subgroups comprised i) children not meeting physical activity guidelines, with at least one BMI-defined obese parent and 2 abdominally obese parents, living in disadvantaged neighborhoods without parks and, ii) children with these characteristics, except with access to ≥1 park and with access to ≥1 convenience store. Group membership was strongly associated with BMI at baseline, but did not systematically predict change in BMI. Findings support the notion that obesity is predicted by multiple factors in different settings and provide some indications of potentially

  4. Health Characteristics of Solo Grandparent Caregivers and Single Parents: A Comparative Profile Using the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the health characteristics of solo grandparents raising grandchildren compared with single parents. Methods. Using the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, respondents identified as a single grandparent raising a grandchild were categorized as a solo grandparent; grandparent responses were compared with single parents. Descriptive analysis compared health characteristics of 925 solo grandparents with 7,786 single parents. Results. Compared to single parents, grandparents have a higher prevalence of physical health problems (e.g., arthritis). Both parent groups have a high prevalence of lifetime depression. A larger share of grandparents actively smoke and did no recreational physical exercise in the last month. However, grandparents appear to have better access to health services in comparison with single parents. Conclusion. Solo grandparents may be at risk for diminished physical capacity and heightened prevalence of depression. Health professionals can be an important resource to increase grandparents' physical and emotional capacities. PMID:26448744

  5. Health Characteristics of Solo Grandparent Caregivers and Single Parents: A Comparative Profile Using the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Deborah M; Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Brennenstuhl, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the health characteristics of solo grandparents raising grandchildren compared with single parents. Methods. Using the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, respondents identified as a single grandparent raising a grandchild were categorized as a solo grandparent; grandparent responses were compared with single parents. Descriptive analysis compared health characteristics of 925 solo grandparents with 7,786 single parents. Results. Compared to single parents, grandparents have a higher prevalence of physical health problems (e.g., arthritis). Both parent groups have a high prevalence of lifetime depression. A larger share of grandparents actively smoke and did no recreational physical exercise in the last month. However, grandparents appear to have better access to health services in comparison with single parents. Conclusion. Solo grandparents may be at risk for diminished physical capacity and heightened prevalence of depression. Health professionals can be an important resource to increase grandparents' physical and emotional capacities.

  6. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Profiles of 263,356 Older Australians According to Region of Birth and Acculturation, with a Focus on Migrants Born in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuyu; Lucas, Robyn M.; Joshy, Grace; Banks, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension and physical inactivity, are common in Australia, but the prevalence varies according to cultural background. We examined the relationship between region of birth, measures of acculturation, and CVD risk profiles in immigrant, compared to Australian-born, older Australians. Cross-sectional data from 263,356 participants aged 45 and over joining the population-based 45 and Up Study cohort from 2006–2008 were used. Prevalence ratios for CVD risk factors in Australian- versus overseas-born participants were calculated using modified Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex and socioeconomic factors and focusing on Asian migrants. The association between time resident in Australia and age at migration and CVD risk factors in Asian migrants was also examined. Migrants from Northeast (n = 3,213) and Southeast Asia (n = 3,942) had lower levels of overweight/obesity, physical activity and female smoking than Australian-born participants (n = 199,356), although differences in prevalence of overweight/obesity were sensitive to body-mass-index cut-offs used. Compared to Australian-born participants, migrants from Northeast Asia were 20–30% less likely, and from Southeast Asia 10–20% more likely, to report being treated for hypertension and/or hypercholesterolaemia; Southeast Asian migrants were 40–60% more likely to report diabetes. Northeast Asian-born individuals were less likely than Australian-born to have 3 or more CVD risk factors. Diabetes, treated hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia occurred at relatively low average body-mass-index in Southeast Asian migrants. The CVD risk factor profiles of migrants tended to approximate those of Australian-born with increasing acculturation, in both favourable (e.g., increased physical activity) and unfavourable directions (e.g., increased female smoking). Minimizing CVD risk in migrant populations may be achieved through efforts to

  7. Sex-related differences in the risk factor profile and medications of patients with atrial fibrillation recruited in J-TRACE.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Nozawa, Takashi; Hirai, Tadakazu; Goto, Shinya; Origasa, Hideki; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Hirabayashi, Takayuki; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Ono, Shiro; Hasegawa, Tooru; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2010-04-01

    Clinical characteristics, including risk factors for thromboembolism, and medications differ between men and women with atrial fibrillation (AF) in Western countries. Whether such a difference exists for Japanese patients with AF is unclear, so data from J-TRACE were used to investigate this issue. A total of 2,892 patients (2,028 men, 864 women; 70.3 years old) with AF were analyzed for the respective prevalences of risk factors and medications. CHADS2 score was calculated to determine thromboembolic risk level. Women were older (P<0.001), and more frequently had heart failure (P<0.001), and hypertension (P=0.051) than men. The proportion of subjects aged 75 years or older was higher among women than among men (P<0.001). CHADS2 score was therefore significantly higher in women than in men (2.05+/-1.29 vs 1.88+/-1.33, P<0.001). Sex-related differences were not observed for the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, nor did warfarin usage differ between men and women. Sex-related differences were observed in the risk factor profile and medications of Japanese patients with AF. CHADS2 score was higher in women than in men.

  8. Epidemiological profile and risk factors of HIV and HBV/HCV co-infection in Fujian Province, southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shouli; Yan, Pingping; Yang, Tianfei; Wang, Zhenghua; Yan, Yansheng

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the epidemiological features of HIV-infected subjects co-infected with HBV/HCV in Fujian Province, southeastern China, and identify the risk factors. Blood samples were collected from 2,028 HIV antibody-positive subjects in Fujian Province. Serum HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody were detected, and CD4(+) T cell count was measured. Of the 2,028 subjects, the prevalence of HIV-HBV, HIV-HCV, and HIV-HBV-HCV co-infections was 16.22%, 3.7%, and 0.79%, respectively. Man (OR = 1.912, 95% CI: 1.371-2.667), key population (OR = 0.756, 95% CI: 0.57-0.976) and detainee (OR = 0.486, 95% CI: 0.259-0.909) were risk factors of HIV-HBV co-infection, and man (OR = 2.227, 95% CI: 1.096-4.525), minority (OR = 5.04, 95% CI: 1.696-14.98), junior high school or lower education (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.071-5.025), intravenous drug use (OR = 38.46, 95% CI: 11.46-129.11) and detainee (OR = 5.687, 95% CI: 2.44-13.25) were risk factors of HIV-HCV co-infection. In addition, a lower mean CD4(+) T cell count was measured in HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects than in HIV-infected subjects among the untreated individuals, while in the treated populations, a higher mean CD4(+) T cell count was detected in HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects than in HIV-infected subjects. HIV co-infection with HBV or HCV, notably HIV-HBV co-infection, is widespread in southeastern China. Hepatitis virus screening should be included in monitoring of HIV infection, and HIV and hepatitis virus co-infection should be considered during the development of HIV antiretroviral therapy scheme. J. Med. Virol. 89:443-449, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Leishmania infantum: illness, transmission profile and risk factors for asymptomatic infection in an endemic metropolis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Marques, Letícia Helena; DA Rocha, Iara Caixeta Marques; Reis, Ilka Afonso; DA Cunha, Gisele Macedo Rodrigues; Oliveira, Edward; Pfeilsticker, Thais Ribeiro; DE Araújo, Valdelaine Etelvina Miranda; Morais, Maria Helena Franco; Rabello, Ana; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the distribution of asymptomatic infection by Leishmania infantum in a metropolis in Brazil with different relative risks (RRs) for disease and risk factors associated with the infection, an ecological study was conducted using a Bayesian approach to estimate the RR of human visceral leishmaniasis (HVL) based on cases between 2008 and 2011. The areas were categorized and selected according to disease incidence: low (area-1), medium (area-2) and high (area-3). Cross-sectional study enrolling 935 children was used to estimate the prevalence of infection by L. infantum. Volunteers from these three areas were tested for L. infantum infection by ELISA (rK39 and soluble antigens). Infection prevalence rates were estimated and compared with the RR of disease. Multilevel logistic regression model evaluated the relationship between infection and the analysed variables. The RR of HVL was distributed heterogeneously in the municipality. The infection prevalence rates were: 34·9% in area-1; 29·3% in area-2; and 33·6% in area-3, with no significant differences between these areas. The variables 'Presence of backyards in the neighbourhood' and 'Younger children' were associated with L. infantum infection. We conclude that infection by L. infantum affects a significant proportion of the infant population regardless of the RR of disease.

  10. [Integrated risk profiling allows prevention and early intervention].

    PubMed

    Stegeman, Inge; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Bossuyt, Patrick M M

    2010-01-01

    Prevention and early intervention can alter the course and incidence of several chronic diseases. Integrated risk profiling is based on the fact that a single risk factor affects more than one condition. Integrated risk profiling uses these overlapping risk factors to calculate the risks of a number of conditions. When used in screening, these risks can be communicated to participants, providing feedback and helping them understand the conditions they are at risk of, eventually leading to better compliance with preventive and therapeutic interventions. In this paper we discuss the underlying principles and background of the rise in integrated risk profiling in public health. We demonstrate why the attractive concept of risk profiling needs further assessment to estimate its effectiveness relative to other methods of prevention, population screening and case finding.

  11. Altered disc pressure profile after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture is a risk factor for adjacent vertebral body fracture

    PubMed Central

    Tzermiadianos, Michael N.; Renner, Susan M.; Phillips, Frank M.; Hadjipavlou, Alexander G.; Zindrick, Michael R.; Havey, Robert M.; Voronov, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of endplate deformity after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture in increasing the risk for adjacent vertebral fractures. Eight human lower thoracic or thoracolumbar specimens, each consisting of five vertebrae were used. To selectively fracture one of the endplates of the middle VB of each specimen a void was created under the target endplate and the specimen was flexed and compressed until failure. The fractured vertebra was subjected to spinal extension under 150 N preload that restored the anterior wall height and vertebral kyphosis, while the fractured endplate remained significantly depressed. The VB was filled with cement to stabilize the fracture, after complete evacuation of its trabecular content to ensure similar cement distribution under both the endplates. Specimens were tested in flexion-extension under 400 N preload while pressure in the discs and strain at the anterior wall of the adjacent vertebrae were recorded. Disc pressure in the intact specimens increased during flexion by 26 ± 14%. After cementation, disc pressure increased during flexion by 15 ± 11% in the discs with un-fractured endplates, while decreased by 19 ± 26.7% in the discs with the fractured endplates. During flexion, the compressive strain at the anterior wall of the vertebra next to the fractured endplate increased by 94 ± 23% compared to intact status (p < 0.05), while it did not significantly change at the vertebra next to the un-fractured endplate (18.2 ± 7.1%, p > 0.05). Subsequent flexion with compression to failure resulted in adjacent fracture close to the fractured endplate in six specimens and in a non-adjacent fracture in one specimen, while one specimen had no adjacent fractures. Depression of the fractured endplate alters the pressure profile of the damaged disc resulting in increased compressive loading of the anterior wall of adjacent vertebra that predisposes it to wedge fracture. This data suggests that

  12. Risk profiles associated with postnatal depressive symptoms among women in a public sector hospital in Mexico: the role of sociodemographic and psychosocial factors.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Filipa; Place, Jean Marie S; Billings, Deborah L; Rivera, Leonor; Frongillo, Edward A

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the association between postnatal depressive symptoms and a set of demographic and psychosocial factors among 604 women attending a public hospital for postnatal care in Mexico City. Specific profiles of women that would indicate an increased probability for developing postnatal depression (PND) based on discrete combinations of risk and protective factors were generated. In a logistic model, followed by the estimation of predicted probabilities, we examined the association between depressive symptomatology and psychosocial factors: low social support, unplanned pregnancies, history of depression, and exposure to moderate or severe intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy. Postnatal depressive symptomatology was reported by 10.6 % of the women, as measured by scores at 12 or above on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. The cumulative probability of presenting PND in the simultaneous presence of the psychosocial factors was 67.0 %; however, this could be reduced to 5.5 % through preventive measures that work to eliminate low social support, unplanned pregnancy, and exposure to severe IPV during pregnancy. Early identification of psychosocial risk factors, specifically low social support, unplanned pregnancies, history of depression, and exposure to violence during pregnancy, is recommended.

  13. Individual, family, school, and community risk and protective factors for depressive symptoms in adolescents: a comparison of risk profiles for substance use and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bond, Lyndal; Toumbourou, John W; Thomas, Lyndal; Catalano, Richard F; Patton, George

    2005-06-01

    This study examines the relationship between adolescent depressive symptoms and risk and protective factors identified for substance use. A questionnaire, developed to measure these factors in a young person's community, family, school, peer group, and individual characteristics for substance use, was used to assess associations with self-reported depressive symptoms. Data were provided by a representative sample of 8984 secondary school students in Victoria, Australia. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 10.5% (95% CI 9.2,12.0) for males and 21.7% (95% CI 20.3,23.7) for females. Depressive symptoms were associated with factors in all domains, with the strongest associations in the family domain. Strong relationships were found between the number of elevated risk and protective factors and depressive symptoms, maintained after adjusting for substance use. Patterns of associations were similar for users and nonsubstance users. The findings indicate that prevention programs targeting factors for substance use have the potential to impact on depression.

  14. Association of Cervical Cancer Screening with Knowledge of Risk Factors, Access to Health Related Information, Health Profiles, and Health Competence Beliefs among Community-Dwelling Women in Japan

    PubMed

    Oba, Shino; Toyoshima, Masato; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2017-08-27

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the past attendance for cervical cancer screening with knowledge of risk factors, access to health-related information, health profiles and health competence beliefs among Japanese women. Methods: Women ages 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 were contacted cross-sectionally as part of a project for the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Nikaho, Akita prefecture Japan between June 2010 and March 2011, and 249 women were analyzed for the current study. The questionnaire asked about past cervical cancer screening. Knowledge of each cervical cancer risk factor was determined on a four-point scale. A barriers to information access scale was utilized to assess the degree of difficulty in accessing health-related information. Health profiles were measured using the EuroQOL EQ-5D. Perceived health competence was measured using a scale (PHCS). The association was evaluated with odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were calculated from a logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age and potential confounders. The trend across the level was also assessed. Results: Women who knew that sexual intercourse at young age was a risk factor were significantly more likely to have participated in cervical cancer screening sometime in their lives (p for trend =0.02). Women who had pain/discomfort and those who had anxiety/depression were significantly more likely to have participated in cervical screening within the past two years (odds ratio [OR]: 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04–3.94; OR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.05–5.16, respectively). Women with higher PHCS were significantly more likely to have attended for cervical screened at some point in their lives (p=0.04). Conclusion: This study observed that specific knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors, health profiles and PHCS were associated with the past attendance for cervical cancer screening among women in a community. Further researches are

  15. Risk-Factor Profile and Comorbidities in 2398 Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hypertension From the Abuja Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Ojji, Dike B.; Libhaber, Elena; Atherton, John J.; Abdullahi, Bolaji; Nwankwo, Ada; Sliwa, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Risk factors, comorbidities, and end-organ damage in newly diagnosed hypertension (HT) are poorly described in larger cohorts of urban African patients undergoing epidemiological transition. We therefore decided to characterize a large cohort of hypertensive subjects presenting to a tertiary health center in sub-Saharan Africa. It is an observational cross-sectional study. We prospectively collected detailed clinical, biochemical, electrocardiography, and echocardiography data of all subjects with HT as the primary diagnosis in patients presenting at the Cardiology Unit of the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital over an 8-year period. Of 2398 subjects, 1187 patients (49.4%) were female with a mean age of 51 ± 12.8 years. Presenting symptoms and signs were most commonly palpitation in 691 (28.8%) followed by dyspnoea on exertion in 541 (22.6%), orthopnea in 532 (22.2%), pedal oedema in 468 (19.5%), paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea in 332 (13.8%), whereas only 31 (1.3%) presented with chest pain. Risk factors were obesity in 671 (28%); 523 (21.8%) had total cholesterol >5.2 mmol/L, diabetes mellitus was present in 201 (8.4%) and 187 (7.8%) were smokers. End-organ damage was present in form of echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in 1336 (55.7%) followed by heart failure in 542 (22.6%). Arrhythmias occurred in 110 (4.6%) of cases, cerebrovascular accident in 103 (4.3%), chronic kidney disease in 26 (1.1%), hypertensive encephalopathy in 10 (0.4%), and coronary artery disease in 6 (0.26%). There were marked differences in sex as women were more obese and men presented with more advanced disease. The burden of HT and its complications in this carefully characterized African cohort is quite enormous with more than three-fourth having one form of complication. The need of effective primary and secondary preventive measures to be mapped out to tackle this problem cannot be overemphasized. PMID:26426662

  16. Impact of β-thalassemia trait carrier state on cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic profile in patients with newly diagnosed hypertension.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, A I; Vyssoulis, G P; Karpanou, E A; Karkalousos, P L; Triantafyllou, E A; Aessopos, A; Farmakis, D T

    2014-05-01

    Thalassemia minor (Tm), the β-thalassemia carrier state, is followed by favorable lipidemic profile and seems to protect against myocardial infarction mainly in men. However, the cardiovascular risk factor (CRF) and metabolic profile of these subjects has not been thoroughly addressed, although it is not known whether gender differences are involved. We evaluated CRFs, metabolic parameters and risk-prediction equations along with renal function and selected echocardiographic indices in 23,680 consecutive subjects, that is, 11,192 women and 12,488 men, with newly diagnosed hypertension according to the presence or absence of Tm. Of 23,680 patients, 548 (2.3%) had Tm. Compared with patients without Tm, Tm cases had similar gender distribution, age, body mass index and blood pressure. Besides having a better lipidemic profile, Tm patients were less frequently smokers (25% vs. 32%, P<0.001), had a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (26% vs. 39%, P<0.001) and lower HeartSCORE and INTERHEART scores (P<0.001). Tm patients also had lower levels of fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (P<0.001), lower serum creatinine and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate (P<0.001), lower prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (35% vs. 48%, P<0.001) and higher total and mid-wall fractional shortening (P=0.03 and <0.001, respectively). Most of these differences were consistent in both genders, whereas the HeartSCORE and the echo indices were significantly better in Tm only in women. Among patients with newly diagnosed hypertension, those with Tm have a better overall CRF and metabolic profile, beyond the well-known differences in serum lipids. Compared with men, women seem to be at least equally protected.

  17. A Profile of HIV Risk Factors in the Context of Sex Work Environments among Migrant Female Sex Workers in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Huso; Mantell, Joanne E.; Wu, Rongrong; Lu, Zhao; Zeng, Jing; Wan, Yanhai

    2010-01-01

    Migrant female sex workers (FSWs) are one of the most at-risk populations for HIV in China. This study demonstrates how multiple risk factors are situated and vary by types of sex work environments in a sample of 348 migrant FSWs in Beijing. Participants reported high rates of clients' refusal to use condoms (76%), unsafe sex with both clients (32%), non-paid regular partners (e.g., boyfriend or husband) (76%), and a STI symptom (79%) last year. Only 22% of FSWs had been tested for HIV. Risk factors were compared by three types of sex work environments: (1) entertainment establishments, (2) personal services sectors, and (3) street-based venues, including roadside brothels. Street-based FSWs, compared to the other FSWs, were more likely to be older, married with children, migrate from rural areas, and be arrested by police, and less likely to be educated, have contact with prevention services, be knowledgeable about HIV, and be tested for HIV. The FSWs in entertainment establishments were more likely than street-based FSWs to have reported being physically, verbally, and/or sexually abused by clients. Multiple discriminant analysis distinguished a profile of two different groups of risk factors: (1) police arrest, lack of protection from violence, access to prevention and health care, and HIV knowledge, and (2) verbal and physical abuse and clients' refusal of condom use. In the massive internal migration in China, disadvantages in economic sectors drive women to become involved in sex work. HIV prevention strategies must target socio-structural factors embedded in sex work environments. PMID:20391235

  18. A profile of HIV risk factors in the context of sex work environments among migrant female sex workers in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Yi, Huso; Mantell, Joanne E; Wu, Rongrong; Lu, Zhao; Zeng, Jing; Wan, Yanhai

    2010-03-01

    Migrant female sex workers (FSWs) are one of the most at-risk populations for HIV in China. This study demonstrates how multiple risk factors are situated and vary by types of sex work environments in a sample of 348 migrant FSWs in Beijing. Participants reported high rates of clients' refusal to use condoms (76%), unsafe sex with both clients (32%), non-paid regular partners (e.g. boyfriend or husband) (76%), and a sexually transmitted infection symptom (79%) last year. Only 22% of FSWs had been tested for HIV. Risk factors were compared by three types of sex work environments: (1) entertainment establishments, (2) personal services sectors, and (3) street-based venues, including roadside brothels. Street-based FSWs, compared to the other FSWs, were more likely to be older, married with children, migrate from rural areas, and be arrested by police, and less likely to be educated, have contact with prevention services, be knowledgeable about HIV, and be tested for HIV. The FSWs in entertainment establishments were more likely than street-based FSWs to have reported being physically, verbally, and/or sexually abused by clients. Multiple discriminant analysis distinguished a profile of two different groups of risk factors: (1) police arrest, lack of protection from violence, access to prevention and health care, and HIV knowledge, and (2) verbal and physical abuse and clients' refusal of condom use. In the massive internal migration in China, disadvantages in economic sectors drive women to become involved in sex work. HIV prevention strategies must target socio-structural factors embedded in sex work environments.

  19. Profile of a drunk driver and risk factors for drunk driving. Findings in roadside testing in the province of Uusimaa in Finland 1990-2008.

    PubMed

    Portman, M; Penttilä, A; Haukka, J; Rajalin, S; Eriksson, C J P; Gunnar, T; Koskimaa, H; Kuoppasalmi, K

    2013-09-10

    The aim of the present study was to define the profile of a drunk driver and to determine risk factors for drunk driving by analyzing data on both sober and drunk drivers. Systematic roadside surveys have been carried out in Southern Finland for over 18 years, with 20,000-30,000 drivers breath tested annually. During the study period, 1241 drunk drivers were caught (legal blood alcohol limit 0.50‰). The comparison material consisted of 3407 sober drivers. The surveys were designed to further investigate demographic features and driving habits of drivers. The prevalence of drunk driving has been 0.2% over the time period, with only random variations. According to the data, a typical drunk driver is a man aged 40-49 who has a valid driving license and drives his own car, usually alone, with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 1.0‰. He has a job and is married or cohabiting. The profile remained consistent throughout the study period. The risk of drunk driving was found to be five times higher for men than for women. Divorcees and widow(er)s had a substantially higher risk factor for being caught drunk driving than married drivers. Drunk drivers are most likely to be caught by roadside testing on Saturday mornings. During the study period the blood alcohol limit for aggravated drunk driving was lowered in 1994 from 1.5 to 1.2‰. In 2004 the taxation of alcohol beverages was reduced by 30%. Neither of these measures affected the prevalence of drunk driving or the mean BAC of drunk drivers (p=0.63). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multidisciplinary Approach to the Treatment of Obese Adolescents: Effects on Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Inflammatory Profile, and Neuroendocrine Regulation of Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda; de Piano, Aline; Campos, Raquel Munhoz da Silveira; Corgosinho, Flávia Campos; Siegfried, Wolfgang; Caranti, Danielle Arisa; Masquio, Deborah Cristina Landi; Carnier, June; Sanches, Priscila de Lima; Leão da Silva, Patrícia; Nascimento, Cláudia Maria Oller; Oyama, Lila Missae; Dantas, Alexandre Dâmaso Aguilera; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Tufik, Sergio; Tock, Lian

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of obesity and health concerns related to body fat is a major challenge worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of a medically supervised, multidisciplinary approach, on reduction in the prevalence of obesity related comorbidities, inflammatory profile, and neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance in a sample of obese adolescents. A total of 97 postpuberty obese adolescents were enrolled in this study. Body composition, neuropeptides, and adipokines were analysed. The metabolic syndrome was defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The abdominal ultrasonography was performed to measure visceral, subcutaneous fat and hepatic steatosis. All measures were performed at baseline and after one year of therapy. The multidisciplinary management promoted the control of obesity reducing body fat mass. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, asthma, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), binge eating, and hyperleptinemia was reduced. An improvement in the inflammatory profile was demonstrated by an increase in anti-inflammatory adiponectin and reduction in proinflammatory adipokines, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, interleukin-6 concentrations, and in the Lep/Adipo ratio. Moreover, a reduction in the AgRP and an increase in the alfa-MSH were noted. The multidisciplinary approach not only reduced obesity but also is efficacious in cardiovascular risk factors, inflammatory profile, and neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance. PMID:24285955

  1. Profile of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in Punjab, Northern India: Results of a State-Wide STEPS Survey

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, J. S.; Jeet, Gursimer; Pal, Arnab; Singh, Shavinder; Singh, Amarjit; Deepti, S. S.; Lal, Mohan; Gupta, Sanjay; Prasad, Rajender; Jain, Sanjay; Saran, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Background Efforts to assess the burden of non-communicable diseases risk factors has improved in low and middle-income countries after political declaration of UN High Level Meeting on NCDs. However, lack of reliable estimates of risk factors distribution are leading to delay in implementation of evidence based interventions in states of India. Methods A STEPS Survey, comprising all the three steps for assessment of risk factors of NCDs, was conducted in Punjab state during 2014–15. A statewide multistage sample of 5,127 residents, aged 18–69 years, was taken. STEPS questionnaire version 3.1 was used to collect information on behavioral risk factors, followed by physical measurements and blood and urine sampling for biochemical profile. Results Tobacco and alcohol consumption were observed in 11.3% (20% men and 0.9% women) and 15% (27% men and 0.3% women) of the population, respectively. Low levels of physical activity were recorded among 31% (95% CI: 26.7–35.5) of the participants. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 28.6% (95% CI: 26.3–30.9) and 12.8% (95% CI: 11.2–14.4) respectively. Central obesity was higher among women (69.3%, 95% CI: 66.5–72.0) than men (49.5%, 95% CI: 45.3–53.7). Prevalence of hypertension in population was 40.1% (95% CI: 37.3–43.0). The mean sodium intake in grams per day for the population was 7.4 gms (95% CI: 7.2–7.7). The prevalence of diabetes (hyperglycemia), hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia was 14.3% (95% CI: 11.7–16.8), 21.6% (95% CI: 18.5–25.1) and 16.1% (95% CI: 13.1–19.2), respectively. In addition, 7% of the population aged 40–69 years had a cardiovascular risk of ≥ 30% over a period of next 10 years. Conclusion We report high prevalence of risk factors of chronic non-communicable diseases among adults in Punjab. There is an urgent need to implement population, individual and programme wide prevention and control interventions to lower the serious consequences of NCDs. PMID

  2. Favorable cardiovascular risk factor profile is associated with reduced prevalence of coronary artery calcification and inflammation in asymptomatic nondiabetic white men.

    PubMed

    Michos, Erin D; Santos, Raul D; Narla, Venkata; Pandey, Shivda; Meneghelo, Romeu; Carvalho, Jose A; Budoff, Matthew J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram

    2008-01-01

    Middle-aged individuals with favorable levels of all major cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) have much lower age-specific risks for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the relationship of the absence of CVRFs with subclinical CVD and inflammation is not well described. We classified 440 asymptomatic Brazilian men (aged 46+/-7 years) based on the number of CVRFs (smoking, systolic blood pressure > or =130 mm Hg, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol > or =130 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <40 mg/dL, triglycerides > or =150 mg/dL, fasting glucose > or =100 mg/dL, and waist circumference >102 cm). Only 7% had no CVRFs, whereas 1, 2, 3, and > or =4 CVRFs were observed in 18%, 24%, 21%, and 29%, respectively. In age-adjusted analysis, each lower CVRF profile was associated with lower odds of prevalent coronary artery calcium (odds ratio, 0.75; P=.002) and elevated white blood cell count (odds ratio, 0.70; P<.001). Our study supports the notion that a favorable CVD profile is associated with less underlying atherosclerosis and inflammation and further highlights the importance of primary prevention of CVRFs.

  3. The Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents--ERICA: rationale, design and sample characteristics of a national survey examining cardiovascular risk factor profile in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Szklo, Moyses; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; Klein, Carlos Henrique; de Vasconcelos, Maurício T L; da Veiga, Glória Valéria; Figueiredo, Valeska C; Dias, Adriano; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Souza, Ana Luiza Lima; de Oliveira, Ana Mayra Andrade; Schaan, Beatriz D'Argord; Tavares, Bruno Mendes; de Oliveira, Cecília Lacroix; Cunha, Cristiane de Freitas; Giannini, Denise Tavares; Belfort, Dilson Rodrigues; Ribas, Dulce Lopes Barboza; Santos, Eduardo Lima; de Leon, Elisa Brosina; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Oliveira, Elizabete Regina Araújo; Magliano, Erika da Silva; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes; Azevedo, George Dantas; Brunken, Gisela Soares; Dias, Glauber Monteiro; Filho, Heleno R Correa; Monteiro, Maria Inês; Guimarães, Isabel Cristina Britto; Faria Neto, José Rocha; Oliveira, Juliana Souza; de Carvalho, Kenia Mara B; Gonçalves, Luis Gonzaga de Oliveira; Santos, Marize M; Muniz, Pascoal Torres; Jardim, Paulo César B Veiga; Ferreira, Pedro Antônio Muniz; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Vianna, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Vasconcelos, Sandra Mary; da Matta, Sandro Silva; Martins, Stella Maris Seixas; Goldberg, Tamara Beres Lederer; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira

    2015-02-07

    The Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents (Portuguese acronym, "ERICA") is a multicenter, school-based country-wide cross-sectional study funded by the Brazilian Ministry of Health, which aims at estimating the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, including those included in the definition of the metabolic syndrome, in a random sample of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years in Brazilian cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants. Approximately 85,000 students were assessed in public and private schools. Brazil is a continental country with a heterogeneous population of 190 million living in its five main geographic regions (North, Northeast, Midwest, South and Southeast). ERICA is a pioneering study that will assess the prevalence rates of cardiovascular risk factors in Brazilian adolescents using a sample with national and regional representativeness. This paper describes the rationale, design and procedures of ERICA. Participants answered a self-administered questionnaire using an electronic device, in order to obtain information on demographic and lifestyle characteristics, including physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, sleeping hours, common mental disorders and reproductive and oral health. Dietary intake was assessed using a 24-hour dietary recall. Anthropometric measures (weight, height and waist circumference) and blood pressure were also be measured. Blood was collected from a subsample of approximately 44,000 adolescents for measurements of fasting glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, glycated hemoglobin and fasting insulin. The study findings will be instrumental to the development of public policies aiming at the prevention of obesity, atherosclerotic diseases and diabetes in an adolescent population.

  4. Risk profile of pregnant mothers in Kelantan.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, A; Rogayah, J; Hashim, M H; Shukri, O; Azmi, H

    1995-12-01

    A demographic and obstetric profile of pregnant mothers attending antenatal clinics in kelantan over period of one year was determined by a retrospective study of 10,032 registered pregnant mothers. The prevalence of risk factors related to the age of the mother, parity, weight, haemoglobin level, bad obstetric history and pregnancy related diseases were determined. Prevalence of teenage pregnancy and primigravida accounted for 4.3 and 17.2 percent respectively. Nearly 3.9 percent of the mothers weighed less than 40 kg and 44.5 percent of mothers were found to be anaemic (Hb less than 11g/d) at the first antenatal visit. Only 3.2 percent of the mothers did not have any designated risk factor. Previous bad obstetric history and pregnancy related disease accounted for 17.1 and 3.5 percent of mothers respectively.

  5. Cumulative Socioeconomic Status Risk, Allostatic Load, and Adjustment: A Prospective Latent Profile Analysis with Contextual and Genetic Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Evans, Gary W.; Beach, Steven R. H.; Windle, Michael; Simons, Ronald L.; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Philibert, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The health disparities literature has identified a common pattern among middle-aged African Americans that includes high rates of chronic disease along with low rates of psychiatric disorders despite exposure to high levels of cumulative socioeconomic status (SES) risk. The current study was designed to test hypotheses about the developmental…

  6. Cumulative Socioeconomic Status Risk, Allostatic Load, and Adjustment: A Prospective Latent Profile Analysis with Contextual and Genetic Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Evans, Gary W.; Beach, Steven R. H.; Windle, Michael; Simons, Ronald L.; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Philibert, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The health disparities literature has identified a common pattern among middle-aged African Americans that includes high rates of chronic disease along with low rates of psychiatric disorders despite exposure to high levels of cumulative socioeconomic status (SES) risk. The current study was designed to test hypotheses about the developmental…

  7. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  8. [Risk factors for stroke].

    PubMed

    Mandić, Milan; Rancić, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality both in men and in women throughout the world. In Serbia, stroke is the first cause of mortality in women older than 55 years of age and the second cause of death in men of the same age. Both ischemic heart diseases and ischemic stroke correlate with the same predisposing, potentially modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes mellitus). Stroke does not usually occur on its own. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of associated medical problems. These conditions may predict the stroke ("preexisting conditions"), occur for the first time after stroke ("post-stroke complications"), or present as manifestations of preexisting medical conditions after stroke. Risk factors for stroke are divided into the three groups: risk factors which cannot be influenced on such as: age, gender, positive family history of stroke, race: those which are modifiable such as: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking cigarettes, obesity, physical inactivity and the third group consists of potential risk factors for stroke (consumption of alcohol, hormones, changes in fibrinolysis, changes in blood. Stroke remains a leading cause of long-term disability and premature death of both men and women. Consequently, stroke survivors are often handicapped and doomed to sedentary lifestyle which restrains performance of activities of daily living, increases the risk for falls, and may contribute to a higher risk for recurrent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Prevention of stroke is still a great medical and social problem. Further studies are required to investigate potential risk factors for the occurrence of stroke as well as the measures of primary and secondary prevention.

  9. Prevalence of coronary calcification in relation to age, gender and risk factor profile in the insight population.

    PubMed

    Motro, M; Shemesh, J

    1997-04-01

    Calcium controls numerous events within the vessel wall. Permeability of the endothelium is calcium dependent. Calcium is also essential for penetration of low-density lipoprotein particles through the endothelium as well as the monocytes that travel through the subendothelial space. Other calcium-dependent processes include platelet activation and adhesion, vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration, and synthesis of fibrous connective tissue in the subendothelial space. Current evidence indicates that calcium channel blockers retard the development of atherosclerosis in monkeys and rabbits. Human trials have evaluated sequential coronary angiograms in patients undergoing coronary angiography for symptomatic coronary artery disease. Double helix computerised tomography is a non-invasive technique that can detect, measure and compare calcification in the coronary arteries. Our objectives are to determine whether the use of nifedipine vs diuretics in hypertensive patients at high risk of coronary calcification will arrest or slow the progression of calcification in the coronary arteries, and to assess the effect of the two drugs on left ventricular hypertrophy, and left ventricular mass as well as on changes in left ventricular function.

  10. [Benefits of an educational intervention on diet and anthropometric profile of women with one cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Soto Rodríguez, Anxela; García Soidán, José Luís; de Toro Santos, Manuel; Lagoa Labrador, Fiz; Failde Garrido, José M; Pérez Fernández, María Reyes

    2016-05-20

    To assess whether an educational intervention in perimenopausal women with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidaemia would improve adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern and achieve changes in anthropometric parameters. Randomized clinical trial of parallel groups: 320 women (45-60 years) in 2 urban primary care services. hip and waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), total, visceral and trunk fat (bioimpedance measures) and adherence to Mediterranean diet (MEDAS-14 questionnaire). Intervention group: 3 interactive workshops on prevention of cardiovascular disease, and control group: information by post. Two hundred and thirty women completed the study (113 control group and 117 intervention group). The differences between groups were significant in all parameters one year later. In the intragroup comparison, the intervention group maintained their BMI and improved adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The control group increased their BMI, abdominal and hip circumference and fat parameters (total, visceral and trunk fat). A simple educational intervention in perimenopausal women with cardiovascular risk can improve their healthy habits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Profiling risk factors for chronic uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a new model for EHR-based research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Chronic uveitis is a common and serious comorbid condition of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, with insidious presentation and potential to cause blindness. Knowledge of clinical associations will improve risk stratification. Based on clinical observation, we hypothesized that allergic conditions are associated with chronic uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort study using Stanford’s clinical data warehouse containing data from Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital from 2000–2011 to analyze patient characteristics associated with chronic uveitis in a large juvenile idiopathic arthritis cohort. Clinical notes in patients under 16 years of age were processed via a validated text analytics pipeline. Bivariate-associated variables were used in a multivariate logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, and race. Previously reported associations were evaluated to validate our methods. The main outcome measure was presence of terms indicating allergy or allergy medications use overrepresented in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with chronic uveitis. Residual text features were then used in unsupervised hierarchical clustering to compare clinical text similarity between patients with and without uveitis. Results Previously reported associations with uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients (earlier age at arthritis diagnosis, oligoarticular-onset disease, antinuclear antibody status, history of psoriasis) were reproduced in our study. Use of allergy medications and terms describing allergic conditions were independently associated with chronic uveitis. The association with allergy drugs when adjusted for known associations remained significant (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.22–5.4). Conclusions This study shows the potential of using a validated text analytics pipeline on clinical data warehouses to examine practice

  12. Patient Age, Ethnicity, Medical History, and Risk Factor Profile, but Not Drug Insurance Coverage, Predict Successful Attainment of Glycemic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Hwee; Braga, Manoela F.B.; Casanova, Amparo; Drouin, Denis; Goodman, Shaun G.; Harris, Stewart B.; Langer, Anatoly; Tan, Mary K.; Ur, Ehud; Yan, Andrew T.; Zinman, Bernard; Leiter, Lawrence A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify factors in patients with type 2 diabetes and A1C >7.0% associated with attainment of A1C ≤7.0%. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used a prospective registry of 5,280 Canadian patients in primary care settings enrolled in a 12-month glycemic pharmacotherapy optimization strategy based on national guidelines. RESULTS At close out, median A1C was 7.1% (vs. 7.8% at baseline) with 48% of subjects achieving A1C ≤7.0% (P < 0.0001). Older patients of Asian or black origin, those with longer diabetes duration, those with lower baseline A1C, BMI, LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure, and those on angiotensin receptor blockers and a lower number of antihyperglycemic agents, were more likely to achieve A1C ≤7.0% at some point during the study (all P < 0.0235). Access to private versus public drug coverage did not impact glycemic target realization. CONCLUSIONS Patient demography, cardiometabolic health, and ongoing pharmacotherapy, but not access to private drug insurance coverage, contribute to the care gap in type 2 diabetes. PMID:20823344

  13. Managing Multiple Risk Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cardiovascular disease among black women can be better controlled through the use of a stress reduction intervention that reduces the sympathetic nervous...All participants will have high normal (130/80) or mild hypertension and at least two additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g

  14. Toxic Profile of Benznidazole in Patients with Chronic Chagas Disease: Risk Factors and Comparison of the Product from Two Different Manufacturers

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, F.; Sánchez-Montalvá, A.; Treviño, B.; Serre, N.; Sao Avilés, A.; Almirante, B.

    2015-01-01

    Benznidazole is considered the first-line treatment option against Chagas disease. The major drawback of benznidazole is its toxicity profile. The main objectives of this study were to describe the adverse events (AEs) in patients with chronic Chagas disease treated with benznidazole, determine the risk factors involved and compare the toxic profiles of two different preparations of the drug from ELEA and Roche. A total of 746 patients were diagnosed with Chagas disease in a 5-year period, and of these 472 were treated with benznidazole. A high proportion of patients (n = 360 [76%]) suffered AEs, the most frequent being those related to hypersensitivity (52.9% of patients), headache (12.5%), and epigastric pain (10.4%). In 72 (12.7%) cases, treatment was discontinued. Overall, women had a higher incidence of AEs compared to men (81.3% versus 66%, P = 0.001) and were subject to higher levels of hypersensitivity-related events. Dermatological events, digestive tract manifestations, and general symptoms had a greater likelihood to appear around day 10 and neurological AEs around day 40 after starting treatment. With respect to liver function and hematological tests, the majority of patients did not suffer significant perturbation of liver enzymes or altered blood cell counts. However, 14 patients suffered from neutropenia, and 14 patients had aminotransferase levels that were more than four times the upper limit of the normal range. Patients treated with the ELEA benznidazole product experienced more arthromyalgia, neutropenia, and neurological disorders (mainly paresthesias) than those treated with the Roche product. Both drug products resulted in approximately the same percentage of permanent withdrawals. PMID:26195525

  15. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  16. Vitamin D receptor BsmI polymorphism modulates soy intake and 25-hydroxyvitamin D supplementation benefits in cardiovascular disease risk factors profile.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jose C E; De Lorenzo, David; Cassanye, Anna; Martín-Gari, Meritxell; Espinel, Alberto; Delgado, Marco Antonio; Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otin, Manuel

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms may predispose that not all individuals could have benefits from the nutritional supplementation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Furthermore, vitamin D-related cardiovascular effects may also be influenced by soy isoflavones considered endocrine regulators of cardiovascular homeostasis. To find possible gene-diet interactions by evaluating individualized lipid metabolism benefits from an increase in soy and 25-hydroxyvitamin D intake, 106 healthy individuals, genotyped for vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphism rs1544410 (BsmI) were randomly assigned to either no intake, to daily 250 mL or 500 mL of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D supplemented SB for 2 months. The soybean beverage induced differences in cardiovascular risk factors (lipid profile, blood pressure, TNFα and MCP-1), as well as vitamin D metabolites in a dose-gene-dependent relation. Thus, VDR BsmI polymorphism affected individual response being the GG genotype the ones that showed dose-dependent manner responsiveness in the reduction in total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides in comparison with the AA/AG genotype. These differences were associated with increased plasma levels of 1α,25-dyhydroxyvitamin D3 in the carriers of the GG genotype. It was concluded that metabolic response to 25-hydroxyvitamin D and soybean supplementation is dependent on VDR BsmI GG genotype due to a higher conversion rate from vitamin D precursors.

  17. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  18. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  19. Risk Factors for Cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Pak, Mila; Lindseth, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone disease is one of the most common public health problems in the United States. Approximately 10%-20% of the national adult populations currently carry gallstones, and gallstone prevalence is rising. In addition, nearly 750,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually in the United States; direct and indirect costs of gallbladder surgery are estimated to be $6.5 billion. Cholelithiasis is also strongly associated with gallbladder, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer occurrence. Moreover, the National Institutes of Health estimates that almost 3,000 deaths (0.12% of all deaths) per year are attributed to complications of cholelithiasis and gallbladder disease. Although extensive research has tried to identify risk factors for cholelithiasis, several studies indicate that definitive findings still remain elusive. In this review, predisposing factors for cholelithiasis are identified, the pathophysiology of gallstone disease is described, and nonsurgical preventive options are discussed. Understanding the risk factors for cholelithiasis may not only be useful in assisting nurses to provide resources and education for patients who are diagnosed with gallstones, but also in developing novel preventive measures for the disease.

  20. Total cardiovascular risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-W; Lin, Y-L; Lin, T-K; Lin, C-T; Chen, B-C; Lin, C-L

    2008-01-01

    Although the health benefits of vegetarian diets have been well documented among Western population, there are geographic differences of vegetarian diets and the health benefits of the Taiwanese vegetarian diet have not been studied extensively. In addition to conventional risk factors, homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels have been found to predict first atherothrombotic events. We undertook this study to examine the total risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians. A total of 198 healthy subjects (99 vegetarians and 99 omnivores) were recruited. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), white blood cell count, hs-CRP and homocysteine. There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, blood glucose, white blood cell count, triglyceride and HDL-C between the two groups. The vegetarian group had significantly more females (65.7 vs 46.5%); lower body weight (58.66+/-11.13 vs 62.88+/-12.24 kg); shorter height (159.14+/-7.88 vs 162.53 +/-8.14 cm); lower total cholesterol (184.74+/-33.23 vs 202.01+/-41.05 mg/dl); and lower LDL-C (119.63+/-31.59 vs 135.89+/-39.50 mg/dl). Hs-CRP was significantly lower (0.14+/-0.23 vs 0.23+/-0.44 mg/dl, P=0.025), whereas homocysteine was significantly higher (10.97+/-6.69 vs 8.44+/-2.50 micromol/l, P=0.001) in vegetarians than omnivores. Taiwanese vegetarians have lower total cholesterol, LDL-C and hs-CRP levels, and higher homocysteine levels than omnivores. Owing to different predictive value of each risk factor, the Taiwanese vegetarians had a better cardiovascular risk profile than omnivores. Whether the Taiwanese vegetarian diet should be supplemented with vitamin B(12) to lower serum homocysteine level remains to be addressed.

  1. Risk-Factor Profile of Living Kidney Donors: The Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Living Kidney Donor Registry 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Philip A; Saunders, John R; McDonald, Stephen P; Allen, Richard D M; Pilmore, Helen; Saunder, Alan; Boudville, Neil; Chadban, Steven J

    2016-06-01

    Recent literature suggests that living kidney donation may be associated with an excess risk of end-stage kidney disease and death. Efforts to maximize access to transplantation may result in acceptance of donors who do not fit within current guidelines, potentially placing them at risk of adverse long-term outcomes. We studied the risk profile of Australian and New Zealand living kidney donors using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Living Kidney Donor Registry over 2004 to 2012. We compared their predonation profile against national guidelines for donor acceptance. The analysis included 2,932 donors (mean age 48.8 ± 11.2 years, range 18-81), 58% female and 87% Caucasian. Forty (1%) had measured glomerular filtration rate less than 80 mL/min; 32 (1%) had proteinuria >300 mg/day; 589 (20%) were hypertensive; 495 (18%) obese; 9 (0.3%) were diabetic while a further 55 (2%) had impaired glucose tolerance; and 218 (7%) were current smokers. Overall 767 donors (26%) had at least one relative contraindication to donation and 268 (9%) had at least one absolute contraindication according to national guidelines. Divergence of current clinical practice from national guidelines has occurred. In the context of recent evidence demonstrating elevated long-term donor risk, rigorous follow-up and reporting of outcomes are now mandated to ensure safety and document any change in risk associated with such a divergence.

  2. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes: application of measurement error methodology in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Liese, Angela D; Crandell, Jamie L; Tooze, Janet A; Kipnis, Victor; Bell, Ronny; Couch, Sarah C; Dabelea, Dana; Crume, Tessa L; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-08-14

    The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study aims to investigate the role of dietary intake on the development of long-term complications of type 1 diabetes in youth, and capitalise on measurement error (ME) adjustment methodology. Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method for episodically consumed foods, we evaluated the relationship between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile, with the application of ME adjustment methodology. The calibration sample included 166 youth with two FFQ and three 24 h dietary recall data within 1 month. The full sample included 2286 youth with type 1 diabetes. SSB intake was significantly associated with higher TAG, total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations, after adjusting for energy, age, diabetes duration, race/ethnicity, sex and education. The estimated effect size was larger (model coefficients increased approximately 3-fold) after the application of the NCI method than without adjustment for ME. Compared with individuals consuming one serving of SSB every 2 weeks, those who consumed one serving of SSB every 2 d had 3.7 mg/dl (0.04 mmol/l) higher TAG concentrations and 4.0 mg/dl (0.10 mmol/l) higher total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations, after adjusting for ME and covariates. SSB intake was not associated with measures of adiposity and blood pressure. Our findings suggest that SSB intake is significantly related to increased lipid levels in youth with type 1 diabetes, and that estimates of the effect size of SSB on lipid levels are severely attenuated in the presence of ME. Future studies in youth with diabetes should consider a design that will allow for the adjustment for ME when studying the influence of diet on health status.

  3. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes: Application of measurement error methodology in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Angela D.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kipnis, Victor; Bell, Ronny; Couch, Sarah C.; Dabelea, Dana; Crume, Tessa L.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study aims to investigate the role of dietary intake on the development of long-term complications of type 1diabetes in youth and capitalize on measurement error (ME) adjustment methodology. Research Design and Methods Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method for episodically-consumed foods, we evaluated the relationship of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile, applying ME adjustment. The calibration sample included 166 youth with two FFQs and three 24-hour dietary recalls within one month. The full sample included 2,286 youth with type 1 diabetes. Results SSB intake was significantly associated with higher triglycerides, total and LDL-cholesterol, adjusted for energy, age, diabetes duration, race/ethnicity, gender, education. The estimated effect size was larger (model coefficients increased approximately threefold) after application of the NCI method than without ME adjustment. Compared to individuals consuming one serving of SSB every two weeks, those who consumed one serving every two days had 3.7 mg/dL higher triglycerides, 4.0 mg/dL higher total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, adjusted for ME and covariates. SSB intake was not associated with measures of adiposity and blood pressure. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SSB intake is significantly related to increased lipid levels in youth with type 1diabetes and that estimates of the effect size of SSB on lipid levels are severely attenuated in the presence of measurement error. Future studies in youth with diabetes should consider a design that will allow for the adjustment for measurement error when studying the influence of diet on health status. PMID:26177613

  4. Prospective Relationship of Low Cardiovascular Risk Factor Profile at Younger Ages to Ankle-Brachial Index: 39-Year Follow-Up—The Chicago Healthy Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Thanh-Huyen T.; Stamler, Jeremiah; Liu, Kiang; McDermott, Mary M.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Pirzada, Amber; Garside, Daniel B.; Daviglus, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Data are sparse regarding the long-term association of favorable levels of all major cardiovascular disease risk factors (RFs) (ie, low risk [LR]) with ankle-brachial index (ABI). Methods and Results In 2007–2010, the Chicago Healthy Aging Study reexamined a subset of participants aged 65 to 84 years from the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry cohort (baseline examination, 1967–1973). RF groups were defined as LR (untreated blood pressure ≤120/≤80 mm Hg, untreated serum cholesterol <200 mg/dL, body mass index <25 kg/m2, not smoking, no diabetes) or as 0 RFs, 1 RF, or 2+ RFs based on the presence of blood pressure ≥140/≥90 mm Hg or receiving treatment, serum cholesterol ≥240 mg/dL or receiving treatment, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2, smoking, or diabetes. ABI at follow-up was categorized as indicating PAD present (≤0.90), as borderline PAD (0.91 to 0.99), or as normal (1.00 to 1.40). We included 1346 participants with ABI ≤1.40. After multivariable adjustment, the presence of fewer baseline RFs was associated with a lower likelihood of PAD at 39-year follow-up (P for trend is <0.001). Odds ratios (95% CIs) for PAD in persons with LR, 0 RFs, or 1 RF compared with those with 2+ RFs were 0.14 (0.05 to 0.44), 0.28 (0.13 to 0.59), and 0.33 (0.16 to 0.65), respectively; findings were similar for borderline PAD (P for trend is 0.005). The association was mainly due to baseline smoking status, cholesterol, and diabetes. Remaining free of adverse RFs or improving RF status over time was also associated with PAD. Conclusions LR profile in younger adulthood (ages 25 to 45) is associated with the lowest prevalence of PAD and borderline PAD 39 years later. PMID:23316312

  5. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Request Permissions Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer ...

  6. Statin treatment patterns and clinical profile of patients with risk factors for coronary heart disease defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III.

    PubMed

    Kern, David M; Balu, Sanjeev; Tunceli, Ozgur; Anzalone, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    To compare clinical characteristics, statin treatment patterns and adherence among patients at different risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) as defined by National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III guidelines. Patients ≥ 18 years old with ≥ 1 claim for dyslipidemia, ≥ 1 statin claim, or ≥ 1 LDL-C value ≥ 100 mg/dL were identified from 1 January 2007 to 31 July 2012. Patients were classified as low risk (LR) (0-1 risk factor: hypertension, age ≥ 45 years [men] or ≥ 55 years [women], or low HDL-C), moderate/moderately high risk (MR) (≥ 2 risk factors), high risk (HR) (CHD or CHD risk equivalent), or very high risk (VHR) (acute coronary syndrome, or established cardiovascular disease plus diabetes or metabolic syndrome). Medication use and lipid levels during the 12 months before and statin use during the 6 months after index were compared across risk groups. There were 1,524,351 LR, 242,357 MR, 188,222 HR, and 57,469 VHR patients identified. Statin use was observed in 15% of all patients, but was higher in the VHR group (45%) versus LR (12%), MR (18%), and HR (29%) groups. Simvastatin accounted for 50%-52% of all statin use, and average statin dose was higher among VHR patients compared with all other groups. Adherence was low overall (mean proportion of days covered [PDC]: 0.57), but higher among VHR (0.69) versus others (mean PDC: 0.55, 0.59, and 0.59 in LR, MR, and HR groups, respectively). Statin treatment was low across all risk groups, and VHR patients had higher doses and better adherence compared with other risk groups. However, adherence was not optimal, indicating a potential limited benefit from statin treatment.

  7. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  8. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  9. Baseline cytokine profiling identifies novel risk factors for invasive fungal disease among haematology patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ceesay, M Mansour; Kordasti, Shahram; Rufaie, Eamaan; Lea, Nicholas; Smith, Melvyn; Wade, Jim; Douiri, Abdel; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is a disease of immunocompromised hosts. Cytokines are important mediators of innate and adaptive immune system. The aim of this study was to identify cytokine profiles that correlate with increased risk of IFD. We prospectively enrolled 172 adult haematology patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy, immunosuppressive therapy, and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pro-inflammatory cytokine profiling using 30-plex Luminex assay was performed at baseline and during treatment. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4.1, TLR4.2, TLR6, CLEC7A, CARD9, and INFG) were investigated among transplant recipients and donors. The incidence of IFD in this cohort was 16.9% (29/172). Median baseline serum concentrations of IL-15, IL-2R, CCL2, and MIP-1α were significantly higher whilst IL-4 was lower in patients with proven/probable IFD compared to those with no evidence of IFD. Baseline high IL-2R and CCL2 were associated with increased risk of IFD in the multivariate analysis (adjusted hazard ratio 2.3 [95% CI 1.1-5.1; P = 0.037], and hazard ratio 2.7 [95% CI 1.2-6.1; P = 0.016], respectively). However, these differences were not significant in follow up measurements. Similarly, no significant independent prognostic value was associated with baseline cytokine profile. High baseline IL-2R and CCL2 concentrations were independent indicators of the risk of developing IFD and could be used to identify patients for enhanced prophylaxis and early antifungal therapy. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modifications of Coronary Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.; August, Phyllis; Nesto, Richard W.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the revascularization and glycemic management interventions assigned at random, the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) design includes the uniform control of major coronary artery disease risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, central obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Target levels for risk factors were adjusted throughout the trial to comply with changes in recommended clinical practice guidelines. At present, the goals are low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.59 mmol/L (<100 mg/dL) with an optional goal of <1.81 mmol/L (<70 mg/dL); plasma triglyceride level <1.70 mmol/L (<150 mg/dL); blood pressure level <130 mm Hg systolic and <80 mm Hg diastolic; and smoking cessation treatment for all active smokers. Algorithms were developed for the pharmacologic management of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Dietary prescriptions for the management of glycemia, plasma lipid profiles, and blood pressure levels were adapted from existing clinical practice guidelines. Patients with a body mass index >25 were prescribed moderate caloric restriction; after the trial was under way, a lifestyle weight-management program was instituted. All patients were formally prescribed both endurance and resistance/flexibility exercises, individually adapted to their level of disability and fitness. Pedometers were distributed as a biofeedback strategy. Strategies to achieve the goals for risk factors were designed by BARI 2D working groups (lipid, cardiovascular and hypertension, and nonpharmacologic intervention) and the ongoing implementation of the strategies is monitored by lipid, hypertension, and lifestyle intervention management centers. PMID:16813737

  11. Risk factors in school shootings.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, S; Hersen, M; Thomas, J

    2000-01-01

    Nine incidents of multiple-victim homicide in American secondary schools are examined and common risk factors are identified. The literature dealing with individual, family, social, societal, and situational risk factors for youth violence and aggression is reviewed along with existing risk assessment methods. Checklists of risk factors for serious youth violence and school violence are used in reviewing each school shooting case. Commonalties among the cases and implications for psychologists practicing in clinical and school settings are discussed.

  12. Normal values for intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery--an update following a novel risk factor profiling.

    PubMed

    Randrianarisoa, Elko; Rietig, Roderich; Jacob, Stephan; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Haering, Hans-Ulrich; Rittig, Kilian; Balletshofer, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    There is a widely approved influence of novel risk factors like the body fat distribution and the associated metabolic syndrome, subclinical inflammation, insulin resistance and prediabetic disturbances in glucose metabolism on the progression of atherosclerosis. Former studies examining normal values for intima-media thickness (IMT) did not consider all of these new study results in detail. We therefore aimed to assess an update on age- and gender-specific normal values for IMT accounting for these novel risk factors. We evaluated IMT by high-resolution ultrasound (13 MHz) on the far wall of the common carotid artery in 801 subjects without cardiovascular disease (428 women aged 46.2±12.9 years; 373 men aged 47.3±13.3 years). After precise evaluation and exclusion of 14 cardiovascular risk factors, 90% limits of IMT were determined by parametric statistics. The reference limits of IMT according to the age classes 18-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years were estimated as 0.47, 0.59, 0.67 and 0.70 mm in women and 0.47, 0.62, 0.72 and 0.80 mm in men. Age and gender-specific normal values for IMT are lower than reported in former studies after additionally accounting for novel cardiovascular risk factors. The still widely regarded upper IMT limit of 1 mm must be strictly regarded as obsolete.

  13. Genetic profiling and individualized assessment of fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan V; Eisman, John A

    2013-03-01

    Osteoporosis and its consequence of fragility fracture impose a considerable demand on health-care services because fracture is associated with a series of adverse events, including re-fracture and mortality. One of the major priorities in osteoporosis care is the development of predictive models to identify individuals at high risk of fracture for early intervention and management. Existing predictive models include clinical factors and anthropometric characteristics but have not considered genetic variants in the prediction. Genome-wide association studies conducted in the past decade have identified several genetic variants relevant to fracture risk. These genetic variants are common in frequency but have very modest effect sizes. A remaining challenge is to use these genetic data to individualize fracture risk assessment on the basis of an individual's genetic risk profile. Empirical and simulation studies have shown that the usefulness of a single genetic variant for fracture risk assessment is very limited, but a profile of 50 genetic variants, each with odds ratio ranging from 1.02 to 1.15, could improve the accuracy of fracture prediction beyond that obtained by use of existing clinical risk factors. Thus, genetic profiling when integrated with existing risk assessment models could inform a more accurate prediction of fracture risk in an individual.

  14. Metabolic Risk Profile and Cancer in Korean Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seulki; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Kim, Dongwoo; Kim, A-Rim; Kim, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hye-Young

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Associations between metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer have recently been documented. We analyzed the sample cohort data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service from 2002, with a follow-up period extending to 2013. The cohort data included 99 565 individuals who participated in the health examination program and whose data were therefore present in the cohort database. The metabolic risk profile of each participant was assessed based on obesity, high serum glucose and total cholesterol levels, and high blood pressure. The occurrence of cancer was identified using Korean National Health Insurance claims data. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age group, smoking status, alcohol intake, and regular exercise. A total of 5937 cases of cancer occurred during a mean follow-up period of 10.4 years. In men with a high-risk metabolic profile, the risk of colon cancer was elevated (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.71). In women, a high-risk metabolic profile was associated with a significantly increased risk of gallbladder and biliary tract cancer (HR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.24 to 3.42). Non-significantly increased risks were observed in men for pharynx, larynx, rectum, and kidney cancer, and in women for colon, liver, breast, and ovarian cancer. The findings of this study support the previously suggested association between metabolic syndrome and the risk of several cancers. A high-risk metabolic profile may be an important risk factor for colon cancer in Korean men and gallbladder and biliary tract cancer in Korean women.

  15. Metabolic Risk Profile and Cancer in Korean Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, A-Rim; Kim, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hye-Young

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Associations between metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer have recently been documented. Methods: We analyzed the sample cohort data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service from 2002, with a follow-up period extending to 2013. The cohort data included 99 565 individuals who participated in the health examination program and whose data were therefore present in the cohort database. The metabolic risk profile of each participant was assessed based on obesity, high serum glucose and total cholesterol levels, and high blood pressure. The occurrence of cancer was identified using Korean National Health Insurance claims data. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age group, smoking status, alcohol intake, and regular exercise. Results: A total of 5937 cases of cancer occurred during a mean follow-up period of 10.4 years. In men with a high-risk metabolic profile, the risk of colon cancer was elevated (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.71). In women, a high-risk metabolic profile was associated with a significantly increased risk of gallbladder and biliary tract cancer (HR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.24 to 3.42). Non-significantly increased risks were observed in men for pharynx, larynx, rectum, and kidney cancer, and in women for colon, liver, breast, and ovarian cancer. Conclusions: The findings of this study support the previously suggested association between metabolic syndrome and the risk of several cancers. A high-risk metabolic profile may be an important risk factor for colon cancer in Korean men and gallbladder and biliary tract cancer in Korean women. PMID:27255073

  16. Personalized Predictive Modeling and Risk Factor Identification using Patient Similarity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenney; Sun, Jimeng; Hu, Jianying; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Personalized predictive models are customized for an individual patient and trained using information from similar patients. Compared to global models trained on all patients, they have the potential to produce more accurate risk scores and capture more relevant risk factors for individual patients. This paper presents an approach for building personalized predictive models and generating personalized risk factor profiles. A locally supervised metric learning (LSML) similarity measure is trained for diabetes onset and used to find clinically similar patients. Personalized risk profiles are created by analyzing the parameters of the trained personalized logistic regression models. A 15,000 patient data set, derived from electronic health records, is used to evaluate the approach. The predictive results show that the personalized models can outperform the global model. Cluster analysis of the risk profiles show groups of patients with similar risk factors, differences in the top risk factors for different groups of patients and differences between the individual and global risk factors.

  17. A simple data base for identification of risk profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Munganahalli, D.

    1996-12-31

    Sedco Forex is a drilling contractor that operates approximately 80 rigs on land and offshore worldwide. The HSE management system developed by Sedco Forex is an effort to prevent accidents and minimize losses. An integral part of the HSE management system is establishing risk profiles and thereby minimizing risk and reducing loss exposures. Risk profiles are established based on accident reports, potential accident reports and other risk identification reports (RIR) like the Du Pont STOP system. A rig could fill in as many as 30 accident reports, 30 potential accident reports and 500 STOP cards each year. Statistics are important for an HSE management system, since they are indicators of success or failure of HSE systems. It is however difficult to establish risk profiles based on statistical information, unless tools are available at the rig site to aid with the analysis. Risk profiles are then used to identify important areas in the operation that may require specific attention to minimize the loss exposure. Programs to address the loss exposure can then be identified and implemented with either a local or corporate approach. In January 1995, Sedco Forex implemented a uniform HSE Database on all the rigs worldwide. In one year companywide, the HSE database would contain information on approximately 500 accident and potential accident reports, and 10,000 STOP cards. This paper demonstrates the salient features of the database and describes how it has helped in establishing key risk profiles. It also shows a recent example of how risk profiles have been established at the corporate level and used to identify the key contributing factors to hands and finger injuries. Based on this information, a campaign was launched to minimize the frequency of occurrence and associated loss attributed to hands and fingers accidents.

  18. Veterans' fall risk profile: a prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Patricia A; Palacios, Polly; Spehar, Andrea M

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) serves the health care needs of an adult, predominantly male, and aging population. The aging profile of VHA patients is 25% greater than the civilian sector (DVA 2001). Aged patients are at higher risk for falls. In February 2002, 6 VHA medical centers profiled their inpatients' fall risk profile as one aspect of program initiatives targeted at reducing veterans' fall risk and fall-related injuries, participating in a one-day collection of fall risk measurement using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) for all inpatients (n = 1819), acute and long-term care units. Data results are reported for age, MFS score, and the relationship between age and score, and by type of ward/unit, ie, predominately acute and critical care or long-term care. The results of this prevalence study documented that the veteran inpatient population are at high-risk for anticipated physiological falls. This Veteran Integrated Services Network-wide Deployment of an Evidence-based Program to Prevent Patient Falls study was completed as part of a nationally funded clinical initiative, National Program Initiative 20-006-1.

  19. Veterans’ fall risk profile: a prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Patricia A; Palacios, Polly; Spehar, Andrea M

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) serves the health care needs of an adult, predominantly male, and aging population. The aging profile of VHA patients is 25% greater than the civilian sector (DVA 2001). Aged patients are at higher risk for falls. In February 2002, 6 VHA medical centers profiled their inpatients’ fall risk profile as one aspect of program initiatives targeted at reducing veterans’ fall risk and fall-related injuries, participating in a one-day collection of fall risk measurement using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) for all inpatients (n=1819), acute and long-term care units. Data results are reported for age, MFS score, and the relationship between age and score, and by type of ward/unit, ie, predominately acute and critical care or long-term care. The results of this prevalence study documented that the veteran inpatient population are at high-risk for anticipated physiological falls. This Veteran Integrated Services Network-wide Deployment of an Evidence-based Program to Prevent Patient Falls study was completed as part of a nationally funded clinical initiative, National Program Initiative 20-006-1. PMID:18044113

  20. Vasomotor symptoms, estradiol levels and cardiovascular risk profile in women.

    PubMed

    Gast, Gerrie-Cor M; Samsioe, Göran N; Grobbee, Diederick E; Nilsson, Peter M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2010-07-01

    We investigated whether menopausal vasomotor symptoms (VMS) are related to an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Furthermore, we examined the association between estradiol levels and VMS, and whether an association between VMS and cardiovascular risk factors can be explained by estradiol levels. We used data from a Swedish population-based sample of 5857 women, aged 50-64 years. Data on VMS and potential confounders were collected by questionnaires. Body mass index (BMI), waist hip ratio (WHR), glucose, blood pressure, lipid profile and estradiol levels were measured. Symptoms of flushing/sweats were reported by 55% and sweats by 31% of all women. Estradiol concentrations were significantly lower in women with VMS. After multivariate adjustment, women with symptoms of sweats had a statistically significantly higher BMI, waist hip ratio, total cholesterol level, LDL level, triglycerides level, glucose level, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. These patterns did not change after correction for estradiol. The associations between flushing/sweats combined and cardiovascular risk factors were less pronounced. Women with VMS have a less favorable cardiovascular risk profile. Although estradiol levels were significantly lower among women with VMS, the increased cardiovascular risk profile cannot be explained by circulating estradiol levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young people].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Contreras, Mónica; Moreno-Gómez, Germán A; Marín-Grisales, Marta E; García-Ortiz, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) involves several disorders related to the formation and development of atherosclerotic processes. Several risk factors are involved in CVD aetiology; some of them (i.e. age, hypertension, obesity, dislipidemia and diabetes) have been clearly associated, whereas others have a variable level of association. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors has been recently reported in the young population; studies of cardiovascular risk factors in this population have shown that its cardiovascular risk profile could be different from that presented by older populations. This review presents a summary of reported cardiovascular risk factors in the young population and their causes which have been released and indexed in different databases. Most factors discussed are life-habit risk factors and represent direct targets for clinical intervention. We propose that primary CVD prevention should include a more detailed knowledge of the nature of the risk factors concerning the young population and could have a positive impact on CVD prevalence during the next few years.

  2. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid profiles and relationship with cardiometabolic risk factors in Cree (Eeyouch) of Northern Québec

    PubMed Central

    Proust, Françoise; Drescher, Olivia; Laouan-Sidi, Elhadji A.; Robinson, Elizabeth; Lucas, Michel; Dewailly, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Background n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) from fish are known modulators of cardiometabolic risk factors. Objective To examine fatty acids (FAs) status and the relationship between n-3 LC-PUFA and cardiometabolic risk factors in Cree participants. Design We analyzed data from a cross-sectional study (n=829) conducted in Cree adults (aged 18–74 years) from 7 communities of the James Bay territory of Quebec (Canada) in 2005–2009. Sociodemographic, lifestyle, clinical and anthropometric data were collected. FAs were quantified in red blood cells (RBCs) under fasting conditions. Results A total of 89% of the participants were overweight (with 69% obesity), 33% had hypertriglyceridemia, 44% had low plasma HDL-c and 77% had fasting plasma insulin ≥90 pmol/l. Total n-3 PUFAs accounted for 6% of total FAs and were higher among older participants, while n-6 PUFAs accounted for 31% of total FAs and were higher among younger participants. According to the adjusted multiple linear regression models, n-3 LC-PUFA was associated (p<0.05) with higher total cholesterol, LDL-c and apo B-100, and was also associated (p<0.05) with lower blood glucose. Conclusion Overall, this study showed that n-3 LC-PUFA levels measured in the RBCs of the Cree adults are relatively low and tend towards lower levels among youth. These levels might be insufficient to offset the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:27427488

  3. Risk profiles of ectasia after keratorefractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Giri, Pushpanjali; Azar, Dimitri T

    2017-07-01

    To identify and evaluate the risk factors of iatrogenic ectasia after refractive surgery. We reviewed recently published papers that identified various risk factors associated with ectasia after LASIK, photorefractive keratectomy, small incision lenticule extraction, and other refractive surgical procedures. We also attempted to evaluate the relative contributions of these factors to the development of ectasia following refractive surgery. Forme fruste keratoconus, genetic predisposition to keratoconus, low residual stromal bed thickness (through high myopia, thin preoperative cornea, or thick LASIK flap), and irregular corneal topography have been identified as risk factors for keratectasia development after refractive surgical procedures. A newly proposed metric, percentage tissue altered, has been reported to be a robust indicator for post LASIK ectasia risk calculation. Several cases of keratectasia have also been reported 6 to 12 months following minimally invasive small incision lenticule extraction procedure. Other risk factors associated with iatrogenic ectasia include eye rubbing, young age, and pregnancy. Ectasia after refractive surgery is a relatively rare complication which can lead to sight-threatening complications if not detected and treated in time. It is important to continue our quest to improve our methods of identifying absolute and relative risk factors of ectasia and their cut-off values following various keratorefractive surgical procedures.

  4. Modifiable risk factors for schizophrenia and autism--shared risk factors impacting on brain development.

    PubMed

    Hamlyn, Jess; Duhig, Michael; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are two poorly understood clinical syndromes that differ in age of onset and clinical profile. However, recent genetic and epidemiological research suggests that these two neurodevelopmental disorders share certain risk factors. The aims of this review are to describe modifiable risk factors that have been identified in both disorders, and, where available, collate salient systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have examined shared risk factors. Based on searches of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO, inspection of review articles and expert opinion, we first compiled a set of candidate modifiable risk factors associated with autism. Where available, we next collated systematic-reviews (with or without meta-analyses) related to modifiable risk factors associated with both autism and schizophrenia. We identified three modifiable risk factors that have been examined in systematic reviews for both autism and schizophrenia. Advanced paternal age was reported as a risk factor for schizophrenia in a single meta-analysis and as a risk factor in two meta-analyses for autism. With respect to pregnancy and birth complications, for autism one meta-analysis identified maternal diabetes and bleeding during pregnancy as risks factors for autism whilst a meta-analysis of eight studies identified obstetric complications as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Migrant status was identified as a risk factor for both autism and schizophrenia. Two separate meta-analyses were identified for each disorder. Despite distinct clinical phenotypes, the evidence suggests that at least some non-genetic risk factors are shared between these two syndromes. In particular, exposure to drugs, nutritional excesses or deficiencies and infectious agents lend themselves to public health interventions. Studies are now needed to quantify any increase in risk of either autism or schizophrenia that is associated with these modifiable environmental factors.

  5. Risk profiles for weight gain among postmenopausal women: A classification and regression tree analysis approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Risk factors for obesity and weight gain are typically evaluated individually while "adjusting for" the influence of other confounding factors, and few studies, if any, have created risk profiles by clustering risk factors. We identified subgroups of postmenopausal women homogeneous in their cluster...

  6. Mexican American Adolescents' Profiles of Risk and Mental Health: A Person-Centered Longitudinal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Knight, George P.; Gonzales, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Although Mexican American adolescents experience multiple risk factors in their daily lives, most research examines the influences of risk factors on adjustment independently, ignoring the additive and interactive effects of multiple risk factors. Guided by a person-centered perspective and utilizing latent profile analysis, this study identified…

  7. Gender Differences in Risk/Protection Profiles for Low Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Stephen D.; Renner, Lynette M.; Herrenkohl, Todd I.

    2010-01-01

    Using holistic-interactionistic theory, the simultaneous nature of risk and protection factors for both males and females (age 6-11 in Wave 1) is examined using latent profile analysis (LPA). Risk/protection classes are estimated using multiple risk factor variables (e.g., physical child abuse) and multiple protective factors (e.g.,…

  8. Mexican American Adolescents' Profiles of Risk and Mental Health: A Person-Centered Longitudinal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Knight, George P.; Gonzales, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Although Mexican American adolescents experience multiple risk factors in their daily lives, most research examines the influences of risk factors on adjustment independently, ignoring the additive and interactive effects of multiple risk factors. Guided by a person-centered perspective and utilizing latent profile analysis, this study identified…

  9. Gender Differences in Risk/Protection Profiles for Low Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Stephen D.; Renner, Lynette M.; Herrenkohl, Todd I.

    2010-01-01

    Using holistic-interactionistic theory, the simultaneous nature of risk and protection factors for both males and females (age 6-11 in Wave 1) is examined using latent profile analysis (LPA). Risk/protection classes are estimated using multiple risk factor variables (e.g., physical child abuse) and multiple protective factors (e.g.,…

  10. Are there differences in risk factor profiles and frequency of CT/MRI-based infarcts among African American stroke patients with and without hypertension? A report from the African American Antiplatelet Stroke Prevention Study (AAASPS).

    PubMed Central

    Whittley, Chandra Y.; Gorelick, Philip B.; Raman, Rema; Harris, Jeffrey; Richardson, DeJuran

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND; African Americans (AAs) have a high risk of stroke and a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. Little is known about stroke risk profiles among non-hypertensive AAs. METHODS: African American Antiplatelet Stroke Prevention Study (AAASPS) enrollees with a history of hypertension (htn) were compared to those without htn for history of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and number and distribution of CT/MRI infarcts. Estimated odds ratios are presented describing the association between selected risk factors and htn status. The estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: The database for this analysis included 1012 patients with htn and 74 patients without htn. When compared to those with htn, those without htn were more commonly men (59% vs. 46%; p = 0.030), current cigarette smokers (55% vs. 37%; p = 0.001), were younger (median age: 59 years vs. 62 years; p = 0.064), had higher education (11.7 +/- 2.9 vs. 11.1 +/- 3.1; p = 0.024), had a higher number of acute strokes of unknown cause (23% vs. 13%; p=0.060), and less commonly had a history of diabetes (25% vs. 41%; p = 0.007). Those without htn had a lower mean number of old infarcts on MRI (0.94 +/- 1.40 vs. 1.45 +/- 1.60; p = 0.045), and a higher number of mean recent infarcts on CT (1.30 +/- 1.15 vs. 0.93 +/- 1.01; p = 0.031). Multivariate analysis to predict those without htn showed that these patients were more likely to be current cigarette smokers (OR = 2.89; CI = 1.60,5.49) and have higher education (OR = 1.08, CI = 0.996,1.17), and were less likely to have old CT/MRI-based infarcts (OR = 0.46; CI = 0.26,0.76). CONCLUSIONS: AAs without htn may have a different cardiovascular risk factor profile and CT/MRI profile than AAs with htn. This baseline profile among AAs without htn may predict lower stroke recurrence rates in this ongoing trial. PMID:12856908

  11. Risk factors for surgical infections.

    PubMed

    Dominioni, Lorenzo; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Rovera, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Many risk factors for postoperative infections have been identified that can be used individually or in combination as scoring indices. Infection risk scores can be applied in clinical practice to identify high-risk surgical patients, to indicate the need to implement risk-reduction strategies, and to stratify risk for comparison of outcome among different patient series. In the hierarchy of patient-related risk factors, serum albumin concentration and advanced age rank at the top of the list. Among the treatment-related factors, the quality of the surgical technique is a most important determinant, although most surgical site infections are attributable to patient-related risk factors rather than to flawed surgical care. Scoring systems can identify the patients at highest risk, thus prompting the implementation of therapy to improve modifiable conditions, but most clinicians outside the academic and research setting do not use them. Risk assessment also can be performed by expert clinical judgment. Discussion with the patient and informed consent are essential. Carefully collected scores of patient risk factors may be valuable to document the relations between the risk and the outcome of surgery. Ideally, each institution should select a validated scoring system to audit postoperative infectious morbidity and surgical performance in the various specialties.

  12. Stroke - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... a higher risk. Diseases such as cancer, chronic kidney disease, and some types of arthritis. Weak areas in an artery wall or abnormal arteries and veins . Pregnancy. Both during and in the weeks right after ...

  13. Sexual Network Profiles and Risk Factors for STIs Among African-American Sexual Minorities in Mississippi: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Sarah; Mena, Leandro; Chan, Philip A; Rose, Jennifer; Simmons, Dantrell; Riggins, Reginald; Hoffmann, Michael; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Chamberlain, Nicholas; Nunn, Amy

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence, socio-demographic characteristics, substance use, sexual behaviors, and sexual network profiles among African American sexual minorities in Jackson, Mississippi. Bivariate chi-square tests and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models explored individual and partner-related factors. Compared to their heterosexual counterparts, male African American sexual minorities reported fewer sex partners (odds ratios [OR] 0.33, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.16-0.65) and lower concurrency levels (OR 0.42, 95%CI 0.24-0.72). African American sexual minority women reported greater substance abuse, more sex partners (OR 2.54, 95%CI 1.47-4.38), higher concurrency levels (OR 1.81, 95%CI 1.24-2.64), and more transactional sex (OR 2.52, 95%CI 1.25-5.11). These results highlight the need for nuanced STI interventions tailored to African American sexual minorities in Mississippi.

  14. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  15. Environmental risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Dietert, Janice M.; Dewitt, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most critical windows of developmental vulnerability is paramount to understanding when and under what circumstances a child is at elevated risk for autism. No single environmental factor explains the increased prevalence of autism. While a handful of environmental risk factors have been suggested based on data from human studies and animal research, it is clear that many more, and perhaps the most significant risk factors, remain to be identified. The most promising risk factors identified to date fall within the categories of drugs, environmental chemicals, infectious agents, dietary factors, and other physical/psychological stressors. However, the rate at which environmental risk factors for autism have been identified via research and safety testing has not kept pace with the emerging health threat posed by this condition. For the way forward, it seems clear that additional focused research is needed. But more importantly, successful risk reduction strategies for autism will require more extensive and relevant developmental safety testing of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24149029

  16. [Preeclampsia as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; Bots, Michiel L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the primary cause of death in women. Guidelines for identifying high-risk individuals have been developed, e.g. the Dutch Guideline on Cardiovascular Risk Management. In the most recent version of this guideline, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cited as cardiovascular risk factors; therefore, individuals with these conditions are identified as being at high risk. As with DM and RA, there is strong evidence that the experience of having a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy is a cardiovascular risk factor. This is particularly the case for early preeclampsia, which constitutes a 7-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease. However, in the Netherlands, there are no guidelines and there is no consensus on how to screen or treat these women. Trial evidence is therefore urgently needed to substantiate the value of cardiovascular risk management for those women with a history of hypertension during pregnancy.

  17. Comparison of Risk Factor Profiles for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Subtypes Defined by Pattern of Visual Field Loss: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae H.; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We explored whether risk factor associations differed by primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) subtypes defined by visual field (VF) loss pattern (i.e., paracentral or peripheral). Methods. We included 77,157 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and 42,773 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS 1986–2010), and incident medical record confirmed cases of paracentral (n = 440) and peripheral (n = 865) POAG subtypes. We evaluated African heritage, glaucoma family history, body mass index (BMI), mean arterial blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, physical activity, smoking, caffeine intake, and alcohol intake. We used competing risk Cox regression analyses modeling age as the metameter and stratified by age, cohort, and event type. We sequentially identified factors with the least significant differences in associations with POAG subtypes (“stepwise down” approach with P for heterogeneity [P-het] < 0.10 as threshold). Results. Body mass index was more inversely associated with the POAG paracentral VF loss subtype than the peripheral VF loss subtype (per 10 kg/m2; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.52, 0.86] versus HR = 0.93 [95% CI: 0.78, 1.10]; P-het = 0.03) as was smoking (per 10 pack-years; HR = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.87, 0.98] versus HR = 0.98 [95% CI: 0.94, 1.01]; P-het = 0.09). These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses using a “stepwise up” approach (identify factors that showed the most significant differences). Nonheterogeneous (P-het > 0.10) adverse associations with both POAG subtypes were observed with glaucoma family history, diabetes, African heritage, greater caffeine intake, and higher mean arterial pressure. Conclusions. These data indicate that POAG with early paracentral VF loss has distinct as well as common determinants compared with POAG with peripheral VF loss. PMID:25758813

  18. Effects of apple juice on risk factors of lipid profile, inflammation and coagulation, endothelial markers and atherosclerotic lesions in high cholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Setorki, Mahbubeh; Asgary, Sedighe; Eidi, Akram; rohani, Ali Haeri; Esmaeil, Nafiseh

    2009-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis which results from gradual deposition of lipids in medium and large arteries is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of apple juice on some risk factors of atherosclerosis and on the development of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet. Methods Thirty two male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal diet, high cholesterol diet (%1 cholesterol), 1% cholesterol supplemented with 5 ml apple juice (low dose) and 1% cholesterol supplemented with 10 ml apple juice (high dose) for 2 month. The C-reactive protein (CRP), nitrite, nitrate, fibrinogen, total cholesterol(TC) and factor VII were measured before the experiment and by the end of period. At the end of study, fatty streak formation in right and left coronary arteries were determined using Chekanov method in all groups. Results Both doses of apple juice significantly were decreased TC, TG, CRP, fibrinogen, factor VII levels, atherosclerotic lesion in right and left coronary arteries and increased nitrite and nitrate compared to cholesterolemic diet. Also using 10 ml apple juice caused significant reduce in LDL-C and increase HDL-C, but 5 ml apple juice did not change these factors. Significant differences were observed between 5 and 10 ml apple juice groups by LDL-C. No significant difference was found between 5 and 10 ml apple juice groups with regard to CRP, nitrite, nitrate, fibrinogen, factor VII, TG, HDL-C and TC concentrations. Conclusion Apple juice can effectively prevent the progress of atherosclerosis. This is likely due to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect of apple juice. PMID:19804641

  19. [Genetic risk factors in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fabisch, H; Kroisel, P M; Fabisch, Karin

    2005-11-01

    The high pathogenetic relevance of genetic factors in schizophrenia is beyond doubt based on the findings of epidemiological studies. By means of a complex mode of transmission, it is likely that several genes with weak to moderate effect jointly constitute a genetic basis for a vulnerability to schizophrenia that may well vary for different individuals. Other organic and psychosocial factors also play an individually different -- in some cases significant -- role in terms of pathogenesis, as a result of which an oligogenic/polygenic multifactor model is assumed from the standpoint of aetiopathogenetics. Molecular genetic methods consist in linkage analyses and association analyses. Positive linkage findings accumulate particularly for the chromosomes 1q, 6p, 8p, 13q and 22q. By themselves, individual mutations contribute little to the range of schizophrenic feature characteristics, it was not possible -- irrespective of some subtypes -- to replicate genes of major effect. From the large number of possible candidate genes, although studies on DRD3, DRD2 and HTR2A produced positive results, the magnitudes of effect were low. The findings for alleles of dysbindin, neuregulin 1, DAO, COMT, PRODH, ZDHHC and DISC are less clear. The search for schizophrenia-relevant mutations is hampered by the possibility of a heterogeneous phenotype of schizophrenia in case of a homogeneous genotype as much as by the possibility of inter-individually homogeneous phenotypical characteristics in case of schizophrenia-relevant heterotype in the genome. With the aid of the concept of endo-phenotypes, based on neurobiological phenomena, it might be possible to take a more direct approach that leads from relevant mutations to the risk of schizophrenias. However, replacing schizophrenic alienation with neurobiological aspects leads to difficulties in explaining these complex disorder profiles. Schizophrenic diseases require an explanatory approach that also incorporates personality and

  20. Psychological Factors Linked to Risk Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaş, I.; Creãu, R. Z.; Stǎnciugelu, I.

    2012-04-01

    Risks are mental models, which allow people to cope with dangerous phenomena (Renn, 2008; Jasanoff, 1998). The term "risk" refers to the likelihood of an adverse effect resulting from an event. The aim of the present study is to identify the psychological factors that are most predictive of risk perception in relation with age, gender, educational level and socio-economical status. Earthquake hazard was considered, because it is an emerging danger for Bucharest. 80% of the laypeople sample are waiting for this event to happen in the next three years. By integrating all the research data, it was attempted to build a risk profile of the investigated population, which could be used by institutions responsible for earthquake risk mitigation situations in Bucharest. This research appealed to the social learning Rotter (1966), auto-effectiveness Bandura (1977; 1983), and anxiety and stress theories. We used psychological variables that measured stress, personal effectiveness and the belief in personal control. The multi-modal risk perception questionnaire was structured on a 49 items sequence. The sample was composed of 1.376 participants recruited on a voluntary basis. The characteristics of risk (like probability and magnitude, time scales) are perceived differently according to psychological factors that play a role also in biases in people's ability to draw inferences from probabilistic information (like cognitive dissonance). Since the 1970's, it has been argued that those who perceive life's events as being beyond their locus of control (external locus of control) are significantly more anxious and less adapted. In this research, strongest associations and significant differences were obtained between sex, age and income categories with Stress vulnerability factor and the External Locus of Control factor. The profile of the low risk perceiver is that of a young, more educated, male individual with a higher self- efficacy level and an internal locus of control.

  1. [Cardiovascular risk factors in Chilean university students].

    PubMed

    Chiang-Salgado, M T; Casanueva-Escobar, V; Cid-Cea, X; González-Rubilar, U; Olate-Mellado, P; Nickel-Paredes, F; Revello-Chiang, L

    1999-01-01

    To study the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in asymptomatic university students of both sexes, aged 18 to 25 years. Serum lipid levels were measured in a subsample of 293 subjects, using a Hitachi 717 chemical analyzer. Obesity was classified using body mass index (BMI) measurements. A self-applied questionnaire was used to collect data on sedentary life style, family history of cardiovascular disease and cigarette smoking. Statistical associations of lipid levels with lipidic and non-lipidic risk factors were assessed using Pearson's chi-square test and multiple regression. We found lipid risk levels in 29.2% for total cholesterol (CT), 16.2% for low-density lipoproteins (C-LDL) and 5% for high-density lipoproteins (C-HDL). The main non-lipidic factors were smoking (46.1%) and sedentarism (60.8%). Obesity, hypertension and parental history of myocardial infarction were present in 1.9%, 4.6% and 11%, respectively. We observed an association of a lipid risk profile with obesity, cigarette smoking and family history. The results show that sedentarism and smoking are associated with a lipid risk profile. These results call for the need to develop appropriate behavior strategies for the successful prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Factor Analysis of the Personal Profile System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Thomas George; Wilmoth, James Noel

    1992-01-01

    Principal components extraction with orthogonal and oblique rotations tested the construct validity of the Personal Profile System (PPS) using data from 1,045 senior noncommissioned Air Force officers. Four factors accounted for 85 percent of the total variance, but the results do not completely justify publisher claims for the PPS. (SLD)

  3. Factor Analysis of the Personal Profile System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Thomas George; Wilmoth, James Noel

    1992-01-01

    Principal components extraction with orthogonal and oblique rotations tested the construct validity of the Personal Profile System (PPS) using data from 1,045 senior noncommissioned Air Force officers. Four factors accounted for 85 percent of the total variance, but the results do not completely justify publisher claims for the PPS. (SLD)

  4. Cannabis use motives and personality risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hecimovic, Karen; Barrett, Sean P; Darredeau, Christine; Stewart, Sherry H

    2014-03-01

    According to the model of substance abuse of Conrod, Pihl, Stewart, and Dongier (2000), four personality factors (i.e., anxiety sensitivity [AS], introversion/hopelessness [I/H], sensation seeking [SS], and impulsivity [IMP]) are associated with elevated risk for substance use/misuse, with each personality factor being related to preference for particular drugs of abuse (e.g., AS with anxiolytics). However, cannabis use has not been consistently linked to any one of these personality factors. This may be due to the heterogeneity in cannabis use motives. The present study explored the association between these four personality risk factors and different cannabis use motives. Cannabis users completed an interview about their motives for cannabis use as well as the self-report Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS; Woicik, Conrod, Stewart, & Pihl, 2009), which measures the four personality risk factors. Results showed that AS was associated with conformity motives and I/H was associated with coping motives for cannabis use. SS was positively associated with expansion motives and IMP was associated with drug availability motives. Thus, personality risk factors in the model of Conrod et al. (2000) are associated with distinct cannabis use motives in a pattern consistent with theory.

  5. Prevalence of high ankle-brachial index (ABI) in general population of Southern Italy, risk factor profiles and systemic cardiovascular co-morbidity: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Salvatore Santo; Fiore, Valerio; Catanzaro, Stefano; Simili, Massimo; Torrisi, Benedetto; Anzaldi, Massimiliano

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out to assess the prevalence, risk factors and co-morbidities of peripheral artery disease (PAD). By contrast, to date there is a lack of data on patients with high-ABI. This study aimed at estimating the prevalence of increased ABI (ABI>1.4) and to evaluate the involvement of traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and the atherosclerotic burden (peripheral and carotid arteries) of these patients in a population of Southern Italy. We invited 9647 subjects, age ranging from 30 to 80, by letters to undergo an ABI measurement. Consequently, in patients with ABI>1.4, an ultrasound evaluation of the peripheral and carotid arteries was performed. An ABI>1.4 was found in 260 of 3412 subjects (7.6%). Statistically significant differences were reported in age, diabetes and hypertension, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). No differences in sex distribution, dyslipidemia and smoke prevalence were observed. Moreover, 67.9% of ABI>1.4 patients showed a peripheral intima-media thickness (IMT)>0.9 mm; at linear regression it was correlated with ABI values; 25% of patients showed peripheral plaques. A carotid IMT>0.9 mm was reported in 78.6% of high-ABI patients and 32.1% were affected by atherosclerotic plaques. The observed increased-ABI prevalence of 7.6% was higher than previously reported. This was more prevalent in an older population with diabetes, hypertension and obesity. Moreover, these patients are characterized by an extended atherosclerotic involvement. Further studies are needed to clarify this evidence, a longitudinal observation of this clinical outcome, as we are performing, could provide a number of interesting elements. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... previous history of clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and livedo reticularis, a mottled purplish discoloration of the skin. “Risk factors are cumulative,” Dr. Kittner adds. “Reducing even one ...

  7. What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... those who smoke. Personal or Family History of Lung Cancer If you are a lung cancer survivor, there ...

  8. Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to third hand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk.

  9. Effects of margarine compared with those of butter on blood lipid profiles related to cardiovascular disease risk factors in normolipemic adults fed controlled diets.

    PubMed

    Judd, J T; Baer, D J; Clevidence, B A; Muesing, R A; Chen, S C; Weststrate, J A; Meijer, G W; Wittes, J; Lichtenstein, A H; Vilella-Bach, M; Schaefer, E J

    1998-10-01

    Effects of butter and 2 types of margarine on blood lipid and lipoprotein concentrations were compared in a controlled diet study with 23 men and 23 women. Table spreads, added to a common basal diet, provided 8.3% of energy as fat. Diets averaged 34.6% of energy as fat and 15.5% as protein. Each diet was fed for 5 wk in a 3 x 3 Latin-square design. One margarine (TFA-M) approximated the average trans monoene content of trans fatty acid-containing margarines in the United States (17% trans fatty acids by dry wt). The other margarine (PUFA-M) was free of trans unsaturated fatty acids; it contained approximately twice the polyunsaturated fatty acid content of TFA-M (49% compared with 27% polyunsaturated fatty acids). The tub-type margarines had similar physical properties at ambient temperature. Fasting blood lipids and lipoproteins were determined in 2 samples taken from the subjects during the fifth week of each dietary treatment. Compared with butter, total cholesterol was 3.5% lower (P=0.009) after consumption of TFA-M and 5.4% lower (P< 0.001) after consumption of PUFA-M. Similarly, LDL cholesterol was 4.9% lower (P=0.005) and 6.7% lower (P< 0.001) after consumption of TFA-M and PUFA-M, respectively. Neither margarine differed from butter in its effect on HDL cholesterol or triacylglycerols. Thus, consumption of TFA-M or PUFA-M improved blood lipid profiles for the major lipoproteins associated with cardiovascular risk when compared with butter, with a greater improvement with PUFA-M than with TFA-M.

  10. Risk factor profiling and study of atherosclerotic coronary plaque burden and morphology with coronary computed tomography angiography in coronary artery disease among young Indians.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R; Chauhan, A; Singhal, M; Bagga, S

    2017-08-01

    With a decade earlier manifestation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and paucity of data characterizing coronary plaque with coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) among CAD patients in India, the study aimed to analyze patient characteristics and coronary plaque burden and morphology in young Indian patients with CAD. Serial coronary CTA was performed in 96 CAD patients. Among 60 patients ≤40years, risk factor and coronary plaque analysis done using a 256- slice CT in 33 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was compared with 27 patients with chronic stable angina (CSA). Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, for factors predicting ACS as an outcome among young CAD patients. In addition, quantitative and morphologic plaque characteristics were compared among those ≤40years and >40years. Among 60 subjects ≤40years of age, 77% had dyslipidemia, 70% high lipoprotein(a), 53.33% elevated hs-CRP and 73.33% raised homocysteine. hs-CRP (9.33 vs. 3.33, p value=0.01) and serum triglycerides (178.67 vs. 141.42, p value=0.03) were markedly raised in patients with ACS. Statistically significant number of patients in the ACS group had positive remodelling (ACS, 69.7% vs. CSA, 14.8%; p value<0.001), low attenuation plaque (ACS, 63.6% vs. CSA, 11.1%; p value<0.001), spotty calcification (ACS, 36.4% vs. CSA, 3.7%; p=0.002) and non-calcified plaque (ACS, 69.7% vs. CSA, 11.1%; p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, only lipoprotein (a) >30mg/dL and composite vulnerability score maintained a predictive value for ACS in patients ≤40years. Statistically significant number of patients in the younger age group had higher mean total plaque volume (66.17±41.31mm(3) vs. 44.94±49.07mm(3); p=0.03), remodelling index (1.5±0.27 vs. 1.08±0.38; p=0.0001). Comparing culprit lesion characteristics of ACS patients in the two age groups, positive remodelling (95.8% vs. 70.5%, p=0.02), spotty calcification (50% vs. 11.7%, p=0.01) and non-calcified plaque (95.8% vs

  11. [Perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Martinez, A M; Martínez-Sanchez, C; Pérez-Segura, J

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk perception on several factors related to reproductive health, with the goal of implementing an educational intervention based on detected needs. 405 women between 12 and 44 years were interviewed at home. 62.2% perceived the risk of pregnancy at 17 years and younger; 78.8% the risk of pregnancy at 35 years and older; 76.6% the risk of parity of 5 and higher; and 55.1% the risk of birth interval of 2 years and less. 60.5% recognized family history of birth defects, 80.2% age 35 years and older, and 84.4% rubella during pregnancy, as risk factors for newborns with congenital malformations. 27.7% identified history of a low birth weight and 61.0% birth interval of 1 year and less, as risk factors for low birth weight. The majority perceived the risk of tobacco, alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy, diseases with no treatment and deficient nutrition. There was an inconsistent influence of social and obstetric variables on risk perception. No linear correlation was detected. Health educators should recognize differences on knowledge and behavior of future receptors before an educational intervention starts.

  12. Risk profile for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Song, Mi-Kyung

    2008-03-01

    Transplant recipients have an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile and experience more cardiovascular morbidity and mortality compared with the general population, primarily because of immunosuppressant-induced diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. These discouraging prospects are even more ominous for lung transplant recipients who are more likely than other organ recipients to require intense immunosuppression and develop these conditions early and concomitantly. The purposes of this article are to heighten awareness of the prevalence, risk factors, and management of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in lung transplant patients, and to assist nurses to be proactive in helping recipients to reduce the likelihood of developing cardiovascular complications.

  13. [Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokuhei; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly patients. Identification of risk factors for AD would contribute to the understanding of AD pathogenesis and thus, help in the development of preventive methods. Early-onset familial AD is associated with mutations of the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PS-1), or PS-2, resulting in the overproduction of amyloid beta-protein. Epidemiological and case-control studies have led to the identification of several risk factors for sporadic AD. The most concrete genetic risk factor for AD is the epsilon4 allele of apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). In addition, several genes such as CTNNA3, GAB2, PVRL2, TOMM40, and APOC1 are known to be the risk factors that contribute to AD pathogenesis. On the other hand, nongenetic risk factors, such as age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, head injury, and nutrition have also been reported. Although aging is the strongest risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the development of AD as a result of ageing remain to be elucidated.

  14. Assessment of high cardiovascular risk profiles for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major cardiovascular (CV) risk factor. General Framingham Risk Profile (GFRP) and World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts were used to assess CV risk in DM in Oman. The GFRP identified more patients with medium-risk DM; GFRP and WHO/ISH identified essentially equal numbers at very high risk. These were then used to evaluate statin usage in Oman, including economics. Google lists innumerable tools from organizations, hospitals, practitioners, magazines, societies, clinics, and medical associations. The GFRP and WHO/ISH calculations provided useful DM assessment of populations in Oman. Other major risk models are Adult Treatment Panel III, based on Framingham, and Reynolds Risk Score; the latter incorporates other factors such as family history, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hemoglobin A(1c) (in DM). These models are useful in assessing specific populations. Individual practitioners with limited time may just evaluate patients as low, medium, and high CV risk based on general knowledge and then treat.

  15. [Cardiovascular risk factor prevalence in university students].

    PubMed

    García-Gulfo, María H; García-Zea, Jerson A

    2012-10-01

    Determining cardiovascular risk factor prevalence in university students from Medellin. A descriptive study of 112 students determined their lipid profile and a survey was conducted to assess their life-style and family history. There results were analyzed by gender using Chi² test and simple binary logistic regression. 82.1 % of the sample was female. A modifiable risk factor was found for at least 99.1 % of the study population: sedentary life-style (79.5 %), smoking (17 %), alcohol consumption (75.0 %), atherogenic diet (78.6 %), hypertension (1.8 %), some form of dyslipidemia (48.3 % BMI >25 (4.5 %)) and stress (86.7 %). At least one non-modifiable risk factor was identified in 77.7 % of the students. New intervention strategies are needed given the significant percentage of the target population ± 19 mean age having cardiovascular disease risk factors and young people must be encouraged to develop healthy life-styles to reduce cardiovascular risk factor prevalence.

  16. Lifestyle Factors, Body Mass Index, and Lipid Profile in Adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Patrice G.; Llabre, Maria M.; Goldberg, Ronald; McCalla, Judith R.; Schneiderman, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Objective and methods A model specifying body mass index (BMI) as mediating the relationship between lifestyle factors (aerobic fitness determined by peak oxygen consumption; physical activity by 7-day physical activity recall; diet by 24 hr dietary recall), and lipid profile were tested in a sample of 205 adolescents (73% boys), who were on average at risk of overweight, aerobically unfit, and from ethnic minority groups. Results In this well-fitting model, consuming a diet low in fat and cholesterol, and being aerobically fit predicted lower BMI, which together resulted in increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreases in triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Being physically active, predicted greater aerobic fitness. Conclusions In addition to furthering understanding of the interrelationships among predisposing, major, and conditional coronary heart disease risk factors in adolescents, these data suggest that improving diet and aerobic fitness will reduce BMI and result in a better lipid profile. PMID:18024982

  17. Analysis for Determining Factors That Place Elementary Students at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Sheila; Vitale, Patrick A.

    1994-01-01

    Urban elementary school teachers completed a checklist designed to determine a profile of the most significant factors that caused students to be at risk. Results indicated there were eight important factors: academic risk, behavior and coping skills, social withdrawal, family income, parenting, language development, retention, and attendance. (SM)

  18. INSIGHTS FROM GENOMIC PROFILING OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    A crucial question in the field of gene regulation is whether the location at which a transcription factor binds influences its effectiveness or the mechanism by which it regulates transcription. Comprehensive transcription factor binding maps are needed to address these issues, and genome-wide mapping is now possible thanks to the technological advances of ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq. This review discusses how recent genomic profiling of transcription factors gives insight into how binding specificity is achieved and what features of chromatin influence the ability of transcription factors to interact with the genome, and also suggests future experiments to further our understanding of the causes and consequences of transcription factor-genome interactions. PMID:19668247

  19. Cardiovascular Risk Factors of Taxi Drivers.

    PubMed

    Elshatarat, Rami Azmi; Burgel, Barbara J

    2016-06-01

    In the United States (U.S.), cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major leading cause of death. Despite the high mortality rate related to CVD, little is known about CVD risk factors among urban taxi drivers in the U.S. A cross-sectional design was used to identify the predictors of high cardiovascular risk factors among taxi drivers. Convenience sampling method was used to recruit 130 taxi drivers. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain the data. The sample was male (94 %), age mean (45 ± 10.75) years, married (54 %), born outside of the USA (55 %), had some college or below (61.5 %), night drivers (50.8 %), and driving on average 9.7 years and 41 h/week. About 79 % of them were eligible for CVD prevention, and 35.4 % had high CVD risk factors (4-9 risk factors). A CVD high-risk profile had a significant relationship with the subjects who were ≥55 years old; had hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia; were drinking alcohol ≥2 times/week; and had insufficient physical activity. Subjects who worked as a taxi driver for more than 10 years (OR 4.37; 95 % CI 1.82, 10.50) and had mental exertion from cab driving >5 out of 10 (OR 2.63; 95 % CI 1.05, 6.57) were more likely to have a CVD high-risk profile. As a conclusion, system-level or worksite interventions include offering healthy food at taxi dispatching locations, creating a work culture of frequent walking breaks, and interventions focusing on smoking, physical activity, and weight management. Improving health insurance coverage for this group of workers is recommended.

  20. Prevalence, Age Profile, and Associated Risk Factors for Hymenolepis nana Infection in a Large Population-Based Study in Northern Peru.

    PubMed

    Vilchez Barreto, Percy M; Gamboa, Ricardo; Santivañez, Saul; O'Neal, Seth E; Muro, Claudio; Lescano, Andrés G; Moyano, Luz-Maria; Gonzálvez, Guillermo; García, Hector H; For The Cysticercosis Working Group In Perú Cwgp

    2017-08-01

    Hymenolepis nana, the dwarf tapeworm, is a common intestinal infection of children worldwide. We evaluated infection and risk factor data that were previously collected from 14,761 children aged 2-15 years during a large-scale program in northern Peru. We found that 1,124 of 14,761 children (7.61%) had H. nana infection, a likely underestimate given that only a single stool sample was examined by microscopy for diagnosis. The strongest association with infection was lack of adequate water (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 2.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82-2.48) and sanitation infrastructure in the house (aPR 1.94, 95% CI 1.64-2.29). One quarter of those tested did not have a bathroom or latrine at home, which doubled their likelihood of infection. Similarly, one quarter did not have piped public water to the house, which also increased the likelihood of infection. Continued efforts to improve access to basic water and sanitation services will likely reduce the burden of infection in children for this and other intestinal infections.

  1. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  2. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A.; Korach, K.S. ); Epstein, S. ); Bhattacharyya, M. ); Pounds, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

  3. Audit of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Supported Adults with Intellectual Disability Attending an Ageing Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robyn A.; Schluter, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile for older adults with intellectual disability (ID). As many CVD risk factors are treatable by lifestyle changes, confirmation of the risk factor profile for older adults with ID could substantially impact upon preventive health practices for this group. Method:…

  4. Audit of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Supported Adults with Intellectual Disability Attending an Ageing Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robyn A.; Schluter, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile for older adults with intellectual disability (ID). As many CVD risk factors are treatable by lifestyle changes, confirmation of the risk factor profile for older adults with ID could substantially impact upon preventive health practices for this group. Method:…

  5. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  6. Risk factors for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, H; Nandurkar, S; Royce, S G; Thien, F; Gibson, P R

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen driven disease, whereby food and/or aeroallergens result in inflammation and luminal narrowing, and the clinical symptoms of dysphagia and food bolus obstruction events (FBOE). Established risk factors are male gender, Caucasian race and atopy. Increased risk amongst family members, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a gene coding thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) on the pseudoautosomal region of the X and Y chromosomes supports a genetic predisposition. Environmental factors including the timing and nature of food and aeroallergen exposure to the developing immune system may be important, whilst esophageal barrier function integrity and the influence of microbiota are worthy of future research.

  7. Sexual harassment: identifying risk factors.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, E A; O'Donohue, W

    1998-12-01

    A new model of the etiology of sexual harassment, the four-factor model, is presented and compared with several models of sexual harassment including the biological model, the organizational model, the sociocultural model, and the sex role spillover model. A number of risk factors associated with sexually harassing behavior are examined within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. These include characteristics of the work environment (e.g., sexist attitudes among co-workers, unprofessional work environment, skewed sex ratios in the workplace, knowledge of grievance procedures for sexual harassment incidents) as well as personal characteristics of the subject (e.g., physical attractiveness, job status, sex-role). Subjects were 266 university female faculty, staff, and students who completed the Sexual Experience Questionnaire to assess the experience of sexual harassment and a questionnaire designed to assess the risk factors stated above. Results indicated that the four-factor model is a better predictor of sexual harassment than the alternative models. The risk factors most strongly associated with sexual harassment were an unprofessional environment in the workplace, sexist atmosphere, and lack of knowledge about the organization's formal grievance procedures.

  8. Lipid Profile Components and Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Joshua Z.; Xu, Qiang; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Paik, Myunghee C.; Moon, Yeseon Park; Sacco, Ralph L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between lipid profile components and incident ischemic stroke in a stroke-free prospective cohort. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting Northern Manhattan, New York. Patients Stroke-free community residents. Intervention As part of the Northern Manhattan Study, baseline fasting blood samples were collected on stroke-free community residents followed up for a mean of 7.5 years. Main Outcome Measures Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for lipid profile components and ischemic stroke after adjusting for demographic and risk factors. In secondary analyses, we used repeated lipid measures over 5 years from a 10% sample of the population to calculate the change per year of each of the lipid parameters and to impute time-dependent lipid parameters for the full cohort. Results After excluding those with a history of myocardial infarction, 2940 participants were available for analysis. Baseline high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels were not associated with risk of ischemic stroke. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were associated with a paradoxical reduction in risk of stroke. There was an interaction with use of cholesterol-lowering medication on follow-up, such that LDL-C level was only associated with a reduction in stroke risk among those taking medications. An LDL-C level greater than 130 mg/dL as a time-dependent covariate showed an increased risk of ischemic stroke (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.53–9.51). Conclusions Baseline lipid panel components were not associated with an increased stroke risk in this cohort. Treatment with cholesterol-lowering medications and changes in LDL-C level over time may have attenuated the risk in this population, and lipid measurements at several points may be a better marker of

  9. Risk factors for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) originates, in most of the cases (95 %), from a full trisomy of chromosome 21. The remaining cases are due to either mosaicism for chromosome 21 or the inheritance of a structural rearrangement leading to partial trisomy of the majority of its content. Full trisomy 21 and mosaicism are not inherited, but originate from errors in cell divisions during the development of the egg, sperm or embryo. In addition, full trisomy for chromosome 21 should be further divided into cases of maternal origin, the majority, and cases of paternal origin, less than 10 %. Among cases of maternal origin, a further stratification should be performed into errors that have occurred or originated during the first meiotic division in the maternal grandmother's body and errors that occurred later in life during the second maternal meiotic division. This complex scenario suggests that our understanding of the risk factors for trisomy 21 should take into account the above stratification as it reflects different individuals and generations in which the first error has occurred. Unfortunately, most of the available literature is focused on maternal risk factors, and the only certain risk factors for the birth of a child with DS are advanced maternal age at conception and recombination errors, even though the molecular mechanisms leading to chromosome 21 nondisjunction are still a matter of debate. This article critically reviews the hypotheses and the risk factors which have been suggested to contribute to the birth of a child with DS, including folate metabolism, dietary, lifestyle, environmental, occupational, genetic and epigenetic factors, with focus on maternal and paternal risk factors, and taking into account the possible contribution of the maternal grandmother and that of the developing trisomic embryo, in a complex scenario depicting the birth of a child with DS as the result of complex gene-environment interactions and selection processes involving different

  10. Prediction of fracture risk. II: Other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1996-12-01

    Many osteoporotic fractures are probably preventable-by definition, prevention requires identification of those at risk prior to fracture. There is a continuum in fracture risk and a very wide range in risk among individuals. Bone density, previous fractures, and the frequency and types of falls are important risk factors for fractures. There are also many other risk factors for bone loss, falls, and fractures. People with multiple risk factors are at greater risk than those with either a single risk factor or none. Identification of risk factors can help when planning interventions. For example, dietary deficiencies are amenable to dietary modification or supplementation; however, the effects of many risk factors have not been quantified separately, making it difficult to determine the importance. In addition, it is not possible to accurately predict current bone density and fracture risk from risk factors for bone loss; bone density should always be measured directly.

  11. Subsets of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis in community-dwelling older adults in the United Kingdom: prevalence, inter-relationships, risk factor profiles and clinical characteristics at baseline and 3-years

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M.; Peat, G.; Nicholls, E.; van der Windt, D.; Myers, H.; Dziedzic, K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the population prevalence, inter-relationships, risk factor profiles and clinical characteristics of subsets of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis (OA) with a view to understanding their relative frequency and distinctiveness. Method 1076 community-dwelling adults with hand symptoms (60% women, mean age 64.7 years) were recruited and classified into pre-defined subsets using physical examination and standardised hand radiographs, scored with the Kellgren & Lawrence (K&L) and Verbruggen–Veys grading systems. Detailed information on selected risk factors was obtained from direct measurement (Body Mass Index (BMI)), self-complete questionnaires (excessive use of hands, previous hand injury) and medical record review (hypertension, dyslipidaemia, type 2 diabetes). Hand pain and disability were self-reported at baseline and 3-year follow-up using Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN). Results Crude population prevalence estimates for symptomatic hand OA subsets in the adult population aged 50 years and over were: thumb base OA (22.4%), nodal interphalangeal joint (IPJ) OA (15.5%), generalised hand OA (10.4%), non-nodal IPJ OA (4.9%), erosive OA (1.0%). Apart from thumb base OA, there was considerable overlap between the subsets. Erosive OA appeared the most distinctive with the highest female: male ratio, and the most disability at baseline and 3-years. A higher frequency of obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and metabolic syndrome was observed in this subset. Conclusion Overlap in the occurrence of hand OA subsets poses conceptual and practical challenges to the pursuit of distinct phenotypes. Erosive OA may nevertheless provide particular insight into the role of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:23954700

  12. Risk factor paradox in wasting diseases.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Horwich, Tamara B; Oreopoulos, Antigone; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Younessi, Houman; Anker, Stefan D; Morley, John E

    2007-07-01

    Emerging data indicate that conventional cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia and obesity) are paradoxically associated with better survival in distinct populations with wasting. We identify these populations and review survival paradoxes and common pathophysiologic mechanisms. A 'reverse epidemiology' of cardiovascular risk is observed in chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, cancer, AIDS and rheumatoid arthritis, and in the elderly. These populations apparently have slowly progressive to full-blown wasting and significantly greater short-term mortality than the general population. The survival paradoxes may result from the time differential between the two competing risk factors [i.e. over-nutrition (long-term killer but short-term protective) versus undernutrition (short-term killer)]. Hemodynamic stability of obesity, protective adipokine profile, endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction, toxin sequestration of fat, antioxidation of muscle, reverse causation, and survival selection may also contribute. The seemingly counterintuitive risk factor paradox is the hallmark of chronic disease states or conditions associated with wasting disease at the population level. Studying similarities among these populations may help reveal common pathophysiologic mechanisms of wasting disease, leading to a major shift in clinical medicine and public health beyond the conventional Framingham paradigm and to novel therapeutic approaches related to wasting and short-term mortality.

  13. [Risk factors associated to preclampsia].

    PubMed

    López-Carbajal, Mario Joaquín; Manríquez-Moreno, María Esther; Gálvez-Camargo, Daniela; Ramírez-Jiménez, Evelia

    2012-01-01

    preeclampsia constitutes one of the main causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim was to identify the risk factors associated to the developmental of preeclampsia mild-moderate and severe, as well as the force of association of these factors in a hospital of second-level medical care. study of cases and controls, a relation 1:1, in women withdrawn of the Service of Gynecology and Obstetrics during 2004 to 2007. Pregnant women with more than 20 weeks gestation were included. In the cases group we included patients with diagnosis of preeclampsia mild-moderate or severe (corroborated clinical and laboratory). In the controls group that had a normal childbirth without pathology during the pregnancy. 42 cases and 42 controls. The average age was of 27 years. The associated risk factors were overweight, obesity, irregular prenatal control, short or long intergenesic period, history of caesarean or preeclampsia in previous pregnancies. the knowledge of the risk factors will allow the accomplishment of preventive measures and decrease the fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality due to preeclampsia.

  14. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Levels in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors (blood lipids, obesity, and smoking) in 329 adults with mental retardation residing in various settings with subjects in the Framingham Offspring Study found that adults with mental retardation had cardiovascular risk profiles similar to those of individuals without mental retardation. (Author/DB)

  15. Neighborhood risk factors for obesity.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Russ P

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study was to explore neighborhood environmental factors associated with obesity in a sample of adults living in a major U.S. metropolitan area. This was a multi-level study combining data from the U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System with data from the U.S. Census. A total of 15,358 subjects living in 327 zip code tabulation areas were surveyed between 1998 and 2002. The outcome was obesity (BMI >30), and independent variables assessed included individual level variables (age, education, income, smoking status, sex, black race, and Hispanic ethnicity), and zip code level variables (percentage black, percentage Hispanic, percentage with more than a high school education, retail density, establishment density, employment density, population density, the presence of a supermarket, intersection density, median household income, and density of fast food outlets). After controlling for individual level factors, median household income [relative risk (RR) = 0.992; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.990, 0.994], population density (RR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.972, 0.990), employment density (RR = 1.004; 95% CI = 1.001, 1.009), establishment density (RR = 0.981 95% CI = 0.964, 0.999), and the presence of a supermarket (RR = 0.893; 95% CI = 0.815, 0.978) were associated with obesity risk. Fast food establishment density was poorly associated with obesity risk. Where one lives may affect obesity status. Given the influence of the presence of a supermarket on obesity risk, efforts to address food access might be a priority for reducing obesity.

  16. Risk factors of striae gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Kasielska-Trojan, A; Sobczak, M; Antoszewski, B

    2015-04-01

    Stretch marks are a common skin disorder. Pregnancy-related lesions are defined as striae gravidarum. The root cause of striae formation remains unknown. The aim of this paper was to identify the risk factors associated with striae gravidarum (SG) development. The study was conducted at Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Clinic and Obstetrics Outpatient Department among 299 Caucasian women maximum 6 months after the delivery, regardless of whether they were primiparas or multiparas. Among the women participating in the study, 71.2% (213 of 299) developed striae gravidarum at least in one site. Logistic regression analysis showed that four of the analysed factors were independent predictors of striae gravidarum occurrence: family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, the lack of chronic diseases and birthweight (P < 0.0001). It has been found that the presence of striae distensae on the breasts increases the risk of SG development (71.4% vs. 28.6%, P = 0.0008), whereas the presence of these lesions on the thighs decreases the risk (23% vs. 77%, P = 0.0076). In this study, we presented a model that can help to predict the risk of SG formation, including family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, birthweight and chronic diseases. Moreover, women with stretch marks on their breasts should know that the risk of SG development is significantly higher, whereas lesions on the thighs do not increase such a risk. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Noncommunicable disease risk profile of factory workers in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Jugal; Kohli, Charu; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Ekta

    2012-01-01

    Background: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are becoming more prevalent in India. The data for presence of NCDs and its risk factors among factory workers is deficient in India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 37 factory workers and equal number of comparable subjects from general population. Screening for presence of diabetes along with its risk factors was made in both the groups using pretested predesigned World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance (WHO STEPS) questionnaire in rural area of Delhi. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. The estimation of risk in two groups was done with calculation of odds ratio (OR). P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: A total of 74 participants were included in the present study. Hypertension and diabetes was present in 13.5 and 5.4% of factory workers and four (10.8%) and three (8.8%) subjects in comparative group, respectively. Seven (18.9%) factory and eight (21.6%) non-factory subjects fell in the category of current smoker or smokeless tobacco users. High density lipoprotein levels were found abnormal among one (2.7%) factory worker and nine (24.3%) subjects in comparative group (P-value = 0.01). Behavioral risk factors, alcohol consumption, and fruits and vegetable intake were significantly different among two groups. Conclusion: Factory workers were having better profile than non-factory subjects except for risk factors such as alcohol intake and inadequate fruits and vegetable intake. However, healthy worker effect phenomenon cannot be ruled out. PMID:23776324

  18. Noncommunicable disease risk profile of factory workers in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Jugal; Kohli, Charu; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Ekta

    2012-09-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are becoming more prevalent in India. The data for presence of NCDs and its risk factors among factory workers is deficient in India. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 37 factory workers and equal number of comparable subjects from general population. Screening for presence of diabetes along with its risk factors was made in both the groups using pretested predesigned World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance (WHO STEPS) questionnaire in rural area of Delhi. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. The estimation of risk in two groups was done with calculation of odds ratio (OR). P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. A total of 74 participants were included in the present study. Hypertension and diabetes was present in 13.5 and 5.4% of factory workers and four (10.8%) and three (8.8%) subjects in comparative group, respectively. Seven (18.9%) factory and eight (21.6%) non-factory subjects fell in the category of current smoker or smokeless tobacco users. High density lipoprotein levels were found abnormal among one (2.7%) factory worker and nine (24.3%) subjects in comparative group (P-value = 0.01). Behavioral risk factors, alcohol consumption, and fruits and vegetable intake were significantly different among two groups. Factory workers were having better profile than non-factory subjects except for risk factors such as alcohol intake and inadequate fruits and vegetable intake. However, healthy worker effect phenomenon cannot be ruled out.

  19. Risk factors for atherosclerosis in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Misra, A

    2000-06-01

    Atherosclerosis starts in childhood, and is accelerated in some individuals. A cluster of clinical and biochemical factors constitute the risk profile for many of them, perhaps most important being metabolic insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance and its components for children and adolescents, especially obesity and dyslipidemia, are generators of hypertension, glucose intolerance and complications of atherosclerosis in adulthood. Some individuals are genetically predisposed, particularly those with the family history of such disorders. For many subjects, there is 'tracking' of metabolic and lifestyle factors from early age to adulthood. Several new risk factors of atherosclerosis (e.g. level of lipoprotein (a), procoagulant state, hyperhomocysteinemia, low birth weight and adverse in-utero environment, and possibly inflammatory markers) are current and potentially future areas of research concerning children and young individuals. Definition of and research on new and hitherto not investigated factors and formulation of strategies to neutralize the known factors are of paramount importance for primary prevention of atherosclerosis. Simple and effective measures for prevention include increasing awareness of the diseases, maintenance of ideal body weight, regular physical exercise, avoidance of smoking and chewing of tobacco, eating a balanced diet, and early periodic monitoring of blood pressure and metabolic status. These measures, starting from childhood, should be applied to all and in particular to the susceptible offspring, predisposed individuals, and populations.

  20. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  1. Obesity and related risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, H; Nabaei, B

    2007-03-01

    To study the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Iranian schoolgirls and to identify risk factors which lead to obesity. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2002 and a sample of 1800 female students between 7-12 years old was obtained using a multistage cluster sampling method from Tehran. Height and weight were measured and related socio-economic information was collected. The overall percent of overweight and obesity was 13.3% and 7.7% respectively. BMI (Body Mass Index) was directly and significantly(r=+0.28, P< 0.001) correlated with increasing age. Physical activity was significantly different between obese and non-obese children. (P=0.03) Also, economical factors such as the type of school (private&public) were different in these children. (P=0.03) The statistical analysis of the data revealed a significant and inverse correlation(r=-0.03, P=0.04) between maternal education and occurrence of overweight and obesity in children. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in young Iranian girls was high. Advanced age, lack of physical inactivity, low economical factors and maternal educational status could be risk factors for obesity in children.

  2. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  3. Chemotherapy-Related Amenorrhea and Menopause in Young Chinese Breast Cancer Patients: Analysis on Incidence, Risk Factors and Serum Hormone Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Giok S.; Mo, Frankie K. F.; Pang, Elizabeth; Suen, Joyce J. S.; Tang, Nelson L. S.; Lee, Kun M.; Yip, Claudia H. W.; Tam, Wing H.; Ng, Rita; Koh, Jane; Yip, Christopher C. H.; Kong, Grace W. S.; Yeo, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this prospective cross-sectional study on young premenopausal breast cancer patients, the objectives were to: determine the incidences of chemotherapy-related amenorrhea (CRA) and menopause (CRM); identify associated factors; and assess plasma levels of estradiol (E2) and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) among patients who developed menopause. Methods Eligibility criteria include Chinese stage I-III breast cancer patients, premenopausal, age ≤45 at breast cancer diagnosis, having received adjuvant chemotherapy, within 3–10 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Detailed menstrual history prior to and after adjuvant treatment was taken at study entry. Patients’ background demographics, tumor characteristics and anti-cancer treatments were collected. The rates of CRA and CRM were determined. Analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with CRM. For postmenopausal patients, levels of E2 and FSH were analyzed. Results 286 patients were recruited; the median time from breast cancer diagnosis to study entry was 5.0 years. 255 patients (91.1%) developed CRA. Of these, 66.7% regained menstruation. At the time of study entry, 137 (48.9%) had developed CRM, amongst whom 84 were age ≤45. On multivariate analysis, age was the only associated factor. Among patients with CRM, the median FSH was 41.0 IU/L; this was significantly lower in those who were taking tamoxifen compared to those who were not (20.1 vs. 59.7 IU/L, p<0.0001). The E2 level was <40 pmol/L; there was no difference between those who were still on tamoxifen or not. Conclusion After adjuvant chemotherapy, the majority of young Chinese breast cancer patients developed CRA; ~50% developed CRM, with 61% at age ≤45. Age at diagnosis is the only factor associated with CRM. FSH level may be affected by tamoxifen intake. PMID:26485568

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer? A risk factor is ... may have few or no known risk factors. Risk factors for eye melanoma Race/ethnicity The risk ...

  5. Metabolite Profiling Identifies Pathways Associated with Metabolic Risk in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P.; Larson, Martin G.; Lewis, Gregory D.; McCabe, Elizabeth L.; Shen, Dongxiao; Palma, Melinda J.; Roberts, Lee D.; Dejam, Andre; Souza, Amanda L.; Deik, Amy A.; Magnusson, Martin; Fox, Caroline S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Melander, Olle; Clish, Clary B.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although metabolic risk factors are known to cluster in individuals who are prone to developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, the underlying biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. Methods and Results To identify pathways associated with cardiometabolic risk, we used liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine the plasma concentrations of 45 distinct metabolites and examine their relation to cardiometabolic risk in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; N=1015) and the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDC; N=746). We then interrogated significant findings in experimental models of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. We observed that metabolic risk factors (obesity, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia) were associated with multiple metabolites including branched-chain amino acids, other hydrophobic amino acids, tryptophan breakdown products, and nucleotide metabolites. We observed strong associations of insulin resistance traits with glutamine (standardized regression coefficients −0.04 to −0.22, per 1-SD change in log-glutamine, P<0.001), glutamate (0.05 to 0.14, P<0.001), and glutamine-glutamate ratio (−0.05 to −0.20, P<0.001) in the discovery sample (FHS); similar associations were observed in the replication sample (MDC). High glutamine-glutamate ratio was associated with lower risk of incident diabetes in FHS (OR 0.79; adjusted P=0.03), but not in MDC. In experimental models, administration of glutamine in mice led to both increased glucose tolerance (P=0.01) and to lower blood pressure (P<0.05). Conclusions Biochemical profiling identified circulating metabolites not previously associated with metabolic traits. Experimentally interrogating one of these pathways demonstrated that excess glutamine relative to glutamate, resulting from exogenous administration, is associated with reduced metabolic risk in mice. PMID:22496159

  6. Metabolite profiling identifies pathways associated with metabolic risk in humans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P; Larson, Martin G; Lewis, Gregory D; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Shen, Dongxiao; Palma, Melinda J; Roberts, Lee D; Dejam, Andre; Souza, Amanda L; Deik, Amy A; Magnusson, Martin; Fox, Caroline S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Melander, Olle; Clish, Clary B; Gerszten, Robert E; Wang, Thomas J

    2012-05-08

    Although metabolic risk factors are known to cluster in individuals who are prone to developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, the underlying biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. To identify pathways associated with cardiometabolic risk, we used liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine the plasma concentrations of 45 distinct metabolites and to examine their relation to cardiometabolic risk in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; n=1015) and the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDC; n=746). We then interrogated significant findings in experimental models of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. We observed that metabolic risk factors (obesity, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, and dyslipidemia) were associated with multiple metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, other hydrophobic amino acids, tryptophan breakdown products, and nucleotide metabolites. We observed strong associations of insulin resistance traits with glutamine (standardized regression coefficients, -0.04 to -0.22 per 1-SD change in log-glutamine; P<0.001), glutamate (0.05 to 0.14; P<0.001), and the glutamine-to-glutamate ratio (-0.05 to -0.20; P<0.001) in the discovery sample (FHS); similar associations were observed in the replication sample (MDC). High glutamine-to-glutamate ratio was associated with lower risk of incident diabetes mellitus in FHS (odds ratio, 0.79; adjusted P=0.03) but not in MDC. In experimental models, administration of glutamine in mice led to both increased glucose tolerance (P=0.01) and decreased blood pressure (P<0.05). Biochemical profiling identified circulating metabolites not previously associated with metabolic traits. Experimentally interrogating one of these pathways demonstrated that excess glutamine relative to glutamate, resulting from exogenous administration, is associated with reduced metabolic risk in mice.

  7. Schizophrenia risk factors constitute general risk factors for psychiatric symptoms in the population.

    PubMed

    Breetvelt, Elemi J; Boks, Marco P M; Numans, Mattijs E; Selten, Jean-Paul; Sommer, Iris E C; Grobbee, Diederick E; Kahn, René S; Geerlings, Mirjam I

    2010-07-01

    The presence of a psychosis continuum is suggested by studies showing that schizophrenia and non-clinical psychotic symptoms in the general population share the same risk factors. However, to our knowledge no large-scale studies have been conducted which examine the specificity of these risk factors in the general population. To investigate whether socio-demographic characteristics associated with non-clinical psychotic symptoms are also associated with other psychiatric symptoms. And secondly, to examine to what extent concomitant psychiatric symptoms explain the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics and non-clinical psychotic symptoms. In a general population sample of 4894 subjects (mean age 39 years, 45% men) from the Utrecht Health Project we investigated the associations of socio-demographical characteristics with non-clinical psychotic symptoms and other psychiatric symptoms by using the SCL-90. We examined these associations using multivariable logistic regression analyses with and without controlling for the presence of other psychiatric symptoms. Participants with non-clinical psychotic symptoms had an 89% probability of concomitant depressive, anxiety or phobic anxiety symptoms, compared to 11% in participants without psychotic symptoms. The risk profiles for non-clinical psychotic symptoms and other psychiatric symptoms were largely similar. Non-Dutch ethnicity was most strongly associated with non-clinical psychotic symptoms. Adjusting for other psychiatric symptoms did not increase the specificity of the risk factors. Socio-demographic risk factors for non-clinical psychotic symptoms in the general population are also risk factors for other psychiatric symptoms. The relationship between these risk factors and psychotic symptoms are for a substantial part explained by an increase in other psychiatric symptoms. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Individual risk profiling for breast cancer recurrence: towards tailored follow-up schemes.

    PubMed

    Kraeima, J; Siesling, S; Vliegen, I M H; Klaase, J M; IJzerman, M J

    2013-08-20

    Breast cancer follow-up is not tailored to the risk of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) in individual patients or as a function of time. The objective of this study was to identify prognostic factors and to estimate individual and time-dependent LRR risk rates. Prognostic factors for LRR were identified by a scoping literature review, expert consultation, and stepwise multivariate regression analysis based on 5 years of data from women diagnosed with breast cancer in the Netherlands in 2005 or 2006 (n=17,762). Inter-patient variability was elucidated by examples of 5-year risk profiles of average-, medium-, and high-risk patients, whereby 6-month interval risks were derived from regression estimates. Eight prognostic factors were identified: age, tumour size, multifocality, gradation, adjuvant chemo-, adjuvant radiation-, hormonal therapy, and triple-negative receptor status. Risk profiles of the low-, average-, and high-risk example patients showed non-uniform distribution of recurrence risks (2.9, 7.6, and 9.2%, respectively, over a 5-year period). Individual risk profiles differ substantially in subgroups of patients defined by prognostic factors for recurrence and over time as defined in 6-month time intervals. To tailor follow-up schedules and to optimise allocation of scarce resources, risk factors, frequency, and duration of follow-up should be taken into account.

  9. Non-dietary environmental risk factors in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrís-i-Tortajada, J; Berbel-Tornero, O; Garcia-i-Castell, J; López-Andreu, J.A.; Sobrino-Najul, E; Ortega-García, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim is to update and disclose the main environmental risk factors, excluding dietary factors, involved in the etiopathology of prostate cancer. Materials and methods Bibliographic review of the last 25 years of non-dietary environmental risk factors associated with prostate cancer between 1985 and 2010, obtained from MedLine, CancerLit, Science Citation Index and Embase. The search profiles were Environmental Risk Factors/Tobacco/Infectious-Inflammatory Factors/Pesticides/Vasectomy/Occupational Exposures/ Chemoprevention Agents/Radiation and Prostate Cancer. Results While some non-dietary environmental risk factors increase the risk of acquiring the disease, others decrease it. Of the former, it is worth mentioning exposal to tobacco smoke, chronic infectious-inflammatory prostatic processes and occupational exposure to cadmium, herbicides and pesticides. The first factors that reduce the risk are the use of chemopreventive drugs (Finasterida, Dutasteride) and exposure to ultraviolet solar radiation. With the current data, a vasectomy does not influence the risk of developing the disease. Conclusions The slow process of prostate carcinogenesis is the final result of the interaction of constitutional risk and environmental factors. Non-dietary environmental factors play an important role in the etiopathology of this disease. To appropriately assess the risk factors, extensive case studies that include all the possible variables must be analyzed. PMID:21439685

  10. [Risk factors for birth injuries].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia; Rubio-Espíritu, Jorge; Islas-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    To identify risk factors associated with birth trauma. Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital General "Dr. Manuel Gea González", Secretaría de Salud. Case-control, prolective study. There were 129 cases and 134 controls. We recorded the following variables: a) maternal and delivery: age, weight, height, prenatal care, pre-existing disease or gestational disease, mode of delivery, anesthetic management during labor, use of external maneuvers or forceps; b) newborn: birth weight, gestational age, academic degree of attendant physician at delivery, and type of birth injury. The independent risk factors associated to birth injury were: for ecchymoses; general anesthesia (OR 13.7, 95% CI = 3 - 62.6), breech presentation (OR 6.4, 95% IC 95% = 1.4 - 27.9) and gestational age < or = 32 weeks (OR 6.4, 95% CI = 1.3 - 31.1); for lacerations, vaginal dystocic delivery or cesarean section (OR 19, 95% CI = 4.4 - 81.1) and use of external maneuvers (OR 5.6, 95% CI = 1.5 - 21.6); for cephalhematoma maternal height < or = 1.54 m (OR 7.4, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7) and external maneuvers (OR 7.2, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7); for caput succedaneum, external maneuvers (OR 3.4, 95% CI = 1.5-7.7) and maternal age < or = 19 or > or = 36 years (OR 3.0, 95% CI = 1.4 - 6.4). Risk factors associated with birth injuries identified in this study involved maternal conditions, neonatal conditions and mechanism of delivery.

  11. Environmental Risk Factors for ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, Farzad; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Over the past several decades, alcohol abuse and cigarette smoke exposure have been identified as risk factors for the development of ARDS. The mechanisms underlying these relationships are complex and remain under investigation but are thought to involve pulmonary immune impairment as well as alveolar epithelial and endothelial dysfunction. This review summarizes the epidemiologic data supporting links between these exposures and ARDS susceptibility and outcomes and highlights key mechanistic investigations that provide insight into the pathways by which each exposure is linked to ARDS. PMID:25453414

  12. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in College Students12

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Jennifer; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Lofgren, Ingrid E.

    2014-01-01

    More than one-half of young adults aged 18–24 y have at least 1 coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor and nearly one-quarter have advanced atherosclerotic lesions. The extent of atherosclerosis is directly correlated with the number of risk factors. Unhealthy dietary choices made by this age group contribute to weight gain and dyslipidemia. Risk factor profiles in young adulthood strongly predict long-term CHD risk. Early detection is critical to identify individuals at risk and to promote lifestyle changes before disease progression occurs. Despite the presence of risk factors and pathological changes, risk assessment and disease prevention efforts are lacking in this age group. Most young adults are not screened and are unaware of their risk. This review provides pathological evidence along with current risk factor prevalence data to demonstrate the need for early detection. Eighty percent of heart disease is preventable through diet and lifestyle, and young adults are ideal targets for prevention efforts because they are in the process of establishing lifestyle habits, which track forward into adulthood. This review aims to establish the need for increased screening, risk assessment, education, and management in young adults. These essential screening efforts should include the assessment of all CHD risk factors and lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, and smoking), blood pressure, glucose, and body mass index in addition to the traditional lipid panel for effective long-term risk reduction. PMID:24618758

  13. Coronary heart disease risk factors in college students.

    PubMed

    Arts, Jennifer; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Lofgren, Ingrid E

    2014-03-01

    More than one-half of young adults aged 18-24 y have at least 1 coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor and nearly one-quarter have advanced atherosclerotic lesions. The extent of atherosclerosis is directly correlated with the number of risk factors. Unhealthy dietary choices made by this age group contribute to weight gain and dyslipidemia. Risk factor profiles in young adulthood strongly predict long-term CHD risk. Early detection is critical to identify individuals at risk and to promote lifestyle changes before disease progression occurs. Despite the presence of risk factors and pathological changes, risk assessment and disease prevention efforts are lacking in this age group. Most young adults are not screened and are unaware of their risk. This review provides pathological evidence along with current risk factor prevalence data to demonstrate the need for early detection. Eighty percent of heart disease is preventable through diet and lifestyle, and young adults are ideal targets for prevention efforts because they are in the process of establishing lifestyle habits, which track forward into adulthood. This review aims to establish the need for increased screening, risk assessment, education, and management in young adults. These essential screening efforts should include the assessment of all CHD risk factors and lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, and smoking), blood pressure, glucose, and body mass index in addition to the traditional lipid panel for effective long-term risk reduction.

  14. Risk Profiles of Children Entering Residential Care: A Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagaman, Jessica L.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Chmelka, M. Beth; Thompson, Ronald W.; Reid, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Children in residential care are a heterogeneous population, presenting various combinations of risks. Existing studies on these children suggest high variability across multiple domains (e.g., academics, behavior). Given this heterogeneity, it is important to begin to identify the combinations and patterns of multiple risks, or risk profiles,…

  15. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Löckenhoff, Corinna E; Crum, Rosa M; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Costa, Paul T

    2008-01-01

    Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57) were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions. PMID:18405382

  16. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  17. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  18. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

  19. Risk Factors and Causes of Syncope

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes of Sy... Back to Fainting Risk Factors & Causes of Syncope Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Syncope The ... heart. LQTS is believed to be a common cause of sudden and unexplained death in children and ...

  20. Cardiometabolic risk profile of rural South Indians undergoing coronary interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sriharibabu, Manne; Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Kabir, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    Background According to projected estimates, India will bear 60% of the world's cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden by the year 2020. CVD mortality rates are high in South India compared with the rest of India. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of behavioural, biological and metabolic risk factors in different age groups of rural South Indians undergoing coronary interventions under a governmental health insurance scheme. Methods This study includes 1294 patients who underwent coronary interventions. Age, gender and anthropometric measurements were recorded. History of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and family history of ischaemic heart disease was obtained from every subject. Physical activity was assessed using a General Practise physical activity questionnaire. Investigations like haemogram, blood urea, serum creatinine, fasting and postprandial blood glucose, lipid profile and echocardiography were carried out for all patients. Results Hypertension was found in 65% patients, 32.38% had diabetes mellitus, 41.65% were smokers (current and former), 37.17% had dyslipidemia, 31.06% had body mass index more than 25 kg/m, 27.04% were physically active, 37% had left ventricular dysfunction, and 8.57% had renal impairment ( table 1). Statistically significant differences were seen in the prevalence rates of different risk factors in the compared age groups (p=<0.05) except for hypertension and dyslipidemia (p=0.596 and 0.306). Conclusions Risks to health, as an area of study, has recently begun to receive attention in developing countries including India. Population-based strategies aimed at bringing down risk factor levels in the community can translate into major public health benefits. PMID:27326054

  1. Quantifying the benefits of achieving or maintaining long-term low risk profile for cardiovascular disease: The Doetinchem Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hulsegge, Gerben; Smit, Henriëtte A; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Daviglus, Martha L; Verschuren, W M Monique

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating the relation between risk profiles and cardiovascular disease have measured risk at baseline only. We investigated maintenance and changes of risk profiles over time and their potential impact on incident cardiovascular disease. Population-based cohort study. Risk factors were measured at baseline (1987-1991) among 5574 cardiovascular disease-free adults aged 20-59 years. They were classified into four risk categories according to smoking status, presence of diabetes and widely accepted cut-off values for blood pressure, total cholesterol/HDL-ratio and body mass index. Categories were subdivided (maintenance, deterioration, improvement) based on risk factor levels at six and 11 years of follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for cardiovascular disease incidence 5-10 years following the risk-change period were fitted using Cox proportional hazards models. Only 12% of participants were low risk at baseline, and only 7% maintained it. Participants who maintained a low risk profile over 11 years had seven times lower risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 0.14, 95% CI: 0.05-0.41) than participants with long-term high risk profile, whereas those low risk at baseline whose profile deteriorated had three times lower risk (HR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.18-0.71). Our results suggest that, within each baseline risk profile group, compared with a stable profile, improving profiles may be associated with up to two-fold lower HRs, and deteriorating profiles with about two-fold higher HRs. Our study, using long-term risk profiles, demonstrates the full benefits of low risk profile. These findings underscore the importance of achieving and maintaining low risk from young adulthood onwards. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  2. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  3. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  4. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.; Frisby, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major…

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.; Frisby, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major…

  7. Evaluating changes in driver behaviour: a risk profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Adrian B; Bliemer, Michiel C J; Greaves, Stephen P

    2015-02-01

    New road safety strategies continue to be devised by researchers and policy makers with pay-as-you-drive (PAYD) schemes gaining increasing attention. However, empirically measuring the effectiveness of these strategies is challenging due to the influence of the road environment and other factors external to the driver. The analysis presented here applies Temporal and Spatial Identifiers to control for the road environment and Driver Behaviour Profiles to provide a common measure of driving behaviour based on the risk of a casualty crash for assessing the effectiveness of a PAYD scheme on reducing driving risks. The results show that in many cases personalised feedback alone is sufficient to induce significant changes, but the largest reductions in risk are observed when drivers are also awarded a financial incentive to change behaviour. Importantly, the more frequent the exposure to the speeding information, the greater the magnitude of the change. However, the changes are disproportionately associated with those that were already safer drivers in the baseline period suggesting that some drivers may be predisposed to changing their behaviour. These results suggest that it would be beneficial to provide real-time or daily feedback on speeding behaviour in conjunction with a financial reward scheme, potentially as a component of insurance premiums.

  8. Distinguishing Risk Profiles among Parent-Only, Partner-Only, and Dually-Perpetrating Physical Aggressors

    PubMed Central

    Smith Slep, Amy M.; O’Leary, Susan G.

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed whether and how men and women who are not physically aggressive, only physically aggressive against their children or their partners, or aggressive against both family members differ in their risk profiles. Risk factors that were unrelated to the partner or parenting role (e.g., impulsivity) and that were specific to one of these roles (e.g., negative parenting attributions, negative partner attributions) were examined using profile analysis. Dually aggressive men and women had the highest overall risk across all types of risk factors; non-aggressive men and women had consistently low risk. Individuals who were aggressive toward only their partners or only their children had distinct risk profiles, with highest levels of risk on the role-specific variable sets. With the exception of parent-only aggressive men, singly aggressive individuals’ risk levels were significantly lower on role-independent and the unrelated role-specific risk than they were on the role-related risk factors. These results suggest theories of partner and parent aggression might gain precision if co-occurrence status were specifically taken into account. PMID:19803606

  9. System Risk Balancing Profiles: Software Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, John C.; Sigal, Burton C.; Gindorf, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The Software QA / V&V guide will be reviewed and updated based on feedback from NASA organizations and others with a vested interest in this area. Hardware, EEE Parts, Reliability, and Systems Safety are a sample of the future guides that will be developed. Cost Estimates, Lessons Learned, Probability of Failure and PACTS (Prevention, Avoidance, Control or Test) are needed to provide a more complete risk management strategy. This approach to risk management is designed to help balance the resources and program content for risk reduction for NASA's changing environment.

  10. Latent profiles of risk among a community sample of men: Implications for sexual aggression

    PubMed Central

    Logan-Greene, Patricia; Davis, Kelly Cue

    2011-01-01

    Of the proposed theoretical explanations for the perpetration of sexual assault, Malamuth’s (1991) confluence theory remains one of the most widely tested. Further development of this theory has incorporated alcohol use into the original pathways of impersonal sex and hostile masculinity. This study uses data from a nationwide online survey (n = 289) to examine the relationship of these three risk factors to sexual aggression using person-oriented methods, specifically Latent Profile Analysis (LPA). Four statistically significant risk profiles were identified: Low Risk, Moderate Impersonal Sex, High Hostile Masculinity, and High on all Risk. All groups with elevated risk factors reported increased levels of sexual aggression. The High Hostile Masculinity and High on all Risk groups reported the highest levels of sexual aggression on all subscales. Implications for intervention and research are discussed. PMID:20587458

  11. [The colorectal carcinoma risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Andrzej; Wawrzyn-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria

    2005-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma constitutes the second, as for the rate, death cause due to a malignant disease both in the western countries and in Poland. Despite deep knowledge concerning morphogenesis and spread of colorectal carcinoma as well as vast achievements in surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy, the percentage of 5-year-survivals still reaches 40%. According to most authors there are 4 risk factor categories: epidemiological, intestinal, dietetic, and mixed. It is well-known that colorectal carcinoma, like neoplasms localized in other organs and systems, is a disease, in which genetic mutations of somatic cells are the molecular base/source of the disease. The inner innervation of the colon seems to play an important role in carcinoma pathogenesis and spread. At present, 80% of colorectal carcinomas are diagnosed in the advanced stage, with infiltration exceeding the intestinal wall or spreading to neighboring organs, which gives full clinical symptoms. The prognosis as to survival and disease progression is usually poor. Therefore, the ways of early diagnosis, monitoring, and the knowledge of etiological factors are so important in medical practice.

  12. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  13. Traditional Risk Factors for Stroke in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Dae; Jung, Yo Han; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and morbidity worldwide. The occurrence of stroke is strongly dependent on well-known vascular risk factors. After rapid modernization, urbanization, and mechanization, East Asian countries have experienced growth in their aged populations, as well as changes in lifestyle and diet. This phenomenon has increased the prevalence of vascular risk factors among Asian populations, which are susceptible to developing cardiovascular risk factors. However, differing patterns of stroke risk factor profiles have been noted in East Asian countries over the past decades. Even though the prevalence of vascular risk factors has changed, hypertension is still prevalent and the burden of diabetes and hypercholesterolemia will continue to increase. Asia remains a high tobacco-consuming area. Although indicators of awareness and management of vascular risk factors have increased in many East Asian countries, their rates still remain low. Here we review the burdens of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking in East Asia. We will also discuss the different associations between these vascular risk factors and stroke in Asian and non-Asian populations. PMID:27733028

  14. Risk and Protective Factors in Gifted Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Viersen, Sietske; de Bree, Elise H.; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Slot, Esther M.; de Jong, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated risk and protective factors associated with dyslexia and literacy development, both at the group and individual level, to gain more insight in underlying cognitive profiles and possibilities for compensation in high-IQ children. A sample of 73 Dutch primary school children included a dyslexic group, a gifted-dyslexic group,…

  15. Risk and Protective Factors in Gifted Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Viersen, Sietske; de Bree, Elise H.; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Slot, Esther M.; de Jong, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated risk and protective factors associated with dyslexia and literacy development, both at the group and individual level, to gain more insight in underlying cognitive profiles and possibilities for compensation in high-IQ children. A sample of 73 Dutch primary school children included a dyslexic group, a gifted-dyslexic group,…

  16. Sun Protection Motivational Stages and Behavior: Skin Cancer Risk Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagoto, Sherry L.; McChargue, Dennis E.; Schneider, Kristin; Cook, Jessica Werth

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To create skin cancer risk profiles that could be used to predict sun protection among Midwest beachgoers. Method: Cluster analysis was used with study participants (N=239), who provided information about sun protection motivation and behavior, perceived risk, burn potential, and tan importance. Participants were clustered according to…

  17. Sun Protection Motivational Stages and Behavior: Skin Cancer Risk Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagoto, Sherry L.; McChargue, Dennis E.; Schneider, Kristin; Cook, Jessica Werth

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To create skin cancer risk profiles that could be used to predict sun protection among Midwest beachgoers. Method: Cluster analysis was used with study participants (N=239), who provided information about sun protection motivation and behavior, perceived risk, burn potential, and tan importance. Participants were clustered according to…

  18. Is risk stratification ever the same as 'profiling'?

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, R Scott; Stevens, Elizabeth R; Caplan, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    Physicians engage in risk stratification as a normative part of their professional duties. Risk stratification has the potential to be beneficial in many ways, and implicit recognition of this potential benefit underlies its acceptance as a cornerstone of the medical profession. However, risk stratification also has the potential to be harmful. We argue that 'profiling' is a term that corresponds to risk stratification strategies in which there is concern that ethical harms exceed likely or proven benefits. In the case of risk stratification for health goals, this would occur most frequently if benefits were obtained by threats to justice, autonomy or privacy. We discuss implications of the potential overlap between risk stratification and profiling for researchers and for clinicians, and we consider whether there are salient characteristics that make a particular risk stratification algorithm more or less likely to overlap with profiling, such as whether the risk stratification algorithm is based on voluntary versus non-voluntary characteristics, based on causal versus non-causal characteristics, or based on signifiers of historical disadvantage. We also discuss the ethical challenges created when a risk stratification scheme helps all subgroups but some more than others, or when risk stratification harms some subgroups but benefits the aggregate group. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Family Factors Predicting Categories of Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Brooke P.; Wang, Wen-Ling; Herting, Jerald R.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared family risk and protective factors among potential high school dropouts with and without suicide-risk behaviors (SRB) and examined the extent to which these factors predict categories of SRB. Subjects were randomly selected from among potential dropouts in 14 high schools. Based upon suicide-risk status, 1,083 potential high school…

  20. Suicide Risk Factors in Alcohol Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motto, Jerome A.

    1980-01-01

    A current focus in evaluating suicide risk is the "clinical model" approach, which determines those factors associated with high risk for suicide. The sociological factors identified as estimators of suicide risk included impaired health, job instability, multiple unit residence, no change in living setting, and modest financial resources. (JAC)

  1. [Suicide risk factors among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pérez Barrero, Sergio Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The author offers a brief overview of suicide risk factors among the elderly such as depression, all manner of abuse of the elderly, as well as medical, psychological and social risk factors, etc. By way of conclusion, a practical guide to evaluate suicide risk among the elderly is provided.

  2. [Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer disease risk: epidemiological studies review].

    PubMed

    Cowppli-Bony, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean-François; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    Etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still undefined in its most frequent sporadic type, but a role of vascular risk factor is more and more evocated in its pathophysiology. This role enables to hope that preventive or curative care of vascular risk factors could decrease AD incidence. Among these factors, high blood pressure, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and tobacco consumption were the most studied. We review the risk for AD, which had been associated with each of these factors in epidemiological studies. High blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of AD in most studies while the results are more controversial for the others factors. All these four vascular risk factors have variable interaction with the presence of cerebrovascular diseases and of the epsilon 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene which is a predisposition factor for sporadic AD.

  3. Risk Factors For Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KAPLAN, Yüksel; KURT, Semiha; KARAER ÜNALDI, Hatice; ERKORKMAZ, Ünal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for distal symmetric sensory-motor polyneuropathy (DSP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Method Sixty seven patients with type 2 DM (33 males and 34 females) were included in the study. In addition to a detailed neurological examination, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was administered to all patients and their total neuropathy scores were calculated. Nerve conduction examinations were performed for all patients. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.83±.87 years. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) value was 8.56±2.07% (normal: 3–6.5%). The total neuropathy score significantly correlated with diabetes duration, hypertension, retinopathy, and HbA1C. Conclusion This study confirms the previous reports regarding the association of neuropathy with poor glycaemic control and duration of the disease. The association of neuropathy with retinopathy and hypertension is important.

  4. [Cardiovascular risk profiles by occupation in Madrid region, Spain].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann Verdejo, Marta; González Gómez, María Fernanda; Galán Labaca, Iñaki

    2010-01-01

    It is well known the association between cardiovascular risks and life styles. In addition, all these factors could be strongly associated with working conditions. The aim of this study was to describe the association between some cardiovascular risk factors and occupations in order to define strategies focused on health promotion at workplace. 16.048 questionnaires were analysed from the Surveillance System for Non-transmissible Diseases Risk Factors (SIVFRENT) for Madrid region. The surveys of eight consecutive years (2000-2007) were aggregated and analysed. Seven risk factors for cardiovascular diseases were studied (diet, overweight, sedentary work, physical activity, alcohol and tobacco consumption and high blood pressure). An indicator of exposure was created based on these seven risk factors. The association between cardiovascular risk factors and occupations was calculated for age and gender effects adjustment. Sedentary work (prevalence: 44,2%) and tobacco consumption (prevalence: 33,1%) were the most common risk factors found . To accumulate more than two cardiovascular risk factors was statistically higher in men (27,4%) than in women (15%). The highest risk was found for tree occupations: Drivers (OR:1,78; 95% CI:1,45-2,18), Administrative secretaries (OR:1,83; 95% CI:1,64-2,05) and Direction managers(OR:1,25; 95% CI:1,09-1,44). Drives, Secretaries and Managers seem to have a higher vulnerability for some cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. Adolescent Health Risk Profiles: The Co-Occurrence of Health Risks among Females and Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Janine M.; Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; McGinley, Karen Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Examines the interrelationships among adolescent health risk behaviors using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health for 12,955 adolescents. Findings show distinct differences for males and females in risk profile, but few distinctions between profiles based on socioeconomic characteristics. (SLD)

  6. Effect of Garlic and Lemon Juice Mixture on Lipid Profile and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in People 30-60 Years Old with Moderate Hyperlipidaemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Negar; Entezari, Mohammad Hasan; Askari, Gholamreza; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to effects of garlic and lemon juice mixture on lipid profile and some cardiovascular risk factors in people 30–60 years old with moderate hyperlipidemia. Methods: In a parallel-designed randomized controlled clinical trial, a total of 112 hyperlipidemic patients 30–60 years, were recruited from Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center. People were selected and randomly divided into four groups. Control blood samples were taken and height, weight, and blood pressure were recorded. (1) Received 20 g of garlic daily, plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice, (2) received 20 g garlic daily, (3) received 1 tablespoon of lemon juice daily, and (4) did not receive garlic or lemon juice. A study technician was done the random allocations using a random numbers table. All participants presented 3 days of dietary records and 3 days of physical activity records during 8 weeks. Blood samples were obtained at study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Results showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol (changes from baseline: 40.8 ± 6.1, P < 0.001), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (29.8 ± 2.6, P < 0.001), and fibrinogen (111.4 ± 16.1, P < 0.001) in the Group 1, in comparison with other groups. A greater reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in Group 1 compared with the Groups 3 and 4 (37 ± 10, P = 0.01) (24 ± 1, P = 0.02); respectively. Furthermore, a great reduction in body mass index was observed in the mixed group compared with the lemon juice and control groups (1.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.04). Conclusions: Administration of garlic plus lemon juice resulted in an improvement in lipid levels, fibrinogen and blood pressure of patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:27563431

  7. Effect of Garlic and Lemon Juice Mixture on Lipid Profile and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in People 30-60 Years Old with Moderate Hyperlipidaemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Negar; Entezari, Mohammad Hasan; Askari, Gholamreza; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to effects of garlic and lemon juice mixture on lipid profile and some cardiovascular risk factors in people 30-60 years old with moderate hyperlipidemia. In a parallel-designed randomized controlled clinical trial, a total of 112 hyperlipidemic patients 30-60 years, were recruited from Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center. People were selected and randomly divided into four groups. Control blood samples were taken and height, weight, and blood pressure were recorded. (1) Received 20 g of garlic daily, plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice, (2) received 20 g garlic daily, (3) received 1 tablespoon of lemon juice daily, and (4) did not receive garlic or lemon juice. A study technician was done the random allocations using a random numbers table. All participants presented 3 days of dietary records and 3 days of physical activity records during 8 weeks. Blood samples were obtained at study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol (changes from baseline: 40.8 ± 6.1, P < 0.001), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (29.8 ± 2.6, P < 0.001), and fibrinogen (111.4 ± 16.1, P < 0.001) in the Group 1, in comparison with other groups. A greater reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in Group 1 compared with the Groups 3 and 4 (37 ± 10, P = 0.01) (24 ± 1, P = 0.02); respectively. Furthermore, a great reduction in body mass index was observed in the mixed group compared with the lemon juice and control groups (1.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.04). Administration of garlic plus lemon juice resulted in an improvement in lipid levels, fibrinogen and blood pressure of patients with hyperlipidemia.

  8. Assessment of cardiovascular risk factors in menopausal Argentinian women.

    PubMed

    Etchegoyen, G S; Ortiz, D; Goya, R G; Sala, C; Panzica, E; Sevillano, A; Dron, N

    1995-01-01

    The cardiovascular risk factor profile was assessed in a population sample consisting of 60 nonmenopausal (control) and 100 menopausal women from different cities in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Each subject was individually interviewed and asked to complete a specially designed questionnaire aimed at identifying cardiovascular risk factors. A clinical general and gynecological examination including blood pressure and anthropometric measurements as well as a Papanicolaou smear were performed. The most prevalent risk factor in the menopausal group was low physical activity (87% of the subjects), followed by nervous complaints (67%), obesity (64%), familial antecedents of cardiovascular disease (CVD; 38%) and hypertension (33%). Other risk factors assessed showed a level of prevalence below 10%. In the control group, a tobacco smoking habit was the CVD risk factor with the highest prevalence (47%). Nervous complaints also showed a high prevalence (48%). Most menopausal patients (77%) had a cardiovascular risk index (RI) level between 1.5 and 4.0, whereas 17% of these subjects had an RI greater than 4.0 (high-risk patients). The present study reveals that, in the studied community, the menopause is associated with increased levels of both estrogen-dependent and psychosocial risk factors for CVD.

  9. Risk factor clustering for psychopathology in socially at-risk Spanish children.

    PubMed

    Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Granero, Roser; de la Osa, Núria; Domènech, Josep M

    2008-07-01

    Data based on general population studies of exposure-to-risk factors is not adequate to describe the mental health of children living in the most extreme "high-risk" environments. Data were collected in a longitudinal prospective study of two cohorts of 9 and 13 year-old socially at-risk children. Cluster analysis was used to classify youths based on the reports about potential areas of risk. The psychopathological structure of empirical clusters was compared through cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological indexes and through multiple regression and multivariate analysis of variance. Cluster analysis provided eight binary high-low risk classifications. Exposure to risk was highly prevalent. In preadolescence, broken family, parenting style and contextual profiles were the highest risk factors for psychopathology. In adolescence, they were psychological variables, verbal comprehension, pre-peri-postnatal history, physical health and family characteristics. Cumulative risk followed a linear trend for psychopathology and functional impairment. The child's perception of low marital discord and good school achievement were protective factors. Extreme socially at-risk populations have specific profiles of risk that can be identified through a person-centered approach and may be amenable to selective preventive interventions.

  10. Risk perception and experience: hazard personality profiles and individual differences.

    PubMed

    Barnett, J; Breakwell, G M

    2001-02-01

    The dominance of the "psychometric" paradigm and the consequent emphasis on personality profiles of hazards has resulted in little attention being given to individual variability in risk judgments. This study examines how far differences in experience of risk activities can explain individual variability in risk assessments. A questionnaire study (n = 172) was used to explore the relationships between experience and risk perceptions in relation to 16 risk activities. It was expected that these relationships would differ for voluntary and involuntary activities. Measures of experience included assessments of "impact" and "outcome" valence as well as "frequency." These three aspects of experience each related to risk assessment but their relationship depended on whether the risk experiences were voluntary or not. The results indicate the importance of developing more fine-grained ways of indexing risk experience.

  11. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Conclusions: Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury. PMID:23016083

  12. [Assessment of dynamic violent behavior risk factors].

    PubMed

    Folino, Jorge Oscar; Cáceres, María Soledad; Campos, María Laura; Silveri, Marina; Ucín, Silvana; Ascazibar, Mariel

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic violent behavior risk factors have special significance since they constitute the main target for preventive intervention. Different dynamic factors as well as violent recidivism were assessed with, among other instruments, the environmental risk (Risk Management) section of the Argentinean version of the HCR-20 in 25 parolees from the Province of Buenos Aires Penitentiary System. Among other findings, the prevalence of the risk factors linked to substance abuse and socioeconomic deprivation, and the heterogeneous perception of the official institutions are very significant. Exposure to destabilizers was the factor most associated with violent recidivism.

  13. Metabolite Profiles and the Risk of Developing Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Thomas J.; Larson, Martin G.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P.; McCabe, Elizabeth; Lewis, Gregory D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Jacques, Paul F.; Fernandez, Céline; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Carr, Stephen A.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Florez, Jose C.; Souza, Amanda; Melander, Olle; Clish, Clary B.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging technologies allow the high-throughput profiling of metabolic status from a blood specimen (metabolomics). We investigated whether metabolite profiles could predict the development of diabetes. Among 2,422 normoglycemic individuals followed for 12 years, 201 developed diabetes. Amino acids, amines, and other polar metabolites were profiled in baseline specimens using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cases and controls were matched for age, body mass index and fasting glucose. Five branched-chain and aromatic amino acids had highly-significant associations with future diabetes: isoleucine, leucine, valine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. A combination of three amino acids predicted future diabetes (>5-fold higher risk for individuals in top quartile). The results were replicated in an independent, prospective cohort. These findings underscore the potential importance of amino acid metabolism early in the pathogenesis of diabetes, and suggest that amino acid profiles could aid in diabetes risk assessment. PMID:21423183

  14. Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among University Students: The Gender Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Mohammad Y.; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F.; Tinawi, Lubna; Hamad, Rawan; Keewan, Esraa F.; Matarneh, Sulaiman K.; Alomari, Mahmoud A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that the pathophysiological process of cardiovascular (CV) disease begins at early age, though the manifestations of the disease do not appear until middle age adulthood. Risk factors for CV disease, particularly lipoprotein profiles, are affected by physiological abnormalities, and lifestyle related issues. To evaluate prevalence of CV diseases risk factors among university students and to investigate relation between number of risk factors and body anthropometric, hematological and biochemical indices parameters. Methods In this cross sectional study, 348 students were randomly recruited. Blood glucose, cholesterol profile (total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol), and triglyceride were measured using standard protocols. Physical activity (PA) level was assessed using the short-form Arabic version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaires (IPAQ). Results The most commonly encountered CV disease risk factor was low levels of HDL-C, followed by physical inactivity, high levels TG, and obese BMI. When stratified by gender, females were less likely to have low HDL-C, and high TG, whereas, males were more likely to have overweight or obese BMI (P < 0.001). About 49% of the participants had at least one CV disease risk factor, where as the prevalence of having one, two and three or more CV disease risk factors were 35.7%, 9.3% and 4%, respectively. Additionally, the number of CV disease risk factors showed strong positive correlation with increases in body fat and bone percentages, glucose, total cholesterol, TG, LDL-C, BMI, and WHR (range of R2: 0.17 to 0.603). On the other hand, physical activity, percentages of body water and muscle, HDL-C showed inverse strong correlation with cardiovascular risk factors (range of R2: -0.239 to -0.412). Conclusions Results indicate the high prevalence of CV disease risk factors among university students, and stress the need for early intervention programs to counteract these risks.

  15. Risk Factor Modification and Projections of Absolute Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Decarli, Adriano; Schairer, Catherine; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Pee, David; Masala, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Background Although modifiable risk factors have been included in previous models that estimate or project breast cancer risk, there remains a need to estimate the effects of changes in modifiable risk factors on the absolute risk of breast cancer. Methods Using data from a case–control study of women in Italy (2569 case patients and 2588 control subjects studied from June 1, 1991, to April 1, 1994) and incidence and mortality data from the Florence Registries, we developed a model to predict the absolute risk of breast cancer that included five non-modifiable risk factors (reproductive characteristics, education, occupational activity, family history, and biopsy history) and three modifiable risk factors (alcohol consumption, leisure physical activity, and body mass index). The model was validated using independent data, and the percent risk reduction was calculated in high-risk subgroups identified by use of the Lorenz curve. Results The model was reasonably well calibrated (ratio of expected to observed cancers = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.26), but the discriminatory accuracy was modest. The absolute risk reduction from exposure modifications was nearly proportional to the risk before modifying the risk factors and increased with age and risk projection time span. Mean 20-year reductions in absolute risk among women aged 65 years were 1.6% (95% CI = 0.9% to 2.3%) in the entire population, 3.2% (95% CI = 1.8% to 4.8%) among women with a positive family history of breast cancer, and 4.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 6.8%) among women who accounted for the highest 10% of the total population risk, as determined from the Lorenz curve. Conclusions These data give perspective on the potential reductions in absolute breast cancer risk from preventative strategies based on lifestyle changes. Our methods are also useful for calculating sample sizes required for trials to test lifestyle interventions. PMID:21705679

  16. Risk factor modification and projections of absolute breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Petracci, Elisabetta; Decarli, Adriano; Schairer, Catherine; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Pee, David; Masala, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico; Gail, Mitchell H

    2011-07-06

    Although modifiable risk factors have been included in previous models that estimate or project breast cancer risk, there remains a need to estimate the effects of changes in modifiable risk factors on the absolute risk of breast cancer. Using data from a case-control study of women in Italy (2569 case patients and 2588 control subjects studied from June 1, 1991, to April 1, 1994) and incidence and mortality data from the Florence Registries, we developed a model to predict the absolute risk of breast cancer that included five non-modifiable risk factors (reproductive characteristics, education, occupational activity, family history, and biopsy history) and three modifiable risk factors (alcohol consumption, leisure physical activity, and body mass index). The model was validated using independent data, and the percent risk reduction was calculated in high-risk subgroups identified by use of the Lorenz curve. The model was reasonably well calibrated (ratio of expected to observed cancers = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.26), but the discriminatory accuracy was modest. The absolute risk reduction from exposure modifications was nearly proportional to the risk before modifying the risk factors and increased with age and risk projection time span. Mean 20-year reductions in absolute risk among women aged 65 years were 1.6% (95% CI = 0.9% to 2.3%) in the entire population, 3.2% (95% CI = 1.8% to 4.8%) among women with a positive family history of breast cancer, and 4.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 6.8%) among women who accounted for the highest 10% of the total population risk, as determined from the Lorenz curve. These data give perspective on the potential reductions in absolute breast cancer risk from preventative strategies based on lifestyle changes. Our methods are also useful for calculating sample sizes required for trials to test lifestyle interventions.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of single accident airport risk profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A computer simulation model was developed for estimating the potential economic impacts of a carbon fiber release upon facilities within an 80 kilometer radius of a major airport. The model simulated the possible range of release conditions and the resulting dispersion of the carbon fibers. Each iteration of the model generated a specific release scenario, which would cause a specific amount of dollar loss to the surrounding community. By repeated iterations, a risk profile was generated, showing the probability distribution of losses from one accident. Using accident probability estimates, the risks profile for annual losses was derived. The mechanics are described of the simulation model, the required input data, and the risk profiles generated for the 26 large hub airports.

  18. Cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle habits among preventive cardiovascular nurses.

    PubMed

    Fair, Joan M; Gulanick, Meg; Braun, Lynne T

    2009-01-01

    The cornerstone of cardiovascular disease prevention is the promotion of a healthy lifestyle and the identification and reduction of cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiology nurses play a major role in counseling patients about lifestyle and cardiovascular risk factors. We used an e-mail survey to elicit self-reported prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and healthy lifestyles among the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA) members and compared their risk profiles with published data for American cardiologists, the Nurses' Health Study 2, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey data for women. A total of 1,345 complete surveys were collected. The respondents were mostly women (96%), with mean (SD) age of 47.4 (8.7) years. More than 95% were not cigarette smokers, more than 50% had a healthy body mass index (<25), and more than 56% achieved the recommended levels of physical activity. Nevertheless, obesity (body mass index ≥ 30) was a health risk in one-fifth of PCNA respondents. The rates of hypertension (17%) and dyslipidemia (15%) were lower than rates reported in other national samples; however, the rate for family history of premature heart disease (20%) was similar to those reported in national samples. Since family history of premature heart disease may be a more significant risk factor in women, PCNA respondents with such a family history may require targeted interventions to further reduce their risk and improve their lifestyle behaviors. PCNA nurses have more favorable lifestyle profiles compared with national samples. It can be expected that nurses who know their risk factors and who follow healthy lifestyle behaviors will be more effective in these counseling roles.

  19. Postpartum depression risk factors: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Ghaedrahmati, Maryam; Kazemi, Ashraf; Kheirabadi, Gholamreza; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Bahrami, Masood

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a debilitating mental disorder with a high prevalence. The aim of this study was review of the related studies. In this narrative review, we report studies that investigated risk factors of postpartum depression by searching the database, Scopus, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Uptodate, Proquest in the period 2000-2015 published articles about the factors associated with postpartum depression were assessed in Farsi and English. The search strategy included a combination of keywords include postpartum depression and risk factors or obstetrical history, social factors, or biological factors. Literature review showed that risk factors for postpartum depression in the area of economic and social factors, obstetrical history, and biological factors, lifestyle and history of mental illness detected. Data from this study can use for designing a screening tools for high-risk pregnant women and for designing a prevention programs.

  20. Risk Profiles for Endometriosis in Japanese Women: Results From a Repeated Survey of Self-Reports

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Nagai, Kazue; Mizunuma, Hideki; Kubota, Toshiro; Lee, Jung-Su; Suzuki, Shosuke

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and risk factors for endometriosis may differ according to diagnosis methodologies, such as study populations and diagnostic accuracy. We examined risk profiles in imaging-diagnosed endometriosis with and without surgical confirmation in a large population of Japanese women, as well as the differences in risk profiles of endometriosis based on history of infertility. Methods Questionnaires that included items on sites of endometriosis determined by imaging techniques and surgical procedure were mailed to 1025 women who self-reported endometriosis in a baseline survey of the Japan Nurses’ Health Study (n = 15 019). Results Two hundred and ten women had surgically confirmed endometriosis (Group A), 120 had imaging-diagnosed endometriosis without a surgical procedure (Group B), and 264 had adenomyosis (Group C). A short menstrual cycle at 18–22 years of age and cigarette smoking at 30 years of age were associated with significantly increased risk of endometriosis (Group A plus Group B), while older age was associated with risk of adenomyosis (Group C). In women with a history of infertility, a short menstrual cycle was associated with a significantly increased risk of endometriosis in both Group A and Group B, but risk profiles of endometriosis were different between Group A and Group B in women without a history of infertility. Conclusions Women with surgically confirmed endometriosis and those with imaging-diagnosed endometriosis without surgery have basically common risk profiles, but these risk profiles are different from those with adenomyosis. The presence of a history of infertility should be taken into consideration for evaluation of risk profiles. PMID:25716280

  1. Indicators of dairy cow transition risks: Metabolic profiling revisited.

    PubMed

    Van Saun, R J

    2016-01-01

    Periparturient disease conditions affecting transition dairy cows have been recognized as a critical contributor to impaired dairy performance and have become a focal point of herd diagnostic investigations. Over the past 40 years use of blood sampling in the form of metabolic profiling has been applied to herd diagnostics with mixed impressions of diagnostic robustness. Research has greatly increased our understanding of underpinning mechanisms related to cow biology, management, environment and their interactions responsible for peripartum diseases. Elevated β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentration (> 1.2 mmol/l) within 7-10 days following calving identifies high risk cows for therapeutic intervention. Herd evaluations with 15-25% of first week fresh cows with elevated BHB indicates significant disease risk and productive losses. Elevated peripartal serum nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) also indicate increased disease risk. This review discusses documented (BHB, NEFA) and other potential analytes using individual or pooled samples useful for disease risk assessment or nutritional status and their application in risk-based or herd screening methods of herd metabolic profiling diagnostics. A pooled sample approach modified from the original Compton Metabolic Profile allows for more economic assessment of multiple analytes, though interpretation and herd-size application may be limited. Pooled samples between 5 and 10 individuals accurately represent arithmetic means of individuals. Most importantly metabolic profiles must be used in concert with other diagnostic metrics of animal and facility evaluations, body condition scoring and ration evaluation to be fully useful in herd evaluations.

  2. Epidemiology of endocrine-related risk factors for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    Ovarian and other hormones are major determinants of breast cancer risk. Particularly important is the accumulative exposure of the breast to circulating levels of the ovarian hormones estradiol and progesterone. A number of breast cancer risk factors can be understood in light of how they affect women's hormone profiles. Age is a marker for the onset and cessation of ovarian activity. Racial differences in hormone profiles correlate with breast cancer incidence patterns. Age at menarche not only serves as the chronological indicator of the onset of ovarian activity, but as a predictor of ovulatory frequency during adolescence and hormone levels in young adults, and has a long-lasting influence on risk. Age at menopause, another established breast cancer risk factor, marks the cessation of ovarian activity. Pregnancy history and lactation experience also are hormonal markers of breast cancer risk. Postmenopausal obesity, which is associated with higher levels of estrogen following cessation of ovarian activity, increases breast cancer risk, whereas physical activity, which can limit menstrual function, reduces risk. A relatively recent area of investigation is prenatal exposures like preeclampsia and low birth weight; both may be associated with lower in utero exposure to estrogen and also may predict lower breast cancer risk as an adult. Improved understanding of these exposures and their potential interactions with breast cancer susceptibility genes may, in the future, improve our prospects for breast cancer prevention.

  3. Managerial Success Factors: A Chinese Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Bonnie P.; Adams, Janet S.; Liu, Bin

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study conducted in the People's Republic of China (PRC) to identify the managerial success factors perceived by Chinese managers to be important in their market economy. The study also looked at how these factors are exhibited by recent graduates of Chinese universities now working in Chinese firms.…

  4. Managerial Success Factors: A Chinese Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Bonnie P.; Adams, Janet S.; Liu, Bin

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study conducted in the People's Republic of China (PRC) to identify the managerial success factors perceived by Chinese managers to be important in their market economy. The study also looked at how these factors are exhibited by recent graduates of Chinese universities now working in Chinese firms.…

  5. Risk analysis. HIV / AIDS country profile: Mozambique.

    PubMed

    1996-12-01

    Mozambique's National STD/AIDS Control Program (NACP) estimates that, at present, about 8% of the population is infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The epidemic is expected to peak in 1997. By 2001, Mozambique is projected to have 1,650,000 HIV-positive adults 15-49 years of age, of whom 500,000 will have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 500,000 AIDS orphans. Incidence rates are highest in the country's central region, the transport corridors, and urban centers. The rapid spread of HIV has been facilitated by extreme poverty, the social upheaval and erosion of traditional norms created by years of political conflict and civil war, destruction of the primary health care infrastructure, growth of the commercial sex work trade, and labor migration to and from neighboring countries with high HIV prevalence. Moreover, about 10% of the adult population suffers from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including genital ulcers. NACP, created in 1988, is attempting to curb the further spread of HIV through education aimed at changing high-risk behaviors and condom distribution to prevent STD transmission. Theater performances and radio/television programs are used to reach the large illiterate population. The integration of sex education and STD/AIDS information in the curricula of primary and secondary schools and universities has been approved by the Ministry of Education. Several private companies have been persuaded to distribute condoms to their employees. Finally, the confidentiality of HIV patients has been guaranteed. In 1993, the total AIDS budget was US $1.67 million, 50% of which was provided by the European Union. The European Commission seeks to develop a national strategy for managing STDs within the primary health care system.

  6. Risk Factor Intervention for Health Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Lester

    1978-01-01

    Risk factors for disease consist of personal habits such as cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, and bodily characteristics such as hypertension and high serum cholesterol. Progress in identifying, quantifying, and controlling risk factors is opening the way to the prevention of disease. (BB)

  7. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  8. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  9. The Role of Risk: Mentoring Experiences and Outcomes for Youth with Varying Risk Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Carla; DuBois, David L.; Grossman, Jean Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    "The Role of Risk: Mentoring Experiences and Outcomes for Youth with Varying Risk Profiles" presents findings from the first large-scale study to examine how the levels and types of risk youth face may influence their relationships with program-assigned mentors and the benefits they derive from these relationships. The study looked…

  10. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Tasca, Raquel Soares; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.

  11. A risk microbiological profile of the Australian red meat industry: risk ratings of hazard-product pairings.

    PubMed

    Sumner, John; Ross, Tom; Jenson, Ian; Pointon, Andrew

    2005-11-25

    A risk profile of microbial hazards across the supply continuum for the beef, sheep and goat meat industries was developed using both a qualitative tool and a semi-quantitative, spreadsheet tool, Risk Ranger. The latter is useful for highlighting factors contributing to food safety risk and for ranking the risk of various product/pathogen combinations. In the present profile the qualitative tool was used as a preliminary screen for a wide range of hazard-product pairings while Risk Ranger was used to rank in order of population health risk pairings for which quantitative data were available and for assessing the effect of hypothetical scenarios. 'High' risk hazard-product pairings identified were meals contaminated with Clostridium perfringens provided by caterers which have not implemented HACCP; kebabs cross-contaminated by Salmonella present in drip trays or served undercooked; meals served in the home cross-contaminated with Salmonella. 'Medium' risk hazard-product pairings identified were ready-to-eat meats contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes and which have extended shelf life; Uncooked Comminuted Fermented Meat (UCFM)/Salami contaminated with Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and Salmonella; undercooked hamburgers contaminated with EHEC; kebabs contaminated by Salmonella under normal production or following final "flash" heating. Identified 'low' risk hazard-product pairings included cooked, ready-to-eat sausages contaminated with Salmonella; UCFM/Salami contaminated with L. monocytogenes; well-cooked hamburgers contaminated with EHEC. The risk profile provides information of value to Australia's risk managers in the regulatory, processing and R&D sectors of the meat and meat processing industry for the purposes of identifying food safety risks in the industry and for prioritising risk management actions.

  12. Risk factors across the eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Anja; Pike, Kathleen; Goldschmidt, Andrea; Wilfley, Denise; Fairburn, Christopher; Dohm, Faith-Anne; Walsh, Timothy; Weissman, Ruth Striegel

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine risk and onset patterns in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Women with AN (n=71), BN (n=66), BED (n=160) and non-psychiatric controls (n=323) were compared retrospectively on risk factors, symptom onset, and diagnostic migration. Eating disorder groups reported greater risk exposure than non-psychiatric controls. AN and BED differed on premorbid personality/behavioral problems, childhood obesity, and family overeating. Risk factors for BN were shared with AN and BED. Dieting was the most common onset symptom in AN, whereas binge eating was most common in BN and BED. Migration between AN and BED was rare, but more frequent between AN and BN and between BN and BED. AN and BED have distinct risk factors and onset patterns, while BN shares similar risk factors and onset patterns with both AN and BED. Results should inform future classification schemes and prevention programs. PMID:25103674

  13. Profiles of Risk Among HIV-infected Youth in Clinic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Huszti, Heather C.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Kahana, Shoshana; Nichols, Sharon; Gonin, René; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the rising number of new HIV infections among youth, few tailored interventions for youth living with HIV (YLH) have been developed and rigorously tested. Developing tailored interventions necessitates identifying different profiles of YLH and understanding how risk and protective factors cluster together. Obtaining this critical information requires accessing a sufficiently large sample of YLH from diverse geographic settings such as those available through the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions (ATN). We recruited a cross-sectional sample of 1,712 YLH from ATN clinics; participants completed a survey on psychosocial and health factors. Using latent class analysis on nine composite variables representing risk factors, we identified five classes distinguished by substance use, sexual behavior, and pregnancy history and differing on health outcomes. Findings suggest a need for tailored interventions addressing multiple risky behaviors of HIV-infected youth and research to clarify how intervention effectiveness may differ by risk profile. PMID:25117556

  14. Persistent diarrhea: risk factors and outcome.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, B; Biswal, Niranjan; Adhisivam, B; Parija, S C; Srinivasan, S

    2010-08-01

    To identify risk factors associated with Persistent diarrhea (PD) and deaths due to PD. This prospective case control study included 60 children with PD (cases) and 60 children (controls) with acute diarrhoea (AD). Detailed history, examination and appropriate investigations were done for all children. Crude Odds ratio was calculated for each risk factor by univariate analysis and adjusted odds ratio was calculated by multivariate logistic regression. Prior antibiotic use, steroid use, anemia, vitamin A deficiency, malnutrition, LRI, UTI, oral candidiasis, and hyponatremia, were statistically significant risk factors by univariate analysis. Prior antibiotic use, vitamin A deficiency, malnutrition and LRI were independently associated with PD by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk factors for mortality were stool frequency more than 10 times per day, severe malnutrition, oral candidiasis, hypoalbuminemia and HIV positivity. The presence of these risk factors should alert the clinician to take appropriate measures, to decrease the mortality.

  15. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  16. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  17. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  18. A classification of risk factors in serious juvenile offenders and the relation between patterns of risk factors and recidivism.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Eva; Brand, Eddy; Bullens, Ruud; Van Marle, Hjalmar

    2010-02-01

    There has been a lot of research on risk factors for recidivism among juvenile offenders, in general, and on individual risk factors, but less focus on subgroups of serious juvenile offenders and prediction of recidivism within these. To find an optimal classification of risk items and to test the predictive value of the resultant factors with respect to severity of recidivism among serious juvenile offenders. Seventy static and dynamic risk factors in 1154 juvenile offenders were registered with the Juvenile Forensic Profile. Recidivism data were collected on 728 of these offenders with a time at risk of at least 2 years. After factor analysis, independent sample t-tests were used to indicate differences between recidivists and non-recidivists. Logistic multiple linear regression analyses were used to test the potential predictive value of the factors for violent or serious recidivism. A nine-factor solution best accounted for the data. The factors were: antisocial behaviour during treatment, sexual problems, family problems, axis-1 psychopathology, offence characteristics, conscience and empathy, intellectual and social capacities, social network, and substance abuse. Regression analysis showed that the factors antisocial behaviour during treatment, family problems and axis-1 psychopathology were associated with seriousness of recidivism. The significance of family problems and antisocial behaviour during treatments suggest that specific attention to these factors may be important in reducing recidivism. The fact that antisocial behaviour during treatment consists mainly of dynamic risk factors is hopeful as these can be influenced by treatment. Consideration of young offenders by subgroup rather than as a homogenous population is likely to yield the best information about risk of serious re-offending and the management of that risk.

  19. [Risk factors of main cancer sites].

    PubMed

    Uleckiene, Saule; Didziapetriene, Janina; Griciūte, Liudvika Laima; Urbeliene, Janina; Kasiulevicius, Vytautas; Sapoka, Virginijus

    2008-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a system of various measures devoted to avoid this disease. Primary cancer prevention means the identification, avoidance, or destruction of known risk factors. The main risk factors are smoking, diet, alcohol consumption, occupational factors, environmental pollution, electromagnetic radiation, infection, medicines, reproductive hormones, and lack of physical activity. Approximately one-third of cancers can be avoided by implementing various preventive measures. The aim of this article was to acquaint medical students, family doctors with risk factors of main cancer sites (lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate).

  20. Risk Factors of Sudden Death From Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lindbohm, Joni Valdemar; Kaprio, Jaakko; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Korja, Miikka

    2017-09-01

    One in every 4 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients dies suddenly outside hospital, but most SAH risk factor studies focus on hospitalized patients. We studied the differences in risk factors between hospitalized SAH and sudden-death SAH patients. The population-based FINRISK study cohort of 65 521 individuals was followed up for 1.52 million person-years. The Cox proportional hazards model calculated hazard ratios (HRs), with all analyses adjusted for known SAH risk factors, marital status, and socioeconomic status. A competing risks model analyzed differences in risk factors between hospitalized SAHs and sudden-death SAHs. We identified 98 sudden-death SAHs and 445 hospitalized SAHs confirmed by autopsy or by standard SAH diagnostics. Increase by 5 cigarettes smoked per day elevated sudden-death SAH risk (HR, 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-1.39) more than hospitalized SAH risk (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.13-1.24; P=0.05 for difference). Per SD (21.4 mm Hg) increase, systolic blood pressure elevated risk of sudden-death SAH (HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09-1.65) more than risk for hospitalized SAH (HR, 1.25; (95% CI, 1.12-1.38; P=0.05 for difference). Participants living without a partner were at elevated risk of sudden-death SAH (HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.33-3.28) but not of hospitalized SAH. No sudden-death SAHs occurred in normotensive never smokers aged <50 years. Sudden-death SAH risk seems to be highest among those individuals with the most adverse risk factor profiles and among those who live without a partner, whereas it is rare among normotensive never smokers aged <50 years. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Baeta, Isabela Guimarães Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques; Gontijo, Bernardo; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease and its pathogenesis involves an interaction between genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. Recent studies have suggested that the chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis may predispose to an association with other inflammatory diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. OBJECTIVES To describe the demographic, clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of a sample of psoriasis patients; to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities in this group of patients; and to identify the cardiovascular risk profile using the Framingham risk score. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study involving the assessment of 190 patients. Participants underwent history and physical examination. They also completed a specific questionnaire about epidemiological data, past medical history, and comorbidities. The cardiovascular risk profile was calculated using the Framingham risk score. RESULTS Patients' mean age was 51.5 ± 14 years, and the predominant clinical presentation was plaque psoriasis (78.4%). We found an increased prevalence of systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. Increased waist circumference was also found in addition to a considerable prevalence of depression, smoking, and regular alcohol intake. Patients' cardiovascular risk was high according to the Framingham risk score, and 47.2% of patients had moderate or high risk of fatal and non-fatal coronary events in 10 years. CONCLUSIONS Patients had high prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and high cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham risk score. Further epidemiological studies are needed in Brazil for validation of our results. PMID:25184912

  2. Ohio Financial Services and Risk Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document describes the essential competencies from secondary through post-secondary associate degree programs for a career in financial services and risk management. Ohio College Tech Prep Program standards are described, and a key to profile codes is provided. Sample occupations in this career area, such as financial accountant, loan…

  3. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  4. Tumor profiling and the incidentalome: patient decisions and risks.

    PubMed

    Hofstatter, Erin; Mehra, Karishma; Yushak, Melinda; Pusztai, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the field of oncology has witnessed rapid advancements in genetic sequencing simultaneously with steeply declining costs of sequencing technology. As a result, genomics-driven cancer medicine and the use of tumor profiling are quickly becoming mainstays of cancer therapy. Oncology patients can benefit from tumor profiling by allowing the selection of targeted therapies tailored to their disease. However, it is increasingly recognized that the process of determining a tumor DNA sequence may lead to incidental discovery of underlying germline mutations which can impact other aspects of a patient's health, and that of their family. How to handle the 'incidentalome' has been the subject of recent public debate, yet patient education about the potential risks of tumor profiling remains sparse. Patient perspectives and clinical implications of the tumor incidentalome must be specifically addressed by the oncology community as tumor profiling expands to become a new standard of care.

  5. Generalisation of a procedure for computing transcription factor profiles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Chu, Y; Cunha, B; Hahn, J

    2010-03-01

    The limited amount of quantitative experimental data generated from life-science experiments poses a major challenge in systems biology. The reason for this is that many systems approaches, such as parameter estimation, simulation and sensitivity analysis make use of models or analyse quantitative data. However, these techniques are only of limited use if only qualitative or semi-quantitative information is available about a system. Therefore procedures that generate quantitative data from experiments in the life sciences can greatly expand the use of systems approaches to biological problems. This study addresses this issue as it introduces a procedure that computes quantitative transcription factor profiles from fluorescent microscopy data collected from green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter cells. This technique forms a generalisation of a method that has recently been introduced for monitoring NF-B profiles. The contribution made in this work is that the assumption that the transcription factor profile exhibits damped oscillations is relaxed, as transcription factors, other than the previously investigated NF-B, may exhibit different profiles. This is achieved by investigating a variety of potential profiles and solving the inverse problem for the model describing transcription, translation and activation of GFP for each one. The transcription factor profile that results in the best fit among the potential candidates, for the measured fluorescent intensity data, is then chosen as the most likely concentration profile. The technique is illustrated in two detailed case studies, where one case study involves simulation data whereas the other one uses experimentally derived fluorescent intensity data.

  6. Risk factors for retained surgical items: a meta-analysis and proposed risk stratification system.

    PubMed

    Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D; Cook, Charles H; Steinberg, Steven M; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2014-08-01

    Retained surgical items (RSI) are designated as completely preventable "never events". Despite numerous case reports, clinical series, and expert opinions few studies provide quantitative insight into RSI risk factors and their relative contributions to the overall RSI risk profile. Existing case-control studies lack the ability to reliably detect clinically important differences within the long list of proposed risks. This meta-analysis examines the best available data for RSI risk factors, seeking to provide a clinically relevant risk stratification system. Nineteen candidate studies were considered for this meta-analysis. Three retrospective, case-control studies of RSI-related risk factors contained suitable group comparisons between patients with and without RSI, thus qualifying for further analysis. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 2.0 (BioStat, Inc, Englewood, NJ) software was used to analyze the following "common factor" variables compiled from the above studies: body-mass index, emergency procedure, estimated operative blood loss >500 mL, incorrect surgical count, lack of surgical count, >1 subprocedure, >1 surgical team, nursing staff shift change, operation "afterhours" (i.e., between 5 PM and 7 AM), operative time, trainee presence, and unexpected intraoperative factors. We further stratified resulting RSI risk factors into low, intermediate, and high risk. Despite the fact that only between three and six risk factors were associated with increased RSI risk across the three studies, our analysis of pooled data demonstrates that seven risk factors are significantly associated with increased RSI risk. Variables found to elevate the RSI risk include intraoperative blood loss >500 mL (odds ratio [OR] 1.6); duration of operation (OR 1.7); >1 subprocedure (OR 2.1); lack of surgical counts (OR 2.5); >1 surgical team (OR 3.0); unexpected intraoperative factors (OR 3.4); and incorrect surgical count (OR 6.1). Changes in nursing staff, emergency surgery, body

  7. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Butler, J.P.

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often by as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per=kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessment for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

  8. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Biwer, B M; Butler, J P

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often be as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per-kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessments for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

  9. Risk factors for coagulopathy after liver resection.

    PubMed

    Ramspoth, Tina; Roehl, Anna B; Macko, Stephan; Heidenhain, Cristoph; Junge, Karsten; Binnebösel, Marcel; Schmeding, Maximilian; Neumann, Ulf P; Rossaint, Rolf; Hein, Marc

    2014-12-01

    To identify risk factors for coagulopathy in patients undergoing liver resection. A retrospective cohort study. Patients who underwent liver resection at a university hospital between April 2010 and May 2011 were evaluated within seven days after surgery. One hundred forty-seven patients were assessed for eligibility. Thirty needed to be excluded because of incomplete data (23) or a preexisting coagulopathy (7). Coagulopathy was defined as 1 or more of the following events: international normalized ratio ≥1.4, platelet count <80,000/μL, and partial thromboplastin time >38 seconds. Related to the time course and coagulation profile thresholds, 3 different groups could be distinguished: no coagulopathy, temporary coagulopathy, and persistent coagulopathy. Seventy-seven patients (65.8%) had no coagulopathy, whereas 33 (28.2%) developed temporary coagulopathy and 7 (6%) developed persistent coagulopathy until day 7. Preoperative international normalized ratio (P = .001), postoperative peak lactate levels (P = .012), and resected liver weight (P = .005) were identified as independent predictors. Preoperative liver transaminases and transfusion volumes of red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma were significantly higher in patients with persistent coagulopathy. Epidural anesthesia is feasible in patients scheduled for liver resection. Caution should be observed for patients with extended resection (≥3 segments) and increased postoperative lactate. In patients with preexisting liver disease, epidural catheters should be avoided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of vitamin E ingestion on plasma and urinary risk factors for calcium oxalate urolithiasis in two population groups having different stone-risk profiles: evidence of different physiological handling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Theka, Takalani; Rodgers, Allen; Lewandowski, Sonja; Webber, Dawn; Allie-Hamdulay, Shameez

    2012-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that vitamin E supplementation reduces calciuria and oxaluria and that it may also prevent oxalate-mediated peroxidative injury, all of which reduce the risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. In view of the significant difference in stone occurrence in black (B) and white (W) South Africans, we undertook to investigate the effects of vitamin E supplementation in subjects from these two groups. Five healthy males from each group ingested one capsule (400 IU) of vitamin E daily for 60 days. Blood and 24 h urine samples were collected at baseline and on day 60; 24 h dietary questionnaires were simultaneously completed. Urine composition was determined by routine analyses. Urinary and plasma TBARS were determined using a commercially available assay kit while plasma vitamin E was determined by reverse phase HPLC. Plasma vitamin E increased significantly in W but not in B. Urinary and plasma TBARS did not increase in either group. Urinary citrate increased significantly in both groups but the percentage increase in W (169%) was greater than that in B (82%). No other urinary parameter changed significantly. The increase in plasma vitamin E in W but not in B suggests either that the mechanism by which it is packaged into chylomicrons, which are secreted into the systemic circulation, is suppressed in the latter group or that it is differentially absorbed in the two groups. Similarly, to explain the greater increase in citraturia in W compared to B, we speculate that inhibition of lipogenesis of arachidonic acid by vitamin E, ultimately leading to an increase in citraturia, occurs to a lesser extent in B than in W.

  11. Genomic risk profiling: attitudes and use in personal and clinical care of primary care physicians who offer risk profiling.

    PubMed

    Haga, Susanne B; Carrig, Madeline M; O'Daniel, Julianne M; Orlando, Lori A; Killeya-Jones, Ley A; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Cho, Alex

    2011-08-01

    Genomic risk profiling involves the analysis of genetic variations linked through statistical associations to a range of disease states. There is considerable controversy as to how, and even whether, to incorporate these tests into routine medical care. To assess physician attitudes and uptake of genomic risk profiling among an 'early adopter' practice group. We surveyed members of MDVIP, a national group of primary care physicians (PCPs), currently offering genomic risk profiling as part of their practice. All physicians in the MDVIP network (N = 356) We obtained a 44% response rate. One third of respondents had ordered a test for themselves and 42% for a patient. The odds of having ordered personal testing were 10.51-fold higher for those who felt well-informed about genomic risk testing (p < 0.0001). Of those who had not ordered a test for themselves, 60% expressed concerns for patients regarding discrimination by life and long-term/disability insurers, 61% about test cost, and 62% about clinical utility. The odds of ordering testing for their patients was 8.29-fold higher among respondents who had ordered testing for themselves (p < 0.0001). Of those who had ordered testing for patients, concerns about insurance coverage (p = 0.014) and uncertain clinical utility (p = 0.034) were associated with a lower relative frequency of intention to order testing again in the future. Our findings demonstrate that respondent familiarity was a key predictor of physician ordering behavior and clinical utility was a primary concern for genomic risk profiling. Educational and interpretive support may enhance uptake of genomic risk profiling.

  12. Harassment Patterns and Risk Profile in Spanish Trans Persons.

    PubMed

    Devís-Devís, José; Pereira-García, Sofía; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; Fuentes-Miguel, Jorge; López-Cañada, Elena; Pérez-Samaniego, Víctor

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the harassment patterns and the risk profile in trans people living in Spain. A sample of 212 trans persons, aged 10-62, participated in this cross-sectional study. Results showed a high percentage of harassment (59.9%) and frequency of daily harassment (12.6%), especially verbal attacks (59%) that occurred in public spaces (49.1%) and within educational contexts (46.2%). Harassment is more prevalent in trans women than men. Those who disclose their gender identities at a younger age experience higher percentages and frequency of harassment than those who disclose at an older age. They also suffer more harassment of different types. The risk profile of harassment indicates that older trans women are more likely to suffer harassment than younger ones, and the risk decreases each year they delay their gender identity disclosure. The elimination of transphobic attitudes and the promotion of gender justice should be priority strategies in Spain.

  13. Relationship Satisfaction and Risk Factors for Suicide.

    PubMed

    Till, Benedikt; Tran, Ulrich S; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that troubled romantic relationships are associated with higher risk factors for mental health. However, studies examining the role of relationship satisfaction in suicide risk factors are scarce. We investigated differences in risk factors for suicide between individuals with high relationship satisfaction, individuals with low relationship satisfaction, and singles. Furthermore, we explored patterns of experiencing, and dealing with, conflicts in the relationship and examined associations with suicide risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed relationship status, relationship satisfaction, specific types of relationship conflicts, and suicide risk factors (i.e., suicidal ideation, hopelessness, depression) with questionnaires among 382 individuals in Austria. Risk factors for suicide were higher among singles than among individuals in happy relationships, but lower among those with low relationship satisfaction. Participants reporting a high number of unsolved conflicts in their relationship had higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression than individuals who tend to solve issues with their partner amicably or report no conflicts. Relationship satisfaction and relationship conflicts reflect risk factors for suicide, with higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression reported by individuals who mentioned unsolved conflicts with their partner and experienced low satisfaction with their relationship.

  14. Concussion risk factors and strategies for prevention.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Hamish A

    2014-12-01

    Concussion in children is frequently related to participation in sports. It requires a traumatic event to occur that transmits acceleration to the brain. Some children may have intrinsic risk factors that place them at greater risk for this type of injury. Comorbidities such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, migraine headaches, and mood disorders may place athletes at increased risk of more severe injury. A previous concussion is probably the most important influence on risk for future injury. Extrinsic risk factors include coaching techniques, officiating, and choice of sport. Helmet choice does not diminish concussion risk, nor does the use of mouth guards. Education of athletes, coaches, parents, and physicians is very important in improving recognition of potential concussive injury and helping child athletes and their parents understand the risks involved in sport participation.

  15. Post-marketing surveillance of the safety profile of iodixanol in the outpatient CT setting: a prospective, multicenter, observational study of patient risk factors, adverse reactions and preventive measures in 9953 patients.

    PubMed

    Müller, F H H

    2014-11-01

    Non-interventional study in outpatient, contrast-enhanced CT; 1. to determine the extent of preventive measures for risk reduction of adverse drug reactions after contrast-enhanced CT examinations. 2. to prospectively determine the incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of the iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol. 3. to determine a possible influence of preventive measures on the incidence/severity of adverse drug reactions.. Evaluable documentation was provided for 9953 patients from 66 radiology centers across Germany. Patient characteristics, aspects of iodixanol administration, and adverse events with an at least "possible" relationship were documented on a standardized case report form (CRF) and were evaluated up to seven days after contrast medium administration. About 55.5 % of patients showed one or more risk factors (e. g. impaired renal function 4.4 %, diabetes mellitus 8.5 %, hypertension 20.6 %). One third of the sites did not implement any preventive measures. Patients with a known risk for an allergy-like reaction were more likely to receive pharmacologic preventive treatment (0.5 - 50.5 %). Oral hydration was the main preventive measure in patients with renal risk factors (< 8 %) followed by intravenous hydration (1 %). Adverse drug reactions, mainly hypersensitivity reactions, occurred in 77 patients (0.74 %), but were classified as serious in only 3 patients (0.03 %). No statistically significant correlation between risk factors, preventive measures, and adverse reactions could be found. The use of preventive measures for CT examinations in this outpatient setting was generally low with risk patients being pre-medicated more often, depending on their history. In the routine outpatient setting, iso-osmolar iodixanol was very well tolerated in almost 10,000 patients undergoing diagnostic CT. The rate of acute and delayed adverse reactions was low. No correlation could be found

  16. Cardiovascular disease and modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and many parts of the world. Potentially modifiable risk factors for CVD include tobacco use, physical inactivity, hypertension, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a cluster of interrelated metabolic risk factors. Over the last several decades, efforts to prevent or treat CVD risk factors have resulted in significantly lower rates of CVD-related mortality. However, many patients never achieve adequate control of CVD risk factors even when these factors have been identified. In addition, the growing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) threatens to undermine the improvements in CVD that have been achieved. In the United States, approximately two thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and even modest excess body weight is associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD-related mortality. Lifestyle interventions to promote weight loss reduce the risk of CVD-related illness but are difficult for patients to sustain over long periods of time. The increased incidence of obesity has also contributed to significant increases in the prevalence of other important CVD risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and type 2 DM. Pharmacologic therapies are currently available to address individual CVD risk factors, and others are being evaluated, including endocannabinoid receptor antagonists, inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subtypes alpha and gamma, and several agents that modulate the activity of glucagon-like peptide-1. The new agents have the potential to significantly improve several CVD risk factors with a single medication and may provide clinicians with several new strategies to reduce the long-term risk of CVD.

  17. Atherosclerosis risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Surabhi; Elliott, Jennifer R; Manzi, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Growing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis from initial endothelial dysfunction to rupture of atheromatous plaques. The increased frequency of atherosclerosis in SLE is likely due to a complex interplay among traditional risk factors, disease-related factors such as medications and disease activity, and inflammatory and immunogenic factors. Identification of these novel risk factors will lead to a better understanding of CVD pathogenesis and may also provide targets for potential treatment strategies. When caring for SLE patients, clinicians should be aware of the increased CVD risk and treat the known modifiable risk factors in addition to controlling disease activity and inflammation.

  18. Factors influencing laboratory animal spontaneous tumor profiles.

    PubMed

    Hardisty, J F

    1985-01-01

    In chemical carcinogenicity and drug-safety testing, a carcinogen is defined as an agent that when administered by an appropriate route causes an increased incidence of tumors in experimental animals as compared to unexposed control animals. Although a carcinogen may cause the appearance of tumors in organs where tumors do not usually occur in a given strain, the usual response is to increase the types of tumors seen spontaneously and to shorten the period of latency. The use of carcinogenesis experiments for research and safety assessment requires properly designed and well-conducted experiments and a knowledge of background data and variations in tumor incidences of control animals. Many factors can influence the reported incidences of spontaneous tumors. These include species, strain, sex, age, and source of the experimental test animal; study duration; extent of the pathology examination; dietary and environmental conditions; qualifications and experience of the study pathologist; diagnostic criteria and nomenclature conventions; and quality assurance and review procedures. This paper discusses several factors which may influence the incidence of tumors in control and test animals, and provides examples to illustrate the potential for these factors to affect the data.

  19. Sudden cardiac death: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Luepker, Russell V.; Roger, Véronique L.; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public-health problem with multiple etiologies, risk factors, and changing temporal trends. Substantial progress has been made over the past few decades in identifying markers that confer increased SCD risk at the population level. However, the quest for predicting the high-risk individual who could be a candidate for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or other therapy, continues. In this article, we review the incidence, temporal trends, and triggers of SCD, and its demographic, clinical, and genetic risk factors. We also discuss the available evidence supporting the use of public-access defibrillators. PMID:20142817

  20. [Risk factors for preterm encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Kornacka, Maria K; Bokiniec, Renata; Bargiel, Agata

    2009-08-01

    Encephalopathy in a common neonatological sense is a term referring to a complex of clinical symptoms occurring in term infants in the first days of their life as a result of hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, if we accept the encyclopedic definition of encephalopathy as a vast or multifocal brain lesions caused by a variety of factors, we may use the term to describe all patients with traumatic, hypoxic or toxic brain lesions, and therefore also newborns at different levels of maturity. Contrary to term newborns, in which case the hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are mostly intrauterine, for preterm infants there is a number of factors which destroy neural tissue postnatally The occurrence of those factors is often influenced by elements of essential intensive care. The article describes the most common biochemical disturbances and clinical causes.

  1. Risk Factors in Adolescent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, D. Rose; Haldeman, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex and multifaceted disease, with many contributing factors. While diet and nutrition are important influences, the confounding effects of overweight and obesity, metabolic and genetic factors, racial and ethnic predispositions, socioeconomic status, cultural influences, growth rate, and pubertal stage have even more influence and make diagnosis quite challenging. The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents far exceeds the numbers who have been diagnosed; studies have found that 75% or more go undiagnosed. This literature review summarizes the challenges of blood pressure classification in adolescents, discusses the impact of these confounding influences, and identifies actions that will improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. PMID:27335997

  2. Developmental risk factors for sexual offending.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph K P; Jackson, Henry J; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the general, common, and specific developmental risk factors for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, and multiple paraphilia, and to address five methodological issues observed in this area of research. This study involved 64 sex offenders and 33 nonsex, nondrug-related, and nonviolent property offenders. The group of 64 sex offenders was further divided into eight subgroups, some of which overlapped in memberships because of multiple diagnoses. To overcome the methodological problem associated with overlapping group memberships, a special approach involving comparisons of sets of logistic regression analyses was adopted. Offenders were clinically assessed for evidence of paraphilias, and their adverse childhood experiences were measured by a battery of tests. Childhood Emotional Abuse and Family Dysfunction, Childhood Behavior Problems, and Childhood Sexual Abuse were found to be general developmental risk factors for paraphilias. Furthermore, Childhood Emotional Abuse and Family Dysfunction was found to be a common developmental risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple paraphilia. Additional analyses revealed that childhood emotional abuse contributed significantly as a common developmental risk factor compared to family dysfunction. Besides, Childhood Sexual Abuse was found to be a specific developmental risk factor for pedophilia. The study has supported the value of conceptualizing certain childhood adversities as developmental risk factors for paraphilic behaviors. The role of childhood emotional abuse as an important developmental risk contributor, and the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and pedophilia are of theoretical significance. Furthermore, the results have significant implications for the prevention of childhood abuse and treatment of sex offenders.

  3. Glaucoma history and risk factors.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles W

    Apart from the risk of developing glaucoma there is also the risk that it is not detected and irreversible loss of vision ensues. Some studies of methods of glaucoma diagnosis have examined the results of instrument-based examinations with great if not complete reliance on objective findings in arriving at a diagnosis. The very valuable advances in glaucoma detection instrument technologies, and apparent increasing dependence on them, may have led to reduced consideration of information available from a patient history in those studies. Dependence on objective evidence of glaucomatous pathology may reduce the possibility of detecting glaucoma suspects or patients at risk for becoming glaucoma suspects. A valid positive family history of glaucoma is very valuable information. However, negative family histories can often be unreliable due to large numbers of glaucoma cases being undiagnosed. No evidence of family history is appropriate rather than no family history. In addition the unreliability of a negative family history is increased when patients with glaucoma fail to inform their family members. A finding of no family history can only be stated as no known family history. In examining the potential diagnostic contribution from a patient history, this review considers, age, frailty, race, type and degree of refractive error, systemic hyper- and hypotension, vasospasm, migraine, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, diabetes, medication interactions and side effects, the degree of exposure to intraocular and intracranial pressure elevations and fluctuations, smoking, and symptoms in addition to genetics and family history of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  5. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  6. Psychological Risk Factors in Headache

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

  7. Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogério S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century. PMID:23515212

  8. Profile sampling to characterize particulate lead risks in potable water.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brandi; Masters, Sheldon; Edwards, Marc

    2014-06-17

    Traditional lead (Pb) profiling, or collecting sequential liters of water that flow from a consumer tap after a stagnation event, has recently received widespread use in understanding sources of Pb in drinking water and risks to consumer health, but has limitations in quantifying particulate Pb risks. A new profiling protocol was developed in which a series of traditional profiles are collected from the same tap at escalating flow rates. The results revealed marked differences in risks of Pb exposure from one consumer home to another as a function of flow rate, with homes grouped into four risk categories with differing flushing requirements and public education to protect consumers. On average, Pb concentrations detected in water at high flow without stagnation were at least three to four times higher than in first draw samples collected at low flow with stagnation, demonstrating a new "worst case" lead release scenario, contrary to the original regulatory assumption that stagnant, first draw samples contain the highest lead concentrations. Testing also revealed that in some cases water samples with visible particulates had much higher Pb than samples without visible particulates, and tests of different sample handling protocols confirmed that some EPA-allowed methods would not quantify as much as 99.9% of the Pb actually present (avg. 27% of Pb not quantified).

  9. What is the impact of obtaining medical clearance to participate in a randomised controlled trial examining a physical activity intervention on the socio-demographic and risk factor profiles of included participants?

    PubMed

    Duncan, Mitch J; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Caperchione, Cristina M; Rebar, Amanda L; Maeder, Anthony J; Tague, Rhys; Savage, Trevor N; van Itallie, Anetta; Mummery, W Kerry; Kolt, Gregory S

    2016-12-07

    Requiring individuals to obtain medical clearance to exercise prior to participation in physical activity interventions is common. The impact this has on the socio-demographic characteristic profiles of participants who end up participating in the intervention is not clear. As part of the multi-component eligibility screening for inclusion in a three-arm randomised controlled trial examining the efficacy of a web-based physical activity intervention, individuals interested in participating were required to complete the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q). The PAR-Q identified individuals as having lower or higher risk. Higher-risk individuals were required to obtain medical exercise clearance prior to enrolment. Comparisons of the socio-demographic characteristics of the lower- and higher-risk individuals were performed using t tests and chi-square tests (p = 0.05). A total of 1244 individuals expressed interest in participating, and 432 were enrolled without needing to undergo further screening. Of the 251 individuals required to obtain medical clearance, 148 received clearance, 15 did not receive clearance and 88 did not return any form of clearance. A total of 105 individuals were enrolled after obtaining clearance, and the most frequent reason for being required to seek clearance was for using blood pressure/heart condition medication. Higher-risk individuals were significantly older, had a higher body mass index and engaged in more sedentary behaviour than lower-risk individuals. Use of more inclusive participant screening protocols that maintain high levels of participant safety are encouraged. Allowing individuals to obtain medical clearance to participate can result in including a more diverse population likely to benefit most from participation. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN12611000157976 ). Registered on 9 February 2011.

  10. Risk factors for hip fracture in older home care clients.

    PubMed

    Stolee, Paul; Poss, Jeff; Cook, Richard J; Byrne, Kerry; Hirdes, John P

    2009-03-01

    Little information is available on hip fracture risks among community-dwelling persons receiving home care. Our aim was to identify risk factors for hip fracture from health information routinely collected for older home care clients. This was a cohort study involving secondary analysis of data on 40,279 long-stay (>60 days) home care clients aged 65 and older in Ontario, Canada; occurrence of hip fracture as well as potential risk factor information were measured using the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI)/Minimum Data Set-Home Care assessment instrument. In all, 1,003 clients (2.5%) had hip fracture on follow-up assessment. Older (85+ vs 65-74, relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 0.52 [0.43-0.64]) clients are at increased risk; males are at reduced risk [0.60 (0.51-0.70)]. Other risk factors include osteoporosis (1.19 [1.03-1.36]), falls (1.31 [1.15-1.49]), unsteady gait (1.18 [1.03-1.36]), use of ambulation aide (1.39 [1.21-1.59]), tobacco use (1.42, [1.13-1.80]), severe malnutrition (2.61 [1.67-4.08]), and cognitive impairment (1.30 [1.12-1.51]). Arthritis (0.86 [0.76-0.98]) and morbid obesity (0.34 [0.16-0.72]) were associated with reduced risk. Males and females demonstrated different risk profiles. Important risk factors for hip fracture can be identified from routinely collected data; these could be used to identify at-risk clients for further investigation and prevention strategies.

  11. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Older Home Care Clients

    PubMed Central

    Poss, Jeff; Cook, Richard J.; Byrne, Kerry; Hirdes, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little information is available on hip fracture risks among community-dwelling persons receiving home care. Our aim was to identify risk factors for hip fracture from health information routinely collected for older home care clients. Methods This was a cohort study involving secondary analysis of data on 40,279 long-stay (>60 days) home care clients aged 65 and older in Ontario, Canada; occurrence of hip fracture as well as potential risk factor information were measured using the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI)/Minimum Data Set–Home Care assessment instrument. Results In all, 1,003 clients (2.5%) had hip fracture on follow-up assessment. Older (85+ vs 65–74, relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 0.52 [0.43–0.64]) clients are at increased risk; males are at reduced risk [0.60 (0.51–0.70)]. Other risk factors include osteoporosis (1.19 [1.03–1.36]), falls (1.31 [1.15–1.49]), unsteady gait (1.18 [1.03–1.36]), use of ambulation aide (1.39 [1.21–1.59]), tobacco use (1.42, [1.13–1.80]), severe malnutrition (2.61 [1.67–4.08]), and cognitive impairment (1.30 [1.12–1.51]). Arthritis (0.86 [0.76–0.98]) and morbid obesity (0.34 [0.16–0.72]) were associated with reduced risk. Males and females demonstrated different risk profiles. Conclusions Important risk factors for hip fracture can be identified from routinely collected data; these could be used to identify at-risk clients for further investigation and prevention strategies [22]. PMID:19196903

  12. Cardiovascular risk profile of young adults: changes over time.

    PubMed

    Tralhão, António; Sousa, Pedro Jerónimo; Ferreira, António Miguel; Miranda, Mafalda; Monge, José Carlos; Tomé, António; Duarte, José Maria

    2014-03-01

    The high prevalence and natural history of atherosclerosis make young people important targets for cardiovascular prevention. This study aimed to analyze changes over time in the cardiovascular risk profile of a population of healthy young adults. We studied 923 Portuguese Air Force applicants between 1991 and 2007, divided into two-year periods. In addition to cardiovascular risk factors, the Framingham score and HeartScore were calculated for age 65. Cochran-Armitage and Jonckheere-Terpstra tests for trend were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Mean age was 19.2 ± 2.3 years (p = 0.34) and 55 applicants (6%) were female (p = 0.56). Mean body mass index was 22.4 ± 2.5 kg (p for trend 0.35). The number of smokers decreased over the study period (11.6 vs. 7.0%, p for trend 0.02). Of the total number of applicants, 122 (13.2%) were classified as hypertensive. Mean systolic blood pressure was 127 ± 12 mmHg and increased significantly over time (122 ± 13 vs. 128 ± 11 mmHg, p for trend <0.001). Hypercholesterolemia was found in 108 applicants (11.7%) and total cholesterol showed an improvement (170 ± 35 vs. 155 ± 26 mg/dl, p for trend <0.001). The mean modified Framingham score was 12.6 ± 5.1 and improved over the study period (12.9 ± 5.9% vs. 11.9 ± 4.7%, p for trend 0.006). The mean modified HeartScore was 3.2 ± 1.4 and remained unchanged (p for trend 0.10). In our population, except for an increase in systolic blood pressure values, there was an overall improvement in cardiovascular risk from 1991 to 2007. Further studies are needed to better assess the situation in Portugal and help devise preventive strategies in young people. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiovascular risk profile and lifestyle habits in a cohort of Italian cardiologists (from the SOCRATES Survey).

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Zito, Giovanni; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2013-07-15

    Cardiologists' cardiovascular profile and lifestyle habits are poorly known worldwide. To offer a snapshot of the personal health habits of Italian cardiologists, the Survey on Cardiac Risk Profile and Lifestyle Habits in a Cohort of Italian Cardiologists (SOCRATES) was undertaken. A Web-based electronic self-reported survey, accessible through a dedicated Web site, was used for data entry, and data were transferred through the Web to a central database. The survey was divided into 4 sections: baseline characteristics, medical illnesses and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, lifestyle habits, and selected medication use. The e-mail databases of 3 national scientific societies were used to survey a large and representative sample of Italian cardiologists. During the 3-month period of the survey, 1,770 of the 5,240 cardiologists contacted (33.7%) completed and returned ≥1 sections of the questionnaire. More than 49% of the participants had 1 of the 5 classic risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, active smoking, diabetes, and previous vascular events). More than 28% of respondents had 2 to 5 risk factors, and only 22.1% had none and therefore, according to age and gender, could be considered at low to intermediate risk. Despite the reported risk factors, >90% of cardiologists had a self-reported risk perception quantified as mild, such as low or intermediate. Furthermore, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity, and stress at work or at home were commonly reported, as well as limited use of cardiovascular drugs, such as statins or aspirin. In conclusion, the average cardiovascular profile of Italian cardiologist is unlikely to be considered ideal or even favorable according to recent statements and guidelines regarding cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Midwives' perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    García-Barrios, C; Castañeda-Camey, X; Romero-Guerrero, X; González-Hernández, D; Langer-Glas, A

    1993-01-01

    Midwives in rural areas of the State of Morelos are one of the most important resources used by rural women for health care of pregnancy, delivery and the puerperium. This work was aimed at identifying midwives perceptions of pregnant women's risk factors, in order to include this knowledge in reproductive health programs which articulate institutional and traditional health systems. We applied a questionnaire to all midwives in the Municipalities of Ocuituco, yecapixtla and Zacualpan, Morelos (n = 35). Four key informants were selected and interviewed. These instruments enabled us to measure variability in perception of risk factors. Knowledge of risk factors is defective among midwives. Previous training made a big difference. Sixty three per cent of midwives who attended training courses are better qualified from an academic medicine point of view. Only 28.7 per cent of non-trained midwives (43% for both groups), indicating that sociocultural aspects prevail over technical training in midwives perceptions of reproductive risk factors.

  15. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  16. Risk profile of coronary heart disease among the staff members of Qassim University, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Nohair, Sultan A. L.; Mohaimeed, Abdulrahman A. L.; Sharaf, Fawzy; Naeem, Zahid; Midhet, Farid; Homaidan, Homaidan A. L.; Winter, Sandra J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the risk profile of coronary heart disease (CHD) among the staff members of Qassim University and assess their knowledge in a screening campaign in Qassim region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among male and female staff at Qassim University campus. All employees of Qassim University were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. The study sample size was 233 staff and employees. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 18. The data analysis focused on providing point estimates for the risk factors. Results: The study found that 30% of participants have one or more risk factors for CHD, namely obesity 20.6%, diabetes 10.3%, hypertension 12.4%, dyslipidemia 10.7%, and smokers (11.6%). About 54% of the participants have a family history of at least one chronic disease as a risk factor for CHD. Conclusion: The most common risk factor of CHD among the staff members is obesity by 20.6%. Risk factors for CHD are quite common among Qassim University staff. These findings need to increase the health education and disease promotion program as an important intervention to reduce the occurrence and severity of CHD risk factors and to improve the quality of the life of the staff members of Qassim University. PMID:28293152

  17. Concurrent risk factors for adolescent violence.

    PubMed

    Saner, H; Ellickson, P

    1996-08-01

    To examine the risk and protective factors for different types of violent behavior in a sample of high school age adolescents drawn from the general population, illuminate the multiple and cumulative nature of the different risk factors, and characterize gender differences in explanatory variables that foster involvement in violent activities. Using data from a 6-year longitudinal self-report survey of over 4,500 high school seniors and high school dropouts from California and Oregon, we developed weighted estimates of the proportions of youth exhibiting different risk factors who are also involved in violent activities. We use risk scales to show the cumulative effects of multiple factors within substantive domains, and logistic regression techniques to pinpoint the effects of each risk factor relative to others included in the models. Major risk factors for violence include gender and deviant behaviors, such as using and selling drugs, committing nonviolent felonies, and engaging in other forms of nonviolent delinquency. Low academic orientation, lack of parental affection and support, and perceptions of parents' substance use also show strong links with violent behavior. As the number of risk factors increases, so does the likelihood of engaging in violent behavior. Boys and girls show somewhat different paths to violence, with girls being comparatively more susceptible to the effects of family problems or disruption and impaired relationships with parents. For boys, engaging in other deviant behaviors provides the most information about their propensity to commit violent acts. Weak bonds with school and family also have an impact on serious violence for boys. Risk factors from multiple domains--demographic, environmental, and behavioral--contribute to involvement in various types of violent behavior. The strong links between violence, drug use, and delinquency argue for prevention/intervention programs that take into account the clustering of these behaviors

  18. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  19. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  20. Behavioral Risk Factors for AIDS among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    This document examines the incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among adolescents in the United States and identifies several risk factors for AIDS among this population. It classifies adolescents' risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by the degree to which adolescents engage in behaviors that are…

  1. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients.

  2. Risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    von Eckardstein, A

    2005-01-01

    Several controlled interventional trials have shown the benefit of anti-hypertensive and hypolipidaemic drugs for the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). International guidelines for the prevention of CHD agree in their recommendations for tertiary prevention and recommend lowering the blood pressure to below 140 mm/90 mm Hg and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol to below 2.6 mmol/l in patients with manifest CHD. Novel recommendations for secondary prevention are focused on the treatment of the pre-symptomatic high-risk patient with an estimated CHD morbidity risk of higher than 20% per 10 years or an estimated CHD mortality risk of higher than 5% per 10 years. For the calculation of this risk, the physician must record the following risk factors: sex, age, family history of premature myocardial infarction, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and triglyceride. This information allows the absolute risk of myocardial infarction to be computed by using scores or algorithms which have been deduced from results of epidemiological studies. To improve risk prediction and to identify new targets for intervention, novel risk factors are sought. High plasma levels of C-reactive protein has been shown to improve the prognostic value of global risk estimates obtained by the combination of conventional risk factors and may influence treatment decisions in patients with intermediate global cardiovascular risk (CHD morbidity risk of 10%-20% per 10 years or CHD mortality risk of 2%-5% per 10 years).

  3. Vascular Risk Factors: Imaging and Neuropathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.; Roberts, Rosebud

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease plays an important role in cognitive disorders in the elderly. Cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease interact on several levels, one important level being the overlap in risk factors. The major vascular risk factors such as diabetes and impaired glycemic control, hypertension, obesity and hyper- or dyslipidemia have been associated both with Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The purpose of this review is to consider the context in which vascular dementia is diagnosed, place the pathophysiological consequences of cerebrovascular disease on cognition in the context of clinical and pathological Alzheimer’s disease, and then to consider the evidence for the role of major vascular risk factors in late-life cognitive impairment, changes in brain imaging and neuropathological changes. Midlife diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are established risk factors for clinically defined Alzheimer’s disease as well as vascular dementia. The basis for these relationships could either be that the risk factors lead to microvascular brain disease, promote Alzheimer pathology or both. The associations of late-life onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity with cognitive impairment are either attenuated or reversed. The role of vascular risk factors in midlife should be the focus of public health efforts to reduce the burden of late-life cognitive impairment. PMID:20182020

  4. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among US Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. PMID:25595171

  5. Risk factors for homelessness among US veterans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  7. Safety profile of Tysabri: international risk management plan.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, P; D'Onghia, M; Trojano, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are potent new tools for a molecular targeted approach to modify the course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Natalizumab is a monoclonal antibody targeted against alpha-4 integrin that has proved to be very effective in the treatment of MS. It is well tolerated, although severe side effects have been reported that have conditioned its use as a second-line drug for the treatment of MS. The clinical benefit of natalizumab should be weighed carefully against the potential risk of serious adverse events. Therefore, risk management plans have already been developed in order to prevent or minimise risks relating to natalizumab. Data so far obtained from these observational programs confirm the already demonstrated risk-benefit profile of natalizumab in clinical trials.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L; Frisby, Craig L

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major profiles in a multi-subtest test battery. Major profile patterns are represented as dimensions extracted from a MDS analysis. PAMS represents an individual observed score as a linear combination of dimensions where the dimensions are the most typical profile patterns present in a population. While the PAMS approach was initially developed for exploratory purposes, its results can later be confirmed in a different sample by CFA. Since CFA is often used to verify results from an exploratory factor analysis, the present paper makes the connection between a factor model and the PAMS model, and then illustrates CFA with a simulated example (that was generated by the PAMS model) and at the same time with a real example. The real example demonstrates confirmation of PAMS exploratory results by using a different sample. Fit indexes can be used to indicate whether the CFA reparameterization as a confirmatory approach works for the PAMS exploratory results.

  9. Vascular risk factors and cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Debette, S

    2013-10-01

    Delaying the onset of dementia by just a few years could have a major impact on the prevalence of the disease at the population level. Vascular risk factors are modifiable and may offer an important opportunity for preventive approaches. Several studies have shown that diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and smoking are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia, but other groups have not observed such a relation. Positive associations were observed mainly in studies where risk factors were assessed in midlife, suggesting that age is an important modulator in the relation between vascular risk factors and cognition. The population attributable risk of dementia is particularly high for hypertension. Associations of vascular risk factors with cognitive decline and dementia are probably mediated largely by cerebrovascular disease, including both stroke and covert vascular brain injury, which can have additive or synergistic effects with coexisting neurodegenerative lesions. To date, randomized trials have not convincingly demonstrated that treating vascular risk factors is associated with a reduction in cognitive decline or dementia risk. Of eight randomized trials testing the effect of antihypertensive agents on dementia risk, only one was positive, and another in a subgroup of individuals with recurrent stroke. In most trials, cognition and dementia were secondary outcomes, follow-up was short and treatment was initiated at an older age. No effect on cognitive decline or dementia could be demonstrated for statins and intensive glycemic control. Future areas of investigation could include differential class effects of antihypertensive drugs on cognitive outcomes and identification of high risk individuals as target population for clinical trials initiated in midlife. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. [Aflatoxins--health risk factors].

    PubMed

    Miliţă, Nicoleta Manuela; Mihăescu, Gr; Chifiriuc, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by a group of strains, mainly Aspergillus and Penicillium species. These mycotoxins are bifurano-coumarin derivatives group with four major products B1, B2, G1 and G2 according to blue or green fluorescence emitted in ultraviolet light and according to chromatographic separation. After metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and B2 in the mammalian body, result two metabolites M1 and M2 as hydroxylated derivatives of the parent compound. Aflatoxins have high carcinogenic potential, the most powerful carcinogens in different species of animals and humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified aflatoxin B1 in Group I carcinogens. The target organ for aflatoxins is the liver. In chronic poisoning, aflatoxin is a risk to health, for a long term causing cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma), and in acute intoxications aflatoxin is lethal. This work purpose to discuss aflatoxins issue: the synthesis, absorption and elimination of aflatoxins, the toxicity mechanisms, and measures to limit the content of aflatoxins in food

  11. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  12. Risk Profiles for Weight Gain among Postmenopausal Women: A Classification and Regression Tree Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Yon; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Fenton, Jenifer; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Hursting, Stephen D.; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Risk factors for obesity and weight gain are typically evaluated individually while “adjusting for” the influence of other confounding factors, and few studies, if any, have created risk profiles by clustering risk factors. We identified subgroups of postmenopausal women homogeneous in their clustered modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for gaining ≥ 3% weight. Methods This study included 612 postmenopausal women 50–79 years old, enrolled in an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study between February 1995 and July 1998. Classification and regression tree and stepwise regression models were built and compared. Results Of 27 selected variables, the factors significantly related to ≥ 3% weight gain were weight change in the past 2 years, age at menopause, dietary fiber, fat, alcohol intake, and smoking. In women younger than 65 years, less than 4 kg weight change in the past 2 years sufficiently reduced risk of ≥ 3% weight gain. Different combinations of risk factors related to weight gain were reported for subgroups of women: women 65 years or older (essential factor: < 9.8 g/day dietary factor), African Americans (essential factor: currently smoking), and white women (essential factor: ≥ 5 kg weight change for the past 2 years). Conclusions Our findings suggest specific characteristics for particular subgroups of postmenopausal women that may be useful for identifying those at risk for weight gain. The study results may be useful for targeting efforts to promote strategies to reduce the risk of obesity and weight gain in subgroups of postmenopausal women and maximize the effect of weight control by decreasing obesity-relevant adverse health outcomes. PMID:25822239

  13. Failed subacromial decompression. Risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, A; Garret, J; Favard, L; Charles, H; Ollat, D

    2014-12-01

    Arthroscopic subacromial decompression (acromioplasty) is widely held to be effective, although pain may persist after the procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the proportion of patients with residual pain (i.e., the failure rate) after isolated subacromial decompression and to look for predictors of failure. We conducted a retrospective multicentre study of 108 patients managed with isolated arthroscopic subacromial decompression between 2007 and 2011, for any reason. We excluded patients in whom surgical procedures on the rotator cuff tendons were performed concomitantly. Data were collected from the medical records, a telephone questionnaire, and radiographs obtained before surgery and at last follow-up. Failure was defined as persistent pain (visual analogue scale score>3) more than 6 months after surgery and at last follow-up. The failure rate was 29% (31/108). Two factors significantly predicted failure, namely, receiving workers' compensation benefits for the shoulder condition and co-planing. Heterogeneous calcific tendinopathy and deep partial-thickness rotator cuff tears were also associated with poorer outcomes, but the effect was not statistically significant. Co-planing may predict failure of subacromial decompression, although whether this effect is due to an insufficient degree of co-planing or to the technique itself is unclear. Nevertheless, in patients with symptoms from the acromio-clavicular joint, acromio-clavicular resection is probably the best option. Receiving workers' compensation benefits was also associated with treatment failure, as a result of well-known parameters related to the social welfare system. Isolated arthroscopic subacromial decompression is effective in 70% of cases. We recommend the utmost caution if co-planing is considered and/or the patient receives workers' compensation benefits for the shoulder condition, as these two factors are associated with a significant increase in the failure rate. IV

  14. Environmental factors and risk for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mimi C; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2004-11-01

    Chronic infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the most important risk factors for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in humans. HBV is the primary cause of HCC in high-risk areas including China and Africa, whereas in developed countries such as the United States, HCV plays a more prominent role and is at least partially responsible for the increase in HCC incidence in this country. Humans are exposed to hepatocarcinogenic aflatoxins through ingestion of moldy foods, a consequence of poor storage of susceptible grains. Highly exposed populations are primarily in sub-Sahara Africa and Asia, where dietary aflatoxins significantly enhance the carcinogenic effects of viral hepatitis. Heavy, long-term alcohol use is a risk factor for HCC, whereas moderate use (1-3 drinks/day) is not. Constituents of cigarette smoke are hepatic carcinogens in animals, and there is mounting evidence that the liver is an organ susceptible to tobacco carcinogenicity. Diabetic patients are at risk for HCC probably as a result of the hepatic injury, fibrosis, and eventual cirrhosis resulting from fatty liver disease. Given the current epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States, this risk factor will be increasingly important. Increased risk for HCC is evident in young noncirrhotic users of oral contraceptives in the United States and Europe. In summary, risk factors for HCC are identifiable in most patients and primarily are associated with chronic hepatic injury.

  15. Bone metastasis risk factors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Catarina; Vendrell, Inês; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Casimiro, Sandra; Mansinho, André; Alho, Irina; Costa, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Bone is the single most frequent site for bone metastasis in breast cancer patients. Patients with bone-only metastasis have a fairly good prognosis when compared with patients with visceral disease. Nevertheless, cancer-induced bone disease carries an important risk of developing skeletal related events that impact quality of life (QoL). It is therefore particularly important to stratify patients according to their risk of developing bone metastasis. In this context, several risk factors have been studied, including demographic, clinicopathological, genetic, and metabolic factors. Most of them show conflicting or non-definitive associations and are not validated for clinical use. Nonetheless, tumour intrinsic subtype is widely accepted as a major risk factor for bone metastasis development and luminal breast cancer carries an increased risk for bone disease. Other factors such as gene signatures, expression of specific cytokines (such as bone sialoprotein and bone morphogenetic protein 7) or components of the extracellular matrix (like bone crosslinked C-telopeptide) might also influence the development of bone metastasis. Knowledge of risk factors related with bone disease is of paramount importance as it might be a prediction tool for triggering the use of targeted agents and allow for better patient selection for future clinical trials. PMID:28194227

  16. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism.

    PubMed

    Burd, L; Severud, R; Kerbeshian, J; Klug, M G

    1999-01-01

    To identify pre- and perinatal risk factors for autism. Case control study. We matched names of patients from North Dakota who met DSM criteria for autism, a pervasive developmental disorder, and autistic disorder with their birth certificates. Five matched controls were selected for each case. Univariate analysis of the 78 cases and 390 controls identified seven risk factors. Logistic modeling to control for confounding produced a five variable model. The model parameters were chi 2 = 36.6 and p < 0.001. The five variables in the model were decreased birth weight, low maternal education, later start of prenatal care, and having a previous termination of pregnancy. Increasing father's age was associated with increased risk of autism. This methodology may provide an inexpensive method for clinics and public health providers to identify risk factors and to identify maternal characteristics of patients with mental illness and developmental disorders.

  17. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN RISK/PROTECTION PROFILES FOR LOW ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Stephen D.; Renner, Lynette M.; Herrenkohl, Todd I.

    2012-01-01

    Using holistic-interactionistic theory, the simultaneous nature of risk and protection factors for both males and females (age 6–11 in Wave 1) is examined using Latent Profile Analysis (LPA). Risk/protection classes are estimated using multiple risk factor variables (e.g., physical child abuse) and multiple protective factors (e.g., extracurricular activities). These risk/protection classes were used to predict low academic performance. For both males and females, high risk, low protection individuals were significantly more likely to experience low academic performance than low risk, high protection cases. Gender differences emerged in a class for females that included the importance of parental/peer disapproval of anti-social behavior as a protective factor that was not present for males. Findings support elements of the holistic-interactionistic theory for human development and suggest the need to examine risk and protective factors in combination to account for their shared influences on developmental outcomes. Implications for youths underperforming academically are discussed. PMID:22879685

  18. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN RISK/PROTECTION PROFILES FOR LOW ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Stephen D; Renner, Lynette M; Herrenkohl, Todd I

    2010-05-01

    Using holistic-interactionistic theory, the simultaneous nature of risk and protection factors for both males and females (age 6-11 in Wave 1) is examined using Latent Profile Analysis (LPA). Risk/protection classes are estimated using multiple risk factor variables (e.g., physical child abuse) and multiple protective factors (e.g., extracurricular activities). These risk/protection classes were used to predict low academic performance. For both males and females, high risk, low protection individuals were significantly more likely to experience low academic performance than low risk, high protection cases. Gender differences emerged in a class for females that included the importance of parental/peer disapproval of anti-social behavior as a protective factor that was not present for males. Findings support elements of the holistic-interactionistic theory for human development and suggest the need to examine risk and protective factors in combination to account for their shared influences on developmental outcomes. Implications for youths underperforming academically are discussed.

  19. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Victor, Marco Antonio de Goes; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%), those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%), with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24) days, with neurological illnesses (26%), cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1%) and various co-morbidities (3±1.8). The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%), impaired mobility (35.6%) and extremes of age (10.3%). the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event.

  20. Nursing Diagnosis Risk for falls: prevalence and clinical profile of hospitalized patients1

    PubMed Central

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Victor, Marco Antonio de Goes; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to identify the prevalence of the Nursing Diagnosis (ND) Risk for falls in the hospitalizations of adult patients in clinical and surgical units, to characterize the clinical profile and to identify the risk factors of the patients with this ND. Method a cross-sectional study with 174 patients. The data was collected from the computerized nursing care prescriptions system and on-line hospital records, and analyzed statistically. Results the prevalence of the ND Risk for falls was 4%. The patients' profile indicated older adults, males (57%), those hospitalized in the clinical units (63.2%), with a median length of hospitalization of 20 (10-24) days, with neurological illnesses (26%), cardio-vascular illnesses (74.1%) and various co-morbidities (3±1.8). The prevalent risk factors were neurological alterations (43.1%), impaired mobility (35.6%) and extremes of age (10.3%). Conclusion the findings contributed to evidencing the profile of the patients with a risk of falling hospitalized in clinical and surgical wards, which favors the planning of interventions for preventing this adverse event. PMID:26107834

  1. Vascular risk factors in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rudack, Claudia; Langer, Claus; Stoll, Wolfgang; Rust, Stephan; Walter, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) and fibrinogen apheresis was recently reported to be an effective therapy in sudden hearing loss (SHL). In this study, we investigated whether lipoprotein and/or fibrinogen plasma concentrations, related gene polymorphisms and other cardiovascular risk factors are also risk factors for SHL. Total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol plasma concentrations, fibrinogen levels, and two functionally relevant fibrinogen polymorphisms were determined in 142 consecutive patients and in 84 age- and sex-matched control subjects of the same ethnic background, using routine laboratory methods and PCR analysis. In addition, we determined the platelet glycoprotein Ia (GPIa) C807T polymorphism, which was recently proposed to be a genetic risk factor for SHL, and we compared the patients' and controls' clinical characteristics. Total and LDL cholesterol concentrations were not different between patients and controls. Fibrinogen plasma levels were significantly increased in SHL patients (260+/-57 vs. 239+/-110 mg/dl, p=0.002). However, fibrinogen was not related to SHL in multivariate analysis, and none of the investigated fibrinogen polymorphisms was associated with SHL. By contrast, T allele carriers of the GPIa 807 polymorphic site had an increased risk to develop SHL (OR 1.81) and were more likely not to recover from SHL, compared to C allele carriers (OR 3.0). Moreover, significantly more SHL patients were current smokers (56.3% vs. 19.3% in the control group, p<0.0001). In conclusion, there is a partial overlap between classical coronary risk factors and risk factors for SHL. Hypercholesterolemia and hypoalphalipoproteinemia (low HDL cholesterol levels) are apparently no major risk factors for SHL, whereas the GPIa C807T polymorphism, elevated fibrinogen levels, and smoking are associated with an increased risk for SHL. Altogether these findings suggest a vascular involvement in the pathogenesis of SHL and may have important implications for the

  2. [Risk factors associated to female infertility].

    PubMed

    Romero Ramos, Ricardo; Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Abortes Monroy, Ignacio; Medina Sánchez, Héctor Gerardo

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of female infertility is growing worldwide and the its rate varies from 10 to 20%. It has been reported diverse risk factors associated with this medical complication. To identify the risk factors with significant association with female infertility. A case-control study was carried out. There were included 440 patients, divided into 220 women with primary or secondary female infertility (cases) and 220 women without infertility recruited at mediate postpartum (controls). Twenty sociodemographic and clinical risk factors for female infertility were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with percentages, arithmetic media, standard error, Student t test and chi squared. An alpha value was set at 0.05. There were 6 factors with statistical significance: advanced age (p < 0.001), elevated body mass index (p < 0.001), age of onset of sexual activity (p < 0.001), prior pelvic surgeries (p < 0.001), and presence of stress (p < 0.001). Other risk factors such as smoking, chemical and radiological treatments, pelvic inflammatory disease, exercise, contraceptive use, alcohol intake, drugs, coffee, solvents, glue and insecticides, were not significant. There are clinical and demographic risk factors associated with female infertility. Them identification in women at reproductive age could diminish the frequency of female infertility and, thus, avoid them consequences.

  3. Sunburn risk factors at Galveston beaches.

    PubMed

    Shoss-Glaich, Adrienne B; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2004-07-01

    Although the beach is a well-recognized environment for sunburn injury, specific risk factors for sunburn and their interactions are poorly understood. In this epidemiologic study, variables related to sunburn injury at the beach were analyzed. Beachgoers exposed to more than 4 hours of sun at the beach were significantly more likely to sunburn compared with those with less exposure. Other significant sunburn risk factors were lack of sunscreen use or use of sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor of 15 or less and Fitzpatrick Skin Types I and II. Reasonable sunburn avoidance strategies should include limiting duration of sun exposure to fewer than 4 hours per day.

  4. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort.

  5. Risk factors for and assessment of constipation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sherree; Hungerford, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Constipation commonly occurs in older people, particularly in hospital or residential care settings, and leads to decreased quality of life and increased healthcare costs. Despite its frequency, however, nurses often overlook the condition. One possible reason for this may be the lack of appropriate tools or scales for nurses to assess risk factors for developing constipation. This article identifies, from the academic literature, 14 risk factors for developing constipation in older people. These factors are then considered in light of four common constipation assessment charts. The article concludes by arguing the need for more comprehensive assessment tools to, firstly, identify risk factors; and, secondly, support the implementation of appropriate preventative strategies that will enable better health outcomes for older people.

  6. A Fatal Case of Acute Butane-Propane Poisoning in a Prisoner Under Psychiatric Treatment: Do These 2 Factors Have an Arrhythmogenic Interaction, Thus Increasing the Cardiovascular Risk Profile?

    PubMed

    Gioia, Sara; Lancia, Massimo; Bacci, Mauro; Suadoni, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Sudden death due to inhalation of aliphatic hydrocarbons such as butane and propane is well described in the literature. The main mechanism involved is the induction of a fatal cardiac arrhythmia. This phenomenon is frequently associated with prisoners who accidentally die while sniffing these volatile substances with an abuse purpose. Furthermore, such prisoners are often under psychiatric treatment; specific drugs belonging to this pharmacological class lead to a drug-related QT interval prolongation, setting the stage for torsade de pointes. In this article, we present the case of a prisoner died after sniffing a butane-propane gas mixture from a prefilled camping stove gas canister. The man was under psychiatric drugs due to mental disorders. He was constantly subjected to electrocardiogram to monitor the QTc (corrected QT interval), which was 460 milliseconds long. Toxicological analysis on cadaveric samples was performed by means of gas chromatography (head space) and revealed the presence of butane and propane at low levels. The aim of this article was to discuss a possible arrhythmogenic interaction of QT interval prolongation induced by psychiatric drugs and butane-propane inhalations, increasing the cardiovascular risk profile. In other words, evidence may suggest that prisoners, under these circumstances, are more likely to experience cardiovascular adverse effects. We believe that this study underlines the need to take this hypothesis into account to reduce death risk in prison and any medical-related responsibilities. Further studies are needed to validate the hypothesis.

  7. [The risk factors of endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Gerber, J; Sozański, L; Suchocki, S

    2001-12-01

    Authors presents the risk factors in endometrial cancer underlying such problems like hyperestrogenism, both external and internal caused by hormonally active ovarian masses, polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenocortical hyperfunction and role of obesity in this pathological state. Other factors have been also described diabetes mellitus and hypertension, oral contraception, genetics factors, patient's obstetric history and other diseases where the increase of aromatization activity of androstendion to estron has been noted.

  8. The global distribution of risk factors by poverty level.

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Tony; Hales, Simon; Kieft, Charlotte; Wilson, Nick; Woodward, Alistair

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the individual-level association of income poverty with being underweight, using tobacco, drinking alcohol, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, being exposed to indoor air pollution and being obese. METHODS: Using survey data for as many countries as possible, we estimated the relative risk association between income or assets and risk factors at the individual level within 11 medium- and low-income subregions of WHO. WHO and The World Bank data on the prevalence of risk factors and income poverty (defined as living on < US$ 1.00 per day, US$ 1-2.00 per day and > US$ 2.00 per day) were analysed to impute the association between poverty and risk factors for each subregion. The possible effect of poverty reduction on the prevalence of risk factors was estimated using population-attributable risk percentages. FINDINGS: There were strong associations between poverty and malnutrition among children, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, and being exposed to indoor air pollution within each subregion (relative risks were twofold to threefold greater for those living on < US$ 1.00 per day compared with those living on > US$ 2.00 per day). Associations between poverty and obesity, tobacco use and alcohol use varied across subregions. If everyone living on < US$ 2.00 per day had the risk factor profile of those living on > US$ 2.00 per day, 51% of exposures to unimproved water and sanitation could be avoided as could 37% of malnutrition among children and 38% of exposure to indoor air pollution. The more realistic, but still challenging, Millennium Development Goal of halving the number of people living on < US$ 1.00 per day would achieve much smaller reductions. CONCLUSION: To achieve large gains in global health requires both poverty eradication and public health action. The methods used in this study may be useful for monitoring pro-equity progress towards Millennium Development Goals. PMID:15744404

  9. The global distribution of risk factors by poverty level.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Tony; Hales, Simon; Kieft, Charlotte; Wilson, Nick; Woodward, Alistair

    2005-02-01

    To estimate the individual-level association of income poverty with being underweight, using tobacco, drinking alcohol, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, being exposed to indoor air pollution and being obese. Using survey data for as many countries as possible, we estimated the relative risk association between income or assets and risk factors at the individual level within 11 medium- and low-income subregions of WHO. WHO and The World Bank data on the prevalence of risk factors and income poverty (defined as living on < US$ 1.00 per day, US$ 1-2.00 per day and > US$ 2.00 per day) were analysed to impute the association between poverty and risk factors for each subregion. The possible effect of poverty reduction on the prevalence of risk factors was estimated using population-attributable risk percentages. There were strong associations between poverty and malnutrition among children, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, and being exposed to indoor air pollution within each subregion (relative risks were twofold to threefold greater for those living on < US$ 1.00 per day compared with those living on > US$ 2.00 per day). Associations between poverty and obesity, tobacco use and alcohol use varied across subregions. If everyone living on < US$ 2.00 per day had the risk factor profile of those living on > US$ 2.00 per day, 51% of exposures to unimproved water and sanitation could be avoided as could 37% of malnutrition among children and 38% of exposure to indoor air pollution. The more realistic, but still challenging, Millennium Development Goal of halving the number of people living on < US$ 1.00 per day would achieve much smaller reductions. To achieve large gains in global health requires both poverty eradication and public health action. The methods used in this study may be useful for monitoring pro-equity progress towards Millennium Development Goals.

  10. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: Epidemiology, microbiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruna; Ferreira, Carina; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Silva, Sónia

    2016-11-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection caused by Candida species that affects millions of women every year. Although Candida albicans is the main cause of VVC, the identification of non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species, especially Candida glabrata, as the cause of this infection, appears to be increasing. The development of VVC is usually attributed to the disturbance of the balance between Candida vaginal colonization and host environment by physiological or nonphysiological changes. Several host-related and behavioral risk factors have been proposed as predisposing factors for VVC. Host-related factors include pregnancy, hormone replacement, uncontrolled diabetes, immunosuppression, antibiotics, glucocorticoids use and genetic predispositions. Behavioral risk factors include use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine device, spermicides and condoms and some habits of hygiene, clothing and sexual practices. Despite a growing list of recognized risk factors, much remains to be elucidated as the role of host versus microorganisms, in inducing VVC and its recurrence. Thus, this review provides information about the current state of knowledge on the risk factors that predispose to VVC, also including a revision of the epidemiology and microbiology of VVC, as well as of Candida virulence factors associated with vaginal pathogenicity.

  11. Musculoskeletal Disorders and Agricultural Risk Factors Among Korean Farmers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mo-Yeol; Lee, Myeong-Jun; Chung, HweeMin; Shin, Dong-Hee; Youn, Kan-Woo; Im, Sang-Hyuk; Chae, Hye Seon; Lee, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    Farming is a strenuous occupation with various health risks, with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) being some of the most common. The risk factors for MSDs among Korean farmers are not well understood. Data were obtained from the Korean Farmers' Occupational Disease and Injury Survey (2012), which interviewed 16,113 participants regarding their demographic profiles, self-reported MSDs, and agricultural characteristics. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for MSDs. Subjects reported MSDs in the neck or upper extremities (5.89%), lower extremities (19.62%), and back (26.9%). Working in animal husbandry significantly increased the risk of MSDs in the neck/upper extremities, compared with irrigation farming (odds ratio: 1.837, 95% confidence interval: 1.130-2.987). The risk of MSDs increased significantly with number of years of farming, after adjusting for age and sex (neck/upper extremities, P for trend = .0002; lower extremities, <.001; back, <.001). Agriculture type, years of farming, and ergonomic factors increased the risk of MSDs among Korean farmers.

  12. Is ambient ethene a cancer risk factor?

    PubMed Central

    Törnqvist, M

    1994-01-01

    Ethene is, on a molar basis, a major urban air pollutant. It has been shown beyond doubt that a fraction of inhaled ethene is metabolized in mammals (including humans) via ethylene oxide, an electrophilic reagent that has been shown to be mutagenic and carcinogenic. To the extent that the linearity hypothesis for dose-response relationships at low levels is accepted, exposure to ethene is therefore expected to lead to a risk increment. In order to judge whether ethene as a single compound should be considered a risk factor, it has to be evaluated whether this risk increment is negligibly small or of concern to individuals or societies. The magnitude of the cancer risk from ethene cannot be inferred from animal experiments. Because of saturation of the metabolism of ethene, sufficient statistical power cannot be attained in long-term animal tests with about 100 animals per dose. By application of the radiation-dose equivalent of the unit of target dose of ethylene oxide and using the best (although still uncertain) value for the conversion factor (about 5%), exposure to 10 ppb ethene--a level occurring in urban areas--is expected to lead to a lifetime risk of cancer death amounting to approximately 70 per 100,000. According to a recent estimate the average exposure in Sweden to ethene is some six times lower. These figures are uncertain by a factor of at least three. They indicate ethene to be a risk factor of concern. PMID:7821290

  13. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  14. Environmental non-occupational risk factors associated with bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrís, J.; Berbel, O.; Alonso-López, J.; Garcia, J.; Ortega, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Context Bladder carcinoma (BC), due its high morbidity and relapsing course, generates significant economic and health care costs. Accordingly, we reviewed the environmental nonoccupational risk factors (RF), more or less evidence-based, in the etiology and pathogenesis of BC, because the involvement of urologists is essential for prevention. Acquisition of evidence Review of the peer-reviewed literature (1987–2012) on nonoccupational environmental RF associated with BC retrieved from Medline, Embase and Science Citation Index. The search profiles have been “Risk factors/Epidemiology/Tobacco-smoking/Diet-nutrition-water-liquids/Radiation/Infectious/Farmacological drugs” and “Bladder cancer”. Synthesis of evidence Smoking was associated with 50% of BC in both sexes. Smokers have a 2–5 times higher risk than nonsmokers, directly proportional to the amount and duration of addiction. Drinking water contaminated with arsenic and chromium chlorination byproducts increases the risk of BC. High consumption of red meat and saturated fat may increase the risk, while high intake of fruits and vegetables decreases it. Patients treated with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and ionizing radiation have an increased risk of BC. Frequent and prolonged use of hair dyes and Schistosoma haematobium infestation increases the risk of BC. Conclusions The reduction or the cessation of smoking decrease BC. The contaminant-free water consumption with the increase of vegetal foods favors BC prevention. Cancer survivors treated with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and radiation therapy should be monitored for early diagnosis of BC. PMID:23618510

  15. Environmental non-occupational risk factors associated with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrís, J; Berbel, O; Alonso-López, J; Garcia, J; Ortega, J A

    2013-10-01

    Bladder carcinoma (BC), due its high morbidity and relapsing course, generates significant economic and health care costs. Accordingly, review the environmental nonoccupational risk factors (RF), more or less evidence-based, in the etiology and pathogenesis of BC, because the involvement of urologists is essential for prevention. Review of the peer-reviewed literature (1987-2012) on nonoccupational environmental RF associated with BC retrieved from Medline, Embase and Science Citation Index. The search profiles have been "Risk factors/Epidemiology/Tobacco-smoking/Diet-nutrition-water-liquids/Radiation/Infectious/Farmacological drugs" and "Bladder cancer". Smoking was associated with 50% of BC in both sexes. Smokers have a 2-5 times higher risk than nonsmokers, directly proportional to the amount and duration of addiction. Drinking water contaminated with arsenic and chromium chlorination byproducts increases the risk of BC. High consumption of red meat and saturated fat may increase the risk, while high intake of fruits and vegetables decreases it. Patients treated with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and ionizing radiation have an increased risk of BC. Frequent and prolonged use of hair dyes and Schistosoma haematobium infestation increases the risk of BC. The reduction or the cessation of smoking decrease BC. The contaminant-free water consumption with the increase of vegetal foods favour BC prevention. Cancer survivors treated with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and radiation therapy should be monitored for early diagnosis of BC. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Recommendations from the EGAPP Working Group: genomic profiling to assess cardiovascular risk to improve cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    The Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Working Group (EWG) found insufficient evidence to recommend testing for the 9p21 genetic variant or 57 other variants in 28 genes (listed in ) to assess risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population, specifically heart disease and stroke. The EWG found that the magnitude of net health benefit from use of any of these tests alone or in combination is negligible. The EWG discourages clinical use unless further evidence supports improved clinical outcomes. Based on the available evidence, the overall certainty of net health benefit is deemed "Low." It has been suggested that an improvement in CVD risk classification (adjusting intermediate risk of CVD into high- or low-risk categories) might lead to management changes (e.g., earlier initiation or higher rates of medical interventions, or targeted recommendations for behavioral change) that improve CVD outcomes. In the absence of direct evidence to support this possibility, this review sought indirect evidence aimed at documenting the extent to which genomic profiling alters CVD risk estimation, alone and in combination with traditional risk factors, and the extent to which risk reclassification improves health outcomes. Assay-related evidence on available genomic profiling tests was deemed inadequate. However, based on existing technologies that have been or may be used and on data from two of the companies performing such testing, the analytic sensitivity and specificity of tests for individual gene variants might be at least satisfactory. Twenty-nine gene candidates were evaluated, with 58 different gene variant/disease associations. Evidence on clinical validity was rated inadequate for 34 of these associations (59%) and adequate for 23 (40%). Inadequate grades were based on limited evidence, poor replication, existence of possible biases, or combinations of these factors. For heart disease (25 combined associations) and stroke (13

  17. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molodecky, Natalie A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  18. The Reliability and Predictive Validity of the Stalking Risk Profile.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Troy E; Shea, Daniel E; Daffern, Michael; MacKenzie, Rachel D; Ogloff, James R P; Mullen, Paul E

    2016-06-14

    This study assessed the reliability and validity of the Stalking Risk Profile (SRP), a structured measure for assessing stalking risks. The SRP was administered at the point of assessment or retrospectively from file review for 241 adult stalkers (91% male) referred to a community-based forensic mental health service. Interrater reliability was high for stalker type, and moderate-to-substantial for risk judgments and domain scores. Evidence for predictive validity and discrimination between stalking recidivists and nonrecidivists for risk judgments depended on follow-up duration. Discrimination was moderate (area under the curve = 0.66-0.68) and positive and negative predictive values good over the full follow-up period (Mdn = 170.43 weeks). At 6 months, discrimination was better than chance only for judgments related to stalking of new victims (area under the curve = 0.75); however, high-risk stalkers still reoffended against their original victim(s) 2 to 4 times as often as low-risk stalkers. Implications for the clinical utility and refinement of the SRP are discussed.

  19. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  20. What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects a ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  1. What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... Cancer? Can Thymus Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  2. What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... not cancer). Other risk factors Family history of kidney cancer People with a strong family history of ...

  3. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  4. Genetic risk profiling for prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mihaescu, Raluca; Meigs, James; Sijbrands, Eric; Janssens, A. Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a common disease caused by a complex interplay between many genetic and environmental factors. Candidate gene studies and recent collaborative genome-wide association efforts revealed at least 38 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased risk of T2D. Genetic testing of multiple SNPs is considered a potentially useful tool for early detection of individuals at high diabetes risk leading to improved targeting of preventive interventions. PMID:21278902

  5. Perinatal risk factors and infantile autism.

    PubMed

    Maimburg, R D; Vaeth, M

    2006-10-01

    Suboptimal conditions during pregnancy and birth have been suggested as a cause of infantile autism. We have studied the association between obstetric factors and infantile autism. A population-based, matched case-control study of infantile autism. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The risk of infantile autism was increased for mothers aged >35 years, with foreign citizenship, and mothers who used medicine during pregnancy. A higher risk of infantile autism was seen among children with low birth weight and with congenital malformations. Birth interventions, pathological cardiotocography, green amnion fluid and acidosis during delivery were not associated with increased risk for infantile autism. Our findings suggest that suboptimal birth conditions are not an independent risk factor for infantile autism. A high prevalence of low birth weight and birth defects among autism cases seems to explain the suboptimal birth outcome.

  6. Risk profiling of schistosomiasis using remote sensing: approaches, challenges and outlook.

    PubMed

    Walz, Yvonne; Wegmann, Martin; Dech, Stefan; Raso, Giovanna; Utzinger, Jürg

    2015-03-17

    Schistosomiasis is a water-based disease that affects an estimated 250 million people, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The transmission of schistosomiasis is spatially and temporally restricted to freshwater bodies that contain schistosome cercariae released from specific snails that act as intermediate hosts. Our objective was to assess the contribution of remote sensing applications and to identify remaining challenges in its optimal application for schistosomiasis risk profiling in order to support public health authorities to better target control interventions. We reviewed the literature (i) to deepen our understanding of the ecology and the epidemiology of schistosomiasis, placing particular emphasis on remote sensing; and (ii) to fill an identified gap, namely interdisciplinary research that bridges different strands of scientific inquiry to enhance spatially explicit risk profiling. As a first step, we reviewed key factors that govern schistosomiasis risk. Secondly, we examined remote sensing data and variables that have been used for risk profiling of schistosomiasis. Thirdly, the linkage between the ecological consequence of environmental conditions and the respective measure of remote sensing data were synthesised. We found that the potential of remote sensing data for spatial risk profiling of schistosomiasis is - in principle - far greater than explored thus far. Importantly though, the application of remote sensing data requires a tailored approach that must be optimised by selecting specific remote sensing variables, considering the appropriate scale of observation and modelling within ecozones. Interestingly, prior studies that linked prevalence of Schistosoma infection to remotely sensed data did not reflect that there is a spatial gap between the parasite and intermediate host snail habitats where disease transmission occurs, and the location (community or school) where prevalence measures are usually derived from. Our findings imply that the

  7. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, G E

    1998-09-01

    A systematic review of the literature to identify risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection was conducted. Two main outcomes were considered: C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. A qualitative assessment, based on a set of defined and consistently applied criteria, appeared to be the best approach for risk factors other than antibiotic use, as an approach based on meta-analysis would have utilized only the information provided by a minority of the studies. Risk factors for which there was evidence suggestive or consistent with an association with C. difficile diarrhoea were: increasing age (excluding infancy), severity of underlying diseases, non-surgical gastrointestinal procedures, presence of a nasogastric tube, anti-ulcer medications, stay on ITU, duration of hospital stay, duration of antibiotic course, administration of multiple antibiotics. For malignant haematological disorders there was evidence of an association only with C. difficile carriage, but there were no suitable studies to explore a possible association of this risk factor with symptomatic infection. Antibiotic use lent itself to quantitative assessment with meta-analysis using logistic regression. Exposure to an antibiotic was shown to be statistically significantly associated with both C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. The meta-analysis approach enabled the ranking of individual antibiotics in relation to the risk of C. difficile infection, though the 95% confidence intervals were often wide and overlapping. Antibiotics associated with a lower risk of C. difficile diarrhoea should be considered, especially when attempting to control a C. difficile outbreak or when prescribing for a patient with other C. difficile risk factors. This systematic review of the literature enabled the identification of features it would be desirable to consider in future epidemiological studies.

  8. Risk and Protective Factors and Achievement of Children At Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Diane

    A study was done to identify social, economic, and childhood characteristics of high and low achieving children living in adverse environmental conditions, and to test the association between achievement and specific risk and protective factors. In addition, the study identified the most powerful model for predicting achievement by comparing…

  9. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  10. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusion Risk factor profiles for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress differ but are interrelated. Antenatal depression was the strongest predictor of postnatal depression, and in turn postnatal depression was the strongest predictor for parenting stress. These results provide clinical direction suggesting that early identification and treatment of perinatal depression is important. PMID:18412979

  11. The intake of a hazelnut skin extract improves the plasma lipid profile and reduces the lithocholic/deoxycholic bile acid faecal ratio, a risk factor for colon cancer, in hamsters fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Caimari, Antoni; Puiggròs, Francesc; Suárez, Manuel; Crescenti, Anna; Laos, Sirle; Ruiz, Juan Antonio; Alonso, Virginia; Moragas, Josep; Del Bas, Josep Maria; Arola, Lluís

    2015-01-15

    The effects on lipid and glucose metabolism of a hazelnut skin extract (FIBEROX™) administrated during 8 weeks (HFD-FBX8w group) or during the last 4 weeks of the study (HFD-FBX4w group) to Golden Syrian hamsters fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks were investigated. FIBEROX™ consumption reversed the increase in total and LDL plasma cholesterol induced by the HFD feeding in both HFD-FBX groups and decreased the circulating levels of free fatty acids and triglycerides in the HFD-FBX4w animals. The higher excretion of bile acids found in the faeces of both groups of hamsters fed the FIBEROX™ suggests that this mechanism is involved in the cholesterol-lowering effects of the extract. Furthermore, FIBEROX™ intake sharply decreased the lithocholic/deoxycholic bile acid faecal ratio, a risk factor for colon cancer, in both HFD-FBX groups. In conclusion, the consumption of FIBEROX™ improves different risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and colon cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future. PMID:24761206

  13. Community Violence, Protective Factors, and Adolescent Mental Health: A Profile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Copeland-Linder, Nikeea; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined interrelationships among community violence exposure, protective factors, and mental health in a sample of urban, predominantly African American adolescents (N = 504). Latent Profile Analysis was conducted to identify profiles of adolescents based on a combination of community violence exposure, self-worth, parental monitoring, and parental involvement and to examine whether these profiles differentially predict adolescents' depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior. Three classes were identified—a vulnerable class, a moderate risk/medium protection class, and a moderate risk/high protection class. The classes differentially predicted depressive symptoms but not aggressive behavior for boys and girls. The class with the highest community violence exposure also had the lowest self-worth. PMID:20390809

  14. A Person-Centered Analysis of Risk Factors that Compromise Wellbeing in Emerging Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Newcomb-Anjo, Sarah E; Barker, Erin T; Howard, Andrea L

    2016-11-08

    The transition to adulthood is a major life course transition that can pose risk to wellbeing. Research is needed to identify patterns of risk for compromised wellbeing, in order to best identify supports for individuals during this potentially vulnerable transition. The purpose of this study was to identify profiles of risk in an emerging adulthood sample, and to relate these profiles to mental health and subjective and academic wellbeing. Undergraduate emerging adults (N = 903, 82 % female), aged 18-25 years (M = 21.14, SD = 1.75), completed a series of questionnaires about risk factors, mental health, and academic variables. Results from a latent profile analysis identified four distinct risk profiles: Low Risk (76 %), Low Social Support Risk (4 %), Financial Risk (11 %), and Multiple Risk (8 %). The risk profiles were subsequently related to mental health and subjective and academic wellbeing outcomes, using a pseudo-class draws approach. Analyses indicated that the risk-pattern profiles differed in several ways across outcomes. Implications for targeted interventions are discussed.

  15. Risk factors and clinical profile of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Is this a distinctive clinical entity in the thrombotic microangiopathy spectrum?: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Merayo-Chalico, Javier; Demichelis-Gómez, Roberta; Rajme-López, Sandra; Aparicio-Vera, Luis; Barrera-Vargas, Ana; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge; Gómez-Martín, Diana

    2014-11-01

    The association of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is rare. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Information about risk factors and clinical outcomes is scant. A retrospective case-control study was performed in a referral center in Mexico City between 1994 and 2013. Patients were diagnosed with TTP if they fulfilled the following criteria: microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, high LDH levels, normal fibrinogen and negative Coombs' test. Patients with SLE were diagnosed with ≥ 4 ACR criteria. We included three study groups: group A included patients with SLE-associated TTP (TTP/SLE; cases n = 22, TTP events n = 24); patients with non-autoimmune TTP (NA-TTP; cases n = 19, TTP events n = 22) were included in group B and patients with SLE without TTP (n = 48) in group C. After multivariate analysis, lymphopenia < 1000/mm3 [OR 19.84, p = 0.037], high SLEDAI score three months prior to hospitalisation [OR 1.54, p = 0.028], Hg <7g/dL [OR 6.81, p = 0.026], low levels of indirect bilirubin [OR 0.51, p = 0.007], and less severe thrombocytopenia [OR 0.98, p = 0.009] were associated with TTP in SLE patients. Patients with TTP/SLE received increased cumulative steroid dose vs. NA-TTP (p = 0.006) and a higher number of immunosuppressive drugs (p = 0.015). Patients with TTP/SLE had higher survival than NA-TTP (p=0.033); however, patients hospitalised for TTP/SLE had a higher risk of death than lupus patients hospitalised for other causes Lymphopenia is an independent risk factor for TTP/SLE. It is likely that patients with TTP/SLE present with less evident clinical features, so the level of suspicion must be higher to avoid delay in treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk factors for sudden cardiac death among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ping-Yi; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Jhong, Jia-Rong; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2015-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from excessive premature mortality, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is receiving growing attention as a potential cause. The present study investigated the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in a large schizophrenia cohort. We enrolled a consecutive series of 8264 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (according to DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria) who were admitted to a psychiatric center in northern Taiwan from January 1, 1985 through December 31, 2008. By linking with national mortality database, 64 cases of SCD were identified. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for SCD was estimated. The cases were matched with controls randomly selected using risk-set sampling in a 1:2 ratio. A standardized chart review process was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and the prescribed drugs for each study subject. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify correlates of SCD at the index admission and the latest admission. The SMR for SCD was 4.5. For the clinical profiles at the index admission, physical disease (adjusted risk ratio [aRR]=2.91, P<.01) and aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.99, P<.01) were associated with the risk of SCD. Regarding the latest admission, electrocardiographic abnormalities (aRR=5.46, P<.05) and administration of first-generation antipsychotics (aRR=5.13, P<.01) elevated the risk for SCD. Consistently, aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.26, P<.05) were associated with increased risk as well. Apart from cardiovascular profiles and antipsychotics, physical aggression is a crucial risk factor that deserves ongoing work for clarifying the mechanisms mediating SCD in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiovascular risk profile: comparison between white and Southeast Asian youth in Wausau SCHOOL Project.

    PubMed

    Hanlin, Erin R; Hendricks, Bryan; Jenkins, Kirk; Olson, Karen; Murdock, David K

    2009-07-01

    The Wausau School Children Have Early Onset Of Leading Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Mellitus (SCHOOL) Project is a community-based effort to assess the cardiovascular (CV) health of students in the Wausau School District (WSD). It has been previously demonstrated that risk factors for CV disease are prevalent and increase with age. Wausau is also a major relocation center for Southeast Asian (SEA) immigrants. Few data are available on the CV health of SEA immigrants. This investigation compares the relative frequency of CV risk factors in SEA and white students in the WSD. A random selection of 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th grade students provided demographic data, health history, sex-adjusted body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose levels, blood pressure levels, and nuclear magnetic resonance lipid profiles (Liposcience). This included 519 white and 48 SEA students. To assess for CV disease risk factors, study participants were examined for dyslipidemia, hypertension, impaired fasting glucose levels, above-normal body weight, and history of smoking. Risk factors for CV disease increased with age for both white and SEA participants. The mean number of risk factors in SEA participants was 1.63 compared to 1.12 for white participants (P=0.016). The mean number of risk factors also increased significantly across grade levels (P=0.001). There was no difference in mean BMI values (P=0.58). No significant differences were found in triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure, or glucose values. Dyslipidemia was present in 53% of SEA students and 42% of white students (P=0.14). CV risk factors are common in school-age children, and the number of risk factors increases with age. SEA students presented a greater prevalence of CV risk factors than white students, but were not significantly more overweight. Interestingly, in a relatively short time period after immigration, first-generation SEA youth have developed a

  18. Risk factors for osteoporosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, J R; Dennerstein, L; Wark, J D

    2000-01-01

    Skeletal fragility and falls are the 2 most potent factors leading to osteoporotic fractures. The aim of this article is to review factors associated with women's risk of developing skeletal fragility and subsequent osteoporosis. Many factors have been implicated, but the evidence for some is unsubstantial. Low premenopausal bone mineral density (BMD), a decrease in BMD, and an increase in bone fragility -- which occur as a result of both aging and the menopause -- are major determinants of subsequent risk for osteoporotic fracture. In addition, low body mass index (BMI), low calcium intake, low physical activity, and smoking can affect BMD. The relative importance of the effects these physical and lifestyle factors have on BMD in midlife women is not fully established. The impact of gynecologic history (parity, lactation, oral contraceptive use, age of menarche) on BMD is uncertain.

  19. Gut Microbiome Associates With Lifetime Cardiovascular Disease Risk Profile Among Bogalusa Heart Study Participants.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tanika N; Bazzano, Lydia A; Ajami, Nadim J; He, Hua; Zhao, Jinying; Petrosino, Joseph F; Correa, Adolfo; He, Jiang

    2016-09-30

    Few studies have systematically assessed the influence of gut microbiota on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. To examine the association between gut microbiota and lifetime CVD risk profile among 55 Bogalusa Heart Study participants with the highest and 57 with the lowest lifetime burdens of CVD risk factors. 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing was conducted on microbial DNA extracted from stool samples of the Bogalusa Heart Study participants. α Diversity, including measures of richness and evenness, and individual genera were tested for associations with lifetime CVD risk profile. Multivariable regression techniques were used to adjust for age, sex, and race (model 1), along with body mass index (model 2) and both body mass index and diet (model 3). In model 1, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each SD increase in richness, measured by the number of observed operational taxonomic units, Chao 1 index, and abundance-based coverage estimator, were 0.62 (0.39-0.99), 0.61 (0.38-0.98), and 0.63 (0.39-0.99), respectively. Associations were consistent in models 2 and 3. Four genera were enriched among those with high versus low CVD risk profile in all models. Model 1 P values were 2.12×10(-3), 7.95×10(-5), 4.39×10(-4), and 1.51×10(-4) for Prevotella 2, Prevotella 7, Tyzzerella, and Tyzzerella 4, respectively. Two genera were depleted among those with high versus low CVD risk profile in all models. Model 1 P values were 2.96×10(-6) and 1.82×10(-4) for Alloprevotella and Catenibacterium, respectively. The current study identified associations of overall microbial richness and 6 microbial genera with lifetime CVD risk. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Risk factors analysis of consecutive exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Qianwen; Wei, Hong; Zhou, Xu; Li, Ziyuan; Liu, Longqian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate clinical factors associated with the onset of consecutive exotropia (XT) following esotropia surgery. By a retrospective nested case-control design, we reviewed the medical records of 193 patients who had undergone initial esotropia surgery between 2008 and 2015, and had follow-up longer than 6 months. The probable risk factors were evaluated between groups 1 (consecutive XT) and 2 (non-consecutive exotropia). Pearson chi-square test and Mann–Whitney U test were used for univariate analysis, and conditional logistic regression model was applied for exploring the potential risk factors of consecutive XT. Consecutive exotropia occurred in 23 (11.9%) of 193 patients. Patients who had undergone large bilateral medial rectus recession (BMR) (P = 0.017) had a high risk of developing consecutive XT. Oblique dysfunction (P = 0.001), adduction limitation (P = 0.000) were associated with a high risk of consecutive XT, which was confirmed in the conditional logistic regression analysis. In addition, large amount of BMR (6 mm or more) was associated with higher incidence of adduction limitation (P = 0.045). The surgical methods and preoperative factors did not appear to influence the risk of developing consecutive XT (P > 0.05). The amount of surgery could be optimized to reduce the risk of consecutive XT. The presence of oblique overaction and postoperative adduction limitation may be associated with a high risk of consecutive XT, which may require close supervision, and/or even earlier operation intervention. PMID:27977611

  1. Cerebrovascular risk factors and clinical classification of strokes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Fernandez, Paola; Licata, Giuseppe

    2004-08-01

    Cerebrovascular risk represents a progressive and evolving concept owing to the particular distribution of risk factors in patients with ischemic stroke and in light of the newest stroke subtype classifications that account for pathophysiological, instrumental, and clinical criteria. Age represents the strongest nonmodifiable risk factor associated with ischemic stroke, while hypertension constitutes the most important modifiable cerebrovascular risk factor, confirmed by a host of epidemiological data and by more recent intervention trials of primary (HOT, Syst-Eur, LIFE) and secondary (PROGRESS) prevention of stroke in hypertensive patients. To be sure, a curious relationship exists between stroke and diabetes. Although the Framingham Study, The Honolulu Heart Program, and a series of Finnish studies reported a linear relationship between improved glucose metabolism and cerebral ischemia, the clinical and prognostic profile of diabetic patients with ischemic stroke remains to be fully understood. Our group, on the basis of TOAST classification--a diagnostic classification of ischemic stroke developed in 1993 that distinguishes five different clinical subtypes of ischemic stroke: large-artery atherosclerosis (LAAS), cardioembolic infarct (CEI), lacunar infarct (LAC), stroke of other determined origin (ODE), and stroke of undetermined origin (UDE), and now extensively used in clinical and scientific context--analysed the prevalence of cerebrovascular risk factors and the distribution of TOAST subtypes in more 300 patients with acute ischemic stroke in two consecutives studies that reported the significant association between diabetes and the lacunar subtype and a better clinical outcome for diabetic patients, most likely related to the higher prevalence of the lacunar subtype. Well-confirmed are the roles of cigarette smoking, atrial fibrillation, and asymptomatic carotid stenosis as cerebrovascular risk factors. Particularly interesting seems to be the function of

  2. Risk factors for mortality in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uppal, H; Chandran, S; Potluri, R

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition that contributes to a significantly shorter life expectancy compared with the general population. We investigated the most common comorbidities in a population of acute hospital patients with Down syndrome and further explored what the most common risk factors for mortality are within this population. From our database of one million patients admitted to National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in northern England, we identified 558 people who had Down syndrome. We compared this group with an age- and gender-matched control group of 5580 people. The most prevalent comorbid diseases within the Down's population were hypothyroidism (22.9%) and epilepsy (20.3%). However, the conditions that had the highest relative risks (RRs) in the Down's population were septal defects and dementia. Respiratory failure, dementia and pneumonia were the most significantly related comorbidities to mortality in the Down syndrome population. In the control population, respiratory failure, dementia and renal failure were the most significant disease contributors. When these contributors were analysed using multivariate analysis, heart failure, respiratory failure, pneumonia and epilepsy were the identified risk factors for in-hospital mortality in the Down syndrome population. Respiratory failure was the sole risk factor for mortality in the Down syndrome population [RR = 9.791 (1.6-59.9) P ≤ 0.05], when compared with the risk factors for mortality in the control population. There is significant medical morbidity in Down syndrome. This morbidity contributes to the lower life expectancy. Respiratory failure is a risk factor for mortality in Down syndrome. We need to thoroughly investigate people with Down syndrome to ensure any treatable illnesses are well managed. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Nursing diagnoses, related factors and risk factors during the postoperative period following bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rosa Aparecida Nogueira; Caetano, Joselany Áfio; Barros, Lívia Moreira; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2013-02-01

    The objective was to identify the main diagnoses, related factors and risk factors regarding the cardiovascular/pulmonary responses class proposed by NANDA version 2009-2011. This case series descriptive study was performed with twenty patients who underwent bariatric surgery in a public hospital in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Data were collected by two intensive care unit nurse specialists through interviews, physical examinations and the reviewing of medical records, and analyzed through descriptive statistics and cross-mapping. The nursing diagnoses identified with a frequency greater than 50% were: decreased cardiac output (75%), ineffective breathing patterns (65%), dysfunctional ventilatory weaning response (55%) and ineffective peripheral tissue perfusion (75%); in addition, fourteen related factors and five risk factors were identified. We verified the need for further studies to better define the diagnostic profile of these patients in order to direct nursing care towards the early detection of complications.

  4. Risk factors associated with sacral stress fractures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Kristi; Bartsokas, Jenna; Averell, Kristina; McBride, Erin; Long, Christine; Cook, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine and identify risk factors associated with the development of sacral stress fractures in order to improve diagnosis in clinical practice. Methods: Electronic search strategies in PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and SPORTDiscus were combined with a hand search to identify articles for inclusion. Studies were considered if they described patient cases in which imaging confirmed diagnosis of a sacral stress fracture, and the diagnosis included whether the fracture was a sacral insufficiency or sacral fatigue stress fracture. Results: In those that developed sacral insufficiency fractures, the risk factors that were most prevalent included osteoporosis, pelvic radiation therapy, rheumatoid arthritis, long-term corticosteroid therapy, and postmenopausal, each with a prevalence of 100%. Risk factors with 100% prevalence in those diagnosed with sacral fatigue fractures included recent increase in training intensity and deficient diet. Discussion: A pattern of signs and symptoms are consistent among subjects with sacral stress fractures. Patients being unsuccessfully treated for low-back and buttock pain who fit the risk factor profiles for sacral stress fractures should be referred to a physician for further diagnostic workup. PMID:26109829

  5. Constitutional and occupational risk factors associated with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrís, J; Garcia, J; Berbel, O; Ortega, J A

    2013-09-01

    Bladder carcinoma (BC) is the fourth most common type of cancer in males from Western countries, with primary prevention an important healthcare challenge. We review the associated constitutional and occupational risk factors (RF), with greater or lesser scientific evidence, in the aetiology of BC. Literature review of the last 25 years of the constitutional and occupational RF associated with BC, conducted on MedLine, CancerLit, Science Citation Index and Embase. The search profiles were Risk factors/Genetic factors/Genetic polymorphisms/Epidemiology/Occupational factors and Bladder cancer. The main RF were a) age and gender (diagnosed at age 65 and over, with a 4:1 ratio of males to females); b) race, ethnicity and geographic location (predominantly in Caucasians and in Southern European countries); c) genetic (N-acetyltransferase-2 and glutathione s-transferase M1 gene mutations, which significantly increase the risk for BC); d) occupational, which represent 5%-10% of BC RF; and f) occupations with high BC risk, such as aluminium production, the manufacture of dyes, paints and colourings, the rubber industry and the extraction and industrial use of fossil fuels. BC is the end result of the variable combination of constitutional and environmental RF, the majority of which are unknown. The most significant constitutional RF are related to age, gender, race, ethnicity geographic location and genetic polymorphisms. The main occupational RF are those related to aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Constitutional and occupational risk factors associated with bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrís, J.; Garcia, J.; Berbel, O.; Ortega, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bladder carcinoma (BC) is the fourth most common type of cancer in males from Western countries, with primary prevention an important healthcare challenge. We review the associated constitutional and occupational risk factors (RF), with greater or lesser scientific evidence, in the etiology of BC. Material and methods Literature review of the last 25 years of the constitutional and occupational RF associated with BC, conducted on MedLine, CancerLit, Science Citation Index and Embase. The search profiles were Risk factors/Genetic factors/Genetic polymorphisms/Epidemiology/Occupational factors and Bladder cancer. Results The main RF were (a) age and gender (diagnosed at age 65 and over, with a 4:1 ratio of males to females); (b) race, ethnicity and geographic location (predominantly in Caucasians and in Southern European countries); (c) genetic (N-acetyltransferase-2 and glutathione s-transferase M1 gene mutations, which significantly increase the risk for BC); (d) occupational, which represent 5–10% of BC RF; and (f) occupations with high BC risk, such as aluminum production, the manufacture of dyes, paints and colourings, the rubber industry and the extraction and industrial use of fossil fuels. Conclusions BC is the end result of the variable combination of constitutional and environmental RF, the majority of which are unknown. The most significant constitutional RF are related to age, gender, race, ethnicity geographic location and genetic polymorphisms. The main occupational RF are those related to aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:23664103

  7. Risk factors for child maltreatment in an Australian population-based birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Doidge, James C; Higgins, Daryl J; Delfabbro, Paul; Segal, Leonie

    2017-02-01

    Child maltreatment and other adverse childhood experiences adversely influence population health and socioeconomic outcomes. Knowledge of the risk factors for child maltreatment can be used to identify children at risk and may represent opportunities for prevention. We examined a range of possible child, parent and family risk factors for child maltreatment in a prospective 27-year population-based birth cohort of 2443 Australians. Physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, neglect and witnessing of domestic violence were recorded retrospectively in early adulthood. Potential risk factors were collected prospectively during childhood or reported retrospectively. Associations were estimated using bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions and combined into cumulative risk scores. Higher levels of economic disadvantage, poor parental mental health and substance use, and social instability were strongly associated with increased risk of child maltreatment. Indicators of child health displayed mixed associations and infant temperament was uncorrelated to maltreatment. Some differences were observed across types of maltreatment but risk profiles were generally similar. In multivariate analyses, nine independent risk factors were identified, including some that are potentially modifiable: economic disadvantage and parental substance use problems. Risk of maltreatment increased exponentially with the number of risk factors experienced, with prevalence of maltreatment in the highest risk groups exceeding 80%. A cumulative risk score based on the independent risk factors allowed identification of individuals at very high risk of maltreatment, while a score that incorporated all significant risk and protective factors provided better identification of low-risk individuals.

  8. Identifying Risk and Protective Factors in Recidivist Juvenile Offenders: A Decision Tree Approach.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Campos, Elena; García-García, Juan; Gil-Fenoy, Maria José; Zaldívar-Basurto, Flor

    2016-01-01

    Research on juvenile justice aims to identify profiles of risk and protective factors in juvenile offenders. This paper presents a study of profiles of risk factors that influence young offenders toward committing sanctionable antisocial behavior (S-ASB). Decision tree analysis is used as a multivariate approach to the phenomenon of repeated sanctionable antisocial behavior in juvenile offenders in Spain. The study sample was made up of the set of juveniles who were charged in a court case in the Juvenile Court of Almeria (Spain). The period of study of recidivism was two years from the baseline. The object of study is presented, through the implementation of a decision tree. Two profiles of risk and protective factors are found. Risk factors associated with higher rates of recidivism are antisocial peers, age at baseline S-ASB, problems in school and criminality in family members.

  9. Identifying Risk and Protective Factors in Recidivist Juvenile Offenders: A Decision Tree Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Campos, Elena; García-García, Juan; Gil-Fenoy, Maria José; Zaldívar-Basurto, Flor

    2016-01-01

    Research on juvenile justice aims to identify profiles of risk and protective factors in juvenile offenders. This paper presents a study of profiles of risk factors that influence young offenders toward committing sanctionable antisocial behavior (S-ASB). Decision tree analysis is used as a multivariate approach to the phenomenon of repeated sanctionable antisocial behavior in juvenile offenders in Spain. The study sample was made up of the set of juveniles who were charged in a court case in the Juvenile Court of Almeria (Spain). The period of study of recidivism was two years from the baseline. The object of study is presented, through the implementation of a decision tree. Two profiles of risk and protective factors are found. Risk factors associated with higher rates of recidivism are antisocial peers, age at baseline S-ASB, problems in school and criminality in family members. PMID:27611313

  10. Foetal nutritional status and cardiovascular risk profile among children.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Sempos, Christopher

    2007-10-01

    To estimate the impact of foetal nutritional status on cardiovascular risk among children with the Foetal Nutritional Status Index (FNSI), calculated by dividing the child's birth weight (BW, kg) by the mother's height (m2). Cross-sectional survey analysis. A sample of children from the US Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A total of 3109 children who were 5-11 years of age and had data on BW and mother's height. Non-fasting blood samples were included. Overall, the FNSI was positively associated with BW and negatively associated with mother's height (P<0.0001). Within sex-specific quintiles of FNSI (third quintile as reference) adjusted for potential confounding variables, cardiovascular risk factors tended to be 'higher' in the lower quintiles for males while the opposite was true for females. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that the odds for males in quintile 1 was 2.4 for having a low level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P<0.01) and 2.1 for having a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (P=0.01); for females, the odds of having a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors was approximately two times higher for those in the first and fifth quintiles, who also had a significantly higher prevalence of central obesity. The FNSI may be a potential proxy indicator of foetal nutritional status and it may be used to test specific hypotheses of whether foetal nutrition restriction or overnutrition programmes future cardiovascular risk.

  11. Natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy: a practical approach to risk profiling and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hunt, David; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2012-02-01

    Natalizumab reduces relapse frequency, delays onset of disease progression and improves disease outcomes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and is a cost-effective treatment for rapidly evolving severe relapsing-remitting MS. However, it is associated with the development of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML), a serious opportunistic brain infection caused by a neurotropic strain of the JC virus (JCV). Until May 2011, 83 300 patients had received natalizumab for MS. One hundred and twenty-four patients had developed PML, of whom 23 (19%) died. In order to maximise the benefit-risk ratio of natalizumab for MS patients it is important to develop a strategy for risk profiling and monitoring for PML. Central to this is an understanding of the biology of the JCV and the emerging clinical picture of natalizumab-associated PML. This paper reviews the evidence for managing the risk of PML in natalizumab-treated patients and the authors propose an algorithm for risk profiling and risk management. Key features of this algorithm include risk stratification based on emerging risk factors, heightened clinical vigilance for the clinical features of natalizumab-associated PML and considerations for temporary and permanent cessation of natalizumab dosing.

  12. Risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Gjonbrataj, Endri; Kim, Ji Na; Gjonbrataj, Juarda; Jung, Hye In; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Won-Il

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods This retrospective cohort study included 237 patients with PE. Patients that had transient risk factors at diagnosis were classified as having provoked PE, with the remaining patients being classified as having unprovoked PE. The baseline clinical characteristics and factors associated with coagulation were compared. We evaluated the risk factors associated with provoked PE. Results Of the 237 PE patients, 73 (30.8%) had provoked PE. The rate of respiratory failure and infection, as well as the disseminated intravascular coagulation score and ratio of right ventricular diameter to left ventricular diameter were significantly higher in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. The protein and activity levels associated with coagulation, including protein C antigen, protein S antigen, protein S activity, anti-thrombin III antigen, and factor VIII, were significantly lower in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. Multivariate analysis showed that infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 7.4) and protein S activity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99) were significantly associated with provoked PE. Conclusions Protein S activity and presence of infection were important factors associated with provoked PE. We should pay attention to the presence of infection in patients with provoked PE. PMID:27097772

  13. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Marc P.; Inge, Thomas H.; Simmons, Mark; Jenkins, Todd M.; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Brandt, Mary L.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Courcoulas, Anita; Chen, Michael; Horlick, Mary; Daniels, Stephen R.; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Severe obesity is increasingly common in the adolescent population but, as of yet, very little information exists regarding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks in this group. OBJECTIVE To assess the baseline prevalence and predictors of CVD risks among severely obese adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective cohort study was conducted from February 28, 2007, to December 30, 2011, at the following 5 adolescent weight-loss surgery centers in the United States: Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio; Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Children’s Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham. Consecutive patients aged 19 years or younger were offered enrollment in a long-term outcome study; the final analysis cohort consisted of 242 participants. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES This report examined the preoperative prevalence of CVD risk factors (ie, fasting hyperinsulinemia, elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, impaired fasting glucose levels, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) and associations between risk factors and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Preoperative data were collected within 30 days preceding bariatric surgery. RESULTS The mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years and median body mass index was 50.5. Cardiovascular disease risk factor prevalence was fasting hyperinsulinemia (74%), elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (75%), dyslipidemia (50%), elevated blood pressure (49%), impaired fasting glucose levels (26%), and diabetes mellitus (14%). The risk of impaired fasting glucose levels, elevated blood pressure, and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels increased by 15%, 10%, and 6%, respectively, per 5-unit

  14. Lipid profile of coronary risk subjects following yogic lifestyle intervention.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, A S; Reddy, K S; Sachdeva, U

    1999-01-01

    The effect of yogic lifestyle on the lipid status was studied in angina patients and normal subjects with risk factors of coronary artery disease. The parameters included the body weight, estimation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and the cholesterol - HDL ratio. A baseline evaluation was done and then the angina patients and risk factors subjects were randomly assigned as control (n = 41) and intervention (yoga) group (n = 52). Lifestyle advice was given to both the groups. An integrated course of yoga training was given for four days followed by practice at home. Serial evaluation of both the groups was done at four, 10 and 14 weeks. Dyslipidemia was a constant feature in all cases. An inconsistent pattern of change was observed in the control group of angina (n = 18) and risk factor subjects (n = 23). The subjects practising yoga showed a regular decrease in all lipid parameters except HDL. The effect started from four weeks and lasted for 14 weeks. Thus, the effect of yogic lifestyle on some of the modifiable risk factors could probably explain the preventive and therapeutic beneficial effect observed in coronary artery disease.

  15. Exploring Risk Factors for Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambinder, Alexander J.; Shenoy, Pareen J.; Malik, Neha; Maggioncalda, Alison; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent malignancy of germinal center B cells with varied incidence across racial groups and geographic regions. Improvements in the classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes provide an opportunity to explore associations between environmental exposures and FL incidence. Our paper found that aspects of Western lifestyle including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and diets high in meat and milk are associated with an increased risk of FL. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, and certain antioxidants are inversely associated with FL risk. A medical history of Sjogren's syndrome, influenza vaccination, and heart disease may be associated with FL incidence. Associations between FL and exposure to pesticides, industrial solvents, hair dyes, and alcohol/tobacco were inconsistent. Genetic risk factors include variants at the 6p21.32 region of the MHC II locus, polymorphisms of the DNA repair gene XRCC3, and UV exposure in individuals with certain polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor. Increasing our understanding of risk factors for FL must involve integrating epidemiological studies of genetics and exposures to allow for the examination of risk factors and interactions between genes and environment. PMID:23028387

  16. [Risk factors in police activities: operational criticism in surveillance programs].

    PubMed

    Ciprani, Fabrizio; Moroni, Maria; Conte, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The planning of specific health surveillance programs for police officers is extremely complex due to difficulty in predictability and variety of occupational hazards. Even in the case of conventional occupational risk factors clearly identified by current regulations, particular working conditions may require specific assessment to effectively identify and quantify the risk of occupational exposure. An extensive program of health surveillance, aimed at promoting overall health and effectiveness of the operators, would be really desirable, in order to help better address a number of risks that cannot be easily predicted. The progressive increase in the average age of the working population and the increasing prevalence of chronic degenerative diseases, may also suggest the need for health surveillance procedures designed to verify continued unqualified suitability to police service, providing for the identification of diversified suitability profiles in relation to age and state of health: accordingly, in regard to our field of interest, there is a close link between medico-legal eligibility and occupational medicine.

  17. Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

  18. Oral cancer risk factors in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Yakin, Muhammed; Gavidi, Ratu Osea; Cox, Brian; Rich, Alison

    2017-03-03

    Oral cancer constitutes the majority of head and neck cancers, which are the fifth most common malignancy worldwide, accounting for an estimated 984,430 cases in 2012. Between 2000 and 2010, there were 1,916 cases of OSCC in New Zealand with a male to female ratio of 1.85:1, and an age-standardised incidence rate of 42 persons per 1,000,000 population. This article presents an overview of the main risk factors for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and their prevalence in New Zealand. Alcohol consumption is the most prevalent risk factor in New Zealand, followed by tobacco. Given the high prevalence of these two risk factors and their synergistic effect, it is important for doctors and dentists to encourage smoking cessation in smokers and to recommend judicious alcohol intake. Research is needed to determine the prevalence of use of oral preparations of tobacco and water-pipe smoking in New Zealand, especially due to changing demography and increases in migrant populations. UV radiation is also an important risk factor. Further investigations are also needed to determine the prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal cancers attributable to oncogenic HPV infection.

  19. Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

  20. Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

  1. Risk Factors for Paternal Physical Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shawna J.; Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Yookyong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study uses the developmental-ecological framework to examine a comprehensive set of paternal factors hypothesized to be linked to risk for paternal child abuse (PCA) among a diverse sample of fathers. Attention was given to fathers' marital status and their race/ethnicity (White, African American, and Hispanic). Methods: Interviews…

  2. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  3. Risk factors for osteoporosis and associated fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, J L

    1989-01-01

    Established risk factors for osteoporosis and associated fractures are increasing age, female sex, white race, removal of the ovaries at an early age, prolonged immobility, and prolonged use of corticosteroids. Obesity and use of estrogen replacement therapy are protective. Factors that probably or possibly increase risk in postmenopausal white women include a low calcium intake, cigarette smoking, and, at least for hip fractures, use of long half-life psychotrophic drugs and heavy alcohol consumption. Factors probably or possibly associated with a decreased risk include ingestion of vitamin D and its metabolites, fluoride levels of 2 ppm or more in drinking water, moderate physical activity, pregnancies and breast feeding, use of thiazide diuretics, and progestogens. Some evidence suggests that calcium intake and physical activity at young ages may be important determinants of peak bone mass. Few studies have been undertaken in males and blacks, although at least some risk factors in males may be similar to those in females. Preventive efforts may be aimed at increasing peak bone mass at young ages, preventing bone loss in postmenopausal women, and preventing fractures and their adverse consequences in older people with osteoporosis. PMID:2517695

  4. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

  5. Risk Factors for Rural Residential Fires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Yang, Jingzhen; Zwerling, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural households report high fire-related mortality and injury rates, but few studies have examined the risk factors for fires. This study aims to identify occupant and household characteristics that are associated with residential fires in a rural cohort. Methods: Of 1,005 households contacted in a single rural county, 691…

  6. Child sexual assault: risk factors for girls.

    PubMed

    Butler, Amy C

    2013-09-01

    To identify prospectively measured risk factors of sexual assault (SA) among girls age 17 and younger. The data come from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and are derived from interviews with 1,087 girls, their primary caregivers, and household heads. The data were collected from the girls' first year of life through their early twenties. Factors measured during childhood were used to predict whether the girls experienced a subsequent first sexual assault before the age of 18. Prospectively measured risk factors associated with subsequent child SA included the absence of one or both parents, maternal education less than college, family income below 400% of the federal poverty threshold, low caregiver warmth, child internalizing and externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, low achievement scores, and having been classified by their school as needing special education. Girls with behavioral health problems and learning challenges are at heightened risk for sexual assault. Research on behavioral health consequences of SA should control for preexisting SA risk factors to more accurately estimate the impact of child SA on subsequent behavioral health.

  7. Environmental Risk Factors in Hospital Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Daniel Z.; Resnik, Harvey L.P.; Holder-Perkins, Vicenzio

    2004-01-01

    Suicide of hospitalized patients is the most common sentinel event reviewed by The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Shorter lengths of stay, sicker patients, and higher patient to staff ratios challenge the ability of the hospital to maintain safety. Risk factors associated with the physical environment of the…

  8. Risk Factors for Rural Residential Fires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Yang, Jingzhen; Zwerling, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural households report high fire-related mortality and injury rates, but few studies have examined the risk factors for fires. This study aims to identify occupant and household characteristics that are associated with residential fires in a rural cohort. Methods: Of 1,005 households contacted in a single rural county, 691…

  9. Risk Factors for Depression in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhee, Angela R.; Andrews, Jac J. W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify salient risk factors for depression in early adolescence from a group of common predictors. The following nine predictors were examined: (1) perceived quality of peer relationships, (2) perceived parental nurturance, (3) perceived parental rejection, (4) self-esteem, (5) body image, (6) pubertal status,…

  10. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  11. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

  12. Risk Factors for Depression in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhee, Angela R.; Andrews, Jac J. W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify salient risk factors for depression in early adolescence from a group of common predictors. The following nine predictors were examined: (1) perceived quality of peer relationships, (2) perceived parental nurturance, (3) perceived parental rejection, (4) self-esteem, (5) body image, (6) pubertal status,…

  13. Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

  14. Environmental Risk Factors in Hospital Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Daniel Z.; Resnik, Harvey L.P.; Holder-Perkins, Vicenzio

    2004-01-01

    Suicide of hospitalized patients is the most common sentinel event reviewed by The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Shorter lengths of stay, sicker patients, and higher patient to staff ratios challenge the ability of the hospital to maintain safety. Risk factors associated with the physical environment of the…

  15. The risk factors of CVA in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Auais, Mohammad A; Alzyoud, Jehad M; Sbieh, Ziad; Abdulla, Fuad A

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to identify the main risk factors of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in Jordan. Identification of risk factors may help to reduce the incidence of CVA. A form was prepared for data collection which consisted of two parts to gather biodata and the incidence of risk factors. A sample of 200 patients with CVA (60% men) were randomly selected from various areas of Jordan. An age, region distribution, and gender-matched sample were selected to serve as control. Hypertension in the experimental group (66%) was significantly higher than the control group (32%) p  <  0.001. Half of the subjects with stroke had diabetes compared to 22% of the control group (p  <  0.001). Cardiovascular diseases were found in 29% of subjects with CVA compared to 14% in the control group (p  <  0.001). About 27% of the CVA group had hyperlipidemia in comparison to 13% in the controls (p <  0.002). Smokers represented 54% of the experimental group compared to 30% of the control group (p <  0.05). An important finding in the present study was that about half of the selected subjects with strokes were under the age of 60 years. In conclusion, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hyperlipidemia, and smoking are risk factors for CVA in Jordan.

  16. Biological risk factors for deep vein trombosis.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Mira, Yolanda; Martínez, Marcial; Villa, Piedad; Ferrando, Fernando; Estellés, Amparo; Corella, Dolores; Aznar, Justo

    2002-01-01

    Hypercoagulable states due either to inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors are only present in approximately half of cases of DVT, but the causes in the other half, remain unknown. The importance of biological risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypofibrinolysis and hemorheological alterations in the pathogenesis of DVT has not been well established. In order to ascertain whether the above mentioned biological factors are associated with DVT and could constitute independent risk factors, we carried out a case-control study in 109 first DVT patients in whom inherited or acquired thrombophilic risk factors had been ruled out and 121 healthy controls age (42+/-15 years) and sex matched. From all the biological variables analyzed (cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, fibrinogen, erythrocyte aggregation, hematocrit, plasma viscosity and PAI-1) only fibrinogen concentration reached a statistically significant difference on the comparison of means (290+/-73 mg/dl in cases vs 268+/-58 mg/dl in controls, p<0.05). After this continuous variables were dichotomized according to our reference values, the percentage of cases with cholesterolemia >220 mg/dl, hematocrit >45% and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl was higher in cases than in controls: 38% vs 22%; p<0.01; 43% vs 27%; p<0.05; 36% vs 23%; p<0.05, respectively. The percentage of cases with PAI-1 values >30 ng/ml, 37% vs 25% was borderline significant; p=0.055. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that cholesterolemia >220 mg/dl and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl constitute independent predictors of venous thrombotic risk. The adjusted OR's were 2.03 (95% CI; 1.12-3.70) for cholesterolemia and 1.94 (95% CI; 1.07-3.55) for fibrinogen. When these two variables combined DVT risk rose about fourfold (3.96; p<0.05). Our results suggest that hypercholesterolemia and hyperfibrinogenemia should be added to the list of known DVT risk factors and we recommend adopting measures to decrease these variables in the population with a

  17. Roles of liver fluke infection as risk factor for cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Kiatsopit, Nadda; Pairojkul, Chawalit

    2014-05-01

    Several factors are known to be associated with risk of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and infection with the liver flukes, Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis, has often been singled out as the leading risk factor in east and southeast Asia. In this review, current knowledge of their biology, life cycle, and pathogenesis of O. viverrini, and its role as a carcinogenic parasite are presented. The trends of age-specific incidence of liver cancer in Khon Kaen, northeast Thailand are considered and compared with the prevalence profiles of O. viverrini. Potential impacts of the liver fluke control program particularly by mass drug administration (MDA) and public health education in the past and a recent drop of incidence of CCA are discussed in relation to primary prevention and control of this fatal bile duct cancer. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  18. Gastric cancer risk factors in subjects with family history.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S E; Ferraroni, M; La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A

    1997-02-01

    Until now, it has been unclear whether there are differences in various risk factor profiles for familial gastric cancer, i.e., gastric cancer among subjects with a family history of the disease. A total of 722 gastric cancer patients and 2024 controls were admitted between 1985 and 1992 to a network of hospitals in the Greater Milan area. Of these, 88 cases and 103 controls who reported a family history of gastric cancer in first degree relatives were considered in the present analysis. There was no relationship between gastric cancer risk and tobacco smoking or alcohol drinking. Shorter duration of electrical refrigerator use was related to a nonsignificant increased risk and a high daily meal frequency was associated with an increased gastric cancer risk. Significant direct trends of risk were observed for pasta (odds ratio, OR = 4.20 for the highest versus the lowest tertile), bread (OR, 2.86), red meat (OR, 3.38), and preserved meat (OR, 1.90). Inverse associations were observed for increasing consumption of selected vegetables and fruits, chiefly peppers (OR = 0.31), total fruits (OR, 0.47), and citrus fruits (OR, 0.38). With reference to selected micronutrients, a significant inverse trend in risk with increasing consumption for beta-carotene (OR, 0.27) and ascorbic acid (OR, 0.20) was observed. These results suggest that dietary risk factors for subjects with a family history of gastric cancer in first-degree relatives are not appreciably different from well-established risk factors of the disease in the general population.

  19. [Risk factors analysis of cardiovascular diseases. Is the Life Style Assessment useful?].

    PubMed

    Bye, A

    1997-08-10

    The Norwegian Medical Association's Health Control Handbook (1993) has introduced a lifestyle risk analysis-a paper-based way of assessing risk factors for cardiovascular disease and transferring them into pedagogic risk scores. By using the lifestyle risk analysis in our data based risk profile system LIVDA, we compared and evaluated the two systems through 437 consultations at our Occupational Health Clinic. The lifestyle risk analysis is a pedagogic tool, as compared with the unsystematic clinical information recorded in journals. We found only small differences between the lifestyle risk analysis and LIVDA, except when assessing total cholesterol and physical exercise. Lifestyle risk analysis does not, however, allow categorisation of risk factor values without adjustments, and does not include all relevant risk factors. Further, there are no possibilities of measuring motivation, or for selecting patients for group intervention.

  20. [Sexual risk factors among European young people].

    PubMed

    Calatrava, María; López-Del Burgo, Cristina; de Irala, Jokin

    2012-05-05

    The sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) in Europe are still rising. In order to prioritize STI prevention strategies in Europe, it is important to describe the prevalence of different sexual risk factors for STIs among European young people. We carried out a systematic review of published articles and studies performed by European institutions. A total of 21 articles and 10 studies were identified. The data shows an increase in early sexual initiation and the number of sexual partners. Young people who use condoms inconsistently ranged from 15 to 20%. The observed risk factors are: unawareness about other STIs different from HIV, being in favour of casual sex, wrongly believing that some measures are effective in avoiding HIV, not being aware of the risks from having multiple sexual partners and unawareness about the sexual transmission of HIV. The data suggests the need to improve the information addressed to youth.

  1. Risk factors associated with lambing traits.

    PubMed

    McHugh, N; Berry, D P; Pabiou, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the risk factors associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality in the Irish sheep multibreed population. A total of 135 470 lambing events from 42 675 ewes in 839 Irish crossbred and purebred flocks were available. Risk factors associated with producer-scored ewe lambing difficulty score (scale of one (no difficulty) to four (severe difficulty)) were determined using linear mixed models. Risk factors associated with the logit of the probability of lamb mortality at birth (i.e. binary trait) were determined using generalised estimating equations. For each dependent variable, a series of simple regression models were developed as well as a multiple regression model. In the simple regression models, greater lambing difficulty was associated with quadruplet bearing, younger ewes, of terminal breed origin, lambing in February; for example, first parity ewes experienced greater (P7.0 kg) birth weights, quadruplet born lambs and lambs that experienced a more difficult lambing (predicted probability of death for lambs that required severe and veterinary assistance of 0.15 and 0.32, respectively); lambs from dual-purpose breeds and born to younger ewes were also at greater risk of mortality. In the multiple regression model, the association between ewe parity, age at first lambing, year of lambing and lamb mortality no longer persisted. The trend in solutions of the levels of each fixed effect that remained associated with lamb mortality in the multiple regression model, did not differ from the trends observed in the simple regression models although the differential in relative risk between the different lambing difficulty scores was greater in the multiple regression model. Results from this study show that many common flock- and animal-level factors are associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality and management of different risk category groups (e.g. scanned litter sizes, ewe age groups) can be used

  2. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers

    PubMed Central

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Aims: Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. Materials and Methods: The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. Statistical analysis used: The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as ‘outcome’ variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. Results: The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 – 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 – 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Conclusions: Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks PMID:27390474

  3. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers.

    PubMed

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as 'outcome' variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 - 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 - 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks.

  4. Environmental factors influencing the risk of autism

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Padideh; Kamali, Elahe; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Karahmadi, Mojgan

    2017-01-01

    Autism is a developmental disability with age of onset in childhood (under 3 years old), which is characterized by definite impairments in social interactions, abnormalities in speech, and stereotyped pattern of behaviors. Due to the progress of autism in recent decades, a wide range of studies have been done to identify the etiological factors of autism. It has been found that genetic and environmental factors are both involved in autism pathogenesis. Hence, in this review article, a set of environmental factors involved in the occurrence of autism has been collected, and finally, some practical recommendations for reduction of the risk of this devastating disease in children are represented. PMID:28413424

  5. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meli, Giampiero; Ottl, Birgit; Paladini, Angela; Cataldi, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Schizophrenia could be considered the most severe of all psychiatric disorders. It shows a heterogeneous clinical picture and presents an etiopathogenesis that is not cleared sufficiently. Even if the etiopathogenesis remains a puzzle, there is a scientific consensus that it is an expression of interaction between genotype and environmental factors. In the present article, following a study of literature and the accumulated evidence, the role of prenatal and perinatal factors in the development of schizophrenia will be revised and synthesized. We think that better knowledge of the risk factors could be helpful not only for better comprehension of the pathogenesis but especially to optimize interventions for prevention of the disorder.

  6. Is consanguinity a risk factor for keratoconus?

    PubMed

    Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Millodot, Michel; Essa, Maron; Garth, Jeanne; Ghara, Mohammed; Shneor, Einat

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether consanguinity is a risk factor for keratoconus (KC). A questionnaire was distributed to all patients presenting to St. John Eye Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. Questionnaire included data on demographic characteristics and potential risk factors. Patients were divided into two groups: cases with KC, in at least one eye, who were diagnosed by the attending ophthalmologist on the basis of abnormal corneal topography and at least one of the common signs of the disease; and controls presenting for problems other than KC and free of systemic and ocular conditions associated with KC. Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to identify risk factors for KC. Seventy cases and 140 controls participated in the study. Groups were similar with respect to sex and age. Univariate analyses found a significant association between KC and parental first-cousin consanguinity, eye rubbing, allergy, positive family history, education (>12 years), and sunglass wear, whereas asthma, eczema, smoking, and second-cousin consanguinity were not. Multivariate analyses showed that total consanguinity (first-cousin and second-cousin) (adjusted odds ratio, 3.96; p = 0.001), eye rubbing and absence of sunglass wear were significant risk factors. Education was also associated with KC, but family history was not so in the multivariate analysis. This study supports the hypothesis that consanguinity is a significant risk factor for KC and provides strong support for a genetic contribution to the disease. Wearing sunglasses in this environment is beneficial, and the study confirmed that eye rubbing, allergy, and education are also significantly associated with KC after adjusting for other predictors.

  7. [Injuries in France: trends and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Richard, J-B; Thélot, B; Beck, F

    2013-06-01

    Whatever the type of injury considered, prevention requires an improvement in health services' awareness of risk factors. The Health Barometer is a general population survey conducted in France since 1992 to contribute to surveillance in this field. The survey's statistical power and the numerous health topics included in the questionnaire provide accurate information for healthcare professionals and decision-makers. The Health Barometer 2010 was a nationwide telephone survey of 9110 persons representative of the 15-85-year-old population. One part of the questionnaire detailed injuries which had occurred during the past year. The numerous variables recorded enabled application of logistic regression models to explore risk factors related to different types of injury by age group. The findings were compared with the Health Barometer 2005 data to search for temporal trends of injury prevalence. The data analysis showed that 10.3% of the 15-85-year-olds reported an injury during the past year. This rate was higher than recorded in 2005; the increase was mainly due to domestic accidents and injuries occurring during recreational activities. Both type of injury and risk factors exhibited age-related variability. Domestic accidents and injuries occurring during recreational activities predominated in the older population and were associated with physical or mental health problems (chronic disease, diability, sleep disorders). For younger people, injuries were related to cannabis use, drunkedness, and insufficient sleep. Risk factors were also depended on type of injury: occupational accident-related injuries were linked with social disadvantage (manual worker population) whereas sports injuries were more common in the socially advantaged population. This survey confirms established knowledge and highlights, at different stages of life, new risk factors that contribute to injuries in France. These findings should be helpful for the development of adapted injury

  8. Prenatal risk factors for childhood CKD.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christine W; Yamamoto, Kalani T; Henry, Rohan K; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Flynn, Joseph T

    2014-09-01

    Development of CKD may be programmed prenatally. We sought to determine the association of childhood CKD with prenatal risk factors, including birth weight, maternal diabetes mellitus (DM), and maternal overweight/obesity. We conducted a population-based, case-control study with 1994 patients with childhood CKD (<21 years of age at diagnosis) and 20,032 controls in Washington state. We linked maternal and infant characteristics in birth records from 1987 to 2008 to hospital discharge data and used logistic regression analysis to assess the association of prenatal risk factors with childhood CKD. The prevalence of CKD was 126.7 cases per 100,000 births. High birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated nominally with CKD, with respective crude odds ratios (ORs) of 1.17 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.34) and 1.97 (95% CI, 1.15 to 3.37); however, adjustment for maternal confounders attenuated these associations to 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79 to 1.21) and 1.19 (95% CI, 0.51 to 2.81), respectively. The adjusted ORs for CKD associated with other prenatal factors were 2.88 (95% CI, 2.28 to 3.63) for low birth weight, 1.54 (95% CI, 1.13 to 2.09) for maternal gestational DM, 1.24 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.48) for maternal overweight, and 1.26 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.52) for maternal obesity. In subgroup analysis by CKD subtype, low birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated significantly with increased risk of renal dysplasia/aplasia. Low birth weight, maternal gestational DM, and maternal overweight/obesity associated significantly with obstructive uropathy. These data suggest that prenatal factors may impact the risk of CKD. Future studies should aim to determine if modification of these factors could reduce the risk of childhood CKD.

  9. Susceptibility and risk factors in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kinane, D F

    2000-10-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a high prevalence of advanced destruction but also that relatively few individuals in each age group account for most of the advanced periodontal disease. The available data suggest that three quarters of advanced periodontal disease could be prevented by targeting an effective preventive strategy on the 28% of individuals especially at risk. Questions remain regarding: 1) whether an acceptable cost-effective preventive strategy can be devised; and 2) whether it is possible to establish a simple method of identifying the 'at risk' group. The various risk factors are numerous and include systemic diseases, smoking, drug therapy, hormonal disturbances and genetic factors as well as the more mundane factors such as plaque control and socio-economic and education and attitude factors. Aside from these factors, many patients present with periodontal disease and have no discernible predisposition other than possibly genetic, for which we can not currently test, and for the vast majority of patients there would appear to be no other alternative to periodic thorough examination for all patients, early treatment of all periodontal lesions and appropriate dental health education.

  10. [Risk factors associated with dystocic delivery].

    PubMed

    Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Ríos López, Juan Carlos; Cortés Salim, Patricia; Ponce Ponce de León, Ana Lilia

    2007-09-01

    the dystocic delivery is a frequent complication and its perinatal repercussions vary from minor lesions to severe brain damage. It has been reported diverse factors associated with this medical complication. to identify the risk factors with significant association with dystocic delivery. a case-control study was carried out. There were included 750 patients, divided into 250 women with dystocic deliveries (cases) and 500 women with eutocic deliveries (controls). Demographic and clinical variables were registered. The statistical analysis was performed with percentages, arithmetic media, standard deviation, Student t test, chi2 and logistic regression analysis. An alpha value was set at 0.05. the factors with statistical significance were: advanced age (p < 0.001), major patient's height (p < 0.001), major new born's weight (p = 0.009), lower parity (p < 0.001), and prolonged duration of labor (p = 0.04). Other variables such as number of pregnancies, previous cesarean sections, spontaneous abortions, weight of the patient, weight earned during pregnancy, number of medical appointments during antenatal care, previous dystocic delivery, and premature rupture of the membranes, were not significant. there are clinical and demographic risk factors associated with dystocic delivery. To identify this risk factors during the antenatal care could diminish the frequency of dystocic deliveries and therefore to avoid the associated maternal-fetal complications.

  11. Environmental risk factors for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zhang, D; Rodzinka-Pasko, J K; Li, Y-M

    2016-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are syndromes that are predominantly defined by behavioral features such as impaired social interactions, restricted verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive or stereotyped behavior. In the past few decades, the reported prevalence of ASD has increased dramatically. This growth can be partially explained by an increased level of awareness of the problem among professionals and better diagnostic methods. Nevertheless, underpinning causes of ASD have not yet been detailed and explained. It is suggested that rather than having a single causative factor, ASD pathogenesis is influenced by environmental or genetic factors, or a combination of both. The aims of this review are to describe the environmental risk factors associated with ASD so as to provide a reference basis for current and future clinical and experimental work. On the basis of a PubMed search, we review the existing knowledge on environmental factors associated with ASD. A series of environmental factors have been repeatedly reported as risk factors for ASD in existing studies. Air pollution, organic toxicants, seasonal factors, psychological stress, migration, birth order, and nutrition may have a close relationship with the incidence of ASD.

  12. Environmental risk factors for heart disease.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Conklin, Daniel J; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current evidence linking environmental pollutants to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Extensive evidence indicates that environmental factors contribute to CVD risk, incidence, and severity. Migrant studies show that changes in the environment could substantially alter CVD risk in a genetically stable population. Additionally, CVD risk is affected by changes in nutritional and lifestyle choices. Recent studies in the field of environmental cardiology suggest that environmental toxins also influence CVD. Exposure to tobacco smoke is paradigmatic of such environmental risk and is strongly and positively associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In animal models of exposure, tobacco smoke induces endothelial dysfunction and prothrombotic responses and exacerbates atherogenesis and myocardial ischemic injury. Similar mechanism may be engaged by other pollutants or food constituents. Several large population-based studies indicate that exposure to fine or ultrafine particulate air pollution increases CVD morbidity and mortality, and the plausibility of this association is supported by data from animal studies. Exposure to other chemicals such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and metals has also been reported to elevate CVD risk by affecting atherogenesis, thrombosis, or blood pressure regulation. Maternal exposure to drugs, toxins, and infection has been linked with cardiac birth defects and premature CVD in later life. Collectively, the data support the notion that chronic environmental stress is an important determinant of CVD risk. Further work is required to assess the magnitude of this risk fully and to delineate specific mechanisms by which environmental toxins affect CVD.

  13. Effects of sulodexide on hemostatic factors, lipid profile, and inflammation in chronic peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Su Hee; Lee, Moo Song; Chang, Jai Won; Lee, Sang Koo; Park, Jung Sik

    2007-01-01

    Sulodexide, a standardized extractive glycosaminoglycan containing 80% "fast moving" heparin and 20% dermatan sulfate, decreased plasma D-dimer, a marker of intravascular coagulation, and fibrinogen levels in chronic peritoneal dialysis patients. Blood levels of von Willebrand factor, lipid, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were not significantly changed. No bleeding episodes were reported. These results suggest that sulodexide was effective in partially reversing the thrombogenic coagulation profile without increasing the risk of bleeding.

  14. Risk factors and their identification second part: study designs for identification of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-06-01

    This is the second a series of three articles which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. In this second article we define the three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and casecohort studies. Examples are provided of each of these study types; their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The final paper will provide some examples of the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first example involves diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and diabetes, we will discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease.

  15. Does fitness improve the cardiovascular risk profile in obese subjects?

    PubMed

    Halland, H; Lønnebakken, M T; Saeed, S; Midtbø, H; Cramariuc, D; Gerdts, E

    2017-06-01

    Good cardiorespiratory fitness has been suggested to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in obesity. We explored the association of fitness with the prevalences of major cardiovascular risk factor like hypertension (HT), diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in overweight and obese subjects. Clinical data from 491 participants in the FAT associated CardiOvasculaR dysfunction (FATCOR) study were analyzed. Physical fitness was assessed by ergospirometry, and subjects with at least good level of performance for age and sex were classified as fit. HT subtypes were identified from clinic and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in combination. Diabetes was diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance test. MetS was defined by the American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute criteria. The participants were on average 48 years old (60% women), and mean body mass index (BMI) was 32 kg/m(2). 28% of study participants were classified as fit. Fitness was not associated with lower prevalences of HT or HT subtypes, diabetes, MetS or individual MetS components (all p > 0.05). In multivariable regression analysis, being fit was characterized by lower waist circumference, BMI < 30 kg/m(2), non-smoking and a higher muscle mass (all p < 0.05). In the FATCOR population, fitness was not associated with a lower prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors like HT, diabetes or MetS. Given the strong association of cardiovascular risk factor burden with risk of clinical cardiovascular disease, these findings challenge the notion that fitness alone is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease in obesity. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Iranian Voice Quality of Life Profile (IVQLP): Factor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dehqan, Ali; Yadegari, Fariba; Scherer, Ronald C; Asgari, Ali; Dabirmoghadam, Payman

    2017-09-01

    An important domain in health-related quality of life evaluations is quality of life perceptions due to having a voice disorder. The objective of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Iranian Voice Quality of Life Profile (IVQLP) based on Exploratory Factor Analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. The study sample consisted of 280 patients (174 males and 106 females) diagnosed with MTD, benign organic disorders such as polyps and nodules, and unilateral vocal fold paralysis and cancer. To evaluate the different dimensions of the IVQLP, a principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to investigate the fitting of extracted dimensions and construct validity of the IVQLP. The results showed that the IVQLP has a 4-factor structure. The first factor has 17 items and refers to Emotions. The second factor has 12 items and refers to Individual/Social Relations. The third factor with 6 items refers to Occupation, and the forth with 5 items relates to Psychosomatic characteristics. The conclusion of this study is that the concept of quality of life in Iranian patients with voice disorders is somewhat different from that of Western patients. This difference can be seen in. the large number of items related to an Emotional factor and the identification of a Psychosomatic factor. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Paul P.; Keane, Pearse A.; O'Neill, Evelyn C.; Altaie, Rasha W.; Loane, Edward; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John M.; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:20339564

  18. Sexual Minority Stress and Suicide Risk: Identifying Resilience through Personality Profile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Nicholas A.; Heck, Nicholas C.; Flentje, Annesa; Gleason, Hillary; Oost, Kathryn M.; Cochran, Bryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual minority-based victimization, which includes threats or enacted interpersonal violence, predicts elevated suicide risk among sexual minority individuals. However, research on personality factors that contribute to resilience among sexual minority populations is lacking. Using the Five-Factor Model, we hypothesized that individuals classified as adaptive (versus at-risk) would be at decreased risk for a suicide attempt in the context of reported lifetime victimization. Method Sexual minority-identified young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 (N=412) were recruited nationally and asked to complete an online survey containing measures of personality, sexual minority stress, and lifetime suicide attempts. Results A two-stage cluster analytic method was used to empirically derive latent personality profiles and to classify respondents as adaptive (lower neuroticism and higher extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness) or at-risk (higher neuroticism, lower extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness) on the basis of their Five Factor Personality trait scores. Adaptive individuals were slightly older and less likely to conceal their sexual orientation, but reported similar rates of victimization, discrimination, and internalized heterosexism as their at-risk counterparts. Logistic regression results indicate that despite reporting similar rates of victimization, which was a significant predictor of lifetime suicide attempt, adaptive individuals evidenced decreased risk for attempted suicide in the context of victimization, relative to at-risk individuals. Discussion These findings suggest that an adaptive personality profile may confer resilience in the face of sexual minority-based victimization. This study adds to our knowledge of sexual minority mental health and highlights new directions for future research. PMID:26640810

  19. The role of fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene expression profiling in myeloma risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Jauch, Anna; Rème, Thierry; Moreaux, Jérôme; Bertsch, Uta; Neben, Kai; Klein, Bernard; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2011-12-01

    Multiple myeloma patients' survival under treatment varies from a few months to more than 15 years. Clinical prognostic factors, especially beta2-microglobulin (B2M) and the international staging system (ISS), allow risk assessment to a certain extent, but do not identify patients at very high risk. As malignant plasma cells are characterized by a variety of chromosomal aberrations and changes in gene expression, a molecular characterization ofCD138-purified myeloma cells by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) and gene expression profiling (GEP) can be used for improved risk assessment, iFISH allows a risk stratification with presence of a translocation t(4;14) and/or deletion of 17p13 being the best documented adverse prognostic factors. A deletion of 13q14 is no longer considered to define adverse risk. Patients harbouring a t(4;14) seems to benefit from a bortezomib- or lenalidomide containing regimen, whereas patients with deletion 17p13 seem only to benefit from a high dose therapy approach using long term bortezomib (in induction and maintenance) and autologous tandem-transplantation as used in the GMMG-HD4 trial, or the total therapy 3 concept. Gene expression profiling allows the assessment of high risk scores (IFM, UAMS), remaining prognostic despite treatment with novel agents, and prognostic surrogates of biological factors (e.g. proliferation) and (prognostic) target gene expression (e.g. Aurora-kinase A). Thus, assessment of B2M and ISS-stage, iFISH, and GEP is considered extended routine diagnostics in therapy requiring multiple myeloma patients for risk assessment and, even now, to a certain extent selection of treatment.

  20. Risk Factors Of Heart Disease in Nurses.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mahdi K; Hojat, Mohsen; Koshkaki, Saiede R; Nazari, Faride; Ragibnejad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and correcting the modifiable risk factors reduces the prevalence of coronary artery disorders (CAD). Nurses, with regards to their employment conditions, can be prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among nurses. In this cross-sectional study, census sampling was conducted among nurses of Jahrom, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected through interviews, blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters, and blood sample collection. To analyze the data, descriptive statistical analysis, and comparative (independent t-test) and correlation (Pearson) tests were used; the significance level was considered to be P < 0.05. In this study, 263 (89.76%) nurses participated, 79.8% of whom were women. The mean age of the participants was 31.04 (6.97). In terms of body mass index, 41.7% was the waist-to-hip ratio, 16.7% was the waist-to-height ratio, and 63.1% were in the range of obesity. In addition, 5.7% had abnormal triglyceride, 4.9% had high cholesterol, and 15.1% had high blood pressure. The mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the participants was 1.07 (1.84). In this study, the total mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the nurses was 1.07, which showed a low risk of CAD in the study population over the next decade.

  1. Risk Factors Of Heart Disease in Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Mahdi K.; Hojat, Mohsen; Koshkaki, Saiede R.; Nazari, Faride; Ragibnejad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identifying and correcting the modifiable risk factors reduces the prevalence of coronary artery disorders (CAD). Nurses, with regards to their employment conditions, can be prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among nurses. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, census sampling was conducted among nurses of Jahrom, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected through interviews, blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters, and blood sample collection. To analyze the data, descriptive statistical analysis, and comparative (independent t-test) and correlation (Pearson) tests were used; the significance level was considered to be P < 0.05. Results: In this study, 263 (89.76%) nurses participated, 79.8% of whom were women. The mean age of the participants was 31.04 (6.97). In terms of body mass index, 41.7% was the waist-to-hip ratio, 16.7% was the waist-to-height ratio, and 63.1% were in the range of obesity. In addition, 5.7% had abnormal triglyceride, 4.9% had high cholesterol, and 15.1% had high blood pressure. The mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the participants was 1.07 (1.84). Conclusions: In this study, the total mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the nurses was 1.07, which showed a low risk of CAD in the study population over the next decade. PMID:28904549

  2. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-05

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  3. Factors affecting ejection risk in rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Bain, Charles E; Wirth, Jeffrey L; Bonugli, Enrique B; Watson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 - 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size.

  4. Factors Affecting Ejection Risk in Rollover Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Funk, James R.; Cormier, Joseph M.; Bain, Charles E.; Wirth, Jeffrey L.; Bonugli, Enrique B.; Watson, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 – 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size. PMID:23169130

  5. The risk factors for labor onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yasumasa; Terauchi, Mikio; Tamakoshi, Koji; Shiozaki, Arihiro; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Our aim was to clarify the perinatal outcomes of and risk factors for hypertension that is first detected after labor onset (labor onset hypertension, LOH), which may be a risk factor for eclampsia and stroke during labor. A total of 1349 parturient women who did not exhibit preeclampsia or gestational hypertension prior to labor were examined. The patients were classified into four groups: the normotensive (n=1023) (whose systolic blood pressure (SBP) remained below 140 mm Hg throughout labor), mild LOH (n=241) (whose maximum SBP during labor ranged from 140 to 159 mm Hg), severe LOH (n=66) (whose maximum SBP during labor ranged from 160 to 179 mm Hg) and emergent LOH groups (n=19) (whose maximum SBP during labor was greater than 180 mm Hg). The perinatal outcomes and patient characteristics of the four groups were compared. Twenty-four percent of the pregnant women who remained normotensive throughout pregnancy developed hypertension during labor. One of the patients in the emergent LOH group developed eclampsia. The blood pressure at delivery and frequencies of hypotensor use, interventional delivery and low Apgar scores differed significantly among the four groups. The following risk factors for severe/emergent LOH were extracted: being over 35 years old, a body mass index at delivery of >30, an SBP at 36 weeks' gestation of 130-134 mm Hg, an SBP at admission of 130-139 mm Hg, proteinuria (a score of 2+ on the dipstick test) and severe edema. The risk factors for severe/emergent LOH were identified in this study. In high risk cases, repeatedly measuring maternal blood pressure during delivery might help detect critical hypertension early.

  6. What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

  7. What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors? A risk factor is anything that ... Can Lung Carcinoid Tumors Be Prevented? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  8. Risk factors for suicidal behavior in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kirkcaldy, B D; Siefen, G R; Urkin, J; Merrick, J

    2006-10-01

    Adolescent suicide is today a public health problem among the leading cause of mortality among adolescents and young adults. There seems to be many reasons for this increase (which has different trends in different populations), but associations have been found with increased substance abuse, television and video violence, socio-economic status and easy access to firearms. Gender differences have also been observed with crime, suicide and substance abuse higher among males, while eating disorder, depression and suicidal behavior more prevalent among females. This paper will review prevalence and incidence of adolescent suicidal behavior, socio-demographic and psychological risk factors, associated cognitive factors and socio-economic factors. Risk factors include previous suicide attempts, a history of others in the family who have been suicidal, mental illness, alcohol and drug use, and other self-destructive behaviors as well as consideration being given to hopelessness, hostility, negative self-concept and isolation. At the individual difference level, factors such as trait depression, anger and hostility, perfectionism and social sensitivity would seem critical variables, as would age, gender and intellectual functioning. Sociological and family-related factors may also be implicated including dysfunctional family organizations, a history of physical or psychological abuse (sexual abuse) and limited extent of social support networks. A frequently reported precipitating event of suicidal behavior is family adversity including rejection, separation and interpersonal conflict. At a socio-economic level it would seem essential to provide comprehensive document about the social and economic conditions from which the adolescent comes.

  9. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    PubMed

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  10. Socioeconomic factors and the risk for sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hampras, Shalaka S; Moysich, Kirsten B; Marimuthu, Sathiya P; Ravi, Vinod; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel

    2014-11-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of rare malignancies arising from mesenchymal tissue. Although several occupational exposures have been evaluated in association with sarcoma, little is known about the role of socioeconomic indicators such as education. Socioeconomic status has been found to be associated with risk of development of several types of cancers, primarily lung, gastric, and cervical cancers. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association of socioeconomic level with the risk for sarcoma. A total of 371 incident cases of sarcoma were matched in terms of age, sex, and year of enrollment in the study with 742 cancer-free controls. Education and income levels were evaluated as the indicators of socioeconomic status. Higher education (college level) was associated with a significantly lower risk for sarcoma [odds ratio (OR)=0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.29-0.80], even after adjusting for important confounders. After stratifying by sex, significantly lower risk for sarcoma was observed among men who had college level education compared with men with a level of education of eighth grade or lower (OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.19-0.74). A significant association between education and the risk for sarcoma remained after stratifying by income (OR=0.49, 95% CI=0.28-0.86, among the low income group). When analyzed as a composite exposure, individuals with high education and high income status had significantly lower risk for sarcoma compared with those with low income and low education status (OR=0.41, 95% CI=0.23-0.71). Thus, socioeconomic factors may play a significant role in determining the risk for sarcoma and should be explored further to elucidate the underlying factors that may explain these sociodemographic inequalities related to sarcoma.

  11. Clinical Risk Factors for Portopulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Krowka, Michael J.; Trotter, James F.; Roberts, Kari E.; Benza, Raymond L.; Badesch, David B.; Taichman, Darren B.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Zacks, Steven; Kaplowitz, Neil; Brown, Robert S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension affects up to 6% of patients with advanced liver disease, but the predictors and biologic mechanism for the development of this complication are unknown. We sought to determine the clinical risk factors for portopulmonary hypertension in patients with advanced liver disease. We performed a multicenter case-control study nested within a prospective cohort of patients with portal hypertension recruited from tertiary care centers. Cases had a mean pulmonary artery pressure >25 mm Hg, pulmonary vascular resistance >240 dynes · second · cm−5, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mm Hg. Controls had a right ventricular systolic pressure < 40 mm Hg (if estimable) and normal right-sided cardiac morphology by transthoracic echocardiography. The study sample included 34 cases and 141 controls. Female sex was associated with a higher risk of portopulmonary hypertension than male sex (adjusted odds ratio =2.90, 95% confidence interval 1.20-7.01, P = 0.018). Autoimmune hepatitis was associated with an increased risk (adjusted odds ratio = 4.02, 95% confidence interval 1.14-14.23, P = 0.031), and hepatitis C infection was associated with a decreased risk (adjusted odds ratio =0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.09-0.65, P =0.005) of portopulmonary hypertension. The severity of liver disease was not related to the risk of portopulmonary hypertension. Conclusion Female sex and autoimmune hepatitis were associated with an increased risk of portopulmonary hypertension, whereas hepatitis C infection was associated with a decreased risk in patients with advanced liver disease. Hormonal and immunologic factors may therefore be integral to the development of portopulmonary hypertension. PMID:18537192

  12. [Risk factors for Alzheimer: towards prevention?].

    PubMed

    Vogel, Thomas; Benetos, Athanase; Verreault, René; Kaltenbach, Georges; Kiesmann, Michèle; Berthel, Marc

    2006-09-01

    Recent longitudinal studies have highlighted associations between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and several factors, especially some cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, diet, obesity, and elevated levels of homocysteine and lipids in the blood. The strongest associations are with hypertension and diabetes. Moderate alcohol consumption also appears to be associated with a decreased risk of incident AD. Studies of the effect of interventions to control these risk factors on the onset and course of dementia report encouraging results about antihypertensive agents and statins. Benefits from other drug therapies such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and antioxidants remain uncertain, and initial hopes for hormonal replacement therapy for postmenopausal women have not been confirmed. Physical, cognitive and leisure activities seem to provide protection against incident AD. Cautious interpretation is necessary in view of the possible biases in these studies (confounding factors as well as survival, regression dilution, and indication biases). These epidemiologic data raise questions about the diagnostic boundaries between AD and vascular dementia. Additional studies are needed to validate these concepts and to confirm the possible benefits of preventive measures.

  13. [Risk factors for anorexia in children].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Xiao; Lang, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Qin-Feng

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the risk factors for anorexia in children, and to reduce the prevalence of anorexia in children. A questionnaire survey and a case-control study were used to collect the general information of 150 children with anorexia (case group) and 150 normal children (control group). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic stepwise regression analysis were performed to identify the risk factors for anorexia in children. The results of the univariate analysis showed significant differences between the case and control groups in the age in months when supplementary food were added, feeding pattern, whether they liked meat, vegetables and salty food, whether they often took snacks and beverages, whether they liked to play while eating, and whether their parents asked them to eat food on time (P<0.05). The results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that late addition of supplementary food (OR=5.408), high frequency of taking snacks and/or drinks (OR=11.813), and eating while playing (OR=6.654) were major risk factors for anorexia in children. Liking of meat (OR=0.093) and vegetables (OR=0.272) and eating on time required by parents (OR=0.079) were protective factors against anorexia in children. Timely addition of supplementary food, a proper diet, and development of children's proper eating and living habits can reduce the incidence of anorexia in children.

  14. Juvenile respiratory papillomatosis: