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Sample records for risk stratify patients

  1. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Nuno S.; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8–7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7–4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4–4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity—HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease–(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3–5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment. PMID:27636095

  2. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Helder Novais; Osório, Nuno S; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8-7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity-HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease-(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3-5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment. PMID:27636095

  3. Improved Method to Stratify Elderly Patients With Cancer at Risk for Competing Events

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Ruben; Zakeri, Kaveh; Green, Garrett; Hwang, Lindsay; Gulaya, Sachin; Xu, Beibei; Verma, Rohan; Williamson, Casey W.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Rose, Brent S.; Shen, Hanjie; Vaida, Florin; Murphy, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare a novel generalized competing event (GCE) model versus the standard Cox proportional hazards regression model for stratifying elderly patients with cancer who are at risk for competing events. Methods We identified 84,319 patients with nonmetastatic prostate, head and neck, and breast cancers from the SEER-Medicare database. Using demographic, tumor, and clinical characteristics, we trained risk scores on the basis of GCE versus Cox models for cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. In test sets, we examined the predictive ability of the risk scores on the different causes of death, including second cancer mortality, noncancer mortality, and cause-specific mortality, using Fine-Gray regression and area under the curve. We compared how well models stratified subpopulations according to the ratio of the cumulative cause-specific hazard for cancer mortality to the cumulative hazard for overall mortality (ω) using the Akaike Information Criterion. Results In each sample, increasing GCE risk scores were associated with increased cancer-specific mortality and decreased competing mortality, whereas risk scores from Cox models were associated with both increased cancer-specific mortality and competing mortality. GCE models created greater separation in the area under the curve for cancer-specific mortality versus noncancer mortality (P < .001), indicating better discriminatory ability between these events. Comparing the GCE model to Cox models of cause-specific mortality or all-cause mortality, the respective Akaike Information Criterion scores were superior (lower) in each sample: prostate cancer, 28.6 versus 35.5 versus 39.4; head and neck cancer, 21.1 versus 29.4 versus 40.2; and breast cancer, 24.6 versus 32.3 versus 50.8. Conclusion Compared with standard modeling approaches, GCE models improve stratification of elderly patients with cancer according to their risk of dying from cancer relative to overall mortality. PMID:26884579

  4. Competing risks regression for stratified data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingqing; Latouche, Aurelien; Rocha, Vanderson; Fine, Jason

    2011-06-01

    For competing risks data, the Fine-Gray proportional hazards model for subdistribution has gained popularity for its convenience in directly assessing the effect of covariates on the cumulative incidence function. However, in many important applications, proportional hazards may not be satisfied, including multicenter clinical trials, where the baseline subdistribution hazards may not be common due to varying patient populations. In this article, we consider a stratified competing risks regression, to allow the baseline hazard to vary across levels of the stratification covariate. According to the relative size of the number of strata and strata sizes, two stratification regimes are considered. Using partial likelihood and weighting techniques, we obtain consistent estimators of regression parameters. The corresponding asymptotic properties and resulting inferences are provided for the two regimes separately. Data from a breast cancer clinical trial and from a bone marrow transplantation registry illustrate the potential utility of the stratified Fine-Gray model.

  5. Risk-Stratified Imputation in Survival Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Richard E.; Adragni, Kofi P.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Brott, Thomas G.; Howard, George

    2013-01-01

    Background Censoring that is dependent on covariates associated with survival can arise in randomized trials due to changes in recruitment and eligibility criteria to minimize withdrawals, potentially leading to biased treatment effect estimates. Imputation approaches have been proposed to address censoring in survival analysis; and while these approaches may provide unbiased estimates of treatment effects, imputation of a large number of outcomes may over- or underestimate the associated variance based on the imputation pool selected. Purpose We propose an improved method, risk-stratified imputation, as an alternative to address withdrawal related to the risk of events in the context of time-to-event analyses. Methods Our algorithm performs imputation from a pool of replacement subjects with similar values of both treatment and covariate(s) of interest, that is, from a risk-stratified sample. This stratification prior to imputation addresses the requirement of time-to-event analysis that censored observations are representative of all other observations in the risk group with similar exposure variables. We compared our risk-stratified imputation to case deletion and bootstrap imputation in a simulated dataset in which the covariate of interest (study withdrawal) was related to treatment. A motivating example from a recent clinical trial is also presented to demonstrate the utility of our method. Results In our simulations, risk-stratified imputation gives estimates of treatment effect comparable to bootstrap and auxiliary variable imputation while avoiding inaccuracies of the latter two in estimating the associated variance. Similar results were obtained in analysis of clinical trial data. Limitations Risk-stratified imputation has little advantage over other imputation methods when covariates of interest are not related to treatment, although its performance is superior when covariates are related to treatment. Risk-stratified imputation is intended for

  6. Assessment and Predicting Factors of Repeated Brain Computed Tomography in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients for Risk-Stratified Care Management: A 5-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumritpradit, Preeda; Setthalikhit, Thitipong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. To determine the value of repeated brain CT in TBI cases for risk-stratified care management (RSCM) and to identify predicting factors which will change the neurosurgical management after repeated brain CTs. Methods. A 5-year retrospective study from January 2009 to August 2013 was conducted. The primary outcome was the value of repeated brain CT in TBI cases. The secondary outcome is to identify predicting factors which will change the neurosurgical management after repeated brain CTs. Results. There were 145 consecutive patients with TBI and repeated brain CT after initial abnormal brain CT. Forty-two percent of all cases (N = 61) revealed the progression of intracranial hemorrhage after repeated brain CT. In all 145 consecutive patients, 67.6% of cases (N = 98) were categorized as mild TBI. For mild head injury, 8.2% of cases (N = 8) had undergone neurosurgical management after repeated brain CT. Only 1 from 74 mild TBI patients with repeated brain CT had neurosurgical intervention. Clopidogrel and midline shift more than 2 mm on initial brain CT were significant predicting factors to indicate the neurosurgical management in mild TBI cases. Conclusion. Routine repeated brain CT for RSCM had no clinical benefit in mild TBI cases. PMID:27703812

  7. Pan-European Chikungunya surveillance: designing risk stratified surveillance zones

    PubMed Central

    Tilston, Natasha; Skelly, Chris; Weinstein, Phil

    2009-01-01

    The first documented transmission of Chikungunya within Europe took place in Italy during the summer of 2007. Chikungunya, a viral infection affecting millions of people across Africa and Asia, can be debilitating and no prophylactic treatment exists. Although imported cases are reported frequently across Europe, 2007 was the first confirmed European outbreak and available evidence suggests that Aedes albopictus was the vector responsible and the index case was a visitor from India. This paper proposed pan-European surveillance zones for Chikungunya, based on the climatic conditions necessary for vector activity and viral transmission. Pan-European surveillance provides the best hope for an early-warning of outbreaks, because national boundaries do not play a role in defining the risk of this new vector borne disease threat. A review of climates, where Chikungunya has been active, was used to inform the delineation of three pan-European surveillance zones. These vary in size each month across the June-September period of greatest risk. The zones stretch across southern Europe from Portugal to Turkey. Although the focus of this study was to define the geography of potential surveillance zones based on the climatic limits on the vector and virus, a preliminary examination of inward bound airline passengers was also undertaken. This indicated that France and Italy are likely to be at greater risk due to the number of visitors they receive from Chikungunya active regions, principally viraemic visitors from India. Therefore this study represents a first attempt at creating risk stratified surveillance zones, which we believe could be usefully refined with the use of higher resolution climate data and more complete air travel data. PMID:19878588

  8. Stratifying the risk of lymph node metastasis in undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Yukiko; Ohtaka, Masahiko; Maekawa, Shinya; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tatsuya; Inoue, Taisuke; Uetake, Tomoyoshi; Sakamoto, Minoru; Sato, Tadashi; Kawaguchi, Yoshihiko; Fujii, Hideki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Hada, Masao; Oyama, Toshio; Yasumura, Tomotaka; Omata, Kosaku; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Naito, Keiichi; Hata, Hideo; Haba, Yoshiaki; Miyata, Kazuyuki; Saitoh, Haruhisa; Yamadera, Yoichi; Miura, Kazuo; Kawaoi, Akira; Abe, Tohru; Tsunoda, Hajime; Honda, Yuji; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study how lymph node metastasis (LNM) risk is stratified in undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer (undiff-EGC) dependent on combinations of risk factors. METHODS: Five hundred and sixty-seven cases with undiff-EGC undergoing gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy were examined retrospectively. Using clinicopathological factors of patient age, location, size, an endoscopic macroscopic tumor form, ulceration, depth, histology, lymphatic involvement (LI) and venous involvement (VI), LNM risk was examined and stratified by conventional statistical analysis and data-mining analysis. RESULTS: LNM was positive in 44 of 567 cases (7.8%). Univariate analysis revealed > 2 cm, protrusion, submucosal (sm), mixed type, LI and VI as significant prognostic factors and > 2 cm and LI-positive were independent factors by multivariate analysis. In preoperatively evaluable factors excluding LVI, sm and > 2 cm were independent factors. According to the depth and size, cases were categorized into the low-risk group [m and ≤ 2 cm, 0% (LNM incidence)], the moderate-risk group (m and > 2 cm, 5.6%; and sm and ≤ 2 cm, 6.0%), and the high-risk group (sm and > 2 cm, 19.3%). On the other hand, LNM occurred in 1.4% in all LI-negative cases, greatly lower than 28.2% in all LI-positive cases, and LNM incidence was low in LI-negative cases even in the moderate- and high-risk groups. CONCLUSION: LNM-related factors in undiff-EGC were depth and size preoperatively while those were LI and size postoperatively. Among these factors, LI was the most significantly correlated factor. PMID:25759537

  9. Limitations of the Parsonnet score for measuring risk stratified mortality in the north west of England

    PubMed Central

    Wynne-Jones, K; Jackson, M; Grotte, G; Bridgewater, B; North, W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study the use of the Parsonnet score to predict mortality following adult cardiac surgery.
DESIGN—Prospective study.
SETTING—All centres performing adult cardiac surgery in the north west of England.
SUBJECTS—8210 patients undergoing surgery between April 1997 and March 1999.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Risk factors and in-hospital mortality were recorded according to agreed definitions. Ten per cent of cases from each centre were selected at random for validation. A Parsonnet score was derived for each patient and its predictive ability was studied.
RESULTS—Data collection was complete. The operative mortality was 3.5% (95% confidence interval 3.1% to 3.9%), ranging from 2.7% to 3.8% across the centres. On validation, the incidence of discrepancies ranged from 0% to 13% for the different risk factors. The predictive ability of the Parsonnet score measured by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.74. The mean Parsonnet score for the region was 7.0, giving an observed to expected mortality ratio of 0.51 (range 0.4 to 0.64 across the centres). A new predictive model was derived from the data by multivariate analysis which includes nine objective risk factors, all with a significant association with mortality, which highlights some of the deficits of the Parsonnet score.
CONCLUSIONS—Risk stratified mortality data were collected on 100% of patients undergoing adult cardiac surgery in two years within a defined geographical region and were used to set an audit standard. Problems with the Parsonnet score of subjectivity, inclusion of many items not associated with mortality, and the overprediction of mortality have been highlighted.


Keywords: risk stratification; cardiac surgery; Parsonnet score; audit PMID:10862595

  10. Differences in Gene-Gene Interactions in Graves’ Disease Patients Stratified by Age of Onset

    PubMed Central

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Ploski, Rafal; Krajewska, Jolanta; Kula, Dorota; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Kolosza, Zofia; Jarzab, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background Graves’ disease (GD) is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. Each gene exerts limited effects on the development of autoimmune disease (OR = 1.2–1.5). An epidemiological study revealed that nearly 70% of the risk of developing inherited autoimmunological thyroid diseases (AITD) is the result of gene interactions. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of the interactions of multiple loci on the genetic predisposition to GD. The aim of our analyses was to identify pairs of genes that exhibit a multiplicative interaction effect. Material and Methods A total of 709 patients with GD were included in the study. The patients were stratified into more homogeneous groups depending on the age at time of GD onset: younger patients less than 30 years of age and older patients greater than 30 years of age. Association analyses were performed for genes that influence the development of GD: HLADRB1, PTPN22, CTLA4 and TSHR. The interactions among polymorphisms were analyzed using the multiple logistic regression and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) methods. Results GD patients stratified by the age of onset differed in the allele frequencies of the HLADRB1*03 and 1858T polymorphisms of the PTPN22 gene (OR = 1.7, p = 0.003; OR = 1.49, p = 0.01, respectively). We evaluated the genetic interactions of four SNPs in a pairwise fashion with regard to disease risk. The coexistence of HLADRB1 with CTLA4 or HLADRB1 with PTPN22 exhibited interactions on more than additive levels (OR = 3.64, p = 0.002; OR = 4.20, p < 0.001, respectively). These results suggest that interactions between these pairs of genes contribute to the development of GD. MDR analysis confirmed these interactions. Conclusion In contrast to a single gene effect, we observed that interactions between the HLADRB1/PTPN22 and HLADRB1/CTLA4 genes more closely predicted the risk of GD onset in young patients. PMID:26943356

  11. Age-Stratified Treatment Response Rates in Hospitalized Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection Treated with Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Vy P.; Luce, Andrea M.; Ruppelt, Sara C.; Wei, Wenjing; Aitken, Samuel L.; Musick, William L.; Roux, Ryan K.

    2015-01-01

    Consensus on the optimal treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is rapidly changing. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with increased clinical failure rates; however, the reasons for this are unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess age-related treatment response rates in hospitalized patients with CDI treated with metronidazole. This was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of hospitalized patients with CDI. Patients were assessed for refractory CDI, defined as persistent diarrhea after 7 days of metronidazole therapy, and stratified by age and clinical characteristics. A total of 242 individuals, aged 60 ± 18 years (Charlson comorbidity index, 3.8 ± 2.4; Horn's index, 1.7 ± 1.0) were included. One hundred twenty-eight patients (53%) had severe CDI. Seventy patients (29%) had refractory CDI, a percentage that increased from 22% to 28% and to 37% for patients aged less than 50 years, for patients from 50 to 70 years, and for patients aged >70 years, respectively (P = 0.05). In multivariate analysis, Horn's index (odds ratio [OR], 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50 to 2.77; P < 0.001), severe CDI (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.15 to 4.41; P = 0.018), and continued use of antibiotics (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.30 to 5.39; P = 0.0072) were identified as significant predictors of refractory CDI. Age was not identified as an independent risk factor for refractory CDI. Therefore, hospitalized elderly patients with CDI treated with metronidazole had increased refractory CDI rates likely due to increased underlying severity of illness, severity of CDI, and concomitant antibiotic use. These results may help identify patients that may benefit from alternative C. difficile treatments other than metronidazole. PMID:26195522

  12. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  13. Personalized Immunomonitoring Uncovers Molecular Networks that Stratify Lupus Patients.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Romain; Hong, Seunghee; Cantarel, Brandi; Baldwin, Nicole; Baisch, Jeanine; Edens, Michelle; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Acs, Peter; Turner, Jacob; Anguiano, Esperanza; Vinod, Parvathi; Kahn, Shaheen; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Wakeland, Edward; Nassi, Lorien; Gotte, Alisa; Punaro, Marilynn; Liu, Yong-Jun; Banchereau, Jacques; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Wright, Tracey; Pascual, Virginia

    2016-04-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by loss of tolerance to nucleic acids and highly diverse clinical manifestations. To assess its molecular heterogeneity, we longitudinally profiled the blood transcriptome of 158 pediatric patients. Using mixed models accounting for repeated measurements, demographics, treatment, disease activity (DA), and nephritis class, we confirmed a prevalent IFN signature and identified a plasmablast signature as the most robust biomarker of DA. We detected gradual enrichment of neutrophil transcripts during progression to active nephritis and distinct signatures in response to treatment in different nephritis subclasses. Importantly, personalized immunomonitoring uncovered individual correlates of disease activity that enabled patient stratification into seven groups, supported by patient genotypes. Our study uncovers the molecular heterogeneity of SLE and provides an explanation for the failure of clinical trials. This approach may improve trial design and implementation of tailored therapies in genetically and clinically complex autoimmune diseases. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27040498

  14. Risk Factors for Emergency Department Short Time Readmission in Stratified Population

    PubMed Central

    Besga, Ariadna; Ayerdi, Borja; Alcalde, Guillermo; Manzano, Alberto; Lopetegui, Pedro; Graña, Manuel; González-Pinto, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background. Emergency department (ED) readmissions are considered an indicator of healthcare quality that is particularly relevant in older adults. The primary objective of this study was to identify key factors for predicting patients returning to the ED within 30 days of being discharged. Methods. We analysed patients who attended our ED in June 2014, stratified into four groups based on the Kaiser pyramid. We collected data on more than 100 variables per case including demographic and clinical characteristics and drug treatments. We identified the variables with the highest discriminating power to predict ED readmission and constructed classifiers using machine learning methods to provide predictions. Results. Classifier performance distinguishing between patients who were and were not readmitted (within 30 days), in terms of average accuracy (AC). The variables with the greatest discriminating power were age, comorbidity, reasons for consultation, social factors, and drug treatments. Conclusions. It is possible to predict readmissions in stratified groups with high accuracy and to identify the most important factors influencing the event. Therefore, it will be possible to develop interventions to improve the quality of care provided to ED patients. PMID:26682222

  15. Preemptive tumor profiling for biomarker-stratified early clinical drug development in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Welt, Anja; Tewes, Mitra; Aktas, Bahriye; O Hoffmann, Oliver; Wiesweg, Marcel; Ting, Saskia; Reis, Henning; Worm, Karl; Richly, Heike; Hense, Jörg; Palmer, Michael R; Lee, Benjamin H; Wendling, Johanna; Kossow, Josef; Scheulen, Max E; Lehnerdt, Cathrin; Kohl, Marzena; Derks, Cordula; Skottky, Silke; Haus, Ulrike; Schmid, Kurt W; Kimmig, Rainer; Schuler, Martin; Kasper, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Biomarker-stratified cancer pharmacotherapy was pioneered in the care of breast cancer patients. The utility of agents modulating hormone receptors, synthesis of steroid hormones, or HER2-targeting agents has been greatly enhanced by the detection of predictive biomarkers in diagnostic tumor samples. Based on deeper understanding of breast cancer biology multiple drug candidates have been developed to modulate additional molecular targets which may associate with specific biomarker profiles. Accordingly, exploratory biomarkers are increasingly incorporated in early clinical trials, thus demanding a new process of patient selection. Here, we describe the implementation of preemptive, multiplexed biomarker profiling linked to standard diagnostic algorithms for metastatic breast cancer patients treated at the West German Cancer Center. Profiling for experimental biomarkers was prospectively offered to patients with metastatic breast cancer who met generic clinical trial inclusion criteria. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were retrieved and studied for potentially “actionable” biomarkers related to active clinical trials by immunohistochemistry, amplicon sequencing, and in situ hybridization. The clinical course of those “profiled” patients was closely monitored to offer trial participation whenever applicable. Here, we report results from the first 131 patients enrolled in this program. PIK3CA mutations (23 %) and amplifications (2 %), loss of PTEN expression (13 %), and FGFR1 amplifications (8 %) were detected next to established biomarkers such as estrogen (67 %) and progesterone receptor expression (52 %), and HER2 overexpression or amplification (23 %). So far 16 “profiled” patients (12 %) have been enrolled in biomarker-stratified early clinical trials. Preemptive profiling of investigational biomarkers can be integrated into the diagnostic algorithm of a large Comprehensive Cancer Center. Extensive administrative efforts are required

  16. Prognostic impact of body mass index stratified by smoking status in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Cui; Ren, Chao; Bi, Xi-Wen; Yang, Hang; An, Xin; Wang, Feng-Hua; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background As smoking affects the body mass index (BMI) and causes the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the prognostic impact of BMI in ESCC could be stratified by smoking status. We investigated the true prognostic effect of BMI and its potential modification by smoking status in ESCC. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 459 patients who underwent curative treatment at a single institution between January 2007 and December 2010. BMI was calculated using the measured height and weight before surgery. Chi-square test was used to evaluate the relationships between smoking status and other clinicopathological variables. The Cox proportional hazard models were used for univariate and multivariate analyses of variables related to overall survival. Results BMI <18.5 kg/m2 was a significantly independent predictor of poor survival in the overall population and never smokers after adjusting for covariates, but not in ever smokers. Among never smokers, underweight patients (BMI <18.5 kg/m2) had a 2.218 times greater risk of mortality than non-underweight (BMI ≥18.5 kg/m2) patients (P=0.015). Among ever smokers, BMI <18 kg/m2 increased the risk of mortality to 1.656 (P=0.019), compared to those having BMI ≥18 kg/m2. Conclusion Our study is likely the first to show that the prognostic effect of BMI was substantial in ESCC, even after stratifying by smoking status. Furthermore, the risk of death due to low BMI would be significantly increased in never smokers. We believe that the prognostic impact of BMI is modified but not eliminated by the smoking status in ESCC. PMID:27799787

  17. Filaggrin-stratified transcriptomic analysis of pediatric skin identifies mechanistic pathways in patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Christian; Kroboth, Karin; Schurch, Nicholas J.; Sandilands, Aileen; Sherstnev, Alexander; O'Regan, Grainne M.; Watson, Rosemarie M.; Irwin McLean, W.H.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Irvine, Alan D.; Brown, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD; eczema) is characterized by a widespread abnormality in cutaneous barrier function and propensity to inflammation. Filaggrin is a multifunctional protein and plays a key role in skin barrier formation. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are a highly significant risk factor for atopic disease, but the molecular mechanisms leading to dermatitis remain unclear. Objective We sought to interrogate tissue-specific variations in the expressed genome in the skin of children with AD and to investigate underlying pathomechanisms in atopic skin. Methods We applied single-molecule direct RNA sequencing to analyze the whole transcriptome using minimal tissue samples. Uninvolved skin biopsy specimens from 26 pediatric patients with AD were compared with site-matched samples from 10 nonatopic teenage control subjects. Cases and control subjects were screened for FLG genotype to stratify the data set. Results Two thousand four hundred thirty differentially expressed genes (false discovery rate, P < .05) were identified, of which 211 were significantly upregulated and 490 downregulated by greater than 2-fold. Gene ontology terms for “extracellular space” and “defense response” were enriched, whereas “lipid metabolic processes” were downregulated. The subset of FLG wild-type cases showed dysregulation of genes involved with lipid metabolism, whereas filaggrin haploinsufficiency affected global gene expression and was characterized by a type 1 interferon–mediated stress response. Conclusion These analyses demonstrate the importance of extracellular space and lipid metabolism in atopic skin pathology independent of FLG genotype, whereas an aberrant defense response is seen in subjects with FLG mutations. Genotype stratification of the large data set has facilitated functional interpretation and might guide future therapy development. PMID:24880632

  18. Derivation and validation of a scoring system to stratify the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Imperiale, Thomas F.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Glowinski, Elizabeth A.; Ransohoff, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several methods are recommended equally strongly for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk persons. Risk stratification would enable tailoring of screening within this group, with less invasive tests (sigmoidoscopy or occult blood tests) for lower-risk persons and colonoscopy for higher-risk persons. Objective To create a risk index for advanced neoplasia (colorectal cancer and adenomas or serrated polyps ≥1.0 cm, villous histology, or high-grade dysplasia) anywhere in the colorectum, using the most common risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Multiple endoscopy units, primarily in the Midwest. Patients Persons aged 50 to 80 years undergoing initial screening colonoscopy (December 2004 to September 2011). Measurements Derivation and validation of a risk index based on points from regression coefficients for age, sex, waist circumference, cigarette smoking, and family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 2993 persons in the derivation set, prevalence of advanced neoplasia was 9.4%. Risks for advanced neoplasia in persons at very low, low, intermediate, and high risk were 1.92% (95% CI, 0.63% to 4.43%), 4.88% (CI, 3.79% to 6.18%), 9.93% (CI, 8.09% to 12.0%), and 24.9% (CI, 21.1% to 29.1%), respectively (P < 0.001). Sigmoidoscopy to the descending colon in the low-risk groups would have detected 51 of 70 (73% [CI, 61% to 83%]) advanced neoplasms. Among 1467 persons in the validation set, corresponding risks for advanced neoplasia were 1.65% (CI, 0.20% to 5.84%), 3.31% (CI, 2.08% to 4.97%), 10.9% (CI, 8.26% to 14.1%), and 22.3% (CI, 16.9% to 28.5%), respectively (P < 0.001). Sigmoidoscopy would have detected 21 of 24 (87.5% [CI, 68% to 97%]) advanced neoplasms. Limitations Split-sample validation; results apply to first-time screening. Conclusion This index stratifies risk for advanced neoplasia among average-risk persons by identifying lower-risk groups for which noncolonoscopy strategies may be

  19. Modified STOP-Bang Tool for Stratifying Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk in Adolescent Children

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Daniel; Goodwin, James L.; Quan, Stuart F.; Morgan, Wayne J.; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent in children and diagnostic polysomnography is costly and not readily available in all areas. We developed a pediatric modification of a commonly used adult clinical prediction tool for stratifying the risk of OSA and the need for polysomnography. Methods A total of 312 children (age 9–17 years) from phase 2 of the Tucson Children’s Assessment of Sleep Apnea cohort study, with complete anthropomorphic data, parent questionnaires, and home polysomnograms were included. An adolescent modification of STOP-Bang (teen STOP-Bang) was developed and included snoring, tired, observed apnea, blood pressure ≥ 95th percentile, BMI > 95th percentile, academic problems, neck circumference >95th percentile for age, and male gender. An apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 1.5 events/hour was considered diagnostic of OSA. Results Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves for parent-reported STOP-Bang scores were generated for teenage and pre-teen children. A STOP-Bang score of < 3 in teenagers was associated with a negative predictive value of 0.96. ROC curves were also generated based upon child-reported sexual maturity rating (SMR; n = 291). The ability of teen STOP-Bang to discriminate the presence or absence of OSA as measured by the AUC for children with SMR ≥ 4 (0.83; 95%CI 0.71–0.95) was better than children with SMR < 4 (0.63; 95%CI 0.46–0.81; p = 0.048). Conclusions In community dwelling adolescents, teen STOP-Bang may be useful in stratifying the risk of OSA. PMID:26581088

  20. Implementing risk-stratified screening for common cancers: a review of potential ethical, legal and social issues

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A.E.; Chowdhury, S.; Hallowell, N.; Pashayan, N.; Dent, T.; Pharoah, P.; Burton, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of common genetic variants associated with common cancers including breast, prostate and ovarian cancers would allow population stratification by genotype to effectively target screening and treatment. As scientific, clinical and economic evidence mounts there will be increasing pressure for risk-stratified screening programmes to be implemented. Methods This paper reviews some of the main ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) raised by the introduction of genotyping into risk-stratified screening programmes, in terms of Beauchamp and Childress's four principles of biomedical ethics—respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice. Two alternative approaches to data collection, storage, communication and consent are used to exemplify the ELSI issues that are likely to be raised. Results Ultimately, the provision of risk-stratified screening using genotyping raises fundamental questions about respective roles of individuals, healthcare providers and the state in organizing or mandating such programmes, and the principles, which underpin their provision, particularly the requirement for distributive justice. Conclusions The scope and breadth of these issues suggest that ELSI relating to risk-stratified screening will become increasingly important for policy-makers, healthcare professionals and a wide diversity of stakeholders. PMID:23986542

  1. Leukemia Risk After Cardiac Fluoroscopic Interventions Stratified by Procedure Number, Exposure Latent Time, and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai-Che; Lin, Hon-Yi; Hung, Shih-Kai; Huang, Yu-Tung; Lee, Moon-Sing; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Su, Yu-Chieh; Shen, Bing-Jie; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chiou, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A number of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions have increased rapidly worldwide over the past decade. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and stent implantation have become increasingly popular, and these advancements have allowed patients to receive repetitive treatments for restenosis. However, these advancements also significantly increase radiation exposure that may lead to higher cumulative doses of radiation. In the present study, a nationwide population-based case-controlled study was used to explore the risk of leukemia after cardiac angiographic fluoroscopic intervention. A total of 5026 patients with leukemia and 100,520 control patients matched for age and sex (1:20) by a propensity score method without any cancer history were enrolled using the Registry Data for Catastrophic Illness and the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan between 2008 and 2010. All subjects were retrospectively surveyed (from year 2000) to determine receipt of cardiac fluoroscopic interventions. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression models, and estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval). After adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidities, PTCA was found to be associated with an increased risk of leukemia with an adjusted OR of 1.566 (95% CI, 1.282–1.912), whereas coronary angiography alone without PTCA and cardiac electrophysiologic study were not. Our results also showed that an increased frequency of PTCA and coronary angiography was associated with a higher risk of leukemia (adjusted OR: 1.326 to 1.530 [all P < 0.05]). Gender subgroup analyses demonstrated that men were associated with a higher risk of leukemia compared with women. These results provide additional data in the quantification of the long-term health effects of radiation exposure derived from the cardiac fluoroscopic diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. PTCA alone or PTCA with coronary angiography was associated

  2. The risk of stillbirth and infant death by each additional week of expectant management stratified by maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jessica M.; Snowden, Jonathan M.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Doss, Amy; Rosenstein, Melissa G.; Caughey, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of the study was to examine fetal/infant mortality by gestational age at term stratified by maternal age. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective cohort study was conducted using 2005 US national birth certificate data. For each week of term gestation, the risk of mortality associated with delivery was compared with composite mortality risk of expectant management. The expectant management measure included stillbirth and infant death. This expectant management risk was calculated to estimate the composite mortality risk with remaining pregnant an additional week by combining the risk of stillbirth during the additional week of pregnancy and infant death risk following delivery at the next week. Maternal age was stratified by 35 years or more compared with women younger than 35 years as well as subgroup analyses of younger than 20, 20–34, 35–39, or 40 years old or older. RESULTS The fetal/infant mortality risk of expectant management is greater than the risk of infant death at 39 weeks’ gestation in women 35 years old or older (15.2 vs 10.9 of 10,000, P < .05). In women younger than 35 years old, the risk of expectant management also exceeded that of infant death at 39 weeks (21.3 vs 18.8 of 10,000, P < .05). For women younger than 35 years old, the overall expectant management risk is influenced by higher infant death risk and does not rise significantly until 41 weeks compared with women 35 years old or older in which it increased at 40 weeks. CONCLUSION Risk varies by maternal age, and delivery at 39 weeks minimizes fetal/infant mortality for both groups, although the magnitude of the risk reduction is greater in older women. PMID:23707677

  3. A new proposal to risk stratify urothelial carcinomas of the upper urinary tract (UTUCs) in a predefinitive treatment setting: low-risk versus high-risk UTUCs.

    PubMed

    Rouprêt, Morgan; Colin, Pierre; Yates, David R

    2014-08-01

    Risk stratification of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) patients and tumours is crucial for highlighting that an alternative to radical extirpative surgery now exists and should be considered for all patients who qualify as having low-risk UTUC.

  4. A Clinical Prediction Model to Stratify Retinopathy of Prematurity Risk Using Postnatal Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Gui-shuang; Quinn, Graham E.; Dreiseitl, Stephan; Karp, Karen; Roberts, Robin S.; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an efficient clinical prediction model that includes postnatal weight gain to identify infants at risk of developing severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Under current birth weight (BW) and gestational age (GA) screening criteria, <5% of infants examined in countries with advanced neonatal care require treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study was a secondary analysis of prospective data from the Premature Infants in Need of Transfusion Study, which enrolled 451 infants with a BW < 1000 g at 10 centers. There were 367 infants who remained after excluding deaths (82) and missing weights (2). Multivariate logistic regression was used to predict severe ROP (stage 3 or treatment). RESULTS: Median BW was 800 g (445–995). There were 67 (18.3%) infants who had severe ROP. The model included GA, BW, and daily weight gain rate. Run weekly, an alarm that indicated need for eye examinations occurred when the predicted probability of severe ROP was >0.085. This identified 66 of 67 severe ROP infants (sensitivity of 99% [95% confidence interval: 94%–100%]), and all 33 infants requiring treatment. Median alarm-to-outcome time was 10.8 weeks (range: 1.9–17.6). There were 110 (30%) infants who had no alarm. Nomograms were developed to determine risk of severe ROP by BW, GA, and postnatal weight gain. CONCLUSION: In a high-risk cohort, a BW-GA-weight-gain model could have reduced the need for examinations by 30%, while still identifying all infants requiring laser surgery. Additional studies are required to determine whether including larger-BW, lower-risk infants would reduce examinations further and to validate the prediction model and nomograms before clinical use. PMID:21321036

  5. A comparison of methods for the construction of confidence interval for relative risk in stratified matched-pair designs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nian-Sheng; Li, Hui-Qiong; Tang, Man-Lai

    2010-01-15

    A stratified matched-pair study is often designed for adjusting a confounding effect or effect of different trails/centers/ groups in modern medical studies. The relative risk is one of the most frequently used indices in comparing efficiency of two treatments in clinical trials. In this paper, we propose seven confidence interval estimators for the common relative risk and three simultaneous confidence interval estimators for the relative risks in stratified matched-pair designs. The performance of the proposed methods is evaluated with respect to their type I error rates, powers, coverage probabilities, and expected widths. Our empirical results show that the percentile bootstrap confidence interval and bootstrap-resampling-based Bonferroni simultaneous confidence interval behave satisfactorily for small to large sample sizes in the sense that (i) their empirical coverage probabilities can be well controlled around the pre-specified nominal confidence level with reasonably shorter confidence widths; and (ii) the empirical type I error rates of their associated test statistics are generally closer to the pre-specified nominal level with larger powers. They are hence recommended. Two real examples from clinical laboratory studies are used to illustrate the proposed methodologies.

  6. Risk stratifying asymptomatic aortic stenosis: role of the resting 12-lead ECG.

    PubMed

    Greve, Anders M

    2014-02-01

    Despite being routinely performed in the clinical follow-up of asymptomatic AS patients, little or no evidence describes the prognostic value of ECG findings in asymptomatic AS populations. This PhD thesis examined the correlates of resting 12-lead ECG variables with echocardiographic measures of AS severity and cardiovascular outcomes in the till date largest cohort (n=1,563) of asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS. Most importantly, this PhD thesis demonstrated that QRS-duration adds independent predictive value of sudden cardiac death and that the additional presence of ECG LVH/strain for fixed AS severity represents a lethal risk attribute. Finally, ECG abnormalities displayed low/moderate concordance with echocardiographic parameters. This argues that the ECG should be regarded as a separate tool for obtaining prognostically important information. Treatment was not randomized by ECG findings, future studies should therefore examine if and which ECG variables should elicit closer follow-up and/or earlier intervention to improve prognosis in asymptomatic AS populations. PMID:24495893

  7. Implications of polygenic risk-stratified screening for prostate cancer on overdiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pashayan, Nora; Duffy, Stephen W.; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Martin, Richard M.; Harrington, Patricia; Benlloch, Sara; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Shah, Mitul; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the probability of overdiagnosis of prostate cancer by polygenic risk. Genet Med 17 10, 789–795. Methods: We calculated the polygenic risk score based on 66 known prostate cancer susceptibility variants for 17,012 men aged 50–69 years (9,404 men identified with prostate cancer and 7,608 with no cancer) derived from three UK-based ongoing studies. We derived the probabilities of overdiagnosis by quartiles of polygenic risk considering that the observed prevalence of screen-detected prostate cancer is a combination of underlying incidence, mean sojourn time (MST), test sensitivity, and overdiagnosis. Genet Med 17 10, 789–795. Results: Polygenic risk quartiles 1 to 4 comprised 9, 18, 25, and 48% of the cases, respectively. For a prostate-specific antigen test sensitivity of 80% and MST of 9 years, 43, 30, 25, and 19% of the prevalent screen-detected cancers in quartiles 1 to 4, respectively, were likely to be overdiagnosed cancers. Overdiagnosis decreased with increasing polygenic risk, with 56% decrease between the lowest and the highest polygenic risk quartiles. Genet Med 17 10, 789–795. Conclusion: Targeting screening to men at higher polygenic risk could reduce the problem of overdiagnosis and lead to a better benefit-to-harm balance in screening for prostate cancer. Genet Med 17 10, 789–795. PMID:25569441

  8. The Impact of Implementation Fidelity on Mortality Under a CD4-Stratified Timing Strategy for Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients With Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Monita R; Westreich, Daniel; Yotebieng, Marcel; Nana, Mbonze; Eron, Joseph J; Behets, Frieda; Van Rie, Annelies

    2015-05-01

    Among patients with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus type 1, CD4-stratified initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended, with earlier ART in those with low CD4 counts. However, the impact of implementation fidelity to this recommendation is unknown. We examined a prospective cohort study of 395 adult patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus between August 2007 and November 2009 in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo. ART was to be initiated after 1 month of tuberculosis treatment at a CD4 count of <100 cells/mm(3) or World Health Organization stage 4 (other than extrapulmonary tuberculosis) and after 2 months of tuberculosis treatment at a CD4 count of 100-350 cells/mm(3). We used the parametric g-formula to estimate the impact of implementation fidelity on 6-month mortality. Observed implementation fidelity was low (46%); 54% of patients either experienced delays in ART initiation or did not initiate ART, which could be avoided under perfect implementation fidelity. The observed mortality risk was 12.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.2, 15.7); under complete (counterfactual) implementation fidelity, the mortality risk was 7.8% (95% CI: 2.4, 12.3), corresponding to a risk reduction of 4.2% (95% CI: 0.3, 8.1) and a preventable fraction of 35.1% (95% CI: 2.9, 67.9). Strategies to achieve high implementation fidelity to CD4-stratified ART timing are needed to maximize survival benefit.

  9. Classification of worldwide bovine tuberculosis risk factors in cattle: a stratified approach

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Marie-France; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Saegerman, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The worldwide status of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) as a zoonosis remains of great concern. This article reviews the main risk factors for bTB in cattle based on a three-level classification: animal, herd and region/country level. A distinction is also made, whenever possible, between situations in developed and developing countries as the difference of context might have consequences in terms of risk of bTB. Recommendations are suggested to animal health professionals and scientists directly involved in the control and prevention of bTB in cattle. The determination of Millenium Development Goals for bTB is proposed to improve the control/eradication of the disease worldwide. PMID:19497258

  10. Alterations in regional homogeneity assessed by fMRI in patients with migraine without aura stratified by disease duration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced neuroimaging approaches have been employed to prove that migraine was a central nervous system disorder. This study aims to examine resting-state abnormalities in migraine without aura (MWoA) patients stratified by disease duration, and to explore the neuroimaging markers for reflecting the disease duration. Methods 40 eligible MWoA patients and 20 matched healthy volunteers were included in the study. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis was used to identify the local features of spontaneous brain activity in MWoA patients stratified by disease duration, and analysis was performed to investigate the correlation of overlapped brain dysfunction in MWoA patients with different disease duration (long-term and short-term) and course of disease. Results Compared with healthy controls, MWoA patients with long-term disease duration showed comprehensive neuronal dysfunction than patients with short-term disease duration. In addition, increased average ReHo values in the thalamus, brain stem, and temporal pole showed significantly positive correlations with the disease duration. On the contrary, ReHo values were negatively correlated with the duration of disease in the anterior cingulate cortex, insula, posterior cingulate cortex and superior occipital gyrus. Conclusions Our findings of progressive brain damage in relation to increasing disease duration suggest that migraine without aura is a progressive central nervous disease, and the length of the disease duration was one of the key reasons to cause brain dysfunction in MwoA patients. The repeated migraine attacks over time result in resting-state abnormalities of selective brain regions belonging to the pain processing and cognition. We predict that these brain regions are sensitive neuroimaging markers for reflecting the disease duration of migraine patients without aura. PMID:24134520

  11. Estimation of risk for diabetes according to the metabolically healthy status stratified by degree of obesity in Korean men.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Jae-Hong; Park, Sung Keun; Ye, Sungmin; Choi, Joong-Myung; Oh, Chang-Mo; Kim, Sun Yong; Shin, Ju-Young; Park, Jai Hyung; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Ko, Taeg Su

    2015-12-01

    Although obesity is clearly identified as a risk factor for diabetes, the relationship between diabetes and metabolically healthy status of obesity is less clear. This study was aimed to evaluate the incidental risk of diabetes according to metabolically healthy status of obesity. 31,834 Korean men without diabetes categorized into six groups according to their metabolically healthy status stratified by degree of obesity were followed up for 5 years: metabolically healthy normal weight (MH-NW), metabolically healthy overweight (MH-OW), metabolically healthy obese (MHO), metabolically unhealthy normal weight (MU-NW), metabolically unhealthy overweight (MU-OW), and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO). Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to measure the risk for diabetes according to their categories. While overall incidence was 9.0 %, incidence of diabetes was in proportion to the degree of obesity and metabolically healthy status (MH-NW: 6.3 %, MH-OW: 7.5 %, MHO: 9.2 %, MU-NW: 11.8 %, MU-OW: 14.9 %, MUO: 20.1 %). When MH-NW was set as reference, the adjusted HRs (95 % CI) for diabetes of the MH-OW, MHO, MU-NW, MU-OW, MUO compared to MH-NW were 1.18 (1.06-1.32), 1.58 (1.03-2.41), 1.81 (1.61-2.04), 2.36 (2.11-2.63), and 3.47 (2.84-4.24), respectively. In conclusion, risk for diabetes was in proportion to the degree of obesity in both metabolically healthy and unhealthy group. Metabolically healthy status was more significant determinant for incident diabetes than obesity itself.

  12. Kernel Machine Testing for Risk Prediction with Stratified Case Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rebecca; Neykov, Matey; Jensen, Majken Karoline; Cai, Tianxi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Large assembled cohorts with banked biospecimens offer valuable opportunities to identify novel markers for risk prediction. When the outcome of interest is rare, an effective strategy to conserve limited biological resources while maintaining reasonable statistical power is the case cohort (CCH) sampling design, in which expensive markers are measured on a subset of cases and controls. However, the CCH design introduces significant analytical complexity due to outcome-dependent, finite-population sampling. Current methods for analyzing CCH studies focus primarily on the estimation of simple survival models with linear effects; testing and estimation procedures that can efficiently capture complex non-linear marker effects for CCH data remain elusive. In this paper, we propose inverse probability weighted (IPW) variance component type tests for identifying important marker sets through a Cox proportional hazards kernel machine (CoxKM) regression framework previously considered for full cohort studies (Cai et al., 2011). The optimal choice of kernel, while vitally important to attain high power, is typically unknown for a given dataset. Thus we also develop robust testing procedures that adaptively combine information from multiple kernels. The proposed IPW test statistics have complex null distributions that cannot easily be approximated explicitly. Furthermore, due to the correlation induced by CCH sampling, standard resampling methods such as the bootstrap fail to approximate the distribution correctly. We therefore propose a novel perturbation resampling scheme that can effectively recover the induced correlation structure. Results from extensive simulation studies suggest that the proposed IPW CoxKM testing procedures work well in finite samples. The proposed methods are further illustrated by application to a Danish CCH study of Apolipoprotein C-III markers on the risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:26692376

  13. Aligning the Economic Value of Companion Diagnostics and Stratified Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Edward D.; Stratton, Elyse K.; Kaufmann, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The twin forces of payors seeking fair pricing and the rising costs of developing new medicines has driven a closer relationship between pharmaceutical companies and diagnostics companies, because stratified medicines, guided by companion diagnostics, offer better commercial, as well as clinical, outcomes. Stratified medicines have created clinical success and provided rapid product approvals, particularly in oncology, and indeed have changed the dynamic between drug and diagnostic developers. The commercial payback for such partnerships offered by stratified medicines has been less well articulated, but this has shifted as the benefits in risk management, pricing and value creation for all stakeholders become clearer. In this larger healthcare setting, stratified medicine provides both physicians and patients with greater insight on the disease and provides rationale for providers to understand cost-effectiveness of treatment. This article considers how the economic value of stratified medicine relationships can be recognized and translated into better outcomes for all healthcare stakeholders. PMID:25562363

  14. Obstacles to the ‘cleanliness of our race’: HIV, reproductive risk, stratified reproduction, and population quality in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Khuat Thu; Nhan, Vu Thi Thanh; Thao, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the interactions between medical professionals in Hanoi, Vietnam and their HIV-positive patients who desire children. Drawing on ethnographic research, we argue that despite ongoing state and civil society efforts to reduce discrimination against people living with HIV (PLHIV), doctors do stigmatize patients who choose to reproduce, even if the patients are found to have carefully considered all associated risks. While the effects of the Social Evils Campaign linger, the doctors’ prejudicial stance towards PLHIV’s reproductive desires and risks also reflects the messages communicated by the more recent governmental campaign on Population Quality. The result of this stigmatization is a stratification of reproduction among the Vietnamese citizenry whereby PLHIV are considered obstacles to ‘the cleanliness of the race’. PMID:25378810

  15. Axl Expression Stratifies Patients with Poor Prognosis after Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yong; Li, Jun; Shi, Lehua; Zou, Qifei; Wan, Xuying; Jiao, Binghua; Wang, Hongyang; Wu, Mengchao; Zhang, Yongjie; Shen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Axl is a receptor tyrosine kinase which plays an important role in multiple human malignancies. Design The Axl expression was examined in several hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) cell lines, paired tumor and nontumorous samples. Then, we examined cell growth curve, cell apoptosis and cell migration in SMMC-7721 cells over-expressed with Axl or siRNA against Axl, respectively. Finally, the prognostic value of Axl was investigated in a prospective cohort of 246 consecutive HCC patients undergoing curative hepatoectomy. Results We found Axl was positive in 22% of examined tumor tissues and all four cell lines. Over-expressing Axl in SMMC-7721 cells accelerated cell growth, cell migration and inhibited cell apoptosis, while knock-down of Axl exerted opposite effect. Axl expression was closely associated with serum AFP, multiple tumors, absence of encapsulation, microvascular invasion, and advanced BCLC or TNM stage. Patients with positive Axl staining had a higher 5-year recurrence rate (92% vs. 71%, P<0.001) and a lower 5-year survival rate (9% vs. 48%, P<0.001) than those with negative staining. The multivariate analyses showed that Axl expression was an independent factor for both tumor recurrence (HR: 1.725; 95% CI: 1.219–2.441) and survival (1.847; 1.291–2.642). Conclusion Axl expression suggests more aggressive tumor invasiveness and predicts worse prognosis for HCC patients undergoing resection. PMID:27182739

  16. Low risk of coronary artery disease in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Silva, Cintia Marques; Lima, G A B; Volschan, I C M; Gottlieb, I; Kasuki, L; Neto, L Vieira; Gadelha, M R

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in acromegalic patients and to investigate the relationship between the coronary artery calcium score (CS) and acromegaly status and clinical parameters [Framingham risk score (FRS)]. Fifty-six acromegalic patients and paired non-acromegalic volunteers were stratified according to the FRS into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. CS was assessed using multidetector computed tomography. The patients were considered to have controlled or active acromegaly at the time they were submitted to evaluation. Sixty-six percent of acromegalic patients exhibited arterial hypertension, 36 % had diabetes mellitus, and 34 % had hypercholesterolemia. The median FRS and the median risk for cardiovascular event within the next 10 years were similar in the acromegalics and the controls. The median total CS and CS >75th percentile didn't differ significantly between these groups. In patients with controlled acromegaly, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was observed in 86, 14, and 0 %, respectively. In patients with active disease, a low, intermediate, or high FRS risk was verified in 94, 3, and 3 %, respectively, and differences between the controlled and active groups were not significant. Seventy-two percent of the patients had total CS = 0, and there were no differences between the controlled and active groups. The risk of coronary artery disease in acromegalic patients, determined according to FRS and CS, is low despite the high prevalence of metabolic abnormalities.

  17. Association between hospital case volume and mortality in non-elderly pneumonia patients stratified by severity: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The characteristics and aetiology of pneumonia in the non-elderly population is distinct from that in the elderly population. While a few studies have reported an inverse association between hospital case volume and clinical outcome in elderly pneumonia patients, the evidence is lacking in a younger population. In addition, the relationship between volume and outcome may be different in severe pneumonia cases than in mild cases. In this context, we tested two hypotheses: 1) non-elderly pneumonia patients treated at hospitals with larger case volume have better clinical outcome compared with those treated at lower case volume hospitals; 2) the volume-outcome relationship differs by the severity of the pneumonia. Methods We conducted the study using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. Patients aged 18–64 years discharged from the participating hospitals between July to December 2010 were included. The hospitals were categorized into four groups (very-low, low, medium, high) based on volume quartiles. The association between hospital case volume and in-hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression with generalized estimating equations adjusting for pneumonia severity, patient demographics and comorbidity score, and hospital academic status. We further analyzed the relationship by modified A-DROP pneumonia severity score calculated using the four severity indices: dehydration, low oxygen saturation, orientation disturbance, and decreased systolic blood pressure. Results We identified 8,293 cases of pneumonia at 896 hospitals across Japan, with 273 in-hospital deaths (3.3%). In the overall population, no significant association between hospital volume and in-hospital mortality was observed. However, when stratified by pneumonia severity score, higher hospital volume was associated with lower in-hospital mortality at the intermediate severity level (modified A-DROP score = 2) (odds ratio (OR) of very low vs

  18. Opposite Associations between Individual KIAA0319 Polymorphisms and Developmental Dyslexia Risk across Populations: A Stratified Meta-Analysis by the Study Population

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shanshan; Niu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kong, Rui; Wang, Jia; Liu, Lingfei; Luo, Xiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Song, Ranran

    2016-01-01

    KIAA0319 at the DYX2 locus is one of the most extensively studied candidate genes for developmental dyslexia (DD) owing to its important role in neuronal migration. Previous research on associations between KIAA0319 genetic variations and DD has yielded inconsistent results. It is important to establish a more precise estimate of the DD risk associated with these genetic variations. We carried out a meta-analysis of association studies involving KIAA0319 polymorphisms and DD risk. The results of pooled analysis indicated that none of the six investigated markers in or near the KIAA0319 gene are associated with DD. However, a stratified analysis by the study population revealed opposite associations involving KIAA0319 rs4504469 in European and Asian subgroups. The stratified analysis also showed that the KIAA0319 rs9461045 minor allele (T allele) has a protective effect in Asians. This meta-analysis has allowed us to establish the effects of specific KIAA0319 polymorphisms on DD risk with greater precision, as they vary across populations; analyzing one single nucleotide polymorphism at a time could not fully explain the genetic association for DD. PMID:27464509

  19. Opposite Associations between Individual KIAA0319 Polymorphisms and Developmental Dyslexia Risk across Populations: A Stratified Meta-Analysis by the Study Population.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shanshan; Niu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kong, Rui; Wang, Jia; Liu, Lingfei; Luo, Xiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Song, Ranran

    2016-01-01

    KIAA0319 at the DYX2 locus is one of the most extensively studied candidate genes for developmental dyslexia (DD) owing to its important role in neuronal migration. Previous research on associations between KIAA0319 genetic variations and DD has yielded inconsistent results. It is important to establish a more precise estimate of the DD risk associated with these genetic variations. We carried out a meta-analysis of association studies involving KIAA0319 polymorphisms and DD risk. The results of pooled analysis indicated that none of the six investigated markers in or near the KIAA0319 gene are associated with DD. However, a stratified analysis by the study population revealed opposite associations involving KIAA0319 rs4504469 in European and Asian subgroups. The stratified analysis also showed that the KIAA0319 rs9461045 minor allele (T allele) has a protective effect in Asians. This meta-analysis has allowed us to establish the effects of specific KIAA0319 polymorphisms on DD risk with greater precision, as they vary across populations; analyzing one single nucleotide polymorphism at a time could not fully explain the genetic association for DD. PMID:27464509

  20. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL. The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL. Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24–2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07–10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08–12.75). Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold. PMID:27603402

  1. Risk of prescribing errors in acutely admitted patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Sædder, Eva Aggerholm; Sørensen, Charlotte Arp; Brock, Birgitte; Andersen, Ljubica; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-10-01

    Background Prescribing errors in emergency settings occur frequently. Knowing which patients have the highest risk of errors could improve patient outcomes. Objective The aim of this study was to test an algorithm designed to assess prescribing error risk in individual patients, and to test the feasibility of medication reviews in high-risk patients. Setting The study was performed at the Acute Admissions Unit at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Methods The study was an interventional pilot study. Patients included were assessed according to risk of prescribing errors with the aid of an algorithm called 'Medication Risk Score' (MERIS). Based on the score, high-risk patients were offered a medication review. The clinical relevance of the medication reviews was assessed retrospectively. Main outcome measure The number and nature of prescribing errors during the patients' hospitalisation. Results The study included 103 patients, all of whom could be risk assessed with the algorithm MERIS. MERIS stratified 38 patients as high-risk patients and 65 as low-risk patients. The 103 patients were prescribed a total of 848 drugs in which 88 prescribing errors were found (10.4 %). Sixty-two of these were found in patients in the high-risk group. In general, the medication reviews were found to be clinically relevant and approximately 50 % of recommendations were implemented. Conclusion MERIS was found to be applicable in a clinical setting and stratified most patients with prescribing errors into the high-risk group. The medication reviews were feasible and found to be clinically relevant by most raters.

  2. A dengue vector surveillance by human population-stratified ovitrap survey for Aedes (Diptera: Culicidae) adult and egg collections in high dengue-risk areas of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huai-Hui; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Lin, Cheo; Lu, Liang-Chen; Jian, Shu-Wan; Chang, Niann-Tai; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Wu, Jhy-Wen; Liu, Ding-Ping; Lin, Li-Jen; Norris, Douglas E; Wu, Ho-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Aedes aegypti L. is the primary dengue vector in southern Taiwan. This article is the first report on a large-scale surveillance program to study the spatial-temporal distribution of the local Ae. aegytpi population using ovitraps stratified according to the human population in high dengue-risk areas. The sampling program was conducted for 1 yr and was based on weekly collections of eggs and adults in Kaohsiung City. In total, 10,380 ovitraps were placed in 5,190 households. Paired ovitraps, one indoors and one outdoors were used per 400 people. Three treatments in these ovitraps (paddle-shaped wooden sticks, sticky plastic, or both) were assigned by stratified random sampling to two areas (i.e., metropolitan or rural, respectively). We found that the sticky plastic alone had a higher sensitivity for detecting the occurrence of indigenous dengue cases than other treatments with time lags of up to 14 wk. The wooden paddle alone detected the oviposition of Ae. aegypti throughout the year in this study area. Furthermore, significantly more Ae. aegypti females were collected indoors than outdoors. Therefore, our survey identified the whole year oviposition activity, spatial-temporal distribution of the local Ae. aegypti population and a 14 wk lag correlation with dengue incidence to plan an effectively proactive control. PMID:23540112

  3. Zolpidem Use and Risk of Fracture in Elderly Insomnia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Yoon; Park, Soyoung; Rhee, Chul-Woo; Kim, Ye-Jee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Lee, Joongyub

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the risk of fractures related with zolpidem in elderly insomnia patients. Methods Health claims data on the entire South Korean elderly population from January 2005 to June 2006 were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. We applied a case-crossover design. Cases were defined as insomnia patients who had a fracture diagnosis. We set the hazard period of 1 day length prior to the fracture date and four control periods of the same length at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks prior to the fracture date. Time independent confounding factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, cognitive function level, mobility, socioeconomic status, residential environment, and comorbidity could be controlled using the casecrossover design. Time dependent confounding factors, especially co-medication of patients during the study period, were adjusted by conditional logistic regression analysis. The odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for the risk of fracture related to zolpidem. Results One thousand five hundred and eight cases of fracture were detected in insomnia patients during the study period. In our data, the use of zolpidem increased the risk of fracture significantly (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.72; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.16). However, the association between benzodiazepine hypnotics and the risk of fracture was not statistically significant (aOR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.21). Likewise, the results were not statistically significant in stratified analysis with each benzodiazepine generic subgroup. Conclusions Zolpidem could increase the risk of fracture in elderly insomnia patients. Therefore zolpidem should be prescribed carefully and the elderly should be provided with sufficient patient education. PMID:22880153

  4. An electronic patient risk communication board.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A; Benoit, Angela N; Breydo, Eugene M; Carroll, Diane L; Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W; Dykes, John S; Dykes, Patricia C

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient's bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient's key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB.

  5. The Readmission Risk Flag: Using the Electronic Health Record to Automatically Identify Patients at Risk for 30-day Readmission

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Charles A.; VanZandbergen, Christine; Tait, Gordon; Hanish, Asaf; Leas, Brian; French, Benjamin; Hanson, C. William; Behta, Maryam; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Identification of patients at high risk for readmission is a crucial step toward improving care and reducing readmissions. The adoption of electronic health records (EHR) may prove important to strategies designed to risk stratify patients and introduce targeted interventions. Objective To develop and implement an automated prediction model integrated into our health system’s EHR that identifies on admission patients at high risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective and prospective cohort. Setting Healthcare system consisting of three hospitals. Patients All adult patients admitted from August 2009 to September 2012. Interventions An automated readmission risk flag integrated into the EHR. Measures Thirty-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned healthcare system readmissions. Results Using retrospective data, a single risk factor, ≥2 inpatient admissions in the past 12 months, was found to have the best balance of sensitivity (40%), positive predictive value (31%), and proportion of patients flagged (18%), with a c-statistic of 0.62. Sensitivity (39%), positive predictive value (30%), proportion of patients flagged (18%) and c-statistic (0.61) during the 12-month period after implementation of the risk flag were similar. There was no evidence for an effect of the intervention on 30-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned readmission rates in the 12-month period after implementation. Conclusions An automated prediction model was effectively integrated into an existing EHR and identified patients on admission who were at risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. PMID:24227707

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of Risk-Stratified Care Management in Reducing Readmissions in Medicaid Adults With Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Hewner, Sharon; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill; Castner, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalized adult Medicaid recipients with chronic disease are at risk for rehospitalization within 90 days of discharge, but most research has focused on the Medicare population. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of population-based care management intensity on inpatient readmissions in Medicaid adults with pre-existing chronic disease. Retrospective analyses of 2,868 index hospital admissions from 2012 New York State Medicaid Data Warehouse claims compared 90-day post-discharge utilization in populations with and without transitional care management interventions. High intensity managed care organization interventions were associated with higher outpatient and lower emergency department post-discharge utilization than low intensity fee-for-service management. However, readmission rates were higher for the managed care cases. Shorter time to readmission was associated with managed care, diagnoses that include heart and kidney failure, shorter length of stay for index hospitalization, and male sex; with no relationship to age. This unexpected result flags the need to re-evaluate readmission as a quality indicator in the complex Medicaid population. Quality improvement efforts should focus on care continuity during transitions and consider population-specific factors that influence readmission. Optimum post-discharge utilization in the Medicaid population requires a balance between outpatient, emergency and inpatient services to improve access and continuity. PMID:26730804

  7. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  8. Risk stratification in patients with non Q wave myocardial infarction: a role for thallium exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Brophy, J M; Kerouac, M

    1990-12-01

    The ability of maximal exercise thallium testing to stratify patients after non Q wave myocardial infarction was prospectively examined in 20 patients. Patients were enrolled in the study if there was no evidence of residual ischemia nor congestive heart failure during initial hospitalization. The thallium exercise test showed four patients to be at high risk, three of whom had successful revascularization. The remaining 16 patients were considered to be at low risk. There were no re-admissions for unstable angina, no myocardial infarctions and no deaths in the follow-up period (average 15 months). Thus patients with no evidence of early ischemia, no signs of left ventricular failure and a negative maximum thallium exercise test are at low risk following non Q wave myocardial infarction.

  9. Stratifying risk of recurrence in stage II colorectal cancer using deregulated stromal and epithelial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Marc D; Pickard, Karen; Mitter, Richard; Sayan, A Emre; Primrose, John N; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A; Thomas, Gareth J; Packham, Graham K; Mirnezami, Alex H

    2015-03-30

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) enable colonic epithelial cells to acquire malignant characteristics and metastatic capabilities. Recently, cancer relevant miRNAs deregulated during disease progression have also been identified in tumor-associated stroma.By combining laser-microdissection (LMD) with high-throughput screening and high-sensitivity quantitation techniques, miRNA expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens and paired normal colonic tissue was independently characterized in stromal and epithelial tissue compartments. Notably, deregulation of the key oncogene miR-21 was identified exclusively as a stromal phenomenon and miR-106a, an epithelial phenomenon in the malignant state.MiRNAs identified in this study successfully distinguished CRC from normal tissue and metastatic from non-metastatic tumor specimens. Furthermore, in a separate cohort of 50 consecutive patients with CRC, stromal miR-21 and miR-556 and epithelial miR-106a expression predicted short disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in stage II disease: miR-21 (DFS: HR = 2.68, p = 0.015; OS: HR = 2.47, p = 0.029); miR-556 (DFS: HR = 2.60, p = 0.018); miR-106a (DFS: HR = 2.91, p = 0.008; OS: HR = 2.25, p = 0.049); combined (All High vs. All Low. DFS: HR = 5.83, p = 0.002; OS: HR = 4.13, p = 0.007).These data support the notion that stromal as well as epithelial miRNAs play important roles during disease progression, and that mapping patterns of deregulated gene expression to the appropriate tumor strata may be a valuable aid to therapeutic decision making in CRC. PMID:25788261

  10. Cancer Risk among Patients with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Lund, Marie; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Gørtz, Sanne; Mueller, Christine M; Moxley, Richard T; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Björkholm, Magnus; Shebl, Fatma M; Hilbert, James E; Landgren, Ola; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Greene, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Context Myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) is an autosomal dominant multisystem neuromuscular disorder characterized by unstable nucleotide repeat expansions. Case reports have suggested that MMD patients may be at increased risk of malignancy, putative risks which have never been quantified. Objective To quantitatively evaluate cancer risk in patients with MMD, overall, and by sex and age. Design, Setting, and Participants We identified 1,658 patients with an MMD discharge diagnosis in the Swedish Inpatient Hospital or Danish Patient Discharge Registries between 1977 and 2008. We linked these patients to their corresponding cancer registry. Patients were followed from date of first MMD-related inpatient or outpatient contact, to first cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, or completion of cancer registration. Main Outcome Measures Risks of all cancers combined, and by anatomic site, stratified by sex and age. Results 104 patients with an inpatient or outpatient discharge diagnosis of MMD developed cancer during post-discharge follow-up. This corresponds to an observed cancer rate of 73.4/10,000 person-years in MMD versus an expected rate of 36.9/10,000 in the general Swedish and Danish populations combined (SIR =2.0, 95% CI =1.6–2.4). Specifically, we observed significant excess risks of cancers of the endometrium (observed rate=16.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=7.6, 95%CI=4.0–13.2), brain (observed rate=4.9/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.3, 95%CI=2.3–10.4), ovary (observed rate=10.3/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.2, 95% CI=2.3–10.2), and colon (observed rate=7.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=2.9, 95%CI=1.5–5.1). Cancer risks were similar in females and males after excluding genital organ tumors (SIR=1.9, 95% CI=1.4–2.5 vs. 1.8, 95% CI=1.3–2.5, respectively, p-heterogeneity=0.81; observed rates=64.5 and 47.7/10,000 person-years in women and men, respectively), The same pattern of cancer excess was observed first in the Swedish, and then in the Danish cohorts, which

  11. Thrombotic risk assessment in 185 WHO-defined essential thrombocythemia patients: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Dambrauskiene, Ruta; Gerbutavicius, Rolandas; Juozaityte, Elona; Gerbutaviciene, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis risk in essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients can be assessed using different prognostic systems. Conventional risk factors include age more than 60 years and history of previous thrombosis. In addition, other factors such as JAK2 V617F mutations, cardiovascular risk factors, leukocytosis more than 11 × 10(9)/l, thrombophilic factors and platelet count more than 1500 × 10(9)/l are used in different hematology centers as high-risk features for thrombosis. Our study compared different risk model groups for thrombosis in 185 WHO-defined ET patients at the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kaunas Klinikos. We found that patient distribution in low, intermediate- and high-risk groups varies using different risk stratification models. The biggest difference in risk assignment is evident in patients who are older than 60 years and have no other risk factors and in patients who are younger than 60 years but have other risk factors. This observation suggests that new prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to better stratify patients at risk for thrombosis. PMID:26793025

  12. Risk Stratification in Atrial Fibrillation Patients – A Review Focused on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increased mortality that is largely due to the severe co-morbidities of patients with this rhythm disturbance rather than to its electrocardiographic features. Available evidence indicated that ageing, heart failure and stroke are the most important predictors of all-cause mortality. Additional clinical parameters such as smoking, renal impairment, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may also identify patients at risk. The prevention of thromboembolic events is based on oral anticoagulant therapy, which reduces the severity and mortality of ischaemic strokes but slightly increase the rate of haemorrhagic events. Most of the traditional risk stratifiers commonly used in patients in sinus rhythm such as New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and resting heart rate seem to be less effective in AF patients thus leaving to the physician judgment the main responsibility of identifying patients with an increased mortality risk. PMID:26835022

  13. Adrenal venous sampling for stratifying patients for surgery of adrenal nodules detected using dynamic contrast enhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Kim, See Hyung; Lee, Hee Jung; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Mi Jeong; Cho, Seung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the value of adrenal venous sampling (AVS) for diagnosing primary aldosteronism (PA) subtypes in patients with a unilateral nodule detected on adrenal computed tomography (CT) and scheduled for adrenalectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study included 80 consecutive patients with PA undergoing CT and AVS. Different lateralization indices were assessed, and a cutoff established using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The value of CT alone versus CT with AVS for differentiating PA subtypes was compared. The adrenalectomy outcome was assessed, and predictors of cure were determined using univariate analysis. RESULTS AVS was successful in 68 patients. A cortisol-corrected aldosterone affected-to-unaffected ratio cutoff of 2.0 and affected-to-inferior vena cava ratio cutoff of 1.4 were the best lateralization indices, with accuracies of 82.5% and 80.4%, respectively. CT and AVS diagnosed 38 patients with aldosterone-producing adenomas, five patients with unilateral adrenal hyperplasia, and 25 patients with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Of the 52 patients with a nodule detected on CT, subsequent AVS diagnosed bilateral adrenal hyperplasia in 14 patients (27%). Compared to the results of combining CT with AVS, the accuracy of CT alone for diagnosing aldosterone-producing adenomas was 71.1% (P < 0.001). The cure rate for hypertension after adrenalectomy was 39.2%, with improvement in 53.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, predictors of persistent hypertension were male gender and preoperative systolic blood pressure. CONCLUSION To avoid inappropriate surgery, AVS is necessary for diagnosing unilateral nodules with aldosterone hypersecretion detected by CT. PMID:24047720

  14. Achieving cholesterol targets by individualizing starting doses of statin according to baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease risk category: The CANadians Achieve Cholesterol Targets Fast with Atorvastatin Stratified Titration (CanACTFAST) study

    PubMed Central

    Ur, Ehud; Langer, Anatoly; Rabkin, Simon W; Calciu, Cristina-Dana; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite an increasing body of evidence on the benefit of lowering elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), there is still considerable concern that patients are not achieving target LDL-C levels. OBJECTIVE: The CANadians Achieve Cholesterol Targets Fast with Atorvastatin Stratified Titration (CanACTFAST) trial tested whether an algorithm-based statin dosing approach would enable patients to achieve LDL-C and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio targets quickly. METHODS: Subjects requiring statin therapy, but with an LDL-C level of 5.7 mmol/L or lower, and triglycerides of 6.8 mmol/L or lower at screening participated in the 12-week study, which had two open-label, six-week phases: a treatment period during which patients received 10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg or 80 mg of atorvastatin based on an algorithm incorporating baseline LDL-C value and cardiovascular risk; and patients who achieved both LDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio targets at six weeks continued on the same atorvastatin dose. Patients who did not achieve both targets received dose uptitration using a single-step titration regimen. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients achieving target LDL-C levels after 12 weeks. RESULTS: Of 2016 subjects screened at 88 Canadian sites, 1258 were assigned to a study drug (1101 were statin-free and 157 were statin-treated at baseline). The proportion of subjects who achieved LDL-C targets after 12 weeks of treatment was 86% (95% CI 84% to 88%) for statin-free patients and 54% (95% CI 46% to 61%) for statin-treated patients. Overall, 1003 subjects (80%; 95% CI 78% to 82%) achieved both lipid targets. CONCLUSIONS: Algorithm-based statin dosing enables patients to achieve LDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio targets quickly, with either no titration or a single titration. PMID:20151053

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Profiles of Antibodies to Mycobacterial Capsular Polysaccharides in Tuberculosis Patients and Controls Stratified by HIV Status

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xian; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Jenny-Avital, Elisabeth R.; Sosa, Katherine; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Despite the complexity of tuberculosis (TB) serology, antibodies (Abs) remain attractive biomarkers for TB. Recent evidence of a mycobacterial capsule that consists mainly of the polysaccharides arabinomannan (AM) and glucan provides new options for serologic targets. For this study, Ab responses to AM and glucan for 47 U.S. TB patients (33 HIV negative [HIV−], 14 HIV positive [HIV+]), 42 healthy controls, and 38 asymptomatic HIV+ controls were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The results were compared with Ab responses to the mycobacterial glycolipid cell wall antigen lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and to the proteins malate synthase (MS) and MPT51. We found that the main immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype response to polysaccharides was IgG, predominantly of subclass IgG2. IgG responses to AM were significantly higher for HIV− and HIV+ TB cases than for controls (P, <0.0001 and <0.01, respectively); significantly higher for HIV− than for HIV+ TB cases (P, <0.01); and significantly higher in sputum smear-positive than smear-negative patients in both HIV− and HIV+ cases (P, 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). In both TB groups, titers of Ab to glucan were significantly lower than titers of Ab to AM (P, <0.0001). IgG responses to AM and MS or to AM and MPT51 did not correlate with each other in HIV− TB patients, while they correlated significantly in HIV+ TB patients (P, 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). We conclude that Ab responses to AM could contribute to the serodiagnosis of TB, especially for HIV− TB patients. This study also provides new and important insights into the differences in the profiles of Abs to mycobacterial antigens between HIV− and HIV+ TB patients. PMID:22169090

  16. Dental care provided to sickle cell anemia patients stratified by age: A population-based study in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Cyrene Piazera Silva; Aires, Bárbara Tamires Cruz; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Souza, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess differences in the dental care provided to sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients depending on age. This retrospective study used secondary data from the dental records of the Center of Hematology and Hemotherapy in Maranhão (HEMOMAR). Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from 574 dental records of patients with SCA treated or under treatment in the Dental Department of HEMOMAR from 2000 to 2011. Data on the gender, age, duration of dental treatment, number of patients submitted to periodontal treatment (PT), number of filled teeth (FT), teeth extracted (EX), endodontically treated teeth (ET), and reason for the dental procedures were collected. The Kruskal–Wallis test together with Dunn's post hoc test, Chi-square test, and Spearman's correlation was used for statistical analysis. An alpha error of 5% was considered acceptable. Results: Significant differences were found for FT, EX (P < 0.05), ET and PT (P < 0.001) between the age groups. There were fewer FT in children compared to other age groups (P < 0.001). The most common reasons for restorations and endodontic treatment were dental caries (100%) and irreversible pulpitis (55.6%), respectively. The main reasons for teeth extractions were residual roots (21.3%), chronic apical periodontitis (19.7%), and crown destruction (19.3%). There were positive correlations between age and EX (r = 0.93; P = 0.025) and ET (r = 0.92; P = 0.028). Conclusions: FT, ET, EX, and PT procedures become more common in older patients. Tooth decay is the main reason for dental treatment in SCA patients. PMID:27403053

  17. Stratification of brachytherapy-treated intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients into favorable and unfavorable cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Fiano, Ryan; Adamovich, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate biochemical failure (BF) and prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM) in intermediate-risk (IR) brachytherapy patients stratified into favorable and unfavorable cohorts, and to compare those outcomes to patients with low (LR) and high-risk (HR) disease. Material and methods From March 1995 till February 2012, 2,502 consecutive patients underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients were stratified into risk groups as per the NCCN guidelines with further stratification of the intermediate risk cohort into unfavorable (primary Gleason pattern 4, ≥ 50% positive biopsies or ≥ 2 IR features) and favorable cohorts. Median follow-up was 8.5 years. The brachytherapy prescription dose was prescribed to the prostate gland with generous periprostatic margins. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA > 0.40 ng/ml after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or non-metastatic castrate resistant disease who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. Multiple parameters were evaluated for effect on outcomes. Results Fifteen year BF for LR, favorable IR, unfavorable IR, and HR were 1.4%, 2.2%, 7.1%, and 11.1% (p < 0.001), respectively. At 15 years, PCSM for LR, favorable IR, unfavorable IR, and HR was 0.3%, 0.6%, 2.2% and 4.6% (p < 0.001), respectively. In multivariate analysis, BF was best predicted by risk group, pre-implant PSA, percent positive biopsies, prostate volume, and ADT duration, while PCSM was most closely related to risk group, percent positive biopsies and prostate volume. Conclusions Patients with favorable IR disease have biochemical and PCSM outcomes comparable to those of patients with LR disease. Although unfavorable IR has greater than a 3-fold increased risk of BF and PCSM when compared to favorable IR, the outcomes remain superior to those men with HR disease. PMID:26816337

  18. Clinico-biological features of 5202 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia enrolled in the Italian AIEOP and GIMEMA protocols and stratified in age cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Chiaretti, Sabina; Vitale, Antonella; Cazzaniga, Gianni; Orlando, Sonia Maria; Silvestri, Daniela; Fazi, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Elia, Loredana; Testi, Anna Maria; Mancini, Francesca; Conter, Valentino; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Ferrara, Felicetto; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Fioritoni, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Francesco; Meloni, Giovanna; Specchia, Giorgina; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Mandelli, Franco; Guarini, Anna; Basso, Giuseppe; Biondi, Andrea; Foà, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of children and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is markedly different. Since there is limited information on the distribution of clinico-biological variables in different age cohorts, we analyzed 5202 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia enrolled in the Italian multicenter AIEOP and GIMEMA protocols and stratified them in nine age cohorts. The highest prevalence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was observed in children, although a second peak was recorded from the 4th decade onwards. Interestingly, the lowest incidence was found in females between 14–40 years. Immunophenotypic characterization showed a B-lineage in 85.8% of patients: a pro-B stage, associated with MLL/AF4 positivity, was more frequent in patients between 10–50 years. T-lineage leukemia (14.2%) was rare among small children and increased in patients aged 10–40 years. The prevalence of the BCR/ABL1 rearrangement increased progressively with age starting from the cohort of patients 10–14 years old and was present in 52.7% of cases in the 6th decade. Similarly, the MLL/AF4 rearrangement constantly increased up to the 5th decade, while the ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangement disappeared from the age of 30 onwards. This study shows that acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults is characterized by a male prevalence, higher percentage of T-lineage cases, an increase of poor prognostic molecular markers with aging compared to cases in children, and conclusively quantified the progressive increase of BCR/ABL+ cases with age, which are potentially manageable by targeted therapies. PMID:23716539

  19. Constipation Risk in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sevim; Atar, Nurdan Yalcin; Ozturk, Nilgun; Mendes, Guler; Kuytak, Figen; Bakar, Esra; Dalgiran, Duygu; Ergin, Sumeyra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Problems regarding bowel elimination are quite common in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Objectives: To determine constipation risk before the surgery, bowel elimination during postoperative period, and the factors affecting bowel elimination. Patients and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. It was conducted in a general surgery ward of a university hospital in Zonguldak, Turkey between January 2013 and May 2013. A total of 107 patients were included in the study, who were selected by convenience sampling. Constipation Risk Assessment Scale (CRAS), patient information form, medical and nursing records were used in the study. Results: The mean age of the patients was found to be 55.97 ± 15.74 (year). Most of the patients have undergone colon (37.4%) and stomach surgeries (21.5%). Open surgical intervention (83.2%) was performed on almost all patients (96.3%) under general anesthesia. Patients were at moderate risk for constipation with average scores of 11.71 before the surgery. A total of 77 patients (72%) did not have bowel elimination problem during postoperative period. The type of the surgery (P < 0.05), starting time for oral feeding after the surgery (P < 0.05), and mobilization (P < 0.05) were effective on postoperative bowel elimination. Conclusions: There is a risk for constipation after abdominal surgery. Postoperative practices are effective on the risk of constipation. PMID:26380107

  20. An Electronic Patient Risk Communication Board

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A.; Benoit, Angela N.; Breydo, Eugene M.; Carroll, Diane L.; Keohane, Carol A.; Bates, David W.; Dykes, John S.; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient’s bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient’s key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB. PMID:24199109

  1. Creation of a Prognostic Index for Spine Metastasis to Stratify Survival in Patients Treated With Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Secondary Analysis of Mature Prospective Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chad; Hess, Kenneth; Bishop, Andrew J.; Pan, Hubert Y.; Christensen, Eva N.; Yang, James N.; Tannir, Nizar; Amini, Behrang; Tatsui, Claudio; Rhines, Laurence; Brown, Paul; Ghia, Amol

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: There exists uncertainty in the prognosis of patients following spinal metastasis treatment. We sought to create a scoring system that stratifies patients based on overall survival. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in 2 prospective trials investigating stereotactic spine radiation surgery (SSRS) for spinal metastasis with ≥3-year follow-up were analyzed. A multivariate Cox regression model was used to create a survival model. Pretreatment variables included were race, sex, age, performance status, tumor histology, extent of vertebrae involvement, previous therapy at the SSRS site, disease burden, and timing of diagnosis and metastasis. Four survival groups were generated based on the model-derived survival score. Results: Median follow-up in the 206 patients included in this analysis was 70 months (range: 37-133 months). Seven variables were selected: female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.7, P=.02), Karnofsky performance score (HR = 0.8 per 10-point increase above 60, P=.007), previous surgery at the SSRS site (HR = 0.7, P=.02), previous radiation at the SSRS site (HR = 1.8, P=.001), the SSRS site as the only site of metastatic disease (HR = 0.5, P=.01), number of organ systems involved outside of bone (HR = 1.4 per involved system, P<.001), and >5 year interval from initial diagnosis to detection of spine metastasis (HR = 0.5, P<.001). The median survival among all patients was 25.5 months and was significantly different among survival groups (in group 1 [excellent prognosis], median survival was not reached; group 2 reached 32.4 months; group 3 reached 22.2 months; and group 4 [poor prognosis] reached 9.1 months; P<.001). Pretreatment symptom burden was significantly higher in the patient group with poor survival than in the group with excellent survival (all metrics, P<.05). Conclusions: We developed the prognostic index for spinal metastases (PRISM) model, a new model that identified patient subgroups with poor and excellent prognoses.

  2. CFD-based Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Coronary aneurysms occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki Disease (KD) patients and put patients at increased risk for myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend using aneurysm diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for treating with anti-coagulation therapy. This study uses patient-specific modeling to non-invasively determine hemodynamic parameters and quantify thrombotic risk. Anatomic models were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 5 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. CFD simulations were performed to obtain hemodynamic data including WSS and particle residence times (PRT). Thrombosis was clinically observed in 4/9 aneurysmal coronaries. Thrombosed vessels required twice as many cardiac cycles (mean 8.2 vs. 4.2) for particles to exit, and had lower mean WSS (1.3 compared to 2.8 dynes/cm2) compared to vessels with non-thrombosed aneurysms of similar max diameter. 1 KD patient in the cohort with acute thrombosis had diameter < 8 mm. Regions of low WSS and high PRT predicted by simulations correlated with regions of subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating both hemodynamic and geometric quantities. Current clinical guidelines to assess patient risk based only on aneurysm diameter may be misleading. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate the utility of patient-specific modeling in risk stratifying KD patients with coronary aneurysms. NIH R21.

  3. Use of minimal disseminated disease and immunity to NPM-ALK antigen to stratify ALK-positive ALCL patients with different prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mussolin, L; Damm-Welk, C; Pillon, M; Zimmermann, M; Franceschetto, G; Pulford, K; Reiter, A; Rosolen, A; Woessmann, W

    2013-02-01

    We studied the prognostic value of minimal disseminated disease (MDD) and anti-ALK immune response in children with NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic-large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and evaluated their potential for risk stratification. NPM-ALK transcripts were analyzed by RT-PCR in bone marrow/peripheral blood of 128 ALCL patients at diagnosis, whereas ALK antibody titers in plasma were assessed using an immunocytochemical approach. MDD was positive in 59% of patients and 96% showed an anti-ALK response. Using MDD and antibody titer results, patients could be divided into three biological risk groups (bRG) with different prognosis: high risk (bHR): MDD-positive and antibody titer ≤ 1/750, 26/128 (20%); low risk (bLR): MDD negative and antibody titer >1/750, 40/128 (31%); intermediate risk (bIR): all remaining patients, 62/128 (48%). Progression-free survival was 28% (s.e., 9%), 68% (s.e., 6%) and 93% (s.e., 4%) for bHR, bIR and bLR, respectively (P<0.0001). Survival was 71% (s.e., 9%), 83% (s.e., 5%) and 98% (s.e., 2%) for bHR, bIR and bLR (P=0.02). Only bHR and histology other than common type were predictive of higher risk of failure (hazard ratio 4.9 and 2.7, respectively) in multivariate analysis. Stratification of ALCL patients based on MDD and anti-ALK titer should be considered in future ALCL trials to optimize treatment.

  4. Mutational spectrum and risk stratification of intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients based on next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bianhong; Liu, Yangyang; Hou, Guangyuan; Wang, Lili; Lv, Na; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yihan; Wang, Xiuli; Xuan, Zhaoling; Jing, Yu; Li, Honghua; Jin, Xiangshu; Deng, Ailing; Wang, Li; Gao, Xiaoning; Dou, Liping; Liang, Junbin; Chen, Chongjian; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Li

    2016-05-31

    Intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (IR-AML), which accounts for a substantial number of AML cases, is highly heterogeneous. Although several mutations have been identified, the heterogeneity of AML is uncertain because novel mutations have yet to be discovered. Here we applied next generation sequencing (NGS) platform to screen mutational hotspots in 410 genes relevant to hematological malignancy. IR-AML samples (N=95) were sequenced by Illumina Hiseq and mutations in 101 genes were identified. Only seven genes (CEBPA, NPM1, DNMT3A, FLT3-ITD, NRAS, IDH2 and WT1) were mutated in more than 10% of patients. Genetic interaction analysis identified several cooperative and exclusive patterns of overlapping mutations. Mutational analysis indicated some correlation between genotype and phenotype. FLT3-ITD mutations were identified as independent factors of poor prognosis, while CEBPA mutations were independent favorable factors. Co-occurrence of FLT3-ITD, NPM1 and DNMT3A mutations was identified with associated with specific clinical AML features and poor outcomes. Furthermore, by integrating multiple mutations in the survival analysis, 95 IR-AML patients could be stratified into three distinct risk groups allowing reductions in IR-AML by one-third. Our study offers deep insights into the molecular pathogenesis and biology of AML and indicated that the prognosis of IR-AML could be further stratified by different mutation combinations which may direct future treatment intervention.

  5. Radon: counseling patients about risk.

    PubMed

    Birrer, R B

    1990-09-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products has increased as the United States has changed from an outdoor society to a largely indoor society. Radon, which is found primarily in the soil, enters houses and buildings through cracks, holes and pipes in foundation walls and floors. Although radon is suspected of being a significant cause of lung cancer, comparisons with other risk factors cannot yet be made. Radon levels in the home can be measured with commercially available kits. Guidelines for reducing the amount of radon in a home are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:2203238

  6. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients: A 5-year nationwide investigation of 44,460 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL.The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL.Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07-10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08-12.75).Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold. PMID:27603402

  7. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in stroke patients: A 5-year nationwide investigation of 44,460 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Pin; Lin, Yung-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Poststroke sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) can hinder communication between patients and healthcare professionals, thereby restricting participation in rehabilitation programs and limiting improvements in physical performance. However, the relationship between stroke and SSNHL remains unclear. This study employed a nationwide population-based dataset to investigate the relationship between stroke and SSNHL.The Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database was used to compile data from 11,115 stroke patients and a comparison cohort of 33,345 matched nonstroke enrollees. Each patient was followed for 5 years to identify new-onset SSNHL. Stratified Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to examine the association of stroke with subsequent SSNHL.Among the 44,460 patients, 66 patients (55,378 person-years) from the stroke cohort and 105 patients (166,586 person-years) from the comparison cohort were diagnosed with SSNHL. The incidence of SSNHL was approximately twice as high among stroke patients than among nonstroke patients (1.19 and 0.63/1000 person-years, respectively). Stroke patients had a 71% increased risk of SSNHL, compared with nonstroke patients (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-2.36). We also observed a remarkable increase in risk of SSNHL in stroke patients within 1-year of follow-up (adjusted HR 5.65, 95% CI 3.07-10.41) or under steroid therapy during hospitalization (adjusted HR 5.14, 95% CI 2.08-12.75).Patients with stroke had a higher risk of subsequent SSNHL compared with patients without stroke. In particular, stroke patients within 1-year follow-up and those undergoing steroid therapy during hospitalization should be treated with the utmost caution, considering that the risk of SSNHL increases by more than 5-fold.

  8. A multidisciplinary approach to therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Cynthia L; Lusk, Jaimie L

    2015-01-01

    As health care trends toward a system of care approach, providers from various disciplines strive to collaborate to provide optimal care for their patients. While a multidisciplinary approach to suicide risk assessment and management has been identified as important for reducing suicidality, standardized clinical guidelines for such an approach do not yet exist. In this article, the authors propose the adoption of the therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient (TRMSP) to improve suicide risk assessment and management within multidisciplinary systems of care. The TRMSP, which has been fully articulated in previous articles, involves augmenting clinical risk assessment with structured instruments, stratifying risk in terms of both severity and temporality, and developing and documenting a safety plan. Augmenting clinical risk assessments with reliable and valid structured instruments serves several functions, including ensuring important aspects of suicide are addressed, establishing a baseline for suicidal thoughts and behaviors, facilitating interprofessional communication, and mitigating risk. Similarly, a two-dimensional risk stratification qualifying suicide risk in terms of both severity and temporality can enhance communication across providers and settings and improve understanding of acute crises in the context of chronic risk. Finally, safety planning interventions allow providers and patients to collaboratively create a personally meaningful plan for managing a suicidal crisis that can be continually modified across time with multiple providers in different care settings. In a busy care environment, the TRMSP can provide concrete guidance on conducting clinically and medicolegally sound suicide risk assessment and management. This collaborative and comprehensive process would potentially improve care of patients with suicidality, optimize clinical resources, decrease unnecessary and costly admissions, and mitigate medicolegal risk. The TRMSP may

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risks in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Ostovan, Mohammad Ali; Sohrabi, Zahra; Atabati, Elham; Raisjalai, Ghanbar Ali; Roozbeh, Jamshid

    2010-09-01

    The risk of premature and progressive occlusive vascular disease is high in chronic uremic patients, and it accounts for more than 40% of the mortality in dialysis patients. End stage renal failure (ESRF) patients exhibit elevated plasma homocystein levels, about four fold as much as those in the controls, and it is now considered as a causative factor for increased risk of cardiovascular death among these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of total plasma homocysteine level and echocardiographic abnormalities as a surrogate of cardiac disease outcome in hemodialysis patients. 123 adult patients on maintenance hemodialysis and having echocardiography done during January till November 2006 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Plasma homocysteine level was directly related to the presence of aortic regurgitation r= 0.27 P= 0.009. There were negative correlations between ejection fraction (EF), left ventricular systolic dimension (LV.S) (r= - 0.71, P= 0.0001), left ventricular diastolic dimension (LV.D) (r= -0.23 p= 0.01) and age (r= - 0.021 P= 0.02). In conclusion we did not find the paradoxical reverse epidemiology in our patients and plasma total homocysteine level was in direct correlation with cardiac risk factors such as left ventricular mass index and aortic regurgitation. PMID:20814121

  10. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolation, Stratified by Its Multilocus Sequence Typing: ST258 Versus Non-ST258.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Sorabh; Martin, Emily T; Lephart, Paul R; McRoberts, John P; Chopra, Teena; Burger, Timothy T; Tal-Jasper, Ruthy; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Ofer-Friedman, Hadas; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Zaidenstein, Ronit; Perez, Federico; Bonomo, Robert A; Kaye, Keith S; Marchaim, Dror

    2016-01-01

    A "high risk" clone of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) as sequence type (ST) 258 has disseminated worldwide. As the molecular epidemiology of the CRE pandemic continues to evolve, the clinical impact of non-ST258 strains is less well defined. We conducted an epidemiological investigation of CRKP based on strains MLST. Among 68 CRKP patients, 61 were ST258 and 7 belonged to non-ST258. Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 strains were significantly associated with bla KPC production and with resistance to an increased number of antimicrobials. Clinical outcomes were not different. Based on this analysis, one cannot rely solely on the presence of bla KPC in order to diagnose CRKP. PMID:26885543

  11. A venous thromboembolism risk assessment model for patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Marialuisa; Mazzai, Linda; Sartori, Maria Teresa; Barbot, Mattia; Ceccato, Filippo; Daidone, Viviana; Casonato, Alessandra; Saggiorato, Graziella; Noventa, Franco; Trementino, Laura; Prandoni, Paolo; Boscaro, Marco; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Scaroni, Carla

    2016-05-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is associated with an incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) about ten times higher than in the normal population. The aim of our study was to develop a model for identifying CS patients at higher risk of VTE. We considered clinical, hormonal, and coagulation data from 176 active CS patients and used a forward stepwise logistic multivariate regression analysis to select the major independent risk factors for thrombosis. The risk of VTE was calculated as a 'CS-VTE score' from the sum of points of present risk factors. VTE developed in 20 patients (4 pulmonary embolism). The group of CS patients with VTE were older (p < 0.001) and had more cardiovascular events (p < 0.05), infections and reduced mobility (both p < 0.001), higher midnight plasma cortisol levels (p < 0.05), and shorter APTT (p < 0.01) than those without. We identified six major independent risk factors for VTE: age ≥69 years and reduced mobility were given two points each, whereas acute severe infections, previous cardiovascular events, midnight plasma cortisol level >3.15 times the normality and shortened APTT were given one point each. A CS-VTE score <2 anticipated no risk of VTE; a CS-VTE score of two mild risk (10 %); a CS-VTE score of three moderate risk (46 %); a CS-VTE score ≥4 high risk (85 %). Considering a score ≥3 as predictive of VTE, 94 % of the patients were correctly classified. A simple score helps stratify the VTE risk in CS patients and identify those who could benefit from thromboprophylaxis.

  12. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  13. Noninvasive Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of the Asymptomatic Diabetic Patient: The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Budoff, Matthew J; Raggi, Paolo; Beller, George A; Berman, Daniel S; Druz, Regina S; Malik, Shaista; Rigolin, Vera H; Weigold, Wm Guy; Soman, Prem

    2016-02-01

    Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is well established; diabetes is associated with at least a 2-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease. Approximately two-thirds of deaths among persons with diabetes are related to cardiovascular disease. Previously, diabetes was regarded as a "coronary risk equivalent," implying a high 10-year cardiovascular risk for every diabetes patient. Following the original study by Haffner et al., multiple studies from different cohorts provided varying conclusions on the validity of the concept of coronary risk equivalency in patients with diabetes. New guidelines have started to acknowledge the heterogeneity in risk and include different treatment recommendations for diabetic patients without other risk factors who are considered to be at lower risk. Furthermore, guidelines have suggested that further risk stratification in patients with diabetes is warranted before universal treatment. The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology systematically reviewed all modalities commonly used for risk stratification in persons with diabetes mellitus and summarized the data and recommendations. This document reviews the evidence regarding the use of noninvasive testing to stratify asymptomatic patients with diabetes with regard to coronary heart disease risk and develops an algorithm for screening based on available data. PMID:26846937

  14. Risk prediction for acute hypotensive patients by using gap constrained sequential contrast patterns.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shameek; Feng, Mengling; Nguyen, Hung; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    The development of acute hypotension in a critical care patient causes decreased tissue perfusion, which can lead to multiple organ failures. Existing systems that employ population level prognostic scores to stratify the risks of critical care patients based on hypotensive episodes are suboptimal in predicting impending critical conditions, or in directing an effective goal-oriented therapy. In this work, we propose a sequential pattern mining approach which target novel and informative sequential contrast patterns for the detection of hypotension episodes. Our results demonstrate the competitiveness of the approach, in terms of both prediction performance as well as knowledge interpretability. Hence, sequential patterns-based computational biomarkers can help comprehend unusual episodes in critical care patients ahead of time for early warning systems. Sequential patterns can thus aid in the development of a powerful critical care knowledge discovery framework for facilitating novel patient treatment plans.

  15. The Incidence and Risk of Herpes Zoster in Patients With Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lin, Hsuan-Hung; Cheng, Nan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lack of sleep can compromise the immune system, which may reactivate latent varicella-zoster virus. Studies on sleep disorders and the risk of herpes zoster (HZ) are scant. We conducted a population-based cohort study to evaluate the risk of HZ in patients with sleep disorders and potential risk factors for HZ development. We identified patients with sleep disorders without apnea from 2002 to 2005 by using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. The patients without sleep disorders were randomly selected and frequency matched with patients with sleep disorders according to age, sex, and index year. We estimated the follow-up time in person-years for the patients from the entry date until HZ diagnosis, loss to follow-up, or the end of 2010. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models and a sensitivity analysis to estimate the risk of HZ while controlling for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. A total of 131,001 study participants (follow-up, 948,177 person-years; mean age, 51.2 ± 16.5 years; 62.2% women) were included in the study. Patients with sleep disorders exhibited a higher incidence of HZ compared with a comparison cohort when stratified by age, sex, and comorbidities. After adjustment for covariates, the sleep disorder cohort exhibited a 1.23-fold greater risk of HZ compared with the comparison cohort (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17–1.30). The incidence of HZ increased with age. Adults ages 65 years and older exhibited a 6.11-fold greater risk of HZ development compared with their younger counterparts (95% CI = 5.34–7.00). Cancers and autoimmune diseases were independent risk factors of HZ development. The patients with sleep disorders may carry an increased risk of developing HZ. PMID:26986095

  16. The Risk of Chronic Pancreatitis in Patients with Psoriasis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Weng-Foung; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder, and studies have revealed its association with a variety of comorbidities. However, the risk of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in psoriasis has not been studied. This study aimed to investigate the risk of CP among patients with psoriasis. Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, this population-based cohort study enrolled 48430 patients with psoriasis and 193720 subjects without psoriasis. Stratified Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the risks of CP between the patients with and without psoriasis. Results The incidence of CP was 0.61 per 1000 person-years in patients with psoriasis and 0.34 per 1000 person-years in controls during a mean 6.6-year follow-up period. Before adjustment, patients with psoriasis had a significantly higher risk of CP (crude hazard ratio (HR) = 1.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.53–2.15), and the risk remained significantly higher after adjustments for gender, age group, medications, and comorbidities (adjusted HR (aHR) = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.47–2.10). All psoriasis patient subgroups other than those with arthritis, including those with mild and severe psoriasis and those without arthritis, had significantly increased aHRs for CP, and the risk increased with increasing psoriasis severity. Psoriasis patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aHR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.22–0.49) and methotrexate (aHR = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.12–0.64) had a lower risk of developing CP after adjustments. Conclusions Psoriasis is associated with a significantly increased risk of CP. The results of our study call for more research to provide additional insight into the relationship between psoriasis and CP. PMID:27467265

  17. Risk of Premenopausal and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer among Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Scott; Burkill, Sarah; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk of premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer among Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, considering tumor stage. Methods The Swedish Patient Register identified 19,330 women with MS between 1968 and 2012, matched individually with a cohort of 193,458 without MS. Matching variables were year of birth, sex, region of residence and vital status at the time of diagnosis. The cancer register identified 471 and 5,753 breast cancer cases among the MS and non-MS cohorts, respectively. Cox proportional hazard models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer. Results Overall risk of postmenopausal breast cancer was 13% higher among MS patients compared with women without MS (HR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.02–1.26). Stratified analyses showed that the risk was statistically significantly increased in women diagnosed between 1968 and 1980 and those who were diagnosed at age 65 or older age. We observed a non-statistically significant risk only for stage 0–1 postmenopausal breast cancer (HR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.93–1.48). MS was not associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Conclusion The modest increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in women with MS may be due to surveillance bias, where contact with health services for one disease increases the risk of a second diagnosis being recorded. PMID:27776164

  18. [Cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Korotaeva, T V; Novikoya, D S; Loginova, E Yu

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic.immune-mediated disease that is observed in 8-30% of psoriatic patients. It has been recently established that PsA and psoriasis are closely associated with the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension; abdominal obesity, and a risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including fatal myocardial infarction (Ml) and acute cerebrovascular accidents, which shortens lifespan in the patients compared to the general population. The authors state their belief that the synergic effect of traditional risk factors (RFs) for CYD and systemic inflammation underlie the development of atherosclerosis in PsA. It is pointed out that the risk of CYD may be reduced not only provided that the traditional RFs for CVD are monitored, but also systemic inflammation is validly suppressed. The cardioprotective abilities of methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) inhibitors are considered; the data of investigations showing that the treatment of PsA patients with TNF-a inhibitors results in a reduction in carotid artery intima-media thickness are given. lt is noted that there is a need for the early monitoring of traditional RFs for CVD in patients with PsA and for the elaboration of interdisciplinary national guidelines. PMID:27458624

  19. Low Serum Uric Acid Level Is a Risk Factor for Death in Incident Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S.M. Kurt; Lee, Andrew L.; Winters, Thomas J.; Tam, Emily; Jaleel, Mohammed; Stenvinkel, Peter; Johnson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Background A reverse epidemiology of classic cardiovascular risk factors was observed in hemodialysis patients with a high comorbidity burden. We hypothesized that uric acid, a novel cardiovascular risk factor, also has an altered association with survival in these patients. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 168 consecutive outpatient hemodialysis patients over a 6-year period. Serum uric acid, albumin levels and relevant laboratory information were recorded monthly. The disease severity was assessed using Comorbidity Index (CoI) scores. Patients were stratified into 3 groups according to their serum uric acid concentrations: group I was the lowest quintile, group II was the middle 3 quintiles and group III was the highest quintile. The risks of death were calculated utilizing a Cox regression model. Results Using group II as a reference group, the hazard ratio of group I was 2.23 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–4.11, p = 0.01] and group III was 0.89 (95% CI 0.47–1.71, p = 0.74). The serum uric acid levels correlated inversely with CoI scores (r = −0.31, 95% CI −0.44 to −0.17, p < 0.0001) and positively with serum albumin levels (r = 0.35, 95% CI 0.21–0.48, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Low serum uric acid is a mortality risk factor in incident hemodialysis patients with a high comorbidity burden and hypoalbuminemia. PMID:18689987

  20. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:27004381

  1. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia.

  2. Management of patients with risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Waldfahrer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses concomitant diseases and risk factors in patients treated for diseases of the ears, nose and throat in outpatient and hospital services. Besides heart disease, lung disease, liver disease and kidney disease, this article also covers disorders of coagulation (including therapy with new oral anticoagulants) and electrolyte imbalance. Special attention is paid to the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of perioperative delirium. It is also intended to help optimise the preparation for surgical procedures and pharmacotherapy during the hospital stay. PMID:24403970

  3. Invasive Stratified Mucin-producing Carcinoma and Stratified Mucin-producing Intraepithelial Lesion (SMILE): 15 Cases Presenting a Spectrum of Cervical Neoplasia With Description of a Distinctive Variant of Invasive Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Ricardo R; Park, Kay J; Schoolmeester, J Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Stratified mucin-producing intraepithelial lesion (SMILE) is a cervical intraepithelial lesion, distinct from conventional squamous or glandular counterparts, believed to arise from embryonic cells at the transformation zone by transdifferentiation during high-risk HPV-associated carcinogenesis. It is characterized by stratified, immature epithelial cells displaying varying quantities of intracytoplasmic mucin throughout the majority of the lesional epithelium. We identified a distinct form of invasive cervical carcinoma with morphologic features identical to those in SMILE, which we have termed "invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma." Fifteen cases from 15 patients (mean 36 y; range, 22 to 64 y) were retrieved from the pathology archives of multiple institutions with a diagnosis of either SMILE or invasive cervical carcinoma with a description or comment about the invasive tumor's resemblance to SMILE. Seven cases had solely intraepithelial disease with a component of SMILE (mean 29 y; range, 22 to 40 y). The 8 other cases had invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma (mean 44; range, 34 to 64 y) in which SMILE was identified in 7. All cases of invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma demonstrated stratified, immature nuclei with intracytoplasmic mucin, which morphologically varied between cases from "mucin-rich" to "mucin-poor" in a similar manner to SMILE. All cases had mitotic figures and apoptotic debris, and an intralesional neutrophilic infiltrate was seen in the majority of cases. In cases of invasive carcinoma, the depth of invasion ranged from <1 to 19 mm. Follow-up information was available in 8 cases and ranged from 1 to 36 months (mean 11 mo). Three cases of invasive stratified mucin-producing carcinoma had biopsy or resection-proven metastatic carcinoma on follow-up. These 15 cases of cervical stratified mucin-producing lesions show a combination of intraepithelial and invasive growth patterns. Given that SMILE is well rooted as a

  4. Stress testing for risk stratification of patients with low to moderate probability of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chandra, A; Rudraiah, L; Zalenski, R J

    2001-02-01

    In summary, this article focused on the use of stress testing to risk-stratify patients at the conclusion of their emergency evaluation for ACI. As discussed, those patients in the probably not ACI category require additional risk stratification prior to discharge. It should be kept in mind that patients in this category are heterogeneous, containing subgroups at both higher and lower risk of ACI and cardiac events. The patients with lower pretest probability for ACI may only need exercise testing in the ED. Patients with higher pretest probability should undergo myocardial perfusion or echocardiographic stress testing to maximize diagnostic and prognostic information. Prognostic information is the key to provocative testing in the ED. Prognostic information is the component that will help emergency physicians identify the patients who may be discharged home safely without having to worry about a 6% annual cardiac death rate and a 10% overall death rate over the next 30 months. Stress testing provides this key prognostic data, and it can be obtained in short-stay chest pain observation units in a safe, timely, and cost-effective fashion. PMID:11214405

  5. Reclassification of cardiovascular risk in patients with normal myocardial perfusion imaging using heart rate response to vasodilator stress.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad M; Al Jaroudi, Wael; Sanam, Kumar; Sweeney, Aaron; Heo, Jaekyeong; Iskandrian, Ami E; Hage, Fadi G

    2013-01-15

    Previous studies have shown that patients with normal vasodilator myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) findings remain at a greater risk of future cardiac events than patients with normal exercise MPI findings. The aim was to assess improvement in risk classification provided by the heart rate response (HRR) in patients with normal vasodilator MPI findings when added to traditional risk stratification. We retrospectively studied 2,000 patients with normal regadenoson or adenosine MPI findings. Risk stratification was performed using Adult Treatment Panel III framework. Patients were stratified by HRR (percentage of increase from baseline) into tertiles specific to each vasodilator. All-cause mortality and cardiac death/nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) ≤2 years from the index MPI were recorded. During follow-up, 11.8% patients died and 2.7% patients experienced cardiac death/nonfatal MI in the adenosine and regadenoson groups, respectively. The patients who died had a greater Framingham risk score (12 ± 4 vs 11 ± 4, p = 0.009) and lower HRR (22 ± 16 vs 32 ± 21, p <0.0001). In an adjusted Cox model, the lowest tertile HRR was associated with an increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio 2.1) and cardiac death/nonfatal MI (hazard ratio 2.9; p <0.01). Patients in the highest HRR tertile, irrespective of the Adult Treatment Panel III category, were at low risk. When added to the Adult Treatment Panel III categories, the HRR resulted in net reclassification improvement in mortality of 18% and cardiac death/nonfatal MI of 22%. In conclusion, a blunted HRR to vasodilator stress was independently associated with an increased risk of cardiac events and overall mortality in patients with normal vasodilator MPI findings. The HRR correctly reclassified a substantial proportion of these patients in addition to the traditional risk classification models and identified patients with normal vasodilator MPI findings, who had a truly low risk of events.

  6. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We selected 6940 patients with pneumoconiosis from the database as our study cohort. Another 27,760 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected and matched with those with pneumoconiosis according to age and sex as the comparison cohort. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses to determine the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events after adjusting for medical comorbidities. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with pneumoconiosis exhibited a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.24) than did those without pneumoconiosis. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was higher, but not significant, in the pneumoconiosis patients (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99–1.46). No statistically significant differences were observed between the pneumoconiosis and nonpneumoconiosis groups in acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.95–1.26). The findings of this study reveal an association between pneumoconiosis and a higher risk of cerebrovascular events after adjustment for comorbidities. Healthcare providers should control the related risk factors for primary prevention of stroke in pneumoconiosis patients. PMID:26945404

  7. Patient repositioning and pressure ulcer risk--monitoring interface pressures of at-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Schwab, Wilhelm K; van Oostrom, Johannes H; Caruso, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Repositioning patients regularly to prevent pressure ulcers and reduce interface pressures is the standard of care, yet prior work has found that standard repositioning does not relieve all areas of at-risk tissue in nondisabled subjects. To determine whether this holds true for high-risk patients, we assessed the effectiveness of routine repositioning in relieving at-risk tissue of the perisacral area using interface pressure mapping. Bedridden patients at risk for pressure ulcer formation (n = 23, Braden score <18) had their perisacral skin-bed interface pressures recorded every 30 s while they received routine repositioning care for 4-6 h. All participants had specific skin areas (206 +/- 182 cm(2)) that exceeded elevated pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. Thirteen participants were observed in three distinct positions (supine, turned left, turned right), and all had specific skin areas (166 +/- 184 cm(2)) that exceeded pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. At-risk patients have skin areas that are likely always at risk throughout their hospital stay despite repositioning. Healthcare providers are unaware of the actual tissue-relieving effectiveness (or lack thereof) of their repositioning interventions, which may partially explain why pressure ulcer mitigation strategies are not always successful. Relieving at-risk tissue is a necessary part of pressure ulcer prevention, but the repositioning practice itself needs improvement.

  8. Risk of Migraine in Patients With Asthma: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi-Hao; Chen, Kuan-Fei; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Hsia, Te-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hung; Liao, Wei-Chih

    2016-03-01

    Asthma has been described as an "acephalic migraine" and "pulmonary migraine." However, no study has investigated the temporal frequency of migraine development in patients with asthma, and the results of previous studies may be difficult to generalize.We investigated the effect of asthma on the subsequent development of migraine by using a population-based data set in Taiwan.We retrieved our study sample from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Specifically, 25,560 patients aged 12 years and older with newly diagnosed asthma were identified as the asthma group, and 102,238 sex and age-matched patients without asthma were identified as the nonasthma group. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were employed to measure the risk of migraine for the asthmatic group compared with that for the nonasthmatic group.The risk of migraine in the asthmatic group was 1.45-fold higher (95% confidence interval 1.33-1.59) than that in the nonasthmatic group after adjustment for sex, age, the Charlson comorbidity index, common medications prescribed for patients with asthma, and annual outpatient department visits. An additional stratified analysis revealed that the risk of migraine remained significantly higher in both sexes and all age groups older than 20 years.Asthma could be an independent predisposing risk factor for migraine development in adults.

  9. Risk of Tuberculosis Among Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yu-Feng; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Feng-Jung; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients on long-term dialysis are at high risk for tuberculosis (TB). Although latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is good target for TB eradication, interferon-gamma release assay-defined LTBI has a high proportion of negative conversion and lacks active TB correlation among patients on dialysis. Patients on long-term dialysis were screened in multiple centers in Taiwan. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) was used to define LTBI and was performed thrice at 6-month intervals. The primary outcome was active TB diagnosed after LTBI screening. The incidence and predictive value of QFT-GIT were analyzed. The 940 dialysis patients enrolled had an average age of 59.3 years. The initial QFT-GIT results were positive in 193, including 49.6% with persistent positive results on second check. In an average follow-up period of 3 years, 7 patients had TB. Three (319.1 per 100,000 person-yrs) and 4 (141.8 per 100,000 person-yrs) of them were prevalent and incident TB cases, respectively. Persistent positive QFT-GIT for 2 and 3 times correlated with increased hazard ratio for TB (14.44 and 20.29, respectively) compared with a single positive result (hazard ratio 10.38). Among those with 3 positive QFT-GIT results, TB development rate was 4.5% and incidence rate was 1352.3 per 100,000 person-years. In contrast, none of the incident TB occurred in those with initial positive and then negative conversion of QFT-GIT. In an area of intermediate TB incidence, dialysis patients have high TB risk. LTBI status is a good predictor of TB development, especially for those with more than 1 positive result. After excluding prevalent TB cases, serial follow-up of LTBI may narrow the target population to reduce treatment costs. PMID:27258523

  10. [Anesthesiological management of the high-risk surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, G; Avalle, M

    1980-03-01

    Evaluation of the anaesthesiological risk in surgical patients is described and an account is given of results obtained with an association of ketamin and NLA II in 57 high-risk patients subjected to general surgical management.

  11. Risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumor recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Joensuu, Heikki; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Hartmann, Jörg T; Pink, Daniel; Schütte, Jochen; Ramadori, Giuliano; Hohenberger, Peter; Duyster, Justus; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Schlemmer, Marcus; Bauer, Sebastian; Wardelmann, Eva; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Nilsson, Bengt; Sihto, Harri; Ballman, Karla V; Leinonen, Mika; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Reichardt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the factors that predict for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant imatinib. METHODS Risk factors for GIST recurrence were identified, and 2 risk stratification scores were developed using the database of the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) XVIII trial, where 358 patients with high-risk GIST with no overt metastases were randomly assigned to adjuvant imatinib 400 mg/day either for 12 or 36 months after surgery. The findings were validated in the imatinib arm of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z9001 trial, where 359 patients with GIST were randomized to receive imatinib and 354 were to receive placebo for 12 months. RESULTS Five factors (high tumor mitotic count, nongastric location, large size, rupture, and adjuvant imatinib for 12 months) were independently associated with unfavorable recurrence-free survival (RFS) in a multivariable analysis in the SSGXVIII cohort. A risk score based on these 5 factors had a concordance index with GIST recurrence of 78.9%. When a simpler score consisting of the 2 strongest predictive factors (mitotic count and tumor site) was devised, the groups with the lowest, intermediate high, and the highest risk had 5-year RFS of 76.7%, 47.5%, and 8.4%, respectively. Both scores were strongly associated with RFS in the validation cohort (P < .001 for each comparison). CONCLUSIONS The scores generated were effective in stratifying the risk of GIST recurrence in patient populations treated with adjuvant imatinib. Patients with nongastric GIST with a high mitotic count are at a particularly high risk for recurrence. PMID:24737415

  12. Concurrent Androgen Deprivation Therapy During Salvage Prostate Radiotherapy Improves Treatment Outcomes in High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Daniel E.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Daignault, Stephanie; Sandler, Howard M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether concurrent androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) during salvage radiotherapy (RT) improves prostate cancer treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 630 postprostatectomy patients were retrospectively identified who were treated with three-dimensional conformal RT. Of these, 441 were found to be treated for salvage indications. Biochemical failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 0.2 ng/mL or greater above nadir with another PSA increase or the initiation of salvage ADT. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as the absence of biochemical failure, continued PSA rise despite salvage therapy, initiation of systemic therapy, clinical progression, or distant failure. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards modeling was performed to determine which factors predict PFS. Results: Low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients made up 10%, 24%, and 66% of patients, respectively. The mean RT dose was 68 Gy. Twenty-four percent of patients received concurrent ADT (cADT). Regional pelvic nodes were treated in 16% of patients. With a median follow-up of 3 years, the 3-year PFS was 4.0 years for cADT vs. 3.4 years for cADT patients (p = 0.22). Multivariate analysis showed that concurrent ADT (p = 0.05), Gleason score (p < 0.001), and pre-RT PSA (p = 0.03) were independent predictors of PFS. When patients were stratified by risk group, the benefits of cADT (hazard ratio, 0.65; p = 0.046) were significant only for high-risk patients. Conclusions: This retrospective study showed a PFS benefit of concurrent ADT during salvage prostate RT. This benefit was observed only in high-risk patients.

  13. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Horsted, Freesia; West, Joe; Grainge, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Background People with cancer are known to be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and this risk is believed to vary according to cancer type, stage of disease, and treatment modality. Our purpose was to summarise the existing literature to determine precisely and accurately the absolute risk of VTE in cancer patients, stratified by malignancy site and background risk of VTE. Methods and Findings We searched the Medline and Embase databases from 1 January 1966 to 14 July 2011 to identify cohort studies comprising people diagnosed with one of eight specified cancer types or where participants were judged to be representative of all people with cancer. For each included study, the number of patients who developed clinically apparent VTE, and the total person-years of follow-up were extracted. Incidence rates of VTE were pooled across studies using the generic inverse variance method. In total, data from 38 individual studies were included. Among average-risk patients, the overall risk of VTE was estimated to be 13 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 7 to 23), with the highest risk among patients with cancers of the pancreas, brain, and lung. Among patients judged to be at high risk (due to metastatic disease or receipt of high-risk treatments), the risk of VTE was 68 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 48 to 96), with the highest risk among patients with brain cancer (200 per 1,000 person-years; 95% CI, 162 to 247). Our results need to be considered in light of high levels of heterogeneity, which exist due to differences in study population, outcome definition, and average duration of follow-up between studies. Conclusions VTE occurs in greater than 1% of cancer patients each year, but this varies widely by cancer type and time since diagnosis. The absolute VTE risks obtained from this review can aid in clinical decision-making about which people with cancer should receive anticoagulant prophylaxis and at what times. Please see later in the article for the

  14. A hydrodynamics-based approach to evaluating the risk of waterborne pathogens entering drinking water intakes in a large, stratified lake.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Andrea B; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Rueda, Francisco J

    2015-10-15

    Pathogen contamination of drinking water lakes and reservoirs is a severe threat to human health worldwide. A major source of pathogens in surface sources of drinking waters is from body-contact recreation in the water body. However, dispersion pathways of human waterborne pathogens from recreational beaches, where body-contact recreation is known to occur to drinking water intakes, and the associated risk of pathogens entering the drinking water supply remain largely undocumented. A high spatial resolution, three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle tracking modeling approach has been developed to analyze the risk and mechanisms presented by pathogen dispersion. The pathogen model represents the processes of particle release, transport and survival. Here survival is a function of both water temperature and cumulative exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Pathogen transport is simulated using a novel and computationally efficient technique of tracking particle trajectories backwards, from a drinking water intake toward their source areas. The model has been applied to a large, alpine lake - Lake Tahoe, CA-NV (USA). The dispersion model results reveal that for this particular lake (1) the risk of human waterborne pathogens to enter drinking water intakes is low, but significant; (2) this risk is strongly related to the depth of the thermocline in relation to the depth of the intake; (3) the risk increases with the seasonal deepening of the surface mixed layer; and (4) the risk increases at night when the surface mixed layer deepens through convective mixing and inactivation by UV radiation is eliminated. While these risk factors will quantitatively vary in different lakes, these same mechanisms will govern the process of transport of pathogens.

  15. Pulmonary embolism: the diagnosis, risk-stratification, treatment and disposition of emergency department patients

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Daniel; Prucnal, Christiana; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis or exclusion of pulmonary embolism (PE) remains challenging for emergency physicians. Symptoms can be vague or non-existent, and the clinical presentation shares features with many other common diagnoses. Diagnostic testing is complicated, as biomarkers, like the D-dimer, are frequently false positive, and imaging, like computed tomography pulmonary angiography, carries risks of radiation and contrast dye exposure. It is therefore incumbent on emergency physicians to be both vigilant and thoughtful about this diagnosis. In recent years, several advances in treatment have also emerged. Novel, direct-acting oral anticoagulants make the outpatient treatment of low risk PE easier than before. However, the spectrum of PE severity varies widely, so emergency physicians must be able to risk-stratify patients to ensure the appropriate disposition. Finally, PE response teams have been developed to facilitate rapid access to advanced therapies (e.g., catheter directed thrombolysis) for patients with high-risk PE. This review will discuss the clinical challenges of PE diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment that emergency physicians face every day. PMID:27752629

  16. End of induction minimal residual disease alone is not a useful determinant for risk stratified therapy in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Chintan; Gaynon, Paul S; Abdel-Azim, Hisham

    2015-11-01

    The role of end of induction minimal residual disease (MRD) as determined by flow cytometry for treatment assignment in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is not well defined. We studied 33 children with newly diagnosed T-ALL. Thirty-two of 33 patients remain in continuous complete remission at a median of 4 years. Nineteen patients were MRD positive at the end of induction and all remain in remission with augmented Berlin Frankfurt Münster-based therapy. One patient underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant for rising MRD. Persistent end of induction MRD alone is not an indication to alter therapy in pediatric T-ALL.

  17. Risk stratification of patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, David; Lobo, Jose Luis; Barrios, Deisy; Prandoni, Paolo; Yusen, Roger D

    2016-02-01

    Patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) who present with arterial hypotension or shock have a high risk of death (high-risk PE), and treatment guidelines recommend strong consideration of thrombolysis in this setting. For normotensive patients diagnosed with PE, risk stratification should aim to differentiate the group of patients deemed as having a low risk for early complications (all-cause mortality, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and major bleeding) (low-risk PE) from the group of patients at higher risk for PE-related complications (intermediate-high risk PE), so low-risk patients could undergo consideration of early outpatient treatment of PE and intermediate-high risk patients would undergo close observation and consideration of thrombolysis. Clinicians should also use risk stratification and eligibility criteria to identify a third group of patients that should not undergo escalated or home therapy (intermediate-low risk PE). Such patients should initiate standard therapy of PE while in the hospital. Clinical models [e.g., Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), simplified PESI (sPESI)] may accurately identify those at low risk of dying shortly after the diagnosis of PE. For identification of intermediate-high risk patients with acute PE, studies have validated predictive models that use a combination of clinical, laboratory and imaging variables. PMID:26768476

  18. Risk of Type 1 Diabetes Progression in Islet Autoantibody-Positive Children Can Be Further Stratified Using Expression Patterns of Multiple Genes Implicated in Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yulan; Sharma, Ashok; Bai, Shan; Davis, Colleen; Liu, Haitao; Hopkins, Diane; Barriga, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    There is tremendous scientific and clinical value to further improving the predictive power of autoantibodies because autoantibody-positive (AbP) children have heterogeneous rates of progression to clinical diabetes. This study explored the potential of gene expression profiles as biomarkers for risk stratification among 104 AbP subjects from the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) using a discovery data set based on microarray and a validation data set based on real-time RT-PCR. The microarray data identified 454 candidate genes with expression levels associated with various type 1 diabetes (T1D) progression rates. RT-PCR analyses of the top-27 candidate genes confirmed 5 genes (BACH2, IGLL3, EIF3A, CDC20, and TXNDC5) associated with differential progression and implicated in lymphocyte activation and function. Multivariate analyses of these five genes in the discovery and validation data sets identified and confirmed four multigene models (BI, ICE, BICE, and BITE, with each letter representing a gene) that consistently stratify high- and low-risk subsets of AbP subjects with hazard ratios >6 (P < 0.01). The results suggest that these genes may be involved in T1D pathogenesis and potentially serve as excellent gene expression biomarkers to predict the risk of progression to clinical diabetes for AbP subjects. PMID:24595351

  19. The incidence and risk of osteoporosis in patients with anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hong-Jhe, Chen; Chin-Yuan, Kuo; Ming-Shium, Tu; Fu-Wei, Wang; Ru-Yih, Chen; Kuang-Chieh, Hsueh; Hsiang-Ju, Pan; Ming-Yueh, Chou; Pan-Ming, Chen; Chih-Chuan, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety disorder (AD) and the subsequent development of osteoporosis. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort analysis according to the data in the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 of Taiwan. We included 7098 patients in both the AD and no-anxiety cohort who were matched according to age and sex between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013. The incidence rate and the risk ratios (RRs) of subsequent new-onset osteoporosis were calculated for both cohorts. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the effect of AD. The Kaplan–Meier method was applied to estimate the cumulative osteoporosis incidence curves. The AD cohort consisted of 7098 patients, and the comparison cohort comprised the same matched control patients without anxiety. The risk of osteoporosis was higher in the AD cohort than in the comparison cohort. In addition, the incidence of newly diagnosed osteoporosis remained significantly increased in all of the stratified follow-up durations (0–1, 1–5, 5–10, ≥10years). Patients with AD were 1.79 times more likely to get osteoporosis than those without AD. We also observed a significant increase in osteoporotic risk in AD patients who are comorbid with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and chronic liver disease. The incidence of osteoporosis in Taiwan is associated with an a priori AD history. The risk ratios are the highest for osteoporosis within 1 year of AD diagnosis, but the risk remains statistically significant for >1 year. Clinicians should pay particular attention to osteoporotic comorbidities in AD patients. PMID:27661037

  20. Developing a tool for nurses to assess risk of infection in pediatric oncology patients in China: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Cui, Yan; Wang, Hong; Wang, Fang; Lu, Chao; Shen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infections are identified as the most common preventable cause of death in pediatric oncology patients. Assessing and stratifying risk of infections are essential to prevent infection in these patients. To date, no tool can fulfill this demand in China. This study aimed to develop a nursing work-based and Chinese-specific tool for pediatric nurses to assess risk of infection in oncology patients. This research was a modified Delphi study. Based on a literature review, a 37-item questionnaire rating on a 0–5 scale was developed. Twenty-four experts from 8 hospitals in 6 provinces of China were consulted for three rounds. Consensus for each item in the first round was defined as: the rating mean was > 3 and the coefficient of variation (CV) was < 0.5. Consensus for each item in the second round was defined as CV < 0.3. Consensus among experts was defined as: P value of Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W) < 0.05. After three rounds of consultation, a two-part tool was developed: the Immune Status Scale (ISS) and the Checklist of Risk Factors of Infection (CRFI). There were 5 items in the ISS and 14 in the CRFI. Based on the ISS score, nurses could stratify children into the low-risk and high-risk groups. For high-risk children, nurses should screen risk factors of infection every day by the CRFI, and twice weekly for low-risk children. Further study is needed to verify this tool's efficacy.

  1. Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Hip Arthroplasty: Routine and High Risk Patients.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Clohisy, John C; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    This study's purpose was to present the use of a risk stratification protocol in which "routine" risk patients receive a mobile compression device with aspirin and "high" risk patients receive warfarin for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty. 1859 hip arthroplasty patients were prospectively enrolled (1402 routine risk--75.4%, 457 high risk--24.6%). The cumulative rate of venous thromboembolism events was 0.5% in the routine versus 0.5% in the high-risk cohort within 6weeks postoperatively (P=1.00). Patients in the routine risk cohort had a lower rate of major bleeding (0.5% versus 2.0%, P=0.006) and wound complications (0.2% versus 1.2%, P=0.01). Use of our risk stratification protocol allowed the avoidance of more aggressive anticoagulation in 75% of patients while achieving a low overall incidence of symptomatic VTE. PMID:26182980

  2. A Simple Risk Model to Predict Survival in Patients With Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yang; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Yang, Chan-Keng; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Huang, Wen-Kuan; Chen, Jen-Shi; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chia-Yen, Hung; Shen, Wen-Chi; Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Hung, Yu-Shin; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carcinoma of unknown primary origin (CUP) is characterized by diverse histological subtypes and clinical presentations, ranging from clinically indolent to frankly aggressive behaviors. This study aimed to identify prognostic factors of CUP and to develop a simple risk model to predict survival in a cohort of Asian patients. We retrospectively reviewed 190 patients diagnosed with CUP between 2007 and 2012 at a single medical center in Taiwan. The clinicopathological parameters and outcomes of our cohort were analyzed. A risk model was developed using multivariate logistic regression and a prognostic score was generated. The prognostic score was calculated based on 3 independent prognostic variables: the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scale (0 points if the score was 1, 2 points if it was 2–4), visceral organ involvement (0 points if no involvement, 1 point if involved), and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (0 points if ≤3, 1 point if >3). Patients were stratified into good (score 0), intermediate (score 1–2), and poor (score 3–4) prognostic groups based on the risk model. The median survival (95% confidence interval) was 1086 days (500–1617, n = 42), 305 days (237–372, n = 75), and 64 days (44–84, n = 73) for the good, intermediate, and poor prognostic groups, respectively. The c-statistics using the risk model and ECOG scale for the outcome of 1-year mortality were 0.80 and 0.70 (P = 0.038), respectively. In this study, we developed a simple risk model that accurately predicted survival in patients with CUP. This scoring system may be used to help patients and clinicians determine appropriate treatments. PMID:26632736

  3. Falls risk assessment in older patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Matarese, Maria; Ivziku, Dhurata

    2016-07-27

    Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals, usually affecting older patients. All hospitals in NHS organisations develop risk prevention policies that include falls risk assessment. Falls risk assessment involves the use of risk screening tools, aimed at identifying patients at increased risk of falls, and risk assessment tools, which identify a patient's risk factors for falls. Various risk screening tools have been used in clinical practice, but no single tool is able to identify all patients at risk of falls or to accurately exclude all those who are not at risk of falls. Guidelines recommend that patients aged 65 years and over who are admitted to hospital should be considered at high risk of falls and that a multifactorial falls risk assessment should be performed. Therefore, falls risk assessment tools should be used to identify the risk factors for each inpatient aged 65 years or over, in order to determine the most appropriate care plan for falls prevention and to maximise patient mobility and independence. PMID:27461329

  4. The Risk of Cancer in Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Che; Hu, Li-Yu; Hu, Yu-Wen; Chang, Wen-Han; Tang, Pei-Ling; Chen, Pan-Ming; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies suggest a link between anxiety disorders and cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of cancer among patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. We recruited newly diagnosed OCD patients without antecedent cancer from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 2002 and 2011. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated for 22 specific cancer types among OCD patients and we determined the SIRs for subgroups according to age and sex group. In addition, because of a potential detection bias, a subgroup analysis stratified with the duration of the OCD diagnosis was carried out. Among the 52,656 OCD patients, who were followed up for 259,945 person-years (median follow-up = 4.9 years), there were 718 cases of cancer. Patients with OCD did not exhibit an increased overall cancer risk relative to the general population (SIR 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98–1.13). An increased SIR was observed among OCD patients only within the first year of OCD diagnosis (SIR 1.21, 95% CI 1.01–1.43). This study indicated that the overall cancer risk was not elevated among OCD patients. An increased SIR observed among OCD patients within the first year of OCD diagnosis may be caused by a surveillance bias, and because paraneoplastic manifestations presented with obsessive-compulsive behaviors. Prospective study is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26945419

  5. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Use Is Not Associated With Acute Pancreatitis in High-Risk Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lin, Jou-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ting; Lai, Mei-Shu; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the association between use of DPP-4 inhibitors and acute pancreatitis in high-risk type 2 diabetic patients. A retrospective nationwide cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claim database. The risk associated with sitagliptin was compared to that with acarbose, a second-line antidiabetic drug prescribed for patients with similar diabetes severity and with a known neutral effect on pancreatitis. Between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010, a total of 8526 sitagliptin initiators and 8055 acarbose initiators who had hypertriglyceridemia or prior hospitalization history for acute pancreatitis were analyzed for the risk of hospitalization due to acute pancreatitis stratified for baseline propensity score. In the crude analysis, sitagliptin was associated with a decreased risk of acute pancreatitis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62–0.88) compared to acarbose in diabetic patients with prior history of hospitalization for pancreatitis or hypertriglyceridemia. The association was abolished after stratification for propensity score quintiles (adjusted HR 0.95; 95% CI: 0.79–1.16). Similar results were found separately in both patients’ histories of prior hospitalization of acute pancreatitis (adjusted HR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.76–1.24) and those with hypertriglyceridemia (adjusted HR 0.86; 95% CI: 0.65–1.13). No significant association was found for different durations or accumulative doses of sitagliptin. In the stratified analysis, no significant effect modification was found in relation to patients’ characteristics. Use of sitagliptin was not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis in high-risk diabetic patients with hypertriglyceridemia or with history of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26886601

  6. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with acute leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mohren, M; Markmann, I; Jentsch-Ullrich, K; Koenigsmann, M; Lutze, G; Franke, A

    2006-01-01

    Patients with malignancies have an increased risk for venous thromboembolisms (VTE), but data on patients with acute leukaemia are very limited so far. We found VTE in 12% of 455 patients with acute leukaemia, half of which occurred in association with central venous catheters, with equal risk of ALL and AML. PMID:16421591

  7. Nutritional Risk Screening in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rongshao; Long, Jianting; Fang, Shi; Mai, Haiyan; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wei, Jianrui; Yan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge concerning nutritional status of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is limited. Nutritional Risk Screening-2002 (NRS-2002) has been used to evaluate the nutritional aspects of patients according to the recommendation of European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Here we aim to assess the prevalence and characteristics of nutritional risk in CKD patients by using NRS-2002. NRS-2002 scores of 292 CDK patients were recorded in first 24 hours subsequent to their admission to hospital. All patients have never been on dialysis. BMI, weight and various biochemical parameters were also characterized for these patients. Possible correlations between these parameters and NRS-2002 score were investigated. The overall prevalence of nutritional risk was 44.9% (53.6% in CKD stage 4-5 patients and 38.3% in stage 1-3 patients). Statistically significant differences were found in serum Albumin, Haemoglobin B, and lymphocyte counts between patients with or without increased nutritional risk. Under the situation that attending physicians were completely unaware of NRS-2002 scores, only 35.1% of the patients at risk received nutritional support. The nutritional risk status was associated with CKD stages but independent from primary diagnosis type. More attention should be paid to the nutritional status in CKD patients (including early stage patients). We recommended using NRS-2002 for nutritional risk assessment among non-dialysis CKD patients in routine clinical practice. PMID:27222407

  8. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolation, Stratified by Its Multilocus Sequence Typing: ST258 Versus Non-ST258

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sorabh; Martin, Emily T.; Lephart, Paul R.; McRoberts, John P.; Chopra, Teena; Burger, Timothy T.; Tal-Jasper, Ruthy; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Ofer-Friedman, Hadas; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Zaidenstein, Ronit; Perez, Federico; Bonomo, Robert A.; Kaye, Keith S.; Marchaim, Dror

    2016-01-01

    A “high risk” clone of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) as sequence type (ST) 258 has disseminated worldwide. As the molecular epidemiology of the CRE pandemic continues to evolve, the clinical impact of non-ST258 strains is less well defined. We conducted an epidemiological investigation of CRKP based on strains MLST. Among 68 CRKP patients, 61 were ST258 and 7 belonged to non-ST258. Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 strains were significantly associated with blaKPC production and with resistance to an increased number of antimicrobials. Clinical outcomes were not different. Based on this analysis, one cannot rely solely on the presence of blaKPC in order to diagnose CRKP. PMID:26885543

  9. Managing cardiovascular risk in patients with inflammatory arthritis: practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Tournadre, Anne; Mathieu, Sylvain; Soubrier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis, have higher rates of cardiovascular mortality. While the increased cardiovascular risk is only explained to some extent, a lot of research is currently conducted to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis, risk stratification, and optimal cardiovascular risk management. This review sought to report epidemiological data pertaining to the cardiovascular disease burden in patients with inflammatory arthritis, underlying mechanisms accounting for excessive cardiovascular risk, along with recommendations regarding risk assessment and management in this patient population. PMID:27721904

  10. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  11. Instruments for assessing the risk of falls in acute hospitalized patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Falls are a serious problem for hospitalized patients, reducing the duration and quality of life. It is estimated that over 84% of all adverse events in hospitalized patients are related to falls. Some fall risk assessment tools have been developed and tested in environments other than those for which they were developed with serious validity discrepancies. The aim of this review is to determine the accuracy of instruments for detecting fall risk and predicting falls in acute hospitalized patients. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main databases, related websites and grey literature were searched. Two blinded reviewers evaluated title and abstracts of the selected articles and, if they met inclusion criteria, methodological quality was assessed in a new blinded process. Meta-analyses of diagnostic ORs (DOR) and likelihood (LH) coefficients were performed with the random effects method. Forest plots were calculated for sensitivity and specificity, DOR and LH. Additionally, summary ROC (SROC) curves were calculated for every analysis. Results Fourteen studies were selected for the review. The meta-analysis was performed with the Morse (MFS), STRATIFY and Hendrich II Fall Risk Model scales. The STRATIFY tool provided greater diagnostic validity, with a DOR value of 7.64 (4.86 - 12.00). A meta-regression was performed to assess the effect of average patient age over 65 years and the performance or otherwise of risk reassessments during the patient’s stay. The reassessment showed a significant reduction in the DOR on the MFS (rDOR 0.75, 95% CI: 0.64 - 0.89, p = 0.017). Conclusions The STRATIFY scale was found to be the best tool for assessing the risk of falls by hospitalized acutely-ill adults. However, the behaviour of these instruments varies considerably depending on the population and the environment, and so their operation should be tested prior to implementation. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of the

  12. Obesity and Risk of Biochemical Failure for Patients Receiving Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Spiotto, Michael T.; Kapp, Daniel S.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Obesity has been proposed as an independent risk factor for patients undergoing surgery or radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Using body mass index (BMI) as a measure of obesity, we tested its role as a risk factor for patients receiving salvage RT after prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Rates of subsequent biochemical relapse were examined in 90 patients who underwent salvage RT between 1984 and 2004 for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy. Median follow-up was 3.7 years. The BMI was tested as a continuous and categorical variable (stratified as <25, 25-<30, and {>=}30 kg/m{sup 2}). Univariate and multivariate proportional hazards regression analyses were performed for clinical, pathologic, and treatment factors associated with time to relapse after salvage RT. Results: There were 40 biochemical failures after salvage RT with a median time to failure of 1.2 years. The BMI was not associated with adverse clinical, pathologic, or treatment factors. On multivariate analysis, obesity was independently significant (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2; p = 0.01), along with RT dose (HR, 0.7; p = 0.003) and pre-RT prostate-specific antigen level (HR, 1.2; p = 0.0003). Conclusions: This study is weakly suggestive that obesity may be a risk factor for salvage RT patients. Whether this results from greater biologic aggressiveness or technical inadequacies cannot be answered by this study. Given the very high failure rate observed for severely obese patients, we propose that technical difficulties with RT are at play. This hypothesis is supported by the RT literature and could be prospectively investigated. Techniques that optimize targeting, especially in obese patients, perhaps seem warranted at this time.

  13. Assessing patients' risk of febrile neutropenia: is there a correlation between physician-assessed risk and model-predicted risk?

    PubMed

    Lyman, Gary H; Dale, David C; Legg, Jason C; Abella, Esteban; Morrow, Phuong Khanh; Whittaker, Sadie; Crawford, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the correlation between the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) estimated by physicians and the risk of severe neutropenia or FN predicted by a validated multivariate model in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies receiving chemotherapy. Before patient enrollment, physician and site characteristics were recorded, and physicians self-reported the FN risk at which they would typically consider granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis (FN risk intervention threshold). For each patient, physicians electronically recorded their estimated FN risk, orders for G-CSF primary prophylaxis (yes/no), and patient characteristics for model predictions. Correlations between physician-assessed FN risk and model-predicted risk (primary endpoints) and between physician-assessed FN risk and G-CSF orders were calculated. Overall, 124 community-based oncologists registered; 944 patients initiating chemotherapy with intermediate FN risk enrolled. Median physician-assessed FN risk over all chemotherapy cycles was 20.0%, and median model-predicted risk was 17.9%; the correlation was 0.249 (95% CI, 0.179-0.316). The correlation between physician-assessed FN risk and subsequent orders for G-CSF primary prophylaxis (n = 634) was 0.313 (95% CI, 0.135-0.472). Among patients with a physician-assessed FN risk ≥ 20%, 14% did not receive G-CSF orders. G-CSF was not ordered for 16% of patients at or above their physician's self-reported FN risk intervention threshold (median, 20.0%) and was ordered for 21% below the threshold. Physician-assessed FN risk and model-predicted risk correlated weakly; however, there was moderate correlation between physician-assessed FN risk and orders for G-CSF primary prophylaxis. Further research and education on FN risk factors and appropriate G-CSF use are needed.

  14. Integrating clinical features and genetic lesions in the risk assessment of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Such, Esperanza; Meggendorfer, Manja; Germing, Ulrich; Rizzo, Ettore; Cervera, Jose; Molteni, Elisabetta; Fasan, Annette; Schuler, Esther; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Lopez-Pavia, Maria; Zibellini, Silvia; Kuendgen, Andrea; Travaglino, Erica; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; Catricalà, Silvia; Vicente, Ana I.; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm with variable clinical course. To predict the clinical outcome, we previously developed a CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) based on clinical parameters and cytogenetics. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that accounting for gene mutations would further improve risk stratification of CMML patients. We therefore sequenced 38 genes to explore the role of somatic mutations in disease phenotype and clinical outcome. Overall, 199 of 214 (93%) CMML patients carried at least 1 somatic mutation. Stepwise linear regression models showed that these mutations accounted for 15% to 24% of variability of clinical phenotype. Based on multivariable Cox regression analyses, cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations in RUNX1, NRAS, SETBP1, and ASXL1 were independently associated with overall survival (OS). Using these parameters, we defined a genetic score that identified 4 categories with significantly different OS and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution. In multivariable analyses, genetic score, red blood cell transfusion dependency, white blood cell count, and marrow blasts retained independent prognostic value. These parameters were included into a clinical/molecular CPSS (CPSS-Mol) model that identified 4 risk groups with markedly different median OS (from >144 to 18 months, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.69) and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution (from 0% to 48% at 4 years, HR = 3.84) (P < .001). The CPSS-Mol fully retained its ability to risk stratify in an independent validation cohort of 260 CMML patients. In conclusion, integrating conventional parameters and gene mutations significantly improves risk stratification of CMML patients, providing a robust basis for clinical decision-making and a reliable tool for clinical trials. PMID:27385790

  15. The Safety of Thoracentesis in Patients with Uncorrected Bleeding Risk

    PubMed Central

    Argento, A. Christine; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Pisani, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thoracentesis is commonly performed to evaluate pleural effusions. Many medications (warfarin, heparin, clopidogrel) or physiological factors (elevated International Normalized Ratio [INR], thrombocytopenia, uremia) increase the risk for bleeding. Frequently these medications are withheld or transfusions are performed to normalize physiological parameters before a procedure. The safety of performing thoracentesis without correction of these bleeding risks has not been prospectively evaluated. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled 312 patients who underwent thoracentesis. All patients were evaluated for the presence of risk factors for bleeding. Hematocrit levels were obtained pre- and postprocedure, and the occurrence of postprocedural hemothorax was evaluated. Measurements and Main Results: Thoracenteses were performed in 312 patients, 42% of whom had a risk for bleeding. Elevated INR, secondary to liver disease or warfarin, and renal disease were the two most common etiologies for bleeding risk, although many patients had multiple potential bleeding risks. There was no significant difference in pre- and postprocedural hematocrit levels in patients with a bleeding risk when compared with patients with no bleeding risk. No patient developed a hemothorax as a result of the thoracentesis. Conclusions: This single-center, observational study suggests that thoracentesis may be safely performed without prior correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia, or medication-induced bleeding risk. This may reduce the morbidity associated with transfusions or withholding of medications. PMID:23952852

  16. Comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Baeta, Isabela Guimarães Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques; Gontijo, Bernardo; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease and its pathogenesis involves an interaction between genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. Recent studies have suggested that the chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis may predispose to an association with other inflammatory diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. OBJECTIVES To describe the demographic, clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of a sample of psoriasis patients; to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities in this group of patients; and to identify the cardiovascular risk profile using the Framingham risk score. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study involving the assessment of 190 patients. Participants underwent history and physical examination. They also completed a specific questionnaire about epidemiological data, past medical history, and comorbidities. The cardiovascular risk profile was calculated using the Framingham risk score. RESULTS Patients' mean age was 51.5 ± 14 years, and the predominant clinical presentation was plaque psoriasis (78.4%). We found an increased prevalence of systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. Increased waist circumference was also found in addition to a considerable prevalence of depression, smoking, and regular alcohol intake. Patients' cardiovascular risk was high according to the Framingham risk score, and 47.2% of patients had moderate or high risk of fatal and non-fatal coronary events in 10 years. CONCLUSIONS Patients had high prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and high cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham risk score. Further epidemiological studies are needed in Brazil for validation of our results. PMID:25184912

  17. Aortic arch calcification and risk of cardiovascular or all-cause and mortality in dialysis patients: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ao; Wang, Shiji; Li, Hongxiang; Yang, Juan; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Studies on aortic arch calcification (AAC) and mortality risk in maintenance dialysis patients have yielded conflicting findings. We conducted this meta-analysis to investigate the association between the presence of AAC and cardiovascular or all-cause and mortality risk in maintenance dialysis patients. Observational studies evaluating baseline AAC and cardiovascular or all-cause mortality risk in maintenance dialysis patients were searched through the PubMed and Embase, CNKI, VIP and Wanfang databases until January 2016. A total of 8 studies with 3,256 dialysis patients were identified. Compared with patients without AAC, the presence of AAC was associated with greater risk of cardiovascular mortality (hazard risk [HR] 2.30; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.78–2.97) and all-cause mortality (HR 1.44; 95% CI 1.19–1.75). Subgroup analyses indicated that the pooled HR for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality was 2.31 (95% CI 1.57–3.40) and 1.45 (95% CI 1.08–1.96) for the grade 2/3 AAC. Peritoneal dialysis patients with AAC had greater cardiovascular (HR 3.93 vs. HR 2.10) and all-cause mortality (HR 2.36 vs. HR 1.33) than hemodialysis patients. The AAC appears to be independently associated with excessive cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in maintenance dialysis patients. Regular follow-up AAC might be helpful to stratify mortality risk in dialysis patients. PMID:27748417

  18. Risk adjusting survival outcomes of hospitals that treat cancer patients without information on cancer stage

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, David G.; Rubin, David M.; Elkin, Elena B.; Neill, Ushma S.; Duck, Elaine; Radzyner, Mark; Bach, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Instituting widespread measurement of outcomes for cancer hospitals using administrative data is difficult due to the lack of cancer specific information such as disease stage. Objective To evaluate the performance of hospitals that treat cancer patients using Medicare data for outcome ascertainment and risk adjustment, and to assess whether hospital rankings based on these measures are influenced by the addition of cancer-specific information. Design Risk adjusted cumulative mortality of patients with cancer captured in Medicare claims from 2005–2009 nationally were assessed at the hospital level. Similar analyses were conducted in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result (SEER)-Medicare data for the subset of the US covered by the SEER program to determine whether the exclusion of cancer specific information (only available in cancer registries) from risk adjustment altered measured hospital performance. Setting Administrative claims data and SEER cancer registry data Participants Sample of 729,279 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries treated for cancer in 2006 at hospitals treating 10+ patients with each of the following cancers, according to Medicare claims: lung, prostate, breast, colon. An additional sample of 18,677 similar patients in SEER-Medicare administrative data. Main Outcomes and Measures Risk-adjusted mortality overall and by cancer type, stratified by type of hospital; measures of correlation and agreement between hospital-level outcomes risk adjusted using Medicare data alone and Medicare data with SEER data. Results There were large outcome differences between different types of hospitals that treat Medicare patients with cancer. At one year, cumulative mortality for Medicare-prospective-payment-system exempt hospitals was 10% lower than at community hospitals (18% versus 28%) across all cancers, the pattern persisted through five years of follow-up and within specific cancer types. Performance ranking of hospitals was

  19. Cancer risk among patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular joint prostheses in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Fryzek, J P; Mellemkjaer, L; McLaughlin, J K; Blot, W J; Olsen, J H

    1999-05-31

    The use of artificial joint implants has risen greatly over the past years. However, few investigations of the cancer risk associated with implants have been performed. We investigated cancer risk in patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular (TMJ) joint implants. A nationwide cohort in Denmark of patients with finger and hand joint prostheses (n = 858) or TMJ implants (n = 389) was followed from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1995, to evaluate any potential cancer risks subsequent to receiving these implants. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all cancers were 1.0 (95% CI = 0.8-1.2) for the finger and hand joint cohort and 1.1 (95% CI = 0.8-1.7) for the TMJ cohort. A significant risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found in the finger and hand joint cohort (SIR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.5-7.8). When the finger and hand joint cohort was stratified by diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, the excess risk was seen only in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. This is consistent with past studies, which have found an association between rheumatoid arthritis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Our results provide evidence that the cancer risk for patients with finger and hand joint prostheses and TMJ implants is similar to that for the general population.

  20. A simple risk stratification model that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality rate in patients with solid-organ cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Wang, Frank; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Miao-Fen; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Lin, Yung-Chang; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to construct a scoring system developed exclusively from the preoperative data that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality in patients with solid cancers. A total of 20,632 patients who had a curative resection for solid-organ cancers between 2007 and 2012 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center were included in the derivation cohort. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to develop a risk model that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality. Patients were then stratified into four risk groups (low-, intermediate-, high-, and very high-risk) according to the total score (0–43) form mortality risk analysis. An independent cohort of 16,656 patients who underwent curative cancer surgeries at three other hospitals during the same study period (validation cohort) was enrolled to verify the risk model. Age, gender, cancer site, history of previous cancer, tumor stage, Charlson comorbidity index, American Society of Anesthesiologist score, admission type, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were independently predictive of 1-year postoperative mortality. The 1-year postoperative mortality rates were 0.5%, 3.8%, 14.6%, and 33.8%, respectively, among the four risk groups in the derivation cohort (c-statistic, 0.80), compared with 0.9%, 4.2%, 14.6%, and 32.6%, respectively, in the validation cohort (c-statistic, 0.78). The risk stratification model also demonstrated good discrimination of long-term survival outcome of the four-tier risk groups (P < 0.01 for both cohorts). The risk stratification model not only predicts 1-year postoperative mortality but also differentiates long-term survival outcome between the risk groups. PMID:26311149

  1. A simple risk stratification model that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality rate in patients with solid-organ cancer.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Wang, Frank; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Miao-Fen; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Lin, Yung-Chang; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to construct a scoring system developed exclusively from the preoperative data that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality in patients with solid cancers. A total of 20,632 patients who had a curative resection for solid-organ cancers between 2007 and 2012 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center were included in the derivation cohort. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to develop a risk model that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality. Patients were then stratified into four risk groups (low-, intermediate-, high-, and very high-risk) according to the total score (0-43) form mortality risk analysis. An independent cohort of 16,656 patients who underwent curative cancer surgeries at three other hospitals during the same study period (validation cohort) was enrolled to verify the risk model. Age, gender, cancer site, history of previous cancer, tumor stage, Charlson comorbidity index, American Society of Anesthesiologist score, admission type, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were independently predictive of 1-year postoperative mortality. The 1-year postoperative mortality rates were 0.5%, 3.8%, 14.6%, and 33.8%, respectively, among the four risk groups in the derivation cohort (c-statistic, 0.80), compared with 0.9%, 4.2%, 14.6%, and 32.6%, respectively, in the validation cohort (c-statistic, 0.78). The risk stratification model also demonstrated good discrimination of long-term survival outcome of the four-tier risk groups (P < 0.01 for both cohorts). The risk stratification model not only predicts 1-year postoperative mortality but also differentiates long-term survival outcome between the risk groups.

  2. Risk Assessment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Transient Elastography Vs. Liver Biopsy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Receiving Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeon Seok; Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Sang Gyune; Um, Soon Ho; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-03-01

    Liver stiffness (LS) assessed using transient elastography (TE) can assess the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated whether TE, when compared with histological data as a reference standard, can predict the risk of HCC development in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients starting antiviral therapy.Observational cohort database of 381 patients with CHB who underwent liver biopsy (LB) and TE were reviewed. All patients underwent surveillance for HCC development using ultrasonography and alpha-fetoprotein.During the median follow-up period of 48.1 (interquartile range 30.3-69.3) months, HCC developed in 34 (8.9%) patients. In patients with HCC development, age, proportion of diabetes mellitus, histological fibrosis stage, and LS value were significantly higher than those in patients without (all P <0.05). The cumulative incidence rates of HCC increased significantly in association with elevated LS value in 3 stratified groups (LS value <8, 8-13, and >13 kPa; log-rank test, P <0.001), and with higher histological fibrosis stage in 3 stratified groups (F0-2, F3, and F4; log-rank test, P <0.001). On multivariate analysis, along with age, LS value was an independent predictor of HCC development (hazard ratio 1.041, P <0.001), whereas histological staging was not (P >0.05).TE predicted HCC development independently in patients with CHB starting antiviral therapy. However, further investigation is needed to determine whether the current surveillance strategy can be optimized based on the LS value at the time of starting antiviral therapy. PMID:27015173

  3. Risk Assessment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Transient Elastography Vs. Liver Biopsy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Receiving Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yeon Seok; Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Sang Gyune; Um, Soon Ho; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Liver stiffness (LS) assessed using transient elastography (TE) can assess the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated whether TE, when compared with histological data as a reference standard, can predict the risk of HCC development in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients starting antiviral therapy. Observational cohort database of 381 patients with CHB who underwent liver biopsy (LB) and TE were reviewed. All patients underwent surveillance for HCC development using ultrasonography and alpha-fetoprotein. During the median follow-up period of 48.1 (interquartile range 30.3–69.3) months, HCC developed in 34 (8.9%) patients. In patients with HCC development, age, proportion of diabetes mellitus, histological fibrosis stage, and LS value were significantly higher than those in patients without (all P <0.05). The cumulative incidence rates of HCC increased significantly in association with elevated LS value in 3 stratified groups (LS value <8, 8–13, and >13 kPa; log-rank test, P <0.001), and with higher histological fibrosis stage in 3 stratified groups (F0–2, F3, and F4; log-rank test, P <0.001). On multivariate analysis, along with age, LS value was an independent predictor of HCC development (hazard ratio 1.041, P <0.001), whereas histological staging was not (P >0.05). TE predicted HCC development independently in patients with CHB starting antiviral therapy. However, further investigation is needed to determine whether the current surveillance strategy can be optimized based on the LS value at the time of starting antiviral therapy. PMID:27015173

  4. Therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient: safety planning.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Homaifar, Beeta Y; Wortzel, Hal S

    2014-05-01

    This column is the fourth in a series describing a model for therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient. Previous columns presented an overview of the therapeutic risk management model, provided recommendations for how to augment risk assessment using structured assessments, and discussed the importance of risk stratification in terms of both severity and temporality. This final column in the series discusses the safety planning intervention as a critical component of therapeutic risk management of suicide risk. We first present concerns related to the relatively common practice of using no-suicide contracts to manage risk. We then present the safety planning intervention as an alternative approach and provide recommendations for how to use this innovative strategy to therapeutically mitigate risk in the suicidal patient.

  5. Patient risk factors' influence on survival of posterior composites.

    PubMed

    van de Sande, F H; Opdam, N J; Rodolpho, P A Da Rosa; Correa, M B; Demarco, F F; Cenci, M S

    2013-07-01

    This practice-based retrospective study evaluated the survival of resin composite restorations in posterior teeth, focusing on the influence of potential patient risk factors. In total, 306 posterior composite restorations placed in 44 adult patients were investigated after 10 to 18 yrs. The history of each restoration was extracted from the dental records, and a clinical evaluation was performed with those still in situ. The patient risk status was assessed for caries and "occlusal-stress" (bruxism-related). Statistical analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox-regression multivariate analysis. In total, 30% of the restorations failed, of which 82% were found in patients with 1 or 2 risk factors. Secondary caries was the main reason of failure within caries-risk patients, whereas fracture was the main reason in "occlusal-stress-risk" patients. The patient variables gender and age did not significantly affect survival, but risk did (p < .001). Tooth type (p < .001), arch (p = .013), and pulpal vitality (p = .003) significantly affected restoration survival. Within the limits of this retrospective evaluation, the survival of restorations is affected by patient risk factors, which should be included in survival analyses of restorations.

  6. A Family History of Lethal Prostate Cancer and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Patients Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Omer A; Cohen, Seth A; Parsons, J Kellogg; Palazzi, Kerrin L; Kane, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether a family history of lethal prostate cancer (PCa) was associated with high-risk disease or biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. A cohort of radical prostatectomy patients was stratified into men with no family history of PCa (NFH); a first-degree relative with PCa (FH); and those with a first-degree relative who had died of PCa (FHD). Demographic, operative and pathologic outcomes were analyzed. Freedom from biochemical recurrence was examined using Kaplan-Meier log rank. A multivariate Cox logistic regression analysis was also performed. We analyzed 471 men who underwent radical prostatectomy at our institution with known family history. The three groups had: 355 patients (75%) in NFH; 97 patients (21%) in FH; and 19 patients (4%) in FHD. The prevalence of a Gleason score ≥8, higher pathologic T stage, and biochemical recurrence (BCR) rates did not significantly differ between groups. On Kaplan-Meier analysis there were no differences in short-term BCR rates (p = 0.212). In this cohort of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, those with first-degree relatives who died of PCa did not have an increased likelihood of high-risk or aggressive PCa or shorter-term risk of BCR than those who did not.

  7. A Family History of Lethal Prostate Cancer and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Patients Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Omer A.; Cohen, Seth A.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Palazzi, Kerrin L.; Kane, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether a family history of lethal prostate cancer (PCa) was associated with high-risk disease or biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. A cohort of radical prostatectomy patients was stratified into men with no family history of PCa (NFH); a first-degree relative with PCa (FH); and those with a first-degree relative who had died of PCa (FHD). Demographic, operative and pathologic outcomes were analyzed. Freedom from biochemical recurrence was examined using Kaplan-Meier log rank. A multivariate Cox logistic regression analysis was also performed. We analyzed 471 men who underwent radical prostatectomy at our institution with known family history. The three groups had: 355 patients (75%) in NFH; 97 patients (21%) in FH; and 19 patients (4%) in FHD. The prevalence of a Gleason score ≥8, higher pathologic T stage, and biochemical recurrence (BCR) rates did not significantly differ between groups. On Kaplan-Meier analysis there were no differences in short-term BCR rates (p = 0.212). In this cohort of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, those with first-degree relatives who died of PCa did not have an increased likelihood of high-risk or aggressive PCa or shorter-term risk of BCR than those who did not. PMID:26112134

  8. Hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure: recognition, risk stratification, and treatment review.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2008-11-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has emerged as a major healthcare problem. It causes approximately 3% of all hospitalizations in the United States, with the direct medical cost of these hospitalizations estimated at $18.8 billion per year. Early recognition, risk stratification, and evidence-based treatment are crucial in reducing the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with this disorder. Classic signs and symptoms of ADHF, such as rales, dyspnea, and peripheral edema, may be absent at hospital presentation and, even when present, are not specific to this disorder. As a result, serum B-type natriuretic peptide level is now used to rapidly and accurately detect ADHF. Multivariate analyses have identified renal dysfunction, hypotension, advanced age, hyponatremia, and comorbidities as significant and independent mortality risk factors. Based on these factors, mortality risk can be stratified from very low to very high using published algorithms that have been validated in independent populations. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of ADHF are available from both the European Society of Cardiology and the Heart Failure Society of America. In general, an intravenous loop diuretic, either alone or in combination with a vasodilator, is recommended as initial therapy in patients with volume overload, depending on the patient's clinical status. Use of inotropic agents should be limited to the small subset of patients with low-output syndrome and significant hypotension. In any event, frequent monitoring of clinical response is essential, with subsequent therapy determined by this response. Finally, focused patient education during hospitalization may help reduce readmissions for ADHF.

  9. Stratifying diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with chemoimmunotherapy: GCB/non-GCB by immunohistochemistry is still a robust and feasible marker

    PubMed Central

    Batlle-López, Ana; de Villambrosía, Sonia González; Francisco, Mazorra; Malatxeberria, Sefora; Sáez, Anabel; Montalban, Carlos; Sánchez, Lydia; Garcia, Juan F.; González-Barca, Eva; López-Hernández, Andrés; Ruiz-Marcellan, MC; Mollejo, Manuela; Grande, Carlos; Richards, Kristy L.; Hsi, Eric D.; Tzankov, Alexandar; Visco, Carlo; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Cao, Xin; Young, Ken H.; Piris, Miguel Ángel; Conde, Eulogio; Montes-Moreno, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive lymphomas that can be classified into three molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling (GEP): GCB, ABC and unclassified. Immunohistochemistry-based cell of origin (COO) classification, as a surrogate for GEP, using three available immunohistochemical algorithms was evaluated in TMA-arranged tissue samples from 297 patients with de novo DLBCL treated by chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP and R-CHOP-like regimens). Additionally, the prognostic impacts of MYC, BCL2, IRF4 and BCL6 abnormalities detected by FISH, the relationship between the immunohistochemical COO classification and the immunohistochemical expression of MYC, BCL2 and pSTAT3 proteins and clinical data were evaluated. In our series, non-GCB DLBCL patients had significantly worse progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), as calculated using the Choi, Visco-Young and Hans algorithms, indicating that any of these algorithms would be appropriate for identifying patients who require alternative therapies to R-CHOP. Whilst MYC abnormalities had no impact on clinical outcome in the non-GCB subtype, those patients with isolated MYC rearrangements and a GCB-DLBCL phenotype had worse PFS and therefore might benefit from novel treatment approaches. PMID:26910115

  10. Symptom profiles in the painDETECT Questionnaire in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain stratified according to sensory loss in quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Jan; Kramer, Martin; Barroso, Alejandro; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kuehler, Bianca M; Maier, Christoph; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Solà, Romà; Tölle, Thomas R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) is commonly used as a screening tool to discriminate between neuropathic pain (NP) and nociceptive pain, based on the self-report of symptoms, including pain qualities, numbness, and pain to touch, cold, or heat. However, there are minimal data about whether the PDQ is differentially sensitive to different sensory phenotypes in NP. The aim of the study was to analyze whether the overall PDQ score or its items reflect phenotypes of sensory loss in NP as determined by quantitative sensory testing. An exploratory analysis in the Innovative Medicines Initiative Europain and Neuropain database was performed. Data records of 336 patients identified with NP were grouped into sensory profiles characterized by (1) no loss of sensation, (2) loss of thermal sensation, (3) loss of mechanical sensation, and (4) loss of thermal and mechanical sensation. painDETECT Questionnaire profiles were analyzed in a 2-factor analysis of variance. Patients with loss of thermal sensation (2 and 4) significantly more often reported pain evoked by light touch, and patients with loss of mechanical sensation (3 and 4) significantly more often reported numbness and significantly less often burning sensations and pain evoked by light touch. Although the PDQ was not designed to assess sensory loss, single items reflect thermal and/or mechanical sensory loss at group level, but because of substantial variability, the PDQ does not allow for individual allocation of patients into sensory profiles. It will be useful to develop screening tools according to the current definition of NP.

  11. Stratifying diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with chemoimmunotherapy: GCB/non-GCB by immunohistochemistry is still a robust and feasible marker.

    PubMed

    Batlle-López, Ana; González de Villambrosía, Sonia; Francisco, Mazorra; Malatxeberria, Sefora; Sáez, Anabel; Montalban, Carlos; Sánchez, Lydia; Garcia, Juan; González-Barca, Eva; López-Hernández, Andrés; Ruiz-Marcellan, M C; Mollejo, Manuela; Grande, Carlos; Richards, Kristy L; Hsi, Eric D; Tzankov, Alexandar; Visco, Carlo; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Cao, Xin; Young, Ken H; Piris, Miguel Ángel; Conde, Eulogio; Montes-Moreno, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive lymphomas that can be classified into three molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling (GEP): GCB, ABC and unclassified. Immunohistochemistry-based cell of origin (COO) classification, as a surrogate for GEP, using three available immunohistochemical algorithms was evaluated in TMA-arranged tissue samples from 297 patients with de novo DLBCL treated by chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP and R-CHOP-like regimens). Additionally, the prognostic impacts of MYC, BCL2, IRF4 and BCL6 abnormalities detected by FISH, the relationship between the immunohistochemical COO classification and the immunohistochemical expression of MYC, BCL2 and pSTAT3 proteins and clinical data were evaluated. In our series, non-GCB DLBCL patients had significantly worse progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), as calculated using the Choi, Visco-Young and Hans algorithms, indicating that any of these algorithms would be appropriate for identifying patients who require alternative therapies to R-CHOP. Whilst MYC abnormalities had no impact on clinical outcome in the non-GCB subtype, those patients with isolated MYC rearrangements and a GCB-DLBCL phenotype had worse PFS and therefore might benefit from novel treatment approaches. PMID:26910115

  12. Explaining the clinical manifestations of T wave alternans in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Michael J; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying sudden cardiac death (SCD) are complex and diverse. Therefore, correct application of any marker to risk stratify patients for appropriate therapy requires knowledge regarding how the marker is reflective of a particular electro-anatomical substrate for arrhythmias. Non-invasive measurement of beat-to-beat alternation of the electrocardiographic T-wave, referred to as T-wave alternans (TWA), is an important marker of risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Is this relationship a mere association or is TWA mechanistically linked to SCD? Recent experimental evidence strongly supports a mechanistic relationship between TWA and SCD. This review will consider the underlying mechanisms of TWA derived from experimental studies, as they relate to clinical observations of TWA in humans, addressing the following questions derived from common clinical observations: 1) Where does TWA on the surface ECG come from? 2) Why is controlled heart rate elevation required to elicit TWA? 3) Why is TWA associated with risk for SCD? 4) Why is TWA associated with a broad range of ventricular arrhythmias? and 5) How do commonly used medications affect TWA? PMID:19168395

  13. Embedded CMs work with high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Care managers embedded in primary care clinics work with patients with high-risk diagnoses and multiple visits to the emergency department or hospital. Patients are identified though risk assessments, suggestions from inpatient case management, and requests from primary care clinicians. Care managers call patients before their clinic visits, look for gaps in care and find out patients' questions and concerns, sharing the information with the treating clinicians. Care managers follow patients for four weeks after their visit, helping them meet their health care goals and follow their treatment plan.

  14. Increased Risk of Stroke in Patients With Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuropsychiatric diseases might enhance stroke development, possibly through inflammation and atherosclerosis. Approximately 25% to 40% of patients with stroke, largely younger patients, are not associated with any conventional stroke risk factors. In this research, we explored whether fibromyalgia (FM), a neuropsychosomatic disorder, increases stroke risk. From a claims dataset with one million enrollees sourced of the Taiwan National Health Insurance database, we selected 47,279 patients with FM and randomly selected 189,112 age- and sex-matched controls within a 3-year period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. Stroke risk was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Comorbidities associated with increased stroke risk, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis, were more prevalent in patients with FM and high stroke risk than in the controls. The overall stroke risk was 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–1.30) higher in the FM group than in the non-FM group. Even without comorbidities, stroke risk was higher in patients with FM than in the controls (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.35–1.53, P < 0.001). The relative risk of stroke was 2.26-fold between FM and non-FM groups in younger patients (age <35 years, 95% CI: 1.86–2.75). This is the first investigation associating FM with an increased risk of stroke development. The outcomes imply that FM is a significant risk factor for stroke and that patients with FM, particularly younger patients, require close attention and rigorous measures for preventing stroke. PMID:26937918

  15. Symptom profiles in the painDETECT Questionnaire in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain stratified according to sensory loss in quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Jan; Kramer, Martin; Barroso, Alejandro; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kuehler, Bianca M; Maier, Christoph; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Solà, Romà; Tölle, Thomas R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) is commonly used as a screening tool to discriminate between neuropathic pain (NP) and nociceptive pain, based on the self-report of symptoms, including pain qualities, numbness, and pain to touch, cold, or heat. However, there are minimal data about whether the PDQ is differentially sensitive to different sensory phenotypes in NP. The aim of the study was to analyze whether the overall PDQ score or its items reflect phenotypes of sensory loss in NP as determined by quantitative sensory testing. An exploratory analysis in the Innovative Medicines Initiative Europain and Neuropain database was performed. Data records of 336 patients identified with NP were grouped into sensory profiles characterized by (1) no loss of sensation, (2) loss of thermal sensation, (3) loss of mechanical sensation, and (4) loss of thermal and mechanical sensation. painDETECT Questionnaire profiles were analyzed in a 2-factor analysis of variance. Patients with loss of thermal sensation (2 and 4) significantly more often reported pain evoked by light touch, and patients with loss of mechanical sensation (3 and 4) significantly more often reported numbness and significantly less often burning sensations and pain evoked by light touch. Although the PDQ was not designed to assess sensory loss, single items reflect thermal and/or mechanical sensory loss at group level, but because of substantial variability, the PDQ does not allow for individual allocation of patients into sensory profiles. It will be useful to develop screening tools according to the current definition of NP. PMID:27093432

  16. RADIAL STABILITY IN STRATIFIED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-03-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  17. [Risk assessment for pressure ulcer in critical patients].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Flávia Sampaio Latini; Bastos, Marisa Antonini Ribeiro; Matozinhos, Fernanda Penido; Temponi, Hanrieti Rotelli; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    Bedridden patients are in risk to developing pressure ulcers and represent a priority group to be studied to identify this condition. To reach this goal, specific instruments are used to assess this problem. The objective of this study was to analyze the risk factors to developing pressure ulcers in adult patients hospitalized in ICUs. This is a sectional analytical study, in which evaluations were performed on 140 patients, hospitalized in 22 ICUs, using the Braden scale. Results showed that patients hospitalized from 15 days or more showed some level of risk. The highest frequencies of pressure ulcers were found in patients in the following categories: sensorial perception (completely limited), moistness (constantly moist), mobility (completely immobilized), activity (bedridden), nutrition (adequate) and friction and shear (problem). In conclusion, the use of this scale is an important strategy when providing care to patients in intensive treatment.

  18. [Initial evaluation of febrile neutropenic patients: risk quantification].

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Lourdes; García, José Elías

    2005-12-01

    Infection in immunocompromised hosts represents a serious clinical situation due the high morbidity and mortality it produces and is one of the most frequent complications in patients with cancer. In patients treated with chemotherapy the risk of infection mainly depends on the duration and intensity of neutropenia. It is essential to evaluate which pathogens are involved so that the most appropriate treatment can be selected a priori, as well as to determine the patient's general clinical status so that more or less aggressive treatment can be provided from the beginning, bearing in mind that "low risk" patients can be managed in the home. These questions can be determined by evaluating the patient's clinical history, physical examination, laboratory investigations, and radiological tests. Prompt initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy adapted to the the patient's risk is crucial.

  19. ABO Blood Group and the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin-Hong; Liu, Li; Xie, Shuang-Shuang; Li, Wen-Wen; Yang, Xia; Fan, Wen-Bo; Gai, Zhong-Tao; Chen, Shi-Jun; Kato, Naoya

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have observed an association between the ABO blood group and risk of certain malignancies. However, no studies of the association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk are available. We conducted this hospital-based case-control study to examine the association with HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Methods From January 2004 to December 2008, a total of 6275 consecutive eligible patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were recruited. 1105 of them were patients with HBV-related HCC and 5,170 patients were CHB without HCC. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between the ABO blood group and HCC risk. Results Compared with subjects with blood type O, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for the association of those with blood type A and HCC risk was 1.39 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05–1.83] after adjusting for age, sex, type 2 diabetes, cirrhosis, hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV DNA. The associations were only statistically significant [AOR (95%CI) = 1.56(1.14–2.13)] for men, for being hepatitis B e antigen positive [AOR (95%CI) = 4.92(2.83–8.57)], for those with cirrhosis [AOR (95%CI), 1.57(1.12–2.20)], and for those with HBV DNA≤105copies/mL [AOR (95%CI), 1.58(1.04–2.42)]. Stratified analysis by sex indicated that compared with those with blood type O, those with blood type B also had a significantly high risk of HCC among men, whereas, those with blood type AB or B had a low risk of HCC among women. Conclusions The ABO blood type was associated with the risk of HCC in Chinese patients with CHB. The association was gender-related. PMID:22235351

  20. Radioiodine remnant ablation in low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer patients who had R0 dissection is an over treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandrasekhar; Ballal, Sanjana; Soundararajan, Ramya; Chopra, Saurav; Garg, Aayushi

    2015-01-01

    Low-risk (LR) differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients should be ablated or not, albeit, with small dose of radioiodine is highly controversial. We hypothesized that those LR DTC patients who were surgically ablated need no radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA). This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcome in these two groups of patients. Retrospective cohort study conducted from January 1991 to December 2012. Based on extent of surgical resection and histopathology, LR DTC patients were classified as Gr-1: 169 patients, who were surgically ablated; Gr-2: 153 patients, who had significant remnant in thyroid bed. Basal parameters were comparable between two groups except pretherapy 24 h radioiodine uptake (0.16 ± 0.01% vs. 5.64 ± 0.46%; P < 0.001). No patient received RRA in Gr-1; Gr-2 patients were administered 30 mCi 131I. Total number of events (recurrence, persistent, and progression of disease), with median follow up of 10.3 years, was observed in 10/322 (3.1%) of LR DTC patients. Only one patient had disease recurrence from Gr-1, who became disease-free after radioiodine therapy. Similarly, one patient from 126, who was ablated with single dose of RRA, had recurrence from Gr-2. However, 8/27 (29.7%) patients from Gr-2 had persistent disease; even two of them subsequently developed disease progression, who failed first-dose of RRA. The event-free survival rates were 99.4% and 94.1% (P = 0.006) in Gr-1 and Gr-2, respectively. RRA is an overtreatment in surgically ablated LR DTC patients. Successfully ablated RRA patients also had similar long-term outcome, however, those who failed, should be re-stratified as intermediate-risk category, and managed aggressively. PMID:25755077

  1. Treating Patients with High-Risk Smoldering Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, patients with smoldering myeloma classified as high risk for progression will be randomly assigned to undergo standard observation or six 4-week courses of treatment with the drug lenalidomide.

  2. Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Cohort Studies of Suicide Risk Assessment among Psychiatric Patients: Heterogeneity in Results and Lack of Improvement over Time

    PubMed Central

    Large, Matthew; Kaneson, Muthusamy; Myles, Nicholas; Myles, Hannah; Gunaratne, Pramudie; Ryan, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is widely assumed that the clinical care of psychiatric patients can be guided by estimates of suicide risk and by using patient characteristics to define a group of high-risk patients. However, the statistical strength and reliability of suicide risk categorization is unknown. Our objective was to investigate the odds of suicide in high-risk compared to lower-risk categories and the suicide rates in high-risk and lower-risk groups. Method We located longitudinal cohort studies where psychiatric patients or people who had made suicide attempts were stratified into high-risk and lower-risk groups for suicide with suicide mortality as the outcome by searching for peer reviewed publications indexed in PubMed or PsychINFO. Electronic searches were supplemented by hand searching of included studies and relevant review articles. Two authors independently extracted data regarding effect size, study population and study design from 53 samples of risk-assessed patients reported in 37 studies. Results The pooled odds of suicide among high-risk patients compared to lower-risk patients calculated by random effects meta-analysis was of 4.84 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 3.79–6.20). Between-study heterogeneity was very high (I2 = 93.3). There was no evidence that more recent studies had greater statistical strength than older studies. Over an average follow up period of 63 months the proportion of suicides among the high-risk patients was 5.5% and was 0.9% among lower-risk patients. The meta-analytically derived sensitivity and specificity of a high-risk categorization were 56% and 79% respectively. There was evidence of publication bias in favour of studies that inflated the pooled odds of suicide in high-risk patients. Conclusions The strength of suicide risk categorizations based on the presence of multiple risk factors does not greatly exceed the association between individual suicide risk factors and suicide. A statistically strong and reliable method to

  3. Alerting patients to the risk of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.T.; Stewart, K.M.

    1993-06-01

    The potential lung cancer risk from exposure to radon gas and the development of appropriate public health policy have been the subject of much discussion for several years. The American Lung Association has taken a leading role in educating the public on radon and other environmental hazards. This article presents background on radon, including the issues of risk assessment and policy development; reviews the current understanding of the hazards of exposure and the scope of the problem; describes how to test for radon; and discusses how to decrease radon levels.

  4. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  5. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Use Is Not Associated With Acute Pancreatitis in High-Risk Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lin, Jou-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ting; Lai, Mei-Shu; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    To analyze the association between use of DPP-4 inhibitors and acute pancreatitis in high-risk type 2 diabetic patients. A retrospective nationwide cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claim database. The risk associated with sitagliptin was compared to that with acarbose, a second-line antidiabetic drug prescribed for patients with similar diabetes severity and with a known neutral effect on pancreatitis. Between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010, a total of 8526 sitagliptin initiators and 8055 acarbose initiators who had hypertriglyceridemia or prior hospitalization history for acute pancreatitis were analyzed for the risk of hospitalization due to acute pancreatitis stratified for baseline propensity score. In the crude analysis, sitagliptin was associated with a decreased risk of acute pancreatitis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.88) compared to acarbose in diabetic patients with prior history of hospitalization for pancreatitis or hypertriglyceridemia. The association was abolished after stratification for propensity score quintiles (adjusted HR 0.95; 95% CI: 0.79-1.16). Similar results were found separately in both patients' histories of prior hospitalization of acute pancreatitis (adjusted HR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.76-1.24) and those with hypertriglyceridemia (adjusted HR 0.86; 95% CI: 0.65-1.13). No significant association was found for different durations or accumulative doses of sitagliptin. In the stratified analysis, no significant effect modification was found in relation to patients' characteristics. Use of sitagliptin was not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis in high-risk diabetic patients with hypertriglyceridemia or with history of acute pancreatitis.

  6. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Use Is Not Associated With Acute Pancreatitis in High-Risk Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lin, Jou-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ting; Lai, Mei-Shu; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    To analyze the association between use of DPP-4 inhibitors and acute pancreatitis in high-risk type 2 diabetic patients. A retrospective nationwide cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claim database. The risk associated with sitagliptin was compared to that with acarbose, a second-line antidiabetic drug prescribed for patients with similar diabetes severity and with a known neutral effect on pancreatitis. Between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010, a total of 8526 sitagliptin initiators and 8055 acarbose initiators who had hypertriglyceridemia or prior hospitalization history for acute pancreatitis were analyzed for the risk of hospitalization due to acute pancreatitis stratified for baseline propensity score. In the crude analysis, sitagliptin was associated with a decreased risk of acute pancreatitis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.88) compared to acarbose in diabetic patients with prior history of hospitalization for pancreatitis or hypertriglyceridemia. The association was abolished after stratification for propensity score quintiles (adjusted HR 0.95; 95% CI: 0.79-1.16). Similar results were found separately in both patients' histories of prior hospitalization of acute pancreatitis (adjusted HR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.76-1.24) and those with hypertriglyceridemia (adjusted HR 0.86; 95% CI: 0.65-1.13). No significant association was found for different durations or accumulative doses of sitagliptin. In the stratified analysis, no significant effect modification was found in relation to patients' characteristics. Use of sitagliptin was not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis in high-risk diabetic patients with hypertriglyceridemia or with history of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26886601

  7. Depression risk in patients with coronary heart disease in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Marcel; Jacob, Louis; Rapp, Michael A; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of depression and its risk factors among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) treated in German primary care practices. METHODS Longitudinal data from nationwide general practices in Germany (n = 1072) were analyzed. Individuals initially diagnosed with CHD (2009-2013) were identified, and 59992 patients were included and matched (1:1) to 59992 controls. The primary outcome measure was an initial diagnosis of depression within five years after the index date among patients with and without CHD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for confounders. RESULTS Mean age was equal to 68.0 years (SD = 11.3). A total of 55.9% of patients were men. After a five-year follow-up, 21.8% of the CHD group and 14.2% of the control group were diagnosed with depression (P < 0.001). In the multivariate regression model, CHD was a strong risk factor for developing depression (HR = 1.54, 95%CI: 1.49-1.59, P < 0.001). Prior depressive episodes, dementia, and eight other chronic conditions were associated with a higher risk of developing depression. Interestingly, older patients and women were also more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared with younger patients and men, respectively. CONCLUSION The risk of depression is significantly increased among patients with CHD compared with patients without CHD treated in primary care practices in Germany. CHD patients should be routinely screened for depression to ensure improved treatment and management. PMID:27721937

  8. Using Coronary Artery Calcification Combined with Pretest Clinical Risk Assessment as a Means of Determining Investigation and Treatment in Patients Presenting with Chest Pain in a Rural Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Baskar; Hanna, Azad; Azzu, Abdul; Rees, Michael

    2015-01-01

    462 patients presenting with chest pain to a rural district general hospital underwent calcium scoring and pretest clinical risk assessment in order to stratify subsequent investigations and treatment was retrospectively reviewed. The patients were followed up for two years and further investigations and outcomes recorded. Of the 206 patients with zero calcium score, 132 patients were immediately discharged from cardiac follow-up with no further investigation on the basis of their calcium score, low pretest risk of coronary artery disease, and no significant incidental findings. After further tests, 267 patients were discharged with no further cardiac therapy, 88 patients were discharged with additional medical therapy, and 19 patients underwent coronary artery by-pass grafting or percutaneous intervention. 164 patients with incidental findings on the chest CT (computed tomography) accompanying calcium scoring were reviewed, of which 88 patients underwent further tests and follow-up for noncardiac causes of chest pain. The correlations between all major risk factors and calcium scores were weak except for a combination of diabetes and hypertension in the male gender (P = 0.012), The use of calcium scoring and pretest risk appeared to reduce the number of unnecessary cardiac investigations in our patients: however, the calcium scoring test produced a high number of incidental findings on the associated CT scans. PMID:25722981

  9. Arterial hypertension and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Caielli, Paola; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Gianpaolo

    2013-08-01

    The dramatic change of the natural history of HIV-infected patients by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has exposed these patients to cardiovascular risk, including cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In HIV-infected patients, the development of arterial hypertension, at least in the medium-long term is an established feature, although recognized predictors of its development have not been clearly identified. In addition, conflicting data regarding the influence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are reported. The presence of a proinflammatory state and oxidative stress-mediated endothelial dysfunction seem, however, to play a pathophysiologic role. In this review, we examine and provide a comprehensive, literature based, consideration of the pathophysiologic aspects of hypertension in these patients. HIV-infected patients, independently of the presence of hypertension, remain at very high cardiovascular risk due to the presence of the same cardiovascular risk factors recognized for the general population with, in addition, the indirect influence of the ART, essentially via its effect on lipid metabolism. This review based on the evidence from the literature, concludes that the management of HIV-infected patients in terms of cardiovascular prevention emerges as a priority. The consideration of cardiovascular risk in these patients should receive the same emphasis given for the general population at high cardiovascular risk, including adequate blood pressure control according to international guidelines.

  10. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kiely, J L; McNicholas, W T

    2000-07-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) but there is debate as to whether OSAS is an independent risk factor for their development, since OSAS may be associated with other disorders and risk factors that predispose to cardiovascular disease. In an effort to quantify the risk of OSAS patients for cardiovascular disease arising from these other factors, the authors assessed the future risk for cardiovascular disease among a group of 114 consecutive patients with established OSAS prior to nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy, using an established method of risk prediction employed in the Framingham studies. Patients were 100 males, aged (mean+/-SD) 52+/-9.0 yrs, and 14 females, aged 51+/-10.4 yrs, with an apnoea/hypopnoea index of 45+/-22 x h(-1). Based on either a prior diagnosis, or a mean of three resting blood pressure recordings >140 mmHg systolic and/or 90 diastolic, 68% of patients were hypertensive. Only 18% were current smokers, while 16% had either diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance, and 63% had elevated fasting cholesterol and/or triglyceride levels. The estimated 10-yr risk of a coronary heart disease (CHD) event in males was (mean+/-SEM) 13.9+/-0.9%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 12.1-16.0, and for a stroke was 12.3+/-1.4%; 95% CI 9.4-15.1, with a combined 10 yr risk for stroke and CHD events of 32.9+/-2.7%; 95% CI 27.8-38.5 in males aged >53 yrs. These findings indicate that obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome patients are at high risk of future cardiovascular disease from factors other than obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, and may help explain the difficulties in identifying a potential independent risk from obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. PMID:10933098

  11. [AIDS: patients' rights, professional risks, preventive measures].

    PubMed

    Dionne-Proulx, J

    1994-11-01

    AIDS in the workplace poses distinct professional risks to health care providers. Identifying HIV carriers and providing specific preventive measures are not the only concerns. Societal prejudices that degenerate into attitudes and behaviors contrary to professional ethics can overwhelm nursing personnel. Their fears can lead them to make irrational decisions such as refusing to care for the client or divulging private information. The author emphasizes that nurses caring for clients with HIV or AIDS should develop a care approach based on two pivotal points. The first point is that nurses must ensure these clients receive appropriate care and that their fundamental rights are maintained. Secondly, nurses must be permitted to provide necessary care without exposing themselves to any associated health risk. The author asserts that nurses must count on complete, clear and accurate information about professional risks and preventative measures. She outlines the legal framework Canadian nurses can access and explains the legal protection available to health care providers. The development of clear and precise workplace policies based on provincial and federal laws can reduce crisis situations, workplace conflict and discrimination.

  12. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  13. Gun Safety Management with Patients at Risk for Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person…

  14. Prospective screening for deep vein thrombosis in high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Barnes, R W

    1977-08-01

    In 257 patients undergoing total hip replacement, gastric bypass for morbid obesity, major abdominal surgery, and major leg amputation, Doppler ultrasonic screening revealed only five instances of deep vein thrombosis. The present study suggests that Doppler screening of high risk patients is a useful alternative to routine anticoagulant prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease.

  15. The incidence and risk of osteoporosis in patients with anxiety disorder: A Population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hong-Jhe, Chen; Chin-Yuan, Kuo; Ming-Shium, Tu; Fu-Wei, Wang; Ru-Yih, Chen; Kuang-Chieh, Hsueh; Hsiang-Ju, Pan; Ming-Yueh, Chou; Pan-Ming, Chen; Chih-Chuan, Pan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety disorder (AD) and the subsequent development of osteoporosis.We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort analysis according to the data in the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 of Taiwan. We included 7098 patients in both the AD and no-anxiety cohort who were matched according to age and sex between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013. The incidence rate and the risk ratios (RRs) of subsequent new-onset osteoporosis were calculated for both cohorts. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the effect of AD. The Kaplan-Meier method was applied to estimate the cumulative osteoporosis incidence curves.The AD cohort consisted of 7098 patients, and the comparison cohort comprised the same matched control patients without anxiety. The risk of osteoporosis was higher in the AD cohort than in the comparison cohort. In addition, the incidence of newly diagnosed osteoporosis remained significantly increased in all of the stratified follow-up durations (0-1, 1-5, 5-10, ≥10years). Patients with AD were 1.79 times more likely to get osteoporosis than those without AD. We also observed a significant increase in osteoporotic risk in AD patients who are comorbid with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and chronic liver disease.The incidence of osteoporosis in Taiwan is associated with an a priori AD history. The risk ratios are the highest for osteoporosis within 1 year of AD diagnosis, but the risk remains statistically significant for >1 year. Clinicians should pay particular attention to osteoporotic comorbidities in AD patients. PMID:27661037

  16. Risk of cardiovascular disease? A qualitative study of risk interpretation among patients with high cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the importance of paying attention to lay peoples’ interpretations of risk of disease, in order to explain health-related behavior. However, risk interpretations interplay with social context in complex ways. The objective was to explore how asymptomatic patients with high cholesterol interpret risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods Fourteen patients with high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease were interviewed, and patterns across patient accounts were identified and analysed from an ethnographic approach. Results Information from the general practitioner about high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease was reinterpreted in everyday social life. The risk associated with fatty foods was weighed against the pleasures of social and cultural events in which this type of food was common and cherished. A positive mindset was applied as a strategy to lower the risk of having high cholesterol, but knowledge about risk was viewed as a cause of anxiety and self-absorption, and this anxiety made the body susceptible to disease, hampering the chances for healthy life. Conclusion Interpretations of high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease are embedded in social relations and everyday life concerns. This should be addressed in general practice in preference-sensitive cases about risk-reducing medication. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01187056 PMID:24040920

  17. Cardiovascular risk and dyslipidemia management in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Stein, James H

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy each appear to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Increased risk may be attributable to the inflammatory effects of HIV infection and dyslipidemia associated with some antiretroviral agents. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease is increasing as patients live longer, age, and acquire traditional coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. In general, any additional cardiovascular risk posed by HIV infection or antiretroviral therapy is of potential concern for patients who are already at moderate or high risk for CHD. Long-term and well-designed studies are needed to more accurately ascertain to what degree HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy affect long-term cardiovascular disease risk. Management of dyslipidemia to reduce CHD risk in HIV-infected patients is much the same as in the general population, with the cornerstone consisting of statin therapy and lifestyle interventions. Smoking cessation is a major step in reducing CHD risk in those who smoke. This article summarizes a presentation by James H. Stein, MD, at the IAS-USA live continuing medical education activity held in New York City in March 2012.

  18. Increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with herpes zoster: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2014-05-01

    The association between herpes zoster and cardiovascular complications remains vague with limited study on the association between these two disorders. This study evaluated the risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with herpes zoster. From insurance claims data of Taiwan, 19,483 patients with herpes zoster diagnosed in 1998-2008 and 77,932 subjects without herpes zoster were identified in this study. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2010 to measure the incidence of arrhythmia and coronary artery disease. The incidence rate ratio and adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of the cardiovascular complications with 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated. The incidence of arrhythmia was 1.17-fold greater in the herpes zoster cohort than in the non-herpes zoster cohort (13.2 vs. 11.3 per 1,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 1.16 (P < 0.01). The coronary artery disease incidence in the herpes zoster cohort was 1.16-fold higher than that in the non-herpes zoster cohort (9.02 vs. 7.83 per 1,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 1.11 (P < 0.01). Over the stratified follow-up years, adjusted HRs were 1.22 (95% CI = 1.12-1.34) for arrhythmia and 1.14 (95% CI = 1.02-1.28) for coronary artery disease within 2 years after herpes zoster diagnosis. The risk measured for these disorders declined over time. Comorbidities of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia also contributed to these cardiovascular disorders with greater extent. It is concluded that the contribution of herpes zoster to the risk of arrhythmia and cardiovascular diseases is less strong than that of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia.

  19. Risk factors with intravenous sedation for patients with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Fumihiro; Tamaki, Yoh; Okumura, Hisa; Miwa, Zenzo; Ishikawa, Masaaki; Shimoyama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Zenkou; Kunimori, Hitomi; Jinno, Shigeharu; Kohase, Hikaru; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with low peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and delayed recovery of dental patients with disabilities after intravenous sedation. A total of 1213 patients with disabilities were retrospectively investigated with respect to demographic parameters and sedation conditions. Multivariate logistic analyses were conducted for patients with an SpO2 <90% and a recovery period of >60 minutes to identify the risk factors for poor sedation conditions. A significant odds ratio related to decreased SpO2 was observed for age, sex, midazolam and propofol levels, concurrent use of nitrous oxide, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, and mental retardation. The most problematic patients were those diagnosed with Down syndrome (odds ratio, 3.003-7.978; 95% confidence interval; P < .001). Decision tree analysis showed an increased risk of decreased SpO2 in males with Down syndrome or after administration of >0.493 mg/kg propofol in combination with midazolam. An increased risk of delayed awakening was seen in patients aged less than 21 years and in males administered >0.032 mg/kg of midazolam. Intravenous sedation for dental patients with disabilities, particularly those with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, or mental retardation, increases the risk of decreased SpO2. In addition, delayed recovery is expected after midazolam administration. PMID:24423418

  20. Stratified medicine for mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Gunter; Binder, Elisabeth B; Holte, Arne; de Kloet, E Ronald; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Robbins, Trevor W; Walker-Tilley, Tom R; Bitter, Istvan; Brown, Verity J; Buitelaar, Jan; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cools, Roshan; Escera, Carles; Fleischhacker, Wolfgang; Flor, Herta; Frith, Chris D; Heinz, Andreas; Johnsen, Erik; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Klingberg, Torkel; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Lewis, Shon; Maier, Wolfgang; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller, Christian P; Müller, Walter E; Nutt, David J; Persico, Antonio; Perugi, Giulio; Pessiglione, Mathias; Preuss, Ulrich W; Roiser, Jonathan P; Rossini, Paolo M; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sandi, Carmen; Stephan, Klaas E; Undurraga, Juan; Vieta, Eduard; van der Wee, Nic; Wykes, Til; Haro, Josep Maria; Wittchen, Hans Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    There is recognition that biomedical research into the causes of mental disorders and their treatment needs to adopt new approaches to research. Novel biomedical techniques have advanced our understanding of how the brain develops and is shaped by behaviour and environment. This has led to the advent of stratified medicine, which translates advances in basic research by targeting aetiological mechanisms underlying mental disorder. The resulting increase in diagnostic precision and targeted treatments may provide a window of opportunity to address the large public health burden, and individual suffering associated with mental disorders. While mental health and mental disorders have significant representation in the "health, demographic change and wellbeing" challenge identified in Horizon 2020, the framework programme for research and innovation of the European Commission (2014-2020), and in national funding agencies, clear advice on a potential strategy for mental health research investment is needed. The development of such a strategy is supported by the EC-funded "Roadmap for Mental Health Research" (ROAMER) which will provide recommendations for a European mental health research strategy integrating the areas of biomedicine, psychology, public health well being, research integration and structuring, and stakeholder participation. Leading experts on biomedical research on mental disorders have provided an assessment of the state of the art in core psychopathological domains, including arousal and stress regulation, affect, cognition social processes, comorbidity and pharmacotherapy. They have identified major advances and promising methods and pointed out gaps to be addressed in order to achieve the promise of a stratified medicine for mental disorders. PMID:24176673

  1. Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Isbell, James M.; Michaels, Alex D.; Lau, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Risk factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgical procedures have been well documented. However, the variables associated with CAUTIs in the cardiac surgical population have not been clearly defined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with CAUTIs in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Methods: All patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution from 2006 through 2012 (4,883 patients) were reviewed. Patients with U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CAUTI were identified from the hospital's Quality Assessment database. Pre-operative, operative, and post-operative patient factors were evaluated. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify significant correlations between perioperative characteristics and CAUTIs. Results: There were 55 (1.1%) documented CAUTIs in the study population. On univariate analysis, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, cardiogenic shock, urgent or emergent operation, packed red blood cell (PRBC) units transfused, and intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS) were all significantly associated with CAUTI [p<0.05]. On multivariable logistic regression, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, and ICU LOS remained significantly associated with CAUTI. Additionally, there was a significant association between CAUTI and 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. However, when controlling for common predictors of operative mortality on multivariable analysis, CAUTI was no longer associated with mortality. Conclusions: There are several identifiable risk factors for CAUTI in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. CAUTI is not independently associated with increased mortality, but it does serve as a marker of sicker patients more likely to die from other comorbidities or complications. Therefore, awareness of the high-risk nature of these patients should lead to

  2. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A 9-Year Follow-Up Nationwide Population Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Ma, Hsin-I; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common form of vertigo and is characterized by episodic dizziness related to changes in head position relative to gravity. BPPV symptoms can be similar to those of central nervous system vascular diseases. The association between BPPV and ischemic stroke has not yet been investigated. The study cohort consisted of patients who were diagnosed with BPPV at least twice in the previous year as an outpatient or for whom BPPV was the primary diagnosis as an inpatient (n = 4104). An age- and gender-matched sample that excluded patients with a diagnosis of any form of vertigo was selected as the comparison cohort (n = 8397). All cases were followed up from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008. The demographic characteristics, medical comorbidities, and use of medications in both groups were investigated using chi-square tests. A stratified analysis of stroke risk factors was performed to determine the hazard ratios of BPPV. During the 9-year follow-up period, 185 of the 4104 (4.5%) subjects with BPPV and 240 of the 8379 (2.9%) subjects without BPPV developed ischemic strokes. The crude hazard ratio of BPPV for developing ischemic strokes was 1.708. After adjusting for stroke risk factors, the risk of developing ischemic strokes in BPPV subjects was 1.415-fold higher than the risk among those without BPPV (confidence interval: 1.162–1.732, p = 0.001). After a subgroup analysis stratified according to stroke risk factors, BPPV remained independently associated with a higher risk of developing future ischemic stroke. We conclude that BPPV is independently associated with a risk of subsequent ischemic stroke. More aggressive control of modifiable risk factors for ischemic strokes should be conducted in patients with BPPV. PMID:24917815

  3. A retrospective comparison of androgen deprivation (AD) vs. no AD among low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or radical prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciezki, Jay P. . E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org; Klein, Eric A.; Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Mahadevan, Arul; Reddy, Chandana A.

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the value of androgen deprivation (AD) in the curative treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with the three major modalities: radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and permanent prostate implantation (PI). Methods and materials: During 1996-2001, 1668 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Only patients with a minimum of 2 years of prostate-specific antigen follow-up were included in the analysis, and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) was used as the endpoint. Patients were grouped according to treatment modality and stratified according to the use of AD. Results: The overall 5-year bRFS rate was 87.8%. The 5-year bRFS rate for low-risk patients was 89% and for intermediate-risk patients was 79%. For low-risk patients, the 5-year bRFS rates by treatment modality (without AD vs. with AD, respectively) were PI: 90% vs. 93%; EBRT: 90% vs. 93%; and RRP: 89% vs. 84%. For intermediate-risk patients, the 5-year bRFS rates by treatment modality (without AD vs. with AD, respectively) were PI: 88% vs. 82%; EBRT: 81% vs. 84%; and RRP: 75% vs. 72%. None of the comparisons within risk groups or among modalities supports an increased efficacy with the use of AD. Conclusion: Five-year bRFS rates in low-risk and intermediate-risk patients are not improved by the use of AD.

  4. Risk and experience: effects of experiential learning and patient characteristics in interpretation of dynamic risk graphics.

    PubMed

    Ancker, Jessica S; Senathirajah, Yalini; Weber, Elke U; Kukafka, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Risks can be explained to patients in narratives, numbers, or graphs. All these methods depend upon description. However, decisions from description differ systematically from decisions about risks that are experienced through activities such as drawing cards from a deck. We have developed a dynamic graphic interface that provides a virtual experience of event probabilities, with potential applications in patient education and decision support. PMID:17238464

  5. Increased risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Chai, Chee-Yin; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tsai, Feng-Ji; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) by analyzing data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). From the Taiwan NHIRD, we analyzed data on 4460 patients aged ≥40 years diagnosed with ED between 1996 and 2010. In total, 17,480 age-matched patients without ED in a 1:4 ratio were randomly selected as the non-ED group. The relationship between ED and the risk of osteoporosis was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. During the follow-up period, 264 patients with ED (5.92%) and 651 patients without ED (3.65%) developed osteoporosis. The overall incidence of osteoporosis was 3.04-fold higher in the ED group than in the non-ED group (9.74 vs 2.47 per 1000 person-years) after controlling for covariates. Compared with patients without ED, patients with psychogenic and organic ED were 3.19- and 3.03-fold more likely to develop osteoporosis. Our results indicate that patients with a history of ED, particularly younger men, had a high risk of osteoporosis. Patients with ED should be examined for bone mineral density, and men with osteoporosis should be evaluated for ED. PMID:27368024

  6. A Prospective Surveillance Study of Candidaemia: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Antifungal Treatment and Outcome in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Sherry, Leighann; Deshpande, Ashutosh; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Hanson, Mary F.; Williams, Craig; Munro, Carol A.; Jones, Brian L.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    This study provide an up-to-date overview of the epidemiology and risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection in Scotland in 2012/2013, and the antifungal susceptibility of isolates from blood cultures from 11 National Health Service boards within Scotland. Candida isolates were identified by chromogenic agar and confirmed by MALDI–TOF methods. Survival and associated risk factors for patients stratified as albicans and non-albicans cases were assessed. Information on the spectrum of antifungals used was collected and summarized. The isolates sensitivity to different antifungals was tested by broth microdilution method and interpreted according to CLSI/EUCAST guidelines. Forty one percent of candidaemia cases were associated with Candida albicans, followed by C. glabrata (35%), C. parapsilosis (11.5%), and remainder with other Candida spp. C. albicans and C. glabrata infections were associated with 20.9 and 16.3% mortality, respectively. Survival of patients with C. albicans was significantly lower compared to non-C. albicans and catheter line removal in C. albicans patients significantly increases the survival days. Predisposing factors such as total parenteral nutrition, and number of days on mechanical ventilation or in intensive care, were significantly associated with C. albicans infections. Fluconazole was used extensively (64.5%) for treating candidaemia cases followed by echinocandins (33.8%). Based on CLSI breakpoints, MIC test found no resistance to any antifungals tested except 5.26% fluconazole resistance among C. glabrata isolates. Moreover, by comparing to EUCAST breakpoints we found 3.95% of C. glabrata isolates were resistant to anidulafungin. We have observed a shift in Candida spp. with an increasing isolation of C. glabrata. Delay and choice of antifungal treatment are associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:27379047

  7. Are burn patients really at risk for thrombotic events?

    PubMed

    Satahoo, Shevonne S; Parikh, Punam P; Naranjo, Daniel; Davis, James S; Duncan, Robert C; Pizano, Louis R; Namias, Nicholas; Schulman, Carl I

    2015-01-01

    There continues to be debate about the routine use of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in burn patients. The concern is that routine prophylaxis may lead to adverse events. The debate hinges on the incidence of DVT and its relation to the risk-benefit ratio. This study seeks to estimate the true rate of DVT in burn patients, and to evaluate possible risk factors to its development. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for all patients with age ≥18 years with ICD-9 codes for burn injuries. Demographic data, comorbidities, burn data, length of stay, total charges, procedures, presence of central venous catheter, and mortality were recorded. Patients were classified based on the presence of DVT. Student's t-test, χ test, and logistic regression were performed. 36,638 burn patients were identified. DVT rate was 0.8%. Patients with DVT were older, had longer hospitalizations, more procedures, and higher charges. On logistic regression, black race, TBSA ≥20%, history of previous venous thrombotic events, blood transfusion, and mechanical ventilation were the significant factors associated with DVT. Patients with DVT were almost twice as likely to die during the admission (P = .011). This is the largest series to date examining the risk factors for DVT in burn patients. DVT developed in approximately 0.8% of burn patients. Black race, TBSA ≥20%, blood transfusions, and mechanical ventilation were associated with approximately 2-fold odds of developing DVT. Identification of these additional risk factors may allow targeted patient prophylaxis. Additionally, patients with DVT incurred higher total charges and longer hospitalization.

  8. Mapping Patterns of Ipsilateral Supraclavicular Nodal Metastases in Breast Cancer: Rethinking the Clinical Target Volume for High-risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Hao; Wang, Shu-Lian; Li, Jing; Xue, Mei; Xiong, Zu-Kun; Jin, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hu; Song, Yong-Wen; Liu, Yue-Ping; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Yu, Zi-Hao; Liu, Xin-Fan; Li, Ye-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To map the location of metastatic supraclavicular (SCV) lymph nodes (LNMs) in breast cancer patients with SCV node involvement and determine whether and where the radiation therapy clinical target volume (CTV) of this region could be modified in high-risk subsets. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with metastatic SCV LNMs were eligible for geographic mapping and atlas coverage analysis. All LNMs and their epicenters were registered proportionally by referencing the surrounding landmarks onto simulation computed tomography images of a standard patient. CTVs based on selected SCV atlases, including the one by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) were contoured. A modified SCV CTV was tried and shown to have better involved-node coverage and thus theoretically improved prophylaxis in this setting. Results: A total of 50 (91%) and 45 (81.8%) patients had LNMs in the medial and lateral SCV subregions, respectively. Also, 36 patients (65.5%) had LNMs located at the junction of the jugular-subclavian veins. All nodes were covered in only 25.5% to 41.8% of patients by different atlases. The RTOG atlas covered all nodes in 25.5% of patients. Stratified by the nodes in all the patients as a whole, 49.2% to 81.3% were covered, and the RTOG atlas covered 62.6%. The lateral and posterior borders were the most overlooked locations. Modification by extending the borders to natural anatomic barriers allowed the new CTV to cover all the nodes in 81.8% of patients and encompass 96.1% of all the nodes. Conclusions: According to the distribution of SCV LNMs, the extent of existing atlases might not be adequate for potential metastatic sites in certain groups of patients. The extension of the lateral and posterior CTV borders in high-risk or recurrent patients might be a reasonable approach for increasing coverage. However, additional data in more homogeneous populations with localized disease are needed before routine application.

  9. Heart rate variability in risk stratification of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Huikuri, Heikki V; Stein, Phyllis K

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) variability has been extensively studied in cardiac patients, especially in patients surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and also in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The majority of studies have shown that patients with reduced or abnormal HR variability have an increased risk of mortality within a few years after an AMI or after a diagnosis of CHF/LV dysfunction. Various measures of HR dynamics, such as time-domain, spectral, and non-linear measures of HR variability have been used in risk stratification. The prognostic power of various measures, except of those reflecting rapid R-R interval oscillations, has been almost identical, albeit some non-linear HR variability measures, such as short-term fractal scaling exponent have provided somewhat better prognostic information than the others. Abnormal HR variability predicts both sudden and non-sudden cardiac death. Because of remodeling of the arrhythmia substrate after AMI, early measurement of HR variability to identify those at high risk should likely be repeated later in order to assess the risk of fatal arrhythmia events. Future randomized trials using HR variability/turbulence as one of the pre-defined inclusion criteria will show whether routine measurement of HR variability/turbulence will become a routine clinical tool for risk stratification of cardiac patients.

  10. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  11. Adrenomedullin for Risk Stratification of Emergency Patients With Nonspecific Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Christian Hans; Messmer, Anna Sarah; Ghanim, Leyla; Ilsemann-Karakoumis, Julia; Giersdorf, Sven; Hertel, Sabine; Ernst, Susanne; Geigy, Nicolas; Bingisser, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with nonspecific complaints (NSC) presenting to the emergency department (ED) are at risk of life-threatening conditions. New stress biomarkers such as the midregional portion of adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) promise to support decision-making. This study tested the following hypotheses: biomarker-assisted disposition of patients with NSC will not increase mortality. Second, discharge from the ED will increase if clinical risk assessment is combined with low MR-proADM levels. Third, inappropriate disposition to a lower level of care will decrease, if clinical assessment is combined with high MR-proADM levels, and fourth that this algorithm is feasible in the ED setting. Prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled interventional feasibility study with a 30-day follow-up, including patients with NSC. Patients were randomly assigned to either the standard group (decision-making solely based on clinical assessment) or the Novum group (biomarker-assisted). Regarding disposition, patients were assigned to 1 of 3 risk classes: high-risk (admission to hospital), intermediate risk (community geriatric hospital), and low-risk patients (discharge). In the Novum group, in addition to clinical risk assessment, the information of the MR-proADM level was used. Unless there were overruling criteria, patients were transferred or discharged according to the risk assessment. Primary endpoint was 30-day mortality. Secondary endpoints were comparisons of patient disposition and related mortality rates, ED, and hospital length of stay and readmission. The final study cohort consisted of 398 patients (210 in the Standard group and 188 in the Novum group). Overruling, that is, disposition not according to the result of the proposed algorithm occurred in 51 cases. Baseline characteristics between Standard and Novum groups were similar. The mortality rate in the Novum group was 4.3%, as compared to the Standard group mortality of 6.2%, which was not significantly

  12. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  13. Cardiovascular disease risk profiles comparison among dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sharabas, Islam; Siddiqi, Nauman

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the prevalent peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients and their association with cardiovascular events (CVEs) in a Saudi end-stage renal disease cohort. This was a prospective, observational, single-center study. A total of 192 patients were screened of which 157 patients were eligible (HD = 121, PD = 36). All patients underwent assessment of cardiovascular risk factors at the time of enrollment including electrocardiogram and echocardiography, lipid profile, homocysteine, and insulin levels. Patients were followed for one year and CVE [acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and congestive heart failure] and mortality were recorded. SPSS ® Version 16 was used for the analysis. T-test and ANOVA were used for continuous data; categorical data were analyzed using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The primary end-point of CVE and all-cause mortality was compared in the two groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. HD patients were older and had been longer on dialysis. While PD patients had higher urine output and better Kt/V values, they were more edematous and using more antihypertensive medications. PD patients also had a lower ejection fraction (EF). Age >57 years and the use of more than one antihypertensive medication were associated with higher risk of CVE, while EF >53 was found to be protective. Age >57 years and EF <53 at enrollment were predictive of all-cause mortality. Saudi patients undergoing PD have worse CVD risk profiles compared to HD patients. Age less than 57 years and an EF >53 were cardioprotective.

  14. Cardiovascular disease risk profiles comparison among dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sharabas, Islam; Siddiqi, Nauman

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the prevalent peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients and their association with cardiovascular events (CVEs) in a Saudi end-stage renal disease cohort. This was a prospective, observational, single-center study. A total of 192 patients were screened of which 157 patients were eligible (HD = 121, PD = 36). All patients underwent assessment of cardiovascular risk factors at the time of enrollment including electrocardiogram and echocardiography, lipid profile, homocysteine, and insulin levels. Patients were followed for one year and CVE [acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and congestive heart failure] and mortality were recorded. SPSS ® Version 16 was used for the analysis. T-test and ANOVA were used for continuous data; categorical data were analyzed using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The primary end-point of CVE and all-cause mortality was compared in the two groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. HD patients were older and had been longer on dialysis. While PD patients had higher urine output and better Kt/V values, they were more edematous and using more antihypertensive medications. PD patients also had a lower ejection fraction (EF). Age >57 years and the use of more than one antihypertensive medication were associated with higher risk of CVE, while EF >53 was found to be protective. Age >57 years and EF <53 at enrollment were predictive of all-cause mortality. Saudi patients undergoing PD have worse CVD risk profiles compared to HD patients. Age less than 57 years and an EF >53 were cardioprotective. PMID:27424685

  15. Vortex trails in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pao, H.-P.; Lai, R. Y.; Schemm, C. E.

    1982-03-01

    A framework is proposed which accounts for the properties of atmospheric vortex trails used by wind flow. Similarities between atmospheric vortex patterns and those in stratified fluids are observed noting that the generation of vortex trails is primarily due to density stratification. Horizontal vortices form for values of Froude numbers between 2-505, and for Reynolds numbers between 600-100,000. The cause of late-wake vortices and the reason for their great regularity is the presence of a large-scale coherent structure in the early wake. A critical Froude number exists above which no horizontal vortices form and its value for a bluff body is about 160. Finally, it is also noted that ambient shear can prevent or destroy late-wake horizontal vortices.

  16. Broadband cloaking in stratified seas.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2012-02-24

    Here we show that floating objects in stratified fluids can be cloaked against broadband incident waves by properly architecting the bottom corrugations. The presented invisibility cloaking of gravity waves is achieved utilizing a nonlinear resonance concept that occurs between surface and internal waves mediated by the bottom topography. Our cloak bends wave rays from the surface into the body of the fluid. Wave rays then pass underneath the floating object and may be recovered back to the free surface at the downstream bearing no trace of diffraction or scattering. The cloak is the proper architecture of bottom corrugations only, and hence is surface noninvasive. The presented scheme is a nonlinear alternative to the transformation-based cloaking, but in the context of dispersive waves.

  17. Cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with RA compared to matched non-RA patients

    PubMed Central

    Cawston, Helene; Bourhis, Francois; Al, Maiwenn; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P. M. H.; Liao, Katherine P.; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. RA is associated with a 50–60% increase in risk of cardiovascular (CV) death. This study aimed to compare management of CV risk factors in RA and matched non-RA patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using UK clinical practice data. Patients presenting with an incident RA diagnosis were matched 1:4 to non-RA patients based on a propensity score for RA, entry year, CV risk category and treatment received at index date (date of RA diagnosis). Patients tested and treated for CV risk factors as well as those attaining CV risk factor management goals were evaluated in both groups. Results. Between 1987 and 2010, 24 859 RA patients were identified and matched to 87 304 non-RA patients. At index date, groups had similar baseline characteristics. Annual blood pressure, lipids and diabetes-related testing were similar in both groups, although CRP and ESR were higher in RA patients at diagnosis and decreased over time. RA patients prescribed antihypertensives increased from 38.2% at diagnosis to 45.7% at 5 years, from 14.0 to 20.6% for lipid-lowering treatments and from 5.1 to 6.4% for antidiabetics. Similar treatment percentages were observed in non-RA patients, although slightly lower for antihypertensives. Modest (2%) but significantly lower attainment of lipid and diabetes goals at 1 year was observed in RA patients. Conclusion. There were no differences between groups in the frequency of testing and treatment of CV risk factors. Higher CV risk in RA patients seems unlikely to be driven by differences in traditional CV risk factor management. PMID:26705329

  18. Predicting 30- to 120-Day Readmission Risk among Medicare Fee-for-Service Patients Using Nonmedical Workers and Mobile Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; O'Connor, Lori; Marshall, Olivia; Angelo, Amanda; Barrett, Kelsy; Majeski, Emily; Handrus, Maxwell; Levy, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hospital readmissions are a large source of wasteful healthcare spending, and current care transition models are too expensive to be sustainable. One way to circumvent cost-prohibitive care transition programs is complement nurse-staffed care transition programs with those staffed by less expensive nonmedical workers. A major barrier to utilizing nonmedical workers is determining the appropriate time to escalate care to a clinician with a wider scope of practice. The objective of this study is to show how mobile technology can use the observations of nonmedical workers to stratify patients on the basis of their hospital readmission risk. Materials and Methods An area agency on aging in Massachusetts implemented a quality improvement project with the aim of reducing 30-day hospital readmission rates using a modified care transition intervention supported by mobile predictive analytics technology. Proprietary readmission risk prediction algorithms were used to predict 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-day readmission risk. Results The risk score derived from the nonmedical workers' observations had a significant association with 30-day readmission rate with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.12 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1 .09–1.15) compared to an OR of 1.25 (95 percent CI, 1.19–1.32) for the risk score using nurse observations. Risk scores using nurse interpretation of nonmedical workers' observations show that patients in the high-risk category had significantly higher readmission rates than patients in the baseline-risk and mild-risk categories at 30, 60, 90, and 120 days after discharge. Of the 1,064 elevated-risk alerts that were triaged, 1,049 (98.6 percent) involved the nurse care manager, 804 (75.6 percent) involved the patient, 768 (72.2 percent) involved the health coach, 461 (43.3 percent) involved skilled nursing, and 235 (22.1 percent) involved the outpatient physician in the coordination of care in response to the alert. Discussion The predictive

  19. Self-criticism of physicians, patient participation and risk competence

    PubMed Central

    Wolffsohn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Self-criticism of physicians and patient participation are the pillars of modern medical ethics and medical programmes. Patients expect risk minimisation from physicians, mostly without realising how much they could actively do themselves in this respect. But what about the willingness of German people to take risks, how high is it really at present? Direct empirical data are not available, but results from general empirical research show that people’s willingness to take risks is probably rather low. Post-heroic societies of welfare states are less likely to take risks than supposedly heroic ones. Therefore, the question whether it is responsible for medical experts to transfer even more responsibility to non-medical laypeople becomes increasingly important in a social context. PMID:26195919

  20. Risk assessment and psychosocial interventions for suicidal patients

    PubMed Central

    Chesin, Megan; Stanley, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Suicide is a leading cause of death in the US. Although factors elevating long-term risk for suicide are known and include bipolar disorder, signs of imminent suicide risk are difficult to study and not well-specified. Acute risk determinations must be made to determine the appropriate level of care to safeguard patients. To increase safety among at-risk patients in the short term and to decrease risk over time, psychosocial interventions to prevent suicide have been developed and tested in acute care and outpatient settings. Methods A narrative review of studies of imminent risk factors for suicide, suicide risk decision making, and psychosocial suicide prevention interventions was conducted. Results While some long-term risk factors of suicide have been established, accurate identification of individuals at imminent risk for suicide is difficult. Therefore, prevention efforts targeting individuals at high suicide behavior risk discharging from acute care settings tend to be generic and focus on psychoeducation and supportive follow-up contact. Data regarding the effectiveness of brief interventions (i.e., those not requiring more than one individualized treatment session) is mixed, showing better outcomes in the shorter term and when incidence of suicidal behavior or ideation is the outcome. With respect to longer term suicide prevention interventions (i.e., those with a minimum of 10 sessions), Dialectical Behavior Therapy has the largest evidence base. Conclusions To improve suicide prevention efforts, more rigorous study of imminent risk factors and psychosocial interventions is needed. Adaptations specific to individuals with bipolar disorder are possible and needed. PMID:23782460

  1. How I manage venous thromboembolism risk in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Dobromirski, Mark; Cohen, Alexander T

    2012-08-23

    Venous thromboembolism is a significant cause of illness and death worldwide. Large bodies of evidence support the heightened risk status of hospitalized medical patients, and that prophylactic measures significantly reduce the risk of thrombosis, yet these patients often fail to receive adequate prophylactic therapy. This failure may be accounted for by a lack of awareness of the relevant indications, poorly designed implementation systems, and clinical concerns over the side effects of anticoagulant medications. This article briefly summarizes our understanding of the clinical factors relevant to the evaluation of venous thromboembolism risk in hospitalized medical patients. We describe our approach to the use of thromboprophylaxis, through which we aim to minimize the disease burden of this under-recognized and preventable pathology.

  2. Perioperative risk and management in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minai, Omar A; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Kaw, Roop; Subramaniam, Kathirvel; Hill, Nicholas S

    2013-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a known risk factor for perioperative complications. Unlike in the case of cardiac surgery, PH is currently not listed as an independent risk factor for postoperative complications in guidelines for the management of noncardiac surgery. Despite the paucity of data, though, patients with PH are often counseled against having elective procedures because early and sudden postoperative deaths have been reported. Patients with PH are unable to accommodate alterations in right ventricular (RV) preload or afterload induced by fluid shifts, medications, or changes in the autonomic nervous system precipitated by hypoxia or hypercapnia. These factors become magnified in situations of added stress such as surgical intervention. Systemic hypotension and arrhythmias may precipitate RV ischemia, further worsening RV function. Patient and surgical characteristics and choice of anesthetic technique are crucial factors in perioperative management. The two main principles of perioperative management are the prevention of systemic hypotension (risk of RV ischemia) and the prevention of acute elevations in pulmonary arterial pressure (risk of RV failure). Close monitoring, optimization of systemic BP, pain control, oxygenation and ventilation, avoidance of exacerbating factors, and use of vasopressors and pulmonary vasodilators as necessary are essential elements of management. Understanding the pathophysiology, cause, and severity of PH in the individual perioperative patient allows accurate risk assessment, optimization of PH and RV function prior to surgery, and appropriate intraoperative and postoperative management.

  3. General Practitioners Views of Implementing a Stratified Treatment Approach for Low Back Pain in Germany: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Karstens, Sven; Joos, Stefanie; Hill, Jonathan C.; Krug, Katja; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Steinhäuser, Jost

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The STarT Back stratified primary care approach has demonstrated clinical and cost effectiveness in the UK, and is commonly used by General Practitioners (GPs). However, it remains unknown how this approach could be implemented into the German healthcare system. The aim of this study was therefore to explore the views and perceptions of German GPs in respect to using a stratified primary care for low back pain (LBP). Methods A 90-minute think-tank workshop was conducted with 14 male and five female GPs, during which the STarT-Back-Screening-Tool (SBST) and related research evidence was presented. This was followed by two focus groups, based on a semi-structured interview guideline to identify potential implementation barriers and opportunities. Discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and coded using a content analysis approach. Results For the three deductively developed main themes, 15 subthemes emerged: (1) application of the SBST, with the following subthemes: which health profession should administer it, patients known to the GP practice, the reason for the GP consultation, scoring the tool, the tool format, and the anticipated impact on GP practice; (2) psychologically informed physiotherapy, with subthemes including: provision by a physiotherapist, anticipated impact, the skills of physiotherapists, management of patients with severe psychosocial problems, referral and remuneration; (3) the management of low-risk patients, with subthemes including: concern about the appropriate advising health professional, information and media, length of consultation, and local exercise venues. Conclusions The attitudes of GPs towards stratified primary care for LBP indicated positive support for pilot-testing in Germany. However, there were mixed reactions to the ability of German physiotherapists to manage high-risk patients and handle their complex clinical needs. GPs also mentioned practical difficulties in providing extended advice to low-risk

  4. Bevacizumab Increases Risk for Severe Proteinuria in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christi; Baer, Lea; Zhu, Xiaolei

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent bevacizumab, a humanized mAb that neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor, can lead to proteinuria and renal damage. The risk factors and clinical outcomes of renal adverse events are not well understood. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized, controlled trials to assess the overall risk for severe proteinuria with bevacizumab. We analyzed data from 16 studies comprising 12,268 patients with a variety of tumors. The incidence of high-grade (grade 3 or 4) proteinuria with bevacizumab was 2.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 4.3%). Compared with chemotherapy alone, bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy significantly increased the risk for high-grade proteinuria (relative risk 4.79; 95% CI 2.71 to 8.46) and nephrotic syndrome (relative risk 7.78; 95% CI 1.80 to 33.62); higher dosages of bevacizumab associated with increased risk for proteinuria. Regarding tumor type, renal cell carcinoma associated with the highest risk (cumulative incidence 10.2%). We did not detect a significant difference between platinum- and non–platinum-based concurrent chemotherapy with regard to risk for high-grade proteinuria (P = 0.39). In conclusion, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy significantly increases the risk for high-grade proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome. PMID:20538785

  5. Risk of thrombosis in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia and antiphospholipid antibodies: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moulis, Guillaume; Audemard-Verger, Alexandra; Arnaud, Laurent; Luxembourger, Cécile; Montastruc, François; Gaman, Amelia Maria; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Ruggeri, Marco; Mahévas, Matthieu; Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Brainsky, Andres; Michel, Marc; Godeau, Bertrand; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sailler, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are common in ITP, but their role for the occurrence of ITP-related thrombosis is controversial. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis to investigate the risk of thrombosis associated with lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β2GP-I antibodies in primary ITP. The literature search was run on Medline, Cochrane and ISI Web of Science from January 1st 1980 to December 31st 2014. Unpublished studies were searched in meeting abstracts. The main analysis assessed the risk of all thromboses (arterial or venous) associated with the presence of LA, aCL or anti-β2GP-I antibodies. Random-effect models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Searches in electronic databases retrieved 776 citations. Twelve additional studies from unpublished literature were added. Eventually, 10 cohort studies totalizing 1574 patients were included in the analysis. The pooled OR for the risk of all thromboses associated with LA was 6.11, 95% CI [3.40-10.99]; it was 2.14, 95% CI [1.11-4.12] with aCL. The ORs were similar when stratifying on the type of thrombosis (arterial vs. venous). Only two studies assessed the risk of thrombosis associated with anti-β2GP-I antibody positivity; consequently, no pooled OR was computed for these antibodies. This meta-analysis highly suggests that LA positivity, and to a less extent aCL antibodies, are associated with an enhanced risk of thrombosis in primary ITP patients. Further prospective studies are needed to identify the factors associated with the risk of thrombosis among LA patients before assessing prevention strategies.

  6. [Atypical risk factors of atherosclerosis in patients with hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Mykhaĭlenko, O Iu

    2013-09-01

    The non-traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic lesions of the cardiovascular system (C-reactive protein, uric acid, fibrinogen, homocysteine) in blood plasma of patients with manifestative hypothyroidism at the age of 23 to 73 years were assessed in the study. An increase in the average values of C-reactive protein was revealed in patients with hypothyroidism without arterial hypertension (AH), as well as under its presence, and increased BMI. Uric acid level also was increased with the combination of hypothyroidism and hypertension. Average level of fibrinogen was within the values of the control group and increased only in 23.4% of patients with hypothyroidism. Homocysteine content was elevated in 32% of patients and was not associated with the presence of AH. Increased levels of these markers of cardiovascular lesions risk coincided with the increased diameter of the common carotid artery.

  7. [Hyperhomocysteinemia as a vascular risk factor in chronic hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Young, Pablo; Díaz, María L; Schropp, Juan; Forrester, Mariano; Freixas, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Homocysteine is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the general population. In addition, it plays a main role in the development of atherogenesis and thrombosis, particularly in end-stage renal disease patients. Therefore, hemodialysis patients are under the burden of homocysteine toxic effects, present in nearly 90% of dialysis patients. Our group found that folic acid is an efficient therapeutic approach to decrease homocysteine levels, and the addition of intravenous methylcobalamin potentiates this effect; however, methylcobalamin alone was unsuccessful to normalize homocysteine levels. With time a group of patients required a higher dose of folic acid to reduce hyperhomocysteinemia. Patients homozygous and, to a lesser extent heterozygous, to the C677T thermolabile variant of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) presented a reduced catalytic activity and required a higher folic acid dose. Vascular-access thrombotic events were similar in all patients according to the variants of the enzyme, suggesting that treating hyperhomocysteinemia was the key to lower the risk of thromboses. Noteworthy, hypohomocysteinemia, generally acompanying malnourishment, is associated to higher mortality. Albeit hyper-homocysteinemia is considered a vascular risk factor in renal failure patients, it has not yet been established in this population if its correction is associated with a decrease in the rate of vascular disease and thrombosis. However, given the mentioned evidence about the low risk and good tolerance of vitamin therapy, we believe it useful to know folate, cobalamin and homocysteine blood levels in chronic renal patients and start a prompt treatment, which may proof adequate to maintain homocysteine levels of 10 +/- 5 micromol/l. PMID:16433478

  8. [Cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic renal failure. Patients in renal replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Cases, A; Vera, M; López Gómez, J M

    2002-01-01

    Dialysis patients constitute a high-risk subset of patients for developing cardiovascular disease, which accounts for nearly 50% of deaths. After stratification for age, race and gender, cardiovascular mortality is 10-20 times higher in dialysis patients than in the general population. Cardiovascular disease in this population cannot be fully explained by the high prevalence of classical cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, smoking, etc.). Thus, the involvement of "new" cardiovascular risk factors (hyperhomocysteinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, high lipoprotein (a) levels, oxidative stress, inflammation, etc.), and uremia-related factors (anemia, impaired calcium-phosphorus metabolism, hyperparathyroidism, accumulation of endogenous inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis, etc.) has been also invoked to play a role in the increased cardiovascular risk in these patients. Endothelial dysfunction is the initial event in the development of atherosclerosis. Uremic patients exhibit an endothelial dysfunction, even before starting dialysis, which persists o is even aggravated under dialysis treatment. Uremic patients must be considered at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Thus cardiovascular risk factors in these patients should be managed early, aggressive and multifactorially in order to reduce their high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  9. TNF-α promoter polymorphisms and risk of recurrence in patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the nonoropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiyun; Sturgis, Erich M.; Zheng, Hongliang; Zafereo, Mark E.; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Functional polymorphisms of TNF-α may play a critical role in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, and could affect transcriptional levels of the TNF-α gene and thus contribute to carcinogenesis and outcomes of cancer patients. In a cohort study, we explored the associations between TNF-α polymorphisms and risk of recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the nonoropharynx (SCCNOP). We used log-rank test and multivariable Cox models to evaluate the associations between TNF-α polymorphisms and risk of recurrence. In overall comparisons, patients with the TNF-α -857 CC, TNF-α -863 CC, and TNF-α -1031 TT genotypes had significantly worse disease-free survival (log-rank, P = .014, log-rank, P = .020, and log-rank, P = .002, respectively) and higher risk of disease recurrence than patients with the corresponding variant genotypes, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4, 95% CI, 1.1-1.9, HR, 1.4, 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, and HR, 1.6, 95% CI, 1.2-2.2, respectively). However, no significant association was detected for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism. Moreover, in further stratified analyses based on smoking status and treatment, we found that the associations of the TNF-α -857, TNF-α -863, and TNF-α -1031 polymorphisms with risk of recurrence were more pronounced in smokers and patients treated with chemo-radiation. Our findings support a significant role of the TNF-α -857, TNF-α -863, and TNF-α -1031 polymorphisms in recurrence of SCCNOP, especially in smokers and patients treated with chemo-radiation. Future prospective studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24550071

  10. Conscious sedation for dentistry: risk management and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Douglass L; Johnson, Barton S

    2002-10-01

    There are many safe and effective medications available to the dental practitioner for producing conscious sedation. Given the many sedatives available, all possessing slightly different clinical characteristics and various degrees of risk, careful consideration needs to be given to the objectives of the sedation when deciding which pharmacologic agents to use. Before making plans to sedate dental patients, however, one needs to make sure that several "layers" of risk management are in place to ensure the sedation procedure is as safe as possible. Included in this risk management plan is a complete understanding of the regulations that define conscious sedation and the training that is required to deliver this state of depressed consciousness. Careful attention also needs to be given to selecting appropriate dental patients for sedation. A thorough understanding of the patient's physical and psychologic status is necessary when making decisions about sedation. Because most dental disease is not life threatening, dental treatment needs tend to be primarily elective in nature. Considering the training requirements for delivering inhalational or enteral conscious sedation with a single agent, it is prudent to limit this type of sedation to the patient population that is healthy (e.g., ASA I and II) and psychologically stable as a way of minimizing risk. The amount of additional risk one encounters when sedating more medically compromised patients (ASA III and greater) should suggest that deferring elective dental treatments until the health status improves is prudent. In situations in which an improvement in the patient's health status is not likely, referral to someone with more experience sedating medically compromised patients is strongly recommended. Equally important to the conscious sedation risk management plan is an assurance that the patient understands what is meant by conscious sedation and that their treatment expectations are realistic. Finally, even

  11. Suicidal ideation and risk factors in Korean migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Young; Park, Sung-Pa

    2014-10-01

    Population-based studies have reported an increased risk of suicidal ideation in patients with migraine. However, there is some controversy as to whether migraine itself is a risk factor for suicidal ideation after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidities. We calculated the frequency of suicidal ideation among patients with migraine visiting a tertiary care hospital and determined its risk factors. Patients with migraine and healthy controls completed self-report questionnaires to assess depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation, and the frequency of suicidal ideation. Risk factors for suicidal ideation were investigated in terms of demographic, clinical, and psychiatric variables. One hundred eighty-five patients with migraine (156 females and 29 males; mean age 39.1 years) and 53 age and education-matched healthy controls participated in the study. The frequency of suicidal ideation was significantly greater in patients with migraine than healthy controls (odds ratio [OR]=5.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-22.10, p=0.003), but this significance was not sustained after adjusting for comorbid depression and anxiety. The risk of suicidal ideation in patients with migraine was associated with lower education levels, higher frequency of migraine attacks, stronger intensity of headaches, and presence of phonophobia, chronic migraine, depression, and anxiety. The strongest predictor was depression (OR=15.36, 95% CI 5.39-43.78, p<0.001), followed by the intensity of headache while completing the questionnaire (OR=1.293, 95% CI 1.077-1.553; p=0.006). The contribution of migraine-specific variables to suicidal ideation is trivial compared to that of depression and headache intensity.

  12. Written Informed Consent for Computed Tomography of the Abdomen/Pelvis is Associated with Decreased CT Utilization in Low-Risk Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Merck, Lisa H.; Ward, Laura A.; Applegate, Kimberly E.; Choo, Esther; Lowery-North, Douglas W.; Heilpern, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The increasing rate of patient exposure to radiation from computerized tomography (CT) raises questions about appropriateness of utilization. There is no current standard to employ informed consent for CT (ICCT). Our study assessed the relationship between informed consent and CT utilization in emergency department (ED) patients. Methods An observational multiphase before-after cohort study was completed from 4/2010–5/2011. We assessed CT utilization before and after (Time I/Time II) the implementation of an informed consent protocol. Adult patients were included if they presented with symptoms of abdominal/pelvic pathology or completed ED CT. We excluded patients with pregnancy, trauma, or altered mental status. Data on history, exam, diagnostics, and disposition were collected via standard abstraction tool. We generated a multivariate logistic model via stepwise regression, to assess CT utilization across risk groups. Logistic models, stratified by risk, were generated to include study phase and a propensity score that controlled for potential confounders of CT utilization. Results 7,684 patients met inclusion criteria. In PHASE 2, there was a 24% (95% CI [10–36%]) reduction in CT utilization in the low-risk patient group (p<0.002). ICCT did not affect CT utilization in the high-risk group (p=0.16). In low-risk patients, the propensity score was significant (p<0.001). There were no adverse events reported during the study period. Conclusion The implementation of ICCT was associated with reduced CT utilization in low-risk ED patients. ICCT has the potential to increase informed, shared decision making with patients, as well as to reduce the risks and cost associated with CT. PMID:26759646

  13. Risk and potential risk reduction in diabetes type 2 patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Häussler, Bertram; Berger, Ursula; Mast, Oliver; Thefeld, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    Avoiding serious complications such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and amputations in diabetes patients is the main interest of long-term treatment. Given the considerable prevalence of diabetes type 2 in industrialized countries this is a major public health concern as well as a burden to health care systems. The present study estimated the current risk of major complications occurring in the German diabetes type 2 population and explored the potential for further risk reduction. Risk reduction can be achieved when physiological and behavioral parameters (HbAlc, blood pressure, cholesterol level, body mass index, smoking) are set to target values recommended in guidelines. To estimate individual risk and potential risk reduction the multifactor disease model Mellibase was employed. Data were obtained from the German Health Survey of 1998, which includes a sample of 7,124 individuals representative of the German population. The survey shows a prevalence rate of 6.3% for diabetes type 2 in persons older than 35 years. The analyses reveal that the overall potential for risk reduction is moderate (e.g., the average reduction potential of the 10-year risk of stroke is 5.7%). A majority of parameter ranges found in the patient population are either already close to the recommended values (HbA1c), are not alarmingly higher than in the general population (blood pressure) or have little impact on risk reduction. In addition nonmodifiable risk factors such as duration of the illness and advanced age constrain possible improvements. However, there is a wide variation in the actual risk between individuals (e.g., the 10-year risk of stroke varies between 2.2% and 79.8%), and thus a wide variation in potential risk reduction (the risk reduction potential for stroke varies between 0% and 53.4%). Intensified treatment should therefore (a) focus on relevant subgroups of patients taking their risk reduction potential into account and (b) aim at improvement in the overall

  14. Pressure ulcer risk of patient handling sling use.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Matthew J; Kahn, Julie A; Kerrigan, Michael V; Gutmann, Joseph M; Harrow, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handling slings and lifts reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries for healthcare providers. However, no published evidence exists of their safety with respect to pressure ulceration for vulnerable populations, specifically persons with spinal cord injury, nor do any studies compare slings for pressure distribution. High-resolution interface pressure mapping was used to describe and quantify risks associated with pressure ulceration due to normal forces and identify at-risk anatomical locations. We evaluated 23 patient handling slings with 4 nondisabled adults. Sling-participant interface pressures were recorded while participants lay supine on a hospital bed and while suspended during typical patient transfers. Sling-participant interface pressures were greatest while suspended for all seated and supine slings and exceeded 200 mm Hg for all seated slings. Interface pressures were greatest along the sling seams (edges), regardless of position or sling type. The anatomical areas most at risk while participants were suspended in seated slings were the posterior upper and lower thighs. For supine slings, the perisacral area, ischial tuberosities, and greater trochanters were most at risk. The duration of time spent in slings, especially while suspended, should be limited.

  15. Metformin use and lung cancer risk in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Lori C.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Achacoso, Ninah S.; Peng, Tiffany; Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2015-01-01

    Methodologic biases may explain why observational studies examining metformin use in relation to lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a cohort study to further investigate this relationship, accounting for potential biases. For 47,351 patients with diabetes aged ≥40 years, who completed a health-related survey administered between 1994 and 1996, data on prescribed diabetes medications were obtained from electronic pharmacy records. Follow-up for incident lung cancer occurred from January 1, 1997, until June 30, 2012. Using Cox regression, we estimated lung cancer risk associated with new use of metformin, along with total duration, recency, and cumulative dose (all modeled as time-dependent covariates), adjusting for potential confounding factors. During 428,557 person-years of follow-up, 747 patients were diagnosed with lung cancer. No association was found with duration, dose, or recency of metformin use and overall lung cancer risk. Among never smokers, however, ever use was inversely associated with lung cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR) 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.33-0.99), and risk appeared to decrease monotonically with longer use (≥5 years: HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.21-1.09). Among current smokers, corresponding risk estimates were >1.0, although not statistically significant. Consistent with this variation in effect by smoking history, longer use was suggestively associated with lower adenocarcinoma risk (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.40-1.17), but higher small cell carcinoma risk (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 0.85-3.91). In this population, we found no evidence that metformin use affects overall lung cancer risk. The observed variation in association by smoking history and histology requires further confirmation. PMID:25644512

  16. Cured meat consumption increases risk of readmission in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    de Batlle, Jordi; Mendez, Michelle; Romieu, Isabelle; Balcells, Eva; Benet, Marta; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Ferrer, Jaume J; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Antó, Josep M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that a high dietary intake of cured meat increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) development. However, its potential effects on COPD evolution have not been tested. We aimed to assess the association between dietary intake of cured meat and risk of COPD readmission in COPD patients. 274 COPD patients were recruited during their first COPD admission between 2004 and 2006, provided information on dietary intake of cured meat during the previous 2 yrs, and were followed until December 31, 2007 (median follow-up 2.6 yrs). Associations between cured meat intake and COPD admissions were assessed using parametric regression survival-time models. Mean ± SD age was 68 ± 8 yrs, 93% of patients were male, 42% were current smokers, mean post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) was 53 ± 16% predicted, and median cured meat intake was 23 g · day(-1). After adjusting for age, FEV(1), and total caloric intake, high cured meat intake (more than median value) increased the risk of COPD readmission (adjusted HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.31-3.12; p=0.001). High cured meat consumption increases the risk of COPD readmission in COPD patients. The assessment of the effectiveness of healthy diet advice should be considered in the future.

  17. Review article: Diagnostic accuracy of risk stratification tools for patients with chest pain in the rural emergency department: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Roche, Tina; Jennings, Natasha; Clifford, Stuart; O'connell, Jane; Lutze, Matthew; Gosden, Edward; Hadden, N Fionna; Gardner, Glenn

    2016-10-01

    Risk stratification tools for patients presenting to rural EDs with undifferentiated chest pain enable early definitive treatment in high-risk patients. This systematic review compares the most commonly used risk stratification tools used to predict the risk of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) for patients presenting to rural EDs with chest pain. A comprehensive search of MEDLINE and Embase for studies published between January 2011 and January 2015 was undertaken. Study quality was assessed using QUADAS-2 criteria and the PRISMA guidelines.Eleven studies using eight risk stratification tools met the inclusion criteria. The percentage of MACE in the patients stratified as suitable for discharge, and the percentage of patients whose scores would have recommended admission that did not experience a MACE event were used as comparisons. Using the findings of a survey of emergency physicians that found a 1% MACE rate acceptable in discharged patients, the EDACS-ADP was considered the best performer. EDACS-ADP had one of the lowest rates of MACE in those discharged (3/1148, 0.3%) and discharged one of the highest percentage of patients (44.5%). Only the GRACE tool discharged more patients (69% - all patients with scores <100) but had a MACE rate of 0.3% in discharged patients. The HFA/CSANZ guidelines achieved zero cases of MACE but discharged only 1.3% of patients.EDACS-ADP can potentially increase diagnostic efficiency of patients presenting at ED with chest pain. Further assessment of tool in a rural context is recommended.

  18. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  19. Photospheric Emission from Stratified Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E p-L p relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  20. Gun safety management with patients at risk for suicide.

    PubMed

    Simon, Robert I

    2007-10-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person responsible for removing guns from the home. A call-back to the clinician from the designated person is required confirming that guns have been removed and secured according to plan. The principle of gun safety management applies to outpatients, inpatients, and emergency patients, although its implementation varies according to the clinical setting.

  1. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up. Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included. In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14–3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P < 0.001 and P = 0.015; and HRs of 16.5 and 1.92, respectively). The dementia risk

  2. Incidence, Characteristics and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury among Dengue Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Khan, Amer Hayat; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Sarriff, Azmi; Khan, Yusra Habib; Jummaat, Fauziah

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue induced acute kidney injury (AKI) imposes heavy burden of illness in terms of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate incidence, characteristics, risk factors and clinical outcomes of AKI among dengue patients. Methodology A total 667 dengue patients (2008–2013) were retrospectively evaluated and were stratified into AKI and non-AKI groups by using AKIN criteria. Two groups were compared by using appropriate statistical methods. Results There were 95 patients (14.2%) who had AKI, with AKIN-I, AKIN-II and AKIN-III in 76.8%, 16.8% and 6.4% patients, respectively. Significant differences (P<0.05) in demographics and clinico-laboratory characteristics were observed between patients with and without AKI. Presence of dengue hemorrhagic fever [OR (95% CI): 8.0 (3.64–17.59), P<0.001], rhabdomyolysis [OR (95% CI): 7.9 (3.04–20.49)], multiple organ dysfunction [OR (95% CI): 34.6 (14.14–84.73), P<0.001], diabetes mellitus [OR (95% CI): 4.7 (1.12–19.86), P = 0.034], late hospitalization [OR (95% CI): 2.1 (1.12–19.86), P = 0.033] and use of nephrotoxic drugs [OR (95% CI): 2.9 (1.12–19.86), P = 0.006] were associated with AKI. Longer hospital stay (>3 days) was also observed among AKI patients (OR = 1.3, P = 0.044). Additionally, 48.4% AKI patients had renal insufficiencies at discharge that were signicantly associated with severe dengue, secondary infection and diabetes mellitus. Overall mortality was 1.2% and all fatal cases had AKI. Conclusions The incidence of AKI is high at 14.2% among dengue patients, and those with AKI portended significant morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stay and poor renal outcomes. Our findings suggest that AKI in dengue is likely to increase healthcare burden that underscores the need of clinicians’ alertness to this highly morbid and potentially fatal complication for optimal prevention and management. PMID:26421839

  3. Prepaid coordinated care for patients with diabetes: practices and patients bear the risks.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Douglas A

    2011-06-01

    The Australian Government is planning to pilot a model of prepaid funding for coordinated care of patients with diabetes in general practice. Patients will register with a practice that undertakes to coordinate their care, and practices will manage pre-allocated funds to provide services instead of billing Medicare. Systems to manage prepaid funds in Australian general practice have not yet been developed. In the model that has been proposed, practices with a small register of patients will be at risk of overspending, which may threaten practice viability and patient services. If the initiative is to have integrity, all patient services should be paid from the prepaid funds and patients should only attend the practice with which they have registered. Risks should be delineated and contingency plans made explicit before practices and patients commit to the initiative. PMID:21644876

  4. Reduced risk of prostate cancer among patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ye, Weimin; Vainio, Harri; Kaaks, Rudolf; Adami, Hans-Olov

    2002-11-20

    Although diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of several malignancies, a negative association with prostate cancer is biologically most plausible. The epidemiologic evidence is, however, inconsistent, limited and based mostly on small studies. We present results from a large, population-based cohort study in Sweden, where we assessed prostate cancer risk among patients hospitalized for diabetes mellitus. The cohort was composed of patients identified in the Swedish In-Patient Register as having a hospital discharge diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 1965-1994. The follow-up was done by linkages with the national cancer register and other population-based registers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), with 95% confidence interval (CI), were used as a measure of relative risk. After complete exclusion of the first year of follow-up (to avoid selection bias), 135,950 men remained in the cohort, contributing 827,099 years of follow-up to the study. A total of 2,455 incident cases of primary prostate cancer were identified during 1-31 years of follow-up, yielding an overall SIR of 0.91 (95% CI 0.87-0.94); this risk reduction was more pronounced among patients who have been hospitalized for diabetic complications (SIR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.74-0.91). We found no consistent trends in risk related to age at first hospitalization or to duration of follow-up. We did find a small, but significantly decreased risk of prostate cancer among men who had been hospitalized for diabetes mellitus.

  5. Increased Risk of Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Te-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies suggest that an association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and migraine exists. However, population-based data are unavailable in Asian cohorts. Our study thus aims to evaluate the association between migraine and RLS in a nationwide, population-based cohort in Taiwan and to examine the effects of age, sex, migraine subtype, and comorbidities on RLS development. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were used. Patients aged 20 years or older with newly diagnosed migraine from 2000 to 2008 were included; 23,641 patients with newly diagnosed migraine and 94,564 subjects without migraine were randomly selected and followed until RLS development, withdrawal from the National Health Insurance, or until the end of 2011. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore the risk of RLS in patients with migraine after adjustment for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. Both cohorts were followed for a mean of 7.38 years. After adjustment for covariates, the risk of RLS was 1.42-fold higher (95% confidence interval = 1.13–1.79) in the migraine cohort than in the nonmigraine cohort (7.19 versus 3.42 years per 10,000 person-years). The increased risk was more prominent in males in the migraine cohort (1.87-fold increased risk, 95% confidence interval 1.22–2.85). Neither comorbidity status nor migraine subtype influenced the RLS risk. This population-based study demonstrated that migraine is associated with an increased risk of RLS compared with those without migraine, particularly in male patients with migraine and regardless of the comorbidity status. PMID:26844484

  6. Core science: Stratified by a sunken impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Miki

    2016-10-01

    There is potential evidence for a stratified layer at the top of the Earth's core, but its origin is not well understood. Laboratory experiments suggest that the stratified layer could be a sunken remnant of the giant impact that formed the Moon.

  7. Increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng

    2015-02-01

    Although past studies have confirmed that chronic dust exposure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the relationship between it and cerebrovascular disease is still unclear. We aimed to determine whether pneumoconiosis is related to increased incidence of ischemic stroke in the following 5 to 11 years. We selected 1238 patients with pneumoconiosis from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database as our study cohort. After matching for age, sex and the date of ambulatory care visit, another 4952 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected as the comparison cohort. Each patient was individually followed up until the end of 2010 to track the incidence of stroke, and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to compute the relative hazard ratio of stroke. Our results showed 19.6% of pneumoconiosis patients and 15.8% of non-pneumoconiosis patients developed stroke. After statistically adjusting for age, sex, and medical comorbidities, the hazard of developing stroke was 1.36 times greater for those with pneumoconiosis compared to those without. Even in those with pneumoconiosis excluding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the hazard of developing stroke was still 1.31 times greater than those without pneumoconiosis. Our study revealed that pneumoconiosis patients are at a higher risk of ischemic stroke, and primary prevention of stroke is particularly important in this group of patients.

  8. Bladder cancer in a young patient: Undiscovered risk factors

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, RAFAY; IBRAHIM, HIYAM; TULPULE, SUNIL; IROKA, NNEKA

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common forms of malignancies involving the urinary system and multiple risk factors have been associated with its etiology. The most common of which include cigarette smoking and various occupational or chemical exposures. It is usually diagnosed in older individuals with an average age of 70. In rare cases it is observed in children as well as young adults where it usually presents as a low-grade, non-invasive disease. In the present case report a 27-year-old male patient is discussed: The patient presented with no significant risk factors and was treated for mucinous adenocarcinoma of the bladder while further investigations were performed to identify other associated factors related to this form of malignancy. Debate in the literature exists in regards to the characteristics of bladder neoplasms in younger patients compared with older patients, however there is a lack of research into the etiology or prognosis in young patients. The present case study illustrates the case of a young adult with no clear risk factors who was diagnosed with a rare case of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the bladder. PMID:27123090

  9. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  10. Environmental Risk Factors in Patients with Noninvasive Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; El Sharnoubi, Mohammed M K; El-Sersy, Hesham A A; Mahmoud, Mohammed S M

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to try to determine the possible environmental risk factors for noninvasive fungal sinusitis in Egyptian patients. Methods. This is a prospective epidemiological case control study on the environmental risk factors of noninvasive fungal sinusitis. It included 60 patients and 100 age and sex matched controls. Results. There was a statistically significant relation between apartment floor, surface area, exposure to dust, exposure to cockroaches, poor air conditioning, and fungal sinusitis. Yet, no statistical significance was found between allergy related occupations, exposure to animals or plants, although their percentages were higher among cases, smoking, and urban or rural residence. Conclusion. We suggest that for patients with noninvasive fungal sinusitis a change in their living environment must be implied with better exposure to sunlight, larger well ventilated homes, proper cleaning of dust and cockroach extermination, and if possible the judicious use of air conditioners. PMID:27274885

  11. Environmental Risk Factors in Patients with Noninvasive Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; El Sharnoubi, Mohammed M K; El-Sersy, Hesham A A; Mahmoud, Mohammed S M

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to try to determine the possible environmental risk factors for noninvasive fungal sinusitis in Egyptian patients. Methods. This is a prospective epidemiological case control study on the environmental risk factors of noninvasive fungal sinusitis. It included 60 patients and 100 age and sex matched controls. Results. There was a statistically significant relation between apartment floor, surface area, exposure to dust, exposure to cockroaches, poor air conditioning, and fungal sinusitis. Yet, no statistical significance was found between allergy related occupations, exposure to animals or plants, although their percentages were higher among cases, smoking, and urban or rural residence. Conclusion. We suggest that for patients with noninvasive fungal sinusitis a change in their living environment must be implied with better exposure to sunlight, larger well ventilated homes, proper cleaning of dust and cockroach extermination, and if possible the judicious use of air conditioners.

  12. Environmental Risk Factors in Patients with Noninvasive Fungal Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; El Sharnoubi, Mohammed M. K.; El-Sersy, Hesham A. A.; Mahmoud, Mohammed S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to try to determine the possible environmental risk factors for noninvasive fungal sinusitis in Egyptian patients. Methods. This is a prospective epidemiological case control study on the environmental risk factors of noninvasive fungal sinusitis. It included 60 patients and 100 age and sex matched controls. Results. There was a statistically significant relation between apartment floor, surface area, exposure to dust, exposure to cockroaches, poor air conditioning, and fungal sinusitis. Yet, no statistical significance was found between allergy related occupations, exposure to animals or plants, although their percentages were higher among cases, smoking, and urban or rural residence. Conclusion. We suggest that for patients with noninvasive fungal sinusitis a change in their living environment must be implied with better exposure to sunlight, larger well ventilated homes, proper cleaning of dust and cockroach extermination, and if possible the judicious use of air conditioners. PMID:27274885

  13. Imaging of cardiovascular risk in patients with Turner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marin, A.; Weir-McCall, J.R.; Webb, D.J.; van Beek, E.J.R.; Mirsadraee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a disorder defined by an absent or structurally abnormal second X chromosome and affects around 1 in 2000 newborn females. The standardised mortality ratio in Turner's syndrome is around three-times higher than in the general female population, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disorders. Most striking is the early age at which Turner's syndrome patients develop the life-threatening complications of cardiovascular disorders compared to the general population. The cardiovascular risk stratification in Turner's syndrome is challenging and imaging is not systematically used. The aim of this article is to review cardiovascular risks in this group of patients and discuss a systematic imaging approach for early identification of cardiovascular disorders in these patients. PMID:25917542

  14. Clinical decision rule for primary care patient with acute low back pain at risk of developing chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Mehling, Wolf E.; Ebell, Mark H.; Avins, Andrew L.; Hecht, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context Primary care clinicians need to identify candidates for early interventions to prevent patients with acute pain from developing chronic pain. Purpose We conducted a 2-year prospective cohort study of risk factors for the progression to chronic pain and developed and internally validated a clinical decision rule (CDR) that stratifies patients into low, medium and high-risk groups for chronic pain. Study Design/Setting Prospective cohort study in primary care. Patient Sample Patients with acute low back pain (LBP; ≤30 days duration) Outcome measures Self-reported perceived non-recovery and chronic pain. Methods Patients were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 2 years. We conducted bivariate and multivariate regression analyses of demographic, clinical and psychosocial variables for chronic pain outcomes, developed a CDR and assessed its performance by calculating the bootstrapped areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and likelihood ratios. This study was supported by NIH/NCCAM grants K23 AT002298, R21 AT004467, NIH/NCCAM K24 AT007827, the Research Evaluation and Allocation Committee (REAC) of the University of California San Francisco, and the Mount Zion Health Fund, San Francisco. The funding agencies played no role in design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. The authors report no conflict of interests. Results 605 patients enrolled. 13% had chronic pain at 6 months, 19% at 2 years. An eight-item CDR was most parsimonious for classifying patients into three risk levels. Bootstrapped AUC was 0.76 (0.70–0.82) for the 6-month CDR. Each 10-point score increase (60-point range) was associated with an odds ratio of 11.1 (10.8–11.4) for developing chronic pain. Using a <5% probability of chronic pain as the cutoff for low risk and a >40% probability for high risk, likelihood ratios were 0.26 (0.14–0.48) and 4

  15. Inhibition of Gastric Acid Secretion by H2 Receptor Antagonists Associates a Definite Risk of Enteric Peritonitis and Infectious Mortality in Patients Treated with Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Fontan, Miguel; Machado Lopes, Daniela; García Enríquez, Alba; López-Calviño, Beatriz; López-Muñiz, Andrés; García Falcón, Teresa; Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidences linking treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion (IGAS) and an increased risk of serious infections are inconclusive, both in the population at large and in the particular case of patients with chronic kidney disease. We have undertaken an investigation to disclose associations between treatment with IGAS and infectious outcomes, in patients undergoing chronic Peritoneal Dialysis (PD). Method Observational, historic cohort, single center design. Six hundred and ninety-one patients incident on PD were scrutinized for an association among treatment with IGAS (H2 antagonists H2A or proton pump inhibitors PPI) (main study variable), on one side, and the risks of enteric peritoneal infection (main outcome), overall peritoneal infection, and general and infectious mortality (secondary outcomes). We applied a three-step multivariate approach, based on classic Cox models (baseline variables), time-dependent analyses and, when appropriate, competing risk analyses. Main results The clinical characteristics of patients treated with H2A, PPI or none of these were significantly different. Multivariate analyses disclosed a consistently increased risk of enteric peritonitis in patients treated with IGAS (RR 1.65, 95% CI 1.08–2.55, p = 0.018, Cox). Stratified analysis indicated that patients treated with H2A, rather than those on PPI, supported the burden of this risk. Similar findings applied for the risk of infectious mortality. On the contrary, we were not able to detect any association among the study variables, on one side, and the general risks of peritonitis or mortality, on the other. Conclusions Treatment with IGAS associates increased incidences of enteric peritonitis and infectious mortality, among patients on chronic PD. The association is clear in the case of H2A but less consistent in the case of PPI. Our results support the convenience of preferring PPI to H2A, for gastric acid inhibition in PD patients. PMID:26872254

  16. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2014-03-01

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103 who were not, taking anticoagulants. Seventy-one were taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and 32 vitamin K antagonists. Patients were treated according to guidelines developed at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), The Netherlands. The operations studied included surgical extraction (when the surgeon had to incise the gingiva before extraction), non-surgical extraction, apicectomy, and placement of implants. Patients were given standard postoperative care and those taking vitamin K antagonists used tranexamic acid mouthwash postoperatively. No patient developed a severe bleed that required intervention. Seven patients (7%) taking anticoagulants developed mild postoperative bleeds. Patients taking vitamin K antagonists reported 3 episodes (9%) compared with 4 (6%) in the group taking thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors. Among patients not taking anticoagulants, two (2%) developed mild bleeding. The differences between the groups were not significant. All bleeding was controlled by the patients themselves with compression with gauze. We conclude that dentoalveolar surgery is safe in patients being treated with anticoagulants provided that the conditions described in the ACTA guidelines are met. PMID:24485810

  17. [Management of vascular risk factors in patients older than 80].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Formiga, Francesc; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Camafort, Miguel; Galve, Enrique; Gil, Pedro; Lobos, José María

    2014-08-01

    The number of patients older than 80 years is steadily increasing and it represents the main basis for increasing population figures in developed countries. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of mortality and disability causes result in a huge burden of disease in elderly people. However, available scientific evidence to support decision-making on cardiovascular prevention in elderly patients is scarce. Currently available risk assessment scales cannot be applied to elderly people. They are focused on cardiovascular mortality risk and do not provide information on factors with a proven prognostic value in the very old (functioning disability, dementia). Elderly people are a highly heterogeneous population, with a variety of co-morbidities, as well as several functional and cognitive impairment degrees. Furthermore, aging-associated physiological changes and common use of multiple drugs result in an increased risk of adverse drug reactions. Thus, drug use should always be based on a risk/benefit assessment in the elderly. Therefore, therapeutic decision-making in the very old must be an individually tailored and based on an appropriate clinical judgement and a comprehensive geriatric assessment. The current consensus report aims to present a proposal for clinical practices in the primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention in the very old and to provide a number of recommendations on lifestyle changes and drug therapy for the management of major cardiovascular risk factors.

  18. [Management of vascular risk factors in patients older than 80].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Formiga, Francesc; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Camafort, Miguel; Galve, Enrique; Gil, Pedro; Lobos, José María

    2014-08-01

    The number of patients older than 80 years is steadily increasing and it represents the main basis for increasing population figures in developed countries. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of mortality and disability causes result in a huge burden of disease in elderly people. However, available scientific evidence to support decision-making on cardiovascular prevention in elderly patients is scarce. Currently available risk assessment scales cannot be applied to elderly people. They are focused on cardiovascular mortality risk and do not provide information on factors with a proven prognostic value in the very old (functioning disability, dementia). Elderly people are a highly heterogeneous population, with a variety of co-morbidities, as well as several functional and cognitive impairment degrees. Furthermore, aging-associated physiological changes and common use of multiple drugs result in an increased risk of adverse drug reactions. Thus, drug use should always be based on a risk/benefit assessment in the elderly. Therefore, therapeutic decision-making in the very old must be an individually tailored and based on an appropriate clinical judgement and a comprehensive geriatric assessment. The current consensus report aims to present a proposal for clinical practices in the primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention in the very old and to provide a number of recommendations on lifestyle changes and drug therapy for the management of major cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:24908624

  19. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  20. Factors associated with risk of suicide in patients with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Camila; de Oliveira e Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Neto, José Pedro Simões; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Suicide risk (SR) has been associated to several factors; one of them is the presence of psychiatric disorders. This study has the objective of investigating the relationship between the risk factors for suicidal behavior in patient bearers of chronic renal illness who are undertaking hemodialysis treatment. Sixty-nine undertook a short, structured diagnostic interview. The prevalence of some psychiatric disorders showed itself greater in the sample than that in the population in general. A significant positive correlation was found between SR, major depressive episode, and agoraphobia without panic disorder. The religiosity of the patient was also evaluated as an influencing factor of SR. Nonreligious patients had 8 times more chance to have SR compared to religious patients. However, the referred effect only occurred in nondepressed religious patients. The latter indicated that religiosity had its effect annulled in depressed patients. This study shows the importance of measures of intervention in mental health, mainly in relation to prevention and treatment of major depressive episode with a view to reducing SR. PMID:21193182

  1. Proposal for a new risk stratification classification for meningioma based on patient age, WHO tumor grade, size, localization, and karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia Henriques; Sousa, Pablo; Otero, Álvaro; Gonçalves, Jesus Maria; Ruiz, Laura; de Oliveira, Catarina; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, Maria Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor recurrence remains the major clinical complication of meningiomas, the majority of recurrences occurring among WHO grade I/benign tumors. In the present study, we propose a new scoring system for the prognostic stratification of meningioma patients based on analysis of a large series of meningiomas followed for a median of >5 years. Methods Tumor cytogenetics were systematically investigated by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in 302 meningioma samples, and the proposed classification was further validated in an independent series of cases (n = 132) analyzed by high-density (500K) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Results Overall, we found an adverse impact on patient relapse-free survival (RFS) for males, presence of brain edema, younger patients (<55 years), tumor size >50 mm, tumor localization at intraventricular and anterior cranial base areas, WHO grade II/III meningiomas, and complex karyotypes; the latter 5 variables showed an independent predictive value in multivariate analysis. Based on these parameters, a prognostic score was established for each individual case, and patients were stratified into 4 risk categories with significantly different (P < .001) outcomes. These included a good prognosis group, consisting of approximately 20% of cases, that showed a RFS of 100% ± 0% at 10 years and a very poor-prognosis group with a RFS rate of 0% ± 0% at 10 years. The prognostic impact of the scoring system proposed here was also retained when WHO grade I cases were considered separately (P < .001). Conclusions Based on this risk-stratification classification, different strategies may be adopted for follow-up, and eventually also for treatment, of meningioma patients at different risks for relapse. PMID:24536048

  2. Long-Term Outcomes for Patients with Prostate Cancer Having Intermediate and High-Risk Disease, Treated with Combination External Beam Irradiation and Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dattoli, Michael; Wallner, Kent; True, Lawrence; Bostwick, David; Cash, Jennifer; Sorace, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background. Perception remains that brachytherapy-based regimens are inappropriate for patients having increased risk of extracapsular extension (ECE). Methods. 321 consecutive intermediate and high-risk disease patients were treated between 1/92 and 2/97 by one author (M. Dattoli) and stratified by NCCN guidelines. 157 had intermediate-risk; 164 had high-risk disease. All were treated using the combination EBRT/brachytherapy ± hormones. Biochemical failure was defined using PSA >0.2 and nadir +2 at last followup. Nonfailing patients followup was median 10.5 years. Both biochemical data and original biopsy slides were independently rereviewed at an outside institution. Results. Overall actuarial freedom from biochemical progression at 16 years was 82% (89% intermediate, 74% high-risk) with failure predictors: Gleason score (P = .01) and PSA (P = .03). Hormonal therapy did not affect failure rates (P = .14). Conclusion. This study helps to strengthen the rationale for brachytherapy-based regimens as being both durable and desirable treatment options for such patients. Prospective studies are justified to confirm these positive results. PMID:20847945

  3. Long-term outcomes for patients with prostate cancer having intermediate and high-risk disease, treated with combination external beam irradiation and brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dattoli, Michael; Wallner, Kent; True, Lawrence; Bostwick, David; Cash, Jennifer; Sorace, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background. Perception remains that brachytherapy-based regimens are inappropriate for patients having increased risk of extracapsular extension (ECE). Methods. 321 consecutive intermediate and high-risk disease patients were treated between 1/92 and 2/97 by one author (M. Dattoli) and stratified by NCCN guidelines. 157 had intermediate-risk; 164 had high-risk disease. All were treated using the combination EBRT/brachytherapy ± hormones. Biochemical failure was defined using PSA >0.2 and nadir +2 at last followup. Nonfailing patients followup was median 10.5 years. Both biochemical data and original biopsy slides were independently rereviewed at an outside institution. Results. Overall actuarial freedom from biochemical progression at 16 years was 82% (89% intermediate, 74% high-risk) with failure predictors: Gleason score (P = .01) and PSA (P = .03). Hormonal therapy did not affect failure rates (P = .14). Conclusion. This study helps to strengthen the rationale for brachytherapy-based regimens as being both durable and desirable treatment options for such patients. Prospective studies are justified to confirm these positive results. PMID:20847945

  4. Identification of Risk Factors Affecting Impaired Fasting Glucose and Diabetes in Adult Patients from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yutian; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Yuhan; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Shili; Zhang, Huiping; Jiang, Lingling; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Yaqin; Li, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Besides genetic factors, the occurrence of diabetes is influenced by lifestyles and environmental factors as well as trace elements in diet materials. Subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to explore risk factors affecting IFG and diabetes in patients from Northeast China. Methods: A population-based, cross-sectional survey of chronic diseases and related risk factors was conducted in Jilin Province of Northeast China. All adult residents, aged 18–79, were invited to participate in this survey using the method of multistage stratified random cluster sampling. One hundred thirty-four patients with IFG or DM and 391 healthy control subjects were recruited. We compared demographic factors, body size measurements, healthy-related behaviors, and hair metallic element contents between IFG/diabetes patients and healthy individuals. Results: IFG/diabetes patients had a greater weight, waist, hip, and body mass index (BMI) than control subjects. Significant differences in the content of zinc (Zn), potassium (K), copper (Ca), and sodium (Na) as well as Cu/Zn ratios between IFG or DM patients and control subjects (p < 0.05) were also observed. Hair Cu, selenium (Se), and Na contents were positively correlated with blood glucose levels (Cu: rs = 0.135, p = 0.002; Se: rs = 0.110, p = 0.012; Na: rs = 0.091, p = 0.038). Polytomous logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, family history of diabetes and BMI, showed that subjects with high BMI were more likely to develop IFG and DM (IFG: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.02–1.29; DM: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.01–1.33). Moreover, rarely or never eating fruits was a risk factor for DM (OR = 5.46, OR 95% CI = 1.87–15.98) but not for IFG (OR = 1.70, OR 95% CI = 0.72–4.02). Subjects with abdominal obesity or DM history were more susceptible to DM (abdominal obesity: OR = 2.99, OR 95% CI = 1.07–8.37; DM history: OR = 2.69, OR 95% CI = 1

  5. Cell of origin predicts outcome to treatment with etoposide-containing chemotherapy in young patients with high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gang, Anne O; Pedersen, Mette Ø; Knudsen, Helle; Lauritzen, Anne F; Pedersen, Michael; Nielsen, Signe L; Brown, Peter; Høgdall, Estrid; Klausen, Tobias W; Nørgaard, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Addition of etoposide to the R-CHOP chemotherapy regimen with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone and rituximab (R-CHOEP) has resulted in improved survival in young patients with high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). It is not known whether biological factors can predict this effect. In this study, 245 patients representing all young patients with high-risk DLBCL treated with R-CHOP or R-CHOEP in 2004-2012 in Denmark were extracted from the Danish lymphoma database. Patients were stratified according to cell of origin (COO) into germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) or non-GCB by Hans' algorithm. Only in patients with the GCB phenotype was treatment with R-CHOEP associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with R-CHOP. Patients with GCB phenotype treated with R-CHOEP also had superior OS compared with patients with non-GCB phenotype treated with R-CHOEP. This was not seen in R-CHOP treated patients. This could suggest that R-CHOEP should be restricted to patients with GCB phenotype.

  6. Arthroprosthetic cobaltism: identification of the at-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Tower, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    MoM hip bearings are being scrutinized due to high early failure rates and concerns that the results of the revision surgeries will be poor. However, orthopedic surgeons and the general medical community are unaware that patients with MoM bearings are also at risk for cobaltism. Medical providers need to know that hip arthroplasty implantees that present with symptom complexes that include tinnitus, deafness, vertigo, visual changes, rashes, hypothyroidism, tremor, dyspnea on exertion, mood disorders, dementia, heart failure, and peripheral neuropathy may be presenting arthroprosthetic cobaltism. These patients need to be asked if they have had a hip replacement and if so what type. For those patients implanted with a MoM bearing or those with a history of hip revision for a failed ceramic bearing obtaining a [Co] is indicated. MoM implantees with renal failure are a particularly high risk for cobaltism. A [Co] can be measured by many reference laboratories from royal blue top trace elements tube of venous blood. Venipuncture with a standard needle is adequate as long as a red stoppered tube is drawn first. The radiographic appearance of a MoM bearing is readily apparent to an orthopedic surgeon. The patient's operative report will usually specify the bearing type. Given that the publicity of the recent ASR bearing recall medical providers will be contacted by worried patients concerned about their hip implants. Most patients with hip replacements will not know the brand or material of their bearings. Providing patients with copies of their hip implant inventory might avoid worry by the majority of patients with hip arthroplasties that are not at risk. Patients with a cobalt levels of greater than 7 mcg/l bear observation of neurologic and cardiac function. Those patients with levels greater than 20 should be advised to have revision of their hip arthroplasty to a bearing that eliminates cobalt. Most patients implanted with MoM bearing have cobalt levels greater

  7. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun; Wang Rui; Niemierko, Andrzej; Macdonald, Shannon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  8. Adverse anthropometric risk profile in biochemically controlled acromegalic patients: comparison with an age- and gender-matched primary care population

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, C.; Wittchen, H. U.; Pieper, L.; Klotsche, J.; Roemmler, J.; Schopohl, J.; Schneider, H. J.; Stalla, G. K.

    2010-01-01

    GH and IGF-1 play an important role in the regulation of metabolism and body composition. In patients with uncontrolled acromegaly, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are increased but are supposed to be normalised after biochemical control is achieved. We aimed at comparing body composition and the cardiovascular risk profile in patients with controlled acromegaly and controls. A cross-sectional study. We evaluated anthropometric parameters (height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumference, waist to height ratio) and, additionally, cardiovascular risk biomarkers (fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and lipoprotein (a), in 81 acromegalic patients (58% cured) compared to 320 age- and gender-matched controls (ratio 1:4), sampled from the primary care patient cohort DETECT. The whole group of 81 acromegalic patients presented with significantly higher anthropometric parameters, such as weight, BMI, waist and hip circumference, but with more favourable cardiovascular risk biomarkers, such as fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL levels, in comparison to their respective controls. Biochemically controlled acromegalic patients again showed significantly higher measurements of obesity, mainly visceral adiposity, than age- and gender-matched control patients (BMI 29.5 ± 5.9 vs. 27.3 ± 5.8 kg/m2; P = 0.020; waist circumference 100.9 ± 16.8 vs. 94.8 ± 15.5 cm; P = 0.031; hip circumference 110.7 ± 9.9 vs. 105.0 ± 11.7 cm; P = 0.001). No differences in the classical cardiovascular biomarkers were detected except for fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides. This effect could not be attributed to a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the acromegalic patient group, since stratified analyses between the subgroup of patients with acromegaly and controls, both with type 2 diabetes mellitus, revealed that there were no significant differences in the

  9. Seismic modeling of complex stratified reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hung-Liang

    Turbidite reservoirs in deep-water depositional systems, such as the oil fields in the offshore Gulf of Mexico and North Sea, are becoming an important exploration target in the petroleum industry. Accurate seismic reservoir characterization, however, is complicated by the heterogeneous of the sand and shale distribution and also by the lack of resolution when imaging thin channel deposits. Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) is a very important technique that is widely applied to locate hydrocarbons. Inaccurate estimates of seismic reflection amplitudes may result in misleading interpretations because of these problems in application to turbidite reservoirs. Therefore, an efficient, accurate, and robust method of modeling seismic responses for such complex reservoirs is crucial and necessary to reduce exploration risk. A fast and accurate approach generating synthetic seismograms for such reservoir models combines wavefront construction ray tracing with composite reflection coefficients in a hybrid modeling algorithm. The wavefront construction approach is a modern, fast implementation of ray tracing that I have extended to model quasi-shear wave propagation in anisotropic media. Composite reflection coefficients, which are computed using propagator matrix methods, provide the exact seismic reflection amplitude for a stratified reservoir model. This is a distinct improvement over conventional AVO analysis based on a model with only two homogeneous half spaces. I combine the two methods to compute synthetic seismograms for test models of turbidite reservoirs in the Ursa field, Gulf of Mexico, validating the new results against exact calculations using the discrete wavenumber method. The new method, however, can also be used to generate synthetic seismograms for the laterally heterogeneous, complex stratified reservoir models. The results show important frequency dependence that may be useful for exploration. Because turbidite channel systems often display complex

  10. How stratified is mantle convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1997-04-01

    due to slabs alone. A stratification index, Sƒ≲0.2, is sufficient to exclude many stratified convection models still under active consideration, including most forms of chemical layering between the upper and lower mantle, as well as the more extreme versions of avalanching convection governed by a strong endothermic phase change.

  11. Left ventricular assist device patient selection: do risk scores help?

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ashwin K; Cowger, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) and left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is becoming increasingly utilized in the advanced heart failure (HF) population. Until further developments are made in this continually evolving field, the need for appropriate patient selection is fueled by our knowledge that the less sick do better. Due to the evolution of MCS technology, and the importance of patient selection to outcomes, risk scores and classification schemes have been developed to provide a structure for medical decision making. As clinical experience grows, technology improves, and further favorable clinical characteristics are identified, it is incumbent upon the HF community to continually hone these instruments. The magnitude of such tools cannot be understated when it comes to aiding in the informed consent and shared-decision making process for patients, families, and the healthcare team. Many risk models that have attempted to address which groups of patients will be successful focus on short term mortality and not long term survival or quality of life. The benefits and pitfalls of these models and their potential implications for patient selection and MCS therapy will be reviewed here. PMID:26793327

  12. Risk factors for death in patients with severe asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andréia Guedes Oliva; Souza-Machado, Carolina; Coelho, Renata Conceição Pereira; Franco, Priscila Abreu; Esquivel, Renata Miranda; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro Augusto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for death among patients with severe asthma. METHODS: This was a nested case-control study. Among the patients with severe asthma treated between December of 2002 and December of 2010 at the Central Referral Outpatient Clinic of the Bahia State Asthma Control Program, in the city of Salvador, Brazil, we selected all those who died, as well as selecting other patients with severe asthma to be used as controls (at a ratio of 1:4). Data were collected from the medical charts of the patients, home visit reports, and death certificates. RESULTS: We selected 58 cases of deaths and 232 control cases. Most of the deaths were attributed to respiratory causes and occurred within a health care facility. Advanced age, unemployment, rhinitis, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, long-standing asthma, and persistent airflow obstruction were common features in both groups. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender, FEV1 pre-bronchodilator < 60% of predicted, and the lack of control of asthma symptoms were significantly and independently associated with mortality in this sample of patients with severe asthma. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of outpatients with severe asthma, the deaths occurred predominantly due to respiratory causes and within a health care facility. Lack of asthma control and male gender were risk factors for mortality. PMID:25210958

  13. Benefits and Risks of Fosaprepitant in Patients Receiving Emetogenic Regimens.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Wendy; Kinsley, Karen

    2016-10-01

    Fosaprepitant dimeglumine (Emend IV®) is an IV antiemetic that may be beneficial to patients receiving highly emetogenic regimens. Aprepitant (Emend®) is an oral medication that is administered for three consecutive days, whereas fosaprepitant is a single-dose IV medication that is administered on the day of chemotherapy for 20-30 minutes (depending on the IV access type). Fosaprepitant may be useful, yet it can also present a risk for hypersensitivity reactions and phlebitis. Oncology nurses must be aware of the signs and symptoms of these potential adverse events to properly care for their patients. 
. PMID:27668376

  14. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  15. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  16. [Special considerations for the regulation of biological medicinal products in individualised medicine. More than stratified medicine].

    PubMed

    Müller-Berghaus, J; Volkers, P; Scherer, J; Cichutek, K

    2013-11-01

    . The development of biomarkers accelerates the process towards stratified or individualised therapies. Increased requirements for companion diagnostics are a possible consequence. Progress in analytical processes and in biotechnology make a higher degree of individualization likely, possibly to the degree that medicinal products will be individually manufactured for each patient. Current principles of medicinal product testing and market authorization may be applicable only with limitations, because the individual medicinal products are not uniform and are not repeatedly manufactured. The assessment of the process, performed on several different medicinal products manufactured by the same process could potentially serve as a basis for the assessment. For the evaluation of risk for the patient in clinical trials new concepts must be considered, which can be facilitated by interaction of regulatory authorities and developers.

  17. [Special considerations for the regulation of biological medicinal products in individualised medicine. More than stratified medicine].

    PubMed

    Müller-Berghaus, J; Volkers, P; Scherer, J; Cichutek, K

    2013-11-01

    . The development of biomarkers accelerates the process towards stratified or individualised therapies. Increased requirements for companion diagnostics are a possible consequence. Progress in analytical processes and in biotechnology make a higher degree of individualization likely, possibly to the degree that medicinal products will be individually manufactured for each patient. Current principles of medicinal product testing and market authorization may be applicable only with limitations, because the individual medicinal products are not uniform and are not repeatedly manufactured. The assessment of the process, performed on several different medicinal products manufactured by the same process could potentially serve as a basis for the assessment. For the evaluation of risk for the patient in clinical trials new concepts must be considered, which can be facilitated by interaction of regulatory authorities and developers. PMID:24170083

  18. Risk factors for complications in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Borovicka, Jan; Seibold, Frank; Vavricka, Stephan R; Lakatos, Peter L; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with ulcerative colitis may develop extraintestinal manifestations like erythema nodosum or primary sclerosing cholangitis or extraintestinal complications like anaemia, malabsorption or they may have to undergo surgery. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate potential risk factors for complications like anaemia, malabsorption or surgery in ulcerative colitis. Methods Data on 179 patients with ulcerative colitis were retrieved from our cross-sectional and prospective Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study data base for a median observational time of 4.2 years. Data were compared between patients with (n = 140) or without (n = 39) complications. Gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, disease extent, delay of diagnosis or therapy, mesalamine (5-ASA) systemic and topical therapy, as well as other medication were analysed as potential impact factors. Results In the multivariate regression analysis a delay of 5-ASA treatment by at least two months (odds ratio (OR) 6.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.13–18.14), p = 0.001) as well as a delay with other medication with thiopurines (OR 6.48 (95% CI 2.01–20.91), p = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk for complications. This significant impact of a delay of 5-ASA therapy was demonstrated for extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) as well as extraintestinal complications (EICs). Extensive disease as well as therapy with methotrexate showed a significantly increased risk for surgery (extensive disease: OR 2.62 (1.02–6.73), p = 0.05, methotrexate: OR 5.36 (1.64–17.58), p = 0.006). Conclusions A delay of 5-ASA therapy of more than two months in the early stage of ulcerative colitis (UC) constitutes a risk for complications during disease course. Extensive disease is associated with a higher risk for surgery. PMID:27087958

  19. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    García-López, Elvia; Carrero, Juan J; Suliman, Mohamed E; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2007-06-01

    Patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) are at high cardiovascular risk. Although some risk factors are unmodifiable (for example, age, sex, genetics), others are exacerbated in the unfriendly uremic milieu (inflammation, oxidative stress, mineral disturbances) or contribute per se to kidney disease and cardiovascular progression (diabetes mellitus, hypertension). Moreover, several factors associated with PD therapy may both increase (by altered lipid profile, hyperinsulinemia, and formation of advanced glycation end-products) and decrease (by better blood pressure control and anemia management) cardiovascular risk. The present review discusses recent findings and therapy trends in cardiovascular research on the PD population, with emphasis on the roles of inflammation, insulin resistance, homocysteinemia, dyslipidemia, vascular calcification, and genetics/epigenetics.

  20. Janus Kinase 2 Polymorphisms Are Associated with Risk in Patients with Gastric Cancer in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Renhua; Zhang, Zhihong; Xu, Hao; Yang, Chao; Zhu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the impact of the Janus kinase 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on gastric cancer risk. Methods In this hospital-based, case–control study, the genotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism protocols in 661 individuals (359 gastric cancer patients and 302 age and sex matched cancer-free controls). Results Both the frequency of A allele in rs2230724 and G allele in rs1887427 were more frequent in patients with gastric cancer (P = 0.013 and 0.001, respectively). Compared with the common genotype, subjects with the (AG+AA) genotypes of rs2230724 and the (AG+GG) genotypes of rs1887427 had a 59% and 98% increased risk of developing gastric cancer, respectively (P = 0.010, adjusted OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.12–2.27; P<0.001, adjusted OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.39–2.81, respectively). Further stratified analysis showed that the association between the risk of gastric cancer and the rare genotypes of rs2230724 were more profound in the subgroups of elder individuals (>56 years), males, nonsmokers and urban subjects, while the association between the risk and the rare genotypes of rs1887427 persisted in subgroups of younger individuals (≤56 years), males, nonsmokers and both of rural and urban subjects. Conclusion The JAK2 gene rs2230724 and rs1887427 polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer in a Chinese Han population. PMID:23717640

  1. Psychiatrically impaired patients often exposed to pregnancy risk.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, L S; Katz, B

    1985-06-01

    The issue of choosing contraceptives for mentally ill patients is important. Over 400,000 female mental patients of childbearing age are treated each year in the US. With less longterm institutionalization, they are increasingly exposed to pregnancy risk. The reproductive rate of mentally ill women has risen markedly since the 1950s. Some evidence exists that pregnancy, childbirth, and child care can contribute to recurrences of psychotic or depressive episodes. Mental patients are interested in family planning, but they may be socially disorganized and thus unable to effectively use community resources. Consequently, they are at especially high risk for unwanted pretnancy. Many mental patients have impaired ability to communicate their needs, making specialized contraceptive services for them imperative in the settings where the patients are usually seen. Before prescribing an oral contraceptive, diaphragm, or IUD, clinicians should obtain informed consent from those patients. For a woman to give adequate informed consent, she must have sufficient knowledge to make a decision, and clinicians must not use coercion in the decision making process. Due to the fact that judgment and reasoning may be impaired in the mentally ill patient, ensuring that she fully understands the risks and benefits of contraceptives may be difficult. Only specially trained professionals should provide contraceptives for the mentally ill. OCs may not be appropriate for patients who are taking antidepressants or who have history of depression. The literature contains contradictory reports about whether or not OCs worsen existing depression or cause depression. 9 of 12 major studies of the association between OC use and depression report depression in 16-56% of women using OCs. 3 studies found no such association. Although vitamin B6 may be a helpful adjunct to OCs for depressed women, pyridoxine may not be entirely benign. Women with mental illness may find mechanical methods of

  2. Prediction of the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients after Sustained Virological Response by Aspartate Aminotransferase to Platelet Ratio Index

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keol; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Cho, Hyun Chin; Jung, Sin-Ho; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Following sustained virological response (SVR) for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection, patients with advanced fibrosis require regular monitoring for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) is a simple noninvasive surrogate marker known to reflect fibrosis. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 598 patients who achieved SVR with interferon-based therapy for CHC. Results Over a median of 5.1 years of follow-up, there were eight patients diagnosed with HCC and a 5-year cumulative incidence rate of 1.3%. The median pretreatment APRI was 0.83, which decreased to 0.29 after achieving SVR (p<0.001). Both the pre- and posttreatment indices were associated with HCC development. The 5-year cumulative HCC incidence rates were 0% and 2.8% for patients with pretreatment APRI <1.0 and ≥1.0, respectively (p=0.001) and 0.8% and 12.8% for patients with posttreatment APRI <1.0 and ≥1.0, respectively (p<0.001). Pretreatment APRI at a cutoff of 1.0 had a 100% negative predictive value until 10 years after SVR. Conclusions HCC development was observed among CHC patients who achieved SVR. The pre- and post-treatment APRI could stratify HCC risk, indicating that the APRI could be a useful marker to classify HCC risk in CHC patients who achieved SVR. However, given the small number of HCC patients, this finding warrants further validation. PMID:27114418

  3. Geriatric nutritional risk index: a mortality predictor in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Edalat-Nejad, Mahnaz; Zameni, Fatemeh; Qlich-Khani, Mahdi; Salehi, Fatemeh

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) has been introduced as a valuable tool to assess the nutritional status of hemodialysis (HD) patients. To determine the predictive value of the GNRI score for death in HD, we studied 145 chronic HD patients (%53 men, mean age 60 ± 16 years). The GNRI score was estimated by an equation involving serum albumin and individual's weight and height. According to the highest positive likelihood and risk ratios, the cut-off value of the GNRI for mortality was set at 100. The survival of patients on HD was examined with the Cox proportional hazards model. Mortality was monitored prospectively over an 18-month period, during which 35 patients died. The GNRI (mean 102.6 ± 5.5) was significantly positively correlated with lean body mass, hematocrit, serum lipids and presence of metabolic syndrome. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis demonstrated that the GNRI <100, serum ferritin ≥ 500 μ g/L and age 65 years or older were significant predictors for mortality (hazard ratio 3.691, 95% CI 1.751-7.779, P = 0.001; hazard ratio 3.105, 95% CI 1.536-6.277, P = 0.002; and hazard ratio 2.806, 95% CI 1.297-6.073, P = 0.009, respectively), after adjustment to gender and vintage time. It can be concluded that, in addition to old age, malnutrition (low GNRI) and inflammation (high ferritin) are identified as significant independent risk factors that predict all-cause mortality in HD patients.

  4. The association between systemic glucocorticoid therapy and the risk of infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy on the risk of infection in patients with RA. Methods A systematic review was conducted by using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database to January 2010 to identify studies among populations of patients with RA that reported a comparison of infection incidence between patients treated with GC therapy and patients not exposed to GC therapy. Results In total, 21 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and 42 observational studies were included. In the RCTs, GC therapy was not associated with a risk of infection (relative risk (RR), 0.97 (95% CI, 0.69, 1.36)). Small numbers of events in the RCTs meant that a clinically important increased or decreased risk could not be ruled out. The observational studies generated a RR of 1.67 (1.49, 1.87), although significant heterogeneity was present. The increased risk (and heterogeneity) persisted when analyses were stratified by varying definitions of exposure, outcome, and adjustment for confounders. A positive dose-response effect was seen. Conclusions Whereas observational studies suggested an increased risk of infection with GC therapy, RCTs suggested no increased risk. Inconsistent reporting of safety outcomes in the RCTs, as well as marked heterogeneity, probable residual confounding, and publication bias in the observational studies, limits the opportunity for a definitive conclusion. Clinicians should remain vigilant for infection in patients with RA treated with GC therapy. PMID:21884589

  5. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2012-02-01

    solution at infinite vertical wavelength (k3=0): There is an oscillatory behavior for τ>1+|K2/k1|, where τ=St is a dimensionless time and K2 is the radial component of the wave vector at τ=0. The model is suitable to describe instabilities leading to turbulence by the bypass mechanism that can be relevant for the analysis of magnetized stratified Keplerian disks with a purely azimuthal field. For initial isotropic conditions, the time evolution of the spectral density of total energy (kinetic + magnetic + potential) is considered. At k3=0, the vertical motion is purely oscillatory, and the sum of the vertical (kinetic + magnetic) energy plus the potential energy does not evolve with time and remains equal to its initial value. The horizontal motion can induce a rapid transient growth provided K2/k1≫1. This rapid growth is due to the aperiodic velocity vortex mode that behaves like Kh/kh where kh(τ)=[k12+(K2-k1τ)2]1/2 and Kh=kh(0). After the leading phase (τ>K2/k1≫1), the horizontal magnetic energy and the horizontal kinetic energy exhibit a similar (oscillatory) behavior yielding a high level of total energy. The contribution to energies coming from the modes k1=0 and k3=0 is addressed by investigating the one-dimensional spectra for an initial Gaussian dense spectrum. For a magnetized Keplerian disk with a purely vertical field, it is found that an important contribution to magnetic and kinetic energies comes from the region near k1=0. The limit at k1=0 of the streamwise one-dimensional spectra of energies, or equivalently, the streamwise two-dimensional (2D) energy, is then computed. The comparison of the ratios of these 2D quantities with their three-dimensional counterparts provided by previous direct numerical simulations shows a quantitative agreement.

  6. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    stability of the solution at infinite vertical wavelength (k(3) = 0): There is an oscillatory behavior for τ > 1+|K(2)/k(1)|, where τ = St is a dimensionless time and K(2) is the radial component of the wave vector at τ = 0. The model is suitable to describe instabilities leading to turbulence by the bypass mechanism that can be relevant for the analysis of magnetized stratified Keplerian disks with a purely azimuthal field. For initial isotropic conditions, the time evolution of the spectral density of total energy (kinetic + magnetic + potential) is considered. At k(3) = 0, the vertical motion is purely oscillatory, and the sum of the vertical (kinetic + magnetic) energy plus the potential energy does not evolve with time and remains equal to its initial value. The horizontal motion can induce a rapid transient growth provided K(2)/k(1)>1. This rapid growth is due to the aperiodic velocity vortex mode that behaves like K(h)/k(h) where k(h)(τ)=[k(1)(2) + (K(2) - k(1)τ)(2)](1/2) and K(h) =k(h)(0). After the leading phase (τ > K(2)/k(1)>1), the horizontal magnetic energy and the horizontal kinetic energy exhibit a similar (oscillatory) behavior yielding a high level of total energy. The contribution to energies coming from the modes k(1) = 0 and k(3) = 0 is addressed by investigating the one-dimensional spectra for an initial Gaussian dense spectrum. For a magnetized Keplerian disk with a purely vertical field, it is found that an important contribution to magnetic and kinetic energies comes from the region near k(1) = 0. The limit at k(1) = 0 of the streamwise one-dimensional spectra of energies, or equivalently, the streamwise two-dimensional (2D) energy, is then computed. The comparison of the ratios of these 2D quantities with their three-dimensional counterparts provided by previous direct numerical simulations shows a quantitative agreement. PMID:22463311

  7. New Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Use for an Accurate Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    TAUTU, Oana-Florentina; DARABONT, Roxana; ONCIUL, Sebastian; DEACONU, Alexandru; COMANESCU, Ioana; ANDREI, Radu Dan; DRAGOESCU, Bogdan; CINTEZA, Mircea; DOROBANTU, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the predictive value of new cardiovascular (CV) risk factors for CV risk assessment in the adult Romanian hypertensive (HT) population. Methods: Hypertensive adults aged between 40-65 years of age, identified in national representative SEPHAR II survey were evaluated by anthropometric, BP and arterial stiffness measurements: aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao), aortic augmentation index (AIXao), revers time (RT) and central systolic blood pressure (SBPao), 12 lead ECGs and laboratory workup. Values above the 4th quartile of mean SBP' standard deviation (s.d.) defined increased BP variability. Log(TG/HDL-cholesterol) defined atherogenic index of plasma (AIP). Serum uric acid levels above 5.70 mg/dl for women and 7.0 mg/dl for males defined hyperuricemia (HUA). CV risk was assessed based on SCORE chart for high CV risk countries. Binary logistic regression using a stepwise likelihood ratio method (adjustments for major confounders and colliniarity analysis) was used in order to validate predictors of high and very high CV risk class. Results: The mean SBP value of the study group was 148.46±19.61 mmHg. Over forty percent of hypertensives had a high and very high CV risk. Predictors of high/very high CV risk category validated by regression analysis were: increased visit-to-visit BP variability (OR: 2.49; 95%CI: 1.67-3.73), PWVao (OR: 1.12; 95%CI: 1.02-1.22), RT (OR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.93-0.98), SBPao (OR: 1.01; 95%CI: 1.01-1.03) and AIP (OR: 7.08; 95%CI: 3.91-12.82). Conclusion: The results of our study suggests that the new CV risk factors such as increased BP variability, arterial stiffness indices and AIP are useful tools for a more accurate identification of hypertensives patients at high and very high CV risk. PMID:25705267

  8. Gun safety management with patients at risk for suicide.

    PubMed

    Simon, Robert I

    2007-10-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person responsible for removing guns from the home. A call-back to the clinician from the designated person is required confirming that guns have been removed and secured according to plan. The principle of gun safety management applies to outpatients, inpatients, and emergency patients, although its implementation varies according to the clinical setting. PMID:17967118

  9. Identifying Causal Risk Factors for Violence among Discharged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Coid, Jeremy W.; Kallis, Constantinos; Doyle, Mike; Shaw, Jenny; Ullrich, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Background Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) is routinely administered in mental health and criminal justice settings but cannot identify violence risk above moderate accuracy. There is no current evidence that violence can be prevented using SPJ. This may be explained by routine application of predictive instead of causal statistical models when standardising SPJ instruments. Methods We carried out a prospective cohort study of 409 male and female patients discharged from medium secure services in England and Wales to the community. Measures were taken at baseline (pre-discharge), 6 and 12 months post-discharge using the Historical, Clinical and Risk-20 items version 3 (HCR-20v3) and Structural Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF). Information on violence was obtained via the McArthur community violence instrument and the Police National Computer. Results In a lagged model, HCR-20v3 and SAPROF items were poor predictors of violence. Eight items of the HCR-20v3 and 4 SAPROF items did not predict violent behaviour better than chance. In re-analyses considering temporal proximity of risk/ protective factors (exposure) on violence (outcome), risk was elevated due to violent ideation (OR 6.98, 95% CI 13.85–12.65, P<0.001), instability (OR 5.41, 95% CI 3.44–8.50, P<0.001), and poor coping/ stress (OR 8.35, 95% CI 4.21–16.57, P<0.001). All 3 risk factors were explanatory variables which drove the association with violent outcome. Self-control (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.08–0.24, P<0.001) conveyed protective effects and explained the association of other protective factors with violence. Conclusions Using two standardised SPJ instruments, predictive (lagged) methods could not identify risk and protective factors which must be targeted in interventions for discharged patients with severe mental illness. Predictive methods should be abandoned if the aim is to progress from risk assessment to effective risk management and replaced by methods which identify factors

  10. Hemostatic risk factors in patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes - a two year follow-up of 243 patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Backgound Thrombosis is regarded to be a key factor in the development of acute coronary syndromes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesize, that hemostatic and rheological risk factors may be of major relevance for the incidence and the risk stratification of these patients. Methods In 243 patients with coronary artery disease and stable angina pectoris parameters of metabolism, hemostasis, blood rheology and endogenous fibrinolysis were assessed. Patients were prospectively followed for 2 years in respect to elective revascularizations and acute coronary syndromes. Results During follow-up 88 patients presented with cardiac events, 22 of those were admitted to the hospital because of acute events, 5 Patients were excluded due to non- cardiac death. Patients with clinical events were found to be more frequently diabetic and presented with a more progressed coronary atherosclerosis. Even though patients with diabetes mellitus demonstrated a comparable level of multivessel disease (71% vs. 70%) the rate of elective revascularization was higher (41% vs. 28%, p < 0.05). The results were also unfavorable for the incidence of acute cardiovascular events (18% vs. 8%, p < 0.01). In comparison to non-diabetic patients diabetics demonstrated significantly elevated levels of fibrinogen (352 ± 76 vs. 312 ± 64 mg/dl, p < 0.01), plasma viscosity (1.38 ± 0.23 vs. 1.31 ± 0.16 mPas, p < 0.01), red blood cell aggregation (13.2 ± 2.5 vs. 12.1 ± 3.1 E, p < 0.05) and plasmin-activator-inhibitor (6.11 ± 3.4 vs. 4.7 ± 2.7 U/l, p < 0.05). Conclusion Pathological alterations of fibrinogen, blood rheology and plasminogen-activator-inhibtor as indicators of a procoagulant state are of major relevance for the short-term incidence of cardiac events, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, and may be used to stratify patients to specific therapies. PMID:19735543

  11. Achilles tendon ruptures stratified by age, race, and cause of injury among active duty U.S. Military members.

    PubMed

    Davis, J J; Mason, K T; Clark, D A

    1999-12-01

    A total of 865 members of the U.S. military underwent repair of Achilles tendon ruptures at U.S. military hospitals during calendar years 1994, 1995, and 1996. The discharge summaries of these patients were analyzed for patient demographic information, including age, race, and causative activity. Patients were then stratified by age, race, and cause of injury. Blacks were at increased risk for undergoing repair of the Achilles tendon compared with nonblacks (overall relative risk = 4.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.63, 4.74; summary odds ratio controlling for age = 3.69, CI = 3.25, 4.19). Participation in the game of basketball accounted for 64.9% of all injuries in black patients and 34.0% of all injuries in nonblack patients. Among those injured, blacks had a significantly increased risk for injury related to playing basketball than nonblacks (relative risk = 1.82, CI = 1.58, 2.10). This finding suggests that there may be other predisposing factor(s) that result in a higher risk of Achilles tendon ruptures in black individuals.

  12. Risk factors for mortality in patients with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yong Duk; Jeong, Woo Yong; Kim, Moo Hyun; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung; Ku, Nam Su

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a nosocomial pathogen associated with high morbidity and mortality, particularly in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. In this study, we investigated the risk factors for mortality in patients with S. maltophilia bacteremia. Retrospectively, medical records from all patients with S. maltophilia bacteremia between December 2005 and 2014 at Severance Hospital, a 2000-bed tertiary care hospital in Seoul, Korea, were reviewed. Analysis was performed to identify factors associated with 28-day mortality. In total, 142 bacteremia patients were enrolled in this study. The overall 28-day mortality rate was 36.6%. Based on the univariate analysis, hematologic malignancy (P = 0.015), Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (P < 0.001) and the removal of a central venous catheter (CVC) (P = 0.040) were significantly related to mortality. In the intensive care unit patients, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (P = 0.001) also had significance. Based on the multivariate analysis, the SOFA score (odds ratio [OR] = 1.323; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.159, 1.509; P < 0.001) and removal of the CVC (OR = 0.330; 95% CI: 0.109, 0.996; P = 0.049) were independent factors associated with mortality. Our results suggest that removing a CVC may considerably reduce mortality in patients with S. maltophilia bacteremia. PMID:27495046

  13. Patients' knowledge of risk and protective factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wartak, Siddharth A; Friderici, Jennifer; Lotfi, Amir; Verma, Ashish; Kleppel, Reva; Naglieri-Prescod, Deborah; Rothberg, Michael B

    2011-05-15

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The American Heart Association has proposed improving overall cardiovascular health by promoting 7 components of ideal cardiovascular health, including health behaviors (not smoking, regular exercise, and healthy diet) and health factors (ideal body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood glucose). The patients' knowledge of these 7 components is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional survey of patients at 4 primary care and 1 cardiology clinic. The survey measured demographic data, personal behaviors/health factors, cardiovascular disease history, and knowledge about these 7 components. A multivariate model was developed to assess patient characteristics associated with high knowledge scores. Of the 2,200 surveys distributed, 1,702 (77%) were returned with sufficient responses for analysis. Of these, 49% correctly identified heart disease as the leading cause of death, and 37% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35% to 39%) correctly identified all 7 components. The average respondent identified 4.9 components (95% CI 4.7 to 5.0). The lowest recognition rates were for exercise (57%), fruit/vegetable consumption (58%), and diabetes (63%). In a multivariate model, knowledge of all 7 components was positively associated with high school education or greater (odds ratio 2.43, 95% CI 1.68 to 3.52) and white ethnicity (odds ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.50), and negatively associated with attending an urban neighborhood clinic (odds ratio 0.60, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.82). In conclusion, just >1/3 of patients could identify all 7 components of ideal cardiovascular health. Educational efforts should target patients in low socioeconomic strata and focus on improving knowledge about healthy diet and regular exercise. Although patients with diabetes were more likely than those without diabetes to recognize their risk, 1 in 5 were not aware that diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  14. [Global treatment of cardiovascular risk in the hypertensive patient].

    PubMed

    Mazón-Ramos, Pilar; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Palma-Gámiz, José L; Quiles-Granado, Juan; Guindo-Soldevilla, José; González-Juanatey, José R

    2007-02-01

    During 2006, new evidence supporting the need to adopt a global approach to the treatment of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients has been reported. It is increasingly clear that it is not sufficient to aim for optimum blood pressure control, which in any case is not easy to achieve, and that it is essential to treat all cardiovascular risk factors by using drugs with proven benefits, even when those benefits are supplementary to the drug's principal effects. In addition, drugs that could have a detrimental effect or that are, merely, less beneficial should be avoided or kept as a last resort. This appears to have happened with atenolol, and with beta-blockers in general, which have been withdrawn as first-line treatment in the recommendations of some professional societies. To lower cardiovascular risk, it is essential to prevent the development of conditions like diabetes, which are known to have drastic effect on the patient's prognosis. Recently, the results of the DREAM study, which are discussed in detail in this article, have been reported. They could lead to a change in therapeutic strategy in patients who are expected to develop diabetes. In addition, this year has seen the publication of substantial data on a new antihypertensive agent, aliskiren, the first oral renin inhibitor. It is awaiting approval by the international medicine agencies (i.e., the FDA and the EMEA), but should provide a very promising tool in the difficult area of high blood pressure management. Despite numerous advances in the pharmacologic treatment of high blood pressure, control is very difficult to achieve, principally in the elderly, in whom the prevalence of hypertension is high. In these patients, social factors and difficulties with treatment compliance also have an influence and must be dealt with by public health measures aimed at improving blood pressure control.

  15. Randomised controlled trial of patient centred care of diabetes in general practice: impact on current wellbeing and future disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Woodcock, Alison; Griffin, Simon; Spiegal, Nicki; Campbell, Michael J

    1998-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of additional training of practice nurses and general practitioners in patient centred care on the lifestyle and psychological and physiological status of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Design Pragmatic parallel group design, with randomisation between practice teams to routine care (comparison group) or routine care plus additional training (intervention group); analysis at one year, allowing for practice effects and stratifiers; self reporting by patients on communication with practitioners, satisfaction with treatment, style of care, and lifestyle. Setting 41 practices (21 in intervention group, 20 in comparison group) in a health region in southern England. Subjects 250/360 patients (aged 30-70 years) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and completing follow up at one year (142 in intervention group, 108 in comparison group). Intervention 1.5 days’ group training for the doctors and nurses—introducing evidence for and skills of patient centred care and a patient held booklet encouraging questions. Main outcome measures Quality of life, wellbeing, haemoglobin A1c and lipid concentrations, blood pressure, body mass index (kg/m2). Results Compared with patients in the C group, those in the intervention group reported better communication with the doctors (odds ratio 2.8; 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.3) and greater treatment satisfaction (1.6; 1.1 to 2.5) and wellbeing (difference in means (d) 2.8; 0.4 to 5.2). However, their body mass index was significantly higher (d=2.0; 0.3 to 3.8), as were triglyceride concentrations (d=0.4 mmol/l; 0.07 to 0.73 mmol/l), whereas knowledge scores were lower (d=−2.74; −0.23 to −5.25). Differences in lifestyle and glycaemic control were not significant. Conclusions The findings suggest greater attention to the consultation process than to preventive care among trained practitioners; those committed to achieving the benefits of patient centred consulting should not lose

  16. Infection risk in patients on multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M; Berger, Joseph R

    2015-03-01

    The interface of multiple sclerosis (MS) and infection occurs on several levels. First, infectious disease has been postulated as a potential trigger, if not cause, of MS. Second, exacerbation of MS has been well-documented as a consequence of infection, and, lastly, infectious diseases have been recognized as a complication of the therapies currently employed in the treatment of MS. MS is a disease in which immune dysregulation is a key component. Examination of central nervous system (CNS) tissue of people affected by MS demonstrates immune cell infiltration, activation and inflammation. Therapies that alter the immune response have demonstrated efficacy in reducing relapse rates and evidence of brain inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Despite the altered immune response in MS, there is a lack of evidence that these patients are at increased risk of infectious disease in the absence of treatment or debility. Links between infections and disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) used in MS will be discussed in this review, as well as estimates of occurrence and ways to potentially minimize these risks. We address infection in MS in a comprehensive fashion, including (1) the impact of infections on relapse rates in patients with MS; (2) a review of available infection data from pivotal trials and postmarketing studies for the approved and experimental DMTs, including frequency, types and severity of infections; and (3) relevant risk minimization strategies, particularly as they pertain to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).

  17. Low Serum Testosterone Increases Mortality Risk among Male Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:19144759

  18. Low serum testosterone increases mortality risk among male dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease.

  19. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Donald E.; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M.; Locke, David G.; Reband, Agnes M.; Pine, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts. We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation. A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume. Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing

  20. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M; Locke, David G; Reband, Agnes M; Pine, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts.We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation.A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume.Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing provider

  1. Assessment of Risk Factors in Patients With Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Fatemeh; Hesabi, Nasrin; Arbabisarjou, Azizollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery diseases (CAD) are one of the important health problems in the world, although considerable progresses have been made to decrease the mortality, they are still the first cause of death in many countries. Hence, the necessity of examining effective factors and risk factors on CAD can be one of the most important health priorities in many countries like Iran. Objective: This study was performed to assess the risk factors in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) in Zahedan. Materials and Methods: This is a cross sectional study in which 213 patients were examined. They had been diagnosed to have heart failure. Data gathering took 18 months. Data gathering tool was a designed checklist which was filled up by an experienced nurse during interview. Obtained results were recorded in files and analyzed in SPSS 21. Results: Results showed that 70% of patients were women and only 30% were men. 48% of them were illiterate and patients mean age was 58.3. SD had been 12.6. The mean of pain onset time till referring to hospital was 11 hours with SD of 2.1. 17% of patients (coronary artery diseases history), 25.5% (hypertension history), 26% (diabetes history), 15.5% (cholesterol history), 13% (smoking) and 3% have reported CABG history. The majority of people who referred had inferior MI (40.4%). 67.1% normal rhythm, 2.8% atrial fibrillation and 16% had ventricular tachycardia. Statistical tests showed a significant correlation between sex and the mean of referring time (p<0.05) but the relation between age and referring time was not significant. Conclusion: Effective risk factors on MI were recognized in this study. Some of them such as age, sex and education cannot be modified but many are controllable such as hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, and smoking and on time referring after pain onset. Having considered the results of this study health promotion for society and especially vulnerable people can be provided by omitting or reducing risk

  2. A Focus Group Exploration of Automated Case-Finders to Identify High-Risk Heart Failure Patients Within an Urban Safety Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark E.; Miranda, Derick; Schuman, Greg; Eaton, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Silver, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leveraging “big data” as a means of informing cost-effective care holds potential in triaging high-risk heart failure (HF) patients for interventions within hospitals seeking to reduce 30-day readmissions. Objective: Explore provider’s beliefs and perceptions about using an electronic health record (EHR)-based tool that uses unstructured clinical notes to risk-stratify high-risk heart failure patients. Methods: Six providers from an inpatient HF clinic within an urban safety net hospital were recruited to participate in a semistructured focus group. A facilitator led a discussion on the feasibility and value of using an EHR tool driven by unstructured clinical notes to help identify high-risk patients. Data collected from transcripts were analyzed using a thematic analysis that facilitated drawing conclusions clustered around categories and themes. Results: From six categories emerged two themes: (1) challenges of finding valid and accurate results, and (2) strategies used to overcome these challenges. Although employing a tool that uses electronic medical record (EMR) unstructured text as the benchmark by which to identify high-risk patients is efficient, choosing appropriate benchmark groups could be challenging given the multiple causes of readmission. Strategies to mitigate these challenges include establishing clear selection criteria to guide benchmark group composition, and quality outcome goals for the hospital. Conclusion: Prior to implementing into practice an innovative EMR-based case-finder driven by unstructured clinical notes, providers are advised to do the following: (1) define patient quality outcome goals, (2) establish criteria by which to guide benchmark selection, and (3) verify the tool’s validity and reliability. Achieving consensus on these issues would be necessary for this innovative EHR-based tool to effectively improve clinical decision-making and in turn, decrease readmissions for high-risk patients. PMID:27683666

  3. A Focus Group Exploration of Automated Case-Finders to Identify High-Risk Heart Failure Patients Within an Urban Safety Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark E.; Miranda, Derick; Schuman, Greg; Eaton, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Silver, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leveraging “big data” as a means of informing cost-effective care holds potential in triaging high-risk heart failure (HF) patients for interventions within hospitals seeking to reduce 30-day readmissions. Objective: Explore provider’s beliefs and perceptions about using an electronic health record (EHR)-based tool that uses unstructured clinical notes to risk-stratify high-risk heart failure patients. Methods: Six providers from an inpatient HF clinic within an urban safety net hospital were recruited to participate in a semistructured focus group. A facilitator led a discussion on the feasibility and value of using an EHR tool driven by unstructured clinical notes to help identify high-risk patients. Data collected from transcripts were analyzed using a thematic analysis that facilitated drawing conclusions clustered around categories and themes. Results: From six categories emerged two themes: (1) challenges of finding valid and accurate results, and (2) strategies used to overcome these challenges. Although employing a tool that uses electronic medical record (EMR) unstructured text as the benchmark by which to identify high-risk patients is efficient, choosing appropriate benchmark groups could be challenging given the multiple causes of readmission. Strategies to mitigate these challenges include establishing clear selection criteria to guide benchmark group composition, and quality outcome goals for the hospital. Conclusion: Prior to implementing into practice an innovative EMR-based case-finder driven by unstructured clinical notes, providers are advised to do the following: (1) define patient quality outcome goals, (2) establish criteria by which to guide benchmark selection, and (3) verify the tool’s validity and reliability. Achieving consensus on these issues would be necessary for this innovative EHR-based tool to effectively improve clinical decision-making and in turn, decrease readmissions for high-risk patients.

  4. A US Claims-Based Analysis of Real-World Lipid-Lowering Treatment Patterns in Patients With High Cardiovascular Disease Risk or a Previous Coronary Event.

    PubMed

    Quek, Ruben G W; Fox, Kathleen M; Wang, Li; Li, Lu; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Wong, Nathan D

    2016-02-15

    The objective was to examine real-world treatment patterns of lipid-lowering therapies and their possible associated intolerance and/or ineffectiveness in patients with high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk initiating statins and/or ezetimibe. Patients aged ≥18 years who initiated statins and/or ezetimibe from January 01, 2007, to June 30, 2011, were retrospectively identified from the IMS LifeLink PharMetrics Plus commercial claims database. Patients were further classified into 2 cohorts: (1) history of cardiovascular event (CVE) and (2) history of coronary heart disease risk equivalent (CHD RE). Patients had continuous health plan enrollment ≥1 year pre- and post-index date (statin and/or ezetimibe initiation date). Primary outcomes were index statin intensity, treatment modifications, possible associated statin/nonstatin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness issues (based on treatment modification), and time-to-treatment modifications. Analyses for each cohort were stratified by age group (<65 and ≥65 years). A total of 41,934 (history of CVE) and 170,344 patients (history of CHD RE) were included. On the index date, 8.8% to 25.1% of patients were initiated on high-intensity statin. Among patients aged <65, 79.2% and 48.8% of those with history of CVE and 78.6% and 47.3% of those with a history of CHD RE had ≥1 and 2 treatment modifications, respectively. Among all patients, 24.6% to 25.6% had possible statin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness issues after accounting for second treatment modification (if any). In conclusion, in patients with high CVD risk, index statin treatment modifications that imply possible statin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness were frequent; low use of high-intensity statins indicates unmet need in the management of hyperlipidemia and possible remaining unaccounted CVD residual risk. PMID:26742468

  5. Stress, Substance Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors among Primary Care Patients in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Lyndsay Ammon; Mertens, Jennifer R.; Ward, Catherine L.; Flisher, Alan J.; Bresick, Graham F.; Weisner, Constance M.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between stress, substance use and sexual risk behaviors in a primary care population in Cape Town, South Africa. A random sample of participants (and over-sampled 18–24 year olds) from 14 of the 49 clinics in Cape Town's public health sector using stratified random sampling (N=2,618), was selected. We evaluated current hazardous drug and alcohol use and three domains of stressors (Personal Threats, Lacking Basic Needs, and Interpersonal Problems). Several personal threat stressors and an interpersonal problem stressor were related to sexual risk behaviors. With stressors included in the model, hazardous alcohol use, but not hazardous drug use, was related to higher rates of sexual risk behaviors. Our findings suggest a positive screening for hazardous alcohol use should alert providers about possible sexual risk behaviors and vice versa. Additionally, it is important to address a broad scope of social problems and incorporate stress and substance use in HIV prevention campaigns. PMID:19205865

  6. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Philipp; Huber, Andreas; Müller, Beat; Maisano, Francesco; Taramasso, Maurizio; Moarof, Igal; Obeid, Slayman; Stähli, Barbara E.; Cahenzly, Martin; Binder, Ronald K.; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Kim, Won-Keun; Hamm, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population. Objectives We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population. Methods We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%). Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l) had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0–26.0, P < 0.01), whereas patients with EuroSCORE II scores above the 75th percentile (> 6.8) only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8–5.6, P = 0.13). The Harrell’s C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45–0.82) for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71–0.92, P = 0.01). In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1–31.3), P <0.01) and improved the model’s net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28–1.59). These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort. Conclusions Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. PMID

  7. Patient characteristics and risk factors of early and late death in incident peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinhui; Huang, Rong; Wu, Haishan; Wu, Juan; Wang, Juan; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify key patient characteristics and risk factors for peritoneal dialysis (PD) mortality in terms of different time-point of death occurrence. The incident PD patients from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2013 in our PD center were recruited and followed up until December 31, 2015. Patients who died in the early period (the first 3 months) were older, had higher neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (N/L), serum phosphorus, and uric acid level, and had lower diastolic pressure, hemoglobin, serum albumin, and calcium levels. After adjustment of gender, age, and PD inception, higher N/L level [hazard ratio (HR) 1.115, P = 0.006], higher phosphorus lever (HR 1.391, P < 0.001), lower hemoglobin level (HR 0.596, P < 0.001), and lower serum albumin level (HR 0.382, P = 0.017) were risk factors for early mortality. While, presence of diabetes (HR 1.627, P = 0.001), presence of cardiovascular disease (HR 1.847, P < 0.001) and lower serum albumin level (HR 0.720, P = 0.023) were risk factors for late mortality (over 24 months). In conclusion, patient characteristics and risk factors associated with early and late mortality in incident PD patients were different, which indicated specific management according to patient characteristics at the initiation of PD should be established to improve PD patient survival. PMID:27576771

  8. Patient characteristics and risk factors of early and late death in incident peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhui; Huang, Rong; Wu, Haishan; Wu, Juan; Wang, Juan; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify key patient characteristics and risk factors for peritoneal dialysis (PD) mortality in terms of different time-point of death occurrence. The incident PD patients from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2013 in our PD center were recruited and followed up until December 31, 2015. Patients who died in the early period (the first 3 months) were older, had higher neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (N/L), serum phosphorus, and uric acid level, and had lower diastolic pressure, hemoglobin, serum albumin, and calcium levels. After adjustment of gender, age, and PD inception, higher N/L level [hazard ratio (HR) 1.115, P = 0.006], higher phosphorus lever (HR 1.391, P < 0.001), lower hemoglobin level (HR 0.596, P < 0.001), and lower serum albumin level (HR 0.382, P = 0.017) were risk factors for early mortality. While, presence of diabetes (HR 1.627, P = 0.001), presence of cardiovascular disease (HR 1.847, P < 0.001) and lower serum albumin level (HR 0.720, P = 0.023) were risk factors for late mortality (over 24 months). In conclusion, patient characteristics and risk factors associated with early and late mortality in incident PD patients were different, which indicated specific management according to patient characteristics at the initiation of PD should be established to improve PD patient survival. PMID:27576771

  9. Left Ventricular Dilatation Increases the Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmias in Patients With Reduced Systolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Aleong, Ryan G; Mulvahill, Matthew J; Halder, Indrani; Carlson, Nichole E; Singh, Madhurmeet; Bloom, Heather L; Dudley, Samuel C; Ellinor, Patrick T; Shalaby, Alaa; Weiss, Raul; Gutmann, Rebecca; Sauer, William H; Narayanan, Kumar; Chugh, Sumeet S; Saba, Samir; London, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmias; however, LV ejection fraction has a low sensitivity to predict ventricular arrhythmias. LV dilatation and mass may be useful to further risk-stratify for ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results Patients from the Genetic Risk of Assessment of Defibrillator Events (GRADE) study (N =930), a study of heart failure subjects with defibrillators, were assessed for appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock and death, heart transplant, or ventricular assist device placement by LV diameter and mass. LV mass was divided into normal, mild, moderate, and severe classifications. Severe LV end-diastolic diameter had worse shock-free survival than normal and mild LV end-diastolic diameter (P =0.0002 and 0.0063, respectively; 2-year shock free, severe 74%, moderate 80%, mild 91%, normal 88%; 4-year shock free, severe 62%, moderate 69%, mild 72%, normal 81%) and freedom from death, transplant, or ventricular assist device compared with normal and moderate LV end-diastolic diameter (P<0.0001 and 0.0441, respectively; 2-year survival: severe 78%, moderate 85%, mild 82%, normal 89%; 4-year survival: severe 55%, moderate 64%, mild 63%, normal 74%). Severe LV mass had worse shock-free survival than normal and mild LV mass (P =0.0370 and 0.0280, respectively; 2-year shock free: severe 80%, moderate 81%, mild 91%, normal 87%; 4-year shock free: severe 68%, moderate 73%, mild 76%, normal 76%) but no association with death, transplant, or ventricular assist device (P =0.1319). In a multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis adjusted for LV ejection fraction, LV end-diastolic diameter was associated with appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks (hazard ratio 1.22, P =0.020). LV end-diastolic diameter was associated with time to death, transplant, or ventricular assist device (hazard ratio 1.29, P =0.0009). Conclusions LV dilatation may complement

  10. Is drug discontinuation risk of adalimumab compared with etanercept affected by concomitant methotrexate dose in patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Tang, Chao-Hsiun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare drug discontinuation risk between adalimumab (ADA) and etanercept (ETN) treatment among anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-naïve rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, in particular the influence of concomitant dose of methotrexate (MTX). Methods This retrospective nationwide population-based cohort study identified 4,592 anti-TNF-naïve RA patients in whom ETN (n=2,609) or ADA (n=1,983) was initiated using National Health Insurance claims data. After adjustment for prior medication, concomitant medication, and baseline demographic data, the relative risk of drug discontinuation in ADA users compared with ETN users was quantified by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazard regression analyses, stratified by the follow-up time (≤1 year, >1 year) and/or concomitant MTX dose (≤10 mg/wk, >10 mg/wk). Results ADA users had a higher risk of drug discontinuation compared with ETN users during the first year of follow-up (aHR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01–1.27), but not during all treatment periods (aHR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.98–1.16) or after 1 year (aHR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.87–1.13). However, ADA users had a significantly higher risk of drug discontinuation compared with ETN users among patients on concomitant MTX >10 mg/wk during all treatment periods (aHR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.10–1.47), during the first year of follow-up (aHR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.22–1.78), or after 1 year (aHR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.06–1.90), but not among patients on concomitant MTX 0–10 mg/wk. Conclusion This population-based cohort study demonstrated a modification effect of concomitant MTX dose on the relative risk of anti-TNF discontinuation for ADA compared with ETN among anti-TNF-naïve RA patients. However, the lack of exact cause of anti-TNF discontinuation limited causal inference of such a concomitant MTX dose-related modification effect. PMID:26917952

  11. Psychiatric comorbidity and suicide risk in patients with chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Di Cosimo, Daniela; Dominici, Giovanni; Innamorati, Marco; Lester, David; Forte, Alberto; Girardi, Nicoletta; De Filippis, Sergio; Tatarelli, Roberto; Martelletti, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of mental illness among patients with migraine. We performed MedLine and PsycINFO searches from 1980 to 2008. Research has systematically documented a strong bidirectional association between migraine and psychiatric disorders. The relationship between migraine and psychopathology has often been clinically discussed rather than systematically studied. Future research should include sound methodologically-based studies focusing on the interplay of factors behind the relationship between migraine, suicide risk, and mental illness. PMID:20396640

  12. [Increased risk of suicide in patients with agitated depression].

    PubMed

    Kenchadze, V G; Chkoniia, E D; Sikharulidze, G G

    2009-12-01

    In our study we aimed to verify the clinical features of agitated depression, which intensify suicidal trends leading to completed suicide. From 477 patients with agitated depression we selected 126, who presented high risk of suicide and studded them by using Mood Anxiety Inventory. On the bases of the structural-dynamic analyses we determine seven clinical variations of agitated-depression with prominent affective, cognitive, psychomotor, somato-algetic and behavioral symptoms. The most dangerous types with regards of suicidal behavior appeared to be senestopathic and algetic types and agitated depression with depersonalization and derealization. PMID:20090153

  13. Methods to evaluate the nutrition risk in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Tülay

    2014-01-01

    The rate of malnutrition is substantially high both in the population and in chronic patients hospitalized because of different reasons. The rate of patients with no marked malnutrition at the time of hospitalization who develop malnutrition during hospitalization is also substantially high. Therefore, there are currently different screening methods with different targets to prevent malnutrition and its overlook. These methods should be simple and reliable and should not be time-consuming in order to be used in daily practice. Seven nutrition risk screening methods used in children have been established until the present time. However, no consensus has been made on any method as in adults. It should be accepted that interrogation of nutrition is a part of normal examination to increase awareness on this issue and to draw attention to this issue. PMID:26078678

  14. Risks of suicidality in adult patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Sherifa A; Elserogy, Yaser BE; Abdou, Madleen A; Abdellah, Mostafa M

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a group of patients with epilepsy. METHODS: Included were 200 adult patients and 100 matched healthy subjects. The clinical interview using The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition), Beck Depression Inventory (2nd edition) (BDI-II), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Rating Scale testings were used for diagnosis and assessment of severity of psychiatric symptoms. Blood concentrations of serotonin, catecholamines and dopamine were also measured. RESULTS: Suicidality was reported in 35% (compared to 9% for controls), of them 80%, 72.86%, 55.71% and 52.9% had depression, anxiety, obsession and aggression respectively. Patients with suicidality had higher scores of BDI-II (P = 0.0001), HAM-A (P = 0.0001), and Y-BOCS (P = 0.037) and lower scores of psychotic (P = 0.0001) and extroversion (P = 0.025) personality traits. Regardless the presence or absence of suicidality, patients with epilepsy had low serotonin (P = 0.006), noradrenaline (P = 0.019) and adrenaline (P = 0.0001) levels. With suicidality, significant correlations were identified between: (1) age and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.235, P = 0.0001) and HAM-A (r = 0.241, P = 0.046); (2) age at onset and concentrations of noradrenaline (r = -0.502, P = 0.024); (3) duration of illness and scores of BDI-II (r = 0.247, P = 0.041), Y-BOCS (r = 0.270, P = 0.025) and neurotic personality trait (r = -0.284, P = 0.018); and (4) doses of antiepileptic drugs and scores of psychotic personality traits (r = -0.495, P = 0.006 for carbamazepine; r = -0.508, P = 0.0001 for valproate). CONCLUSION: This is the first study which systematically estimated the prevalence and risks of suicidality in a homogenous group of patients with epilepsy. This study emphasizes the importance of epilepsy itself as a risk for suicidality and not its treatment. PMID

  15. A novel programme to evaluate and communicate 10-year risk of CHD reduces predicted risk and improves patients' modifiable risk factor profile

    PubMed Central

    Benner, J S; Erhardt, L; Flammer, M; Moller, R A; Rajicic, N; Changela, K; Yunis, C; Cherry, S B; Gaciong, Z; Johnson, E S; Sturkenboom, M C J M; García-Puig, J; Girerd, X

    2008-01-01

    Aims We assessed whether a novel programme to evaluate/communicate predicted coronary heart disease (CHD) risk could lower patients' predicted Framingham CHD risk vs. usual care. Methods The Risk Evaluation and Communication Health Outcomes and Utilization Trial was a prospective, controlled, cluster-randomised trial in nine European countries, among patients at moderate cardiovascular risk. Following baseline assessments, physicians in the intervention group calculated patients' predicted CHD risk and were instructed to advise patients according to a risk evaluation/communication programme. Usual care physicians did not calculate patients' risk and provided usual care only. The primary end-point was Framingham 10-year CHD risk at 6 months with intervention vs. usual care. Results Of 1103 patients across 100 sites, 524 patients receiving intervention, and 461 receiving usual care, were analysed for efficacy. After 6 months, mean predicted risks were 12.5% with intervention, and 13.7% with usual care [odds ratio = 0.896; p = 0.001, adjusted for risk at baseline (17.2% intervention; 16.9% usual care) and other covariates]. The proportion of patients achieving both blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets was significantly higher with intervention (25.4%) than usual care (14.1%; p < 0.001), and 29.3% of smokers in the intervention group quit smoking vs. 21.4% of those receiving usual care (p = 0.04). Conclusions A physician-implemented CHD risk evaluation/communication programme improved patients' modifiable risk factor profile, and lowered predicted CHD risk compared with usual care. By combining this strategy with more intensive treatment to reduce residual modifiable risk, we believe that substantial improvements in cardiovascular disease prevention could be achieved in clinical practice. PMID:18691228

  16. Risk Factors for Mortality in Patients with Serratia marcescens Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Bean; Jeon, Yong Duk; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Ann, Hea Won; Choi, Heun; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeong, Su Jin; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Over the last 30 years, Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) has emerged as an important pathogen, and a common cause of nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients with S. marcescens bacteremia. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 98 patients who had one or more blood cultures positive for S. marcescens between January 2006 and December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, South Korea. Multiple risk factors were compared with association with 28-day all-cause mortality. Results The 28-day mortality was 22.4% (22/98 episodes). In a univariate analysis, the onset of bacteremia during the intensive care unit stay (p=0.020), serum albumin level (p=0.011), serum C-reactive protein level (p=0.041), presence of indwelling urinary catheter (p=0.023), and Sequential Oran Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at the onset of bacteremia (p<0.001) were significantly different between patients in the fatal and non-fatal groups. In a multivariate analysis, lower serum albumin level and an elevated SOFA score were independently associated with 28-day mortality [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.206, 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.044-0.960, p=0.040, and adjusted OR 1.474, 95% CI 1.200-1.810, p<0.001, respectively]. Conclusion Lower serum albumin level and an elevated SOFA score were significantly associated with adverse outcomes in patients with S. marcescens bacteremia. PMID:25683980

  17. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum.

  18. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  19. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  20. Risk factors for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients.

  1. Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Ventricular Dysfunction in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients. PMID:24368945

  2. Exercise training reduces coronary risk and effectively rehabilitates hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, A P; Geltman, E M; Gavin, J R; Carney, R M; Hagberg, J M; Delmez, J A; Naumovich, A; Oldfield, M H; Harter, H R

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the effects of 12 months of endurance exercise training (cycling, walking and jogging) on lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, blood pressure, anemia and psychological function in 14 hemodialysis patients. Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) increased 18% in the exercisers (p less than 0.01), but did not change in 11 controls. This was associated with a reduction in depression, a decrease in dosages of antihypertensive medications, a significant increase in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels (red cell mass rose, plasma volume did not change), a decrease in plasma triglyceride by 23% (p less than 0.05) and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels by 21% (p less than 0.01) (both HDL-C and triglyceride levels worsened in the sedentary controls), and an 18% increase in glucose disappearance rates (p less than 0.05) in spite of a 52% decrease in fasting insulin levels (p less than 0.01), suggesting that insulin sensitivity improved. These results demonstrate that some of the complications present in hemodialysis patients may be caused by their sedentary life-style, rather than endstage renal disease itself. This suggests that rehabilitation through exercise is possible for these patients. By reducing coronary risk factors in hemodialysis patients, exercise training may also decrease their heightened morbidity and mortality from atherosclerotic complications. These possibilities need to be examined in a longitudinal study.

  3. Proactive Risk Assessment for Ebola-Infected Patients: A Systematic Approach to Identifying and Minimizing Risk to Healthcare Personnel.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Rosemarie; Mitchell, Steven; Ehrmantraut, Ross; Meschke, John Scott; Simcox, Nancy J; Wolz, Sarah A; Parker, Sarah Henrickson

    2016-07-01

    Performing patient care while wearing high-level personal protective equipment presents risks to healthcare providers. Our failure mode effects analysis identified 81 overall risks associated with providing hygienic care and linen change to a patient with continuous watery stool. Implementation of checklists and scheduled pauses could potentially mitigate 76.5% of all risks. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:867-871. PMID:27226216

  4. Risk of skin cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hui-Wen; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Lam, Hing-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence suggests that certain types of cancers are more common in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to investigate the risk of skin cancer in patients with DM in Taiwan. In this retrospective cohort study using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Research Database, the risk of developing overall skin cancer, including nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma, was compared by Poisson regression analysis and Cox regression analysis between the DM and non-DM cohorts. The DM cohort with newly diagnosed DM (n = 41,898) and a non-DM cohort were one-to-one matched by age, sex, index date, and comorbidities (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity). Compared with non-DM cohort statistically, for the people with DM aged ≥60 years, the incidence rates of overall skin cancer and NMSC were significantly higher (overall: DM/non-DM: number [n] = 99/76, incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.44, P = 0.02; NMSC: DM/non-DM: n = 94/66, IRR = 1.57, P = 0.005). By Cox regression analysis, the risk of developing overall skin cancer or NMSC was significantly higher after adjusting for sex, comorbidities, and overall diseases with immunosuppression status (overall: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.46, P = 0.01; NMSC: AHR = 1.6, P = 0.003). Other significant risk factors were older males for skin cancer (overall: AHR = 1.68, P = 0.001; NMSC: AHR = 1.59, P = 0.004; melanoma: AHR = 3.25, P = 0.04), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for NMSC (AHR = 1.44, P = 0.04), and coronary artery disease for melanoma (AHR = 4.22, P = 0.01). The risk of developing melanoma was lower in the DM cohort than in the non-DM cohort, but without significance (AHR = 0.56, P = 0.28; DM/non-DM: n = 5/10). The incidence rate and risk of developing overall skin cancer, including NMSC, was significantly higher in older adults with DM. Other significant risk factors for older

  5. Utility of the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Risk Index Score as a Criterion for Nonadmission in Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study was initiated in febrile neutropenic inpatients with solid tumors in 4 community hospitals, to discover how the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) risk index score (RIS) of 21 or greater correlated with complications occurring in 198 episodes: whether it could help determine which patients not to admit, the savings of not admitting patients without complications, and whether an algorithm could facilitate management of those not admitted. Methods: Febrile neutropenic episodes in patients with solid tumors were identified electronically between October 1, 2008, and November 15, 2010. Electronic charts were reviewed manually for inclusion criteria and data extraction. Episodes were stratified by an MASCC RIS below 21 or 21 or greater. Complications were correlated with the index. Results: Inclusion criteria were met in 198 episodes. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the MASCC RIS vs complications were 94%, 29.6%, 57.7%, and 82.9%, respectively. In episodes with an RIS 21 or greater, 42.3% had complications, misclassifying to low risk 69 episodes with complications. “Unable to eat” correlated with complications in 84% of episodes. In 3 patients stratified to no complication, a complication developed 24 hours after admission. Conclusions: An MASCC RIS of 21 or greater could not be used as a criterion for “no complication/do not admit.” Inability to eat should be an admission criterion. Savings of approximately $1 million per 100 uncomplicated admissions could be realized if appropriate criteria for nonadmission could be devised. An algorithm to facilitate outpatient management is suggested. PMID:26176568

  6. Thermals in stratified regions of the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, A.; Raga, A. C.

    2013-10-01

    We present a model of a ``thermal'' (i.e., a hot bubble) rising within an exponentially stratified region of the ISM. This model includes terms representing the ram pressure braking and the entrainment of environmental gas into the thermal. We then calibrate the free parameters associated with these two terms through a comparison with 3D numerical simulations of a rising bubble. Finally, we apply our ``thermal'' model to the case of a hot bubble produced by a SN within the stratified ISM of the Galactic disk.

  7. Stratified charge rotary engine for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, R. E.; Parente, A. M.; Hady, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    A development history, a current development status assessment, and a design feature and performance capabilities account are given for stratified-charge rotary engines applicable to aircraft propulsion. Such engines are capable of operating on Jet-A fuel with substantial cost savings, improved altitude capability, and lower fuel consumption by comparison with gas turbine powerplants. Attention is given to the current development program of a 400-hp engine scheduled for initial operations in early 1990. Stratified charge rotary engines are also applicable to ground power units, airborne APUs, shipboard generators, and vehicular engines.

  8. Anomalous response of stratified fluid to forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ingel, L. Kh.

    2006-01-15

    The time-independent disturbances induced by nonuniformly distributed surface shear stress in a binary fluid (salt water) are analyzed in the linear approximation. It is shown that correct treatment of two scalar fields (stratified background temperature and salinity distributions) may lead to counterintuitive qualitative predictions even if the thermal and salt diffusivities are equal. In particular, when stable salinity stratification is imposed on stable temperature stratification, both the amplitude and depth of the disturbance may substantially increase rather than decrease (contrary to intuitive expectations). A previously unknown mechanism of convective instability is revealed for a stable density-stratified binary fluid.

  9. Thermal laminarization of a stratified pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The present work constitutes a new program that grew out of a scoping assessment by ANL to determine the propensity for pipe stratification to occur in the reactor outlet nozzles and hot-leg piping of a generic LMFBR during events producing reverse pipe flow. This paper focuses on the role that thermal buoyancy plays relative to being able to laminarize a turbulent stratified shear zone in a horizontal pipe. The preceeding can influence the behavior of a pipe stratified-backflow-recirculation zone (cold plenum water down into the hot pipe flow) which developes as the result of a temperature difference between the pipe flow and the plenum.

  10. Non-invasive evaluation of arrhythmic risk in dilated cardiomyopathy: From imaging to electrocardiographic measures

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Monitillo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Malignant ventricular arrhythmias are a major adverse event and worsen the prognosis of patients affected by ischemic and non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. The main parameter currently used to stratify arrhythmic risk and guide decision making towards the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is the evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction. However, this strategy is characterized by several limitations and consequently additional parameters have been suggested in order to improve arrhythmic risk stratification. The aim of this review is to critically revise the prognostic significance of non-invasive diagnostic tools in order to better stratify the arrhythmic risk prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy patients. PMID:25068017

  11. The Incremental Diagnostic Performance of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Added to Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients with Intermediate-to-High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Ying; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Wu, Yen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have suggested that a combined approach of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) can provide diagnostic results with excellent accuracy. We aimed to explore whether the addition of CCTA to stress MPI provides incremental diagnostic value in intermediate-to-high cardiovascular risk patients. Methods A total of 106 consecutive patients (93 male, 65 ± 10.4 years) underwent coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS), CCTA and 201Thallium stress MPI before coronary angiography was reviewed. Thirty-seven patients (34.9%) had a history of proven coronary artery disease (CAD) or revascularization procedures, and four had documented non-significant CAD (3.8%). The remaining patients consisted of 17 (16.0%) classified as intermediate, and 48 (45.3%) as the high-risk groups. Results Obstructive CAD was diagnosed by invasive coronary angiography in 88 patients with 161 vessels. The sensitivity and specificity in a patient-based analysis for obstructive CAD were 99% and 17% for CCTA, 80% and 50% for MPI and 91% and 67% for the combined method, respectively. The per-vessel diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 95% and 54% for CCTA, 59% and 75% for MPI and 84% and 76% for the combined method. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) when comparing the combined method with MPI or CCTA by areas under the curve in a patient- or vessel-based analysis. However, CACS of 400 or more could not further stratify the patients with obstructive CAD. Conclusions CCTA, not CACS, provided additional diagnostic values to stress MPI in patients with intermediate-to-high cardiovascular risk. PMID:27122945

  12. Lack of health maintenance examinations and risk in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Gleason, Charise; Faiman, Beth; Doss, Deborah; Catamero, Donna; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Katz, Mike; Kurtin, Sandra; Moran, Diane; Lonial, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    Health maintenance (HM) practices are essential to prevent illness, promote well-being, and maximize health. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cancers, yet, research on HM practices and preventative care of MM survivors has limited report. The study comprised a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional online survey design. Survey of patients with MM was carried out through the International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) and the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR) e-mail list services. The members of the IMF and ACOR e-mail list services were surveyed, of which 237 patients responded. The modified Medical Expenditure Preventive Survey-Preventive Care questionnaire was used; it included items that ask patients regarding their healthcare practices that relate to dental care, cancer prevention, addiction, lifestyles, sensory screening, immunizations, cardiovascular, endocrine, psychosocial, and bone health. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi-square, and Spearman's rho correlation coefficient were obtained. In this study, men had statistically significant inferior global health maintenance scores than women (P = 0.002). Being employed (P = 0.054) and married or partnered (P = 0.017) were significantly correlated with better health maintenance patterns among male respondents. In contrast, no statistically significant correlations between sociodemographic factors and health maintenance patterns were found in women. Patients with MM, particularly men, require continued education and close monitoring of health maintenance practices. These findings are consistent with publications looking at gender disparities in healthcare utilization in the United States. Studies show that men, in general, are less likely to seek preventative healthcare screenings. Healthcare providers must incorporate health maintenance promotion during clinic visits.

  13. Risk Factors for Gallstone Formation in Resected Gastric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Paik, Kyu-hyun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Kang, Jingu; Lee, Yoon Suk; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Jaihwan

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies reported increased incidence of gallstone formation after gastrectomy. However, there were few reports about factors other than surgical technique. The purpose of this study is to investigate the spectrum of risk factors of gallstone formation after gastrectomy. From June 2003 to December 2008, 1480 patients who underwent gastrectomy due to gastric cancer but had no gallstones before surgery were identified. Electronic medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Gallstones were assessed by computerized tomography or ultrasound performed as surveillance for recurrence. There were 987 men (66.7%) and the median age was 59.0 years. The median follow-up period was 47.0 months. According to the surgical technique, 754 (50.9%), 459 (31.1%), and 267 (18.0%) underwent subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth I (STG B-I) and Billroth II (STG B-II) anastomosis, and total gastrectomy (TG). Within the follow-up period, gallstone formation occurred in 106 of 1480 patients (7.2%), the only 9 patients (0.6%) experienced symptomatic cholecystitis. By multivariate Cox regression analysis, age (HR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.04), male (1.65, 1.02-2.67), diabetes mellitus (2.15, 1.43-3.24), ≥4% decrease of body mass index after surgery (1.66, 1.02-2.70), STG B-II (1.63, 1.03-2.57), and TG (2.35, 1.43-3.24) compared with STG B-I were associated with gallstone formation. Common bile duct stone formation occurred in 20 of 1480 patients (1.4%) and was only associated with gallstones. After gastrectomy, there were considerable numbers of patients with newly developed gallstones; however, prophylactic cholecystectomy should not be routinely recommended. Gastrectomy (STG B-II or TG), old age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and decreased body mass index were associated with gallstones. PMID:27082555

  14. Lack of health maintenance examinations and risk in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Gleason, Charise; Faiman, Beth; Doss, Deborah; Catamero, Donna; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Katz, Mike; Kurtin, Sandra; Moran, Diane; Lonial, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    Health maintenance (HM) practices are essential to prevent illness, promote well-being, and maximize health. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cancers, yet, research on HM practices and preventative care of MM survivors has limited report. The study comprised a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional online survey design. Survey of patients with MM was carried out through the International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) and the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR) e-mail list services. The members of the IMF and ACOR e-mail list services were surveyed, of which 237 patients responded. The modified Medical Expenditure Preventive Survey-Preventive Care questionnaire was used; it included items that ask patients regarding their healthcare practices that relate to dental care, cancer prevention, addiction, lifestyles, sensory screening, immunizations, cardiovascular, endocrine, psychosocial, and bone health. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi-square, and Spearman's rho correlation coefficient were obtained. In this study, men had statistically significant inferior global health maintenance scores than women (P = 0.002). Being employed (P = 0.054) and married or partnered (P = 0.017) were significantly correlated with better health maintenance patterns among male respondents. In contrast, no statistically significant correlations between sociodemographic factors and health maintenance patterns were found in women. Patients with MM, particularly men, require continued education and close monitoring of health maintenance practices. These findings are consistent with publications looking at gender disparities in healthcare utilization in the United States. Studies show that men, in general, are less likely to seek preventative healthcare screenings. Healthcare providers must incorporate health maintenance promotion during clinic visits. PMID:27119422

  15. Association between Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Health-Related Quality of Life among Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jonathan P. W.; Rienzi, Edgardo G.; Lavie, Carl J.; Blair, Steven N.; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    To date, few studies have examined the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in populations at high risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Purpose To examine the association between objectively measured CRF and physical and mental components of HRQoL in a Uruguayan cohort at risk for developing CVD. Methods Patient data records from 2002–2012 at the Calidad de Vida Center were examined. To assess CRF, participants performed a submaximal exercise test. During the evaluation, participants also completed the SF-36, a HRQoL measure comprised of eight dimensions that are summarized by physical and mental component scores (PCS and MCS, respectively). ANCOVA was used to examine the relationship between HRQoL dimensions and CRF. Logistic regression was then used to compare the odds of having a HRQoL component score above the norm across CRF. All analyses were performed separately for males and females with additional stratified analyses across age and BMI conducted among significant trends. Results A total of 2,302 subjects were included in the analysis. Among females, a significant relationship was observed between CRF and vitality, physical functioning, physical role, bodily pain, and general health dimensions. However, for males the only dimension found to be significantly associated with CRF was physical health. After adjusting for potential confounders, a significant linear trend (p<0.001) for PCS scores above the norm across CRF levels was observed for females only. Conclusion Among females with one or more risk factors for developing CVD, higher levels of CRF were positively associated with the vitality and physical dimensions of HRQoL, as well as the overall PCS. However, among males the only dimension associated with CRF was physical functioning. Future studies should examine this relationship among populations at risk for developing CVD in more detail and over time. PMID:25901358

  16. Relevance of immobility and importance of risk assessment management for medically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hull, Russell D

    2013-06-01

    Recent or continued immobility is a significant risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in acutely ill medical patients. Patients may benefit from thromboprophylaxis; however, its optimal duration remains unclear. The Extended Clinical Prophylaxis in Acutely Ill Medical Patients (EXCLAIM) study was the first trial to systematically investigate how the degree of immobilization relates to the risk of developing VTE. EXCLAIM offers insights into the duration of VTE risk associated with reduced mobility and helps identify which patients would benefit most from extended-duration thromboprophylaxis. Further recent studies suggest that extended-duration thromboprophylaxis may be in order in certain high-risk patients to protect the patients from the risk of VTE events occurring, particularly in the posthospitalization period. Baseline d-dimer data and level of mobility could be included in risk assessment. Physicians are recommended to consider the use of extended-duration thromboprophylaxis based on individual risk assessment management (RAM) and balance of benefit and harm.

  17. Oscillations in a Linearly Stratified Salt Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our physics students like to watch a ball bouncing underwater. They do this by dropping a weighted plastic ball into a 1000-ml cylinder filled with a linearly stratified salt-water solution at room temperature. The ball oscillates and comes to rest at about mid-depth. Its motion is analogous to the damped vertical oscillations of a mass hanging…

  18. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors and the Risk of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Taiwan: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yun-Ju; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chou, Pesus

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the risk of acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes.This nationwide population-based cohort study used the diabetes patients dataset of Taiwan's National Health Research Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009 and no history of acute pancreatitis were selected. This cohort was followed from the index date to the onset of acute pancreatitis or December 31, 2011. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) for acute pancreatitis associated with DPP-4 inhibitor use. Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses were adjusted for alcohol use, hypertriglyceridemia, cholelithiasis, neoplasm, and Diabetes Complications Severity Index (DCSI) score. Subgroup analyses stratified by age and sex were conducted.The study cohort comprised 114,141 patients. Significant interaction effects were observed between sex and age (HR 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.99) and age and DCSI score (HR 0.83, 95% CI: 0.71-0.97). In subgroup analyses, significant risks of acute pancreatitis were noted in female and elderly DPP-4 inhibitor users. Among women, the risk of acute pancreatitis was significantly higher among DPP-4 inhibitor users than among nonusers (HR 2.27, 95% CI: 1.30-3.97). This risk was also significantly higher in users than in nonusers among patients aged >65 years (HR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.11-5.15).Female and elderly DPP-4 inhibitor users had significantly elevated risks of acute pancreatitis development. Further well-conducted studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26512613

  19. Impact on Life Expectancy of Withdrawing Thiopurines in Patients with Crohn’s Disease in Sustained Clinical Remission: A Lifetime Risk-Benefit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kirchgesner, Julien; Beaugerie, Laurent; Carrat, Fabrice; Sokol, Harry; Cosnes, Jacques; Schwarzinger, Michaël

    2016-01-01

    Objective Long-term treatment with thiopurines is associated with a decreased risk of Crohn’s disease (CD) flare but an increased risk of various cancers depending on gender, age, and presence of extensive colitis. We evaluated risks and benefits of withdrawing thiopurines in patients with CD in prolonged remission. Methods We developed a Markov model assessing risks and benefits of withdrawing thiopurines compared to continuing thiopurines in a lifetime horizon. The model was stratified by age (35 and 65 years old at thiopurine withdrawal), gender and presence of extensive colitis. Parameter estimates were taken from French cohorts and hospital databases, cancer and death national registries and published literature. Life expectancy, rates of relapse, serious adverse events, and causes-of-death were evaluated. Results In patients without extensive colitis, continuing thiopurines increased life expectancy up to 0.03 years for 35 year-old men and women but decreased life expectancy down to 0.07 years for 65 year-old men and women. Withdrawal strategy became the preferred strategy at 40.6 years for men, and 45.7 years for women without extensive colitis. In patients with extensive colitis, continuation strategy was the preferred strategy regardless of age. Risk-benefit analysis was not modified by duration of CD activity. Conclusions Factors determining life expectancy associated with withdrawal or continuation of thiopurines in patients with CD and in sustained clinical remission vary substantially according to gender, age and presence of extensive colitis. Individual decisions to continue or withdraw thiopurines in patients with CD in sustained remission should take into account these parameters. PMID:27271176

  20. RISK OF DEMENTIA IN PERITONEAL DIALYSIS PATIENTS COMPARED WITH HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgram, Dawn F.; Szabo, Aniko; Murray, Anne M.; Whittle, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background Compared with similarly aged controls, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a higher prevalence of cognitive impairment and more rapid cognitive decline, which is not explained by traditional risk factors alone. Since previous small studies suggest an association of cognitive impairment with dialysis modality, we compared incident dementia among patients initiating hemodialysis (HD) versus peritoneal dialysis (PD) in a large national cohort. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of incident dialysis patients in the United States from 2006 to 2008 with no diagnosis of dementia prior to beginning dialysis. We evaluated the effect of initial dialysis modality on incidence of dementia, diagnosed by Medicare claims data, adjusted for baseline demographic and clinical data from USRDS registry. Results Our analysis included 121,623 patients, of whom 8,663 initiated dialysis on PD. The mean age of our cohort was 69.2 years. Patients who initiated on PD had a lower cumulative incidence of dementia than those who initiated HD (1.0% versus 2.7%, 2.5% versus 5.3%, and 3.9% versus 7.3% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively). The risk of dementia for patients who started on PD was lower compared with those who started on HD, with a hazard ratio (HR) = 0.46 [0.41, 0.53], in an unadjusted model and HR 0.74 [0.64, 0.86] in a matched model. Conclusions Dialysis modality is associated with incident dementia in a cohort of older ESRD patients. This finding warrants further investigation of the effect of dialysis modality on cognitive function and evaluation for possible mechanisms. PMID:25742686

  1. Cancer Risk in Patients With Inflammatory Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuang-Hui; Kuo, Chang-Fu; Huang, Lu Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Kuan; See, Lai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether inflammation is related to cancer development, and whether the incidence of cancer is increased and occurs in a site-specific manner in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs). This study included a nationwide dynamic cohort of patients with various newly diagnosed SARDs from 1997 to 2010 with follow-up until 2012. This study included 75,123 patients with SARDs. During 562,870 person-years of follow-up, 2844 patients developed cancer. Between 1997 and 2010, the highest number of newly diagnosed SARDs cases were rheumatoid arthritis (n = 35,182), followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 15,623), Sjögren syndrome (n = 11,998), Kawasaki disease (n = 3469), inflammatory bowel disease (n = 2853), scleroderma (n = 1814), Behçet disease (n = 1620), dermatomyositis (n = 1119), polymyositis (n = 811), and vasculitis other than Kawasaki disease (n = 644). A significant standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of overall cancer was observed for patients with SLE (1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–1.56), Sjögren syndrome (1.19; 95% CI, 1.08–1.30), scleroderma (1.27; 95% CI, 1.02–1.59), dermatomyositis (4.79; 95% CI, 4.01–5.73), polymyositis (1.47; 95% CI, 1.05–2.06), vasculitis excluding Kawasaki disease (1.75; 95% CI, 1.20–2.55), and Kawasaki disease (2.88; 95% CI, 1.60–5.20). Overall, patients with most SARDs had a significantly higher risk of inflammation-associated site-specific cancers and hematologic malignancies. This study confirms that autoimmunity is associated with site-specific and hematological malignancies and provides clinical evidence of an association between inflammation and subsequent site-specific cancer development. These findings support the importance of inflammation in site-specific organ system carcinogenesis. PMID:27149461

  2. Ultrasonic assessment of cervix in 'at risk' patients.

    PubMed

    Varma, T R; Patel, R H; Pillai, U

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and fifteen women were considered to be at risk of cervical incompetence, judging from their previous history. They were scanned serially from the first trimester to 32 weeks of gestation. Of the 115, 75 women were found to have defective cervix, as assessed on the basis of its length, its overall width and the width of the cervical canal at the level of the internal cervical os, and herniation of the amniotic membrane, with or without fetal parts, into the cervical canal. Sixteen of the 75 women with ultrasonically diagnosed cervical incompetence aborted, 40 needed cervical cerclage, 24 gave birth premature (24 to 34 weeks). Of the 115 women, 40 did not have ultrasonic evidence of cervical incompetence and only one patient gave birth at 36 weeks' gestation, while 39 patients gave birth between 37 and 42 weeks. These 40 women would have had cervical cerclage on the basis of clinical history alone. Ultrasound is an objective method of diagnosing the incompetent cervix and also helps to avoid unnecessary cerclage operations on the basis of history alone. PMID:3524097

  3. Reducing cardiovascular risk in spouses of cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yates, Bernice C; Rowland, Sheri; Mancuso, Kerry; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Norman, Joseph F; Shurmur, Scott; Tesina, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reducing interventions in spouses of coronary artery bypass patients. This study examined the effects of the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) intervention versus usual care on cardiovascular risk factors. Spouses in the experimental group (n = 17/group) attended cardiac rehabilitation with patients and made the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the usual care group attended educational classes with patients. Spouses' 30-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Scale before and after cardiac rehabilitation (3 months), and at 6 months. Spouses in both groups significantly reduced 30-year risk scores at 3 and 6 months. Exercise was the key ingredient in lowering risk. There was a trend toward reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. Although there were no group differences, having spouses participate in cardiac rehabilitation with the patient was effective for reducing spouses' cardiovascular risk.

  4. Breast Cancer Patients with High Density Mammograms Do Not Have Increased Risk of Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Thursday, September 6, 2012 Breast cancer patients with high density mammograms do not have ... is a marker of increased risk of developing breast cancer, does not seem to increase the risk of ...

  5. Risk of Hand Syndromes in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu-Hsuan; Li, Chung-Yi; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Wang, Liang-Yi; Kuo, Ken N.; Jou, I-Ming; Hou, Wen-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the overall and cause-specific incidences of diabetic hand syndromes (DHS) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) by using age and sex stratifications. The DM and control cohorts comprised 606,152 patients with DM and 609,970 age- and sex-matched subjects, respectively, who were followed up from 2000 to 2008. We estimated the incidence densities (IDs) of overall and cause-specific DHS, namely carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), stenosing flexor tenosynovitis (SFT), limited joint mobility (LJM), and Dupuytren disease (DD), and calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) of DHS in relation to DM by using a Cox proportional hazards model with adjustment for potential confounders. Over a 9-year period, 51,207 patients with DM (8.45%) and 39,153 matched controls (6.42%) sought ambulatory care visits for various DHS, with an ID of 117.7 and 80.7 per 10,000 person-years, respectively. The highest cause-specific ID was observed for CTS, followed by SFT, LJM, and DD, regardless of the diabetic status. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with DM had a significantly high HR of overall DHS (1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.48–1.53). Men and women aged <35 years had the highest HR (2.64, 95% CI = 2.15–3.24 and 2.99, 95% CI = 2.55–3.50, respectively). Cause-specific analyses revealed that DM was more strongly associated with SFT (HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.86–1.95) and DD (HR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.39–2.39) than with CTS (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.28–1.34) and LJM (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.13–1.35). Men and younger patients with DM have the highest risk of DHS. Certain hand syndromes, such as SFT and DD, were more strongly associated with DM than with other syndromes and require the attention of clinicians. PMID:26469895

  6. Wakes of Maneuvering Bodies in Stratified Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Fernando, H. J.

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of experimental/theoretical studies on large momentum eddies generated in late wakes of unsteady moving self-propelled bodies in stratified fluids. The experiments were conducted with scaled submarine model at high Reynolds numbers (50,000), corresponding to the fully turbulent flow regime. Dye visualization and PIV were used for flow diagnostics. When a self-propelled body makes a maneuver, e.g. accelerates, it imparts net momentum on the surrounding fluid. We show that in a stratified fluid this leads to impulsive momentum wakes with large, long-lived coherent vortices in the late flows, which may be used as a signature for identification of submarine wakes in oceanic thermocline. First, we consider dynamics and properties of such wakes in a linearly stratified fluid and present a model that permits to predict the main flow characteristics. Second, we consider wakes in a two layer stratified fluid (analog of the upper ocean) and show that such wakes may penetrate to the water surface; we present a model for this phenomenon and propose criteria for the penetration of wake signatures to the water surface in terms of main governing parameters (signature contrast versus confinement number). Finally, we consider the evolution of such momentum wake eddies in the field of decaying background turbulence, which mimics the oceanic thermocline, and show that for the flow configuration studied the contrast number remains sufficiently large and detectable wake imprints survive for a long period of time. Some pertinent estimates for submarines cruising in the upper ocean are also given. For more details see [1-3]. This study was supported by grant from the Office of Naval Research. 1. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S., Smirnov S.A. & Morrison R.J. 2006. On surface signatures generated by submersed momentum sources. Phys. Fluids, under revision. 2. Voropayev S.I., Fernando H.J.S. & Morrison R.J. 2006. Dipolar eddies in a stratified turbulent flow. J. Fluid

  7. Cell cycle progression score is a marker for five-year lung cancer-specific mortality risk in patients with resected stage I lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takashi; Kadota, Kyuichi; Chaft, Jamie; Evans, Brent; Kidd, John; Tan, Kay See; Dycoco, Joe; Kolquist, Kathryn; Davis, Thaylon; Hamilton, Stephanie A.; Yager, Kraig; Jones, Joshua T.; Travis, William D.; Jones, David R.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goals of our study were (a) to validate a molecular expression signature (cell cycle progression [CCP] score and molecular prognostic score [mPS; combination of CCP and pathological stage {IA or IB}]) that identifies stage I lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients with a higher risk of cancer-specific death following curative-intent surgical resection, and (b) to determine whether mPS stratifies prognosis within stage I lung ADC histological subtypes. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stage I lung ADC tumor samples from 1200 patients were analyzed for 31 proliferation genes by quantitative RT-PCR. Prognostic discrimination of CCP score and mPS was assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression, using 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality as the primary outcome. Results In multivariable analysis, CCP score was a prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.6 per interquartile range; 95% CI, 1.14–2.24; P=0.006). In a multivariable model that included mPS instead of CCP, mPS was a significant prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.77; 95% CI, 1.18–2.66; P=0.006). Five-year lung cancer–specific survival differed between low-risk and high-risk mPS groups (96% vs 81%; P<0.001). In patients with intermediate-grade lung ADC of acinar and papillary subtypes, high mPS was associated with worse 5-year lung cancer–specific survival (P<0.001 and 0.015, respectively), compared with low mPS. Conclusion This study validates CCP score and mPS as independent prognostic markers for lung cancer–specific mortality and provides quantitative risk assessment, independent of known high-risk features, for stage I lung ADC patients treated with surgery alone. PMID:27153551

  8. The link between heightened thrombogenicity and inflammation: pre-procedure characterization of the patient at high risk for recurrent events after stenting.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Bliden, Kevin P; Kreutz, Rolf P; Dichiara, Joseph; Antonino, Mark J; Tantry, Udaya S

    2009-03-01

    Heightened thrombogenicity and biomarker evidence of inflammation have been independently associated with ischemic risk in patients with coronary artery disease. However, a study examining their relation has not been reported. We analysed the relation between measurements of thrombogenicity and biomarkers in patients undergoing stenting and followed for 24 months recurrent ischemic events. In 84 consecutive patients undergoing stenting, pre-procedure thrombogenicity was measured by thrombelastography (TEG) and conventional aggregometry whereas biomarkers were measured by fluorokine multi-analyte profiling. Patients were stratified into quartiles based on platelet-fibrin clot strength (MA) by TEG and correlated with ischemic event occurrence. Patients in the highest MA quartile (high MA) had greater ADP-induced platelet aggregation (57.5 +/- 15.0% vs. 47.9 +/- 17.6%, p = 0.05), C-reactive protein (25.0 +/- 5.6 vs. 4.2 +/- 1.0 microg/mL, p = 0.006) and interleukin-8 (23.8 +/- 2.8 vs. 14.1 +/- 1.6 pg/mL, p < 0.001) than patients within the lowest MA quartile (low MA). Epidermal growth factor (7.7 +/- 2.2 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.3 pg/mL, p = 0.006) and vascular endothelial growth factor (296 +/- 35 vs. 190 +/- 10 pg/mL, p = 0.05) were also higher. Patients with high-MA had an ischemic event more often than patients with low-MA (48% vs. 13%, p = 0.02). Our study suggests that a link is present between inflammation and heightened thrombogenicity measured pre-procedurally in the patient at high risk for recurrent ischemic events after stenting. Larger studies are required to solidify these observations and their clinical relevance.

  9. Prevalence and Risk Profile Of Unread Messages To Patients In A Patient Web Portal

    PubMed Central

    Mostaghimi, A.; O’Brien, J.; Bajracharya, A.; Safran, C.; Landon, B.E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Excitement around the adoption of electronic communication between physicians and patients is tempered by the possibility of increased clinical and legal risk. If patients do not read messages in a timely fashion, duplicative communication efforts may be required and patient safety may be jeopardized. Objective We sought to assess the prevalence and risk profile of unread messages in a mature patient portal. Methods We analyzed six years of messages (2005–2010) from physicians to patients to determine the prevalence and associated characteristics of unread messages in a patient portal. We focused on clinical messages, and excluded announcements. Because some physicians sent clinical messages to groups of patients, we labeled messages sent to more than 5 patients as “outreach” messages and excluded them from general analyses. We performed a chart review of 75 clinical messages to assess for harm. Results We found that 3% of clinical messages were unread after 21 days. Messages arriving outside of business hours were slightly more likely to go unread (RR 1.15 95% CI 1.11–1.19). Patients who were male (OR 1.14 CI 1.04–1.26) African American (OR 1.69 CI 1.29–2.22) or Hispanic (OR 1.74 CI 1.17–2.59), or in the lowest income group (OR 1.72 CI 1.19–2.49) were more likely to have unread messages. Chart review showed no evidence of harm, but 13% of sampled unread messages were associated with potential delays in care. Incidentally, we found 50% of the physician-initiated outreach messages were unread. Conclusions Overall, secure messaging appears a safe form of communication, but systems to notify senders when messages are unread may have value. While most clinical messages were read, many outreach messages were not, providing caution for relying on such systems for information dissemination. Similar to other studies, differences by race and income were observed and require further study. PMID:26171082

  10. Nitrogen transformations in stratified aquatic microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Revsbech, Niels Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2006-11-01

    New analytical methods such as advanced molecular techniques and microsensors have resulted in new insights about how nitrogen transformations in stratified microbial systems such as sediments and biofilms are regulated at a microm-mm scale. A large and ever-expanding knowledge base about nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, and dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium, and about the microorganisms performing the processes, has been produced by use of these techniques. During the last decade the discovery of anammmox bacteria and migrating, nitrate accumulating bacteria performing dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium have given new dimensions to the understanding of nitrogen cycling in nature, and the occurrence of these organisms and processes in stratified microbial communities will be described in detail.

  11. Multicentre validation of the Geneva Risk Score for hospitalised medical patients at risk of venous thromboembolism. Explicit ASsessment of Thromboembolic RIsk and Prophylaxis for Medical PATients in SwitzErland (ESTIMATE).

    PubMed

    Nendaz, M; Spirk, D; Kucher, N; Aujesky, D; Hayoz, D; Beer, J H; Husmann, M; Frauchiger, B; Korte, W; Wuillemin, W A; Jäger, K; Righini, M; Bounameaux, H

    2014-03-01

    There is a need to validate risk assessment tools for hospitalised medical patients at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We investigated whether a predefined cut-off of the Geneva Risk Score, as compared to the Padua Prediction Score, accurately distinguishes low-risk from high-risk patients regardless of the use of thromboprophylaxis. In the multicentre, prospective Explicit ASsessment of Thromboembolic RIsk and Prophylaxis for Medical PATients in SwitzErland (ESTIMATE) cohort study, 1,478 hospitalised medical patients were enrolled of whom 637 (43%) did not receive thromboprophylaxis. The primary endpoint was symptomatic VTE or VTE-related death at 90 days. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01277536. According to the Geneva Risk Score, the cumulative rate of the primary endpoint was 3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-4.6%) in 962 high-risk vs 0.6% (95% CI 0.2-1.9%) in 516 low-risk patients (p=0.002); among patients without prophylaxis, this rate was 3.5% vs 0.8% (p=0.029), respectively. In comparison, the Padua Prediction Score yielded a cumulative rate of the primary endpoint of 3.5% (95% CI 2.3-5.3%) in 714 high-risk vs 1.1% (95% CI 0.6-2.3%) in 764 low-risk patients (p=0.002); among patients without prophylaxis, this rate was 3.2% vs 1.5% (p=0.130), respectively. Negative likelihood ratio was 0.28 (95% CI 0.10-0.83) for the Geneva Risk Score and 0.51 (95% CI 0.28-0.93) for the Padua Prediction Score. In conclusion, among hospitalised medical patients, the Geneva Risk Score predicted VTE and VTE-related mortality and compared favourably with the Padua Prediction Score, particularly for its accuracy to identify low-risk patients who do not require thromboprophylaxis.

  12. Stably Stratified Flow in a Shallow Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, L.

    2016-07-01

    Stratified nocturnal flow above and within a small valley of approximately 12-m depth and a few hundred metres width is examined as a case study, based on a network of 20 sonic anemometers and a central 20-m tower with eight levels of sonic anemometers. Several regimes of stratified flow over gentle topography are conceptually defined for organizing the data analysis and comparing with the existing literature. In our case study, a marginal cold pool forms within the shallow valley in the early evening but yields to larger ambient wind speeds after a few hours, corresponding to stratified terrain-following flow where the flow outside the valley descends to the valley floor. The terrain-following flow lasts about 10 h and then undergoes transition to an intermittent marginal cold pool towards the end of the night when the larger-scale flow collapses. During this 10-h period, the stratified terrain-following flow is characterized by a three-layer structure, consisting of a thin surface boundary layer of a few metres depth on the valley floor, a deeper boundary layer corresponding to the larger-scale flow, and an intermediate transition layer with significant wind-directional shear and possible advection of lee turbulence that is generated even for the gentle topography of our study. The flow in the valley is often modulated by oscillations with a typical period of 10 min. Cold events with smaller turbulent intensity and duration of tens of minutes move through the observational domain throughout the terrain-following period. One of these events is examined in detail.

  13. Evolution of a forced stratified mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, J.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Kit, E.

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory measurements were carried out in a spatially developing stably stratified shear layer generated downstream of a splitter plate. The instabilities were controlled using a flapper spanning the entire shear layer, with the flapper forced at the fastest growing frequency of the primary [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability. The measurements were taken as the KH instabilities roll up, break down, and degenerate into stratified turbulence. Both stratified and homogeneous shear layers were considered, the latter acting as the "baseline" case. The measurements included the streamwise and vertical velocities (made using X-wire hot film probes), which allowed calculation of the mean and rms velocities, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation, and TKE production. The density and its gradients were measured using miniature conductivity probes. The measurements and flow visualization elicited interesting features of KH evolution, namely that KH billows may be turbulent from the onset, the TKE dissipation is largest at early stages of evolution, the production of TKE is a maximum at the breakdown of billows, the decay of turbulence to fossilized motions and concomitant formation of fine (layered) structure occur rapidly after the breakdown of billows, and episodic rebirth of (zombie) turbulence develops before a final permanently fossilized state is achieved.

  14. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  15. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients.

    PubMed

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  16. Morbidity, mortality, and categorization of the risk of perioperative complications in lung cancer patients*

    PubMed Central

    Stanzani, Fabiana; Paisani, Denise de Moraes; de Oliveira, Anderson; de Souza, Rodrigo Caetano; Perfeito, João Aléssio Juliano; Faresin, Sonia Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine morbidity and mortality rates by risk category in accordance with the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines, to determine what role pulmonary function tests play in this categorization process, and to identify risk factors for perioperative complications (PCs). METHODS: This was a historical cohort study based on preoperative and postoperative data collected for cases of lung cancer diagnosed or suspected between 2001 and 2010. RESULTS: Of the 239 patients evaluated, only 13 (5.4%) were classified as being at high risk of PCs. Predicted postoperative FEV1 (FEV1ppo) was sufficient to define the risk level in 156 patients (65.3%); however, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) was necessary for identifying those at high risk. Lung resection was performed in 145 patients. Overall morbidity and mortality rates were similar to those reported in other studies. However, morbidity and mortality rates for patients at an acceptable risk of PCs were 31.6% and 4.3%, respectively, whereas those for patients at high risk were 83.3% and 33.3%. Advanced age, COPD, lobe resection, and lower FEV1ppo were correlated with PCs. CONCLUSIONS: Although spirometry was sufficient for risk assessment in the majority of the population studied, CPET played a key role in the identification of high-risk patients, among whom the mortality rate was seven times higher than was that observed for those at an acceptable risk of PCs. The risk factors related to PCs coincided with those reported in previous studies. PMID:24626266

  17. hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity identifies high-risk TNM stage I and II colorectal cancer patients, regardless of adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Leonardo; Petroni, Giulia; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Jessica; Lastraioli, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Messerini, Luca; Di Costanzo, Francesco; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC) with high risk of progression is one major clinical challenge, mainly due to lack of validated biomarkers. The aims of the present study were to analyze the prognostic impact of three molecular markers belonging to the ion channels and transporters family: the ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) and the calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channels, as well as the glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1); and to define the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy in conjunction with the abovementioned biomarkers, in a cohort of radically resected stage I–III CRC patients. Patients and methods The expressions of hERG1, KCa3.1, and Glut-1 were tested by immunohistochemistry on 162 surgical samples of nonmetastatic, stage I–III CRC patients. The median follow-up was 32 months. The association between biological markers, clinicopathological features, and survival outcomes was investigated by evaluating both disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Although no prognostic valence emerged for KCa3.1, evidence of a negative impact of hERG1 expression on survival outcomes was provided. On the contrary, Glut-1 expression had a positive impact. According to the results of the multivariate analysis, patients were stratified in four risk groups, based on TNM stage and hERG1/Glut-1 expression. After adjusting for adjuvant therapy, stage I and II, Glut-1-negative, and hERG1-positive patients showed the worst survival experience. Conclusion This study strongly indicates that the combination of hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity behaves as a prognostic biomarker in radically resected CRC patients. This combination identifies a group of stage I and II CRC patients with a bad prognosis, even worse than that of stage III patients, regardless of adjuvant therapy accomplishment.

  18. DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein Status in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Correlates With Outcome for Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Corbin; Tumati, Vasu; Kapur, Payal; Yan, Jingsheng; Hong, David; Bhuiyan, Manzerul; Xie, Xian-Jin; Pistenmaa, David; Yu, Lan; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Saha, Debabrata; Kim, D. W. Nathan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This pilot study investigates the role of DOC-2/DAB2 Interacting Protein (DAB2IP) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) as prognostic biomarkers in high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was performed and scored by an expert genitourinary pathologist. Clinical endpoints evaluated were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), castration resistance–free survival (CRFS), and distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS). Log-rank test and Cox regression were used to determine significance of biomarker levels with clinical outcome. Results: Fifty-four patients with high-risk prostate cancer (stage ≥T3a, or Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) treated with radiation therapy from 2005 to 2012 at our institution were evaluated. Nearly all patients expressed EZH2 (98%), whereas 28% of patients revealed DAB2IP reduction and 72% retained DAB2IP. Median follow-up was 34.0 months for DAB2IP-reduced patients, 29.9 months for DAB2IP-retained patients, and 32.6 months in the EZH2 study. Reduction in DAB2IP portended worse outcome compared with DAB2IP-retained patients, including FFBF (4-year: 37% vs 89%, P=.04), CRFS (4-year: 50% vs 90%, P=.02), and DMFS (4-year: 36% vs 97%, P=.05). Stratified EZH2 expression trended toward significance for worse FFBF and CRFS (P=.07). Patients with reduced DAB2IP or highest-intensity EZH2 expression exhibited worse FFBF (4-year: 32% vs 95%, P=.02), CRFS (4-year: 28% vs 100%, P<.01), and DMFS (4-year: 39% vs 100%, P=.04) compared with the control group. Conclusion: Loss of DAB2IP is a potent biomarker that portends worse outcome despite definitive radiation therapy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 is expressed in most high-risk tumors and is a less potent discriminator of outcome in this study. The DAB2IP status in combination with degree of EZH2 expression may be useful for

  19. Ruxolitinib is effective in patients with intermediate-1 risk myelofibrosis: a summary of recent evidence.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Claire N; Talpaz, Moshe; Mead, Adam J

    2016-10-01

    Ruxolitinib is the only therapy with an approved indication for myelofibrosis (MF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm associated with progressive bone marrow fibrosis and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Although the pivotal phase 3 COMFORT studies included only patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk MF, the US indication includes all patients with intermediate- or high-risk disease. Data from recent nonrandomized studies confirm that the benefits of ruxolitinib established in the COMFORT studies in terms of spleen size reduction and symptom improvement also extend to patients with intermediate-1 risk MF, who tend to have less advanced disease than patients with higher-risk MF. Given the disease-modifying potential of ruxolitinib therapy, timely initiation of ruxolitinib therapy may not only improve patients' current clinical status but also lead to better long-term outcomes. The decision of whether or when to initiate ruxolitinib treatment should be based on the expected benefit-risk ratio for each patient, specifically considering potential adverse effects.

  20. Secure e-Health: managing risks to patient health data.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Eike-Henner W

    2007-01-01

    e-Health, as an inter-jurisdictional enterprise, presents risks to patient health data that involve not only technology and professional protocols but also laws, regulations and professional security cultures. The USA Patriot Act is one example of how national laws can shape these concerns. Secure e-Health therefore requires not only national standardization of professional education and protocols but also global interoperability of regulations and laws. Some progress in this regard has been made in the European context; however, even here developments are incomplete, and nothing similar has been accomplished on a global scale. Professional health information organizations must take the lead in developing appropriate high-level principles for professional certification and security protocols and in harmonizing these on a global basis, so that they can provide a firm and consistent foundation for international treaties. Such developments should occur in concert with other health professions, so that coordinated requirements are integrated into revisions of the relevant codes of ethics. This presentation identifies and addresses some of the ethical and legal issues and proposes a series of recommendations.

  1. Perceived and actual risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Sunjoo; Froelicher, Erika S.; Yun, Ju-Hui; Kim, Ye-Won; Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purposes of this study were to compare the perceived and actual 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to evaluate the influence of cardiovascular risk factors on perceived CVD risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Korea. Additionally, the attainment of CVD prevention guideline goals by 3 levels of CVD risk (low, moderate, and high) was presented. For this cross-sectional study, data were collected from 208 patients with RA. Actual CVD risk was estimated with the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), and goal attainment was assessed based on the European League Against Rheumatism guidelines. Actual CVD risk and perceived risk were compared with cross-tabulation. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate differences in cardiovascular risk factors by perceived risk. Levels of goal attainment were presented in percentages. Among patients with RA, 13.9% were identified as being at high risk for CVD, whereas 39.9% were at moderate risk, and 46.2% were at low risk. The majority of those at high risk (96.6%) underestimated their risk for CVD. The use of antihypertensive or lipid-lowering medications and having a parental history of CVD significantly increased the likelihood that subjects with RA would perceive themselves as being at high risk for CVD. Diabetes, smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity did not affect perceived risk. A substantial proportion of the subjects with RA did not meet the prevention guideline goals. Patients with RA who are at increased risk of developing CVD must be managed as soon as possible to attain the guideline goals and, accordingly, lower their risk of future CVD. PMID:27749595

  2. Old age, high risk medication, polypharmacy: a ‘trilogy’ of risks in older patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: The safety of pharmacotherapy in atrial fibrillation (AF) is compounded by a trilogy of risks old age, high-risk medications (e.g., antithrombotics, antiarrhythmics), polypharmacy due to multiple patient comorbidities. However, to date, scarce study has investigated the use of polypharmacy (including potentially inappropriate medication (PIM)) in AF patients, and how this may contribute to their overall risk of medication misadventure. Objectives: To review the extent of polypharmacy and PIM use in older patients (65 years or older) with AF. Methods: Information was extracted from a database characterising a cohort of older AF patients treated in general practice in New South Wales, Australia. Patient characteristics, number and types of drugs, the degree of PIM use were recorded. The predictors for the use of polypharmacy in older AF patients were identified. Results: Overall, 367 patients (mean age 77.8 years) were reviewed, among which 94.8% used 5 medications or more and over half used 10 medications or more. Cardiovascular agents were most commonly used (98.9%), followed by antithrombotics (90.7%). Among agents deemed PIMs, digoxin (30.2%) was the most frequently used, followed by benzodiazepines (19.6%), and sotalol (9.8%). AF patients using polypharmacy were more likely to have low bleeding risk (OR=10.97), representing those patients in whom high-risk antithrombotics are mostly indicated. Patients with major-polypharmacy (5-9 medications) are more likely to have obstructive pulmonary diseases (OR=2.32), upper gastrointestinal diseases (OR=2.02) and poor physical function (OR=1.04), but less likely to have cognitive impairment (OR=0.27). Conclusion: Polypharmacy affects oldest AF patients, comprising medications that are indicated for AF, yet regarded as PIMs. Patients with lower risk of bleeding, obstructive pulmonary diseases, upper gastrointestinal diseases and poor physical function are also at higher risk of using higher number of

  3. Predicting patients with high risk of becoming high-cost healthcare users in Ontario (Canada).

    PubMed

    Chechulin, Yuriy; Nazerian, Amir; Rais, Saad; Malikov, Kamil

    2014-02-01

    Literature and original analysis of healthcare costs have shown that a small proportion of patients consume the majority of healthcare resources. A proactive approach is to target interventions towards those patients who are at risk of becoming high-cost users (HCUs). This approach requires identifying high-risk patients accurately before substantial avoidable costs have been incurred and health status has deteriorated further. We developed a predictive model to identify patients at risk of becoming HCUs in Ontario. HCUs were defined as the top 5% of patients incurring the highest costs. Information was collected on various demographic and utilization characteristics. The modelling technique used was logistic regression. If the top 5% of patients at risk of becoming HCUs are followed, the sensitivity is 42.2% and specificity is 97%. Alternatives for implementation of the model include collaboration between different levels of healthcare services for personalized healthcare interventions and interventions addressing needs of patient cohorts with high-cost conditions. PMID:24726075

  4. Tailored information increases patient/physician discussion of colon cancer risk and testing: The Cancer Risk Intake System trial.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Celette Sugg; Gupta, Samir; Bishop, Wendy Pechero; Ahn, Chul; Tiro, Jasmin A; Halm, Ethan A; Farrell, David; Marks, Emily; Morrow, Jay; Julka, Manjula; McCallister, Katharine; Sanders, Joanne M; Rawl, Susan M

    2016-12-01

    Assess whether receipt of tailored printouts generated by the Cancer Risk Intake System (CRIS) - a touch-screen computer program that collects data from patients and generates printouts for patients and physicians - results in more reported patient-provider discussions about colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and screening than receipt of non-tailored information. Cluster-randomized trial, randomized by physician, with data collected via CRIS prior to visit and 2-week follow-up telephone survey among 623 patients. Patients aged 25-75 with upcoming primary-care visits and eligible for, but currently non-adherent to CRC screening guidelines. Patient-reported discussions with providers about CRC risk and testing. Tailored recipients were more likely to report patient-physician discussions about personal and familial risk, stool testing, and colonoscopy (all p < 0.05). Tailored recipients were more likely to report discussions of: chances of getting cancer (+ 10%); family history (+ 15%); stool testing (+ 9%); and colonoscopy (+ 8%) (all p < 0.05). CRIS is a promising strategy for facilitating discussions about testing in primary-care settings.

  5. 76 FR 41929 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... July 15, 2011 Part III Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Part 153 Patient Protection and... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 153 RIN 0938-AR07 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment AGENCY: Department of Health and...

  6. [Individualized, personalized and stratified medicine: a challenge for allergology in ENT?].

    PubMed

    Chaker, Adam M; Klimek, L

    2015-05-01

    Individualized, personalized or stratified medicine approaches offer emerging opportunities in the field of allergy and ENT. Avoidance of side effects, targeted therapy approaches and stratified prevention promise better outcomes and optimal results for patients. Conceptual incongruencies remain with regard to definitions and perceptions of "personalized medicine". Serious ethical considerations have to be taken into account. The development of pharmacogenomics, molecular phenotyping, genomic sequencing and other -omics opens the door to unique mechanistic therapeutic advances. The molecular allergology and recombinant diagnostics available are tools that offer substantial improved diagnostics for the benefit of allergic patients, e. g. in anaphylaxis and food allergy. For stratified therapeutic approaches, however, regulatory affairs will have to keep pace with medical and scientific discovery.

  7. Seasonal variations in urinary risk factors among patients with nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, K.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-four hour urine specimens from 5,677 stone-forming patients throughout the United States were analyzed for seasonal variations in urinary risk factors for nephrolithiasis. Determinations were performed for urine volume, pH, calcium, oxalate, phosphorus, sodium, magnesium, citrate, sulfate, uric acid, and the relative supersaturation (RS) of calcium oxalate, brushite, monosodium urate, and uric acid. Criteria for significant seasonal variation included a significant difference in monthly means of risk factors, seasonal grouping of the data by the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple range test, consistent year-to-year trends and a physiologically significant range. Minimum urine volume of 1.54 +/- 0.70 SD L/day occurred in October while a maximum urine volume of 1.76 +/- 0.78 SD L/day was observed during February. Minimum urine pH of 5.94 +/- 0.64 SD was observed during July and August while a maximum pH of 6.18 +/- 0.61 SD was observed during February. Daily urinary excretion of sodium was lowest during August, 158 +/- 74 SD mEq/day and highest during February 177 +/- 70 SD mEq/day. The RS of brushite and uric acid were found to display significant pH-dependent seasonal variation with a maximum RS of uric acid 2.26 +/- 1.98 SD in June and a low of 1.48 +/- 1.30 SD in February. Maximum RS of brushite 2.75 +/- 2.58 was observed during February. Minimum RS of brushite 1.93 +/- 1.70 SD was observed in June. Phosphorus excretion displayed seasonal variation about a spring-fall axis with a maximum value 1042 +/- 373 SD mg/day in April and a minimum value of 895 +/- 289 SD mg/day. Urine volume, sodium, and pH were significantly lower during the summer (June, July, August) than in the winter (December, January, February). The RS of uric acid was higher, but that of brushite and monosodium urate was lower in the summer than in the winter. The seasonal changes observed in urine volume, pH, sodium, and the RS of brushite and uric acid are consistent with summertime sweating

  8. Evolving treatment strategies in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Gary J

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is defined by a set of biologically distinct diseases characterized by maturation arrest and clonal proliferation of myeloid cells. Recommendations for post-remission therapy depend on assessing the leukemia risk characteristics, such as cytogenetics and molecular features present at diagnosis. Patients with high-risk disease include those whose leukemia is characterized by monosomal karyotype or poor-risk cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities, patients with antecedent hematologic disorders or therapy-related AML, and presence of adverse host factors, such as comorbidities, impaired performance status or older age. Older patients are more likely to have these adverse features. High-risk AML responds poorly to available induction treatment and is likely to relapse despite consolidation therapy. Current data support an increasing understanding of prognosis but have not yet resulted in effective therapies for patients with high-risk disease. This review discusses current therapies and evolving treatment strategies for high-risk AML.

  9. [Incidence and Risk Assessment of Tumor Lysis Syndrome in Patients with Advanced Germ Cell Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kurobe, Masahiro; Kawai, Koji; Tanaka, Ken; Ichioka, Daishi; Yoshino, Takayuki; Kandori, Shuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Waku, Natsui; Takaoka, Ei-Ichirou; Kojima, Takahiro; Joraku, Akira; Suetomi, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a major oncological emergency. TLS is common in patients with hematological malignancies, but it can occur across a spectrum of cancer types. Germ cell tumors (GCT) have rapid cancer cell turnover and often present with bulky metastasis. The international TLS expert consensus panel has recommended guidelines for a medical decision tree to assign low, intermediate and high risk to patients with cancer at risk for TLS. GCT is classified as intermediate risk for TLS, and the patients who have other TLS risks factors are classified to be at high risk for TLS. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 67 patients with metastatic GCT who were treated with induction chemotherapy at Tsukuba University Hospital between 2000 and 2013. Thirty-one, 15 and 21 patients were classified with good-, intermediate- and poor-prognosis disease, respectively, according to the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group criteria. Twelve patients (18%) were classified to be at high risk for TLS, and two patients were treated with allopurinol or rasburicase as prophylaxes for TLS. They did not show progression to laboratory TLS (L-TLS). In the remaining 10 TLS high-risk patients, three (30%) patients developed L-TLS after chemotherapy and started receiving oral allopurinol. As a result, no patients developed clinical TLS (C-TLS). In this study, 30% of TLS-high risk patients developed L-TLS without prophylactic treatment. Therefore, it is important to conduct TLS-risk stratification and consider prophylaxis such as rasburicase for advanced GCT patients at induction chemotherapy. PMID:27320114

  10. Patient-related medical risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee

    PubMed Central

    Eka, Aleeson

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements and improvements in methods for preventing infection, periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a significant complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Prevention is the most important strategy to deal with this disabling complication, and prevention should begin with identifying patient-related risk factors. Medical risk factors, such as morbid obesity, malnutrition, hyperglycemia, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), preoperative anemia, cardiovascular disorders, chronic renal failure, smoking, alcohol abuse and depression, should be evaluated and optimized prior to surgery. Treating patients to get laboratory values under a specified threshold or cessation of certain modifiable risk factors can decrease the risk of PJI. Although significant advances have been made in past decades to identify these risk factors, there remains some uncertainty regarding the risk factors predisposing TJA patients to PJI. Through a review of the current literature, this paper aims to comprehensively evaluate and provide a better understanding of known medical risk factors for PJI after TJA. PMID:26539450

  11. Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Kutter, E.

    2015-07-01

    Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain has been considered a difficult condition for measuring net ecosystem-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, water vapor, and energy. A long-standing advection error in eddy-flux measurements is caused by stably stratified canopy flow. Such a condition with strong thermal gradient and less turbulent air is also difficult for modeling. To understand the challenging atmospheric condition for eddy-flux measurements, we use the renormalized group (RNG) k-ϵ turbulence model to investigate the main characteristics of stably stratified canopy flows in complex terrain. In this two-dimensional simulation, we imposed persistent constant heat flux at ground surface and linearly increasing cooling rate in the upper-canopy layer, vertically varying dissipative force from canopy drag elements, buoyancy forcing induced from thermal stratification and the hill terrain. These strong boundary effects keep nonlinearity in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations high enough to generate turbulent behavior. The fundamental characteristics of nighttime canopy flow over complex terrain measured by the small number of available multi-tower advection experiments can be reproduced by this numerical simulation, such as (1) unstable layer in the canopy and super-stable layers associated with flow decoupling in deep canopy and near the top of canopy; (2) sub-canopy drainage flow and drainage flow near the top of canopy in calm night; (3) upward momentum transfer in canopy, downward heat transfer in upper canopy and upward heat transfer in deep canopy; and (4) large buoyancy suppression and weak shear production in strong stability.

  12. A Filtering Method For Gravitationally Stratified Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti-Bono, Caroline; Colella, Phillip

    2005-04-25

    Gravity waves arise in gravitationally stratified compressible flows at low Mach and Froude numbers. These waves can have a negligible influence on the overall dynamics of the fluid but, for numerical methods where the acoustic waves are treated implicitly, they impose a significant restriction on the time step. A way to alleviate this restriction is to filter out the modes corresponding to the fastest gravity waves so that a larger time step can be used. This paper presents a filtering strategy of the fully compressible equations based on normal mode analysis that is used throughout the simulation to compute the fast dynamics and that is able to damp only fast gravity modes.

  13. Bayesian stratified sampling to assess corpus utility

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, J.; Scovel, C.; Thomas, T.; Hall, S.

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes a method for asking statistical questions about a large text corpus. The authors exemplify the method by addressing the question, ``What percentage of Federal Register documents are real documents, of possible interest to a text researcher or analyst?`` They estimate an answer to this question by evaluating 200 documents selected from a corpus of 45,820 Federal Register documents. Bayesian analysis and stratified sampling are used to reduce the sampling uncertainty of the estimate from over 3,100 documents to fewer than 1,000. A possible application of the method is to establish baseline statistics used to estimate recall rates for information retrieval systems.

  14. White dwarf stars with chemically stratified atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchmore, D.

    1982-01-01

    Recent observations and theory suggest that some white dwarfs may have chemically stratified atmospheres - thin layers of hydrogen lying above helium-rich envelopes. Models of such atmospheres show that a discontinuous temperature inversion can occur at the boundary between the layers. Model spectra for layered atmospheres at 30,000 K and 50,000 K tend to have smaller decrements at 912 A, 504 A, and 228 A than uniform atmospheres would have. On the basis of their continuous extreme ultraviolet spectra, it is possible to distinguish observationally between uniform and layered atmospheres for hot white dwarfs.

  15. Improved Clinical Risk Stratification in Patients with Long QT Syndrome? Novel Insights from Multi-Channel ECGs

    PubMed Central

    Samol, Alexander; Gönes, Mehmet; Zumhagen, Sven; Bruns, Hans-Jürgen; Paul, Matthias; Vahlhaus, Christian; Waltenberger, Johannes; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Eckardt, Lars; Mönnig, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated whether multichannel ECG-recordings are useful to risk-stratify patients with congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) for risk of sudden cardiac death under optimized medical treatment. Methods In 34 LQTS-patients (11 male; age 31±13 years, QTc 478±51ms; LQT1 n = 8, LQT2 n = 15) we performed a standard 12-channel ECG and a 120-channel body surface potential mapping. The occurrence of clinical events (CE; syncope, torsade de pointes (TdP), sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)) was documented and correlated with different ECG-parameters in all lead positions. Results Seven patients developed TdP, four survived SCA and 12 experienced syncope. 12/34 had at least one CE. CE was associated with a longer QTc-interval (519±43ms vs. 458±42ms; p = 0.001), a lower T-wave integral (TWI) on the left upper chest (-1.2±74.4mV*ms vs. 63.0±29.7mV*ms; p = 0.001), a lower range of T-wave amplitude (TWA) in the region of chest lead V8 (0.10±0.08mV vs. 0.18±0.07mV; p = 0.008) and a longer T-peak-T-end time (TpTe) in lead V1 (98±23ms vs. 78±26ms; p = 0.04). Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analyses revealed a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 75% (area under curve (AUC) 0.89±0.06, p = 0.001) at a cut-off value of 26.8mV*ms for prediction of CE by TWI, a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 83% at a cut-off value of 0.11mV (AUC 0.83±0.09, p = 0.002) for prediction of CE by TWA and a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 73% at a cut-off value of 87ms (AUC 0.80±0.07, p = 0.005) for prediction of CE by TpTe. Conclusions Occurrence of CE in LQTS-patients seems to be associated with a prolonged, low-amplitude T-wave. PMID:27379800

  16. Dipyridamole-thallium scanning in patients undergoing vascular surgery. Optimizing preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk

    SciTech Connect

    Eagle, K.A.; Singer, D.E.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Mulley, A.G.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-04-24

    Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has been suggested as a method of preoperatively assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing major surgery. To define more clearly its proper role in preoperative assessment, we prospectively evaluated 111 patients undergoing vascular surgery. In the first set of 61 patients, our data confirmed the value of preoperative dipyridamole-thallium scanning in identifying the patients who suffered postoperative ischemic events. Events occurred in eight of 18 patients with reversible defects on preoperative imaging, compared with no events in 43 patients with no thallium redistribution (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.624, 0.256). The results also suggested that clinical factors might allow identification of a low-risk subset of patients. To test the hypothesis that patients with no evidence of congestive heart failure, angina, prior myocardial infarction, or diabetes do not require further preoperative testing, we evaluated an additional 50 patients having vascular procedures. None of the 23 without the clinical markers had untoward outcomes, while ten of 27 patients with one or more of these clinical markers suffered postoperative ischemic events (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.592, 0.148). In the clinical high-risk subset, further risk stratification is achieved with dipyridamole-thallium scanning.

  17. Evaluation of patients' attitudes towards stroke prevention and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, S; Regpala, S; Lacombe, S; Sharma, M; Gibbens, S; Ball, D; Francis, K

    2014-03-01

    Patient's values and preferences regarding the relative importance of preventing strokes and avoiding bleeding are now recognised to be of great importance in deciding on therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation (SPAF). We used an iPad questionnaire to determine the minimal clinically important difference (Treatment Threshold) and the maximum number of major bleeding events that a patient would be willing to endure in order to prevent one stroke (Bleeding Ratio) for the initiation of antithrombotic therapy in 172 hospital in-patients with documented non-valvular atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulant therapy was being considered. Patients expressed strong opinions regarding SPAF. We found that 12% of patients were "medication averse" and were not willing to consider antithrombotic therapy; even if it was 100% effective in preventing strokes. Of those patients who were willing to consider antithrombotic therapy, 42% were identified as "risk averse" and 15% were "risk tolerant". Patients required at least a 0.8% (NNT=125) annual absolute risk reduction and 15% relative risk reduction in the risk of stroke in order to agree to initiate antithrombotic therapy, and patients were willing to endure 4.4 major bleeds in order to prevent one stroke. In conclusion, there was a substantial amount of inter-patient variability, and often extreme differences in opinion regarding tolerance of bleeding risk in the context of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. These findings highlight the importance of considering patient preferences when deciding on SPAF therapy.

  18. Risk stratification of adult emergency department syncope patients to predict short-term serious outcomes after discharge (RiSEDS) study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    primary outcome) for robust identification of risk factors and clinical decision tool development. Discussion Once successfully developed, this tool will accurately risk-stratify adult syncope patients; however, validation and implementation will still be required. This program of research should lead to standardized care of syncope patients, and improve patient safety. PMID:24629180

  19. Unfavourable cardiovascular disease risk profiles in a cohort of Dutch and British haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Fransen van de Putte, Dietje E; Fischer, Kathelijn; Makris, Michael; Tait, R Campbell; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter W; Meijer, Karina; Roosendaal, Goris; Schutgens, Roger E G; Mauser-Bunschoten, Eveline P

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is reported to be decreased in haemophilia patients, but reports on the prevalence of CVD risk factors are conflicting. A cross-sectional assessment of CVD risk profiles was performed in a large cohort of haemophilia patients. Baseline data on CVD risk factors of 709 Dutch and UK haemophilia patients aged ≥30 years were analysed and compared with the general age-matched male population. CVD risk profiles were assessed using the QRISK®2-2011 and SCORE algorithms. Although QRISK® 2 was only validated in the UK, comparison with SCORE indicated similar properties of QRISK®2 in both Dutch and UK patients (correlation 0.86). Mean age was 49.8 years. Hypertension was more common in haemophilia patients than in the general population (49% vs. 40%), while the prevalences of obesity and hypercholesterolaemia were lower (15 vs. 20% and 44 vs. 68%, respectively), and those of diabetes and smoking were similar. The predicted 10-year QRISK®2 risk was significantly higher in haemophilia patients than in the general population (8.9 vs. 6.7%), indicating more unfavourable cardiovascular disease risk profiles. This increased risk became apparent after the age of 40 years. Our results indicate an increased prevalence of hypertension and overall more unfavourable CVD risk profiles in haemophilia patients compared with the general age-matched male population.

  20. Catastrophic thinking and increased risk for prescription opioid misuse in patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Martel, MO; Wasan, AD; Jamison, RN; Edwards, RR

    2013-01-01

    Background As a consequence of the substantial rise in the prescription of opioids for the treatment of chronic noncancer pain, greater attention has been paid to the factors that may be associated with an increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that patients with high levels of catastrophizing are at increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. Objective The primary objective of this study was to examine the variables that might underlie the association between catastrophizing and risk for prescription opioid misuse in patients with chronic pain. Methods Patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (n = 115) were asked to complete the SOAPP-R, a validated self-report questionnaire designed to identify patients at risk for prescription opioid misuse. Patients were also asked to complete self-report measures of pain intensity, catastrophizing, anxiety, and depression. Results Consistent with previous research, we found that catastrophizing was associated with an increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. Results also revealed that the association between catastrophizing and risk for opioid misuse was partially mediated by patients’ levels of anxiety. Follow-up analyses, however, indicated that catastrophizing remained a significant ‘unique’ predictor of risk for opioid misuse even when controlling for patients’ levels of pain severity, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Discussion Discussion addresses the factors that might place patients with high levels of catastrophizing at increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. The implications of our findings for the management of patients considered for opioid therapy are also discussed. PMID:23618767

  1. Patient- and cohort-specific dose and risk estimation for abdominopelvic CT: a study based on 100 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was twofold: (a) to estimate patient- and cohort-specific radiation dose and cancer risk index for abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) scans; (b) to evaluate the effects of patient anatomical characteristics (size, age, and gender) and CT scanner model on dose and risk conversion coefficients. The study included 100 patient models (42 pediatric models, 58 adult models) and multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which DLP-normalized-effective dose (k factor) and DLP-normalized-risk index values (q factor) were derived. The k factor showed exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For a given gender, q factor showed exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The discrepancies in k and q factors across scanners were on average 8% and 15%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of estimating patient-specific organ dose and cohort-specific effective dose and risk index in abdominopelvic CT requiring only the knowledge of patient size, gender, and age.

  2. [The assessment of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Chubirko, K I; Ivachevs'ka, V V; Hechko, M M; Chopeĭ, I V; Stan, M P; Koshelia, I I

    2014-01-01

    Article presents the result of assessmaent of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The results show the presence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with NAFLD, namely the increase of waist and hip circumferences compared with patients of the control group, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, decrease in apolipoprotein A1 (AroA1) compared to practically healthy people. PMID:25796862

  3. Number of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors and Mortality in Patients With First Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and outcomes of acute myocardial infarction in community practice. Objective To determine the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors in patients with first myocardial infarction and hospital mortality. Design Observational study from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction, 1994-2006. Patients We examined the presence and absence of 5 major traditional coronary heart disease risk factors (hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and family history of coronary heart disease) and hospital mortality among 542 008 patients with first myocardial infarction and without prior cardiovascular disease. Main Outcome Measure All-cause in-hospital mortality. Results A majority (85.6%) of patients who presented with initial myocardial infarction had at least 1 of the 5 coronary heart disease risk factors, and 14.4% had none of the 5 risk factors. Age varied inversely with the number of coronary heart disease risk factors, from a mean age of 71.5 years with 0 risk factors to 56.7 years with 5 risk factors (P for trend <.001). The total number of in-hospital deaths for all causes was 50 788. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were 14.9%, 10.9%, 7.9%, 5.3%, 4.2%, and 3.6% for patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. After adjusting for age and other clinical factors, there was an inverse association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and hospital mortality adjusted odds ratio (1.54; 95% CI, 1.23-1.94) among individuals with 0 vs 5 risk factors. This association was consistent among several age strata and important patient subgroups. Conclusion Among patients with incident acute myocardial infarction without prior cardiovascular disease, in-hospital mortality was inversely related to the number of coronary heart disease risk factors. PMID:22089719

  4. Carfilzomib significantly improves the progression-free survival of high-risk patients in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Rafael; Siegel, David; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Špička, Ivan; Masszi, Tamás; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Mihaylov, Georgi; Maisnar, Vladimír; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Wang, Michael; Niesvizky, Ruben; Oriol, Albert; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Minarik, Jiri; Palumbo, Antonio; Bensinger, William; Kukreti, Vishal; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stewart, A. Keith; Obreja, Mihaela; Moreau, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The presence of certain high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities, such as translocations (4;14) and (14;16) and deletion (17p), are known to have a negative impact on survival in multiple myeloma (MM). The phase 3 study ASPIRE (N = 792) demonstrated that progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly improved with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd), compared with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd) in relapsed MM. This preplanned subgroup analysis of ASPIRE was conducted to evaluate KRd vs Rd by baseline cytogenetics according to fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 417 patients with known cytogenetic risk status, 100 patients (24%) were categorized with high-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 48; Rd, n = 52) and 317 (76%) were categorized with standard-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 147; Rd, n = 170). For patients with high-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd resulted in a median PFS of 23.1 months, a 9-month improvement relative to treatment with Rd. For patients with standard-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd led to a 10-month improvement in median PFS vs Rd. The overall response rates for KRd vs Rd were 79.2% vs 59.6% (high-risk cytogenetics) and 91.2% vs 73.5% (standard-risk cytogenetics); approximately fivefold as many patients with high- or standard-risk cytogenetics achieved a complete response or better with KRd vs Rd (29.2% vs 5.8% and 38.1% vs 6.5%, respectively). KRd improved but did not abrogate the poor prognosis associated with high-risk cytogenetics. This regimen had a favorable benefit-risk profile in patients with relapsed MM, irrespective of cytogenetic risk status, and should be considered a standard of care in these patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01080391. PMID:27439911

  5. Carfilzomib significantly improves the progression-free survival of high-risk patients in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Fonseca, Rafael; Siegel, David; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Špička, Ivan; Masszi, Tamás; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Mihaylov, Georgi; Maisnar, Vladimír; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Wang, Michael; Niesvizky, Ruben; Oriol, Albert; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Minarik, Jiri; Palumbo, Antonio; Bensinger, William; Kukreti, Vishal; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stewart, A Keith; Obreja, Mihaela; Moreau, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The presence of certain high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities, such as translocations (4;14) and (14;16) and deletion (17p), are known to have a negative impact on survival in multiple myeloma (MM). The phase 3 study ASPIRE (N = 792) demonstrated that progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly improved with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd), compared with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd) in relapsed MM. This preplanned subgroup analysis of ASPIRE was conducted to evaluate KRd vs Rd by baseline cytogenetics according to fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 417 patients with known cytogenetic risk status, 100 patients (24%) were categorized with high-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 48; Rd, n = 52) and 317 (76%) were categorized with standard-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 147; Rd, n = 170). For patients with high-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd resulted in a median PFS of 23.1 months, a 9-month improvement relative to treatment with Rd. For patients with standard-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd led to a 10-month improvement in median PFS vs Rd. The overall response rates for KRd vs Rd were 79.2% vs 59.6% (high-risk cytogenetics) and 91.2% vs 73.5% (standard-risk cytogenetics); approximately fivefold as many patients with high- or standard-risk cytogenetics achieved a complete response or better with KRd vs Rd (29.2% vs 5.8% and 38.1% vs 6.5%, respectively). KRd improved but did not abrogate the poor prognosis associated with high-risk cytogenetics. This regimen had a favorable benefit-risk profile in patients with relapsed MM, irrespective of cytogenetic risk status, and should be considered a standard of care in these patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01080391. PMID:27439911

  6. Elastic Waves Green Functions For Stratified Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Ferreira, E. C.; Mauriz, P. W.

    Multiple scattering analysis of elastic waves propagating in a stratified medium is a powerful method to model seismic reflection signals, widely used in the exploration for oil and gas reservoirs. Reflection imaging and inversion method derive their exis- tence from the presence of singularities in the Earth's material properties that support the waves. Considering a Green's function formalism based on the {it frequency distri- bution} of the elastic wave spectra, we study their propagation within a model in which the Earth is treated as a stratified medium. The calculations are based on the linear response function approach, which is very convenient to deal with this kind of prob- lem. Both the displacement ({it space}) and the wavevector ({it space-time}) Green's functions are determined. A damping term gamma is included in a phenomenolog- ical way into the wavevector expression. In order to examine the waves' excitation, we also determine, by using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, their power spectra, which have many interesting properties.

  7. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward. PMID:26953963

  8. Mixing and Vorticity Structure in Stratified Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalena Matulka, Anna; Redondo, Jose M.

    2010-05-01

    Several series of experiments in stratified and in rotating/stratified decaying flows after a grid is used to stir the two layer stable fluid brine and fresh water set up. (Matulka 2009). We measure by comparing the gained potential energy with the available kinetic energy AKE, the relative efficiency of mixing. The experiments in stratified rotating flows with grid driven turbulence were both periodic (quasi stationary) and non-monotonic (decaying) forcing(Matulka et al. 2008). A complex Parameter Space Using Ri, Ro, Re is used to compare field, experimental and numerical observations on the mixing structure and Topology(Redondo 2004, Redondo et al 1996) of the Stratified Rotating Flows. The horizontal spectra changes appreciable with slopes from 1.1 to 5, but relevant to dispersion, vorticity and local circulation, not only the spectral slope is important, but also the initial topology and forcing of the AKE (in Elliptical, vortex core regions ) or in hyperbolic regions dominated by shear). Using multi-fractal geometry as well, we can establish now a theoretical pattern for the turbulence behavior that is reflected in the different descriptors (volume fraction, velocity and vorticity and thus obtain a certain classification relating D3 and the sum (integral) of the different fractal dimensions D2 for different levels of scalar (volume fraction intensity or temperature). Vorticity evolution is smoother and different than that of scalar or tracer density. The correlation between the local Ri and the fractal dimension detected from energy or entropy is good. Using multi-fractal geometry we can also establish certain regions of higher local activity used to establish the geometry of the turbulence mixing, that needs to be studied in detail when interpreting the complex balance between the direct 3D Kolmogorov type cascade and the Inverse 2D Kraichnan type cascade. A large collection of SAR images obtained from three European coastal areas (Gade and Redondo 1999

  9. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S M; Miles, T N; Seroka, G N; Xu, Y; Forney, R K; Yu, F; Roarty, H; Schofield, O; Kohut, J

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward. PMID:26953963

  10. Jet-mixing of initially stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stuart; Markides, Christos; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Low pipeline velocities in the oil-and-gas industry generally lead to liquid-liquid flows stratifying due to density differences. Pipeline stratified flows inherently have no single point for sub-sampling and phase slip leads to in situ phase fractions differing from input volume fractions. Establishing representative or average properties and phase fractions is therefore difficult for industry. This leads to sampling errors through measurement uncertainty. In-line mixing overcomes liquid-liquid stratification, establishing a liquid-liquid dispersion that minimises slip between phases. Here, we use jets-in-crossflow (JICF) as a means of mixing. We present results of CFD simulations using the volume-of- fluid method that demonstrate the breakup of stratification as a result of the application of JICF. A number of simple jet configurations are described, and their effectiveness in generating dispersions is compared. We also present preliminary experimental results based on the use of a matched-refractive-index method, laser-induced fluorescence, particle-tracking- and particle-image-velocimetry. Funding from Cameron for Ph.D. studentship (SW) gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Energy transfer in stably stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yoshifumi; Herring, Jackson

    2015-11-01

    Energy transfer in forced stable stratified turbulence is investigated using pseudo-spectral DNS of the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation with 10243 grid points. Making use of the Craya-Herring decomposition, the velocity field is decomposed into vortex (Φ1) and wave (Φ2) modes. To understand the anisotropy of stably stratified turbulence, the energy flues in terms of the spherical, the horizontal and the vertical wave numbers, are investigated for the total kinetic, Φ1, Φ2 energies, respectively. Among the three fluxes, the spherical and the horizontal look similar for strong stratification, and Φ1 flux shows a wave number region of constant value, which implies Kolmogorov's inertial range. The corresponding spectral power are, however, k - 5 / 2 for the spherical and k⊥- 5 / 3 for the horizontal cases. In contrast to these, the vertical energy fluxes show completely different features. We have observed the saturation spectrum E (kz) ~ CN2kz-3 for strong stratification as before, but the mechanism to produce this spectrum seems different from the Kolmogorov picture.

  12. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  13. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Glenn, S M; Miles, T N; Seroka, G N; Xu, Y; Forney, R K; Yu, F; Roarty, H; Schofield, O; Kohut, J

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  14. Non-genetic risk factors and their influence on the management of patients in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Teresa; Soto, Immaculada; Astermark, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The development of inhibitors is the most serious iatrogenic complication affecting patients with haemophilia. This complication is associated with impaired vital or functional prognosis, reduced quality of life and increased cost of treatment. The reasons why some patients develop antibodies to factor replacement and others do not remain unclear. It is however clear that inhibitor development results from a complex multifactorial interaction between genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Environmental influences implicated in increasing the risk of inhibitor formation can be viewed as modifiable risk factors. Therefore, identification of the non-genetic risk factors may offer the possibility of personalising haemophilia therapy by modifying treatment strategies in high-risk patients in the critical early phase of factor VIII exposure. In this article, we review the non-genetic factors reported as well as the potential impact of danger signals and the different scores for inhibitor development risk stratification.

  15. The ongoing risk assessment in the treatment of forensic patients on conditional release status.

    PubMed

    Wack, R C

    1993-01-01

    In New York State, patients who have been found not criminally responsible by reason of mental disease or defect, eventually become outpatients while still under the supervision of the courts. The treatment of these patients on outpatient orders of condition poses special problems. Treatment needs to center on the issues related to patient's potential for harmful/violent behavior. Therefore, outpatient clinicians need to conduct periodic risk assessments and must continuously monitor identified risk indicators. The author outlines steps for information gathering and evaluation necessary for risk assessment. Treatment of these patients is conceptualized as ongoing clinical risk identification and management. It is framed by a treatment contract that integrates mandates of the Orders of Conditions with information gathered through ongoing risk assessments and spells out legal and other consequences that may arise from non-compliance.

  16. Increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability in patients at risk for adult respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.; Ehlers, N.A.; Hurst, J.M.

    1987-04-01

    Two methods for predicting adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were evaluated prospectively in a group of 81 multitrauma and sepsis patients considered at clinical high risk. A popular ARDS risk-scoring method, employing discriminant analysis equations (weighted risk criteria and oxygenation characteristics), yielded a predictive accuracy of 59% and a false-negative rate of 22%. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was determined with a radioaerosol lung-scan technique in 23 of these 81 patients, representing a statistically similar subgroup. Lung scanning achieved a predictive accuracy of 71% (after excluding patients with unilateral pulmonary contusion) and gave no false-negatives. We propose a combination of clinical risk identification and functional determination of PACP to assess a patient's risk of developing ARDS.

  17. Dry Eye Syndrome Risks in Patients With Fibromyalgia: A National Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Hsien; Yang, Tse-Yen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Ming; Kuo, Chia-Nan; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of fibromyalgia (FM) and dry eye syndrome (DES) has been previously reported. However, there are few studies on how patients with FM may develop concomitant DES. Patients with chronic widespread pain, like FM, chronic fatigue syndrome, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), was concerned for the rheumatic or psychosomatic disorders which might adequately reflect the long-term risk of DES. We retrieved data on FM patients from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan covering the years 2000 to 2011. Our FM population consisted of 25,777 patients versus 103,108 patients in the non-FM group: the overall incidence of DES in these populations was 7.37/10,000 and 4.81/10,000, respectively. Male FM patients had a higher incidence of DES, with a 1.39-fold DES risk for males and a 1.45-fold for females after adjustment for confounding factor. Notably, FM patients aged ≤49 years had an elevated 80% risk of DES compared with the non-FM group. Without comorbidities, FM patients had an approximately 1.40-fold risk of DES than those without FM. The additive effects of FM and IBS or FM and sleep disturbance were pointed out that the risk for DES would be elevated when the FM patients with IBS or sleep disturbance. FM patients have a higher incidence of DES than that of non-FM patients. They carry long-term DES risks from a relatively young age, particularly those with psychiatric problems. Risk stratification for a timely psychiatric medication intervention and risk modifications are not intended.

  18. High Risk of Depressive Disorders in Patients With Gout: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Changchien, Te-Chang; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic abnormalities are common in patients with depressive disorders. However, the relationship between gout and depression is unclear. We explored the causal relationship among gout, antigout medication, and the associated risk of incidental depressive disorders.In this nationwide cohort study, we sampled data from the National Health Insurance Research Database to recruit 34,050 patients with gout as the gout cohort and 68,100 controls (without gout) as the nongout cohort. Our primary endpoint was the diagnosis of depressive disorders during follow-up. The overall study population was followed up until depression diagnosis, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of the study. The differences in demographic and clinical characteristics between both cohorts were determined using the Chi-square test for categorical variables and the t-test for continuous variables. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the effect of gout on the risk of depression, represented using the hazard ratio with the 95% confidence interval.Patients with gout exhibited a higher risk of depressive disorders than controls did. The risk of depressive disorders increased with age and was higher in female patients and those with hypertension, stroke, and coronary artery disease. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug and prednisolone use was associated with a reduced risk of depression. Patients with gout who had received antigout medication exhibited a reduced risk of depressive disorders compared with nongout patients.Our findings support that gout increases the risk of depressive disorders, and that antigout medication use reduces the risk.

  19. How do dental students determine patients' caries risk level using the Caries Management By Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) system?

    PubMed

    Doméjean, Sophie; Léger, Stéphanie; Rechmann, Peter; White, Joel M; Featherstone, John D B

    2015-03-01

    Research has demonstrated the validation of specific caries risk assessment (CRA) systems, but little is known about how dental practitioners assign a caries risk level to their patients. The aim of this study was to explore dental students' decision making in caries risk assignment when using the Caries Management By Risk Assessment (CAMBRA) system. Multiple correspondence analysis and chi-squared automated interaction detector analysis were performed on data collected retrospectively for a period of six years (2003-09) at the University of California, San Francisco predoctoral dental clinic. The study population consisted of 12,952 patients from six years of age through adult who received a baseline CRA during the period, were new to CAMBRA, and had not received any prior CAMBRA recommendations. The results showed variation in decision making and risk level assignment, illustrated by the range of percentages for the three scores (low, moderate, and high/extreme caries risk) when CRA was assigned for the first time. For those first-time CRAs, decision making was mainly based on four factors: cavities or caries lesions into dentin on radiograph, restorations during the last three years due to caries, visible heavy plaque, and interproximal lesions into enamel (by radiographs). This study's findings provide important data regarding one group of CAMBRA users and thus contribute to the development of knowledge about the implementation of caries risk assessment in contemporary dental practice. PMID:25729021

  20. Long-term (60-month) results for the implantable miniature telescope: efficacy and safety outcomes stratified by age in patients with end-stage age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, David; Freund, K Bailey; Regillo, Carl; Levy, Marc H; Garg, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of an implantable miniature telescope (IMT) in patients with bilateral, end-stage, age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods A prospective, open-label, multicenter clinical trial with fellow eye controls enrolled 217 patients (mean age 76 years) with AMD and moderate-to-profound bilateral central visual acuity loss (20/80–20/800) resulting from untreatable geographic atrophy, disciform scars, or both. A subgroup analysis was performed with stratification for age (patient age 65 to <75 years [group 1; n=70] and patient age ≥75 years [group 2; n=127]), with a comparative evaluation of change in best-corrected distance visual acuity (BCDVA), quality of life, ocular complications from surgery, adverse events, and endothelial cell density (ECD). Follow-up in an extension study was 60 months. Results Data were available for 22, 38, and 31 patients in group 1 and 42, 46, and 32 patients in group 2 at 36, 48, and 60 months, respectively. Mean BCDVA improvement from baseline to 60 months was 2.41±2.69 lines in all patients (n=76), with 2.64±2.55 lines in group 1 and 2.09±2.88 lines in group 2. Quality of life scores were significantly higher in group 1. The most common significant surgery-related ocular complications in group 1 were iritis >30 days after surgery (7/70; 10%) and persistent corneal edema (3/70; 4.3%); and in group 2 were a decrease in BCDVA in the implanted eye or IMT removal (10/127 each; 7.9%), corneal edema >30 days after surgery (9/127; 7.1%), and persistent corneal edema (6/127; 4.7%). Significant adverse events included four corneal transplants, comprising two (2.9%) in group 1 and two (1.6%) in group 2. At 60 months, one patient in group 1 (3.2%) and three patients in group 2 (9.4%) had lost ≥2 lines of vision. The IMT was removed in one (1.4%) and ten (7.9%) patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Mean ECD loss was 20% at 3 months. Chronic loss was 3% per

  1. Calculated Risk Taking in the Treatment of Suicidal Patients: Ethical and Legal Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltsberger, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses discharge of suicidal patients from inpatient care from both economic and ethical perspectives. Suggests that clinicians must exercise prudence in discharging patients unlikely to recover, considering duty to preserve life. Encourages discharge when benefits outweigh risks, with careful preparation of patient and family and meticulous…

  2. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  3. A systematic review of patient-related risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Perera, Marlon; Pretorius, Casper

    2015-10-01

    To identify patient-related risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) or peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). We performed a systematic review of the literature assessing patient-related risk factors for thrombosis related to CVC or PICC. The databases PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library were searched for observational studies pertaining to patient-related risk factors for CVC and PICC-related thrombosis. The initial search through PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library yielded 516 results. After 71 duplicates were removed, 445 articles were assessed for eligibility based on title and abstract. Four hundred and eleven articles were then excluded and 33 full text articles were manually assessed for eligibility. Eight articles were eliminated as they did not contain content relevant to the review. Twenty-five studies were then selected to assess 20 risk factors. There were no consistent significant associations for catheter-related thrombosis across the twenty-five studies. Multiple studies identified age, malignancy, diabetes, obesity, chemotherapy, thrombophilia and a history of thrombosis as significant risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis. Inconsistent findings among studies make it difficult to establish which patient-related risk factors are associated with catheter-related thrombosis. Future studies could include larger sample sizes and more cases of catheter-related thrombosis to produce more significant results. Identification of patient-related risk factors could lead to early recognition of upper limb deep vein thrombosis in patients with catheters, thereby preventing complications.

  4. Asymptomatic pulmonary embolism: a common event in high risk patients

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.W.; Eikman, E.A.; Greenberg, S.

    1982-03-01

    Ventilation and perfusion lung scans were obtained before and at weekly intervals following hip surgery or major amputation in 158 patients. Pulmonary arteriograms were obtained in 21 of 33 patients developing perfusion patterns strongly suggesting embolism; 19 of the 21 arteriograms demonstrated pulmonary embolism. From autopsy and clinical data, 36 patients were diagnosed as having an embolus while under study, and 12 patients were suspected of having had an embolus during their illness but prior to entry into the study. Only four of these 48 patients experienced symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism. We conclude that asymptomatic pulmonary embolism is a common event in the populations studied.

  5. Increased Risk of Stroke in Patients With Fibromyalgia: A Population-BASED Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Neuropsychiatric diseases might enhance stroke development, possibly through inflammation and atherosclerosis. Approximately 25% to 40% of patients with stroke, largely younger patients, are not associated with any conventional stroke risk factors. In this research, we explored whether fibromyalgia (FM), a neuropsychosomatic disorder, increases stroke risk.From a claims dataset with one million enrollees sourced of the Taiwan National Health Insurance database, we selected 47,279 patients with FM and randomly selected 189,112 age- and sex-matched controls within a 3-year period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. Stroke risk was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression.Comorbidities associated with increased stroke risk, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis, were more prevalent in patients with FM and high stroke risk than in the controls. The overall stroke risk was 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.30) higher in the FM group than in the non-FM group. Even without comorbidities, stroke risk was higher in patients with FM than in the controls (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.35-1.53, P < 0.001). The relative risk of stroke was 2.26-fold between FM and non-FM groups in younger patients (age <35 years, 95% CI: 1.86-2.75).This is the first investigation associating FM with an increased risk of stroke development. The outcomes imply that FM is a significant risk factor for stroke and that patients with FM, particularly younger patients, require close attention and rigorous measures for preventing stroke.

  6. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer in High Risk Patients: Is Percutaneous Drainage Justified?

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Gad, Mohammad A; Ellabban, Gouda M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Conservative treatment was recommended as the treatment of choice in perforated acute peptic ulcer. Here, we adjunct percutaneous peritoneal drainage with nonoperative conservative treatment in high risk elderly patients with perforated duodenal ulcer. Aim: The work was to study the efficacy of percutaneous peritoneal drainage under local anesthesia supported by conservative measures in high risk elderly patients, according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists grading, with perforated duodenal ulcer. Patients and Methods: Twenty four high risk patients with age >65 years having associated medical illness with evidence of perforated duodenal ulcer. Results: The overall morbidity and mortality were comparable with those treated by conservative measures alone. Conclusion: In high risk patients with perforated peptic ulcer and established peritonitis, percutaneous peritoneal drainage under local anesthesia seems to be effective with least operative trauma and mortality rate. PMID:22393546

  7. Which screening method is appropriate for older cancer patients at risk for malnutrition?

    PubMed

    Isenring, Elizabeth; Elia, Marinos

    2015-04-01

    The risk for malnutrition increases with age and presence of cancer, and it is particularly common in older cancer patients. A range of simple and validated nutrition screening tools can be used to identify malnutrition risk in cancer patients (e.g., Malnutrition Screening Tool, Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form Revised, Nutrition Risk Screening, and the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool). Unintentional weight loss and current body mass index are common components of screening tools. Patients with cancer should be screened at diagnosis, on admission to hospitals or care homes, and during follow-up at outpatient or general practitioner clinics, at regular intervals depending on clinical status. Nutritional assessment is a comprehensive assessment of dietary intake, anthropometrics, and physical examination often conducted by dietitians or geriatricians after simple screening has identified at-risk patients. The result of nutritional screening, assessment and the associated care plans should be documented, and communicated, within and between care settings for best patient outcomes.

  8. [Medico-social aspects of risk factors impairing quality of life in patients with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Beghi, E; Gromov, S A; Lipatova, L V; Mikhaĭlov, V A

    2002-01-01

    The results of 2-year multicenter project "Epilepsy, risk factors and insurance" organized by Epilepsy European Commission, on risk factors deteriorating quality of life of epileptic patients in 9 European countries (Italy, Germany, Spain, Netherlands, England, Portugal, Estonia, Russia and Slovenia), have been used in the study. The "patient-control" pairs were matched for various features characterizing social aspects of epileptic patient's life (educational level, professional level and employment, marital status, driving abilities, sports, medical insurance) as well as medical events (concomitant diseases, medical complications, seizures, frequency of accidents, hospitalization, disablement indices, etc). Patients at low and high risk for quality of life impairment were defined. In Russia, the rate of these risk factors in epileptic patients corresponds in general to that in other European countries.

  9. [Assessment of surgical risk in patients with lower limb chronic critical ischaemia].

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Iu I; Lukin, I B; Sokolova, N Iu; Strakhov, M A

    2016-01-01

    Analysed herein are both immediate and remote results of surgical treatment of 93 patients presenting with chronic atherosclerotic occlusion of the femoral-popliteal-tibial segment in the stage of critical ischaemia. The patients were subjected to autovenous femoropopliteal bypass grafting to the isolated arterial segment or balloon angioplasty with stenting of the superficial femoral artery. While choosing the method of arterial reconstruction we assessed concomitant diseases, primarily lesions of the coronary and cerebral circulation. In order to objectively evaluate the patient state, we worked out a scale for assessing surgical risk. Survival rate without amputation after three years in patients with low risk amounted to 71.4%, in those with moderate risk to 60.0%, and in high-risk patients to 43.3%. Patients with initially high risk were found to have a high incidence rate of cardiac and cerebrovascular complications, exceeding 40%. It was shown that the worked out system of assessing the level of surgical risk objectively reflects the prognosis of patient survival following a reconstructive operation. This system of assessment may be appropriate while choosing an optimal method of arterial reconstruction (bypassing operation or endovascular intervention) in patients with atherosclerotic lesions of arteries of the femoropopliteal-tibial segment and critical ischaemia accompanied by severe concomitant pathology. Patients with high surgical risk should preferably be subjected to endovascular reconstruction, while those with low surgical risk should better undergo open shunting bypassing operation, and for those with moderate risk it is acceptable to perform both methods of arterial reconstruction. PMID:27626262

  10. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients.

  11. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients. PMID:20135072

  12. Prolonged bradycardia, asystole and outcome of high spinal cord injury patients: Risk factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; Rhaman, M. A.; Raza, Ali; Shabana, Adel; Malstrom, Mahommad Faisal; Al-Sulaiti, Ghanem

    2016-01-01

    Background: High spinal cord injury (HSCI) is one of the devastating traumatic injuries. 80% of these patients are young male, and 93% will have major neurological disabilities. There is a paucity of literature about prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. The aim of this study was to know the prevalence, risk factors, precipitating factors for prolonged bradycardia in the HSCI patients. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital, with spinal cord injury above level of dorsal (D4) were enrolled in this study prospectively. Patient's demographic data, mechanism, level and type of spinal injury, associated injuries, injury severity score (ISS), spinal shock, vasopressors used, time of occurrence of bradycardia, treatment for bradycardia, precipitating as well as risk factors and outcome were recorded. Results: During the study period, a total of 138 patients were admitted to the ICU with HSCI. Majority of patients were male. The most frequently associated injury in these patients was skeletal fractures (38.4%). Most common complication was pneumonia 56 (41%). Forty-five (33%) of the total patients had prolonged bradycardia; 87% of these patients had pneumonia when bradycardia occurred. 53.4% had cardiac asystole. 29 (21%) patients had bradycardia at the time of endotracheal suctioning, whereas 27 (20%) patients developed bradycardia at the time of positioning. Majority of the patients were managed conservatively. Those HSCI patients who developed prolonged bradycardia, their ISS score was statistically higher, ICU and hospital stay was significantly higher compared with those HSCI patient who did not have prolonged bradycardia. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypotension on admission; pneumonia, and tracheostomy were risk factors for the development of prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. Conclusion: Prolonged bradycardia was associated with significantly higher incidence of asystole

  13. Prolonged bradycardia, asystole and outcome of high spinal cord injury patients: Risk factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; Rhaman, M. A.; Raza, Ali; Shabana, Adel; Malstrom, Mahommad Faisal; Al-Sulaiti, Ghanem

    2016-01-01

    Background: High spinal cord injury (HSCI) is one of the devastating traumatic injuries. 80% of these patients are young male, and 93% will have major neurological disabilities. There is a paucity of literature about prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. The aim of this study was to know the prevalence, risk factors, precipitating factors for prolonged bradycardia in the HSCI patients. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital, with spinal cord injury above level of dorsal (D4) were enrolled in this study prospectively. Patient's demographic data, mechanism, level and type of spinal injury, associated injuries, injury severity score (ISS), spinal shock, vasopressors used, time of occurrence of bradycardia, treatment for bradycardia, precipitating as well as risk factors and outcome were recorded. Results: During the study period, a total of 138 patients were admitted to the ICU with HSCI. Majority of patients were male. The most frequently associated injury in these patients was skeletal fractures (38.4%). Most common complication was pneumonia 56 (41%). Forty-five (33%) of the total patients had prolonged bradycardia; 87% of these patients had pneumonia when bradycardia occurred. 53.4% had cardiac asystole. 29 (21%) patients had bradycardia at the time of endotracheal suctioning, whereas 27 (20%) patients developed bradycardia at the time of positioning. Majority of the patients were managed conservatively. Those HSCI patients who developed prolonged bradycardia, their ISS score was statistically higher, ICU and hospital stay was significantly higher compared with those HSCI patient who did not have prolonged bradycardia. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypotension on admission; pneumonia, and tracheostomy were risk factors for the development of prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. Conclusion: Prolonged bradycardia was associated with significantly higher incidence of asystole

  14. Cardiovascular risk factor control is insufficient in young patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Jensen, Jesper Møller; Brøndberg, Anders Krogh; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf

    2016-01-01

    Background Control of cardiovascular risk factor is important in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is unknown whether treatment targets are achieved in young patients. We aimed to examine the prevalence and control of risk factors in this subset of patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, single-center study on patients with documented CAD before age 40. All patients treated between 2002 and 2014 were invited to participate at least 6 months after the last coronary intervention. We included 143 patients and recorded the family history of cardiovascular disease, physical activity level, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, metabolic status, and current medical therapy. Risk factor control and treatment targets were evaluated according to the shared guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology. Results The most common insufficiently controlled risk factors were overweight (113 [79.0%]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol above target (77 [57.9%]), low physical activity level (78 [54.6%]), hypertriglyceridemia (67 [46.9%]), and current smoking (53 [37.1%]). Almost one-half of the patients fulfilled the criteria of metabolic syndrome. The median (interquartile range) number of uncontrolled modifiable risk factors was 2 (2;4) and only seven (4.9%) patients fulfilled all modifiable health measure targets. Conclusion Among the youngest patients with CAD, there remains a potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile. PMID:27307744

  15. Left atrial size and risk of stroke in patients in sinus rhythm. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Overvad, Thure Filskov; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Søgaard, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the risk of stroke associated with left atrial enlargement in patients in sinus rhythm, and whether such patients may have an unmet need for thromboprophylaxis. In this systematic review we summarise the existing evidence concerning left atrial size and risk of stroke in patients in sinus rhythm. Nine cohort studies were identified, analysing a total of 67,875 participants and 3,093 stroke outcomes. Rates of stroke per 100 person-years in patients with left atrial enlargement and in sinus rhythm ranged from 0.59 in a population-based cohort to 2.06 in patients referred for echocardiography. All studies reported a higher risk of stroke with larger/enlarged left atrium compared to smaller/normal sized left atrium. Two studies found indications of modification by sex, with only positive associations observed in women. Left atrial enlargement may represent an important predictor of stroke across a variety of patient populations in sinus rhythm. The underlying aetiology explaining this observed higher risk is likely to be multifactorial and not confined to a potential direct effect of left atrial enlargement on thromboembolic risk. Formal stroke risk stratification among patients with left atrial enlargement may further help identify patients who stand to gain from preventive antithrombotic therapy.

  16. Entrainment and mixing in stratified shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strang, Eric James

    1997-12-01

    The results of a laboratory experiment designed to study turbulent entrainment at sheared density interfaces are described. In the parameter ranges investigated the entrainment problem is mainly determined by two parameters, the bulk Richardson number RiB = /Delta bD//Delta U2 and the frequency ratio fN = ND//Delta U. When RiB > 1.5, the buoyancy effects play a governing role, whence interfacial instabilities locally mix heavy and light fluids. The nature of interfacial instabilities is governed by RiB or a related quantity, the mean local gradient Richardson number /overline [Ri]g=/overline [N(z)]2/(/overline[/partial u//partial z)]2, where N(z) is the Brunt-Vaisala frequency local to the interface. When RiB < 5 (or /overline [Rig] < 1), the interfacial mixing is dominated by Kelvin- Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities. Interfacial swelling as a result of the collective breakdown of K-H billows into turbulence persists for a time dictated by the rates of local generation and removal of mixed fluid, and the two processes appear to be coadjutant (with a maximum flux Richardson number or mixing efficiency of Rif ~ 0.15-0.4) when RiB≃ 3-5. At RiB~ 5, the K-H regime transitions to a new regime wherein the interface is dominated by interfacial/Holmboe wave instabilities. Here, the entrainment rates are much smaller and there is no evidence of interfacial swelling. In the K-H regime, the swelling of the interface introduces its own forcing time scale, which excites and radiates internal waves in the lower layer if it is continuously stratified. Consequently, the amount of energy available for entrainment decreases and, depending on fN, the entrainment velocities in the linearly stratified case can be substantially smaller than the two-layer case (up to 50%). In the interfacial/Holmboe wave breaking regime, internal wave radiation to the bottom layer is much smaller, so as the difference in entrainment rates of the two-layer and linearly stratified cases. Furthermore, when Ri

  17. The influence of hamstring autograft size on patient reported outcomes and risk of revision following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A MOON cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Flanigan, David C.; Mitchell, Joshua; Pedroza, Angela D.; Jones, Morgan H.; Andrish, Jack T.; Parker, Richard D.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Magnussen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of graft size on patient-reported outcomes and revision risk following ACL reconstruction. Methods A retrospective chart review of prospectively collected cohort data, 263 of 320 consecutive patients (82.2%) undergoing primary ACL reconstruction with hamstring autograft were evaluated. Graft size, femoral tunnel drilling technique, patient age, sex, and BMI at the time of ACL reconstruction, pre-operative and 2-year post-operative KOOS and IKDC scores, and whether each patient underwent revision ACL reconstruction during the 2 year follow-up period were recorded. Revision was used as a marker for graft failure. The relationship between graft size and patient-reported outcomes was determined by multiple linear regression. The relationship between graft size and risk of revision was determined by dichotomizing graft size at 8mm and stratifying by age. Results After controlling for age, sex, operative side, surgeon, BMI, graft choice, and femoral tunnel drilling technique, a 1 mm increased in graft size was noted to correlate with 3.3-point increase in the KOOS-pain subscale (p = 0.003), a 2.0-point increased in the KOOS activities of daily living subscale (p = 0.034), a 5.2-point increase in the KOOS-sport/recreation function subscale (p = 0.004), and a 3.4-point increase in the subjective IKDC score (p = 0.026). Revision was required in 0 of 64 patients (0.0%) with grafts greater than 8mm in diameter and 14 of 199 patients (7.0%) with 8 mm or smaller grafts (p = 0.037). Among patients age 18 and under, revision was required in 0 of 14 patients (0.0%) with grafts greater than 8mm in diameter and 13 of 71 patients (18.3 %) with 8 mm or smaller grafts. Conclusions Smaller hamstring autograft size is a predictor of poorer KOOS Sport and Recreation function 2 years following primary ACL reconstruction. Larger sample size is required to confirm the relationship between graft size and risk of revision ACL

  18. Injury Risk Spikes While Cancer Patients Seek Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical and drug therapy complications, accidents and self-harm To use the sharing features on this page, ... 8,300 injuries from accidents or intentional self-harm, the study findings showed. The risk for medical- ...

  19. The clinical benefits, ethics, and economics of stratified medicine and companion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Trusheim, Mark R; Berndt, Ernst R

    2015-12-01

    The stratified medicine companion diagnostic (CDx) cut-off decision integrates scientific, clinical, ethical, and commercial considerations, and determines its value to developers, providers, payers, and patients. Competition already sharpens these issues in oncology, and might soon do the same for emerging stratified medicines in autoimmune, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, respiratory, and other conditions. Of 53 oncology targets with a launched therapeutic, 44 have competing therapeutics. Only 12 of 141 Phase III candidates addressing new targets face no competition. CDx choices might alter competitive positions and reimbursement. Under current diagnostic incentives, payers see novel stratified medicines that improve public health and increase costs, but do not observe companion diagnostics for legacy treatments that would reduce costs. It would be in the interests of payers to rediscover their heritage of direct investment in diagnostic development. PMID:26542060

  20. Dental implants in patients at high risk for infective endocarditis: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Findler, M; Chackartchi, T; Regev, E

    2014-10-01

    The safety of dental implant placement in patients at high risk for infective endocarditis (IE) has never been shown. The outcome of osseointegrated implants in patients with artificial heart valves or with a history of an infected valve is not known. In this article we describe our experience of dental implant placement in patients at high risk for IE. A retrospective study was conducted on patients at high risk for IE who underwent dental implant placement. All the patients received prophylactic antibiotic treatment before the surgical procedure, in accordance with the relevant American Heart Association guidelines. A total 13 patients underwent 16 surgical procedures for the placement of 57 dental implants over a period of 17 years. Within the follow-up period, no case of IE was reported. Two implants failed before exposure in one patient, one patient suffered from mitral valve thrombosis 14 days after the dental procedure, and another patient suffered a stroke 6 months following treatment. Despite the limitation of the small group of patients and the known low incidence of IE, dental implants may be regarded as a legitimate procedure for patients at high risk for IE. PMID:24893765

  1. [Corruption risks in relations between doctor and patient ].

    PubMed

    Kolwitz, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the problem of corruption occurring in the relationship between doctor and patient. The doctor-patient relationship, including the provision of health services, is one of several potential areas of corruption in the health care system. Among the reasons for the existence of corruption in these relationships are the need to obtain better healthcare for the patient, and higher earnings in the case of a doctor. Indications of corruption are utilitarian (action for personal advantage without ethical aspects), but may also be (actually or in the patient's opinion) the only way to obtain services and save health and even life. Corruption between the doctor and the patient can be limited by better organization of the health care system, including the financing of benefits and education of medical personnel and patients, as well as traditional legal measures, such as prevention or the application of criminal sanctions. PMID:25518104

  2. [Corruption risks in relations between doctor and patient ].

    PubMed

    Kolwitz, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the problem of corruption occurring in the relationship between doctor and patient. The doctor-patient relationship, including the provision of health services, is one of several potential areas of corruption in the health care system. Among the reasons for the existence of corruption in these relationships are the need to obtain better healthcare for the patient, and higher earnings in the case of a doctor. Indications of corruption are utilitarian (action for personal advantage without ethical aspects), but may also be (actually or in the patient's opinion) the only way to obtain services and save health and even life. Corruption between the doctor and the patient can be limited by better organization of the health care system, including the financing of benefits and education of medical personnel and patients, as well as traditional legal measures, such as prevention or the application of criminal sanctions.

  3. The potential of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for risk stratification of asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Bonow, Robert O; Tschöpe, Diethelm; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Barrett, Eugene

    2006-08-15

    Patients with diabetes, in particular patients with type 2 diabetes, are at a 2- to 4-fold higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with their nondiabetic peers. Patients with diabetes are also more likely to have silent ischemia and less likely to survive a myocardial infarction than nondiabetic patients. Recent studies with electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) have shown that subclinical atherosclerosis is common in patients with diabetes, and studies with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (with single-photon emission computed tomography) or stress echocardiography have demonstrated that between 25% and 50% of asymptomatic diabetic patients have ischemia during exercise or pharmacological stress and that a substantial proportion of these patients go on to develop major cardiovascular events within several years. Clearly, asymptomatic diabetic patients include a subset of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease who would benefit from improved risk stratification beyond that possible with risk factor scoring systems alone. Single-photon emission computed tomography, stress echocardiography, and possibly EBCT or multi-slice computed tomography, are emerging as valuable diagnostic tools for identifying asymptomatic diabetic patients who might require early and aggressive intervention to manage their cardiovascular risk. PMID:16904545

  4. Risk factors for osteoporosis in female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Di Munno, O; Mazzantini, M; Delle Sedie, A; Mosca, M; Bombardieri, S

    2004-01-01

    In the last years it has been recognized that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at high risk of osteoporosis (OP) and fractures, both occurring through disease-specific (chronic arthritis, reduced physical activity, induction of cytokines promoting bone resorption, renal impairment, endocrine factors) and nondisease-specific mechanisms (sunshine avoidance with consequent vitamin D deficiency, glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants and chronic anticoagulants). Regarding anticoagulants, subcutaneous heparin is crucial against the risk of recurrent thromboembolism or pregnancy loss, specifically in patients with SLE and anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). Thus heparin-induced OP represents one of the hazards of this treatment, first because heparin must be used long-term and secondly because pregnancy and lactation themselves may predispose to OP and fractures. Current data suggest the use of prophylaxis with calcium and vitamin D in all patients treated with heparin during pregnancy. Nevertheless glucocorticoid-induced OP (GIOP) is considered the most serious risk factor for OP and fractures in SLE patients. All guidelines recommend general measures and supplementation with calcium and vitamin D in all patients. However when considering premenopausal patients, there is no generally recommended treatment. Bisphosphonates, which are considered the first choice therapy for the prevention and treatment of GIOP, should be used 'cautiously' in these patients. Therefore the potential risks and lack of efficacy data on fracture risk reduction in premenopausal patients must be weighed against their proven efficacy in postmenopausal patients.

  5. Monte Carlo stratified source-sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.; Gelbard, E.M.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995, at a conference on criticality safety, a special session was devoted to the Monte Carlo {open_quotes}eigenvalue of the world{close_quotes} problem. Argonne presented a paper, at that session, in which the anomalies originally observed in that problem were reproduced in a much simplified model-problem configuration, and removed by a version of stratified source-sampling. The original test-problem was treated by a special code designed specifically for that purpose. Recently ANL started work on a method for dealing with more realistic eigenvalue of the world configurations, and has been incorporating this method into VIM. The original method has been modified to take into account real-world statistical noise sources not included in the model problem. This paper constitutes a status report on work still in progress.

  6. Spectral calculations in stably stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Kishore; Nandy, Malay K

    2014-12-01

    We perform a Leslie-type perturbative treatment on stably stratified turbulence with Boussinesq approximation, where the buoyancy terms in the corresponding dynamical equations are treated as perturbations against the isotropic background fields. Thus we calculate the anisotropic corrections to various correlation functions, namely, velocity-velocity, temperature-temperature, and velocity-temperature correlations, up to second order in this scheme. We find that the prefactors associated with the anisotropic corrections depend on the energy flux, scalar flux, Kolmogorov constant, Batchelor constant, and the eddy-damping amplitudes. The correlation functions further yield the anisotropic parts of the energy and mean-square temperature spectra as k(-3) and the anisotropic buoyancy spectrum as k(-7/3). The resulting angle-dependent energy density is found to be concentrated predominantly around the vertical wave vector signifying layered structures in the physical space. PMID:25615193

  7. Emergence of helicity in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Mininni, Pablo D.; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2013-03-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying rotating stratified turbulence and show, in the Boussinesq framework, that helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation), as observed in supercell storms and hurricanes, is spontaneously created due to an interplay between buoyancy and rotation common to large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Helicity emerges from the joint action of eddies and of inertia-gravity waves (with inertia and gravity with respective associated frequencies f and N), and it occurs when the waves are sufficiently strong. For N/f<3 the amount of helicity produced is correctly predicted by a quasilinear balance equation. Outside this regime, and up to the highest Reynolds number obtained in this study, namely Re≈10000, helicity production is found to be persistent for N/f as large as ≈17, and for ReFr2 and ReRo2, respectively, as large as ≈100 and ≈24000.

  8. Domain Growth Kinetics in Stratifying Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are μ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. We experimentally elucidate the influence of these different driving forces, and confinement on drainage kinetics of horizontal stratifying foam films. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. Quantitative characterization of domain growth visualized in a using Scheludko-type thin film cell and a theoretical model based on lubrication analysis, provide critical insights into hydrodynamics of thin foam films, and the strength and nature of surface forces, including supramolecular oscillatory structural forces.

  9. On turbulence in a stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sutanu

    2015-11-01

    John Lumley, motivated by atmospheric observations, made seminal contributions to the statistical theory (Lumley and Panofsky 1964, Lumley 1964) and second-order modeling (Zeman and Lumley 1976) of turbulence in the environment. Turbulent processes in the ocean share many features with the atmosphere, e.g., shear, stratification, rotation and rough topography. Results from direct and large eddy simulations of two model problems will be used to illustrate some of the features of turbulence in a stratified environment. The first problem concerns a shear layer in nonuniform stratification, a situation typical of both the atmosphere and the ocean. The second problem, considered to be responsible for much of the turbulent mixing that occurs in the ocean interior, concerns topographically generated internal gravity waves. Connections will be made to data taken during observational campaigns in the ocean.

  10. Direct multiangle solution for poorly stratified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Vladimir; Wold, Cyle; Petkov, Alexander; Hao, Wei Min

    2012-09-01

    The direct multiangle solution is considered, which allows improving the scanning lidar-data-inversion accuracy when the requirement of the horizontally stratified atmosphere is poorly met. The signal measured at zenith or close to zenith is used as a core source for extracting optical characteristics of the atmospheric aerosol loading. The multiangle signals are used as auxiliary data to extract the vertical transmittance profile from the zenith signal. Details of the retrieval methodology are considered that eliminate, or at least soften, some specific ambiguities in the multiangle measurements in horizontally heterogeneous atmospheres. Simulated and experimental elastic lidar data are presented that illustrate the essentials of the data-processing technique. Finally, the prospects of the utilization of high-spectral-resolution lidar in the multiangle mode are discussed. PMID:22945162

  11. Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Kutter, E.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of stably stratified canopy flows in complex terrain are investigated by employing the Renormalized Group (RNG) k-ɛ turbulence model. In this two-dimensional simulation, we imposed persistent constant heat flux at ground surface and linearly increasing cooling rate in the upper canopy layer, vertically varying dissipative force from canopy drag elements, buoyancy forcing induced from thermal stratification and the hill terrain. These strong boundary effects keep nonlinearity in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations high enough to generate turbulent behavior. The fundamental characteristics of nighttime canopy flow over complex terrain measured by a few multi-tower advection experiments can be produced by this numerical simulation, such as: (1) unstable layer in the canopy, (2) super-stable layer associated with flow decoupling in deep canopy and near the top of canopy, (3) upward momentum transfer in canopy, and (4) large buoyancy suppression and weak shear production in strong stability.

  12. Atomic force microscopy as a tool to evaluate the risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Ana Filipa; Carvalho, Filomena A.; Malho, Inês; Lousada, Nuno; Sargento, Luís; Santos, Nuno C.

    2016-08-01

    The availability of biomarkers to evaluate the risk of cardiovascular diseases is limited. High fibrinogen levels have been identified as a relevant cardiovascular risk factor, but the biological mechanisms remain unclear. Increased aggregation of erythrocytes (red blood cells) has been linked to high plasma fibrinogen concentration. Here, we show, using atomic force microscopy, that the interaction between fibrinogen and erythrocytes is modified in chronic heart failure patients. Ischaemic patients showed increased fibrinogen-erythrocyte binding forces compared with non-ischaemic patients. Cell stiffness in both patient groups was also altered. A 12-month follow-up shows that patients with higher fibrinogen-erythrocyte binding forces initially were subsequently hospitalized more frequently. Our results show that atomic force microscopy can be a promising tool to identify patients with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Atomic force microscopy as a tool to evaluate the risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Ana Filipa; Carvalho, Filomena A.; Malho, Inês; Lousada, Nuno; Sargento, Luís; Santos, Nuno C.

    2016-08-01

    The availability of biomarkers to evaluate the risk of cardiovascular diseases is limited. High fibrinogen levels have been identified as a relevant cardiovascular risk factor, but the biological mechanisms remain unclear. Increased aggregation of erythrocytes (red blood cells) has been linked to high plasma fibrinogen concentration. Here, we show, using atomic force microscopy, that the interaction between fibrinogen and erythrocytes is modified in chronic heart failure patients. Ischaemic patients showed increased fibrinogen–erythrocyte binding forces compared with non-ischaemic patients. Cell stiffness in both patient groups was also altered. A 12-month follow-up shows that patients with higher fibrinogen–erythrocyte binding forces initially were subsequently hospitalized more frequently. Our results show that atomic force microscopy can be a promising tool to identify patients with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Information content of household-stratified epidemics.

    PubMed

    Kinyanjui, T M; Pellis, L; House, T

    2016-09-01

    Household structure is a key driver of many infectious diseases, as well as a natural target for interventions such as vaccination programs. Many theoretical and conceptual advances on household-stratified epidemic models are relatively recent, but have successfully managed to increase the applicability of such models to practical problems. To be of maximum realism and hence benefit, they require parameterisation from epidemiological data, and while household-stratified final size data has been the traditional source, increasingly time-series infection data from households are becoming available. This paper is concerned with the design of studies aimed at collecting time-series epidemic data in order to maximize the amount of information available to calibrate household models. A design decision involves a trade-off between the number of households to enrol and the sampling frequency. Two commonly used epidemiological study designs are considered: cross-sectional, where different households are sampled at every time point, and cohort, where the same households are followed over the course of the study period. The search for an optimal design uses Bayesian computationally intensive methods to explore the joint parameter-design space combined with the Shannon entropy of the posteriors to estimate the amount of information in each design. For the cross-sectional design, the amount of information increases with the sampling intensity, i.e., the designs with the highest number of time points have the most information. On the other hand, the cohort design often exhibits a trade-off between the number of households sampled and the intensity of follow-up. Our results broadly support the choices made in existing epidemiological data collection studies. Prospective problem-specific use of our computational methods can bring significant benefits in guiding future study designs. PMID:27663787

  15. Laminar flame propagation in a stratified charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Youngchul

    The propagation of laminar flame from a rich or stoichiometric mixture to a lean mixture in a stratified methane-air charge was investigated experimentally and numerically. Emphasis was on the understanding of the flame behavior in the transition region; in particular, on the mechanism of burning velocity enhancement in this region. In the experimental setup, mixtures of two different equivalence ratios were separated by a soap bubble in a spherical constant volume combustion vessel. The richer mixture inside the bubble was ignited by a focused laser beam. The flame development was observed by Schlieren technique and flame speeds were measured by heat release analysis of the pressure data. An one-dimensional, time- dependant numerical simulation of the flame propagation in a charge with step-stratification was used to interpret the experimental results. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the instantaneous flame speed depended on the previous flame history. Thus a `strong' (with mixture equivalence ratio close to stoichiometric) flame can sustain propagation into finite regions of substantially lean equivalence ratio. Both thermal and chemical effects were crucial for explaining the mechanism of the flame speed enhancement in the transition period. Because of the presence of this `back- support' effect, the usual concept of specifying the burning velocity as a function of the end gas state is inadequate for a stratified charge. A simple correlation for instantaneous flame velocity based on the local burned gas temperature is developed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  16. Vortex Formation in Vertically Stratified Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2013-10-01

    A central problem of planet formation is how to form large planetesimals in a turbulent protoplanetary disk. Recent work suggests that MRI turbulence would excite such large velocities that the planetesimals would collisionally fragment rather than grow. The structure of chondritic meteorites indicates a gentle nebular environment where chondrules are sorted by size and cemented together rapidly. Although it is well established that anticyclones can concentrate particles that are weakly coupled to the gas in protoplanetary disks, the conditions required for the formation and long-time stability of anticyclones in a vertically stratified disk are still highly uncertain. Fully three dimensional fluid dynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks are computationally expensive when one requires a computational domain that is large compared to the vertical scale height of the disk. An alternative simulation approach is to use potential temperature as the vertical coordinate so that the equations of motion resemble the shallow water equations (Dowling et al. 1998). We have therefore modified a multilayer shallow water simulation code to model the formation of vortices in a vertically stratified protoplanetary disk with a radial entropy gradient. Vertical stratification of the disk is modeled by using multiple layers, where each layer has a different constant value of the entropy. By forcing a slope in the interfaces between the layers, we impose a radial entropy gradient in the disk. Radiative heating and cooling causes vertical mass exchange between adjacent constant entropy layers according to a Newton cooling formula. We find that the formation of anticyclones is robust, and that these vortices actively excite density waves, which in turn, transport angular momentum through the disk. Our simulations therefore yield new insights on how the dusty dead zones of protoplanetary disks can transport angular momentum through the disk by purely hydrodynamic processes. Support

  17. Information content of household-stratified epidemics.

    PubMed

    Kinyanjui, T M; Pellis, L; House, T

    2016-09-01

    Household structure is a key driver of many infectious diseases, as well as a natural target for interventions such as vaccination programs. Many theoretical and conceptual advances on household-stratified epidemic models are relatively recent, but have successfully managed to increase the applicability of such models to practical problems. To be of maximum realism and hence benefit, they require parameterisation from epidemiological data, and while household-stratified final size data has been the traditional source, increasingly time-series infection data from households are becoming available. This paper is concerned with the design of studies aimed at collecting time-series epidemic data in order to maximize the amount of information available to calibrate household models. A design decision involves a trade-off between the number of households to enrol and the sampling frequency. Two commonly used epidemiological study designs are considered: cross-sectional, where different households are sampled at every time point, and cohort, where the same households are followed over the course of the study period. The search for an optimal design uses Bayesian computationally intensive methods to explore the joint parameter-design space combined with the Shannon entropy of the posteriors to estimate the amount of information in each design. For the cross-sectional design, the amount of information increases with the sampling intensity, i.e., the designs with the highest number of time points have the most information. On the other hand, the cohort design often exhibits a trade-off between the number of households sampled and the intensity of follow-up. Our results broadly support the choices made in existing epidemiological data collection studies. Prospective problem-specific use of our computational methods can bring significant benefits in guiding future study designs.

  18. Stratified charge rotary engine combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, H.; Hamady, F.; Somerton, C.; Stuecken, T.; Chouinard, E.; Rachal, T.; Kosterman, J.; Lambeth, M.; Olbrich, C.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the combustion process in a stratified charge rotary engine (SCRE) continue to be the subject of active research in recent years. Specifically to meet the demand for more sophisticated products, a detailed understanding of the engine system of interest is warranted. With this in mind the objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the controlling factors that affect the SCRE combustion process so that an efficient power dense rotary engine can be designed. The influence of the induction-exhaust systems and the rotor geometry are believed to have a significant effect on combustion chamber flow characteristics. In this report, emphasis is centered on Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements and on qualitative flow visualizations in the combustion chamber of the motored rotary engine assembly. This will provide a basic understanding of the flow process in the RCE and serve as a data base for verification of numerical simulations. Understanding fuel injection provisions is also important to the successful operation of the stratified charge rotary engine. Toward this end, flow visualizations depicting the development of high speed, high pressure fuel jets are described. Friction is an important consideration in an engine from the standpoint of lost work, durability and reliability. MSU Engine Research Laboratory efforts in accessing the frictional losses associated with the rotary engine are described. This includes work which describes losses in bearing, seal and auxillary components. Finally, a computer controlled mapping system under development is described. This system can be used to map shapes such as combustion chamber, intake manifolds or turbine blades accurately.

  19. Stratified scaffold design for engineering composite tissues.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Christopher Z; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Lu, Helen H

    2015-08-01

    A significant challenge to orthopaedic soft tissue repair is the biological fixation of autologous or allogeneic grafts with bone, whereby the lack of functional integration between such grafts and host bone has limited the clinical success of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and other common soft tissue-based reconstructive grafts. The inability of current surgical reconstruction to restore the native fibrocartilaginous insertion between the ACL and the femur or tibia, which minimizes stress concentration and facilitates load transfer between the soft and hard tissues, compromises the long-term clinical functionality of these grafts. To enable integration, a stratified scaffold design that mimics the multiple tissue regions of the ACL interface (ligament-fibrocartilage-bone) represents a promising strategy for composite tissue formation. Moreover, distinct cellular organization and phase-specific matrix heterogeneity achieved through co- or tri-culture within the scaffold system can promote biomimetic multi-tissue regeneration. Here, we describe the methods for fabricating a tri-phasic scaffold intended for ligament-bone integration, as well as the tri-culture of fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts on the stratified scaffold for the formation of structurally contiguous and compositionally distinct regions of ligament, fibrocartilage and bone. The primary advantage of the tri-phasic scaffold is the recapitulation of the multi-tissue organization across the native interface through the layered design. Moreover, in addition to ease of fabrication, each scaffold phase is similar in polymer composition and therefore can be joined together by sintering, enabling the seamless integration of each region and avoiding delamination between scaffold layers.

  20. Fibrinolysis for Acute Care of Pulmonary Embolism in the Intermediate Risk Patient.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Guy; Planquette, Benjamin; Sanchez, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Controversy over the role of fibrinolysis in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) has persisted because of the lack of adequately sized trials. The PEITHO study now allows a more precise estimate of the risk to benefit ratio of fibrinolysis in these patients. This trial enrolled patients with intermediate-risk PE who were randomized to receive heparin with either tenecteplase or placebo. Fibrinolysis was associated with a significant reduction in the combined end-point of death or hemodynamic decompensation, but also with a significant increase in the risk of major bleeding. The primary efficacy end-point occurred in 2.6 % of the patients in the tenecteplase group and in 5.6 % of the patients in the placebo group (OR, 0.44; 95 % CI, 0.23 to 0.87), conversely, major extracranial bleeding occurred in 6.3 % and 1.2 % in the tenecteplase and placebo groups, respectively (OR, 5.55; 95 % CI, 2.3 to 13.39) and stroke occurred in 2.4 % and in 0.2 % of the patients in the tenecteplase group and in the placebo group, respectively (OR, 12.10; 95 % CI, 1.57 to 93.39). No difference was observed for the risk of death alone and the risk of full-dose thrombolytic therapy outweighs its benefit in patients with intermediate-risk PE. Recent meta-analyses suggest that fibrinolysis may be associated with a slight reduction in overall mortality offset by an increase in major bleeding. Two pilot studies suggest that a reduced dose of fibrinolysis may produce significant hemodynamic improvement with a low risk of major bleeding. These options need to be evaluated in larger studies including patients with a higher risk of adverse outcome than those included in the PEITHO study.

  1. The importance of cardiovascular risk factors for thrombosis prediction in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Lekovic, Danijela; Gotic, Mirjana; Milic, Natasa; Miljic, Predrag; Mitrovic, Mirjana; Cokic, Vladan; Elezovic, Ivo

    2014-10-01

    The current widely accepted stratification defined by age and previous thrombosis in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) probably deserves deeper analysis. The aim of our study was to identify additional factors at the time of diagnosis, which have an impact on the thrombosis prediction. We conducted a study of 244 consecutive ET patients with median follow-up of 83 months. We analyzed the influence of age, gender, laboratory parameters, history of previous thrombosis, spleen size, JAK2 mutation as well as cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including arterial hypertension, diabetes, active tobacco use and hyperlipidemia in the terms of thrombosis. The most important predictors of thrombosis in multivariate Cox regression model were the presence of CV risk factors (p=0.004) and previous thrombosis (p=0.038). Accordingly, we assigned risk scores based on multivariable analysis-derived hazard ratios (HR) to the presence of 1 CV risk factor (HR=3.5; 1 point), >1 CV risk factors (HR=8.3; 2 points) and previous thrombosis (HR=2.0; 1 point). A final three-tiered prognostic model for thrombosis prediction was developed as low (score 0), intermediate (score 1 or 2) and high risk (score 3) (p<0.001). The hazard of thrombosis was 3.8% in low-risk group, 16.7% in the intermediate-risk group and 60% in the high-risk group (p<0.001). Patients with thrombotic complications during the follow-up had a significantly shorter survival (p=0.018). The new score based on CV risk factors and previous thrombotic events allows a better patient selection within prognostic-risk groups and improved identification of the high-risk patients for thrombosis.

  2. [The PROMET study: Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolic disease in at-risk patients hospitalized in Algeria].

    PubMed

    Guermaz, R; Belhamidi, S; Amarni, A

    2015-07-01

    PROMET is an observational study aimed to assess the management of patients at venous thromboembolism risk in the Algerian hospitals and to evaluate the proportion of at-risk patients treated with an adequate prophylaxis. Following the ENDORSE study achieved five years before with a similar protocol, PROMET included 435hospitalized patients (229 in medical units and 206 in surgical units). Compared to the ENDORSE results, the PROMET data reflect progress in the management of venous thromboembolism: 73.3% of at-risk patients received prophylaxis (57.6% of medical patients and 90.8% of surgical patients). In 93.1% of cases, this prophylaxis was provided by a low molecular weight heparin, mainly at the dose of one injection per day. In medical population, the prescription was triggered by long-term immobilization (P=0.01; OR=5.8 95%CI [1.5-23.0]), associated risk factors (P=0.025; OR=4.13 [1.2-14.2]) and the cause of hospitalization (P=0.056). In surgical departments, the therapeutic decision depended on the nature of the surgical intervention and was influenced by the presence of a contraindication for prophylaxis (P<0.001; OR=0.02 [0.00-0.14]) or a high hemorrhagic risk (P<0.001; OR=0.02). The assessment and management of thromboembolic risk were in accordance with ACCP recommendations for surgical patients. However efforts are needed for medical patients for whom the risk is underestimated and insufficiently supported. Unlike surgery where procedures are well established, there are real difficulties in medicine to define the at-risk patients who will benefit from thromboprophylaxis. The process of preventive treatment (particularly the optimal duration) needs to be clarified.

  3. Additive prognostic value of the SYNTAX score over GRACE, TIMI, ZWOLLE, CADILLAC and PAMI risk scores in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Brkovic, Voin; Dobric, Milan; Beleslin, Branko; Giga, Vojislav; Vukcevic, Vladan; Stojkovic, Sinisa; Stankovic, Goran; Nedeljkovic, Milan A; Orlic, Dejan; Tomasevic, Miloje; Stepanovic, Jelena; Ostojic, Miodrag

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated additive prognostic value of the SYNTAX score over GRACE, TIMI, ZWOLLE, CADILLAC and PAMI risk scores in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). All six scores were calculated in 209 consecutive STEMI patients undergoing pPCI. Primary end-point was the major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE--composite of cardiovascular mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke); secondary end point was cardiovascular mortality. Patients were stratified according to the SYNTAX score tertiles (≤12; between 12 and 19.5; >19.5). The median follow-up was 20 months. Rates of MACE and cardiovascular mortality were highest in the upper tertile of the SYNTAX score (p < 0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively). SYNTAX score was independent multivariable predictor of MACE and cardiovascular mortality when added to GRACE, TIMI, ZWOLLE, and PAMI risk scores. However, the SYNTAX score did not improve the Cox regression models of MACE and cardiovascular mortality when added to the CADILLAC score. The SYNTAX score has predictive value for MACE and cardiovascular mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Furthermore, SYNTAX score improves prognostic performance of well-established GRACE, TIMI, ZWOLLE and PAMI clinical scores, but not the CADILLAC risk score. Therefore, long-term survival in patients after STEMI depends less on detailed angiographical characterization of coronary lesions, but more on clinical characteristics, myocardial function and basic angiographic findings as provided by the CADILLAC score.

  4. The prevalence of infections and patient risk factors in home health care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Ma, Chenjuan; Poghosyan, Lusine; Dowding, Dawn; Stone, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Home health care (HHC) has been the fastest growing health care sector for the past 3 decades. The uncontrolled home environment, increased use of indwelling devices, and the complexity of illnesses among HHC patients lead to increased risk for infections. Methods A systematic review of studies evaluating infection prevalence and risk factors among adult patients who received HHC services was conducted and guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Literature was searched using Medline, PubMed, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health as well as hand searching. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using validated quality assessment checklists. Results Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The infection rates and identified risk factors for infections varied dramatically between studies. In general, patients receiving home parental nutrition treatments had higher infection rates than patients receiving home infusion therapy. The identified risk factors were limited by small sample sizes and other methodologic flaws. Conclusions Establishing a surveillance system for HHC infections, identifying patients at high risk for infections, tailoring HHC and patient education based on patient living conditions, and facilitating communication between different health care facilities will enhance infection control in HHC settings. Future studies should use a nationally representative sample and multivariate analysis for the identification of risk factors for infections. PMID:24656786

  5. Psychiatric Symptoms and Community Violence among High-Risk Patients: A Test of the Relationship at the Weekly Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeem, Jennifer L.; Schubert, Carol; Odgers, Candice; Mulvey, Edward P.; Gardner, William; Lidz, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Given the availability of violence risk assessment tools, clinicians are now better able to identify high-risk patients. Once these patients have been identified, clinicians must monitor risk state and intervene when necessary to prevent harm. Clinical practice is dominated by the assumption that increases in psychiatric symptoms elevate risk of…

  6. Existing General Population Models Inaccurately Predict Lung Cancer Risk in Patients Referred for Surgical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Isbell, James M.; Deppen, Stephen; Putnam, Joe B.; Nesbitt, Jonathan C.; Lambright, Eric S.; Dawes, Aaron; Massion, Pierre P.; Speroff, Theodore; Jones, David R.; Grogan, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Background atients undergoing resections for suspicious pulmonary lesions have a 9-55% benign rate. Validated prediction models exist to estimate the probability of malignancy in a general population and current practice guidelines recommend their use. We evaluated these models in a surgical population to determine the accuracy of existing models to predict benign or malignant disease. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of our thoracic surgery quality improvement database (2005-2008) to identify patients who underwent resection of a pulmonary lesion. Patients were stratified into subgroups based on age, smoking status and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) results. The probability of malignancy was calculated for each patient using the Mayo and SPN prediction models. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and calibration curves were used to measure model performance. Results 89 patients met selection criteria; 73% were malignant. Patients with preoperative PET scans were divided into 4 subgroups based on age, smoking history and nodule PET avidity. Older smokers with PET-avid lesions had a 90% malignancy rate. Patients with PET- non-avid lesions, or PET-avid lesions with age<50 years or never smokers of any age had a 62% malignancy rate. The area under the ROC curve for the Mayo and SPN models was 0.79 and 0.80, respectively; however, the models were poorly calibrated (p<0.001). Conclusions Despite improvements in diagnostic and imaging techniques, current general population models do not accurately predict lung cancer among patients ref erred for surgical evaluation. Prediction models with greater accuracy are needed to identify patients with benign disease to reduce non-therapeutic resections. PMID:21172518

  7. Exercise for Asthma Patients. Little Risk, Big Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disabella, Vincent; Sherman, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Asthma patients can benefit from 20 to 30 minutes of exercise at 60 to 85% of maximum heart rate several times a week. Improved fitness can reduce airway reactivity and medication use. The capacity to exercise requires good general control of asthma. Patients must learn to prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction by using inhaled medications…

  8. Stress echocardiography for risk assessment of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Baur, L.H.B.; Graal, M.

    2004-01-01

    Coronary artery disease in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus will become an increasing problem in the future. Because diabetic patients benefit from treatment of symptomatic but also asymptomatic coronary artery disease, early diagnosis is warranted. The diagnostic techniques used to detect ischaemia, with a focus on stress echocardiography, are described. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696265

  9. [Modified texture diet and useful in patients with nutritional risk].

    PubMed

    de Luis, Daniel A; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz

    2014-01-20

    In the nutritional management of patients with dysphagia and/or elderly must make a multidisciplinary approach and a main tool is changing the texture of food. Patients with dysphagia, who need a texture modified diet, generally do not have a calorie and nutrient requirements different from those exhibited by people of the same age and sex, unless a condition or disease coexist. In these patients, Texture of foods should be individualized according to the patient and the time course of their disease. The use of texture modified diets without specifying produces a clear decrease in caloric and protein intakes and nutritional disorders. These patients may have other characteristics associated diseases, which would require special modification, as in the case of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis and constipation. Sometimes it is necessary to use artificial products to achieve different desired textures and precooked dishes, too.

  10. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p < .05). A statistically significant difference was found in the 3-year recurrence-free survival rate among the no further treatment, RT, and CRT groups (67.5%, 90.5%, and 97.5%, respectively; p < .05). The incidence of Grade 3-4 hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicities was not significantly different statistically between the RT and CRT groups (6.1% and 13.4%, respectively; p > .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  11. Mortality risk among hemodialysis patients receiving different vitamin D analogs.

    PubMed

    Tentori, F; Hunt, W C; Stidley, C A; Rohrscheib, M R; Bedrick, E J; Meyer, K B; Johnson, H K; Zager, P G

    2006-11-01

    Intravenous vitamin D is standard therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In for-profit dialysis clinics, mortality was higher for patients on calcitriol compared to paricalcitol. Doxercalciferol, a second vitamin D2 analog, is currently available. We assessed mortality associated with each vitamin D analog and with lack of vitamin D therapy in patients who began HD at Dialysis Clinic Inc. (DCI), a not-for-profit dialysis provider. During the 1999-2004 study period we studied 7731 patients (calcitriol: n=3212; paricalcitol: n=2087; doxercalciferol: n=2432). Median follow-up was 37 weeks. Mortality rates (deaths/100 patient-years) were identical in patients on doxercalciferol (15.4, 95% confidence interval (13.6-17.1)) and paricalcitol (15.3 (13.6-16.9)) and higher in patients on calcitriol (19.6 (18.2-21.1)) (P<0.0001). In all models mortality was similar for paricalcitol versus doxercalciferol (hazard ratios=1.0). In unadjusted models, mortality was lower in patients on doxercalciferol (0.80 (0.66, 0.96)) and paricalcitol (0.79 (0.68, 0.92)) versus calcitriol (P<0.05). In adjusted models, this difference was not statistically significant. In all models mortality was higher for patients who did not receive vitamin D versus those who did (1.2 (1.1-1.3)). Mortality in doxercalciferol- and paricalcitol-treated patients was virtually identical. Differences in survival between vitamin D2 and D3 may be smaller than previously reported.

  12. Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients At Greater Risk for Same Diagnosis: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161091.html Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients at Greater Risk for Same Diagnosis: Study ... People who have a brother or sister with schizophrenia are 10 times more likely to develop the ...

  13. Prediction of risk and incidence of dry eye in critical patients1

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Diego Dias; Almeida, Natália Gherardi; Silva, Priscila Marinho Aleixo; Ribeiro, Nayara Souza; Werli-Alvarenga, Andreza; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to estimate the incidence of dry eye, to identify risk factors and to establish a risk prediction model for its development in adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a public hospital. Method: concurrent cohort, conducted between March and June, 2014, with 230 patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Data were analyzed by bivariate descriptive statistics, with multivariate survival analysis and Cox regression. Results: 53% out of 230 patients have developed dry eye, with onset mean time of 3.5 days. Independent variables that significantly and concurrently impacted the time for dry eye to occur were: O2 in room air, blinking more than five times per minute (lower risk factors) and presence of vascular disease (higher risk factor). Conclusion: dry eye is a common finding in patients admitted to adults intensive care units, and care for its prevention should be established. PMID:27192415

  14. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  15. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  16. Digestive Byproduct Tied to Meat Raises Risks for Some Heart Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... identify high-risk patients who likely need more aggressive and specific dietary and pharmacologic therapy," said lead ... for those with high levels of TMAO, "more aggressive dietary counseling is warranted," he said. The report ...

  17. Managing the risk of germ cell tumourigenesis in disorders of sex development patients.

    PubMed

    Cools, Martine; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The risk of germ cell cancer (GCC) is elevated in many disorders of sex development (DSD) patients, although not to the same extent. A number of risk factors have been identified recently, but their interplay and relative impact is currently not fully clear. This paper offers guidance on how theoretical knowledge on GCC risk can be translated to the clinical setting, taking into account individual patient characteristics. Guidelines for decision making in different patient groups, based on a literature review, epidemiological evidence, pathological and clinical research, and personal experience are offered. Until the advent of reliable screening tools for the detection of pre-invasive cancer lesions, managing germ cell tumour risk focuses on the question of if and when to perform biopsy or gonadectomy in most patients, and how to interpret the histological findings.

  18. A competing risk analysis of sequential complication development in Asian type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Chen, Jeng-Huei; Lin, Ming-Yen; Chen, Li-Chia; Lao, Chun-Huan; Luh, Hsing; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the progression risk of sequential complication in Asian type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients using the Taiwan Pay-for-Performance Diabetes Registry and claim data from November 2003 to February 2009. 226,310 adult T2D patients without complication were followed from diagnosis to complications, including myocardial infarction (MI), other ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke, chronic kidney disease (CKD), retinopathy, amputation, death or to the end of study. Cumulative incidences (CIs) of first and second complications were analyzed in 30 and 4 years using the cumulative incidence competing risk method. IHD (29.8%), CKD (24.5%) and stroke (16.0%) are the most common first complications. The further development of T2D complications depends on a patient's existing complication profiles. Patients who initially developed cardiovascular complications had a higher risk (9.2% to 24.4%) of developing IHD or CKD, respectively. All-cause mortality was the most likely consequence for patients with a prior MI (12.0%), so as stroke in patients with a prior MI (10.8%) or IHD (8.9%). Patients with CKD had higher risk of developing IHD (16.3%), stroke (8.9%) and all-cause mortality (8.7%) than end-stage renal disease (4.0%). Following an amputation, patients had a considerable risk of all-cause mortality (42.1%). PMID:26507664

  19. Towards actionable risk stratification: a bilinear approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Risk stratification is instrumental to modern clinical decision support systems. Comprehensive risk stratification should be able to provide the clinicians with not only the accurate assessment of a patient's risk but also the clinical context to be acted upon. However, existing risk stratification techniques mainly focus on predicting the risk score for individual patients; at the cohort level, they offer little insight beyond a flat score-based segmentation. This essentially reduces a patient to a score and thus removes him/her from his/her clinical context. To address this limitation, in this paper we propose a bilinear model for risk stratification that simultaneously captures the three key aspects of risk stratification: (1) it predicts the risk of each individual patient; (2) it stratifies the patient cohort based on not only the risk score but also the clinical characteristics; and (3) it embeds all patients into clinical contexts with clear interpretation. We apply our model to a cohort of 4977 patients, 1127 among which were diagnosed with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF). We demonstrate that our model cannot only accurately predict the onset risk of CHF but also provide rich and actionable clinical insights into the patient cohort.

  20. Secondary Primary Malignancy Risk in Patients With Cervical Cancer in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chao, Yee; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hung, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the risk of secondary primary malignancy (SPM) in patients with cervical cancer using a nationwide population-based dataset. Patients newly diagnosed with cervical cancer between 1997 and 2011 were identified using Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. Patients with antecedent malignancies were excluded. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for SPM were calculated by comparing with the cancer incidence in the general population. Risk factors for cancer development were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models. During the 14-year study period (follow-up of 223,062 person-years), 2004 cancers developed in 35,175 patients with cervical cancer. The SIR for all cancers was 1.56 (95% confidence interval, 1.50–1.63, P < 0.001). SIRs for follow-up periods of >10, 5 to 10, 1 to 5, and <1 year were 1.37, 1.51, 1.34, and 2.59, respectively. After the exclusion of SPM occurring within 1 year of cervical cancer diagnosis, SIRs were significantly higher for cancers of the esophagus (2.05), stomach (1.38), colon, rectum, and anus (1.36); lung and mediastinum (2.28), bone and soft tissue (2.23), uterus (3.76), bladder (2.26), and kidneys (1.41). Multivariate analysis showed that age ≥60 was a significant SPM risk factor (hazard ratio [HR] 1.59). Different treatments for cervical cancer, including radiotherapy (HR 1.41) and chemotherapy (HR 1.27), had different impacts on SPM risk. Carboplatin and fluorouracil independently increased SPM risk in cervical cancer patients. Patients with cervical cancer are at increased risk of SPM development. Age ≥60 years, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are independent risk factors. Carboplatin and fluorouracil also increased SPM risk independently. Close surveillance of patients at high risk should be considered for the early detection of SPMs. PMID:26512575

  1. Identification of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment Based Risk Factors for Malnutrition in Elderly Asian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Whee Sze; Rajasekaran, Tanujaa; Nee Koo, Khai; Chan, Li Li; Poon, Donald; Roy Chowdhury, Anupama; Krishna, Lalit; Kanesvaran, Ravindran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elderly cancer patients are at increased risk for malnutrition. We aim to identify comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) based clinical factors associated with increased nutritional risk and develop a clinical scoring system to identify nutritional risk in elderly cancer patients. Patients and Methods CGA data was collected from 249 Asian patients aged 70 years or older. Nutritional risk was assessed based on the Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) checklist. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to assess the association between patient clinical factors together with domains within the CGA and moderate to high nutritional risk. Goodness of fit was assessed using Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Discrimination ability was assessed based on the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). Internal validation was performed using simulated datasets via bootstrapping. Results Among the 249 patients, 184 (74%) had moderate to high nutritional risk. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified stage 3–4 disease (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.54; 95% CI, 1.14–5.69), ECOG performance status of 2–4 (OR 3.04; 95% CI, 1.57–5.88), presence of depression (OR 5.99; 95% CI, 1.99–18.02) and haemoglobin levels <12 g/dL (OR 3.00; 95% CI 1.54–5.84) as significant independent factors associated with moderate to high nutritional risk. The model achieved good calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow test’s p = 0.17) and discrimination (AUC = 0.80). It retained good calibration and discrimination (bias-corrected AUC = 0.79) under internal validation. Conclusion Having advanced stage of cancer, poor performance status, depression and anaemia were found to be predictors of moderate to high nutritional risk. Early identification of patients with these risk factors will allow for nutritional interventions that may improve treatment tolerance, quality of life and survival outcomes. PMID:27231951

  2. Increased Risk for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D; Herfarth, Hans H.; Pipkin, Clare; Porter, Carol Q; Sandler, Robert S; Kappelman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) might be at increased risk for certain malignancies. We evaluated the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients with IBD and determined how immunosuppressive and biologic medications affect this risk. Methods We performed retrospective cohort and nested case-control studies using administrative data from PharMetrics Patient Centric Database. In the cohort study, 26403 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 26974 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) were each matched to 3 non-IBD controls. NMSC risk was evaluated by incidence rate ratio. In the nested case-control study, 387 CD patients and 355 UC patients with NMSC were each matched to 4 IBD patients without NMSC using incidence density sampling. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the association between specific IBD medication use and NMSC. Results In the cohort study, the incidence of NMSC was higher among patients with IBD compared to controls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51–1.78). In the nested-case control study, recent thiopurine use (≤90 days) was associated with NMSC (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.56, 95% CI 2.81–4.50), as was recent biologic use among patients with CD (adjusted OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.28–3.33). Persistent thiopurine use (>365 days) was associated with NMSC (adjusted OR 4.27, 95% CI 3.08–5.92), as was persistent biologic use among patients with CD (adjusted OR 2.18 95% CI 1.07–4.46). Conclusions Patients with IBD, especially those that receive thiopurines, are at risk for NMSC. Appropriate counseling and monitoring of such patients with IBD is recommended. PMID:20005977

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis C virus infection in haemodialysis patients: a multicentre study in 2796 patients

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, H; Leimenstoll, G; Stegen, G; Schrader, H; Fölsch, U R; Schmidt, W E

    2002-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a significant problem in the management of haemodialysis patients. A high prevalence of HCV infection in haemodialysis patients has been reported. Risk factors such as the number of blood transfusions or duration on haemodialysis have been identified. Aim: To determine the prevalence of HCV by antibody testing and HCV-RNA determination by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in haemodialysis patients. Furthermore, liver function tests were performed and epidemiological data were obtained to determine risk factors for HCV in this cohort of patients. Results: A total of 2796 patients from 43 dialysis centres were enrolled. The overall prevalence of HCV (HCV antibody and/or HCV-RNA positivity) was 7.0% (195 patients). Antibody positivity occurred in 171 patients (6.1%). Viraemia was detectable in 111 patients (4.0%). Twenty four of 111 HCV RNA positive patients (21.6%) were negative for HCV antibodies. Thus 0.8% of the entire study population was HCV positive but could not be diagnosed by routine HCV antibody testing. Major risk factors identified by a standard questionnaire in 1717 of 2796 patients were the number of blood transfusions individuals had received and duration of dialysis, the latter including patients who received no blood transfusions. Sequencing of the 5`untranslated region of the genome showed a dominant genotype 1 (77.6%) within the cohort. Further reverse transcription-PCR of the NS5b and core region were performed to document phylogenetic analysis. Comparing nucleic acid sequences detected by PCR, no homogeneity was found and thus nosocomial transmission was excluded. Conclusions: HCV is common in German haemodialysis patients but screening for HCV antibodies alone does not exclude infection with HCV. PMID:12171969

  4. Optimal Combination Treatment and Vascular Outcomes in Recent Ischemic Stroke Patients by Premorbid Risk Level

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background Optimal combination of secondary stroke prevention treatment including antihypertensives, antithrombotic agents, and lipid modifiers is associated with reduced recurrent vascular risk including stroke. It is unclear whether optimal combination treatment has a differential impact on stroke patients based on level of vascular risk. Methods We analyzed a clinical trial dataset comprising 3680 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. Patients were categorized by appropriateness level 0 to III depending on the number of the drugs prescribed divided by the number of drugs potentially indicated for each patient (0=none of the indicated medications prescribed and III=all indicated medications prescribed [optimal combination treatment]). High-risk was defined as having a history of stroke or coronary heart disease (CHD) prior to the index stroke event. Independent associations of medication appropriateness level with a major vascular event (stroke, CHD, or vascular death), ischemic stroke, and all-cause death were analyzed. Results Compared with level 0, for major vascular events, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.20–1.28) and 0.32 (0.14–0.70) in the high-risk group; for stroke, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.54 (0.16–1.77) and 0.25 (0.08–0.85) in the high-risk group; and for all-cause death, the HR of level III in the low-risk group was 0.66 (0.09–5.00) and 0.22 (0.06–0.78) in the high-risk group. Conclusion Optimal combination treatment is related to a significantly lower risk of future vascular events and death among high-risk patients after a recent non-cardioembolic stroke. PMID:26044963

  5. Risk Assessment of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in the Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia Environment: Predictive Values of the Apfel's Simplified Risk Score for Identification of High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Hyung; Shin, Yang-Sik; Oh, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Rim; Chung, Sung Chan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) is popular method of postoperative pain control, but many patients suffer from IV PCA-related postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). In this retrospective observational study, we have determined independent predictors of IV PCA-related PONV and predictive values of the Apfel's simplified risk score in pursuance of identifying high-risk patients. Materials and Methods We analyzed 7000 patients who received IV PCA with background infusion after elective surgery. Patients who maintained IV PCA for a postoperative period of 48 hr (completion group, n=6128) were compared with those who have discontinued IV PCA within 48 hr of surgery due to intractable PONV (cessation group, n=872). Patients, anesthetics, and surgical factors known for predicting PONV were evaluated by logistic regression analysis to identify independent predictors of IV PCA related intractable PONV. Results In a stepwise multivariate analysis, weight, background infusion dose of fentanyl, addition of ketolorac to PCA, duration of anesthesia, general anesthesia, head and neck surgery, and Apfel's simplified risk score were revealed as independent risk factors for intractable PONV followed by the cessation of IV PCA. In addition, Apfel's simplified risk score, which demonstrated the highest odds ratio among the predictors, was strongly correlated with the cessation rate of IV PCA. Conclusion Multimodal prophylactic antiemetic strategies and dose reduction of opioids may be considered as strategies for the prevention of PONV with the use of IV PCA, especially in patients with high Apfel's simplified risk scores. PMID:23918581

  6. Evaluation and treatment of high-risk patients with early-stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hiren J; Ross, Christopher; Silvestri, Gerard A; Decker, Roy H

    2011-12-01

    Standard therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer is lobectomy for patients who are able to tolerate such surgery. However, the risk of postoperative morbidity is not trivial, with a 30% to 40% incidence of postoperative complications and a 1% to 5% incidence of operative mortality. Some patients, though technically resectable, refuse surgery or are considered medically inoperable because of insufficient respiratory reserve, cardiovascular disease, or general frailty. This group is considered either "high risk" or "medically inoperable."

  7. Reduced risk avoidance and altered neural correlates of feedback processing in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Endrass, Tanja; Schuermann, Beate; Roepke, Stefan; Kessler-Scheil, Sonia; Kathmann, Norbert

    2016-09-30

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show deficits in reward-guided decision making and learning. The present study examined risk-taking behavior in combination with feedback processing. Eighteen BPD patients and 18 healthy controls performed a probabilistic two-choice gambling task, while an electroencephalogram was recorded. Options differed in risk, but were identical in expected value and outcome probability. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 were analyzed. Healthy controls preferred low-risk over high-risk options, whereas BPD patients chose both option with equal probability. FRN amplitudes were reduced in BPD, but effects of feedback valence and risk did not differ between groups. This suggests attenuated outcome processing in the anterior cingulate cortex, but intact reward prediction error signaling. Furthermore, the modulation of the feedback-related P300 with feedback valence and risk was smaller in BPD patients, and decreased P300 amplitudes were associated with increased behavioral risk-taking behavior. These findings could relate to the reduced ability of BPD patients to learn and adequately adjust their behavior based on feedback information, possibly due to reduced significance of negative feedback.

  8. Reduced risk avoidance and altered neural correlates of feedback processing in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Endrass, Tanja; Schuermann, Beate; Roepke, Stefan; Kessler-Scheil, Sonia; Kathmann, Norbert

    2016-09-30

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show deficits in reward-guided decision making and learning. The present study examined risk-taking behavior in combination with feedback processing. Eighteen BPD patients and 18 healthy controls performed a probabilistic two-choice gambling task, while an electroencephalogram was recorded. Options differed in risk, but were identical in expected value and outcome probability. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 were analyzed. Healthy controls preferred low-risk over high-risk options, whereas BPD patients chose both option with equal probability. FRN amplitudes were reduced in BPD, but effects of feedback valence and risk did not differ between groups. This suggests attenuated outcome processing in the anterior cingulate cortex, but intact reward prediction error signaling. Furthermore, the modulation of the feedback-related P300 with feedback valence and risk was smaller in BPD patients, and decreased P300 amplitudes were associated with increased behavioral risk-taking behavior. These findings could relate to the reduced ability of BPD patients to learn and adequately adjust their behavior based on feedback information, possibly due to reduced significance of negative feedback. PMID:27344588

  9. Interactive “Video Doctor” Counseling Reduces Drug and Sexual Risk Behaviors among HIV-Positive Patients in Diverse Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Paul; Ciccarone, Daniel; Gansky, Stuart A.; Bangsberg, David R.; Clanon, Kathleen; McPhee, Stephen J.; Calderón, Sophia H.; Bogetz, Alyssa; Gerbert, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors. Methodology and Findings We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003–September 2006) at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults) completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476) were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a “Video Doctor” via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months) and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months). Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months) than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (−2.3 vs. −1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and −2.7 vs. −0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months). Conclusions The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual

  10. Value of the "TAVI2-SCORe" versus surgical risk scores for prediction of one year mortality in 511 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Debonnaire, Philippe; Fusini, Laura; Wolterbeek, Ron; Kamperidis, Vasileios; van Rosendael, Philippe; van der Kley, Frank; Katsanos, Spyridon; Joyce, Emer; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Gripari, Paola; Bax, Jeroen J; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Pepi, Mauro; Delgado, Victoria

    2015-01-15

    A bedside-available transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)-dedicated prognostic risk score is an unmet clinical need. We aimed to develop such a risk score predicting 1-year mortality post-TAVI and to compare it with the performance of the logistic EuroSCORE (LES) I and LES-II and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' (STS) score. Baseline variables of 511 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI that were independently associated with 1-year mortality post-TAVI were included in the "TAVI2-SCORe." Discrimination and calibration abilities of the novel score were assessed and compared with surgical risk scores. One-year mortality was 17.0% (n = 80 of 471). Porcelain thoracic aorta (hazard ratio [HR] 2.56), anemia (HR 2.03), left ventricular dysfunction (HR 1.98), recent myocardial infarction (HR 3.78), male sex (HR 1.81), critical aortic valve stenosis (HR 2.46), old age (HR 1.68), and renal dysfunction (HR 1.76) formed the TAVI2-SCORe (all p <0.05). According to the number of points assigned (1 for each variable and 2 for infarction), patients were stratified into 5 risk categories: 0, 1 (HR 2.6), 2 (HR 3.6), 3 (HR 10.5), and ≥4 (HR 17.6). TAVI2-SCORe showed better discrimination ability (Harrells' C statistic 0.715) compared with LES-I, LES-II, and STS score (0.609, 0.633, and 0.50, respectively). Cumulative 1-year survival rate was 54% versus 88% for patients with TAVI2-SCORE ≥3 versus <3 points, respectively (p <0.001). Contrary to surgical risk scores, there was no significant difference between observed and expected 1-year mortality for all TAVI2-SCORe risk strata (all p >0.05, Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic 0.304), suggesting superior calibration performance. In conclusion, the TAVI2-SCORe is an accurate, simple, and bedside-available score predicting 1-year mortality post-TAVI, outperforming conventional surgical risk scores for this end point. PMID:25432413

  11. Breast cancer patients with dense breasts do not have increased death risk

    Cancer.gov

    High mammographic breast density, which is a marker of increased risk of developing breast cancer, does not seem to increase the risk of death among breast cancer patients, according to a study led by Gretchen L. Gierach, Ph.D., NCI. Image shows physician

  12. Applying a Forensic Actuarial Assessment (the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide) to Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Grant T.; Rice, Marnie E.; Camilleri, Joseph A..

    2004-01-01

    The actuarial Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) was developed for male offenders where it has shown excellent replicability in many new forensic samples using officially recorded outcomes. Clinicians also make decisions, however, about the risk of interpersonal violence posed by nonforensic psychiatric patients of both sexes. Could an actuarial…

  13. Differences in Risk Factors for Suicidality between African American and White Patients Vulnerable to Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderwerker, Lauren C.; Chen, Joyce H; Charpentier, Peter; Paulk, Mary Elizabeth; Michalski, Marion; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2007-01-01

    Risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts have been shown to differ between African Americans and Whites across the lifespan. In the present study, risk factors for suicidality were examined separately by race/ethnicity in a population of 131 older adult patients considered vulnerable to suicide due to substance abuse and/or medical frailty.…

  14. Risk bodies: rehabilitation of sports patients in the physiotherapy clinic.

    PubMed

    Thing, Lone Friis

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes how body regimes are effectuated in the prevailing treatment strategy of physiotherapy. The process of self-mastering in the context of sports-related injuries is highlighted. Through a Foucauldian perspective on body regimes the aim is to shed light on the process of individualization and self-mastery in rehabilitation. The treatment of illness in the physiotherapy clinic does not characterize the patient as sick, and exempt the patient from daily duties and expectations. The empirical data include 17 qualitative illness narratives and several years of fieldwork observing patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in a physiotherapy clinic. The study demonstrates how the expectation that the patients be active and self-mastering permeates the total process of treatment. The individual responsibility for personal well-being is a recurrent phenomenon in public health services in general, and specifically prominent in the rehabilitation of sports injuries.

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